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  1. Drosophila Myc is required for normal DREF gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element-binding factor (dDREF) is required for the expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Finding a canonical E-box, 5'-CACGTG, in the dDREF gene promoter prompted us to explore the possibility that the dDREF gene is a target of Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Luciferase transient expression assays combined with RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells revealed that knockdown of dmyc reduced dDREF gene promoter activity by 35% to 82%, an effect at least partly mediated by the E-box in the promoter. dm 4 /Y hemizygous mutant larvae demonstrated no maternal dMyc and severe impairment of dDREF mRNA transcription. dMyc loss of function in dm 2 /dm 2 homozygous mutant follicle cell clones also resulted in loss of anti-dDREF immunostaining in nuclei. In contrast, co-expression of dMyc-dMax up-regulated dDREF promoter activity in S2 cells. Furthermore, dMyc over-expressing clones exhibited a high level of dDREF gene expression in wing and eye discs. These results taken together indicate that dMyc is indeed required for dDREF gene expression

  2. Two dynamin-2 genes are required for normal zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Gibbs

    Full Text Available Dynamin-2 (DNM2 is a large GTPase involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and related trafficking pathways. Mutations in human DNM2 cause two distinct neuromuscular disorders: centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Zebrafish have been shown to be an excellent animal model for many neurologic disorders, and this system has the potential to inform our understanding of DNM2-related disease. Currently, little is known about the endogenous zebrafish orthologs to human DNM2. In this study, we characterize two zebrafish dynamin-2 genes, dnm2 and dnm2-like. Both orthologs are structurally similar to human DNM2 at the gene and protein levels. They are expressed throughout early development and in all adult tissues examined. Knockdown of dnm2 and dnm2-like gene products resulted in extensive morphological abnormalities during development, and expression of human DNM2 RNA rescued these phenotypes. Our findings suggest that dnm2 and dnm2-like are orthologs to human DNM2, and that they are required for normal zebrafish development.

  3. Nociceptor-Enriched Genes Required for Normal Thermal Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Honjo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe a targeted reverse genetic screen for thermal nociception genes in Drosophila larvae. Using laser capture microdissection and microarray analyses of nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, we identified 275 nociceptor-enriched genes. We then tested the function of the enriched genes with nociceptor-specific RNAi and thermal nociception assays. Tissue-specific RNAi targeted against 14 genes caused insensitive thermal nociception while targeting of 22 genes caused hypersensitive thermal nociception. Previously uncategorized genes were named for heat resistance (i.e., boilerman, fire dancer, oven mitt, trivet, thawb, and bunker gear or heat sensitivity (firelighter, black match, eucalyptus, primacord, jet fuel, detonator, gasoline, smoke alarm, and jetboil. Insensitive nociception phenotypes were often associated with severely reduced branching of nociceptor neurites and hyperbranched dendrites were seen in two of the hypersensitive cases. Many genes that we identified are conserved in mammals.

  4. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Müller-Moulé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance.

  5. Search for missing schizophrenia genes will require a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... And finally, what is needed to make progress? What do we know? Over 40 years of research has established that a number of genomic regions and genes ... who isolated and identified human endogenous retrovirus. (HERV) sequences ... W family of endogenous retroviruses in the cerebrospinal fluid from ...

  6. Genes required for Lactococcus garvieae survival in a fish host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Aurora; Fernández, Lucia; Reimundo, Pilar; Guijarro, José A

    2007-10-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is considered an emergent pathogen in aquaculture and it is also associated with mastitis in domestic animals as well as human endocarditis and septicaemia. In spite of this, the pathogenic mechanisms of this bacterium are poorly understood. Signature-tagged mutagenesis was used to identify virulence factors and to establish the basis of pathogen-host interactions. A library of 1250 L. garvieae UNIUD074-tagged Tn917 mutants in 25 pools was screened for the ability to grow in fish. Among them, 29 mutants (approx. 2.4 %) were identified which could not be recovered from rainbow trout following infection. Sequence analysis of the tagged Tn917-interrupted genes in these mutants indicated the participation in pathogenesis of the transcriptional regulatory proteins homologous to GidA and MerR; the metabolic enzymes asparagine synthetase A and alpha-acetolactate synthase; the ABC transport system of glutamine and a calcium-transporting ATPase; the dltA locus involved in alanylation of teichoic acids; and hypothetical proteins containing EAL and Eis domains, among others. Competence index experiments in several of the selected mutants confirmed the relevance of the Tn917-interrupted genes in the development of the infection process. The results suggested some of the metabolic routes and enzymic systems necessary for the complete virulence of this bacterium. This work is believed to represent the first report of a genome-wide scan for virulence factors in L. garvieae. The identified genes will further our understanding of the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections and may provide targets for intervention or lead to the development of novel therapies.

  7. PMR6, a Pectate Lyase–Like Gene Required for Powdery Mildew Susceptibility in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John P.; Raab, Theodore K.; Schiff, Celine; Somerville, Shauna C.

    2002-01-01

    The plant genes required for the growth and reproduction of plant pathogens are largely unknown. In an effort to identify these genes, we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that do not support the normal growth of the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Here, we report on the cloning and characterization of one of these genes, PMR6. PMR6 encodes a pectate lyase–like protein with a novel C-terminal domain. Consistent with its predicted gene function, mutations in PMR6 alter the composition of the plant cell wall, as shown by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. pmr6-mediated resistance requires neither salicylic acid nor the ability to perceive jasmonic acid or ethylene, indicating that the resistance mechanism does not require the activation of well-described defense pathways. Thus, pmr6 resistance represents a novel form of disease resistance based on the loss of a gene required during a compatible interaction rather than the activation of known host defense pathways. PMID:12215508

  8. PMR6, a pectate lyase-like gene required for powdery mildew susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John P; Raab, Theodore K; Schiff, Celine; Somerville, Shauna C

    2002-09-01

    The plant genes required for the growth and reproduction of plant pathogens are largely unknown. In an effort to identify these genes, we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that do not support the normal growth of the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Here, we report on the cloning and characterization of one of these genes, PMR6. PMR6 encodes a pectate lyase-like protein with a novel C-terminal domain. Consistent with its predicted gene function, mutations in PMR6 alter the composition of the plant cell wall, as shown by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. pmr6-mediated resistance requires neither salicylic acid nor the ability to perceive jasmonic acid or ethylene, indicating that the resistance mechanism does not require the activation of well-described defense pathways. Thus, pmr6 resistance represents a novel form of disease resistance based on the loss of a gene required during a compatible interaction rather than the activation of known host defense pathways.

  9. CHD5 is required for neurogenesis and has a dual role in facilitating gene expression and polycomb gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egan, Chris M; Nyman, Ulrika; Skotte, Julie

    2013-01-01

    , the chromodomains of CHD5 directly bind H3K27me3 and are required for neuronal differentiation. In the absence of CHD5, a subgroup of Polycomb-repressed genes becomes aberrantly expressed. These findings provide insights into the regulatory role of CHD5 during neurogenesis and suggest how inactivation...

  10. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). PMID:29084901

  11. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreti, Elena; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2018-02-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Rpr1, a gene required for Rpg1-dependent resistance to stem rust in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Fetch, T; Nirmala, J; Schmierer, D; Brueggeman, R; Steffenson, B; Kleinhofs, A

    2006-09-01

    Rpg1 is a stem rust resistance gene that has protected barley from severe losses for over 60 years in the US and Canada. It confers resistance to many, but not all, pathotypes of the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. A fast neutron induced deletion mutant, showing susceptibility to stem rust pathotype Pgt-MCC, was identified in barley cv. Morex, which carries Rpg1. Genetic and Rpg1 mRNA and protein expression level analyses showed that the mutation was a suppressor of Rpg1 and was designated Rpr1 (Required for P. graminis resistance). Genome-wide expression profiling, using the Affymetrix Barley1 GeneChip containing approximately 22,840 probe sets, was conducted with Morex and the rpr1 mutant. Of the genes represented on the Barley1 microarray, 20 were up-regulated and 33 were down-regulated by greater than twofold in the mutant, while the Rpg1 mRNA level remained constant. Among the highly down-regulated genes (greater than fourfold), genomic PCR, RT-PCR and Southern analyses identified that three genes (Contig4901_s_at, HU03D17U_s_at, and Contig7061_s_at), were deleted in the rpr1 mutant. These three genes mapped to chromosome 4(4H) bin 5 and co-segregated with the rpr1-mediated susceptible phenotype. The loss of resistance was presumed to be due to a mutation in one or more of these genes. However, the possibility exists that there are other genes within the deletions, which are not represented on the Barley1 GeneChip. The Rpr1 gene was not required for Rpg5- and rpg4-mediated stem rust resistance, indicating that it shows specificity to the Rpg1-mediated resistance pathway.

  13. The Aspergillus flavus Homeobox Gene, hbx1, Is Required for Development and Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Cary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeobox proteins, a class of well conserved transcription factors, regulate the expression of targeted genes, especially those involved in development. In filamentous fungi, homeobox genes are required for normal conidiogenesis and fruiting body formation. In the present study, we identified eight homeobox (hbx genes in the aflatoxin-producing ascomycete, Aspergillus flavus, and determined their respective role in growth, conidiation and sclerotial production. Disruption of seven of the eight genes had little to no effect on fungal growth and development. However, disruption of the homeobox gene AFLA_069100, designated as hbx1, in two morphologically different A. flavus strains, CA14 and AF70, resulted in complete loss of production of conidia and sclerotia as well as aflatoxins B1 and B2, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem. Microscopic examination showed that the Δhbx1 mutants did not produce conidiophores. The inability of Δhbx1 mutants to produce conidia was related to downregulation of brlA (bristle and abaA (abacus, regulatory genes for conidiophore development. These mutants also had significant downregulation of the aflatoxin pathway biosynthetic genes aflC, aflD, aflM and the cluster-specific regulatory gene, aflR. Our results demonstrate that hbx1 not only plays a significant role in controlling A. flavus development but is also critical for the production of secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxins.

  14. A regulatory gene (ECO-orf4) required for ECO-0501 biosynthesis in Amycolatopsis orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Luo, Minyu; Chen, Daijie

    2014-02-01

    ECO-0501 is a novel linear polyene antibiotic, which was discovered from Amycolatopsis orientalis. Recent study of ECO-0501 biosynthesis pathway revealed the presence of regulatory gene: ECO-orf4. The A. orientalis ECO-orf4 gene from the ECO-0501 biosynthesis cluster was analyzed, and its deduced protein (ECO-orf4) was found to have amino acid sequence homology with large ATP-binding regulators of the LuxR (LAL) family regulators. Database comparison revealed two hypothetical domains, a LuxR-type helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding motif near the C-terminal and an N-terminal nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) binding motif included. Deletion of the corresponding gene (ECO-orf4) resulted in complete loss of ECO-0501 production. Complementation by one copy of intact ECO-orf4 restored the polyene biosynthesis demonstrating that ECO-orf4 is required for ECO-0501 biosynthesis. The results of overexpression ECO-orf4 on ECO-0501 production indicated that it is a positive regulatory gene. Gene expression analysis by reverse transcription PCR of the ECO-0501 gene cluster showed that the transcription of ECO-orf4 correlates with that of genes involved in polyketide biosynthesis. These results demonstrated that ECO-orf4 is a pathway-specific positive regulatory gene that is essential for ECO-0501 biosynthesis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The Aspergillus flavus Homeobox Gene, hbx1, is Required for Development and Aflatoxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Jeffrey W; Harris-Coward, Pamela; Scharfenstein, Leslie; Mack, Brian M; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Wei, Qijian; Lebar, Matthew; Carter-Wientjes, Carol; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Mitra, Chandrani; Banerjee, Sourav; Chanda, Anindya

    2017-10-12

    Homeobox proteins, a class of well conserved transcription factors, regulate the expression of targeted genes, especially those involved in development. In filamentous fungi, homeobox genes are required for normal conidiogenesis and fruiting body formation. In the present study, we identified eight homeobox ( hbx ) genes in the aflatoxin-producing ascomycete, Aspergillus flavus , and determined their respective role in growth, conidiation and sclerotial production. Disruption of seven of the eight genes had little to no effect on fungal growth and development. However, disruption of the homeobox gene AFLA_069100, designated as hbx1 , in two morphologically different A. flavus strains, CA14 and AF70, resulted in complete loss of production of conidia and sclerotia as well as aflatoxins B₁ and B₂, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem. Microscopic examination showed that the Δ hbx1 mutants did not produce conidiophores. The inability of Δ hbx1 mutants to produce conidia was related to downregulation of brlA (bristle) and abaA (abacus), regulatory genes for conidiophore development. These mutants also had significant downregulation of the aflatoxin pathway biosynthetic genes aflC , aflD , aflM and the cluster-specific regulatory gene, aflR . Our results demonstrate that hbx1 not only plays a significant role in controlling A. flavus development but is also critical for the production of secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxins.

  16. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. → The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. → Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. → Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. → New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  17. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Krause, Michael W. [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kostrouch, Zdenek [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kostrouchova, Marta, E-mail: marta.kostrouchova@lf1.cuni.cz [Laboratory of Model Systems, Institute of Inherited Metabolic Disorders, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  18. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carlos A; Drost, Jarno; Wijchers, Patrick J; van de Werken, Harmen; de Wit, Elzo; Oude Vrielink, Joachim A F; Elkon, Ran; Melo, Sónia A; Léveillé, Nicolas; Kalluri, Raghu; de Laat, Wouter; Agami, Reuven

    2013-02-07

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any known p53 target gene. Interestingly, many of these regions possess conserved p53-binding sites and all known hallmarks of enhancer regions. We demonstrate that these p53-bound enhancer regions (p53BERs) indeed contain enhancer activity and interact intrachromosomally with multiple neighboring genes to convey long-distance p53-dependent transcription regulation. Furthermore, p53BERs produce, in a p53-dependent manner, enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are required for efficient transcriptional enhancement of interacting target genes and induction of a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Thus, our results ascribe transcription enhancement activity to p53 with the capacity to regulate multiple genes from a single genomic binding site. Moreover, eRNA production from p53BERs is required for efficient p53 transcription enhancement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A genetic screen identifies interferon-α effector genes required to suppress hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Dahlene N; Brisac, Cynthia; John, Sinu P; Huang, Yi-Wen; Chin, Christopher R; Xie, Tiao; Zhao, Hong; Jilg, Nikolaus; Zhang, Leiliang; Chevaliez, Stephane; Wambua, Daniel; Lin, Wenyu; Peng, Lee; Chung, Raymond T; Brass, Abraham L

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease. Interferon-α (IFNα) is an important component of anti-HCV therapy; it up-regulates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes, many of which have been investigated for their antiviral effects. However, all of the genes required for the antiviral function of IFNα (IFN effector genes [IEGs]) are not known. IEGs include not only IFN-stimulated genes, but other nontranscriptionally induced genes that are required for the antiviral effect of IFNα. In contrast to candidate approaches based on analyses of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, identification of IEGs requires a broad functional approach. We performed an unbiased genome-wide small interfering RNA screen to identify IEGs that inhibit HCV. Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs incubated with IFNα and then infected with JFH1 HCV. Cells were stained using HCV core antibody, imaged, and analyzed to determine the percent infection. Candidate IEGs detected in the screen were validated and analyzed further. The screen identified 120 previously unreported IEGs. From these, we more fully evaluated the following: asparagine-linked glycosylation 10 homolog (yeast, α-1,2-glucosyltransferase); butyrylcholinesterase; dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (CD26, adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2); glucokinase (hexokinase 4) regulator; guanylate cyclase 1, soluble, β 3; MYST histone acetyltransferase 1; protein phosphatase 3 (formerly 2B), catalytic subunit, β isoform; peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ-DBD-interacting protein 1; and solute carrier family 27 (fatty acid transporter), member 2; and demonstrated that they enabled IFNα-mediated suppression of HCV at multiple steps of its life cycle. Expression of these genes had more potent effects against flaviviridae because a subset was required for IFNα to suppress dengue virus but not influenza A virus. In addition, many of the host genes detected in this

  20. Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-07-17

    Jul 17, 2012 ... Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant serrawettin W1 production from Serratia marcescens. Monabel May N. Apao*, Franco G. Teves and Ma. Reina Suzette B. Madamba. Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Mathematics, MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, ...

  1. Commentary: When does understanding phenotypic evolution require identification of the underlying genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausher, Mark D; Delph, Lynda F

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive evolution is fundamentally a genetic process. Over the past three decades, characterizing the genes underlying adaptive phenotypic change has revealed many important aspects of evolutionary change. At the same time, natural selection is often fundamentally an ecological process that can often be studied without identifying the genes underlying the variation on which it acts. This duality has given rise to disagreement about whether, and under what circumstances, it is necessary to identify specific genes associated with phenotypic change. This issue is of practical concern, especially for researchers who study nonmodel organisms, because of the often enormous cost and labor required to "go for the genes." We here consider a number of situations and questions commonly addressed by researchers. Our conclusion is that although gene identification can be crucial for answering some questions, there are others for which definitive answers can be obtained without finding underlying genes. It should thus not be assumed that considerations of "empirical completeness" dictate that gene identification is always desirable. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Variation in genes required for normal mitosis and risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J E; Wang, X; Goode, E L; Pankratz, V S; Fredericksen, Z S; Vierkant, R A; Pharoah, P D P; Cerhan, J R; Couch, F J

    2010-01-01

    The down-regulation of genes involved in normal cell division can cause aberrant mitoses and increased cell death. Surviving cells exhibit aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. Since mitotic disruption has been linked with tumor development and progression, alterations in the expression or activity of these mitotic regulators may contribute to breast tumor formation. We evaluated associations between common inherited variation in these genes and breast cancer risk. Two hundred and five tagging and candidate functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in 30 genes required for normal cell division were genotyped in 798 breast cancer cases and 843 controls from the Mayo Clinic breast cancer study. Two variants in EIF3A (rs10787899 and rs3824830; P cancer along with single variants in RRM2, PSCD3, C11orf51, CDC16, SNW1, MFAP1, and CDC2 (P cancer. The observed associations between breast cancer risk and genetic variation in the SART1 and EIF3A genes that are required for maintenance of normal mitosis suggest a direct role for these genes in the development of breast cancer.

  3. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Oscar A; Núñez-Villena, Felipe; Soto, Sarita E; Ugalde, José Manuel; López-Solís, Remigio; Toledo, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat) was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR) by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  4. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Cerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  5. Bromodomain Protein BRD4 Is Required for Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Enhancer Activation and Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankari Nagarajan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor α (ERα controls cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by recruiting various cofactors to estrogen response elements (EREs to control gene transcription. A deeper understanding of these transcriptional mechanisms may uncover therapeutic targets for ERα-dependent cancers. We show that BRD4 regulates ERα-induced gene expression by affecting elongation-associated phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII and histone H2B monoubiquitination. Consistently, BRD4 activity is required for proliferation of ER+ breast and endometrial cancer cells and uterine growth in mice. Genome-wide studies revealed an enrichment of BRD4 on transcriptional start sites of active genes and a requirement of BRD4 for H2B monoubiquitination in the transcribed region of estrogen-responsive genes. Importantly, we demonstrate that BRD4 occupancy on distal EREs enriched for H3K27ac is required for recruitment and elongation of RNAPII on EREs and the production of ERα-dependent enhancer RNAs. These results uncover BRD4 as a central regulator of ERα function and potential therapeutic target.

  6. The Arabidopsis histone chaperone FACT is required for stress-induced expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfab, Alexander; Breindl, Matthias; Grasser, Klaus D

    2018-03-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is involved in the expression of genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthetic enzymes also upon induction by moderate high-light and therefore contributes to the stress-induced plant pigmentation. The histone chaperone FACT consists of the SSRP1 and SPT16 proteins and associates with transcribing RNAPII (RNAPII) along the transcribed region of genes. FACT can promote transcriptional elongation by destabilising nucleosomes in the path of RNA polymerase II, thereby facilitating efficient transcription of chromatin templates. Transcript profiling of Arabidopsis plants depleted in SSRP1 or SPT16 demonstrates that only a small subset of genes is differentially expressed relative to wild type. The majority of these genes is either up- or down-regulated in both the ssrp1 and spt16 plants. Among the down-regulated genes, those encoding enzymes of the biosynthetic pathway of the plant secondary metabolites termed anthocyanins (but not regulators of the pathway) are overrepresented. Upon exposure to moderate high-light stress several of these genes are up-regulated to a lesser extent in ssrp1/spt16 compared to wild type plants, and accordingly the mutant plants accumulate lower amounts of anthocyanin pigments. Moreover, the expression of SSRP1 and SPT16 is induced under these conditions. Therefore, our findings indicate that FACT is a novel factor required for the accumulation of anthocyanins in response to light-induction.

  7. Systematic Identification of Genes Required for Expression of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    It has several advantages over the existing ones and one of them is the ability to make a very large number (tenth of thousands) of gene knockouts...each of reporters in LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells, respectively. See Task 2 To identify genes required for the full length AR or AR3, we took advantage of...splicing, and are important determinants of mRNA export , localization, translation, and stability [28]. Several members of this family have been

  8. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a

  9. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  10. CSL protein regulates transcription of genes required to prevent catastrophic mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Zach, Róbert; Jordáková, Anna; Bähler, Jürg; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2016-11-16

    For every eukaryotic cell to grow and divide, intricately coordinated action of numerous proteins is required to ensure proper cell-cycle progression. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been instrumental in elucidating the fundamental principles of cell-cycle control. Mutations in S. pombe 'cut' (cell untimely torn) genes cause failed coordination between cell and nuclear division, resulting in catastrophic mitosis. Deletion of cbf11, a fission yeast CSL transcription factor gene, triggers a 'cut' phenotype, but the precise role of Cbf11 in promoting mitotic fidelity is not known. We report that Cbf11 directly activates the transcription of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase gene cut6, and the biotin uptake/biosynthesis genes vht1 and bio2, with the former 2 implicated in mitotic fidelity. Cbf11 binds to a canonical, metazoan-like CSL response element (GTGGGAA) in the cut6 promoter. Expression of Cbf11 target genes shows apparent oscillations during the cell cycle using temperature-sensitive cdc25-22 and cdc10-M17 block-release experiments, but not with other synchronization methods. The penetrance of catastrophic mitosis in cbf11 and cut6 mutants is nutrient-dependent. We also show that drastic decrease in biotin availability arrests cell proliferation but does not cause mitotic defects. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that CSL proteins play conserved roles in regulating cell-cycle progression, and they could guide experiments into mitotic CSL functions in mammals.

  11. U2 snRNP is required for expression of the 3' end of genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Koga

    Full Text Available Pre-mRNA in eukaryotes is subjected to mRNA processing, which includes capping, polyadenylation, and splicing. Transcription and mRNA processing are coupled, and this coupling stimulates mRNA processing; however, the effects of mRNA processing on transcription are not fully understood. In this study, we found that inhibition of U2 snRNP by a splicing inhibitor, spliceostatin A (SSA, or by an antisense oligonucleotide to U2 snRNA, caused gene-specific 3'-end down-regulation. Removal of SSA from the culture media restored expression of the 3' ends of genes, suggesting that U2 snRNP is required for expression of the 3' end of genes. Finally, we found that SSA treatment caused accumulation of Pol II near the 5' end of 3'-end down regulated genes, such as CDK6, SMEK2 and EGFR, indicating that SSA treatment led to transcription elongation arrest on these genes. These findings suggest that U2 snRNP is important for production of full length mRNA probably through regulation of transcription elongation, and that a novel checkpoint mechanism prevents pre-mRNA from accumulating as a result of splicing deficiencies, and thereby prevents production of aberrant proteins that might be translated from pre-mRNAs through the arrest of transcription elongation.

  12. An Arabidopsis NPR1-like gene, NPR4, is required for disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guosheng; Holub, Eric B; Alonso, Jose M; Ecker, Joseph R; Fobert, Pierre R

    2005-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains six NPR1-related genes. Given the pivotal role played by NPR1 in controlling salicylic acid (SA)-mediated gene expression and disease resistance, functional characterization of other family members appears to be justified. Reverse genetics was used to analyze the role of one NPR1-like gene, which we called NPR4. The NPR4 protein shares 36% identity with NPR1 and interacts with the same spectrum of TGA transcription factors in yeast two-hybrid assays. Plants with T-DNA insertions in NPR4 are more susceptible to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato DC3000. This phenotype is complemented by expression of the wild type NPR4 coding region. As determined by the parasite reproduction, the npr4-1 mutant is more susceptible to the fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum, but does not differ markedly from wild type in its interaction with virulent and avirulent strains of the oomycete Peronospora parasitica. In leaves of wild-type plants, NPR4 mRNA levels increase following pathogen challenge or SA treatment, and decrease rapidly following methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) treatment. Transcripts of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5 are only marginally reduced in the npr4-1 mutant following pathogen challenge or SA treatment. This reduction of PR gene expression is more pronounced when leaves are challenged with the bacterial pathogen following SA treatment. Expression of the jasmonic acid-dependent pathway marker gene PDF1.2 is compromised in npr4-1 leaves following application of MeJA or a combination of SA and MeJA. These results indicate that NPR4 is required for basal defense against pathogens, and that it may be implicated in the cross-talk between the SA- and JA-dependent signaling pathways.

  13. Genome-Wide Discovery of Genes Required for Capsule Production by UropathogenicEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kelvin G K; Phan, Minh-Duy; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ulett, Glen C; Sweet, Matthew J; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-10-24

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a major cause of urinary tract and bloodstream infections and possesses an array of virulence factors for colonization, survival, and persistence. One such factor is the polysaccharide K capsule. Among the different K capsule types, the K1 serotype is strongly associated with UPEC infection. In this study, we completely sequenced the K1 UPEC urosepsis strain PA45B and employed a novel combination of a lytic K1 capsule-specific phage, saturated Tn 5 transposon mutagenesis, and high-throughput transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS) to identify the complement of genes required for capsule production. Our analysis identified known genes involved in capsule biosynthesis, as well as two additional regulatory genes ( mprA and lrhA ) that we characterized at the molecular level. Mutation of mprA resulted in protection against K1 phage-mediated killing, a phenotype restored by complementation. We also identified a significantly increased unidirectional Tn 5 insertion frequency upstream of the lrhA gene and showed that strong expression of LrhA induced by a constitutive Pcl promoter led to loss of capsule production. Further analysis revealed loss of MprA or overexpression of LrhA affected the transcription of capsule biosynthesis genes in PA45B and increased sensitivity to killing in whole blood. Similar phenotypes were also observed in UPEC strains UTI89 (K1) and CFT073 (K2), demonstrating that the effects were neither strain nor capsule type specific. Overall, this study defined the genome of a UPEC urosepsis isolate and identified and characterized two new regulatory factors that affect UPEC capsule production. IMPORTANCE Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans and are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Many UPEC strains express a polysaccharide K capsule that provides protection against host innate immune factors and contributes to survival

  14. p73 Is Required for Multiciliogenesis and Regulates the Foxj1-Associated Gene Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton B. Marshall

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report that p73 is expressed in multiciliated cells (MCCs, is required for MCC differentiation, and directly regulates transcriptional modulators of multiciliogenesis. Loss of ciliary biogenesis provides a unifying mechanism for many phenotypes observed in p73 knockout mice including hydrocephalus; hippocampal dysgenesis; sterility; and chronic inflammation/infection of lung, middle ear, and sinus. Through p73 and p63 ChIP-seq using murine tracheal cells, we identified over 100 putative p73 target genes that regulate MCC differentiation and homeostasis. We validated Foxj1, a transcriptional regulator of multiciliogenesis, and many other cilia-associated genes as direct target genes of p73 and p63. We show p73 and p63 are co-expressed in a subset of basal cells and suggest that p73 marks these cells for MCC differentiation. In summary, p73 is essential for MCC differentiation, functions as a critical regulator of a transcriptome required for MCC differentiation, and, like p63, has an essential role in development of tissues.

  15. NuMA is required for the selective induction of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Hirokazu; Miyazaki, Makoto; Otomo, Ryo; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Otsubo, Chihiro; Nagase, Takahiro; Arakawa, Hirofumi; Yokota, Jun; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Taya, Yoichi; Enari, Masato

    2013-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a transcription factor controlling various outcomes, such as growth arrest and apoptosis, through the regulation of different sets of target genes. The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) plays important roles in spindle pole organization during mitosis and in chromatin regulation in the nucleus during interphase. Although NuMA has been shown to colocalize with several nuclear proteins, including high-mobility-group proteins I and Y and GAS41, the role of NuMA during interphase remains unclear. Here we report that NuMA binds to p53 to modulate p53-mediated transcription. Acute and partial ablation of NuMA attenuates the induction of the proarrested p21 gene following DNA damage, subsequently causing impaired cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, NuMA knockdown had little effect on the induction of the p53-dependent proapoptotic PUMA gene. Furthermore, NuMA is required for the recruitment of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (Cdk8), a component of the Mediator complex and a promoter of p53-mediated p21 gene function. These data demonstrate that NuMA is critical for the target selectivity of p53-mediated transcription.

  16. Reactivation of methionine synthase from Thermotoga maritima (TM0268) requires the downstream gene product TM0269.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Romanchuk, Gail; Pattridge, Katherine; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A; Matthews, Rowena G; Ludwig, Martha

    2007-08-01

    The crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima gene product TM0269, determined as part of genome-wide structural coverage of T. maritima by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics, revealed structural homology with the fourth module of the cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) from Escherichia coli, despite the lack of significant sequence homology. The gene specifying TM0269 lies in close proximity to another gene, TM0268, which shows sequence homology with the first three modules of E. coli MetH. The fourth module of E. coli MetH is required for reductive remethylation of the cob(II)alamin form of the cofactor and binds the methyl donor for this reactivation, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). Measurements of the rates of methionine formation in the presence and absence of TM0269 and AdoMet demonstrate that both TM0269 and AdoMet are required for reactivation of the inactive cob(II)alamin form of TM0268. These activity measurements confirm the structure-based assignment of the function of the TM0269 gene product. In the presence of TM0269, AdoMet, and reductants, the measured activity of T. maritima MetH is maximal near 80 degrees C, where the specific activity of the purified protein is approximately 15% of that of E. coli methionine synthase (MetH) at 37 degrees C. Comparisons of the structures and sequences of TM0269 and the reactivation domain of E. coli MetH suggest that AdoMet may be bound somewhat differently by the homologous proteins. However, the conformation of a hairpin that is critical for cobalamin binding in E. coli MetH, which constitutes an essential structural element, is retained in the T. maritima reactivation protein despite striking divergence of the sequences.

  17. Geminin is required for zygotic gene expression at the Xenopus mid-blastula transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Kerns

    Full Text Available In many organisms early development is under control of the maternal genome and zygotic gene expression is delayed until the mid-blastula transition (MBT. As zygotic transcription initiates, cell cycle checkpoints become activated and the tempo of cell division slows. The mechanisms that activate zygotic transcription at the MBT are incompletely understood, but they are of interest because they may resemble mechanisms that cause stem cells to stop dividing and terminally differentiate. The unstable regulatory protein Geminin is thought to coordinate cell division with cell differentiation. Geminin is a bi-functional protein. It prevents a second round of DNA replication during S and G2 phase by binding and inhibiting the essential replication factor Cdt1. Geminin also binds and inhibits a number of transcription factors and chromatin remodeling proteins and is thought to keep dividing cells in an undifferentiated state. We previously found that the cells of Geminin-deficient Xenopus embryos arrest in G2 phase just after the MBT then disintegrate at the onset of gastrulation. Here we report that they also fail to express most zygotic genes. The gene expression defect is cell-autonomous and is reproduced by over-expressing Cdt1 or by incubating the embryos in hydroxyurea. Geminin deficient and hydroxyurea-treated blastomeres accumulate DNA damage in the form of double stranded breaks. Bypassing the Chk1 pathway overcomes the cell cycle arrest caused by Geminin depletion but does not restore zygotic gene expression. In fact, bypassing the Chk1 pathway by itself induces double stranded breaks and abolishes zygotic transcription. We did not find evidence that Geminin has a replication-independent effect on transcription. We conclude that Geminin is required to maintain genome integrity during the rapid cleavage divisions, and that DNA damage disrupts zygotic gene transcription at the MBT, probably through activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

  18. Comprehensive identification of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium genes required for infection of BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy R Chaudhuri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Genes required for infection of mice by Salmonella Typhimurium can be identified by the interrogation of random transposon mutant libraries for mutants that cannot survive in vivo. Inactivation of such genes produces attenuated S. Typhimurium strains that have potential for use as live attenuated vaccines. A quantitative screen, Transposon Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH, has been developed that identifies those members of a large library of transposon mutants that are attenuated. TMDH employs custom transposons with outward-facing T7 and SP6 promoters. Fluorescently-labelled transcripts from the promoters are hybridised to whole-genome tiling microarrays, to allow the position of the transposon insertions to be determined. Comparison of microarray data from the mutant library grown in vitro (input with equivalent data produced after passage of the library through mice (output enables an attenuation score to be determined for each transposon mutant. These scores are significantly correlated with bacterial counts obtained during infection of mice using mutants with individual defined deletions of the same genes. Defined deletion mutants of several novel targets identified in the TMDH screen are effective live vaccines.

  19. Genome-Wide Functional Profiling Reveals Genes Required for Tolerance to Benzene Metabolites in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Tandon, Vickram J.; Thomas, Reuben; Loguinov, Alex; Gerlovina, Inna; Hubbard, Alan E.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2011-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and is widely used in industry. Exposure to benzene causes a number of serious health problems, including blood disorders and leukemia. Benzene undergoes complex metabolism in humans, making mechanistic determination of benzene toxicity difficult. We used a functional genomics approach to identify the genes that modulate the cellular toxicity of three of the phenolic metabolites of benzene, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CAT) and 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT), in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Benzene metabolites generate oxidative and cytoskeletal stress, and tolerance requires correct regulation of iron homeostasis and the vacuolar ATPase. We have identified a conserved bZIP transcription factor, Yap3p, as important for a HQ-specific response pathway, as well as two genes that encode putative NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases, PST2 and YCP4. Many of the yeast genes identified have human orthologs that may modulate human benzene toxicity in a similar manner and could play a role in benzene exposure-related disease. PMID:21912624

  20. Neutral Competition forDrosophilaFollicle and Cyst Stem Cell Niches Requires Vesicle Trafficking Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew S; Cazin, Coralie; Amoyel, Marc; Yamamoto, Shinya; Bach, Erika; Nystul, Todd

    2017-07-01

    The process of selecting for cellular fitness through competition plays a critical role in both development and disease. The germarium, a structure at the tip of the ovariole of a Drosophila ovary, contains two follicle stem cells (FSCs) that undergo neutral competition for the stem cell niche. Using the FSCs as a model, we performed a genetic screen through a collection of 126 mutants in essential genes on the X chromosome to identify candidates that increase or decrease competition for the FSC niche. We identified ∼55 and 6% of the mutations screened as putative FSC hypo- or hyper-competitors, respectively. We found that a large majority of mutations in vesicle trafficking genes (11 out of the 13 in the collection of mutants) are candidate hypo-competition alleles, and we confirmed the hypo-competition phenotype for four of these alleles. We also show that Sec16 and another COPII vesicle trafficking component, Sar1, are required for follicle cell differentiation. Lastly, we demonstrate that, although some components of vesicle trafficking are also required for neutral competition in the cyst stem cells of the testis, there are important tissue-specific differences. Our results demonstrate a critical role for vesicle trafficking in stem cell niche competition and differentiation, and we identify a number of putative candidates for further exploration. Copyright © 2017 Cook et al.

  1. Drosophila Dynein intermediate chain gene, Dic61B, is required for spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Fatima

    Full Text Available This study reports the identification and characterization of a novel gene, Dic61B, required for male fertility in Drosophila. Complementation mapping of a novel male sterile mutation, ms21, isolated in our lab revealed it to be allelic to CG7051 at 61B1 cytogenetic region, since two piggyBac insertion alleles, CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138 failed to complement. CG7051 putatively encodes a Dynein intermediate chain. All three mutants, ms21, CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138, exhibited absolute recessive male sterility with abnormally coiled sperm axonemes causing faulty sperm individualization as revealed by Phalloidin staining in Don Juan-GFP background. Sequencing of PCR amplicons uncovered two point mutations in ms21 allele and confirmed the piggyBac insertions in CG7051(c05439 and CG7051(f07138 alleles to be in 5'UTR and 4(th exon of CG7051 respectively, excision of which reverted the male sterility. In situ hybridization to polytene chromosomes demonstrated CG7051 to be a single copy gene. RT-PCR of testis RNA revealed defective splicing of the CG7051 transcripts in mutants. Interestingly, expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain, α, β, γ tubulins and α-spectrin was normal in mutants while ultra structural studies revealed defects in the assembly of sperm axonemes. Bioinformatics further highlighted the homology of CG7051 to axonemal dynein intermediate chain of various organisms, including DNAI1 of humans, mutations in which lead to male sterility due to immotile sperms. Based on these observations we conclude that CG7051 encodes a novel axonemal dynein intermediate chain essential for male fertility in Drosophila and rename it as Dic61B. This is the first axonemal Dic gene of Drosophila to be characterized at molecular level and shown to be required for spermatogenesis.

  2. rFTR1 is Required for Pathogenesis, and appears to be an Essential Gene, of Rhizopus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Rhizopus oryzae is a multinucleated fungus responsible for the majority of cases of mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iron-limited environments. We sought to disrupt the gene to define its role in virulence. METHODS: ...

  3. Microarray Analysis of Transposon Insertion Mutants in Bacillus Anthracis: Global Identification of Genes Required for Sporulation and Germination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day , Jr., William A; Rasmussen, Suzanne L; Carpenter, Beth M; Peterson, Scott N; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2007-01-01

    .... The system, used to identify genes required for generation of the infectious anthrax spore, spore germination and optimal growth on rich medium, was predictive of the contribution of two conserved...

  4. DNA sequences required for regulated expresson of the β-globin genes in murine erythroleukaemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Wright; E. de Boer (Ernie); A. Rosenthal; R.A. Flavell (Richard); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced into murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells a series of human globin gene cosmids and two sets of hybrid genes constructed from the human beta-globin gene and the human gamma-globin or murine H-2Kbm1 genes. S1-nuclease analysis of the mRNA products from these genes before

  5. Mms Sensitivity of All Amino Acid-Requiring Mutants in Aspergillus and Its Suppression by Mutations in a Single Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Käfer, Etta

    1987-01-01

    All available amino acid-requiring mutants of Aspergillus nidulans were found to be hypersensitive to MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) to various degrees. On MMS media, secondary mutations could be selected which suppress this MMS sensitivity but do not affect the requirement. Many such mutations were analyzed and found to be alleles of one gene, smsA (= suppressor of MMS sensitivity), which mapped distal on the right arm of chromosome V. This gene is more likely to be involved in general regula...

  6. Activation of germline-specific genes is required for limb regeneration in the Mexican axolotl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Pao, Gerald M; Satoh, Akira; Cummings, Gillian; Monaghan, James R; Harkins, Timothy T; Bryant, Susan V; Voss, S Randal; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2013-01-01

    The capacity for tissue and organ regeneration in humans is dwarfed by comparison to that of salamanders. Emerging evidence suggests that mechanisms learned from the early phase of salamander limb regeneration – wound healing, cellular dedifferentiation and blastemal formation – will reveal therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration in humans. Here we describe a unique transcriptional fingerprint of regenerating limb tissue in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells to a germline-like state. Two genes that are required for self-renewal of germ cells in mice and flies, Piwi-like 1 (PL1) and Piwi-like 2 (PL2), are expressed in limb blastemal cells, the basal layer keratinocytes and the thickened apical epithelial cap in the wound epidermis in the regenerating limb. Depletion of PL1 and PL2 by morpholino oligonucleotides decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death in the blastema leading to a significant retardation of regeneration. Examination of key molecules that are known to be required for limb development or regeneration further revealed that FGF8 is transcriptionally downregulated in the presence of the morpholino oligos, indicating PL1 and PL2 might participate in FGF signaling during limb regeneration. Given the requirement for FGF signaling in limb development and regeneration, the results suggest that PL1 and PL2 function to establish a unique germline-like state that is associated with successful regeneration. PMID:22841627

  7. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France); Tora, Laszlo, E-mail: laszlo@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France)

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ISW2 encodes a microtubule-interacting protein required for premeiotic DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtulcová, P; Janatová, I; Kohlwein, S D; Hasek, J

    2000-01-15

    A molecular genetic characterization of the ORF YOR304W (ISW2), identified in a screen of a yeast lambdagt11 library using a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a 210 kDa mammalian microtubule-interacting protein, is presented in this paper. The protein encoded by the ORF YOR304W is 50% identical to the Drosophila nucleosome remodelling factor ISWI and is therefore a new member of the SNF2 protein family and has been recently entered into SDG as ISW2. Although not essential for vegetative growth, we found that the ISW2 gene is required for early stages in sporulation. The isw2 homozygous deletant diploid strain was blocked in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, unable to execute the premeiotic DNA replication and progress through the nuclear meiotic division cycle. ISW2 expression from a multicopy plasmid had the same effect as deletion, but ISW2 expression from a centromeric plasmid rescued the deletion phenotype. In vegetatively growing diploid cells, the Isw2 protein was preferentially found in the cytoplasm, co-localizing with microtubules. An accumulation of the Isw2 protein within the nucleus was observed in cells entering sporulation. Together with data published very recently by Tsukiyama et al. (1999), we propose a role for the Isw2 protein in facilitating chromatin accessibility for transcriptional factor(s) that positively regulate meiosis/sporulation-specific genes. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Host specific differences alter the requirement for certain Salmonella genes during swine colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D

    2011-06-02

    The pathogenic potential of Salmonella is determined during the complex interaction between pathogen and host, requiring optimal regulation of multiple bacterial genetic systems within variable in vivo environments. The mouse model of systemic disease has been an extremely productive model to investigate the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Although the mouse model is a widely used paradigm for studying the pathogenesis of systemic disease caused by Salmonella, investigations concerning food safety interventions should employ natural hosts to examine gastrointestinal colonization by Salmonella. Recent research has demonstrated specific differences in the attenuation of certain S. Typhimurium mutants in mice compared to swine. This variation in pathogenesis between the mouse model and pigs for the S. Typhimurium mutants is presumably dependent upon either the requirements for specific gene products during systemic disease (mouse) versus gastrointestinal colonization (pig) or host specific differences. In addition, host specific diversity in Salmonella colonization of swine has also been described in comparison to other food-producing animals, including cattle and chickens. Differences in Salmonella colonization and pathogenesis across diverse animal species highlight the importance of species-specific studies of gastrointestinal colonization for the development of Salmonella interventions to enhance pork safety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amsterdam Adam

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells occurs within the pharyngeal arches. Substantial efforts have led to the identification of several genes required for craniofacial skeletal development such as the endothelin-1 (edn1 signaling pathway that is required for lower jaw formation. However, many essential genes required for craniofacial development remain to be identified. Results Through screening a collection of insertional zebrafish mutants containing approximately 25% of the genes essential for embryonic development, we present the identification of 15 essential genes that are required for craniofacial development. We identified 3 genes required for hyomandibular development. We also identified zebrafish models for Campomelic Dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. To further demonstrate the utility of this method, we include a characterization of the wdr68 gene. We show that wdr68 acts upstream of the edn1 pathway and is also required for formation of the upper jaw equivalent, the palatoquadrate. We also present evidence that the level of wdr68 activity required for edn1 pathway function differs between the 1st and 2nd arches. Wdr68 interacts with two minibrain-related kinases, Dyrk1a and Dyrk1b, required for embryonic growth and myotube differentiation, respectively. We show that a GFP-Wdr68 fusion protein localizes to the nucleus with Dyrk1a in contrast to an engineered loss of function mutation Wdr68-T284F that no longer accumulated in the cell nucleus and failed to rescue wdr68 mutant animals. Wdr68 homologs appear to exist in all eukaryotic genomes. Notably, we found that the Drosophila wdr68 homolog CG14614 could substitute for the vertebrate wdr68 gene even though insects lack the NC cell lineage. Conclusion This work represents a systematic

  12. Evolution of New cis-Regulatory Motifs Required for Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Barkoulas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patterning of C. elegans vulval cell fates relies on inductive signaling. In this induction event, a single cell, the gonadal anchor cell, secretes LIN-3/EGF and induces three out of six competent precursor cells to acquire a vulval fate. We previously showed that this developmental system is robust to a four-fold variation in lin-3/EGF genetic dose. Here using single-molecule FISH, we find that the mean level of expression of lin-3 in the anchor cell is remarkably conserved. No change in lin-3 expression level could be detected among C. elegans wild isolates and only a low level of change-less than 30%-in the Caenorhabditis genus and in Oscheius tipulae. In C. elegans, lin-3 expression in the anchor cell is known to require three transcription factor binding sites, specifically two E-boxes and a nuclear-hormone-receptor (NHR binding site. Mutation of any of these three elements in C. elegans results in a dramatic decrease in lin-3 expression. Yet only a single E-box is found in the Drosophilae supergroup of Caenorhabditis species, including C. angaria, while the NHR-binding site likely only evolved at the base of the Elegans group. We find that a transgene from C. angaria bearing a single E-box is sufficient for normal expression in C. elegans. Even a short 58 bp cis-regulatory fragment from C. angaria with this single E-box is able to replace the three transcription factor binding sites at the endogenous C. elegans lin-3 locus, resulting in the wild-type expression level. Thus, regulatory evolution occurring in cis within a 58 bp lin-3 fragment, results in a strict requirement for the NHR binding site and a second E-box in C. elegans. This single-cell, single-molecule, quantitative and functional evo-devo study demonstrates that conserved expression levels can hide extensive change in cis-regulatory site requirements and highlights the evolution of new cis-regulatory elements required for cell-specific gene expression.

  13. ATG genes involved in non-selective autophagy are conserved from yeast to man, but the selective Cvt and pexophagy pathways also require organism-specific genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wiebe H.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten; Kiel, Jan A.K.W.

    2007-01-01

    ATG genes encode proteins that are required for macroautophagy, the Cvt pathway and/or pexophagy. Using the published Atg protein sequences, we have screened protein and DNA databases to identify putative functional homologs (orthologs) in 21 fungal species (yeast and filamentous fungi) of which the

  14. Xenopus Nanos1 is required to prevent endoderm gene expression and apoptosis in primordial germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fangfang; Singh, Amar; King, Mary Lou

    2012-01-01

    Nanos is expressed in multipotent cells, stem cells and primordial germ cells (PGCs) of organisms as diverse as jellyfish and humans. It functions together with Pumilio to translationally repress targeted mRNAs. Here we show by loss-of-function experiments that Xenopus Nanos1 is required to preserve PGC fate. Morpholino knockdown of maternal Nanos1 resulted in a striking decrease in PGCs and a loss of germ cells from the gonads. Lineage tracing and TUNEL staining reveal that Nanos1-deficient PGCs fail to migrate out of the endoderm. They appear to undergo apoptosis rather than convert to normal endoderm. Whereas normal PGCs do not become transcriptionally active until neurula, Nanos1-depleted PGCs prematurely exhibit a hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain at the midblastula transition. Furthermore, they inappropriately express somatic genes characteristic of endoderm regulated by maternal VegT, including Xsox17α, Bix4, Mixer, GATA4 and Edd. We further demonstrate that Pumilio specifically binds VegT RNA in vitro and represses, along with Nanos1, VegT translation within PGCs. Repressed VegT RNA in wild-type PGCs is significantly less stable than VegT in Nanos1-depleted PGCs. Our data indicate that maternal VegT RNA is an authentic target of Nanos1/Pumilio translational repression. We propose that Nanos1 functions to translationally repress RNAs that normally specify endoderm and promote apoptosis, thus preserving the germline. PMID:22399685

  15. MMS sensitivity of all amino acid-requiring mutants in aspergillus and its suppression by mutations in a single gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käfer, E

    1987-04-01

    All available amino acid-requiring mutants of Aspergillus nidulans were found to be hypersensitive to MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) to various degrees. On MMS media, secondary mutations could be selected which suppress this MMS sensitivity but do not affect the requirement. Many such mutations were analyzed and found to be alleles of one gene, smsA (= suppressor of MMS sensitivity), which mapped distal on the right arm of chromosome V. This gene is more likely to be involved in general regulation of amino acid biosynthesis than MMS uptake, since a variety of pathway interactions were clearly modified by smsA suppressors in the absence of MMS.

  16. SHC1, a high pH inducible gene required for growth at alkaline pH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S K; Han, S B; Snyder, M; Choi, E Y

    1999-02-05

    In this study, we carried out a large-scale transposon tagging screening to identify genes whose expression is regulated by ambient pH. Of 35,000 transformants, two strains carrying the genes whose expression is strictly dependent on pH of growth medium were identified. One of the genes with 20-fold induction by alkali pH was identified as SHC1 gene in the Yeast Genome Directory and its expression was the highest at alkaline pH and moderately induced by osmotic stress. However, the gene was expressed neither at acidic pH nor by other stress conditions. The haploid mutant with truncated shc1 gene showed growth retardation and an abnormal morphology at alkaline pH. On the other hand, the mutant strain carrying the wild-type SHC1 gene reverted to the mutant phenotype. To confirm that Shc1p is an alkali-inducible protein, a monoclonal antibody to Shc1p was produced. While a 55-kDa protein band appeared on the Western blot of cells grown at alkaline pH, Shc1p was barely detectable on the blots of cells grown in YPD. Our results indicate that yeast cells have an efficient system adapting to large variations in ambient pH and SHC1 is one of the genes required for the growth at alkaline pH. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. The ligand binding domain of GCNF is not required for repression of pluripotency genes in mouse fetal ovarian germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Okumura

    Full Text Available In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. Interestingly, these genes are repressed at different developmental timepoints in germ and somatic cells. Ovarian germ cells maintain their expression until about embryonic day (E 14.5, whereas somatic cells silence them much earlier, at about E8.0. In both somatic cells and embryonic stem cells, silencing of Oct4 and Nanog requires the nuclear receptor GCNF. However, expression of the Gcnf gene has not been investigated in fetal ovarian germ cells, and whether it is required for silencing Oct4 and Nanog in that context is not known. Here we demonstrate that Gcnf is expressed in fetal ovarian germ cells, peaking at E14.5, when Oct4 and Nanog are silenced. However, conditional ablation of the ligand-binding domain of Gcnf using a ubiquitous, tamoxifen-inducible Cre indicates that Gcnf is not required for the down-regulation of pluripotency genes in fetal ovarian germ cells, nor is it required for initiation of meiosis and oogenesis. These results suggest that the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog in germ cells occurs via a different mechanism from that operating in somatic cells during gastrulation.

  18. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3, which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12. The gene neighbouring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis.

  19. Complete auxotrophy for unsaturated fatty acids requires deletion of two sets of genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Cecilia B; Doprado, Mariana; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Morbidoni, Héctor R

    2017-10-01

    The synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Mycobacterium smegmatis is poorly characterized. Bioinformatic analysis revealed four putative fatty acid desaturases in its genome, one of which, MSMEG_1886, is highly homologous to desA3, the only palmitoyl/stearoyl desaturase present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. A MSMEG_1886 deletion mutant was partially auxotrophic for oleic acid and viable at 37°C and 25°C, although with a long lag phase in liquid medium. Fatty acid analysis suggested that MSMEG_1886 is a palmitoyl/stearoyl desaturase, as the synthesis of palmitoleic acid was abrogated, while oleic acid contents dropped by half in the mutant. Deletion of the operon MSMEG_1741-1743 (highly homologous to a Pseudomonas aeruginosa acyl-CoA desaturase) had little effect on growth of the parental strain; however the double mutant MSMEG_1886-MSMEG_1741-1743 strictly required oleic acid for growth. The ΔMSMEG_1886-ΔMSMEG_1741 double mutant was able to grow (poorly but better than the ΔMSMEG_1886 single mutant) in solid and liquid media devoid of oleic acid, suggesting a repressor role for ΔMSMEG_1741. Fatty acid analysis of the described mutants suggested that MSMEG_1742-43 desaturates C18:0 and C24:0 fatty acids. Thus, although the M. smegmatis desA3 homologue is the major player in unsaturated fatty acid synthesis, a second set of genes is also involved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of CREB target genes reveals a core promoter requirement for cAMP responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkright, Michael D; Guzmán, Ernesto; Flechner, Lawrence; Su, Andrew I; Hogenesch, John B; Montminy, Marc

    2003-04-01

    We have employed a hidden Markov model (HMM) based on known cAMP responsive elements to search for putative CREB target genes. The best scoring sites were positionally conserved between mouse and human orthologs, suggesting that this parameter can be used to enrich for true CREB targets. Target validation experiments revealed a core promoter requirement for transcriptional induction via CREB; TATA-less promoters were unresponsive to cAMP compared to TATA-containing genes, despite comparable binding of CREB to both sets of genes in vivo. Indeed, insertion of a TATA box motif rescued cAMP responsiveness on a TATA-less promoter. These results illustrate a mechanism by which subsets of target genes for a transcription factor are differentially regulated depending on core promoter configuration.

  1. Identification of pif-2, a third conserved baculovirus gene required for per os infection of insect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Pruijssers, A.; Vlak, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of cultured insect cells with Spodoptera exigua multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) resulted in the generation of mutants with major genomic deletions. Some of the mutants lacked the ability to infect S. exigua larvae per os. The gene(s) responsible for this phenotype in SeMNPV was

  2. Determination of variants in the 3'-region of the Tyrosinase gene requires locus specific amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaki, M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ray, K.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (TYR, 11q14-q21) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). The 3'-region of the TYR shows 98.55% sequence identity with a pseudogene, known as Tyrosinase-Like Gene (TYRL, 11p11.2-cen). A large number of publicly available nucleotide variants of TYR in this region

  3. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C.A.; Drost, J.; Wijchers, P.J.; van de Werken, H.; de Wit, E.; Oude Vrielink, J.A.; Elkon, R.; Melo, S.A.; Leveille, N.; Kalluri, R.; de Laat, W.; Agami, R.

    2013-01-01

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any

  4. Deep Conservation of Genes Required for Both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep Includes a Role for Dopaminergic Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Komudi; Ju, Jennifer Y.; Walsh, Melissa B.; DiIorio, Michael A.; Hart, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cross-species conservation of sleep-like behaviors predicts the presence of conserved molecular mechanisms underlying sleep. However, limited experimental evidence of conservation exists. Here, this prediction is tested directly. Measurements and Results: During lethargus, Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneously sleep in short bouts that are interspersed with bouts of spontaneous locomotion. We identified 26 genes required for Drosophila melanogaster sleep. Twenty orthologous C. elegans genes were selected based on similarity. Their effect on C. elegans sleep and arousal during the last larval lethargus was assessed. The 20 most similar genes altered both the quantity of sleep and arousal thresholds. In 18 cases, the direction of change was concordant with Drosophila studies published previously. Additionally, we delineated a conserved genetic pathway by which dopamine regulates sleep and arousal. In C. elegans neurons, G-alpha S, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A act downstream of D1 dopamine receptors to regulate these behaviors. Finally, a quantitative analysis of genes examined herein revealed that C. elegans arousal thresholds were directly correlated with amount of sleep during lethargus. However, bout duration varies little and was not correlated with arousal thresholds. Conclusions: The comprehensive analysis presented here suggests that conserved genes and pathways are required for sleep in invertebrates and, likely, across the entire animal kingdom. The genetic pathway delineated in this study implicates G-alpha S and previously known genes downstream of dopamine signaling in sleep. Quantitative analysis of various components of quiescence suggests that interdependent or identical cellular and molecular mechanisms are likely to regulate both arousal and sleep entry. Citation: Singh K, Ju JY, Walsh MB, Dilorio MA, Hart AC. Deep conservation of genes required for both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans sleep includes a role for

  5. Cloning and Expression of the Lactococcus lactis purDEK Genes, Required for Growth in Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    An operon containing the genes purD and purE and part of the purK gene was cloned from the facultative anaerobic gram positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis by complementation of the purD mutation in Escherichia coli SO609. The genes encode enzymes in the de novo pathway of purine nucleotides....... The expression of the genes was regulated approximately 35-fold at the transcription level by the availability of purines in the growth medium. Deletion analysis of the nucleotide region upstream of purD indicated that a region of 145 bp is enough to give regulated expression of the reporter lacLM genes, which...... encode beta-galactosidase. Deletion of a region 79 bp upstream of the transcription start point reduced the promoter activity 33-fold when incubated in a purine-free medium and to values below the detection limit when incubated in a purine-containing medium. No secondary transcription start points were...

  6. DNA polymerases ν and θ are required for efficient immunoglobulin V gene diversification in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nishihara, Kana; Hirota, Kouji; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Yoshimura, Michio; Ekino, Shigeo; Butler, John E.; Watanabe, Masami; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2010-01-01

    The chicken DT40 B lymphocyte line diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) V genes through translesion DNA synthesis–dependent point mutations (Ig hypermutation) and homologous recombination (HR)–dependent Ig gene conversion. The error-prone biochemical characteristic of the A family DNA polymerases Polν and Polθ led us to explore the role of these polymerases in Ig gene diversification in DT40 cells. Disruption of both polymerases causes a significant decrease in Ig gene conversion events, although POLN−/−/POLQ−/− cells exhibit no prominent defect in HR-mediated DNA repair, as indicated by no increase in sensitivity to camptothecin. Polη has also been previously implicated in Ig gene conversion. We show that a POLH−/−/POLN−/−/POLQ−/− triple mutant displays no Ig gene conversion and reduced Ig hypermutation. Together, these data define a role for Polν and Polθ in recombination and suggest that the DNA synthesis associated with Ig gene conversion is accounted for by three specialized DNA polymerases. PMID:20584917

  7. Analysis of an ordered, comprehensive STM mutant library in infectious Borrelia burgdorferi: insights into the genes required for mouse infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    Full Text Available The identification of genes important in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease Borrelia has been hampered by exceedingly low transformation rates in low-passage, infectious organisms. Using the infectious, moderately transformable B. burgdorferi derivative 5A18NP1 and signature-tagged versions of the Himar1 transposon vector pGKT, we have constructed a defined transposon library for the efficient genome-wide investigation of genes required for wild-type pathogenesis, in vitro growth, physiology, morphology, and plasmid replication. To facilitate analysis, the insertion sites of 4,479 transposon mutants were determined by sequencing. The transposon insertions were widely distributed across the entire B. burgdorferi genome, with an average of 2.68 unique insertion sites per kb DNA. The 10 linear plasmids and 9 circular plasmids had insertions in 33 to 100 percent of their predicted genes. In contrast, only 35% of genes in the 910 kb linear chromosome had incapacitating insertions; therefore, the remaining 601 chromosomal genes may represent essential gene candidates. In initial signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM analyses, 434 mutants were examined at multiple tissue sites for infectivity in mice using a semi-quantitative, Luminex-based DNA detection method. Examples of genes found to be important in mouse infectivity included those involved in motility, chemotaxis, the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system, and other transporters, as well as putative plasmid maintenance genes. Availability of this ordered STM library and a high-throughput screening method is expected to lead to efficient assessment of the roles of B. burgdorferi genes in the infectious cycle and pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  8. The ROOT HAIRLESS 1 gene encodes a nuclear protein required for root hair initiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Mathur, J; Boudonck, K; Wells, B; Dolan, L; Roberts, K

    1998-07-01

    The epidermis of Arabidopsis wild-type primary roots, in which some cells grow hairs and others remain hairless in a position-dependent manner, has become an established model system to study cell differentiation. Here we present a molecular analysis of the RHL1 (ROOT HAIRLESS 1) gene that, if mutated, prevents the formation of hairs on primary roots and causes a seedling lethal phenotype. We have cloned the RHL1 gene by use of a T-DNA-tagged mutant and found that it encodes a protein that appears to be plant specific. The predicted RHL1 gene product is a small hydrophilic protein (38.9 kD) containing putative nuclear localization signals and shows no significant homology to any known amino acid sequence. We demonstrate that a 78-amino-acid sequence at its amino terminus is capable of directing an RHL1-GFP fusion protein to the nucleus. The RHL1 transcript is present throughout the wild-type plant and in suspension culture cells, but in very low amounts, suggesting a regulatory function for the RHL1 protein. Structural evidence suggests a role for the RHL1 gene product in the nucleolus. We have examined the genetic relationship between RHL1 and GL2, an inhibitor of root hair initiation in non-hair cells. Our molecular and genetic data with double mutants, together with the expression analysis of a GL2 promoter-GUS reporter gene construct, indicate that the RHL1 gene acts independently of GL2.

  9. Cloning and characterization of a gene (UVR3) required for photorepair of 6-4 photoproducts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, S.; Sugiyama, M.; Iwai, S.; Hitomi, K.; Otoshi, E.; Kim SangTae; Jiang CaiZhong; Todo, T.; Britt, A.B.; Yamamoto, K.

    1998-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major classes of pyrimidine dimers: the pyrimidine [6-4] pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4 product) and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Many organisms produce enzymes, termed photolyases, that specifically bind to these damage products and split them via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism, thereby reversing the damage. These photolyases are specific for either CPDs or 6-4 products. A gene that expresses a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity in vitro was recently cloned from Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis. We report here the isolation of a homolog of this gene, cloned on the basis of sequence similarity, from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This cloned gene produces a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity when expressed in Escherichia coli. We also find that a previously described mutant of Arabidopsis (uvr3) that is defective in photoreactivation of 6-4 products carries a nonsense mutation in this 6-4 photolyase homolog. We have therefore termed this gene UVR3. Although homologs of this gene have previously been shown to produce a functional 6-4 photolyase when expressed in heterologous systems, this is the first demonstration of a requirement for this gene for photoreactivation of 6-4 products in vivo

  10. A functional genomic screen for evolutionarily conserved genes required for lifespan and immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sinha

    Full Text Available The reproductive system regulates lifespan in insects, nematodes and vertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans removal of germline increases lifespan by 60% which is dependent upon insulin signaling, nuclear hormone signaling, autophagy and fat metabolism and their microRNA-regulators. Germline-deficient C. elegans are also more resistant to various bacterial pathogens but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Firstly, we demonstrate that previously identified genes that regulate the extended lifespan of germline-deficient C. elegans (daf-2, daf-16, daf-12, tcer-1, mir-7.1 and nhr-80 are also essential for resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila. We then use a novel unbiased approach combining laser cell ablation, whole genome microarrays, RNAi screening and exposure to X. nematophila to generate a comprehensive genome-wide catalog of genes potentially required for increased lifespan and innate immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans. We find 3,440 genes to be upregulated in C. elegans germline-deficient animals in a gonad dependent manner, which are significantly enriched for genes involved in insulin signaling, fatty acid desaturation, translation elongation and proteasome complex function. Using RNAi against a subset of 150 candidate genes selected from the microarray results, we show that the upregulated genes such as transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, the PTEN homolog lipid phosphatase DAF-18 and several components of the proteasome complex (rpn-6.1, rpn-7, rpn-9, rpn-10, rpt-6, pbs-3 and pbs-6 are essential for both lifespan and immunity of germline deficient animals. We also identify a novel role for genes including par-5 and T12G3.6 in both lifespan-extension and increased survival on X. nematophila. From an evolutionary perspective, most of the genes differentially expressed in germline deficient C. elegans also show a conserved expression pattern in germline deficient Pristionchus pacificus, a

  11. MCTP2 is a dosage-sensitive gene required for cardiac outflow tract development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Seema R.; Ware, Stephanie M.; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys; Tian, Qi; Franco, Luis M.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Bucasas, Kristine; Scott, Daryl A.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Hanchard, Neil; Umaña, Luis; Cast, Ashley; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W.; McBride, Kim L.; Bray, Molly; Craig Chinault, A.; Boggs, Barbara A.; Huang, Miao; Baker, Mariah R.; Hamilton, Susan; Towbin, Jeff; Jefferies, John L.; Fernbach, Susan D.; Potocki, Lorraine; Belmont, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) have been reported in rare individuals with large terminal deletions of chromosome 15q26. However, no single gene important for left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) development has been identified in this region. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified two half-siblings with CoA with a 2.2 Mb deletion on 15q26.2, inherited from their mother, who was mosaic for this deletion. This interval contains an evolutionary conserved, protein-coding gene, MCTP2 (multiple C2-domains with two transmembrane regions 2). Using gene-specific array screening in 146 individuals with non-syndromic LVOT obstructive defects, another individual with HLHS and CoA was found to have a de novo 41 kb intragenic duplication within MCTP2, predicted to result in premature truncation, p.F697X. Alteration of Mctp2 gene expression in Xenopus laevis embryos by morpholino knockdown and mRNA overexpression resulted in the failure of proper OT development, confirming the functional importance of this dosage-sensitive gene for cardiogenesis. Our results identify MCTP2 as a novel genetic cause of CoA and related cardiac malformations. PMID:23773997

  12. Multiple BiP genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are required for male gametogenesis and pollen competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    Immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) is a molecular chaperone of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family. BiP is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plays key roles in protein translocation, protein folding and quality control in the ER. The genomes of flowering plants contain multiple BiP genes. Arabidopsis thaliana has three BiP genes. BIP1 and BIP2 are ubiquitously expressed. BIP3 encodes a less well conserved BiP paralog, and it is expressed only under ER stress conditions in the majority of organs. Here, we report that all BiP genes are expressed and functional in pollen and pollen tubes. Although the bip1 bip2 double mutation does not affect pollen viability, the bip1 bip2 bip3 triple mutation is lethal in pollen. This result indicates that lethality of the bip1 bip2 double mutation is rescued by BiP3 expression. A decrease in the copy number of the ubiquitously expressed BiP genes correlates well with a decrease in pollen tube growth, which leads to reduced fitness of mutant pollen during fertilization. Because an increased protein secretion activity is expected to increase the protein folding demand in the ER, the multiple BiP genes probably cooperate with each other to ensure ER homeostasis in cells with active secretion such as rapidly growing pollen tubes.

  13. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stähli

    Full Text Available Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB431542. Emdogain caused 39 coding genes to be differentially expressed in palatal fibroblasts by microarray analysis (p10-fold. Importantly, in the presence of the TGF-βRI kinase inhibitor SB431542, Emdogain failed to cause any significant changes in gene expression. Consistent with this mechanism, three independent TGF-βRI kinase inhibitors and a TGF-β neutralizing antibody abrogated the increased expression of IL-11, a selected Emdogain target gene. The MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and U0126 lowered the impact of Emdogain on IL-11 expression. The data support that TGF-βRI kinase activity is necessary to mediate the effects of Emdogain on gene expression in vitro.

  14. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähli, Alexandra; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB431542. Emdogain caused 39 coding genes to be differentially expressed in palatal fibroblasts by microarray analysis (p10-fold). Importantly, in the presence of the TGF-βRI kinase inhibitor SB431542, Emdogain failed to cause any significant changes in gene expression. Consistent with this mechanism, three independent TGF-βRI kinase inhibitors and a TGF-β neutralizing antibody abrogated the increased expression of IL-11, a selected Emdogain target gene. The MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and U0126 lowered the impact of Emdogain on IL-11 expression. The data support that TGF-βRI kinase activity is necessary to mediate the effects of Emdogain on gene expression in vitro.

  15. Homologues of Genetic Transformation DNA Import Genes Are Required for Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent Recipient Capability Regulated by the Response Regulator CtrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, Cedric A; Ding, Hao; Johnson, Jeanette A; Beatty, J Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) morphologically resemble small, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages; however, their only known role is to package and transfer random pieces of the producing cell genome to recipient cells. The best understood GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that homologues of three genes involved in natural transformation in other bacteria, comEC, comF, and comM, are essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition. This paper gives genetic and biochemical evidence that RcGTA-borne DNA entry into cells requires the ComEC and ComF putative DNA transport proteins and genetic evidence that putative cytoplasmic ComM protein of unknown function is required for recipient capability. Furthermore, the master regulator of RcGTA production in bacterial horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, where donor DNA is packaged in transducing phage-like particles and recipient cells take up DNA using natural transformation-related machinery. Both of these differentiated subsets of a culture population, donors and recipients, are dependent on the same response regulator, CtrA. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to environmental stresses. Traits such as antibiotic resistance or metabolic properties can be transferred between bacteria via HGT; thus, HGT can have a tremendous effect on the fitness of a bacterial population. The three classically described HGT mechanisms are conjugation, transformation, and phage-mediated transduction. More recently, the HGT factor GTA was described, where random pieces of producing cell genome are packaged into phage-like particles that deliver DNA to recipient cells. In this report, we show that transport of DNA borne by the R. capsulatus RcGTA into recipient cells requires key genes previously thought to be specific to natural transformation pathways. These findings indicate that RcGTA combines central aspects of phage-mediated transduction and natural

  16. Requirements for Clinical Trials with Gene Therapy and Transplant Products in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims to describe and summarize the regulation of gene and cell therapy products in Switzerland and its legal basis. Product types are briefly described, as are Swiss-specific terminologies such as the term "transplant product," which means products manufactured from cells, tissues, or even whole organs. Although some parts of this chapter may show a guideline character, they are not legally binding, but represent the current thinking of Swissmedic, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products. As so far the experience with marketing approval of gene therapy and cell therapy products in Switzerland is limited, this chapter focuses on the regulation of clinical trials conducted with these products. Quality, nonclinical, and clinical aspects are summarized separately for gene therapy products and transplant products.

  17. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...... metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance...... was compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further...

  18. Genome-wide screen for salmonella genes required for long-term systemic infection of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A microarray-based negative selection screen was performed to identify Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (serovar Typhimurium genes that contribute to long-term systemic infection in 129X1/SvJ (Nramp1(r mice. A high-complexity transposon-mutagenized library was used to infect mice intraperitoneally, and the selective disappearance of mutants was monitored after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d postinfection. One hundred and eighteen genes were identified to contribute to serovar Typhimurium infection of the spleens of mice by 28 d postinfection. The negatively selected mutants represent many known aspects of Salmonella physiology and pathogenesis, although the majority of the identified genes are of putative or unknown function. Approximately 30% of the negatively selected genes correspond to horizontally acquired regions such as those within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI 1-5, prophages (Gifsy-1 and -2 and remnant, and the pSLT virulence plasmid. In addition, mutations in genes responsible for outer membrane structure and remodeling, such as LPS- and PhoP-regulated and fimbrial genes, were also selected against. Competitive index experiments demonstrated that the secreted SPI2 effectors SseK2 and SseJ as well as the SPI4 locus are attenuated relative to wild-type bacteria during systemic infection. Interestingly, several SPI1-encoded type III secretion system effectors/translocases are required by serovar Typhimurium to establish and, unexpectedly, to persist systemically, challenging the present description of Salmonella pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed a progressive selection against serovar Typhimurium mutants based upon the duration of the infection, suggesting that different classes of genes may be required at distinct stages of infection. Overall, these data indicate that Salmonella long-term systemic infection in the mouse requires a diverse repertoire of virulence factors. This diversity of genes presumably reflects the fact that

  19. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V Matz

    Full Text Available Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process.In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts. Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests.Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been implemented as the MCMC.qpcr package in R.

  20. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Mikhail V; Wright, Rachel M; Scott, James G

    2013-01-01

    Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process. In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts). Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization) but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests. Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been implemented as the MCMC.qpcr package in R.

  1. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2009-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are fun...

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus BKRF4 Gene Product Is Required for Efficient Progeny Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, H M Abdullah Al; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of human gammaherpesvirus, infects mainly B cells. EBV has two alternative life cycles, latent and lytic, and is reactivated occasionally from the latent stage to the lytic cycle. To combat EBV-associated disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of the EBV lytic replication cycle is also important. Here, we focused on an EBV lytic gene, BKRF4. Using our anti-BKRF4 antibody, we revealed that the BKRF4 gene product is expressed during the lytic cycle with late kinetics. To characterize the role of BKRF4, we constructed BKRF4-knockout mutants using the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. Although disruption of the BKRF4 gene had almost no effect on viral protein expression and DNA synthesis, it significantly decreased progeny virion levels in HEK293 and Akata cells. Furthermore, we show that BKRF4 is involved not only in production of progeny virions but also in increasing the infectivity of the virus particles. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that BKRF4 interacted with a virion protein, BGLF2. We showed that the C-terminal region of BKRF4 was critical for this interaction and for efficient progeny production. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that BKRF4 partially colocalized with BGLF2 in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Finally, we showed that BKRF4 is a phosphorylated, possible tegument protein and that the EBV protein kinase BGLF4 may be important for this phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that BKRF4 is involved in the production of infectious virions. IMPORTANCE Although the latent genes of EBV have been studied extensively, the lytic genes are less well characterized. This study focused on one such lytic gene, BKRF4, which is conserved only among gammaherpesviruses (ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or murine herpesvirus 68). After preparing the BKRF4 knockout virus using B95-8 EBV-BAC, we demonstrated that the BKRF4 gene was involved in infectious

  3. Plastid gene expression and plant development require a plastidic protein of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiychuk, Elena; Vandepoele, Klaas; Wissing, Josef; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; De Rycke, Riet; Akbari, Hana; Joubès, Jérôme; Beeckman, Tom; Jänsch, Lothar; Frentzen, Margrit; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Kushnir, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles unique to plant cells. In Arabidopsis, one-third of the genes required for embryo development encode plastid-localized proteins. To help understand the role of plastids in embryogenesis and postembryonic development, we characterized proteins of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, which in animal models, comprises DNA-binding regulators of mitochondrial transcription. Of 35 Arabidopsis mTERF proteins, 11 are plastid-localized. Genetic complementation shows that at least one plastidic mTERF, BELAYA SMERT' (BSM), is required for embryogenesis. The main postembryonic phenotypes of genetic mosaics with the bsm mutation are severe abnormalities in leaf development. Mutant bsm cells are albino, are compromised in growth, and suffer defects in global plastidic gene expression. The bsm phenotype could be phenocopied by inhibition of plastid translation with spectinomycin. Plastid translation is essential for cell viability in dicotyledonous species such as tobacco but not in monocotyledonous maize. Here, genetic interactions between BSM and the gene encoding plastid homomeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC2 suggest that there is a functional redundancy in malonyl-CoA biosynthesis that permits bsm cell survival in Arabidopsis. Overall, our results indicate that biosynthesis of malonyl-CoA and plastid-derived systemic growth-promoting compounds are the processes that link plant development and plastid gene expression. PMID:21464319

  4. Plastid gene expression and plant development require a plastidic protein of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor family.

    OpenAIRE

    Babiychuk, Elena; Vandepoele, Klaas; Wissing, Josef; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; De Rycke, Riet; Akbari, Hana; Joubès, Jérôme; Beeckman, Tom; Jänsch, Lothar; Frentzen, Margrit; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Kushnir, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles unique to plant cells. In Arabidopsis, one-third of the genes required for embryo development encode plastid-localized proteins. To help understand the role of plastids in embryogenesis and postembryonic development, we characterized proteins of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, which in animal models, comprises DNA-binding regulators of mitochondrial transcription. Of 35 Arabidopsis mTERF proteins, 11 are plastid-localiz...

  5. Identification of Rad23-4 gene required for pollen development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    雨林木风

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... number of highly conserved DNA repair systems to maintain the integrity of the genome, such as ... then transferred to a phytotron kept under a regime of a 16 h photoperiod (22°C; 70% humidity). Isolation .... the rad23-4 gene, RNA was isolated from roots, mature leaves, floral buds and developing siliques.

  6. The noncoding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 is required for differentiation of the murine retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, T L; Matsuda, T; Cepko, C L

    2005-03-29

    With the advent of genome-wide analyses, it is becoming evident that a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are expressed in vertebrates. However, of the thousands of ncRNAs identified, the functions of relatively few have been established. In a screen for genes upregulated by taurine in developing retinal cells, we identified a gene that appears to be a ncRNA. Taurine Upregulated Gene 1 (TUG1) is a spliced, polyadenylated RNA that does not encode any open reading frame greater than 82 amino acids in its full-length, 6.7 kilobase (kb) RNA sequence. Analyses of Northern blots and in situ hybridization revealed that TUG1 is expressed in the developing retina and brain, as well as in adult tissues. In the newborn retina, knockdown of TUG1 with RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in malformed or nonexistent outer segments of transfected photoreceptors. Immunofluorescent staining and microarray analyses suggested that this loss of proper photoreceptor differentiation is a result of the disregulation of photoreceptor gene expression. A function for a newly identified ncRNA, TUG1, has been established. TUG1 is necessary for the proper formation of photoreceptors in the developing rodent retina.

  7. Requirements for chromatin reassembly during transcriptional downregulation of a heat shock gene in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Moesgaard; Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Bonven, Bjarne Juul

    2008-01-01

    Heat shock genes respond to moderate heat stress by a wave of transcription. The induction phase is accompanied by massive eviction of histones, which later reassemble with DNA during the ensuing phase of transcription downregulation. Here, we identify determinants of this reassembly throughout...

  8. GmSGT1 is differently required for soybean Rps genes-mediated and basal resistance to Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Su, Liming; Xu, Na; Guo, Na; Xing, Han; Dou, Daolong

    2014-08-01

    Using RNAi approach, we demonstrate that GmSGT1 is an essential component in soybean against Phytophthora sojae, but not required for Rps 2 or Rps 3a-mediated resistance. Utilization of disease resistance in soybean is a major approach to combat root and stem rot disease, which is caused by Phytophthora sojae and poses a growing threat to soybean safety production. The SGT1 protein is essential for disease resistance in many plant species. Here, we analyzed and characterized functions of GmSGT1 gene family in R protein-mediated resistance and basal defense in this important crop. Five candidate genes of GmSGT1 were identified and they were grouped into three clades. Transcriptional levels of all the tested genes were highly induced upon P. sojae infection in four soybean cultivars that confer different resistant levels. Using a gene silencing system in soybean cotyledons, we demonstrated that silencing GmSGT1 genes comprised race-specific resistance in soybean lines carrying genes at the following loci for race-specific resistance to P. sojae: Rps1a, Rps1c, Rps1d, Rps1k, and Rps8. In contrast, the resistance mediated by Rps2 or Rps3a was not affected. Silencing GmSGT1 genes in cotyledons also reduced resistance to this pathogen in a moderately partial resistant cultivar. We further showed that transient overexpression of GmSGT1-1 in Nicotiana benthamiana could enhance the resistance to P. capsici. These results suggest that GmSGT1 is an essential component for soybean in resisting the pathogen and pathways of Rps-mediated disease resistance are diverse in soybean.

  9. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for tolerance to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sá-Correia Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetic acid is a byproduct of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation. Together with high concentrations of ethanol and other toxic metabolites, acetic acid may contribute to fermentation arrest and reduced ethanol productivity. This weak acid is also a present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, a highly interesting non-feedstock substrate in industrial biotechnology. Therefore, the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for the rational selection of optimal fermentation conditions and the engineering of more robust industrial strains to be used in processes in which yeast is explored as cell factory. Results The yeast genes conferring protection against acetic acid were identified in this study at a genome-wide scale, based on the screening of the EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection for susceptibility phenotypes to this weak acid (concentrations in the range 70-110 mM, at pH 4.5. Approximately 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid were identified. Clustering of these acetic acid-resistance genes based on their biological function indicated an enrichment of genes involved in transcription, internal pH homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall assembly, biogenesis of mitochondria, ribosome and vacuole, and in the sensing, signalling and uptake of various nutrients in particular iron, potassium, glucose and amino acids. A correlation between increased resistance to acetic acid and the level of potassium in the growth medium was found. The activation of the Snf1p signalling pathway, involved in yeast response to glucose starvation, is demonstrated to occur in response to acetic acid stress but no evidence was obtained supporting the acetic acid-induced inhibition of glucose uptake. Conclusions Approximately 490 of the 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid identified in this work are implicated, for the first time, in tolerance to

  10. Ethylene-induced senescence-related gene expression requires protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, K.A.; Raghothama, K.G.; Woodson, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of inhibiting protein synthesis on the ethylene-induced expression of 3 carnation senescence-related genes, pSR5, pSR8, and pSR12. Treatment of preclimacteric carnation petal discs with 1μg/ml of cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic protein synthesis inhibitor, for 3h inhibited protein synthesis by >80% as quantitated by the incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein. Pre-treatment of petal discs with cycloheximide prevented ethylene-induced SR transcript accumulation. Cycloheximide treatment of petal discs held in air did not result in increased levels of SR mRNA. These results indicate that ethylene does not interact with pre-formed factors but rather that the activation of SR gene expression by ethylene is mediated by labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Experiments are currently underway to determine if cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level

  11. Cutting edge: Dab2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitya; Nguyen, Hai; Friedline, Randall H; Malhotra, Nidhi; Brehm, Michael; Koyanagi, Madoka; Bix, Mark; Cooper, Jonathan A; Chambers, Cynthia A; Kang, Joonsoo

    2009-10-01

    FOXP3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. In this study we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFbeta responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3, and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed, and DAB2 appears to be dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naive T cell homeostasis.

  12. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2010-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed and DAB2 appears dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naïve T cell homeostasis. PMID:19767570

  13. The Popeye domain containing 2 (popdc2) gene in zebrafish is required for heart and skeletal muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmaier, Bettina C.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schwerte, Thorsten; Huisken, Jan; Winkler, Christoph; Jungblut, Benno; Stainier, Didier Y.; Brand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode a family of transmembrane proteins with an evolutionary conserved Popeye domain. These genes are abundantly expressed in striated muscle tissue, however their function is not well understood. In this study we have investigated the role of the popdc2 gene in zebrafish. Popdc2 transcripts were detected in the embryonic myocardium and transiently in the craniofacial and tail musculature. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of popdc2 resulted in aberrant development of skeletal muscle and heart. Muscle segments in the trunk were irregularly shaped and craniofacial muscles were severely reduced or even missing. In the heart, pericardial edema was prevalent in the morphants and heart chambers were elongated and looping was abnormal. These pathologies in muscle and heart were alleviated after reducing the morpholino concentration. However the heart still was abnormal displaying cardiac arrhythmia at later stages of development. Optical recordings of cardiac contractility revealed irregular ventricular contractions with a 2:1, or 3:1 atrial/ventricular conduction ratio, which caused a significant reduction in heart frequency. Recordings of calcium transients with high spatiotemporal resolution using a transgenic calcium indicator line (Tg(cmlc2:gCaMP)s878) and SPIM microscopy confirmed the presence of a severe arrhythmia phenotype. Our results identify popdc2 as a gene important for striated muscle differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. In addition it is required for the development of the cardiac conduction system. PMID:22290329

  14. Laf4/Aff3, a Gene Involved in Intellectual Disability, Is Required for Cellular Migration in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheena; Lickiss, Tom; Molnár, Zoltán; Davies, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the AFF (AF4/FMR2) family of putative transcription factors are involved in infant acute leukaemia and intellectual disability (ID), although very little is known about their transcriptional targets. For example, deletion of human lymphoid nuclear protein related to AF4/AFF member 3 (LAF4/AFF3) is known to cause severe neurodevelopmental defects, and silencing of the gene is also associated with ID at the folate-sensitive fragile site (FSFS) FRA2A; yet the normal function of this gene in the nervous system is unclear. The aim of this study was to further investigate the function of Laf4 in the brain by focusing on its role in the cortex. By manipulating expression levels in organotypic slices, we demonstrate here that Laf4 is required for normal cellular migration in the developing cortex and have subsequently identified Mdga2, an important structural protein in neurodevelopment, as a target of Laf4 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show that the migration deficit caused by loss of Laf4 can be partially rescued by Mdga2 over-expression, revealing an important functional relationship between these genes. Our study demonstrates the key transcriptional role of Laf4 during early brain development and reveals a novel function for the gene in the process of cortical cell migration relevant to the haploinsufficiency and silencing observed in human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25162227

  15. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Stähli, Alexandra Beatrice; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB43...

  16. A Critical Dose of Doxorubicin Is Required to Alter the Gene Expression Profiles in MCF-7 Cells Acquiring Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Tzer-Ming; Hsiao, Hui-Ting; Chen, Yen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    . Model 1: Selection for CSC-like cells. Model 2: Mutations for gain-of resistance. Either model 1 or model 2 requires doxorubicin dose approaching 1 μM to alter gene regulation. PMID:25635866

  17. Dissection of the beta-globin replication-initiation region reveals specific requirements for replicator elements during gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Okada

    Full Text Available Gene amplification plays a pivotal role in malignant transformation of human cells. A plasmid with both a mammalian replication-initiation region (IR/origin/replicator and a nuclear matrix-attachment region (MAR is spontaneously amplified in transfected cells by a mechanism that involves amplification at the extrachromosomal site, followed by amplification at the chromosomal arm, ultimately generating a long homogeneously staining region (HSR. Several observations suggest that replication initiation from IR sequences might mediate amplification. To test this idea, we previously dissected c-myc and DHFR IRs to identify the minimum sequence required to support amplification. In this study, we applied an improved analysis that discriminates between two amplification steps to the ß-globin RepP IR, which contains separate elements already known to be essential for initiation on the chromosome arm. The IR sequence was required at least for the extrachromosomal amplification step. In addition to the vector-encoded MAR, amplification also required an AT-rich region and a MAR-like element, consistent with the results regarding replicator activity on the chromosome. However, amplification did not require the AG-rich tract necessary for replicator activity, but instead required a novel sequence containing another AG-rich tract. The differential sequence requirement might be a consequence of extrachromosomal replication.

  18. glpx Gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Required for In Vitro Gluconeogenic Growth and In Vivo Survival.

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    Hiten J Gutka

    Full Text Available Several enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism and gluconeogenesis play a critical role in survival and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. The only known functional fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase in Mtb is encoded by the glpX gene and belongs to the Class II sub-family of FBPase. We describe herein the generation of a ΔglpX strain using homologous recombination. Although the growth profile of ΔglpX is comparable to that of wild type Mtb when grown on the standard enrichment media, its growth is dysgonic with individual gluconeogenic substrates such as oleic acid, glycerol and acetate. In mice lung CFU titers of ΔglpX were 2-3 log10 lower than the wild-type Mtb strain. The results indicate that glpX gene encodes a functional FBPase and is essential for both in vitro and in vivo growth and survival of Mtb. Loss of glpX results in significant reduction of FBPase activity but not complete abolition. These findings verify that the glpX encoded FBPase II in Mtb can be a potential target for drug discovery.

  19. Genome-wide identification of genes required for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under ethanol stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorst, Frank; Houghton-Larsen, Jens; Jønson, Lars; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C; Brandt, Anders

    2006-04-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion collection was screened for impaired growth on glucose-based complex medium containing 6% ethanol. Forty-six mutants were found. Genes encoding proteins involved in vacuolar function, the cell integrity pathway, mitochondrial function, subunits of the co-chaperone complex GimC and components of the SAGA transcription factor complex were in this way found to be important for the growth of wild-type Saccharomyces yeast in the presence of ethanol. Several mutants were also sensitive to Calcofluor white (14 mutants), sorbic acid (9), increased temperature (5) and NaCl (3). The transcription factors Msn2p and Ars1p, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were translocated to the nucleus upon ethanol stress. Only one of the genes that contain STRE elements in the promoter was important under ethanol stress; this was TPS1, encoding trehalose 6-phosphate synthase. The map kinase of the cell integrity pathway, Slt2p, was phosphorylated when cells were treated with 6% ethanol. Two out of three mutants tested fermented 20% glucose more slowly than the wild-type. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. B-lineage transcription factors and cooperating gene lesions required for leukemia development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijchon, E.J.H.; Havinga, J.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Scheijen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into B lymphocytes requires the concerted action of specific transcription factors, such as RUNX1, IKZF1, E2A, EBF1 and PAX5. As key determinants of normal B-cell development, B-lineage transcription factors are frequently deregulated in hematological

  1. Foxp1 in Forebrain Pyramidal Neurons Controls Gene Expression Required for Spatial Learning and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Daniel J; Toriumi, Kazuya; Escamilla, Christine O; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Anderson, Ashley G; Harper, Matthew; Usui, Noriyoshi; Ellegood, Jacob; Lerch, Jason P; Birnbaum, Shari G; Tucker, Haley O; Powell, Craig M; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-11-08

    Genetic perturbations of the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 ( FOXP1 ) are causative for severe forms of autism spectrum disorder that are often comorbid with intellectual disability. Recent work has begun to reveal an important role for FoxP1 in brain development, but the brain-region-specific contributions of Foxp1 to autism and intellectual disability phenotypes have yet to be determined fully. Here, we describe Foxp1 conditional knock-out ( Foxp1 cKO ) male and female mice with loss of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex and the CA1/CA2 subfields of the hippocampus. Foxp1 cKO mice exhibit behavioral phenotypes that are of potential relevance to autism spectrum disorder, including hyperactivity, increased anxiety, communication impairments, and decreased sociability. In addition, Foxp1 cKO mice have gross deficits in learning and memory tasks of relevance to intellectual disability. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified differentially expressed genes in the hippocampus of Foxp1 cKO mice associated with synaptic function and development. Furthermore, using magnetic resonance imaging, we uncovered a significant reduction in the volumes of both the entire hippocampus as well as individual hippocampal subfields of Foxp1 cKO mice. Finally, we observed reduced maintenance of LTP in area CA1 of the hippocampus in these mutant mice. Together, these data suggest that proper expression of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the forebrain is important for regulating gene expression pathways that contribute to specific behaviors reminiscent of those seen in autism and intellectual disability. In particular, Foxp1 regulation of gene expression appears to be crucial for normal hippocampal development, CA1 plasticity, and spatial learning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Loss-of-function mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 ( FOXP1 ) lead to autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Understanding the potential brain

  2. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of genes required for the biosynthesis of type 1 capsular polysaccharide in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W S; Cunneen, T; Lee, C Y

    1994-11-01

    We previously cloned a 19.4-kb DNA region containing a cluster of genes affecting type 1 capsule production from Staphylococcus aureus M. Subcloning experiments showed that these capsule (cap) genes are localized in a 14.6-kb region. Sequencing analysis of the 14.6-kb fragment revealed 13 open reading frames (ORFs). Using complementation tests, we have mapped a collection of Cap- mutations in 10 of the 13 ORFs, indicating that these 10 genes are involved in capsule biosynthesis. The requirement for the remaining three ORFs in the synthesis of the capsule was demonstrated by constructing site-specific mutations corresponding to each of the three ORFs. Using an Escherichia coli S30 in vitro transcription-translation system, we clearly identified 7 of the 13 proteins predicted from the ORFs. Homology search between the predicted proteins and those in the data bank showed very high homology (52.3% identity) between capL and vipA, moderate homology (29% identity) between capI and vipB, and limited homology (21.8% identity) between capM and vipC. The vipA, vipB, and vipC genes have been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of Salmonella typhi Vi antigen, a homopolymer polysaccharide consisting of N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid, which is also one of the components of the staphylococcal type 1 capsule. The homology between these sets of genes therefore suggests that capL, capI, and capM may be involved in the biosynthesis of amino sugar, N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid. In addition, the search showed that CapG aligned well with the consensus sequence of a family of acetyltransferases from various prokaryotic organisms, suggesting that CapG may be an acetyltransferase. Using the isogenic Cap- and Cap+ strains constructed in this study, we have confirmed that type 1 capsule is an important virulence factor in a mouse lethality test.

  3. Developmentally-regulated excision of the SPβ prophage reconstitutes a gene required for spore envelope maturation in Bacillus subtilis.

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    Kimihiro Abe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperate phages infect bacteria by injecting their DNA into bacterial cells, where it becomes incorporated into the host genome as a prophage. In the genome of Bacillus subtilis 168, an active prophage, SPβ, is inserted into a polysaccharide synthesis gene, spsM. Here, we show that a rearrangement occurs during sporulation to reconstitute a functional composite spsM gene by precise excision of SPβ from the chromosome. SPβ excision requires a putative site-specific recombinase, SprA, and an accessory protein, SprB. A minimized SPβ, where all the SPβ genes were deleted, except sprA and sprB, retained the SPβ excision activity during sporulation, demonstrating that sprA and sprB are necessary and sufficient for the excision. While expression of sprA was observed during vegetative growth, sprB was induced during sporulation and upon mitomycin C treatment, which triggers the phage lytic cycle. We also demonstrated that overexpression of sprB (but not of sprA resulted in SPβ prophage excision without triggering the lytic cycle. These results suggest that sprB is the factor that controls the timing of phage excision. Furthermore, we provide evidence that spsM is essential for the addition of polysaccharides to the spore envelope. The presence of polysaccharides on the spore surface renders the spore hydrophilic in water. This property may be beneficial in allowing spores to disperse in natural environments via water flow. A similar rearrangement occurs in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, where a SPβ-like element is excised during sporulation to reconstitute a polysaccharide synthesis gene, suggesting that this type of gene rearrangement is common in spore-forming bacteria because it can be spread by phage infection.

  4. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anush Chiappino-Pepe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA. Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention.

  5. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappino-Pepe, Anush; Ataman, Meriç

    2017-01-01

    Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa) of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA). Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention. PMID:28333921

  6. Developmentally-Regulated Excision of the SPβ Prophage Reconstitutes a Gene Required for Spore Envelope Maturation in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kimihiro; Kawano, Yuta; Iwamoto, Keito; Arai, Kenji; Maruyama, Yuki; Eichenberger, Patrick; Sato, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Temperate phages infect bacteria by injecting their DNA into bacterial cells, where it becomes incorporated into the host genome as a prophage. In the genome of Bacillus subtilis 168, an active prophage, SPβ, is inserted into a polysaccharide synthesis gene, spsM. Here, we show that a rearrangement occurs during sporulation to reconstitute a functional composite spsM gene by precise excision of SPβ from the chromosome. SPβ excision requires a putative site-specific recombinase, SprA, and an accessory protein, SprB. A minimized SPβ, where all the SPβ genes were deleted, except sprA and sprB, retained the SPβ excision activity during sporulation, demonstrating that sprA and sprB are necessary and sufficient for the excision. While expression of sprA was observed during vegetative growth, sprB was induced during sporulation and upon mitomycin C treatment, which triggers the phage lytic cycle. We also demonstrated that overexpression of sprB (but not of sprA) resulted in SPβ prophage excision without triggering the lytic cycle. These results suggest that sprB is the factor that controls the timing of phage excision. Furthermore, we provide evidence that spsM is essential for the addition of polysaccharides to the spore envelope. The presence of polysaccharides on the spore surface renders the spore hydrophilic in water. This property may be beneficial in allowing spores to disperse in natural environments via water flow. A similar rearrangement occurs in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, where a SPβ-like element is excised during sporulation to reconstitute a polysaccharide synthesis gene, suggesting that this type of gene rearrangement is common in spore-forming bacteria because it can be spread by phage infection. PMID:25299644

  7. Successful Reconstruction of Tooth Germ with Cell Lines Requires Coordinated Gene Expressions from the Initiation Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Tomooka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth morphogenesis is carried out by a series of reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme in embryonic germs. Previously clonal dental epithelial cell (epithelium of molar tooth germ (emtg lines were established from an embryonic germ. They were odontogenic when combined with a dental mesenchymal tissue, although the odontogenesis was quantitatively imperfect. To improve the microenvironment in the germs, freshly isolated dental epithelial cells were mixed with cells of lines, and germs were reconstructed in various combinations. The results demonstrated that successful tooth construction depends on the mixing ratio, the age of dental epithelial cells and the combination with cell lines. Analyses of gene expression in these germs suggest that some signal(s from dental epithelial cells makes emtg cells competent to communicate with mesenchymal cells and the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments are able to progress  odontogenesis from the initiation stage.

  8. LIM-domain proteins, LIMD1, Ajuba, and WTIP are required for microRNA-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Victoria; Zhang, Yining; Foxler, Daniel E; de Moor, Cornelia H; Kong, Yi Wen; Webb, Thomas M; Self, Tim J; Feng, Yungfeng; Lagos, Dimitrios; Chu, Chia-Ying; Rana, Tariq M; Morley, Simon J; Longmore, Gregory D; Bushell, Martin; Sharp, Tyson V

    2010-07-13

    In recent years there have been major advances with respect to the identification of the protein components and mechanisms of microRNA (miRNA) mediated silencing. However, the complete and precise repertoire of components and mechanism(s) of action remain to be fully elucidated. Herein we reveal the identification of a family of three LIM domain-containing proteins, LIMD1, Ajuba and WTIP (Ajuba LIM proteins) as novel mammalian processing body (P-body) components, which highlight a novel mechanism of miRNA-mediated gene silencing. Furthermore, we reveal that LIMD1, Ajuba, and WTIP bind to Ago1/2, RCK, Dcp2, and eIF4E in vivo, that they are required for miRNA-mediated, but not siRNA-mediated gene silencing and that all three proteins bind to the mRNA 5' m(7)GTP cap-protein complex. Mechanistically, we propose the Ajuba LIM proteins interact with the m(7)GTP cap structure via a specific interaction with eIF4E that prevents 4EBP1 and eIF4G interaction. In addition, these LIM-domain proteins facilitate miRNA-mediated gene silencing by acting as an essential molecular link between the translationally inhibited eIF4E-m(7)GTP-5(')cap and Ago1/2 within the miRISC complex attached to the 3'-UTR of mRNA, creating an inhibitory closed-loop complex.

  9. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha is an accessory factor required for activation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B; Morris, D W; Chou, J Y

    1998-11-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis, causes glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD-1a), also know as von Gierke disease. Expression of the G6Pase gene is regulated by multiple hormones, including glucocorticoids. The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased G6Pase mRNA abundance and gene transcription in H4-IIE hepatoma cells. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the G6Pase promoter was active in H4-IIE cells only in the presence of dexamethasone. The minimal G6Pase promoter was contained within nucleotides -234/+3, which has two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at nucleotides -178/-164 (site 1) and -154/-140 (site 2). Electromobility shift and transient transfection assays showed that only GRE site 1 was required for glucocorticoid-activated transcription from the G6Pase promoter. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the DNA elements absolutely essential for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription from the G6Pase promoter were contained within nucleotides -234/-212, encompassing binding motifs for hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) 1 (-226/-212) and 4 (-231/-220). Electromobility shift and cotransfection assays showed that HNF1alpha bound to its cognate site and mediated transcription activation of the G6Pase gene by glucocorticoids.

  10. Asymmetric division and differential gene expression during a bacterial developmental program requires DivIVA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prahathees Eswaramoorthy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a developmental program in which a progenitor cell differentiates into two different cell types, the smaller of which eventually becomes a dormant cell called a spore. The process begins with an asymmetric cell division event, followed by the activation of a transcription factor, σF, specifically in the smaller cell. Here, we show that the structural protein DivIVA localizes to the polar septum during sporulation and is required for asymmetric division and the compartment-specific activation of σF. Both events are known to require a protein called SpoIIE, which also localizes to the polar septum. We show that DivIVA copurifies with SpoIIE and that DivIVA may anchor SpoIIE briefly to the assembling polar septum before SpoIIE is subsequently released into the forespore membrane and recaptured at the polar septum. Finally, using super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that DivIVA and SpoIIE ultimately display a biased localization on the side of the polar septum that faces the smaller compartment in which σF is activated.

  11. The Additional sex combs gene of Drosophila is required for activation and repression of homeotic loci, and interacts specifically with Polycomb and super sex combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T A; Sinclair, D A; Brock, H W

    1999-06-01

    The protein products of Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes are required for the maintenance of the transcriptionally repressed and active states, respectively, of the homeotic genes. Mutations in PcG genes produce gain-of-function (posterior) homeotic transformations, while mutations in trxG genes produce loss-of-function (anterior) homeotic transformations. Double mutant combinations between a PcG gene and a trxG gene suppress the homeotic transformations seen with either mutation alone, suggesting that PcG and trxG genes act antagonistically. The PcG gene Additional sex combs (Asx) is interesting because one mutant allele, AsxP1, causes both anterior and posterior homeotic transformations. AsxP1 and other Asx mutations were crossed to mutations in the PcG gene Polycomb (Pc) and the trxG gene trithorax (trx). Asx alleles enhance both PcG and trxG homeotic transformations, showing that Asx is required for both the activation and the repression of homeotic loci. Asx also shows strong allele-specific interactions with the PcG genes Pc and super sex combs (sxc). Together, these data indicate that there are functional interactions between Asx, Pc and sxc in vivo. ASX may interact with a PcG complex containing PC and SXC and mediate activation versus repression at target loci, perhaps by interacting directly with the TRX protein.

  12. The milkweed pod1 gene encodes a KANADI protein that is required for abaxial/adaxial patterning in maize leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Johnston, Robyn; Gerhold, Abigail; Foster, Toshi; Hake, Sarah

    2008-08-01

    Leaf primordia initiate from the shoot apical meristem with inherent polarity; the adaxial side faces the meristem, while the abaxial side faces away from the meristem. Adaxial/abaxial polarity is thought to be necessary for laminar growth of leaves, as mutants lacking either adaxial or abaxial cell types often develop radially symmetric lateral organs. The milkweed pod1 (mwp1) mutant of maize (Zea mays) has adaxialized sectors in the sheath, the proximal part of the leaf. Ectopic leaf flaps develop where adaxial and abaxial cell types juxtapose. Ectopic expression of the HD-ZIPIII gene rolled leaf1 (rld1) correlates with the adaxialized regions. Cloning of mwp1 showed that it encodes a KANADI transcription factor. Double mutants of mwp1-R with a microRNA-resistant allele of rld1, Rld1-N1990, show a synergistic phenotype with polarity defects in sheath and blade and a failure to differentiate vascular and photosynthetic cell types in the adaxialized sectors. The sectored phenotype and timing of the defect suggest that mwp1 is required late in leaf development to maintain abaxial cell fate. The phenotype of mwp1; Rld1 double mutants shows that both genes are also required early in leaf development to delineate leaf margins as well as to initiate vascular and photosynthetic tissues.

  13. Sample size requirements to detect gene-environment interactions in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, Cassandra E; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Conti, David V; Thomas, Duncan C; Gauderman, W James

    2011-04-01

    Many complex diseases are likely to be a result of the interplay of genes and environmental exposures. The standard analysis in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) scans for main effects and ignores the potentially useful information in the available exposure data. Two recently proposed methods that exploit environmental exposure information involve a two-step analysis aimed at prioritizing the large number of SNPs tested to highlight those most likely to be involved in a GE interaction. For example, Murcray et al. ([2009] Am J Epidemiol 169:219–226) proposed screening on a test that models the G-E association induced by an interaction in the combined case-control sample. Alternatively, Kooperberg and LeBlanc ([2008] Genet Epidemiol 32:255–263) suggested screening on genetic marginal effects. In both methods, SNPs that pass the respective screening step at a pre-specified significance threshold are followed up with a formal test of interaction in the second step. We propose a hybrid method that combines these two screening approaches by allocating a proportion of the overall genomewide significance level to each test. We show that the Murcray et al. approach is often the most efficient method, but that the hybrid approach is a powerful and robust method for nearly any underlying model. As an example, for a GWAS of 1 million markers including a single true disease SNP with minor allele frequency of 0.15, and a binary exposure with prevalence 0.3, the Murcray, Kooperberg and hybrid methods are 1.90, 1.27, and 1.87 times as efficient, respectively, as the traditional case-control analysis to detect an interaction effect size of 2.0.

  14. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic analysis of Zn2Cys6 transcription factors required for development and pathogenicity by high-throughput gene knockout in the rice blast fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Lu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because of great challenges and workload in deleting genes on a large scale, the functions of most genes in pathogenic fungi are still unclear. In this study, we developed a high-throughput gene knockout system using a novel yeast-Escherichia-Agrobacterium shuttle vector, pKO1B, in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Using this method, we deleted 104 fungal-specific Zn(2Cys(6 transcription factor (TF genes in M. oryzae. We then analyzed the phenotypes of these mutants with regard to growth, asexual and infection-related development, pathogenesis, and 9 abiotic stresses. The resulting data provide new insights into how this rice pathogen of global significance regulates important traits in the infection cycle through Zn(2Cys(6TF genes. A large variation in biological functions of Zn(2Cys(6TF genes was observed under the conditions tested. Sixty-one of 104 Zn(2Cys(6 TF genes were found to be required for fungal development. In-depth analysis of TF genes revealed that TF genes involved in pathogenicity frequently tend to function in multiple development stages, and disclosed many highly conserved but unidentified functional TF genes of importance in the fungal kingdom. We further found that the virulence-required TF genes GPF1 and CNF2 have similar regulation mechanisms in the gene expression involved in pathogenicity. These experimental validations clearly demonstrated the value of a high-throughput gene knockout system in understanding the biological functions of genes on a genome scale in fungi, and provided a solid foundation for elucidating the gene expression network that regulates the development and pathogenicity of M. oryzae.

  17. Arabidopsis PAD3, a gene required for camalexin biosynthesis, encodes a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N; Tootle, T L; Glazebrook, J

    1999-12-01

    Phytoalexins are low molecular weight antimicrobial compounds that are synthesized in response to pathogen attack. The phytoalexin camalexin, an indole derivative, is produced by Arabidopsis in response to infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The phytoalexin deficient 3 (pad3) mutation, which causes a defect in camalexin production, has no effect on resistance to P. syringae but compromises resistance to the fungal pathogen Alternaria brassicicola. We have now isolated PAD3 by map-based cloning. The predicted PAD3 protein appears to be a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, similar to those from maize that catalyze synthesis of the indole-derived secondary metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy-1, 4-benzoxazin-3-one. The expression of PAD3 is tightly correlated with camalexin synthesis and is regulated by PAD4 and PAD1. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that PAD3 almost certainly encodes an enzyme required for camalexin biosynthesis. Moreover, these results strongly support the idea that camalexin does not play a major role in plant resistance to P. syringae infection, although it is involved in resistance to a fungal pathogen.

  18. DRH1, a p68-related RNA helicase gene, is required for chromosome breakage in Tetrahymena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. McDaniel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The p68 DEAD box helicases comprise a widely conserved protein family involved in a large range of biological processes including transcription, splicing and translation. The genome of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophile encodes two p68-like helicases, Drh1p and Lia2p. We show that DRH1 is essential for growth and completion of development. In growing cells, Drh1p is excluded from the nucleus and accumulates near cortical basal bodies. In contrast, during sexual reproduction, this protein localizes to meiotic micronuclei, initially in punctate foci in regions where centromeres and telomeres are known to reside and later in post-zygotic differentiating somatic macronuclei. Differentiation of the macronuclear genome involves extensive DNA rearrangements including fragmentation of the five pairs of germline-derived chromosomes into 180 chromosomal sub-fragments that are stabilized by de novo telomere deletion. In addition, thousands of internal eliminated sequences (IESs are excised from loci dispersed throughout the genome. Strains with DRH1 deleted from the germline nuclei, which do not express the protein during post-zygotic development, fail to fragment the developing macronuclear chromosomes. IES excision still occurs in the absence of DRH1 zygotic expression; thus, Drh1p is the first protein found to be specifically required for chromosome breakage but not DNA elimination.

  19. Comparison of genes required for H2O2 resistance in Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Itzek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced by several members of the genus Streptococcus mainly through the pyruvate oxidase SpxB under aerobic growth conditions. The acute toxic nature of H2O2 raises the interesting question of how streptococci cope with intrinsically produced H2O2, which subsequently accumulates in the microenvironment and threatens the closely surrounding population. Here, we investigate the H2O2 susceptibility of oral Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis and elucidate potential mechanisms of how they protect themselves from the deleterious effect of H2O2. Both organisms are considered primary colonizers and occupy the same intraoral niche making them potential targets for H2O2 produced by other species. We demonstrate that S. gordonii produces relatively more H2O2 and has a greater ability for resistance to H2O2 stress. Functional studies show that, unlike in Streptococcus pneumoniae, H2O2 resistance is not dependent on a functional SpxB and confirms the important role of the ferritin-like DNA-binding protein Dps. However, the observed increased H2O2 resistance of S. gordonii over S. sanguinis is likely to be caused by an oxidative stress protection machinery present even under anaerobic conditions, while S. sanguinis requires a longer period of time for adaptation. The ability to produce more H2O2 and be more resistant to H2O2 might aid S. gordonii in the competitive oral biofilm environment, since it is lower in abundance yet manages to survive quite efficiently in the oral biofilm. PMID:25280752

  20. The Mi-2-like Smed-CHD4 gene is required for stem cell differentiation in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimone, M Lucila; Meisel, Joshua; Reddien, Peter W

    2010-04-01

    Freshwater planarians are able to regenerate any missing part of their body and have extensive tissue turnover because of the action of dividing cells called neoblasts. Neoblasts provide an excellent system for in vivo study of adult stem cell biology. We identified the Smed-CHD4 gene, which is predicted to encode a chromatin-remodeling protein similar to CHD4/Mi-2 proteins, as required for planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis. Following inhibition of Smed-CHD4 with RNA interference (RNAi), neoblast numbers were initially normal, despite an inability of the animals to regenerate. However, the proliferative response of neoblasts to amputation or growth stimulation in Smed-CHD4(RNAi) animals was diminished. Smed-CHD4(RNAi) animals displayed a dramatic reduction in the numbers of certain neoblast progeny cells. Smed-CHD4 was required for the formation of these neoblast progeny cells. Together, these results indicate that Smed-CHD4 is required for neoblasts to produce progeny cells committed to differentiation in order to control tissue turnover and regeneration and suggest a crucial role for CHD4 proteins in stem cell differentiation.

  1. Cloning and characterization of pvdS, a gene required for pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: PvdS is probably an alternative sigma factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunliffe, H E; Merriman, T R; Lamont, I L

    1995-01-01

    Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa secrete a fluorescent yellow-green siderophore, pyoverdine, when grown under iron-deficient conditions. We describe here the cloning and characterization of a gene, pvdS, which is required for this process. The pvdS gene is required for expression from promoters of at least two pyoverdine synthesis genes and can cause expression from these promoters in Escherichia coli, where they are otherwise inactive. Sequencing of pvdS revealed that it is a member of a subf...

  2. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  3. Allocation of distinct organ fates from a precursor field requires a shift in expression and function of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Palliyil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A common occurrence in metazoan development is the rise of multiple tissues/organs from a single uniform precursor field. One example is the anterior forebrain of vertebrates, which produces the eyes, hypothalamus, diencephalon, and telencephalon. Another instance is the Drosophila wing disc, which generates the adult wing blade, the hinge, and the thorax. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are comprised of signaling pathways and batteries of transcription factors parcel the undifferentiated field into discrete territories. This simple model is challenged by two observations. First, many GRN members that are thought to control the fate of one organ are actually expressed throughout the entire precursor field at earlier points in development. Second, each GRN can simultaneously promote one of the possible fates choices while repressing the other alternatives. It is therefore unclear how GRNs function to allocate tissue fates if their members are uniformly expressed and competing with each other within the same populations of cells. We address this paradigm by studying fate specification in the Drosophila eye-antennal disc. The disc, which begins its development as a homogeneous precursor field, produces a number of adult structures including the compound eyes, the ocelli, the antennae, the maxillary palps, and the surrounding head epidermis. Several selector genes that control the fates of the eye and antenna, respectively, are first expressed throughout the entire eye-antennal disc. We show that during early stages, these genes are tasked with promoting the growth of the entire field. Upon segregation to distinct territories within the disc, each GRN continues to promote growth while taking on the additional roles of promoting distinct primary fates and repressing alternate fates. The timing of both expression pattern restriction and expansion of functional duties is an elemental requirement for allocating fates within a single field.

  4. The GCR2 gene family is not required for ABA control of seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA regulates diverse processes of plant growth and development. It has recently been proposed that GCR2 functions as a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR for ABA. However, the structural relationships and functionality of GCR2 have been challenged by several independent studies. A central question in this controversy is whether gcr2 mutants are insensitive to ABA, because gcr2 mutants were shown to display reduced sensitivity to ABA under one experimental condition (e.g. 22 degrees C, continuous white light with 150 micromol m(-2 s(-1 but were shown to display wild-type sensitivity under another slightly different condition (e.g. 23 degrees C, 14/10 hr photoperiod with 120 micromol m(-2 s(-1. It has been hypothesized that gcr2 appears only weakly insensitive to ABA because two other GCR2-like genes in Arabidopsis, GCL1 and GCL2, compensate for the loss of function of GCR2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to test this hypothesis, we isolated a putative loss-of-function allele of GCL2, and then generated all possible combinations of mutations in each member of the GCR2 gene family. We found that all double mutants, including gcr2 gcl1, gcr2 gcl2, gcl1 gcl2, as well as the gcr2 gcl1 gcl2 triple mutant displayed wild-type sensitivity to ABA in seed germination and early seedling development assays, demonstrating that the GCR2 gene family is not required for ABA responses in these processes. CONCLUSION: These results provide compelling genetic evidence that GCR2 is unlikely to act as a receptor for ABA in the context of either seed germination or early seedling development.

  5. Dynein Heavy Chain, Encoded by Two Genes in Agaricomycetes, Is Required for Nuclear Migration in Schizophyllum commune.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Brunsch

    Full Text Available The white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (Agaricomycetes was used to study the cell biology of microtubular trafficking during mating interactions, when the two partners exchange nuclei, which are transported along microtubule tracks. For this transport activity, the motor protein dynein is required. In S. commune, the dynein heavy chain is encoded in two parts by two separate genes, dhc1 and dhc2. The N-terminal protein Dhc1 supplies the dimerization domain, while Dhc2 encodes the motor machinery and the microtubule binding domain. This split motor protein is unique to Basidiomycota, where three different sequence patterns suggest independent split events during evolution. To investigate the function of the dynein heavy chain, the gene dhc1 and the motor domain in dhc2 were deleted. Both resulting mutants were viable, but revealed phenotypes in hyphal growth morphology and mating behavior as well as in sexual development. Viability of strain Δdhc2 is due to the higher expression of kinesin-2 and kinesin-14, which was proven via RNA sequencing.

  6. Nodal signaling from the visceral endoderm is required to maintain Nodal gene expression in the epiblast and drive AVE migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Lualdi, Margaret; Lyozin, George T.; Sharma, Prashant; Loncarek, Jadranka; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Kuehn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    In the early mouse embryo, a specialized population of extraembryonic visceral endoderm (VE) cells called the anterior VE (AVE) establishes the anterior posterior (AP) axis by restricting gastrulation-inducing signals to the opposite pole. These cells arise at the distal tip of the egg cylinder stage embryo and then asymmetrically migrate to the prospective anterior following the path of an earlier arising and migrating population called the distal VE (DVE). The Nodal-signaling pathway has been shown to have a critical role in the generation of the DVE and AVE and in their migration. The Nodal gene is expressed in both the VE and in the pluripotent epiblast, which gives rise to the germ layers. Previous findings have provided conflicting evidence as to the relative importance of Nodal signaling from the epiblast vs. VE for AP patterning. Here we show that conditional mutagenesis of the Nodal gene specifically within the VE leads to reduced Nodal expression levels in the epiblast and incomplete or failed AVE migration. These results support a required role for VE Nodal to maintain normal levels of expression in the epiblast, and suggest signaling from both VE and epiblast is important for AVE migration. PMID:25536399

  7. Translational control of the antibiotic inducibility of the PA5471 gene required for mexXY multidrug efflux gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Gilmour, Christie; Metcalf, Devon; Poole, Keith

    2009-08-01

    The PA5471 gene required for induction of the MexXY multidrug efflux system in response to ribosome-targeting antimicrobials was itself shown to be inducible by ribosome-targeting antimicrobials (Y. Morita, M. L. Sobel, and K. Poole, J. Bacteriol. 188:1847-1855, 2006). Using a lacZ transcriptional reporter, drug inducibility of PA5471 was shown to require the entirety of the 367-bp PA5472-PA5471 intergenic region. A constitutive promoter activity was, however, localized to the first 75 bp of this region, within which a single PA5471 transcription initiation site was mapped. That 3' sequences of the intergenic region blocked PA5471 expression and made it antibiotic dependent was suggestive of an attenuation mechanism of control. A 13-amino-acid leader peptide (LP)-encoding open reading frame preceded by a Shine-Dalgarno sequence was identified ca. 250 bp upstream of the PA5471 coding sequence, and its expression and translation were confirmed using a lacZ translational reporter. Alteration of the initiation codon (M1T) or introduction of translational stop signals at codons 3 (Q3Am) and 8 (C8Op) of this LP sequence (PA5471.1) yielded high-level constitutive expression of PA5471, suggesting that interference with LP translation was linked to PA5471 gene expression. Consistent with this, a Q3K mutation in the LP sequence maintained the drug inducibility of PA5471 expression. Introduction of the LP Q3Am mutation into the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded stronger expression of PA5471 than did antibiotic (chloramphenicol) exposure of wild-type P. aeruginosa, in agreement with lacZ transcriptional fusion data. Still, the Q3Am mutation yielded modest expression of mexXY, less than that seen for antibiotic-treated wild-type P. aeruginosa. These data suggest that PA5471 is not sufficient for MexXY recruitment in response to antibiotic exposure and that additional antibiotic-dependent effects are needed.

  8. Association of the multidrug resistance-1 gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms with the tacrolimus dose requirements in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglicheau, Dany; Verstuyft, Céline; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Becquemont, Laurent; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Cassinat, Bruno; Beaune, Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Thervet, Eric

    2003-07-01

    The immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus, whose pharmacokinetic characteristics display large interindividual variations, is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the product of the multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene. Some of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of MDR1 reported correlated with the in vivo activity of P-gp. Because P-gp is known to control tacrolimus intestinal absorption, it was postulated that these polymorphisms are associated with tacrolimus pharmacokinetic variations in renal transplant recipients. The objective of this study was to evaluate in a retrospective study of 81 renal transplant recipients the effect on tacrolimus dosages and concentration/dose ratio of four frequent MDR1 SNP possibly associated with P-gp function (T-129C in exon 1b, 1236C>T in exon 12, 2677G>T,A in exon 21, and 3435C>T in exon 26). As in the general population, the SNP in exons 12, 21, and 26 were frequent (16, 17.3, and 22.2% for the variant homozygous genotype, respectively) and exhibited incomplete linkage disequilibrium. One month after tacrolimus introduction, exon 21 SNP correlated significantly with the daily tacrolimus dose (P < or = 0.05) and the concentration/dose ratio (P < or = 0.02). Tacrolimus dose requirements were 40% higher in homozygous than wild-type patients for this SNP. The concentration/dose ratio was 36% lower in the wild-type patients, suggesting that, for a given dose, their tacrolimus blood concentration is lower. Haplotype analysis substantiated these results and suggested that exons 26 and 21 SNP may be associated with tacrolimus dose requirements. Genotype monitoring of the MDR1 gene reliably predicts the optimal dose of tacrolimus in renal transplant recipients and may predict the initial daily dose needed by individual patients to obtain adequate immunosuppression.

  9. The familial dysautonomia disease gene IKBKAP is required in the developing and adult mouse central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Chaverra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders defined by peripheral nervous system (PNS dysfunction. HSAN type III, known as familial dysautonomia (FD, results from a single base mutation in the gene IKBKAP that encodes a scaffolding unit (ELP1 for a multi-subunit complex known as Elongator. Since mutations in other Elongator subunits (ELP2 to ELP4 are associated with central nervous system (CNS disorders, the goal of this study was to investigate a potential requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS of mice. The sensory and autonomic pathophysiology of FD is fatal, with the majority of patients dying by age 40. While signs and pathology of FD have been noted in the CNS, the clinical and research focus has been on the sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and no genetic model studies have investigated the requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS. Here, we report, using a novel mouse line in which Ikbkap is deleted solely in the nervous system, that not only is Ikbkap widely expressed in the embryonic and adult CNS, but its deletion perturbs both the development of cortical neurons and their survival in adulthood. Primary cilia in embryonic cortical apical progenitors and motile cilia in adult ependymal cells are reduced in number and disorganized. Furthermore, we report that, in the adult CNS, both autonomic and non-autonomic neuronal populations require Ikbkap for survival, including spinal motor and cortical neurons. In addition, the mice developed kyphoscoliosis, an FD hallmark, indicating its neuropathic etiology. Ultimately, these perturbations manifest in a developmental and progressive neurodegenerative condition that includes impairments in learning and memory. Collectively, these data reveal an essential function for Ikbkap that extends beyond the peripheral nervous system to CNS development and function. With the identification of discrete CNS cell types and structures that depend on

  10. Schizophrenia risk gene CAV1 is both pro-psychotic and required for atypical antipsychotic drug actions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J A; Yadav, P N; Setola, V; Farrell, M; Roth, B L

    2011-08-16

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a scaffolding protein important for regulating receptor signaling cascades by partitioning signaling molecules into membrane microdomains. Disruption of the CAV1 gene has recently been identified as a rare structural variant associated with schizophrenia. Although Cav-1 knockout (KO) mice displayed no baseline behavioral disruptions, Cav-1 KO mice, similar to schizophrenic individuals, exhibited increased sensitivity to the psychotomimetic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). Thus, PCP disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and PCP-induced mouse locomotor activity were both enhanced by genetic deletion of Cav-1. Interestingly, genetic deletion of Cav-1 rendered the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine and the 5-HT(2A)-selective antagonist M100907 ineffective at normalizing PCP-induced disruption of PPI. We also discovered that genetic deletion of Cav-1 attenuated 5-HT(2A)-induced c-Fos and egr-1 expression in mouse frontal cortex and also reduced 5-HT(2A)-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization in primary cortical neuronal cultures. The behavioral effects of the 5-HT(2A) agonist (2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine) including head twitch responses and disruption of PPI were also attenuated by genetic deletion of Cav-1, indicating that Cav-1 is required for both inverse agonist (that is, atypical antipsychotic drug) and agonist actions at 5-HT(2A) receptors. This study demonstrates that disruption of the CAV1 gene--a rare structural variant associated with schizophrenia--is not only pro-psychotic but also attenuates atypical antipsychotic drug actions.

  11. Grr1p is required for transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes and proper transcriptional regulation of genes in carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    dependent on Grr1p. Comparison of the grr1 Delta strain with the reference strain in the absence of citrulline revealed that GRR1 disruption leads to increased transcription of numerous genes. These encode enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose-phosphate pathway and both glucose and starch...... metabolism. Promoter analysis showed that many of the genes with increased transcription display Mig1p- and/or Msn2p/Msn4p-binding sites. Increased expression of glucose-repressed genes in the grr1 strain may be explained by the reduced expression of the hexose transporter genes HXT1, HXT2, HXT3 and HXT4...

  12. E2A proteins are required for proper B cell development and initiation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bain, G.; Maandag, E. C.; Izon, D. J.; Amsen, D.; Kruisbeek, A. M.; Weintraub, B. C.; Krop, I.; Schlissel, M. S.; Feeney, A. J.; van Roon, M.

    1994-01-01

    E12 and E47 are two helix-loop-helix transcription factors that arise by alternative splicing of the E2A gene. Both have been implicated in the regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression. We have now generated E2A (-/-) mice by gene targeting. E2A-null mutant mice fail to generate mature B cells.

  13. Role of RecA protein in untargeted UV mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda: evidence for the requirement for the dinB gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotcorne-Lannoye, A.; Maenhaut-Michel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Untargeted UV mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda--i.e., the increased recovery of lambda mutants when unirradiated lambda infects UV-irradiated Escherichia coli--is thought to be mediated by a transient decrease in DNA replication fidelity, generating mutations in the newly synthesized strands. Using the bacteriophage lambda cI857----lambda c mutation system, we provide evidence that the RecA protein, shown previously to be required for this mutagenic pathway, is no longer needed when the LexA protein is inactivated by mutation. We suggest that the error-prone DNA replication responsible for UV-induced untargeted mutagenesis is turned on by the presence of replication-blocking lesions in the host cell DNA and that the RecA protein is required only to derepress the relevant din gene(s). This is in contrast to mutagenesis of irradiated bacteria or irradiated phage lambda, in which activated RecA protein has a second role in mutagenesis in addition to the cleavage of the LexA protein. Among the tested din genes, the dinB gene product (in addition to the uvrA and uvrB gene products) was found to be required for untargeted mutagenesis of bacteriophage lambda. To our knowledge, a phenotype associated with the dinB gene has not been reported previously

  14. Turning off flagellum rotation requires the pleiotropic gene pleD: pleA, pleC, and pleD define two morphogenic pathways in Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, J M; Newton, A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified mutations in three pleiotropic genes, pleA, pleC, and pleD, that are required for differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus. pleA and pleC mutants were isolated in an extensive screen for strains defective in both motility and adsorption of polar bacteriophage phi CbK; using temperature-sensitive alleles, we determined the time at which the two genes act. pleA was required for a short period at 0.7 of the swarmer cell cycle for flagellum biosynthesis, whereas pleC was requi...

  15. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1. Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis.

  16. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 gene is required for boundary and shoot meristem formation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vroemen, Casper W; Mordhorst, Andreas P; Albrecht, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    From an enhancer trap screen for genes expressed in Arabidopsis embryos, we identified a gene expressed from the octant stage onward in the boundary between the two presumptive cotyledons and in a variety of postembryonic organ and meristem boundaries. This gene, CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 (CUC3...... revealing an even higher degree of redundancy in this class of genes than was thought previously. The CUC3 expression pattern, the cuc3 phenotypes, and CUC3 expression in a series of shoot meristem mutants and transgenes suggest a primary role for CUC3 in the establishment of boundaries that contain cells...

  17. RNA interference and retinoblastoma-related genes are required for repression of endogenous siRNA targets in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishok, Alla; Hoersch, Sebastian; Sharp, Phillip A

    2008-12-23

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, a vast number of endogenous short RNAs corresponding to thousands of genes have been discovered recently. This finding suggests that these short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may contribute to regulation of many developmental and other signaling pathways in addition to silencing viruses and transposons. Here, we present a microarray analysis of gene expression in RNA interference (RNAi)-related mutants rde-4, zfp-1, and alg-1 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) mutant lin-35. We found that a component of Dicer complex RDE-4 and a chromatin-related zinc finger protein ZFP-1, not implicated in endogenous RNAi, regulate overlapping sets of genes. Notably, genes a) up-regulated in the rde-4 and zfp-1 mutants and b) up-regulated in the lin-35(Rb) mutant, but not the down-regulated genes are highly represented in the set of genes with corresponding endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs). Our study suggests that endogenous siRNAs cooperate with chromatin factors, either C. elegans ortholog of acute lymphoblastic leukemia-1 (ALL-1)-fused gene from chromosome 10 (AF10), ZFP-1, or tumor suppressor Rb, to regulate overlapping sets of genes and predicts a large role for RNAi-based chromatin silencing in control of gene expression in C. elegans.

  18. Activation of Bvg-Repressed Genes in Bordetella pertussis by RisA Requires Cross Talk from Noncooperonic Histidine Kinase RisK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Ng, Victoria; Warfel, Jason M; Merkel, Tod J; Stibitz, Scott

    2017-11-15

    The two-component response regulator RisA, encoded by open reading frame BP3554 in the Bordetella pertussis Tohama I genomic sequence, is a known activator of vrg genes, a set of genes whose expression is increased under the same environmental conditions (known as modulation) that result in repression of the bvgAS virulence regulon. Here we demonstrate that RisA is phosphorylated in vivo and that RisA phosphorylation is required for activation of vrg genes. An adjacent histidine kinase gene, risS , is truncated by frameshift mutation in B. pertussis but not in Bordetella bronchiseptica or Bordetella parapertussis Neither deletion of risS ' or bvgAS nor phenotypic modulation with MgSO 4 affected levels of phosphorylated RisA (RisA∼P) in B. pertussis However, RisA phosphorylation did require the histidine kinase encoded by BP3223, here named RisK (cognate histidine kinase of RisA). RisK was also required for expression of the vrg genes. This requirement could be obviated by the introduction of the phosphorylation-mimicking RisA D60E mutant, indicating that an active conformation of RisA, but not phosphorylation per se , is crucial for vrg activation. Interestingly, expression of vrg genes is still modulated by MgSO 4 in cells harboring the RisA D60E mutation, suggesting that the activated RisA senses additional signals to control vrg expression in response to environmental stimuli. IMPORTANCE In B. pertussis , the BvgAS two-component system activates the expression of virulence genes by binding of BvgA∼P to their promoters. Expression of the reciprocally regulated vrg genes requires RisA and is also repressed by the Bvg-activated BvgR. RisA is an OmpR-like response regulator, but RisA phosphorylation was not expected because the gene for its presumed, cooperonic, histidine kinase is inactivated by mutation. In this study, we demonstrate phosphorylation of RisA in vivo by a noncooperonic histidine kinase. We also show that RisA phosphorylation is necessary but not

  19. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kubo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS. Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS–S24–S35 for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK. We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK–S35 and EFS–S24 in indica–japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes.

  20. ZC4H2, an XLID gene, is required for the generation of a specific subset of CNS interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Melanie; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Miles, Judith; Williams, Charlie; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Kahler, Stephen G; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Steindl, Katharina; Van Der Spek, Peter J; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Mueller, Jennifer; Stefl, Shannon; Alexov, Emil; Ryu, Jeong-Im; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Tarpey, Patrick; Neri, Giovanni; Holloway, Lynda; Skinner, Cindy; Stevenson, Roger E; Dorsky, Richard I; Wang, Tao; Schwartz, Charles E; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-09-01

    Miles-Carpenter syndrome (MCS) was described in 1991 as an XLID syndrome with fingertip arches and contractures and mapped to proximal Xq. Patients had microcephaly, short stature, mild spasticity, thoracic scoliosis, hyperextendable MCP joints, rocker-bottom feet, hyperextended elbows and knees. A mutation, p.L66H, in ZC4H2, was identified in a XLID re-sequencing project. Additional screening of linked families and next generation sequencing of XLID families identified three ZC4H2 mutations: p.R18K, p.R213W and p.V75in15aa. The families shared some relevant clinical features. In silico modeling of the mutant proteins indicated all alterations would destabilize the protein. Knockout mutations in zc4h2 were created in zebrafish and homozygous mutant larvae exhibited abnormal swimming, increased twitching, defective eye movement and pectoral fin contractures. Because several of the behavioral defects were consistent with hyperactivity, we examined the underlying neuronal defects and found that sensory neurons and motoneurons appeared normal. However, we observed a striking reduction in GABAergic interneurons. Analysis of cell-type-specific markers showed a specific loss of V2 interneurons in the brain and spinal cord, likely arising from mis-specification of neural progenitors. Injected human wt ZC4H2 rescued the mutant phenotype. Mutant zebrafish injected with human p.L66H or p.R213W mRNA failed to be rescued, while the p.R18K mRNA was able to rescue the interneuron defect. Our findings clearly support ZC4H2 as a novel XLID gene with a required function in interneuron development. Loss of function of ZC4H2 thus likely results in altered connectivity of many brain and spinal circuits. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. The sp7 gene is required for maturation of osteoblast-lineage cells in medaka (Oryzias latipes) vertebral column development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azetsu, Yuki; Inohaya, Keiji; Takano, Yoshiro; Kinoshita, Masato; Tasaki, Mai; Kudo, Akira

    2017-11-15

    Sp7 is a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for osteoblast differentiation in mammals. To verify the characteristic features of osteoblast-lineage cells in teleosts, we established medaka sp7 mutants using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) genome editing system. These mutants showed severe defects in the formation of skeletal structures. In particular, the neural and the hemal arches were not formed, although the chordal centra were formed. Analysis of the transgenic medaka revealed that sp7 mutant had normal distribution of type X collagen a1 a (col10a1a)-positive osteoblast-like cells around the centrum and at the proximal region of the vertebral arch. The sp7 mutant phenotype could be rescued by exogenous sp7 expression in col10a1a-positive cells, as well as in sp7-positive osteoblast cells. Furthermore, runx2-positive osteoblast progenitors were observed on the vertebral arches, but not on the centrum, during vertebral column development. In addition, these osteoblast progenitors differentiated into the col10a1a-positive cells. In sp7 mutant, the runx2-positive cells were normally distributed at the region of unformed vertebral arch but failed to differentiate into col10a1a-positive cells. These results indicate that osteoblast-lineage cells undergo two distinct differentiation processes during development of the vertebral arch and the centrum. Nevertheless, our results verified that sp7 gene expression in osteoblast-lineage cells is required for differentiation into mature osteoblasts to form the vertebral column and other skeletal structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yan [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Nguyen, Hong T. [Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Lasky, Joseph A. [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Cao, Subing [Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Li, Cui [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan 41008 (China); Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E. [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Shan, Bin, E-mail: bshan@tulane.edu [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States)

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  3. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavadian, Reza; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Johannsen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit “true” late kinetics–their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these “βγ” genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt) was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes. PMID:27348612

  4. Identification of New X-Chromosomal Genes Required for Drosophila Oogenesis and Novel Roles for fs(1)Yb, brainiac and dunce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Andrew; Hijal, Sirine; Hilfiker, Andres; Suter, Beat

    2001-01-01

    We performed a screen for female sterile mutations on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster and identified new loci required for developmental events in oogenesis as well as new alleles of previously described genes. We present mapping and phenotypic characterization data for many of these genes and discuss their significance in understanding fundamental developmental and cell biological processes. Our screen has identified genes that are involved in cell cycle control, intracellular transport, cell migration, maintenance of cell membranes, epithelial monolayer integrity and cell survival or apoptosis. We also describe new roles for the genes dunce (dnc), brainiac (brn) and fs(1)Yb, and we identify new alleles of Sex lethal (Sxl), ovarian tumor (otu), sans filles (snf), fs(1)K10, singed (sn), and defective chorion-1 (dec-1). PMID:11156616

  5. Heterologous expression of the pneumococcal serotype 14 polysaccharide in Lactococcus lactis requires lactococcal epsABC regulatory genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop Groot, M.N.; Godefrooij, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2008-01-01

    The pneumococcal serotype 14 polysaccharide was produced in Lactococcus lactis by coexpressing pneumococcal polysaccharide type 14-specific genes (cpsFGHIJKL(14)) with the lactococcal regulatory and priming glucosyltransferase-encoding genes specific for B40 polysaccharide (epsABCD(B40)). The

  6. The fruitless gene is required for the proper formation of axonal tracts in the embryonic central nervous system of Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ho-Juhn; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud, Enrique; Carlo, Troy; Spana, Eric P; Perrimon, Norbert; Goodwin, Stephen F; Baker, Bruce S; Taylor, Barbara J

    2002-01-01

    The fruitless (fru) gene in Drosophila melanogaster is a multifunctional gene that has sex-specific functions in the regulation of male sexual behavior and sex-nonspecific functions affecting adult viability and external morphology. While much attention has focused on fru's sex-specific roles, less

  7. Phenotypic evidence that the function of the [Fe]-hydrogenase Hmd in Methanococcus maripaludis requires seven hcg (hmd co-occurring genes) but not hmdII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Thomas J; Costa, Kyle C; Pak, Daniel; Sakesan, Varun; Leigh, John A

    2013-06-01

    The H2 -dependent methylene-tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase (Hmd), also known as the [Fe]-hydrogenase, is found only in methanogens without cytochromes. In contrast to the binuclear metal centers of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the [Fe]-hydrogenase contains only a single Fe atom, which is coordinated by a novel guanylylpyridinol cofactor in the active site. The biosynthesis of the cofactor is not well understood and the responsible genes are unknown. However, seven genes (hmd co-occurring genes, hcg) encoding proteins of unknown function are always associated with the hmd gene. In the model methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis, we used a genetic background in which a deletion of hmd had a distinct growth phenotype, and made null-mutations in each hcg gene as well as in a gene encoding the Hmd paralog HmdII, which is hypothesized to function as a scaffold for cofactor synthesis. Deletions in all seven hcg genes resulted in the same growth phenotype as a deletion in hmd, suggesting they are required for Hmd function. In all cases, genetic complementation of the mutation restored the wild-type phenotype. A deletion in hmdII had no effect. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The naked endosperm genes encode duplicate INDETERMINATE domain transcription factors required for maize endosperm cell patterning and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Gibum; Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Gontarek, Bryan C; Vollbrecht, Erik; Becraft, Philip W

    2015-02-01

    The aleurone is the outermost layer of cereal endosperm and functions to digest storage products accumulated in starchy endosperm cells as well as to confer important dietary health benefits. Whereas normal maize (Zea mays [Zm]) has a single aleurone layer, naked endosperm (nkd) mutants produce multiple outer cell layers of partially differentiated cells that show sporadic expression of aleurone identity markers such as a viviparous1 promoter-β-glucuronidase transgene. The 15:1 F2 segregation ratio suggested that two recessive genes were involved, and map-based cloning identified two homologous genes in duplicated regions of the genome. The nkd1 and nkd2 genes encode the INDETERMINATE1 domain (IDD) containing transcription factors ZmIDDveg9 and ZmIDD9 on chromosomes 2 and 10, respectively. Independent mutant alleles of nkd1 and nkd2, as well as nkd2-RNA interference lines in which both nkd genes were knocked down, also showed the nkd mutant phenotype, confirming the gene identities. In wild-type kernels, the nkd transcripts were most abundant around 11 to 16 d after pollination. The NKD proteins have putative nuclear localization signals, and green fluorescent protein fusion proteins showed nuclear localization. The mutant phenotype and gene identities suggest that NKD controls a gene regulatory network involved in aleurone cell fate specification and cell differentiation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Identification of Salmonella typhimurium Genes Required for Colonization of the Chicken Alimentary Tract and for Virulence in Newly Hatched Chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Arthur K.; Lovell, Margaret A.; Hulme, Scott D.; Zhang-Barber, Li; Barrow, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    From a collection of 2,800 Tn5-TC1 transposon mutants of Salmonella typhimurium F98, 18 that showed reduced intestinal colonization of 3-week-old chicks were identified. The sites of transposon insertion were determined for most of the mutants and included insertions in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes rfaK, rfaY, rfbK, and rfbB and the genes dksA, clpB, hupA, and sipC. In addition, identification was made of an insertion into a novel gene that encodes a protein showing similarity to...

  10. Regulated expression of the human cytomegalovirus pp65 gene: Octamer sequence in the promoter is required for activation by viral gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depto, A.S.; Stenberg, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    To better understand the regulation of late gene expression in human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected cells, the authors examined expression of the gene that codes for the 65-kilodalton lower-matrix phosphoprotein (pp65). Analysis of RNA isolated at 72 h from cells infected with CMV Towne or ts66, a DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutant, supported the fact that pp65 is expressed at low levels prior to viral DNA replication but maximally expressed after the initiation of viral DNA replication. To investigate promoter activation in a transient expression assay, the pp65 promoter was cloned into the indicator plasmid containing the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfection of the promoter-CAT construct and subsequent superinfection with CMV resulted in activation of the promoter at early times after infection. Cotransfection with plasmids capable of expressing immediate-early (IE) proteins demonstrated that the promoter was activated by IE proteins and that both IE regions 1 and 2 were necessary. These studies suggest that interactions between IE proteins and this octamer sequence may be important for the regulation and expression of this CMV gene

  11. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe map1 gene encodes an SRF/MCM1-related protein required for P-cell specific gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Friis, T; Kjaerulff, S

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergo mating and meiosis when starved for a nitrogen source. In this process a P and and M cell first mate to generate a diploid zygote, which subsequently enters meiosis and sporulates. The P mating type is controlled by the mat1-Pc gene at the mating type...

  12. Rice Snl6, a cinnamoyl-CoA reductase-like gene family member, is required for NH1-mediated immunity to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Bart

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice NH1 (NPR1 homolog 1 is a key mediator of innate immunity. In both plants and animals, the innate immune response is often accompanied by rapid cell death at the site of pathogen infection. Over-expression of NH1 in rice results in resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, constitutive expression of defense related genes and enhanced benzothiadiazole (BTH- mediated cell death. Here we describe a forward genetic screen that identified a suppressor of NH1-mediated lesion formation and resistance, snl6. Comparative genome hybridization and fine mapping rapidly identified the genomic location of the Snl6 gene. Snl6 is a member of the cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR-like gene family. We show that Snl6 is required for NH1-mediated resistance to Xoo. Further, we show that Snl6 is required for pathogenesis-related gene expression. In contrast to previously described CCR family members, disruption of Snl6 does not result in an obvious morphologic phenotype. Snl6 mutants have reduced lignin content and increased sugar extractability, an important trait for the production of cellulosic biofuels. These results suggest the existence of a conserved group of CCR-like genes involved in the defense response, and with the potential to alter lignin content without affecting development.

  13. Cloning and characterization of pvdS, a gene required for pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: PvdS is probably an alternative sigma factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, H E; Merriman, T R; Lamont, I L

    1995-05-01

    Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa secrete a fluorescent yellow-green siderophore, pyoverdine, when grown under iron-deficient conditions. We describe here the cloning and characterization of a gene, pvdS, which is required for this process. The pvdS gene is required for expression from promoters of at least two pyoverdine synthesis genes and can cause expression from these promoters in Escherichia coli, where they are otherwise inactive. Sequencing of pvdS revealed that it is a member of a subfamily of RNA polymerase sigma factors which direct the synthesis of extracellular products by bacteria. The pvdS gene is expressed only in iron-starved bacteria, and in E. coli cells at least, expression is regulated by the Fur repressor protein. We propose that in iron-rich cells of P. aeruginosa, Fur binds to the pvdS promoter and prevents expression of the gene; under conditions of iron starvation, repression is relieved and PvdS is made, reprogramming the cells for pyoverdine synthesis.

  14. Induction and requirement of gene expression in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex for the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory consolidation is a process to stabilize short-term memory, generating long-term memory. A critical biochemical feature of memory consolidation is a requirement for gene expression. Previous studies have shown that fear memories are consolidated through the activation of gene expression in the amygdala and hippocampus, indicating essential roles of these brain regions in memory formation. However, it is still poorly understood whether gene expression in brain regions other than the amygdala/hippocampus is required for the consolidation of fear memory; however, several brain regions are known to play modulatory roles in fear memory formation. Results To further understand the mechanisms underlying the formation of fear memory, we first identified brain regions where gene expression is activated after learning inhibitory avoidance (IA by analyzing the expression of the immediately early genes c-fos and Arc as markers. Similarly with previous findings, the induction of c-fos and Arc expression was observed in the amygdala and hippocampus. Interestingly, we also observed the induction of c-fos and Arc expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC: prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL regions and Arc expression in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. We next examined the roles of these brain regions in the consolidation of IA memory. Consistent with previous findings, inhibiting protein synthesis in the hippocampus blocked the consolidation of IA memory. More importantly, inhibition in the mPFC or ACC also blocked the formation of IA memory. Conclusion Our observations indicated that the formation of IA memory requires gene expression in the ACC and mPFC as well as in the amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting essential roles of the ACC and mPFC in IA memory formation.

  15. Adenosine-uridine-rich element is one of the required cis-elements for epimastigote form stage-specific gene expression of the congolense epimastigote specific protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Keisuke; Mochabo, Kennedy Miyoro; Hakimi, Hassan; Yamasaki, Shino; Yamagishi, Junya; Asada, Masahito; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2013-09-01

    It is known that gene expression in kinetoplastida is regulated post-transcriptionally. Several previous studies have shown that stage-specific gene expression in trypanosomes is regulated by cis-elements located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of each mRNA and also by RNA binding proteins. Our previous study revealed that gene expression of congolense epimastigote specific protein (cesp) was regulated by cis-elements located in the 3'UTR. In the present study, we identified the adenosine and uridine rich region in the cesp 3'UTR. Using transgenic trypanosome cell lines with different egfp expression cassettes, we showed that this adenosine and uridine rich region is one of the regulatory elements for epimastigote form (EMF) stage-specific gene expression via the regulatory cis-element of the eukaryotic AU rich element (ARE). Therefore this required element within the cesp 3'UTR was designated as T. congolense ARE. This required cis-element might selectively stabilize mRNA in the EMF stage and destabilize mRNA in other stages. By RNA electro mobility shift assay, unknown stage-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) whose sequences specifically interacted with the required cis-element were found. These results indicate that EMF stage specific cis-element and RBP complexes might specifically stabilize cesp mRNA in EMF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Extreme Mutation Tolerance: Nearly Half of the Archaeal Fusellovirus Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 Genes Are Not Required for Virus Function, Including the Minor Capsid Protein Gene vp3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Eric A; Goodman, David A; Gorchels, Madeline E; Stedman, Kenneth M

    2017-05-15

    Viruses infecting the Archaea harbor a tremendous amount of genetic diversity. This is especially true for the spindle-shaped viruses of the family Fuselloviridae , where >90% of the viral genes do not have detectable homologs in public databases. This significantly limits our ability to elucidate the role of viral proteins in the infection cycle. To address this, we have developed genetic techniques to study the well-characterized fusellovirus Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), which infects Sulfolobus solfataricus in volcanic hot springs at 80°C and pH 3. Here, we present a new comparative genome analysis and a thorough genetic analysis of SSV1 using both specific and random mutagenesis and thereby generate mutations in all open reading frames. We demonstrate that almost half of the SSV1 genes are not essential for infectivity, and the requirement for a particular gene correlates well with its degree of conservation within the Fuselloviridae The major capsid gene vp1 is essential for SSV1 infectivity. However, the universally conserved minor capsid gene vp3 could be deleted without a loss in infectivity and results in virions with abnormal morphology. IMPORTANCE Most of the putative genes in the spindle-shaped archaeal hyperthermophile fuselloviruses have no sequences that are clearly similar to characterized genes. In order to determine which of these SSV genes are important for function, we disrupted all of the putative genes in the prototypical fusellovirus, SSV1. Surprisingly, about half of the genes could be disrupted without destroying virus function. Even deletions of one of the known structural protein genes that is present in all known fuselloviruses, vp3 , allows the production of infectious viruses. However, viruses lacking vp3 have abnormal shapes, indicating that the vp3 gene is important for virus structure. Identification of essential genes will allow focused research on minimal SSV genomes and further understanding of the structure of

  17. In vivo repressed genes ofVibrio choleraereveal inverse requirements of an H+/Cl-transporter along the gastrointestinal passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G; Moisi, Manuel; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2018-03-06

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae changes its transcriptional profile upon oral ingestion by the host to facilitate survival and colonization fitness. Here, we used a modified version of recombination-based in vivo expression technology to investigate gene silencing during the in vivo passage, which has been understudied. Using a murine model of cholera, we screened a V. cholerae transposon library composed of 10,000 randomly generated reporter fusions and identified 101 in vivo repressed ( ivr ) genes. Our data indicate that constitutive expression of ivr genes reduces colonization fitness, highlighting the necessity to down-regulate these genes in vivo. For example, the ivr gene clcA , encoding an H + /Cl - transporter, could be linked to the acid tolerance response against hydrochloric acid. In a chloride-dependent manner, ClcA facilitates survival under low pH (e.g., the stomach), but its presence becomes detrimental under alkaline conditions (e.g., lower gastrointestinal tract). This pH-dependent clcA expression is controlled by the LysR-type activator AphB, which acts in concert with AphA to initiate the virulence cascade in V. cholerae after oral ingestion. Thus, transcriptional networks dictating induction of virulence factors and the repression of ivr genes overlap to regulate in vivo colonization dynamics. Overall, the results presented herein highlight the impact of spatiotemporal gene silencing in vivo. The molecular characterization of the underlying mechanisms can provide important insights into in vivo physiology and virulence network regulation. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  18. In vivo repressed genes of Vibrio cholerae reveal inverse requirements of an H+/Cl− transporter along the gastrointestinal passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G.; Moisi, Manuel; Reidl, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae changes its transcriptional profile upon oral ingestion by the host to facilitate survival and colonization fitness. Here, we used a modified version of recombination-based in vivo expression technology to investigate gene silencing during the in vivo passage, which has been understudied. Using a murine model of cholera, we screened a V. cholerae transposon library composed of 10,000 randomly generated reporter fusions and identified 101 in vivo repressed (ivr) genes. Our data indicate that constitutive expression of ivr genes reduces colonization fitness, highlighting the necessity to down-regulate these genes in vivo. For example, the ivr gene clcA, encoding an H+/Cl− transporter, could be linked to the acid tolerance response against hydrochloric acid. In a chloride-dependent manner, ClcA facilitates survival under low pH (e.g., the stomach), but its presence becomes detrimental under alkaline conditions (e.g., lower gastrointestinal tract). This pH-dependent clcA expression is controlled by the LysR-type activator AphB, which acts in concert with AphA to initiate the virulence cascade in V. cholerae after oral ingestion. Thus, transcriptional networks dictating induction of virulence factors and the repression of ivr genes overlap to regulate in vivo colonization dynamics. Overall, the results presented herein highlight the impact of spatiotemporal gene silencing in vivo. The molecular characterization of the underlying mechanisms can provide important insights into in vivo physiology and virulence network regulation. PMID:29463743

  19. Bordetella pertussis risA, but not risS, is required for maximal expression of Bvg-repressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Trevor H; Allen, Andrew G; Al-Meer, Jehan A; Maskell, Duncan; Peppler, Mark S

    2005-09-01

    Expression of virulence determinants by Bordetella pertussis, the primary etiological agent of whooping cough, is regulated by the BvgAS two-component regulatory system. The role of a second two-component regulatory system, encoded by risAS, in this process is not defined. Here, we show that mutation of B. pertussis risA does not affect Bvg-activated genes or proteins. However, mutation of risA resulted in greatly diminished expression of Bvg-repressed antigens and decreased transcription of Bvg-repressed genes. In contrast, mutation of risS had no effect on the expression of Bvg-regulated molecules. Mutation of risA also resulted in decreased bacterial invasion in a HeLa cell model. However, decreased invasion could not be attributed to the decreased expression of Bvg-repressed products, suggesting that mutation of risA may affect the expression of a variety of genes. Unlike the risAS operons in B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica, B. pertussis risS is a pseudogene that encodes a truncated RisS sensor. Deletion of the intact part of the B. pertussis risS gene does not affect the expression of risA-dependent, Bvg-repressed genes. These observations suggest that RisA activation occurs through cross-regulation by a heterologous system.

  20. Genome-wide identification of the Fermentome; genes required for successful and timely completion of wine-like fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michelle E; Nguyen, Trung D; Liccioli, Tommaso; Schmid, Frank; Kalatzis, Nicholas; Sundstrom, Joanna F; Gardner, Jennifer M; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2014-07-03

    Wine fermentation is a harsh ecological niche to which wine yeast are well adapted. The initial high osmotic pressure and acidity of grape juice is followed by nutrient depletion and increasing concentrations of ethanol as the fermentation progresses. Yeast's adaptation to these and many other environmental stresses, enables successful completion of high-sugar fermentations. Earlier transcriptomic and growth studies have tentatively identified genes important for high-sugar fermentation. Whilst useful, such studies did not consider extended growth (>5 days) in a temporally dynamic multi-stressor environment such as that found in many industrial fermentation processes. Here, we identify genes whose deletion has minimal or no effect on growth, but results in failure to achieve timely completion of the fermentation of a chemically defined grape juice with 200 g L-1 total sugar. Micro- and laboratory-scale experimental fermentations were conducted to identify 72 clones from ~5,100 homozygous diploid single-gene yeast deletants, which exhibited protracted fermentation in a high-sugar medium. Another 21 clones (related by gene function, but initially eliminated from the screen because of possible growth defects) were also included. Clustering and numerical enrichment of genes annotated to specific Gene Ontology (GO) terms highlighted the vacuole's role in ion homeostasis and pH regulation, through vacuole acidification. We have identified 93 genes whose deletion resulted in the duration of fermentation being at least 20% longer than the wild type. An extreme phenotype, 'stuck' fermentation, was also observed when DOA4, NPT1, PLC1, PTK2, SIN3, SSQ1, TPS1, TPS2 or ZAP1 were deleted. These 93 Fermentation Essential Genes (FEG) are required to complete an extended high-sugar (wine-like) fermentation. Their importance is highlighted in our Fermentation Relevant Yeast Genes (FRYG) database, generated from literature and the fermentation-relevant phenotypic characteristics of

  1. Sexual and asexual oogenesis require the expression of unique and shared sets of genes in the insect Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallot, Aurore; Shigenobu, Shuji; Hashiyama, Tomomi; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Tagu, Denis

    2012-02-15

    Although sexual reproduction is dominant within eukaryotes, asexual reproduction is widespread and has evolved independently as a derived trait in almost all major taxa. How asexuality evolved in sexual organisms is unclear. Aphids, such as Acyrthosiphon pisum, alternate between asexual and sexual reproductive means, as the production of parthenogenetic viviparous females or sexual oviparous females and males varies in response to seasonal photoperiodism. Consequently, sexual and asexual development in aphids can be analyzed simultaneously in genetically identical individuals. We compared the transcriptomes of aphid embryos in the stages of development during which the trajectory of oogenesis is determined for producing sexual or asexual gametes. This study design aimed at identifying genes involved in the onset of the divergent mechanisms that result in the sexual or asexual phenotype. We detected 33 genes that were differentially transcribed in sexual and asexual embryos. Functional annotation by gene ontology (GO) showed a biological signature of oogenesis, cell cycle regulation, epigenetic regulation and RNA maturation. In situ hybridizations demonstrated that 16 of the differentially-transcribed genes were specifically expressed in germ cells and/or oocytes of asexual and/or sexual ovaries, and therefore may contribute to aphid oogenesis. We categorized these 16 genes by their transcription patterns in the two types of ovaries; they were: i) expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis; ii) expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis but with different localizations; or iii) expressed only during sexual or asexual oogenesis. Our results show that asexual and sexual oogenesis in aphids share common genetic programs but diverge by adapting specificities in their respective gene expression profiles in germ cells and oocytes.

  2. Sexual and asexual oogenesis require the expression of unique and shared sets of genes in the insect Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallot Aurore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although sexual reproduction is dominant within eukaryotes, asexual reproduction is widespread and has evolved independently as a derived trait in almost all major taxa. How asexuality evolved in sexual organisms is unclear. Aphids, such as Acyrthosiphon pisum, alternate between asexual and sexual reproductive means, as the production of parthenogenetic viviparous females or sexual oviparous females and males varies in response to seasonal photoperiodism. Consequently, sexual and asexual development in aphids can be analyzed simultaneously in genetically identical individuals. Results We compared the transcriptomes of aphid embryos in the stages of development during which the trajectory of oogenesis is determined for producing sexual or asexual gametes. This study design aimed at identifying genes involved in the onset of the divergent mechanisms that result in the sexual or asexual phenotype. We detected 33 genes that were differentially transcribed in sexual and asexual embryos. Functional annotation by gene ontology (GO showed a biological signature of oogenesis, cell cycle regulation, epigenetic regulation and RNA maturation. In situ hybridizations demonstrated that 16 of the differentially-transcribed genes were specifically expressed in germ cells and/or oocytes of asexual and/or sexual ovaries, and therefore may contribute to aphid oogenesis. We categorized these 16 genes by their transcription patterns in the two types of ovaries; they were: i expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis; ii expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis but with different localizations; or iii expressed only during sexual or asexual oogenesis. Conclusions Our results show that asexual and sexual oogenesis in aphids share common genetic programs but diverge by adapting specificities in their respective gene expression profiles in germ cells and oocytes.

  3. Complementation between avirulent Newcastle disease virus and a fusion protein gene expressed from a retrovirus vector: requirements for membrane fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, T; McQuain, C; McGinnes, L

    1991-01-01

    The cDNA derived from the fusion gene of the virulent AV strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was expressed in chicken embryo cells by using a retrovirus vector. The fusion protein expressed in this system was transported to the cell surface and was efficiently cleaved into the disulfide-linked F1-F2 form found in infectious virions. The cells expressing the fusion gene grew normally and could be passaged many times. Monolayers of these cells would plaque, in the absence of trypsin, avirul...

  4. Simultaneous Mutations in Multi-Viral Proteins Are Required for Soybean mosaic virus to Gain Virulence on Soybean Genotypes Carrying Different R Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowda-Reddy, R. V.; Sun, Haiyue; Hill, John H.; Poysa, Vaino; Wang, Aiming

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic resistance is the most effective and sustainable approach to the control of plant pathogens that are a major constraint to agriculture worldwide. In soybean, three dominant R genes, i.e., Rsv1, Rsv3 and Rsv4, have been identified and deployed against Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) with strain-specificities. Molecular identification of virulent determinants of SMV on these resistance genes will provide essential information for the proper utilization of these resistance genes to protect soybean against SMV, and advance knowledge of virus-host interactions in general. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the gain and loss of SMV virulence on all the three resistance loci, SMV strains G7 and two G2 isolates L and LRB were used as parental viruses. SMV chimeras and mutants were created by partial genome swapping and point mutagenesis and then assessed for virulence on soybean cultivars PI96983 (Rsv1), L-29 (Rsv3), V94-5152 (Rsv4) and Williams 82 (rsv). It was found that P3 played an essential role in virulence determination on all three resistance loci and CI was required for virulence on Rsv1- and Rsv3-genotype soybeans. In addition, essential mutations in HC-Pro were also required for the gain of virulence on Rsv1-genotype soybean. To our best knowledge, this is the first report that CI and P3 are involved in virulence on Rsv1- and Rsv3-mediated resistance, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Multiple viral proteins, i.e., HC-Pro, P3 and CI, are involved in virulence on the three resistance loci and simultaneous mutations at essential positions of different viral proteins are required for an avirulent SMV strain to gain virulence on all three resistance loci. The likelihood of such mutations occurring naturally and concurrently on multiple viral proteins is low. Thus, incorporation of all three resistance genes in a soybean cultivar through gene pyramiding may provide durable resistance to SMV. PMID:22140577

  5. The dyslexia-associated gene DCDC2 is required for spike-timing precision in mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Alicia; Girgenti, Matthew J; LoTurco, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Variants in dyslexia-associated genes, including DCDC2, have been linked to altered neocortical activation, suggesting that dyslexia associated genes might play as yet unspecified roles in neuronal physiology. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were used to compare the electrophysiological properties of regular spiking pyramidal neurons of neocortex in Dcdc2 knockout (KO) and wild-type mice. Ribonucleic acid sequencing and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify and characterize changes in gene expression in Dcdc2 KOs. Neurons in KOs showed increased excitability and decreased temporal precision in action potential firing. The RNA sequencing screen revealed that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit Grin2B was elevated in Dcdc2 KOs, and an electrophysiological assessment confirmed a functional increase in spontaneous NMDAR-mediated activity. Remarkably, the decreased action potential temporal precision could be restored in mutants by treatment with either the NMDAR antagonist (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid or the NMDAR 2B subunit-specific antagonist Ro 25-6981. These results link the function of the dyslexia-associated gene Dcdc2 to spike timing through activity of NMDAR. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SHY1, the yeast homolog of the mammalian SURF-1 gene, encodes a mitochondrial protein required for respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkevich, G; Repetto, B; Glerum, D M; Jin, C; Tzagoloff, A

    1997-05-30

    C173 and W125 are pet mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, partially deficient in cytochrome oxidase but with elevated concentrations of cytochrome c. Assays of electron transport chain enzymes indicate that the mutations exert different effects on the terminal respiratory pathway, including an inefficient transfer of electrons between the bc1 and the cytochrome oxidase complexes. A cloned gene capable of restoring respiration in C173/U1 and W125 is identical to reading frame YGR112w of yeast chromosome VII (GenBank Z72897Z72897). The encoded protein is homologous to the product of the mammalian SURF-1 gene. In view of the homology, the yeast gene has been designated SHY1 (Surf Homolog of Yeast). An antibody against the carboxyl-terminal half of Shy1p has been used to localize the protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Deletion of part of SHY1 produces a phenotype similar to that of G91 mutants. Disruption of SHY1 at a BamHI site, located approximately 2/3 of the way into the gene, has no obvious phenotypic consequence. This evidence, together with the ability of a carboxyl-terminal coding sequence starting from the BamHI site to complement a shy1 mutant, suggests that the Shy1p contains two domains that can be separately expressed to form a functional protein.

  7. Identification of Salmonella typhimurium genes required for colonization of the chicken alimentary tract and for virulence in newly hatched chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A K; Lovell, M A; Hulme, S D; Zhang-Barber, L; Barrow, P A

    1998-05-01

    From a collection of 2,800 Tn5-TC1 transposon mutants of Salmonella typhimurium F98, 18 that showed reduced intestinal colonization of 3-week-old chicks were identified. The sites of transposon insertion were determined for most of the mutants and included insertions in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes rfaK, rfaY, rfbK, and rfbB and the genes dksA, clpB, hupA, and sipC. In addition, identification was made of an insertion into a novel gene that encodes a protein showing similarity to the IIC component of the mannose class of phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems, which we putatively called ptsC. Transduction of most of the transposon mutations to a fresh S. typhimurium F98 genetic background and construction of defined mutations in the rfbK, dksA, hupA, sipC, and ptsC genes of S. typhimurium F98 supported the role in colonization of all but the pts locus. The virulence of the rfbK, dksA, hupA, sipC, and ptsC defined mutants and clpB and rfaY transductants in 1-day-old chicks was tested. All but the ptsC and rfaY mutants were attenuated for virulence. A number of other phenotypes associated with some of the mutations are described.

  8. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Antonietta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779 encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p, a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5, and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus.

  9. A genetic screen for modifiers of UFO meristem activity identifies three novel FUSED FLORAL ORGANS genes required for early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Fletcher, J C; Chen, X; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-06-01

    In a screen to identify novel genes required for early Arabidopsis flower development, we isolated four independent mutations that enhance the Ufo phenotype toward the production of filamentous structures in place of flowers. The mutants fall into three complementation groups, which we have termed FUSED FLORAL ORGANS (FFO) loci. ffo mutants have specific defects in floral organ separation and/or positioning; thus, the FFO genes identify components of a boundary formation mechanism(s) acting between developing floral organ primordia. FFO1 and FFO3 have specific functions in cauline leaf/stem separation and in first- and third-whorl floral organ separation, with FFO3 likely acting to establish and FFO1 to maintain floral organ boundaries. FFO2 acts at early floral stages to regulate floral organ number and positioning and to control organ separation within and between whorls. Plants doubly mutant for two ffo alleles display additive phenotypes, indicating that the FFO genes may act in separate pathways. Plants doubly mutant for an ffo gene and for ufo, lfy, or clv3 reveal that the FFO genes play roles related to those of UFO and LFY in floral meristem initiation and that FFO2 and FFO3 may act to control cell proliferation late in inflorescence development.

  10. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE4 (RSL4) promotes root hair elongation by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes required for cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Priya; Datta, Sourav; Dolan, Liam

    2016-12-01

    ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE4 (RSL4) is necessary and sufficient for root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Root hair length is determined by the duration for which RSL4 protein is present in the developing root hair. The aim of this research was to identify genes regulated by RSL4 that affect root hair growth. To identify genes regulated by RSL4, we identified genes whose expression was elevated by induction of RSL4 activity in the presence of an inhibitor of translation. Thirty-four genes were identified as putative targets of RSL transcriptional regulation, and the results suggest that the activities of SUPPRESSOR OF ACTIN (SAC1), EXOCSYT SUBUNIT 70A1 (EXO70A1), PEROXIDASE7 (PRX7) and CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE11 (CPK11) are required for root hair elongation. These data indicate that RSL4 controls cell growth by controlling the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in cell signalling, cell wall modification and secretion. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. SET domain-containing protein 5 is required for expression of primordial germ cell specification-associated genes in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seung Eun; Kim, Min Seong; Park, Su Hyung; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Kyung Hee; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2017-07-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification is one of the most fundamental processes in developmental biology. Because PGCs are a common source of both gametes, generation of PGCs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a useful model for analysing the germ line lineage. Although several studies focused on the role of epigenetic regulation on PGC differentiation from ESCs in vitro have been published, germ line commitment remains poorly understood. Here, we show that SET domain-containing protein (Setd5), which has a previously unknown function, is essential for regulating germ cell-associated genes in murine ESCs (mESCs). Even though Setd5 knockdown with 3 distinct shRNAs did not affect expression of pluripotency genes or levels of global histone methylation, all 3 shRNAs significantly diminished the expression of early and late-stage PGC-associated genes. Furthermore, our immunoprecipitation assay showed that Setd5 can interact with Tbl1xr1 and Ctr9, which are components of 2 different transcriptional regulatory complexes, namely, NcoR1 corepressor complex and Paf1 complex, respectively, in mESCs. Taken together, our data suggest that Setd5 is required for maintaining PGC-associated genes and Setd5-associated protein complexes containing Tbl1xr1 and Ctr9, which in turn are likely involved in regulating germ cell-related genes in mESCs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Identification of the rctA Gene, Which Is Required for Repression of Conjugative Transfer of Rhizobial Symbiotic Megaplasmids†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Edgardo; Pando, Victoria; Muñoz, Socorro; Nogales, Joaquina; Olivares, José; Soto, Maria J.; Herrera-Cervera, José A.; Romero, David; Brom, Susana; Sanjuán, Juan

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the conjugative transfer of pRetCFN42d, the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli, has revealed a novel gene, rctA, as an essential element of a regulatory system for silencing the conjugative transfer of R. etli pSym by repressing the transcription of conjugal transfer genes in standard laboratory media. The rctA gene product lacks sequence conservation with other proteins of known function but may belong to the winged-helix DNA-binding subfamily of transcriptional regulators. Similar to that of many transcriptional repressors, rctA transcription seems to be positively autoregulated. rctA expression is greatly reduced upon overexpression of another gene, rctB, previously identified as a putative activator of R. etli pSym conjugal transfer. Thus, rctB seems to counteract the repressive action of rctA. rctA homologs are present in at least three other bacterial genomes within the order Rhizobiales, where they are invariably located adjacent to and divergently transcribed from putative virB-like operons. We show that similar to that of R. etli pSym, conjugative transfer of the 1.35-Mb symbiotic megaplasmid A of Sinorhizobium meliloti is also subjected to the inhibitory action of rctA. Our data provide strong evidence that the R. etli and S. meliloti pSym plasmids are indeed self-conjugative plasmids and that this property would only be expressed under optimal, as yet unknown conditions that entail inactivation of the rctA function. The rctA gene seems to represent novel but probably widespread regulatory systems controlling the transfer of conjugative elements within the order Rhizobiales. PMID:16237017

  13. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clp gene regulator is required for in vitro reactivation from hypoxia-induced dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Amanda; Golden, Nadia A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-01-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide and is the causative agent of tuberculosis (Chao, M. C., and Rubin, E. J. (2010) Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 64, 293-311). Throughout infection, Mtb encounters a variety of host pressures. Thus, responding to these host stresses via the induction of multiple regulatory networks is needed for survival within the host. The Clp protease gene regulator, Rv2745c (clgR), is induced in response to environmental stress conditions, implicating its potential role in Mtb pathogenesis. Transcriptional activation of genes downstream of Rv2745c occurs in a condition-dependent manner. Our isogenic Mtb:ΔRv2745c mutant expresses a significantly different phenotype upon reaeration conditions. Transcriptional analysis revealed differential gene expression profiles relative to wild-type Mtb. Rv2745c is strongly induced in response to hypoxic and reaeration conditions, implicating a role of Rv2745c in vivo during both establishment of infection and reactivation. We found dysregulation of downstream genes within both the σ(H)/σ(E) regulon as well as the dosR regulon in the isogenic mutant, Mtb:ΔRv2745c. Upon hypoxic and reaeration conditions, Clp protease induction occurred within wild-type Mtb, indicating that activation of clgR, which subsequently leads to Clp protease induction, is crucial for degradation of misfolded proteins and ultimately survival of Mtb upon specific stress conditions. Our data indicate the diverse response of Rv2745c, σ(H) and σ(E) in response to a variety of stress conditions. Activation of Rv2745c in response to various stress conditions leads to differential activation of downstream genes, indicating the diverse role of Rv2745c and its importance for Mtb survival in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. PTTG1, A novel androgen responsive gene is required for androgen-induced prostate cancer cell growth and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Bo [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Yaqiong [Biobank for Clinical Data and Samples in Pediatric, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100045 (China); Huang, Shengquan; Niu, Xiaohua [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Mao, Zebin [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Health Science Center, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Xin, Dianqi, E-mail: xin-dianqi@163.com [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Androgens (AR) play an important role in initiation and progression of prostate cancer. It has been shown that AR exert their effects mainly through the androgen-activated AR which binds to androgen response elements (AREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes to regulate the transcription of androgen-responsive genes, thus, identification of AR downstream target gene is critical to understand androgen function in prostate cancer. In this study, our results showed that androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression, which was blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, Casodex. Bioinformatics analysis and experiments using PTTG1 promoter deletion mutants showed that the PTTG1 promoter contains a putative androgen response element (ARE), which localizes in the −851 to −836 region of the promoter. Androgen activated androgen receptor (AR) binding to this ARE was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Furthermore, Knockdown of PTTG1 expression using short hairpin RNA significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. In addition, we showed PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. These results suggest that PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor and take part in prostate cancer proliferation and metastasis. - Highlights: • Androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression. • Knockdown of PTTG1 expression significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. • PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. • PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor.

  15. cDNA sequence of human transforming gene hst and identification of the coding sequence required for transforming activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, M.; Yoshida, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Terada, M.; Sugimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    The hst gene was originally identified as a transforming gene in DNAs from human stomach cancers and from a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa by DNA-mediated transfection assay using NIH3T3 cells. cDNA clones of hst were isolated from the cDNA library constructed from poly(A) + RNA of a secondary transformant induced by the DNA from a stomach cancer. The sequence analysis of the hst cDNA revealed the presence of two open reading frames. When this cDNA was inserted into an expression vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter, it efficiently induced the transformation of NIH3T3 cells upon transfection. It was found that one of the reading frames, which coded for 206 amino acids, was responsible for the transforming activity

  16. A Novel Testis-Specific Gene, Ccdc136, Is Required for Acrosome Formation and Fertilization in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qiang; Ni, Liwei; Ouyang, Bin; Hu, Yanhua; Zhao, Yu; Guo, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Testis-specific genes are essential for the spermatogenesis in mammalian male reproduction. In this study, we have identified a novel testis-specific gene, Ccdc136 (coiled-coil domain containing 136), from the results of high-throughput gene expression profiling in the developmental stage of mouse testes. Ccdc136 was conserved across species in evolution. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses showed that Ccdc136 messenger RNA and protein were extraordinarily expressed in mouse testes, which was first presented at postnatal 3 week and increased in an age-dependent manner before adulthood. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that CCDC136 protein was most abundantly located in the acrosome of round spermatids and elongating spermatids within seminiferous tubules of the adult mouse testes. To investigate the function of Ccdc136 in mouse testes, we generated the Ccdc136-knockout mice using Cas9/RNA-mediated gene targeting technology. Interestingly, we found Ccdc136(-/-) males were infertile, due to severe defect of disrupting acrosome formation. The expression levels of proteins (SPACA1 and PICK1) involved in acrosome formation were significantly downregulated in the testes of Ccdc136(-/-) mice than wide-type mice. Moreover, in vitro fertilization assay revealed that anti-CCDC136 antibody could remarkably inhibit fertilization, suggesting CCDC136 also plays an important role in fertilization. All of these demonstrated the essential role of CCDC136-mediated acrosome formation in spermatogenesis and fertilization, which might also provide new insight into the genetic causes of human infertility. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Transcription factor VdCmr1 is required for pigment production, protection from UV irradiation, and regulates expression of melanin biosynthetic genes in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonglin; Hu, Xiaoping; Fang, Yulin; Anchieta, Amy; Goldman, Polly H; Hernandez, Gustavo; Klosterman, Steven J

    2018-04-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungus that causes vascular wilt diseases on numerous plant species worldwide. The production of darkly melanized microsclerotia is crucial in the disease cycle of V. dahliae, as these structures allow for long-term survival in soil. Previously, transcriptomic and genomic analysis identified a cluster of genes in V. dahliae that encodes some dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin biosynthetic pathway homologues found in related fungi. In this study, we explored the roles of cluster-specific transcription factor VdCmr1, as well as two other genes within the cluster encoding a polyketide synthase (VdPKS1) and a laccase (VdLac1), enzymes at initial and endpoint steps in DHN melanin production. The results revealed that VdCmr1 and VdPKS1 are required for melanin production, but neither is required for microsclerotia production. None of the three genes were required for pathogenesis on tobacco and lettuce. Exposure of ΔVdCmr1 and wild-type strains to UV irradiation, or to high temperature (40 °C), revealed an approx. 50 % reduction of survival in the ΔVdCmr1 strain, relative to the wild-type strain, in response to either condition. Expression profiles revealed that expression of some melanin biosynthetic genes are in part dependent on VdCmr1. Combined data indicate VdCmr1 is a key regulator of melanin biosynthesis, and that via regulation of melanogenesis, VdCmr1 affects survival of V. dahliae in response to abiotic threats. We conclude with a model showing regulation of VdCmr1 by a high osmolarity glycerol response (Hog)-type MAP kinase pathway.

  18. Characterization of dapB, a gene required by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 for lysine and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The dapB gene, which encodes L-2,3-dihydrodipicolinate reductase, the second enzyme of the lysine branch of the aspartic amino acid family, was cloned and sequenced from a tabtoxin-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 60 to 90% identity to known dapB gene products from gram-negative bacteria and 19 to 21% identity to the dapB products from gram-positive bacteria. The consensus sequence for the NAD(P)H binding site [(V/I)(A/G)(V/I)XGXXGXXG)] and the proposed substrate binding site (HHRHK) were conserved in the polypeptide. A BR2.024 dapB mutant is a diaminopimelate auxotroph and tabtoxin negative. The addition of a mixture of L-,L-, D,D-, and meso-diaminopimelate to defined media restored growth but not tabtoxin production. Cloned DNA fragments containing the parental dapB gene restored the ability to grow in defined media and tabtoxin production to the dapB mutant. These results indicate that the dapB gene is required for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis, thus providing the first genetic evidence that the biosynthesis of tabtoxin proceeds in part along the lysine biosynthetic pathway. These data also suggest that L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate is a common intermediate for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis. PMID:8990304

  19. Requirement of the immediate early gene vesl-1S/homer-1a for fear memory formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue Naoko

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of long-term memory (LTM and the late phase of long-term potentiation (L-LTP depend on macromolecule synthesis, translation, and transcription in neurons. vesl-1S (VASP/Ena-related gene upregulated during seizure and LTP, also known as homer-1a is an LTP-induced immediate early gene. The short form of Vesl (Vesl-1S is an alternatively spliced isoform of the vesl-1 gene, which also encodes the long form of the Vesl protein (Vesl-1L. Vesl-1L is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein that binds to and modulates the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1/5 (mGluR1/5, the IP3 receptor, and the ryanodine receptor. Vesl-1 null mutant mice show abnormal behavior, which includes anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, and an increase in cocaine-induced locomotion; however, the function of the short form of Vesl in behavior is poorly understood because of the lack of short-form-specific knockout mice. Results In this study, we generated short-form-specific gene targeting (KO mice by knocking in part of vesl-1L/homer-1c cDNA. Homozygous KO mice exhibited normal spine number and morphology. Using the contextual fear conditioning test, we demonstrated that memory acquisition and short-term memory were normal in homozygous KO mice. In contrast, these mice showed impairment in fear memory consolidation. Furthermore, the process from recent to remote memory was affected in homozygous KO mice. Interestingly, reactivation of previously consolidated fear memory attenuated the conditioning-induced freezing response in homozygous KO mice, which suggests that the short form plays a role in fear memory reconsolidation. General activity, emotional performance, and sensitivity to electrofootshock were normal in homozygous KO mice. Conclusion These results indicate that the short form of the Vesl family of proteins plays a role in multiple steps of long-term, but not short-term, fear memory formation.

  20. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  1. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  2. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome-wide screening of the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, which is a potential inhibitor of bioethanol fermentation, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Ayako; Nakamura, Toshihide; Ando, Akira; Tokuyasu, Ken; Shima, Jun

    2008-04-15

    Lignocellulosic materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for bioethanol production. Although the pretreatment of lignocellulose is necessary for efficient saccharification and fermentation, numerous by-products, including furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds, are generated in the pretreatment step. Many of these components inhibit the growth and fermentation of yeast. In particular, vanillin is one of the most effective inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates because it inhibits fermentation at very low concentrations. To identify the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, we screened a set of diploid yeast deletion mutants, which are powerful tools for clarifying the function of particular genes. Seventy-six deletion mutants were identified as vanillin-sensitive mutants. The numerous deleted genes in the vanillin-sensitive mutants were classified under the functional categories for 'chromatin remodeling' and 'vesicle transport', suggesting that these functions are important for vanillin tolerance. The cross-sensitivity of the vanillin-sensitive mutants to furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds was also examined. Genes for ergosterol biosynthesis were required for tolerance to all inhibitory compounds tested, suggesting that ergosterol is a key component of tolerance to various inhibitors. Our analysis predicts that vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by various complicated processes that take place on both the molecular and the cellular level. In addition, the ergosterol biosynthetic process is important for achieving a tolerance to various inhibitors. Our findings provide a biotechnological basis for the molecular engineering as well as for screening of more robust yeast strains that may potentially be useful in bioethanol fermentation.

  4. Genome-wide screening of the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, which is a potential inhibitor of bioethanol fermentation, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuyasu Ken

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignocellulosic materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for bioethanol production. Although the pretreatment of lignocellulose is necessary for efficient saccharification and fermentation, numerous by-products, including furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds, are generated in the pretreatment step. Many of these components inhibit the growth and fermentation of yeast. In particular, vanillin is one of the most effective inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates because it inhibits fermentation at very low concentrations. To identify the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, we screened a set of diploid yeast deletion mutants, which are powerful tools for clarifying the function of particular genes. Results Seventy-six deletion mutants were identified as vanillin-sensitive mutants. The numerous deleted genes in the vanillin-sensitive mutants were classified under the functional categories for 'chromatin remodeling' and 'vesicle transport', suggesting that these functions are important for vanillin tolerance. The cross-sensitivity of the vanillin-sensitive mutants to furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds was also examined. Genes for ergosterol biosynthesis were required for tolerance to all inhibitory compounds tested, suggesting that ergosterol is a key component of tolerance to various inhibitors. Conclusion Our analysis predicts that vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by various complicated processes that take place on both the molecular and the cellular level. In addition, the ergosterol biosynthetic process is important for achieving a tolerance to various inhibitors. Our findings provide a biotechnological basis for the molecular engineering as well as for screening of more robust yeast strains that may potentially be useful in bioethanol fermentation.

  5. The Aspergillus nidulans acuL gene encodes a mitochondrial carrier required for the utilization of carbon sources that are metabolized via the TCA cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipphi, Michel; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Nicolas, Valérie; Guitton, Audrey; Vélot, Christian

    2014-07-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the utilization of acetate as sole carbon source requires several genes (acu). Most of them are also required for the utilization of fatty acids. This is the case for acuD and acuE, which encode the two glyoxylate cycle-specific enzymes, isocitrate lyase and malate synthase, respectively, but also for acuL that we have identified as AN7287, and characterized in this study. Deletion of acuL resulted in the same phenotype as the original acuL217 mutant. acuL encodes a 322-amino acid protein which displays all the structural features of a mitochondrial membrane carrier, and shares 60% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae succinate/fumarate mitochondrial antiporter Sfc1p (also named Acr1p). Consistently, the AcuL protein was shown to localize in mitochondria, and partial cross-complementation was observed between the S. cerevisiae and A. nidulans homologues. Extensive phenotypic characterization suggested that the acuL gene is involved in the utilization of carbon sources that are catabolized via the TCA cycle, and therefore require gluconeogenesis. In addition, acuL proves to be co-regulated with acuD and acuE. Overall, our data suggest that AcuL could link the glyoxylate cycle to gluconeogenesis by exchanging cytoplasmic succinate for mitochondrial fumarate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cloning and genetic characterization of dca genes required for beta-oxidation of straight-chain dicarboxylic acids in Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, D; Garcia, M A; Ornston, L N

    2001-10-01

    A previous study of deletions in the protocatechuate (pca) region of the Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 chromosome revealed that genes required for utilization of the six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, adipic acid, are linked to the pca structural genes. To investigate the genes involved in adipate catabolism, a 33.8-kb SacI fragment, which corrects a deletion spanning this region, was cloned. In addition to containing known pca, qui, and pob genes (for protocatechuate, quinate, and 4-hydroxybenzoate dissimilation), clone pZR8000 contained 10 kb of DNA which was the subject of this investigation. A mutant strain of Escherichia coli DH5alpha, strain EDP1, was isolated that was able to utilize protocatechuate and 4-hydroxybenzoate as growth substrates when EDP1 cells contained pZR8000. Sequence analysis of the new region of DNA on pZR8000 revealed open reading frames predicted to be involved in beta-oxidation. Knockouts of three genes implicated in beta-oxidation steps were introduced into the chromosome of Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. Each of the mutants was unable to grow with adipate. Because the mutants were affected in their ability to utilize additional saturated, straight-chain dicarboxylic acids, the newly discovered 10 kb of DNA was termed the dca (dicarboxylic acid) region. Mutant strains included one with a deletion in dcaA (encoding an acyl coenzyme A [acyl-CoA] dehydrogenase homolog), one with a deletion in dcaE (encoding an enoyl-CoA hydratase homolog), and one with a deletion in dcaH (encoding a hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase homolog). Data on the dca region should help us probe the functional significance and interrelationships of clustered genetic elements in this section of the Acinetobacter chromosome.

  7. The pobA gene of Burkholderia cenocepacia encodes a group I Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase required for biosynthesis of the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Atif H; Shastri, Sravanthi; Dave, Emma; Wowk, Irena; Agnoli, Kirsty; Cook, Anne M; Thomas, Mark S

    2011-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia produces the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin under iron-restricted conditions. Biosynthesis of both siderophores requires the involvement of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Using a transposon containing the lacZ reporter gene, two B. cenocepacia mutants were isolated which were deficient in siderophore production. Mutant IW10 was shown to produce normal amounts of ornibactin but only trace amounts of pyochelin, whereas synthesis of both siderophores was abolished in AHA27. Growth of AHA27, but not IW10, was inhibited under iron-restricted conditions. In both mutants, the transposon had integrated into the pobA gene, which encodes a polypeptide exhibiting similarity to the Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferases (PPTases). These enzymes are responsible for activation of NRPSs by the covalent attachment of the 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-pant) moiety of coenzyme A. Previously characterized PPTase genes from other bacteria were shown to efficiently complement both mutants for siderophore production when provided in trans. The B. cenocepacia pobA gene was also able to efficiently complement an Escherichia coli entD mutant for production of the siderophore enterobactin. Using mutant IW10, in which the lacZ gene carried by the transposon is inserted in the same orientation as pobA, it was shown that pobA is not appreciably iron-regulated. Finally, we confirmed that Sfp-type bacterial PPTases can be subdivided into two distinct groups, and we present the amino acid signature sequences which characterize each of these groups.

  8. The nociception genes painless and Piezo are required for the cellular immune response of Drosophila larvae to wasp parasitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokusumi, Yumiko; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Schulz, Robert A

    2017-05-13

    In vertebrates, interaction between the nervous system and immune system is important to protect a challenged host from stress inputs from external sources. In this study, we demonstrate that sensory neurons are involved in the cellular immune response elicited by wasp infestation of Drosophila larvae. Multidendritic class IV neurons sense contacts from external stimuli and induce avoidance behaviors for host defense. Our findings show that inactivation of these sensory neurons impairs the cellular response against wasp parasitization. We also demonstrate that the nociception genes encoding the mechanosensory receptors Painless and Piezo, both expressed in class IV neurons, are essential for the normal cellular immune response to parasite challenge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Repression by H-NS of genes required for the biosynthesis of the Vibrio cholerae biofilm matrix is modulated by the second messenger cyclic diguanylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Julio C; Wang, Hongxia; Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of Vibrio cholerae genes required for the biosynthesis of exopolysacchide (vps) and protein (rbm) components of the biofilm matrix is enhanced by cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). In a previous study, we reported that the histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS) protein represses the transcription of vpsA, vpsL and vpsT. Here we demonstrate that the regulator VpsT can disrupt repressive H-NS nucleoprotein complexes at the vpsA and vpsL promoters in the presence of c-di-GMP, while H-NS could disrupt the VpsT-promoter complexes in the absence of c-di-GMP. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq showed a remarkable trend for H-NS to cluster at loci involved in biofilm development such as the rbmABCDEF genes. We show that the antagonistic relationship between VpsT and H-NS regulates the expression of the rbmABCDEF cluster. Epistasis analysis demonstrated that VpsT functions as an antirepressor at the rbmA/F, vpsU and vpsA/L promoters. Deletion of vpsT increased H-NS occupancy at these promoters while increasing the c-di-GMP pool had the opposite effect and included the vpsT promoter. The negative effect of c-di-GMP on H-NS occupancy at the vpsT promoter required the regulator VpsR. These results demonstrate that c-di-GMP activates the transcription of genes required for the biosynthesis of the biofilm matrix by triggering a coordinated VpsR- and VpsT-dependent H-NS antirepression cascade. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The GLO1 Gene Is Required for Full Activity of O-Acetyl Homoserine Sulfhydrylase Encoded by MET17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzurik, Matias I; Ly, Kien; David, Karine M; Gardner, Richard C; Fedrizzi, Bruno

    2017-02-17

    During glycolysis, yeast generates methylglyoxal (MG), a toxic metabolite that affects growth. Detoxification can occur when glyoxylase I (GLO1) and glyoxylase II (GLO2) convert MG to lactic acid. We have identified an additional, previously unrecognized role for GLO1 in sulfur assimilation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During a screening for putative carbon-sulfur lyases, the glo1 deletion strain showed significant production of H 2 S during fermentation. The glo1 strain also assimilated sulfate inefficiently but grew normally on cysteine. These phenotypes are consistent with reduced activity of the O-acetyl homoserine sulfhydrylase, Met17p. Overexpression of Glo1p gave a dominant negative phenotype that mimicked the glo1 and met17 deletion strain phenotypes. Western analysis revealed reduced expression of Met17p in the glo1 deletion, but there was no indication of an altered conformation of Met17p or any direct interaction between the two proteins. Unravelling a novel function in sulfur assimilation and H 2 S generation in yeast for a gene never connected with this pathway provides new opportunities for the study of this molecule in cell signaling, as well as the potential regulation of its accumulation in the wine and beer industry.

  11. Characterization of genes required for the pathogenicity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21 in Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hwan; Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Juneok; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyusuk; Choi, Minseon; Oh, Changsik; Ryu, Sangryeol; Yun, Jongchul; Heu, Sunggi

    2013-07-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum is a well-known plant pathogen that causes severe soft rot disease in various crops, resulting in considerable economic loss. To identify pathogenicity-related factors, Chinese cabbage was inoculated with 5314 transposon mutants of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21 derived using Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. A total of 35 reduced-virulence or avirulent mutants were isolated, and 14 loci were identified. The 14 loci could be functionally grouped into nutrient utilization (pyrD, purH, purD, leuA and serB), production of plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) (expI, expR and PCC21_023220), motility (flgA, fliA and flhB), biofilm formation (expI, expR and qseC), susceptibility to antibacterial plant chemicals (tolC) and unknown function (ECA2640). Among the 14 genes identified, qseC, tolC and PCC21_023220 are novel pathogenicity factors of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum involved in biofilm formation, phytochemical resistance and PCWDE production, respectively.

  12. The FBPase Encoding Gene glpX Is Required for Gluconeogenesis, Bacterial Proliferation and Division In Vivo of Mycobacterium marinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jingfeng; Meng, Lu; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Lixia; Lyu, Liangdong; Wang, Chuan; Li, Yang; Gao, Qian; Yang, Chen; Niu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have been identified as important carbon sources for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to utilize in vivo. Thus gluconeogenesis bears a key role for Mtb to survive and replicate in host. A rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) is encoded by the gene glpX. The functions of glpX were studied in M. marinum, a closely related species to Mtb. The glpX deletion strain (ΔglpX) displayed altered gluconeogenesis, attenuated virulence, and altered bacterial proliferation. Metabolic profiles indicate an accumulation of the FBPase substrate, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP) and altered gluconeogenic flux when ΔglpX is cultivated in a gluconeogenic carbon substrate, acetate. In both macrophages and zebrafish, the proliferation of ΔglpX was halted, resulting in dramatically attenuated virulence. Intracellular ΔglpX exhibited an elongated morphology, which was also observed when ΔglpX was grown in a gluconeogenic carbon source. This elongated morphology is also supported by the observation of unseparated multi-nucleoid cell, indicating that a complete mycobacterial division in vivo is correlated with intact gluconeogenesis. Together, our results indicate that glpX has essential functions in gluconeogenesis, and plays an indispensable role in bacterial proliferation in vivo and virulence of M. marinum.

  13. Dual Bar homeo box genes of Drosophila required in two photoreceptor cells, R1 and R6, and primary pigment cells for normal eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashijima, S; Kojima, T; Michiue, T; Ishimaru, S; Emori, Y; Saigo, K

    1992-01-01

    In the Bar mutation of Drosophila, ommatidial differentiation is known to be suppressed in the anterior portion of the eye. Our structural analysis shows that the Bar region contains a pair of homeo box genes, BarH1 and BarH2. These genes encode polypeptides similar in size and sequence and share a common homeo domain that is identical in sequence except for putative trans-activator-binding sites. We also show, by mosaic analysis and immunostaining with anti-BarH1/BarH2 antibodies, that BarH1 and BarH2 are not only specifically coexpressed but also functionally required in R1/R6 prephotoreceptors and primary pigment cells in developing ommatidia. In R1/R6, the expression of BarH1 and BarH2 appears to be regulated by rough and glass gene products. BarH1 and BarH2 proteins are essential to normal lens formation, formation of three types of pigment cells, and elimination of excess cells from mature ommatidia. Taken together, our results suggest that Bar homeo domain proteins may play key roles in the fate-determination processes of pigment cells and cone cells.

  14. Machine Learning Analysis Identifies Drosophila Grunge/Atrophin as an Important Learning and Memory Gene Required for Memory Retention and Social Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balint Z. Kacsoh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput experiments are becoming increasingly common, and scientists must balance hypothesis-driven experiments with genome-wide data acquisition. We sought to predict novel genes involved in Drosophila learning and long-term memory from existing public high-throughput data. We performed an analysis using PILGRM, which analyzes public gene expression compendia using machine learning. We evaluated the top prediction alongside genes involved in learning and memory in IMP, an interface for functional relationship networks. We identified Grunge/Atrophin (Gug/Atro, a transcriptional repressor, histone deacetylase, as our top candidate. We find, through multiple, distinct assays, that Gug has an active role as a modulator of memory retention in the fly and its function is required in the adult mushroom body. Depletion of Gug specifically in neurons of the adult mushroom body, after cell division and neuronal development is complete, suggests that Gug function is important for memory retention through regulation of neuronal activity, and not by altering neurodevelopment. Our study provides a previously uncharacterized role for Gug as a possible regulator of neuronal plasticity at the interface of memory retention and memory extinction.

  15. Targeted deletion of multiple CTCF-binding elements in the human C-MYC gene reveals a requirement for CTCF in C-MYC expression.

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    Wendy M Gombert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulators and domain boundaries both shield genes from adjacent enhancers and inhibit intrusion of heterochromatin into transgenes. Previous studies examined the functional mechanism of the MYC insulator element MINE and its CTCF binding sites in the context of transgenes that were randomly inserted into the genome by transfection. However, the contribution of CTCF binding sites to both gene regulation and maintenance of chromatin has not been tested at the endogenous MYC gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the impact of CTCF binding on MYC expression, a series of mutant human chromosomal alleles was prepared in homologous recombination-efficient DT40 cells and individually transferred by microcell fusion into murine cells. Functional tests reported here reveal that deletion of CTCF binding elements within the MINE does not impact the capacity of this locus to correctly organize an 'accessible' open chromatin domain, suggesting that these sites are not essential for the formation of a competent, transcriptionally active locus. Moreover, deletion of the CTCF site at the MYC P2 promoter reduces transcription but does not affect promoter acetylation or serum-inducible transcription. Importantly, removal of either CTCF site leads to DNA methylation of flanking sequences, thereby contributing to progressive loss of transcriptional activity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings collectively demonstrate that CTCF-binding at the human MYC locus does not repress transcriptional activity but is required for protection from DNA methylation.

  16. The Vaccinium corymbosum FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene (VcFT): a flowering activator reverses photoperiodic and chilling requirements in blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-qing; Walworth, Aaron; Zhao, Dongyan; Jiang, Ning; Hancock, James F

    2013-11-01

    The blueberry FLOWERING LOCUS T ( FT )-like gene ( VcFT ) cloned from the cDNA of a tetraploid, northern highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is able to reverse the photoperiodic and chilling requirements and drive early and continuous flowering. Blueberry is a woody perennial bush with a longer juvenile period than annual crops, requiring vernalization to flower normally. Few studies have been reported on the molecular mechanism of flowering in blueberry or other woody plants. Because FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) from Arabidopsis thaliana plays a multifaceted role in generating mobile molecular signals to regulate plant flowering time, isolation and functional analysis of the blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) FT-like gene (VcFT) will facilitate the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of flowering in woody plants. Based on EST sequences, a 525-bpVcFT was identified and cloned from the cDNA of a tetraploid, northern highbush blueberry cultivar, Bluecrop. Ectopic expression of 35S:VcFT in tobacco induced flowering an average of 28 days earlier than wild-type plants. Expression of the 35S:VcFT in the blueberry cultivar Aurora resulted in an extremely early flowering phenotype, which flowered not only during in vitro culture, a growth stage when nontransgenic shoots had not yet flowered, but also in 6-10-week old, soil-grown transgenic plants, in contrast to the fact that at least 1 year and 800 chilling hours are required for the appearance of the first flower of both nontransgenic 'Aurora' and transgenic controls with the gusA. These results demonstrate that the VcFT is a functional floral activator and overexpression of the VcFT is able to reverse the photoperiodic and chilling requirements and drive early and continuous flowering.

  17. Conserved structural domains in FoxD4L1, a neural forkhead box transcription factor, are required to repress or activate target genes.

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    Steven L Klein

    Full Text Available FoxD4L1 is a forkhead transcription factor that expands the neural ectoderm by down-regulating genes that promote the onset of neural differentiation and up-regulating genes that maintain proliferative neural precursors in an immature state. We previously demonstrated that binding of Grg4 to an Eh-1 motif enhances the ability of FoxD4L1 to down-regulate target neural genes but does not account for all of its repressive activity. Herein we analyzed the protein sequence for additional interaction motifs and secondary structure. Eight conserved motifs were identified in the C-terminal region of fish and frog proteins. Extending the analysis to mammals identified a high scoring motif downstream of the Eh-1 domain that contains a tryptophan residue implicated in protein-protein interactions. In addition, secondary structure prediction programs predicted an α-helical structure overlapping with amphibian-specific Motif 6 in Xenopus, and similarly located α-helical structures in other vertebrate FoxD proteins. We tested functionality of this site by inducing a glutamine-to-proline substitution expected to break the predicted α-helical structure; this significantly reduced FoxD4L1's ability to repress zic3 and irx1. Because this mutation does not interfere with Grg4 binding, these results demonstrate that at least two regions, the Eh-1 motif and a more C-terminal predicted α-helical/Motif 6 site, additively contribute to repression. In the N-terminal region we previously identified a 14 amino acid motif that is required for the up-regulation of target genes. Secondary structure prediction programs predicted a short β-strand separating two acidic domains. Mutant constructs show that the β-strand itself is not required for transcriptional activation. Instead, activation depends upon a glycine residue that is predicted to provide sufficient flexibility to bring the two acidic domains into close proximity. These results identify conserved predicted

  18. Vernalization requirement and the chromosomal VRN1-region can affect freezing tolerance and expression of cold-regulated genes in Festuca pratensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åshild eErgon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants adapted to cold winters go through annual cycles of gain followed by loss of freezing tolerance (cold acclimation and deacclimation. Warm spells during winter and early spring can cause deacclimation, and if temperatures drop, freezing damage may occur. Many plants are vernalized during winter, a process making them competent to flower in the following summer. In winter cereals, a coincidence in the timing of vernalization saturation, deacclimation, downregulation of cold-induced genes, and reduced ability to reacclimate, occurs under long photoperiods and is under control of the main regulator of vernalization requirement in cereals, VRN1, and/or closely linked gene(s. Thus, the probability of freezing damage after a warm spell may depend on both vernalization saturation and photoperiod. We investigated the role of vernalization and the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds., a perennial grass species. Two F2 populations, divergently selected for high and low vernalization requirement, were studied. Each genotype was characterized for the copy number of one of the four parental haplotypes of the VRN1-region. Clonal plants were cold acclimated for 2 weeks or vernalized/cold acclimated for a total of 9 weeks, after which the F2 populations reached different levels of vernalization saturation. Vernalized and cold acclimated plants were deacclimated for 1 week and then reacclimated for 2 weeks. All treatments were given at 8 h photoperiod. Flowering response, freezing tolerance and expression of the cold-induced genes VRN1, MADS3, CBF6, COR14B, CR7 (BLT14, LOS2 and IRI1 was measured. We found that some genotypes can lose some freezing tolerance after vernalization and a deacclimation-reacclimation cycle. The relationship between vernalization and freezing tolerance was complex. We found effects of the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance in plants cold acclimated for 2 weeks, timing of heading after 9 weeks

  19. The milkweed pod1 Gene Encodes a KANADI Protein That Is Required for Abaxial/Adaxial Patterning in Maize Leaves[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Johnston, Robyn; Gerhold, Abigail; Foster, Toshi; Hake, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Leaf primordia initiate from the shoot apical meristem with inherent polarity; the adaxial side faces the meristem, while the abaxial side faces away from the meristem. Adaxial/abaxial polarity is thought to be necessary for laminar growth of leaves, as mutants lacking either adaxial or abaxial cell types often develop radially symmetric lateral organs. The milkweed pod1 (mwp1) mutant of maize (Zea mays) has adaxialized sectors in the sheath, the proximal part of the leaf. Ectopic leaf flaps develop where adaxial and abaxial cell types juxtapose. Ectopic expression of the HD-ZIPIII gene rolled leaf1 (rld1) correlates with the adaxialized regions. Cloning of mwp1 showed that it encodes a KANADI transcription factor. Double mutants of mwp1-R with a microRNA-resistant allele of rld1, Rld1-N1990, show a synergistic phenotype with polarity defects in sheath and blade and a failure to differentiate vascular and photosynthetic cell types in the adaxialized sectors. The sectored phenotype and timing of the defect suggest that mwp1 is required late in leaf development to maintain abaxial cell fate. The phenotype of mwp1; Rld1 double mutants shows that both genes are also required early in leaf development to delineate leaf margins as well as to initiate vascular and photosynthetic tissues. PMID:18757553

  20. Human disease isolates of serotype m4 and m22 group a streptococcus lack genes required for hyaluronic acid capsule biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Anthony R; Jewell, Brittany E; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Beres, Stephen B; Musser, James M

    2012-11-06

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes human pharyngitis and invasive infections and frequently colonizes individuals asymptomatically. Many lines of evidence generated over decades have shown that the hyaluronic acid capsule is a major virulence factor contributing to these infections. While conducting a whole-genome analysis of the in vivo molecular genetic changes that occur in GAS during longitudinal human pharyngeal interaction, we discovered that serotypes M4 and M22 GAS strains lack the hasABC genes necessary for hyaluronic acid capsule biosynthesis. Using targeted PCR, we found that all 491 temporally and geographically diverse disease isolates of these two serotypes studied lack the hasABC genes. Consistent with the lack of capsule synthesis genes, none of the strains produced detectable hyaluronic acid. Despite the lack of a hyaluronic acid capsule, all strains tested multiplied extensively ex vivo in human blood. Thus, counter to the prevailing concept in GAS pathogenesis research, strains of these two serotypes do not require hyaluronic acid to colonize the upper respiratory tract or cause abundant mucosal or invasive human infections. We speculate that serotype M4 and M22 GAS have alternative, compensatory mechanisms that promote virulence. A century of study of the antiphagocytic hyaluronic acid capsule made by group A streptococcus has led to the concept that it is a major virulence factor contributing to human pharyngeal and invasive infections. However, the discovery that some strains that cause abundant human infections lack hyaluronic acid biosynthetic genes and fail to produce this capsule provides a new stimulus for research designed to understand the group A streptococcus factors contributing to pharyngeal infection and invasive disease episodes.

  1. Improving the gene structure annotation of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum fulfils a vital requirement towards an in silico-derived vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodswen, Stephen J; Barratt, Joel L N; Kennedy, Paul J; Ellis, John T

    2015-04-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which can cause abortion in cattle, instigating major economic burden. Vaccination has been proposed as the most cost-effective control measure to alleviate this burden. Consequently the overriding aspiration for N. caninum research is the identification and subsequent evaluation of vaccine candidates in animal models. To save time, cost and effort, it is now feasible to use an in silico approach for vaccine candidate prediction. Precise protein sequences, derived from the correct open reading frame, are paramount and arguably the most important factor determining the success or failure of this approach. The challenge is that publicly available N. caninum sequences are mostly derived from gene predictions. Annotated inaccuracies can lead to erroneously predicted vaccine candidates by bioinformatics programs. This study evaluates the current N. caninum annotation for potential inaccuracies. Comparisons with annotation from a closely related pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, are also made to distinguish patterns of inconsistency. More importantly, a mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiment is used to validate the annotation. Potential discrepancies originating from a questionable start codon context and exon boundaries were identified in 1943 protein coding sequences. We conclude, where experimental data were available, that the majority of N. caninum gene sequences were reliably predicted. Nevertheless, almost 28% of genes were identified as questionable. Given the limitations of RNA-Seq, the intention of this study was not to replace the existing annotation but to support or oppose particular aspects of it. Ideally, many studies aimed at improving the annotation are required to build a consensus. We believe this study, in providing a new resource on gene structure and annotation, is a worthy contributor to this endeavour. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal control of glial cell migration in the Drosophila eye requires gilgamesh, hedgehog, and eye specification genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Thomas; Attix, Suzanne; Gunning, Dorian; Zipursky, S Lawrence

    2002-01-17

    In the Drosophila visual system, photoreceptor neurons (R cells) extend axons towards glial cells located at the posterior edge of the eye disc. In gilgamesh (gish) mutants, glial cells invade anterior regions of the eye disc prior to R cell differentiation and R cell axons extend anteriorly along these cells. gish encodes casein kinase Igamma. gish, sine oculis, eyeless, and hedgehog (hh) act in the posterior region of the eye disc to prevent precocious glial cell migration. Targeted expression of Hh in this region rescues the gish phenotype, though the glial cells do not require the canonical Hh signaling pathway to respond. We propose that the spatiotemporal control of glial cell migration plays a critical role in determining the directionality of R cell axon outgrowth.

  3. The exonuclease activity of hPMC2 is required for transcriptional regulation of the QR gene and repair of estrogen-induced abasic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, N; Ngam, C R; Berdis, A J; Montano, M M

    2011-11-24

    We have previously reported that the expression of antioxidative stress enzymes is upregulated by trans-hydroxytamoxifen (TOT) in breast epithelial cell lines providing protection against estrogen-induced DNA damage. This regulation involves Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ) recruitment to the Electrophile Response Element (EpRE) and a novel protein, human homolog of Xenopus gene which Prevents Mitotic Catastrophe (hPMC2). We have also demonstrated that ERβ and hPMC2 are required for TOT-dependent recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and Topoisomerase IIβ (Topo IIβ) to the EpRE. Sequence analysis reveals that the C-terminus of hPMC2 encodes a putative exonuclease domain. Using in vitro kinetic assays, we found that hPMC2 is a 3'-5' non-processive exonuclease that degrades both single-stranded and double-stranded substrates. Mutation of two conserved carboxylate residues drastically reduced the exonuclease activity of hPMC2, indicating the relative importance of the catalytic residues. Western blot analysis of breast cancer cell lines for Quinone Reductase (QR) levels revealed that the intrinsic exonuclease activity of hPMC2 was required for TOT-induced QR upregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays also indicated that hPMC2 was involved in the formation of strand breaks observed with TOT treatment and is specific for the EpRE-containing region of the QR gene. We also determined that the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is involved in the specificity of hPMC2 for the EpRE. In addition, we determined that the catalytic activity of hPMC2 is required for repair of abasic sites that result from estrogen-induced DNA damage. Thus, our study provides a mechanistic basis for transcriptional regulation by hPMC2 and provides novel insights into its role in cancer prevention.

  4. Development of a subset of forelimb muscles and their attachment sites requires the ulnar-mammary syndrome gene Tbx3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary P. Colasanto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the vertebrate limb over 40 muscles are arranged in a precise pattern of attachment via muscle connective tissue and tendon to bone and provide an extensive range of motion. How the development of somite-derived muscle is coordinated with the development of lateral plate-derived muscle connective tissue, tendon and bone to assemble a functional limb musculoskeletal system is a long-standing question. Mutations in the T-box transcription factor, TBX3, have previously been identified as the genetic cause of ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS, characterized by distinctive defects in posterior forelimb bones. Using conditional mutagenesis in mice, we now show that TBX3 has a broader role in limb musculoskeletal development. TBX3 is not only required for development of posterior forelimb bones (ulna and digits 4 and 5, but also for a subset of posterior muscles (lateral triceps and brachialis and their bone eminence attachment sites. TBX3 specification of origin and insertion sites appears to be tightly linked with whether these particular muscles develop and may represent a newly discovered mechanism for specification of anatomical muscles. Re-examination of an individual with UMS reveals similar previously unrecognized muscle and bone eminence defects and indicates a conserved role for TBX3 in regulating musculoskeletal development.

  5. β-1,6-glucan synthesis-associated genes are required for proper spore wall formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hua-Ping; Wang, Ning; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2017-11-01

    The yeast spore wall is an excellent model to study the assembly of an extracellular macromolecule structure. In the present study, mutants defective in β-1,6-glucan synthesis, including kre1∆, kre6∆, kre9∆ and big1∆, were sporulated to analyse the effect of β-1,6-glucan defects on the spore wall. Except for kre6∆, these mutant spores were sensitive to treatment with ether, suggesting that the mutations perturb the integrity of the spore wall. Morphologically, the mutant spores were indistinguishable from wild-type spores. They lacked significant sporulation defects partly because the chitosan layer, which covers the glucan layer, compensated for the damage. The proof for this model was obtained from the effect of the additional deletion of CHS3 that resulted in the absence of the chitosan layer. Among the double mutants, the most severe spore wall deficiency was observed in big1∆ spores. The majority of the big1∆chs3∆ mutants failed to form visible spores at a higher temperature. Given that the big1∆ mutation caused a failure to attach a GPI-anchored reporter, Cwp2-GFP, to the spore wall, β-1,6-glucan is involved in tethering of GPI-anchored proteins in the spore wall as well as in the vegetative cell wall. Thus, β-1,6-glucan is required for proper organization of the spore wall. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Aspergillus flavus Spermidine Synthase (spds Gene, Is Required for Normal Development, Aflatoxin Production, and Pathogenesis During Infection of Maize Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajtilak Majumdar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus is a soil-borne saprophyte and an opportunistic pathogen of both humans and plants. This fungus not only causes disease in important food and feed crops such as maize, peanut, cottonseed, and tree nuts but also produces the toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites (SMs known as aflatoxins. Polyamines (PAs are ubiquitous polycations that influence normal growth, development, and stress responses in living organisms and have been shown to play a significant role in fungal pathogenesis. Biosynthesis of spermidine (Spd is critical for cell growth as it is required for hypusination-mediated activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A, and other biochemical functions. The tri-amine Spd is synthesized from the diamine putrescine (Put by the enzyme spermidine synthase (Spds. Inactivation of spds resulted in a total loss of growth and sporulation in vitro which could be partially restored by addition of exogenous Spd. Complementation of the Δspds mutant with a wild type (WT A. flavus spds gene restored the WT phenotype. In WT A. flavus, exogenous supply of Spd (in vitro significantly increased the production of sclerotia and SMs. Infection of maize kernels with the Δspds mutant resulted in a significant reduction in fungal growth, sporulation, and aflatoxin production compared to controls. Quantitative PCR of Δspds mutant infected seeds showed down-regulation of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes in the mutant compared to WT A. flavus infected seeds. Expression analyses of PA metabolism/transport genes during A. flavus-maize interaction showed significant increase in the expression of arginine decarboxylase (Adc and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (Samdc genes in the maize host and PA uptake transporters in the fungus. The results presented here demonstrate that Spd biosynthesis is critical for normal development and pathogenesis of A. flavus and pre-treatment of a Δspds mutant with Spd or Spd uptake from the

  7. Characterization of nifB, nifS, and nifU genes in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: NifB is required for the vanadium-dependent nitrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, E M; Thiel, T

    1995-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium containing both a Mo-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the nif genes and V-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the vnf genes. The nifB, nifS, and nifU genes of A. variabilis were cloned, mapped, and partially sequenced. The fdxN gene was between nifB and nifS. Growth and acetylene reduction assays using wild-type and mutant strains indicated that the nifB product (NifB) was required for nitrogen fixation not only by...

  8. Cysteine desulphurase-encoding gene sufS2 is required for the repressor function of RirA and oxidative resistance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhubhanil, Sakkarin; Niamyim, Phettree; Sukchawalit, Rojana; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2014-01-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens genome contains a cluster of genes that are predicted to encode Fe-S cluster assembly proteins, and this cluster is known as the sufS2BCDS1XA operon. sufS2 is the first gene in the operon, and it was inactivated to determine its physiological function. The sufS2 mutant exhibited a small colony phenotype, grew slower than the wild-type strain and was more sensitive to various oxidants including peroxide, organic hydroperoxide and superoxide. The sufS2 gene was negatively regulated by iron response regulator (Irr) and rhizobial iron regulator (RirA) under low and high iron conditions, respectively, and was inducible in response to oxidative stress. The oxidant-induced expression of sufS2 was controlled by Irr, RirA and an additional but not yet identified mechanism. sufS2 was required for RirA activity in the repression of a sufS2 promoter-lacZ fusion. RirA may use Fe-S as its cofactor. sufS2 disruption may cause a defect in the Fe-S supply and could thereby affect the RirA activity. The three conserved cysteine residues (C91, C99 and C105) in RirA were predicted to coordinate with the Fe-S cluster and were shown to be essential for RirA repression of the sufS2-lacZ fusion. These results suggested that sufS2 is important for the survival of A. tumefaciens.

  9. Rice gene SDL/RNRS1, encoding the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, is required for chlorophyll synthesis and plant growth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ran; Zeng, Dongdong; Liang, Rong; Yang, Chengcong; Akhter, Delara; Alamin, Md; Jin, Xiaoli; Shi, Chunhai

    2017-09-05

    A new mutant named sdl (stripe and drooping leaf) was characterized from indica cultivar Zhenong 34 by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis. The mutant sdl exhibited development defects including stripe and drooping leaf, dwarfism and deformed floral organs. The gene SDL was found allelic to RNRS1 by map-based cloning, which was homologous to Arabidopsis TSO2 encoding the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase. The gDNA sequencing results of sdl in mutant showed that there was a repetitive sequence insertion of 138-bp at the 475 th bp in the exon. The redundant sequence was conserved in SDL homologous proteins, which contained the active site (tyrosine), as well as two amino acids glutamate and histidine involved in the binding of iron. There were fewer chloroplasts and grana lamellas in sdl leaf compared with those of wild-type. Additionally, the stripe leaves of sdl seedlings were highly sensitive to temperature, since the chlorophyll content was increased with the temperature rising. The drooping leaf of sdl might be resulted from the disappearance of vascular bundles and mesophyll cells in both leaf midrib and lateral veins. Fittingly to the phenotypes of mutant sdl, the expression levels of genes associated with photosynthesis and chlorophyll synthesis were found to be down- or up-regulated at different temperatures in mutant sdl. Also, the transcriptional levels of genes related to plant height and floral organ formation showed obvious differences between wild-type and sdl. The "SDL/RNRS1" was, hence, required for the chlorophyll biosynthesis and also played pleiotropic roles in the regulation of plant development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Of the Nine Cytidine Deaminase-Like Genes in Arabidopsis, Eight Are Pseudogenes and Only One Is Required to Maintain Pyrimidine Homeostasis in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingjia; Herde, Marco; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2016-06-01

    CYTIDINE DEAMINASE (CDA) catalyzes the deamination of cytidine to uridine and ammonia in the catabolic route of C nucleotides. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CDA gene family comprises nine members, one of which (AtCDA) was shown previously in vitro to encode an active CDA. A possible role in C-to-U RNA editing or in antiviral defense has been discussed for other members. A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of plant CDA sequences, combined with biochemical functionality tests, strongly suggests that all Arabidopsis CDA family members except AtCDA are pseudogenes and that most plants only require a single CDA gene. Soybean (Glycine max) possesses three CDA genes, but only two encode functional enzymes and just one has very high catalytic efficiency. AtCDA and soybean CDAs are located in the cytosol. The functionality of AtCDA in vivo was demonstrated with loss-of-function mutants accumulating high amounts of cytidine but also CMP, cytosine, and some uridine in seeds. Cytidine hydrolysis in cda mutants is likely caused by NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) because cytosine accumulation is strongly reduced in a cda nsh1 double mutant. Altered responses of the cda mutants to fluorocytidine and fluorouridine indicate that a dual specific nucleoside kinase is involved in cytidine as well as uridine salvage. CDA mutants display a reduction in rosette size and have fewer leaves compared with the wild type, which is probably not caused by defective pyrimidine catabolism but by the accumulation of pyrimidine catabolism intermediates reaching toxic concentrations. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The phosphotransferase system gene ptsI in the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus is required for biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol against wheat sharp eyespot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Bin; Chen, Mai; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Miao; Wang, Ying; Huang, Qiu-bin; Wang, Xue; Wang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Natural resistance of wheat plants to wheat sharp eyespot is inadequate, and new strategies for controlling the disease are required. Biological control is an alternative and attractive way of reducing the use of chemicals in agriculture. In this study, we investigated the biocontrol properties of endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus strain 0-9, which was isolated from the root systems of healthy wheat varieties. The phosphotransferase system is a major regulator of carbohydrate metabolism in bacteria. Enzyme I is one of the protein components of this system. Specific disruption and complementation of the enzyme I-coding gene ptsI from B. cereus was achieved through homologous recombination. Disruption of ptsI in B. cereus caused a 70% reduction in biofilm formation, a 30.4% decrease in biocontrol efficacy, and a 1000-fold reduction in colonization. The growth of ΔptsI mutant strain on G-tris synthetic medium containing glucose as the exclusive carbon source was also reduced. Wild-type properties could be restored to the ΔptsI mutant strain by ptsI complementation. These results suggested that ptsI may be one of the key genes involved in biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol of B. cereus and that B. cereus wild-type strain 0-9 may be an ideal biocontrol agent for controlling wheat sharp eyespot. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Analyses of the Diels-Alderase Gene sol5 of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani Indicate that the Solanapyrone Phytotoxins Are Not Required for Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonyong; Park, Chung-Min; Park, Jeong-Jin; Akamatsu, Hajime O; Peever, Tobin L; Xian, Ming; Gang, David R; Vandemark, George; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani, the causal agents of Ascochyta blight of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum), respectively, produce a set of phytotoxic compounds including solanapyrones A, B, and C. Although both the phytotoxicity of solanapyrones and their universal production among field isolates have been documented, the role of solanapyrones in pathogenicity is not well understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of the sol5 gene, which encodes a Diels-Alderase that catalyzes the final step of solanapyrone biosynthesis. Deletion of sol5 in both Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani completely prevented production of solanapyrones and led to accumulation of the immediate precursor compound, prosolanapyrone II-diol, which is not toxic to plants. Deletion of sol5 did not negatively affect growth rate or spore production in vitro, and led to overexpression of the other solanapyrone biosynthesis genes, suggesting a possible feedback regulation mechanism. Phytotoxicity tests showed that solanapyrone A is highly toxic to several legume species and Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite the apparent phytotoxicity of solanapyrone A, pathogenicity tests showed that solanapyrone-minus mutants of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani were equally virulent as their corresponding wild-type progenitors, suggesting that solanapyrones are not required for pathogenicity.

  13. Nodal signaling from the visceral endoderm is required to maintain Nodal gene expression in the epiblast and drive DVE/AVE migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Lualdi, Margaret; Lyozin, George T; Sharma, Prashant; Loncarek, Jadranka; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Kuehn, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    In the early mouse embryo, a specialized population of extraembryonic visceral endoderm (VE) cells called the distal VE (DVE) arises at the tip of the egg cylinder stage embryo and then asymmetrically migrates to the prospective anterior, recruiting additional distal cells. Upon migration these cells, called the anterior VE (AVE), establish the anterior posterior (AP) axis by restricting gastrulation-inducing signals to the opposite pole. The Nodal-signaling pathway has been shown to have a critical role in the generation and migration of the DVE/AVE. The Nodal gene is expressed in both the VE and in the pluripotent epiblast, which gives rise to the germ layers. Previous findings have provided conflicting evidence as to the relative importance of Nodal signaling from the epiblast vs. VE for AP patterning. Here we show that conditional mutagenesis of the Nodal gene specifically within the VE leads to reduced Nodal expression levels in the epiblast and incomplete or failed DVE/AVE migration. These results support a required role for VE Nodal to maintain normal levels of expression in the epiblast, and suggest signaling from both VE and epiblast is important for DVE/AVE migration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The galactophilic lectin (PA-IL, gene LecA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its binding requirements and the localization of lectin receptors in various mouse tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Hansen, Axel K; d'Apice, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    . It is concluded that the carbohydrate recognizing site of the lectin can have a binding requirement of only one saccharide. Lectin histochemistry was performed on sections from wild type mice and from knock-out mice, which lack function of the alpha.1,3-galactosyltransferase gene. All assays with the P......, kidney and adrenal gland while none of the two lectins were able to detect capillaries in the pancreas. This could indicate a differential glycosylation with respect to endothelial cell Gal alpha. epitopes among different organs. Further, since no PA-IL bindingto the endothelial cells in the KO mouse...... was observed, it seems that, in the mouse, the Pseudomonas lectin adheres to the Gal alpha l-3Ga4 beta 1-G1cNAc carbohydrate on endothelial cells in most organs and tissues. Finally, lectin staining of the basement membrane of the acini in the exocrine pancreas suggests the presence of Ga1 alpha 1-3Gal...

  15. The rpg4-mediated resistance to wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) requires Rpg5, a second NBS-LRR gene, and an actin depolymerization factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Richards, J; Gross, T; Druka, A; Kleinhofs, A; Steffenson, B; Acevedo, M; Brueggeman, R

    2013-04-01

    The rpg4 gene confers recessive resistance to several races of wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) and Rpg5 provides dominant resistance against isolates of the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) in barley. The rpg4 and Rpg5 genes are tightly linked on chromosome 5H, and positional cloning using high-resolution populations clearly separated the genes, unambiguously identifying Rpg5; however, the identity of rpg4 remained unclear. High-resolution genotyping of critical recombinants at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus, designated here as rpg4-mediated resistance locus (RMRL) delimited two distinct yet tightly linked loci required for resistance, designated as RMRL1 and RMRL2. Utilizing virus-induced gene silencing, each gene at RMRL1, i.e., HvRga1 (a nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat [NBS-LRR] domain gene), Rpg5 (an NBS-LRR-protein kinase domain gene), and HvAdf3 (an actin depolymerizing factor-like gene), was individually silenced followed by inoculation with P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ. Silencing each gene changed the reaction type from incompatible to compatible, indicating that all three genes are required for rpg4-mediated resistance. This stem rust resistance mechanism in barley follows the emerging theme of unrelated pairs of genetically linked NBS-LRR genes required for specific pathogen recognition and resistance. It also appears that actin cytoskeleton dynamics may play an important role in determining resistance against several races of stem rust in barley.

  16. The Arabidopsis NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 genes are functionally redundant and are required in early embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Fornari

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y is a trimeric transcription factor composed of three distinct subunits called NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC. In Arabidopsis thaliana, NF-Y subunits are known to play roles in many processes, such as gametogenesis, embryogenesis, seed development, drought resistance, ABA signaling, flowering time, primary root elongation, Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER stress response and blue light responses. Here, we report that the closely related NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 genes control early embryogenesis. Detailed GUS and in situ analyses showed that NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 are expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues with the highest expression being during embryo development from the globular to the torpedo embryo stage. Plants from the nf-ya3 and nf-ya8 single mutants do not display any obvious phenotypic alteration, whereas nf-ya3 nf-ya8 double mutants are embryo lethal. Morphological analyses showed that the nf-ya3 nf-ya8 embryos fail to undergo to the heart stage and develop into abnormal globular embryos with both proembryo and suspensor characterized by a disordered cell cluster with an irregular shape, suggesting defects in embryo development. The suppression of both NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 gene expression by RNAi experiments resulted in defective embryos that phenocopied the nf-ya3 nf-ya8 double mutants, whereas complementation experiments partially rescued the abnormal globular nf-ya3 nf-ya8 embryos, confirming that NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 are required in early embryogenesis. Finally, the lack of GFP expression of the auxin responsive DR5rev::GFP marker line in double mutant embryos suggested that mutations in both NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 affect auxin response in early developing embryos. Our findings indicate that NF-YA3 and NF-YA8 are functionally redundant genes required in early embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  17. Candida albicans AGE3, the ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1, is required for hyphal growth and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lettner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyphal growth and multidrug resistance of C. albicans are important features for virulence and antifungal therapy of this pathogenic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show by phenotypic complementation analysis that the C. albicans gene AGE3 is the functional ortholog of the yeast ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1. The finding that the gene is required for efficient endocytosis points to an important functional role of Age3p in endosomal compartments. Most C. albicans age3Delta mutant cells which grew as cell clusters under yeast growth conditions showed defects in filamentation under different hyphal growth conditions and were almost completely disabled for invasive filamentous growth. Under hyphal growth conditions only a fraction of age3Delta cells shows a wild-type-like polarization pattern of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts. Moreover, age3Delta cells were highly susceptible to several unrelated toxic compounds including antifungal azole drugs. Irrespective of the AGE3 genotype, C-terminal fusions of GFP to the drug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p were predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. Moreover, the plasma membranes of wild-type and age3Delta mutant cells contained similar amounts of Cdr1p, Cdr2p and Mdr1p. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that the defect in sustaining filament elongation is probably caused by the failure of age3Delta cells to polarize the actin cytoskeleton and possibly of inefficient endocytosis. The high susceptibility of age3Delta cells to azoles is not caused by inefficient transport of efflux pumps to the cell membrane. A possible role of a vacuolar defect of age3Delta cells in drug susceptibility is proposed and discussed. In conclusion, our study shows that the ARF-GAP Age3p is required for hyphal growth which is an important virulence factor of C. albicans and essential for detoxification of azole drugs which are routinely used for antifungal therapy. Thus, it

  18. Expression of the putA gene encoding proline dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus is independent of NtrC regulation but requires an Lrp-like activator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuntje, B; Masepohl, B; Klipp, W

    1995-11-01

    Four Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants unable to grow with proline as the sole nitrogen source were isolated by random Tn5 mutagenesis. The Tn5 insertions were mapped within two adjacent chromosomal EcoRI fragments. DNA sequence analysis of this region revealed three open reading frames designated selD, putR, and putA. The putA gene codes for a protein of 1,127 amino acid residues which is homologous to PutA of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. The central part of R. capsulatus PutA showed homology to proline dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Put1) and Drosophila melanogaster (SlgA). The C-terminal part of PutA exhibited homology to Put2 (pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase) of S. cerevisiae and to aldehyde dehydrogenases from different organisms. Therefore, it seems likely that in R. capsulatus, as in enteric bacteria, both enzymatic steps for proline degradation are catalyzed by a single polypeptide (PutA). The deduced amino acid sequence of PutR (154 amino acid residues) showed homology to the small regulatory proteins Lrp, BkdR, and AsnC. The putR gene, which is divergently transcribed from putA, is essential for proline utilization and codes for an activator of putA expression. The expression of putA was induced by proline and was not affected by ammonia or other amino acids. In addition, putA expression was autoregulated by PutA itself. Mutations in glnB, nifR1 (ntrC), and NifR4 (ntrA encoding sigma 54) had no influence on put gene expression. The open reading frame located downstream of R. capsulatus putR exhibited strong homology to the E. coli selD gene, which is involved in selenium metabolism. R. capsulatus selD mutants exhibited a Put+ phenotype, demonstrating that selD is required neither for viability nor for proline utilization.

  19. The histone demethylase LSD1 is required for estrogen-dependent S100A7 gene expression in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Eun [Department of Systems Biology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomolecule Research Initiative, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yeun Kyu, E-mail: ykjang@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Systems Biology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomolecule Research Initiative, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S100A7 gene is up-regulated in response to estrogen in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histone demethylase LSD1 can associate physically with S100A7 gene promoters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E2-induced S100A7 expression requires the enzymatic activity of LSD1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S100A7 inhibits cell proliferation, implying its tumor suppressor-like function. -- Abstract: S100A7, a member of S100 calcium binding protein family, is highly associated with breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of S100A7 regulation remains unclear. Here we show that long-term treatment with estradiol stimulated S100A7 expression in MCF7 breast cancer cells at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Both treatment with a histone demethylase LSD1 inhibitor and shRNA-based knockdown of LSD1 expression significantly decreased 17{beta}-estradiol (E2)-induced S100A7 expression. These reduced E2-mediated S100A7 expression are rescued by the overexpressed wild-type LSD1 but not by its catalytically inactive mutant. Our data showed in vivo association of LSD1 with S100A7 promoters, confirming the potential role of LSD1 in regulating S100A7 expression. S100A7 knockdown increased both normal cell growth and estrogen-induced cell proliferation, suggesting a negative influence by S100A7 on the growth of cancer cells. Together, our data suggest that estrogen-induced S100A7 expression mediated by the histone demethylase LSD1 may downregulate breast cancer cell proliferation, implying a potential tumor suppressor-like function for S100A7.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa high-level resistance to polymyxins and other antimicrobial peptides requires cprA, a gene that is disrupted in the PAO1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutu, Alina D; Rodgers, Nicole S; Park, Jihye; Moskowitz, Samuel M

    2015-09-01

    The arn locus, found in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, mediates resistance to polymyxins and other cationic antimicrobial peptides through 4-amino-l-arabinose modification of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, several two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) control the arn locus, which is necessary but not sufficient for these resistance phenotypes. A previous transposon mutagenesis screen to identify additional polymyxin resistance genes that these systems regulate implicated an open reading frame designated PA1559 in the genome of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Resequencing of this chromosomal region and bioinformatics analysis for a variety of P. aeruginosa strains revealed that in the sequenced PAO1 strain, a guanine deletion at the end of PA1559 results in a frameshift and truncation of a full-length open reading frame that also encompasses PA1560 in non-PAO1 strains, such as P. aeruginosa PAK. Deletion analysis in the PAK strain showed that this full-length open reading frame, designated cprA, is necessary for polymyxin resistance conferred by activating mutations in the PhoPQ, PmrAB, and CprRS TCSs. The cprA gene was also required for PmrAB-mediated resistance to other cationic antimicrobial peptides in the PAK strain. Repair of the mutated cprA allele in the PAO1 strain restored polymyxin resistance conferred by an activating TCS mutation. The deletion of cprA did not affect the arn-mediated lipid A modification, indicating that the CprA protein is necessary for a different aspect of polymyxin resistance. This protein has a domain structure with a strong similarity to the extended short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family that comprises isomerases, lyases, and oxidoreductases. These results suggest a new avenue through which to pursue targeted inhibition of polymyxin resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Virk

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

  2. The histone demethylase LSD1 is required for estrogen-dependent S100A7 gene expression in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Seung Eun; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► S100A7 gene is up-regulated in response to estrogen in breast cancer cells. ► Histone demethylase LSD1 can associate physically with S100A7 gene promoters. ► E2-induced S100A7 expression requires the enzymatic activity of LSD1. ► S100A7 inhibits cell proliferation, implying its tumor suppressor-like function. -- Abstract: S100A7, a member of S100 calcium binding protein family, is highly associated with breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of S100A7 regulation remains unclear. Here we show that long-term treatment with estradiol stimulated S100A7 expression in MCF7 breast cancer cells at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Both treatment with a histone demethylase LSD1 inhibitor and shRNA-based knockdown of LSD1 expression significantly decreased 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced S100A7 expression. These reduced E2-mediated S100A7 expression are rescued by the overexpressed wild-type LSD1 but not by its catalytically inactive mutant. Our data showed in vivo association of LSD1 with S100A7 promoters, confirming the potential role of LSD1 in regulating S100A7 expression. S100A7 knockdown increased both normal cell growth and estrogen-induced cell proliferation, suggesting a negative influence by S100A7 on the growth of cancer cells. Together, our data suggest that estrogen-induced S100A7 expression mediated by the histone demethylase LSD1 may downregulate breast cancer cell proliferation, implying a potential tumor suppressor-like function for S100A7.

  3. A Tourist-like MITE insertion in the upstream region of the BnFLC.A10 gene is associated with vernalization requirement in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jinna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. has spring and winter genotypes adapted to different growing seasons. Winter genotypes do not flower before the onset of winter, thus leading to a longer vegetative growth period that promotes the accumulation and allocation of more resources to seed production. The development of winter genotypes enabled the rapeseed to spread rapidly from southern to northern Europe and other temperate regions of the world. The molecular basis underlying the evolutionary transition from spring- to winter- type rapeseed is not known, however, and needs to be elucidated. Results We fine-mapped the spring environment specific quantitative trait locus (QTL for flowering time, qFT10-4,in a doubled haploid (DH mapping population of rapeseed derived from a cross between Tapidor (winter-type and Ningyou7 (semi-winter and delimited the qFT10-4 to an 80-kb region on chromosome A10 of B. napus. The BnFLC.A10 gene, an ortholog of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC in Arabidopsis, was cloned from the QTL. We identified 12 polymorphic sites between BnFLC.A10 parental alleles of the TN-DH population in the upstream region and in intron 1. Expression of both BnFLC.A10 alleles decreased during vernalization, but decreased more slowly in the winter parent Tapidor. Haplotyping and association analysis showed that one of the polymorphic sites upstream of BnFLC.A10 is strongly associated with the vernalization requirement of rapeseed (r2 = 0.93, χ2 = 0.50. This polymorphic site is derived from a Tourist-like miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE insertion/deletion in the upstream region of BnFLC.A10. The MITE sequence was not present in the BnFLC.A10 gene in spring-type rapeseed, nor in ancestral ‘A’ genome species B. rapa genotypes. Our results suggest that the insertion may have occurred in winter rapeseed after B. napus speciation. Conclusions Our findings strongly suggest that (i BnFLC.A10 is the gene underlying qFT10

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the bHLH gene family in planarians identifies factors required for adult neurogenesis and neuronal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Martis W; Brown, David D R; Nisperos, Sean V; Stanley, Brianna N; Pearson, Bret J; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2013-12-01

    In contrast to most well-studied model organisms, planarians have a remarkable ability to completely regenerate a functional nervous system from a pluripotent stem cell population. Thus, planarians provide a powerful model to identify genes required for adult neurogenesis in vivo. We analyzed the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors, many of which are crucial for nervous system development and have been implicated in human diseases. However, their potential roles in adult neurogenesis or central nervous system (CNS) function are not well understood. We identified 44 planarian bHLH homologs, determined their patterns of expression in the animal and assessed their functions using RNAi. We found nine bHLHs expressed in stem cells and neurons that are required for CNS regeneration. Our analyses revealed that homologs of coe, hes (hesl-3) and sim label progenitors in intact planarians, and following amputation we observed an enrichment of coe(+) and sim(+) progenitors near the wound site. RNAi knockdown of coe, hesl-3 or sim led to defects in CNS regeneration, including failure of the cephalic ganglia to properly pattern and a loss of expression of distinct neuronal subtype markers. Together, these data indicate that coe, hesl-3 and sim label neural progenitor cells, which serve to generate new neurons in uninjured or regenerating animals. Our study demonstrates that this model will be useful to investigate how stem cells interpret and respond to genetic and environmental cues in the CNS and to examine the role of bHLH transcription factors in adult tissue regeneration.

  5. Identification of the promoter region required for human adiponectin gene transcription: Association with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β and tumor necrosis factor-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Hironori; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Moriuchi, Akie; Fukushima, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Ryoko; Abiru, Norio; Uotani, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Eiji; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2005-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, is involved in insulin sensitizing and has anti-atherosclerotic properties. Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in obese individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreases the expression of adiponectin in adipocytes. The aims of the present study were: (1) to identify the promoter region responsible for basal transcription of the human adiponectin gene, and (2) to investigate the mechanism by which adiponectin was regulated by TNF-α. The human adiponectin promoter (2.1 kb) was isolated and used for luciferase reporter analysis by transient transfection into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the promoter region from -676 to +41 was sufficient for basal transcriptional activity. Mutation analysis of putative response elements for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) (-431 to -423) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) (-230 to -224) showed that both elements were required for basal promoter activity. Adiponectin transcription was increased 3-fold in cells that over-expressed constitutively active C/EBP-β. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, using nuclear extract from 3T3-L1 cells and the -258 to -199 region as a probe, demonstrated specific DNA-protein binding, which was abolished by TNF-α treatment. The present data indicate that the putative response elements for SREBP and C/EBP are required for human adiponectin promoter activity, and that suppression by TNF-α may, at least in part, be associated with inactivation of C/EBP-β

  6. The Drosophila Su(var)3-7 gene is required for oogenesis and female fertility, genetically interacts with piwi and aubergine, but impacts only weakly transposon silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basquin, Denis; Spierer, Anne; Begeot, Flora; Koryakov, Dmitry E; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Ronsseray, Stéphane; Vieira, Cristina; Spierer, Pierre; Delattre, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is made of repetitive sequences, mainly transposable elements (TEs), the regulation of which is critical for genome stability. We have analyzed the role of the heterochromatin-associated Su(var)3-7 protein in Drosophila ovaries. We present evidences that Su(var)3-7 is required for correct oogenesis and female fertility. It accumulates in heterochromatic domains of ovarian germline and somatic cells nuclei, where it co-localizes with HP1. Homozygous mutant females display ovaries with frequent degenerating egg-chambers. Absence of Su(var)3-7 in embryos leads to defects in meiosis and first mitotic divisions due to chromatin fragmentation or chromosome loss, showing that Su(var)3-7 is required for genome integrity. Females homozygous for Su(var)3-7 mutations strongly impair repression of P-transposable element induced gonadal dysgenesis but have minor effects on other TEs. Su(var)3-7 mutations reduce piRNA cluster transcription and slightly impact ovarian piRNA production. However, this modest piRNA reduction does not correlate with transposon de-silencing, suggesting that the moderate effect of Su(var)3-7 on some TE repression is not linked to piRNA production. Strikingly, Su(var)3-7 genetically interacts with the piwi and aubergine genes, key components of the piRNA pathway, by strongly impacting female fertility without impairing transposon silencing. These results lead us to propose that the interaction between Su(var)3-7 and piwi or aubergine controls important developmental processes independently of transposon silencing.

  7. The Drosophila Su(var)3–7 Gene Is Required for Oogenesis and Female Fertility, Genetically Interacts with piwi and aubergine, but Impacts Only Weakly Transposon Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeot, Flora; Koryakov, Dmitry E.; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Ronsseray, Stéphane; Vieira, Cristina; Spierer, Pierre; Delattre, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is made of repetitive sequences, mainly transposable elements (TEs), the regulation of which is critical for genome stability. We have analyzed the role of the heterochromatin-associated Su(var)3–7 protein in Drosophila ovaries. We present evidences that Su(var)3–7 is required for correct oogenesis and female fertility. It accumulates in heterochromatic domains of ovarian germline and somatic cells nuclei, where it co-localizes with HP1. Homozygous mutant females display ovaries with frequent degenerating egg-chambers. Absence of Su(var)3–7 in embryos leads to defects in meiosis and first mitotic divisions due to chromatin fragmentation or chromosome loss, showing that Su(var)3–7 is required for genome integrity. Females homozygous for Su(var)3–7 mutations strongly impair repression of P-transposable element induced gonadal dysgenesis but have minor effects on other TEs. Su(var)3–7 mutations reduce piRNA cluster transcription and slightly impact ovarian piRNA production. However, this modest piRNA reduction does not correlate with transposon de-silencing, suggesting that the moderate effect of Su(var)3–7 on some TE repression is not linked to piRNA production. Strikingly, Su(var)3–7 genetically interacts with the piwi and aubergine genes, key components of the piRNA pathway, by strongly impacting female fertility without impairing transposon silencing. These results lead us to propose that the interaction between Su(var)3–7 and piwi or aubergine controls important developmental processes independently of transposon silencing. PMID:24820312

  8. Final Report Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER20307 Lipopolysaccharide Structures and Genes Required for Root Nodule Development August 1, 2004 to July 31, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, K. Dale [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee,WI (United States)

    2008-12-07

    the roles of other important bacterial factors at multiple stages of nodule development. The project also investigated the biosynthesis of this bacterial factor. It has a complex structure and the first accomplishment was the determination of the sequences of genetic regions known to be important. Next the discovered genes were mutated to identify the 26 that are required for its synthesis. In addition, six others were discovered that are believed to change its structure under various environmental conditions. By studying mutants affected in specific genes, genes were associated with each of the predicted steps in the biosynthesis. Current work is testing the predicted biosynthetic model with studies conducted in vitro with bacterial extracts. Overall, the work funded by this grant establishes this system as a model for host-bacterial interactions based on specific polysaccharide structure. All areas that are needed for a comprehensive model have been significantly advanced: the biological function, the structural features that are crucial, the complete set of bacterial genes involved, and a model for the biosynthesis.

  9. YUCCA Genes Are Expressed in Response to Leaf Adaxial-Abaxial Juxtaposition and Are Required for Leaf Margin Development1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Ben; Wang, Hua; Li, Jiqin; Huang, Hai; Xu, Lin

    2011-01-01

    During leaf development, the formation of leaf adaxial-abaxial polarity at the primordium stage is crucial for subsequent leaf expansion. However, little is known about the genetic control from polarity establishment to blade outgrowth. The leaf margin, comprising elongated margin cells and hydathodes, is thought to affect leaf expansion. Here, we show that mutants with defective leaf polarity or with loss of function in the multiple auxin-biosynthetic YUCCA (YUC) genes exhibited a similar abnormal leaf margin and less-expanded leaves. Leaf margins of these mutants contained fewer hydathodes and an increased number of cell patches in which the patterns of epidermal cells resembled those of hydathodes. The previously characterized leaf-abaxialized asymmetric leaves2 (as2) revoluta (rev) and leaf-adaxialized kanadi1 (kan1) kan2 double mutants both produce finger-shaped, hydathode-like protrusions on adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces, respectively. YUCs are required for formation of the protrusions, as those produced by as2 rev and kan1 kan2 were absent in the yuc1 yuc2 yuc4 triple mutant background. Expressions of YUC1, YUC2, and YUC4 were spatially regulated in the leaf, being associated with hydathodes in wild-type leaves and protrusions on as2 rev and kan1 kan2 leaves. In addition, inhibition of auxin transport by treatment of seedlings with N-(1-naphtyl) phtalamic acid or disruption of the auxin gradient by transforming plants with the 35S:YUC1 construct also blocked leaf margin development. Collectively, our data show that expressions of YUCs in the leaf respond to the adaxial-abaxial juxtaposition, and that the activities of auxin mediate leaf margin development, which subsequently promotes blade outgrowth. PMID:22003085

  10. A Zinc-Finger-Family Transcription Factor, AbVf19, Is Required for the Induction of a Gene Subset Important for Virulence in Alternaria brassicicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Akhil [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Ohm, Robin A. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Oxiles, Lindsay [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Brooks, Fred [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Lawrence, Christopher B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cho, Yangrae [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States)

    2011-10-26

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen with a broad host range within the family Brassicaceae. It produces secondary metabolites that marginally affect virulence. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CDWE) have been considered important for pathogenesis but none of them individually have been identified as significant virulence factors in A. brassicicola. In this study, knockout mutants of a gene, AbVf19, were created and produced considerably smaller lesions than the wild type on inoculated host plants. The presence of tandem zinc-finger domains in the predicted amino acid sequence and nuclear localization of AbVf19- reporter protein suggested that it was a transcription factor. Gene expression comparisons using RNA-seq identified 74 genes being downregulated in the mutant during a late stage of infection. Among the 74 downregulated genes, 28 were putative CWDE genes. These were hydrolytic enzyme genes that composed a small fraction of genes within each family of cellulases, pectinases, cutinases, and proteinases. The mutants grew slower than the wild type on an axenic medium with pectin as a major carbon source. This study demonstrated the existence and the importance of a transcription factor that regulates a suite of genes that are important for decomposing and utilizing plant material during the late stage of plant infection.

  11. Limited agreement of independent RNAi screens for virus-required host genes owes more to false-negative than false-positive factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Hao

    Full Text Available Systematic, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi analysis is a powerful approach to identify gene functions that support or modulate selected biological processes. An emerging challenge shared with some other genome-wide approaches is that independent RNAi studies often show limited agreement in their lists of implicated genes. To better understand this, we analyzed four genome-wide RNAi studies that identified host genes involved in influenza virus replication. These studies collectively identified and validated the roles of 614 cell genes, but pair-wise overlap among the four gene lists was only 3% to 15% (average 6.7%. However, a number of functional categories were overrepresented in multiple studies. The pair-wise overlap of these enriched-category lists was high, ∼19%, implying more agreement among studies than apparent at the gene level. Probing this further, we found that the gene lists implicated by independent studies were highly connected in interacting networks by independent functional measures such as protein-protein interactions, at rates significantly higher than predicted by chance. We also developed a general, model-based approach to gauge the effects of false-positive and false-negative factors and to estimate, from a limited number of studies, the total number of genes involved in a process. For influenza virus replication, this novel statistical approach estimates the total number of cell genes involved to be ∼2,800. This and multiple other aspects of our experimental and computational results imply that, when following good quality control practices, the low overlap between studies is primarily due to false negatives rather than false-positive gene identifications. These results and methods have implications for and applications to multiple forms of genome-wide analysis.

  12. Comparative transcript profiling of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis identifies SFL2, a C. albicans gene required for virulence in a reconstituted epithelial infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spiering, Martin J

    2010-02-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are closely related species displaying differences in virulence and genome content, therefore providing potential opportunities to identify novel C. albicans virulence genes. C. albicans gene arrays were used for comparative analysis of global gene expression in the two species in reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHE). C. albicans (SC5314) showed upregulation of hypha-specific and virulence genes within 30 min postinoculation, coinciding with rapid induction of filamentation and increased RHE damage. C. dubliniensis (CD36) showed no detectable upregulation of hypha-specific genes, grew as yeast, and caused limited RHE damage. Several genes absent or highly divergent in C. dubliniensis were upregulated in C. albicans. One such gene, SFL2 (orf19.3969), encoding a putative heat shock factor, was deleted in C. albicans. DeltaDeltasfl2 cells failed to filament under a range of hypha-inducing conditions and exhibited greatly reduced RHE damage, reversed by reintroduction of SFL2 into the DeltaDeltasfl2 strain. Moreover, SFL2 overexpression in C. albicans triggered hyphal morphogenesis. Although SFL2 deletion had no apparent effect on host survival in the murine model of systemic infection, DeltaDeltasfl2 strain-infected kidney tissues contained only yeast cells. These results suggest a role for SFL2 in morphogenesis and an indirect role in C. albicans pathogenesis in epithelial tissues.

  13. Characterization of RAD4 gene required for ultraviolet-induced excision repair of Saccharomyces cerevisiae propagated in Escherichia coli without inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, I.S.; Kim, J.B.; Lee, K.N.; Park, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    The previously isolated RAD4 gene designated as pPC1 from the genomic library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae appeared to propagate in Escherichia coli and yet retained its complementing activity of rad4 mutants without inactivation. The subcloned RAD4 gene was found to be localized within a 2.5 kb DNA fragment flanking Bg/II and BamHI sites in the insert DNA, and was shown to have the same restriction map as a yeast chromosomal DNA, as determined by Southern hybridization. Tetrad analysis and pulse-field chromosome mapping have revealed that the cloned RAD4 gene can be mapped and integrated into the yeast chromosome V, the actual site of this gene. DNA-tRNA hybridization has shown that the isolated RAD4 gene did not contain a suppressor tRNA gene. These results have indicated that the pPC1 is a functional RAD4 gene playing a unique role involved in the nucleotide excision repair of yeast without any genetic change during amplification in E. coli. (author)

  14. Molecular study on the carAB operon reveals that carB gene is required for swimming and biofilm formation in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Tao; Rou, Wei; Song, Xue; Guo, Jing; Fan, Xiaojing; Kamau, Gicharu Gibson; Zou, Huasong

    2015-10-23

    The carA and carB genes code the small and large subunits of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase (CPS) that responsible for arginine and pyrimidine production. The purpose of this work was to study the gene organization and expression pattern of carAB operon, and the biological functions of carA and carB genes in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. RT-PCR method was employed to identify the full length of carAB operon transcript in X. citri subsp. citri. The promoter of carAB operon was predicted and analyzed its activity by fusing a GUS reporter gene. The swimming motility was tested on 0.25% agar NY plates with 1% glucose. Biofilm was measured by cell adhesion to polyvinyl chloride 96-well plate. The results indicated that carAB operon was composed of five gene members carA-orf-carB-greA-rpfE. A single promoter was predicted from the nucleotide sequence upstream of carAB operon, and its sensitivity to glutamic acid, uracil and arginine was confirmed by fusing a GUS reporter gene. Deletion mutagenesis of carB gene resulted in reduced abilities in swimming on soft solid media and in forming biofilm on polystyrene microtiter plates. From these results, we concluded that carAB operon was involved in multiple biological processes in X. citri subsp. citri.

  15. A Novel Murine Gene, Sickle tail, Linked to the Danforth's short tail Locus, Is Required for Normal Development of the Intervertebral Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Semba, Kei; Araki, Kimi; Li, Zhengzhe; Matsumoto, Ken-ichirou; Suzuki, Misao; Nakagata, Naoki; Takagi, Katsumasa; Takeya, Motohiro; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Araki, Masatake; Imai, Kenji; Abe, Kuniya; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2006-01-01

    We established the mutant mouse line, B6;CB-SktGtAyu8021IMEG (SktGt), through gene-trap mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells. The novel gene identified, called Sickle tail (Skt), is composed of 19 exons and encodes a protein of 1352 amino acids. Expression of a reporter gene was detected in the notochord during embryogenesis and in the nucleus pulposus of mice. Compression of some of the nuclei pulposi in the intervertebral discs (IVDs) appeared at embryonic day (E) 17.5, resulting in a kinky-...

  16. The Four Arabidopsis Reduced Wall Acetylation Genes are Expressed in Secondary Wall-Containing Cells and Required for the Acetylation of Xylan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylan is one of the major polysaccharides in cellulosic biomass, and understanding the mechanisms underlying xylan biosynthesis will potentially help us design strategies to produce cellulosic biomass better suited for biofuel production. Although a number of genes have been show...

  17. Arabidopsis GH3-LIKE DEFENSE GENE 1 is required for accumulation of salicylic acid, activation of defense responses and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeeswaran, Guru; Raina, Surabhi; Acharya, Biswa R; Maqbool, Shahina B; Mosher, Stephen L; Appel, Heidi M; Schultz, Jack C; Klessig, Daniel F; Raina, Ramesh

    2007-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the GH3-like gene family consists of 19 members, several of which have been shown to adenylate the plant hormones jasmonic acid, indole acetic acid and salicylic acid (SA). In some cases, this adenylation has been shown to catalyze hormone conjugation to amino acids. Here we report molecular characterization of the GH3-LIKE DEFENSE GENE 1 (GDG1), a member of the GH3-like gene family, and show that GDG1 is an important component of SA-mediated defense against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Expression of GDG1 is induced earlier and to a higher level in response to avirulent pathogens compared to virulent pathogens. gdg1 null mutants are compromised in several pathogen defense responses, including activation of defense genes and resistance against virulent and avirulent bacterial pathogens. Accumulation of free and glucoside-conjugated SA (SAG) in response to pathogen infection is compromised in gdg1 mutants. All defense-related phenotypes of gdg1 can be rescued by external application of SA, suggesting that gdg1 mutants are defective in the SA-mediated defense pathway(s) and that GDG1 functions upstream of SA. Our results suggest that GDG1 contributes to both basal and resistance gene-mediated inducible defenses against P. syringae (and possibly other pathogens) by playing a critical role in regulating the levels of pathogen-inducible SA. GDG1 is allelic to the PBS3 (avrPphB susceptible) gene.

  18. SUR1 (CSG1/BCL21), a gene necessary for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of high Ca2+ concentrations at 37 degrees C, is required for mannosylation of inositolphosphorylceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, T J; Fu, D; Rivera, J; Monaghan, E; Gable, K; Dunn, T M

    1997-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells require two genes, CSG1/SUR1 and CSG2, for growth in 50 mM Ca2+, but not 50 mM Sr2+. CSG2 was previously shown to be required for the mannosylation of inositolphosphorylceramide (IPC) to form mannosylinositolphosphorylceramide (MIPC). Here we demonstrate that SUR1/CSG1 is both genetically and biochemically related to CSG2. Like CSG2, SUR1/CSG1 is required for IPC mannosylation. A 93-amino acid stretch of Csg1p shows 29% identity with the alpha-1, 6-mannosyltransferase encoded by OCH1. The SUR1/CSG1 gene is a dose-dependent suppressor of the Ca(2+)-sensitive phenotype of the csg2 mutant, but overexpression of CSG2 does not suppress the Ca2+ sensitivity of the csg1 mutant. The csg1 and csg2 mutants display normal growth in YPD, indicating that mannosylation of sphingolipids is not essential. Increased osmolarity of the growth medium increases the Ca2+ tolerance of csg1 and csg2 mutant cells, suggesting that altered cell wall synthesis causes Ca(2+)-induced death. Hydroxylation of IPC-C to form IPC-D requires CCC2, a gene encoding an intracellular Cu2+ transporter. Increased expression of CCC2 or increased Cu2+ concentration in the growth medium enhances the Ca2+ tolerance of csg1 mutants, suggesting that accumulation of IPC-C renders csg1 cells Ca2+ sensitive.

  19. A Major Facilitator Superfamily protein encoded by TcMucK gene is not required for cuticle pigmentation, growth and development in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seulgi; Noh, Mi Young; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-01

    Insect cuticle pigmentation and sclerotization (tanning) are vital physiological processes for insect growth, development and survival. We have previously identified several colorless precursor molecules as well as enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and processing to yield the mature intensely colored body cuticle pigments. A recent study indicated that the Bombyx mori (silkmoth) gene, BmMucK, which encodes a protein orthologous to a Culex pipiens quiquefasciatus (Southern house mosquito) cis,cis, muconate transporter, is a member of the "Major Facilitator Superfamily" (MFS) of transporter proteins and is associated with the appearance of pigmented body segments of naturally occurring body color mutants of B. mori. While RNA interference of the BmMucK gene failed to result in any observable phenotype, RNAi using a dsRNA for an orthologous gene from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was reported to result in molting defects and darkening of the cuticle and some body parts, leading to the suggestion that orthologs of MucK genes may differ in their functions among insects. To verify the role and essentiality of the ortholog of this gene in development and body pigmentation function in T. castaneum we obtained cDNAs for the orthologous gene (TcMucK) from RNA isolated from the GA-1 wild-type strain of T. castaneum. The sequence of a 1524 nucleotides-long cDNA for TcMucK which encodes the putatively full-length protein, was assembled from two overlapping RT-PCR fragments and the expression profile of this gene during development was analyzed by real-time PCR. This cDNA encodes a 55.8 kDa protein consisting of 507 amino acid residues and includes 11 putative transmembrane segments. Transcripts of TcMucK were detected throughout all of the developmental stages analyzed. The function of this gene was explored by injection of two different double-stranded RNAs targeting different regions of the TcMucK gene (dsTcMucKs) into young larvae to down

  20. The insulator factor CTCF controls MHC class II gene expression and is required for the formation of long-distance chromatin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Parimal; Gomez, Jorge A.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2008-01-01

    Knockdown of the insulator factor CCCTC binding factor (CTCF), which binds XL9, an intergenic element located between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, was found to diminish expression of these genes. The mechanism involved interactions between CTCF and class II transactivator (CIITA), the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) gene expression, and the formation of long-distance chromatin loops between XL9 and the proximal promoter regions of these MHC-II genes. The interactions were inducible and dependent on the activity of CIITA, regulatory factor X, and CTCF. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridizations show that both genes can be expressed simultaneously from the same chromosome. Collectively, the results suggest a model whereby both HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 loci can interact simultaneously with XL9, and describe a new regulatory mechanism for these MHC-II genes involving the alteration of the general chromatin conformation of the region and their regulation by CTCF. PMID:18347100

  1. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  2. Mutations in the gene for EF-G reduce the requirement for 4.5S RNA in the growth of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S

    1987-01-01

    A general strategy is described for the isolation of suppressors of essential genes whose functions are unknown. This strategy was used to analyze the role of 4.5S RNA, an essential RNA of E. coli. In this strategy, the structural gene for 4.5S RNA is fused to the Ptac promoter in such a way that....... Furthermore, the increased sedimentation velocity is sensitive to the antibiotic puromycin. These results show that 4.5S RNA physically associates with the ribosome in performing its essential function, and that this association is mediated by elongation factor G....

  3. Mutations in the gene for EF-G reduce the requirement for 4.5S RNA in the growth of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S

    1987-01-01

    A general strategy is described for the isolation of suppressors of essential genes whose functions are unknown. This strategy was used to analyze the role of 4.5S RNA, an essential RNA of E. coli. In this strategy, the structural gene for 4.5S RNA is fused to the Ptac promoter in such a way....... Furthermore, the increased sedimentation velocity is sensitive to the antibiotic puromycin. These results show that 4.5S RNA physically associates with the ribosome in performing its essential function, and that this association is mediated by elongation factor G....

  4. Identification of the genes required for the culture of Liberibacter crescens, the closest cultured relative of the uncultured Liberibacter plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin-Kwan eLai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here Tn5 random transposon mutagenesis was used to identify the essential elements for culturing Liberibacter crescens BT-1 that can serve as antimicrobial targets for the closely related pathogens of citrus, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las and tomato and potato, Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso. In order to gain insight on the virulence, metabolism, and culturability of the pathogens within the genus Liberibacter, a mini-Tn5 transposon derivative system consisting of a gene specifying resistance to kanamycin, flanked by a 19-base-pair terminal repeat sequence of Tn5, was used for the genome-wide mutagenesis of L. crescens BT-1 and created an insertion mutant library. By analyzing the location of insertions using Sanger and Illumina Mi-Seq sequencing, 314 genes are proposed as essential for the culture of L. crescens BT-1 on BM-7 medium. Of those genes, 76 are not present in the uncultured Liberibacter pathogens and, as a result, suggest molecules necessary for the culturing these pathogens. Those molecules include the aromatic amino acids, several vitamins, histidine, cysteine, lipopolysaccharides, and fatty acids. In addition, the 238 essential genes of L. crescens in common with L. asiaticus are potential targets for the development of therapeutics against the disease.

  5. A human model for multigenic inheritance : Phenotypic expression in Hirschsprung disease requires both the RET gene and a new 9q31 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolk, S; Pelet, A; Hofstra, RMW; Angrist, M; Salomon, R; Croaker, D; Buys, CHCM; Lyonnet, S; Chakravarti, A

    2000-01-01

    Reduced penetrance in genetic disorders may be either dependent or independent of the genetic background of gene carriers. Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) demonstrates a complex pattern of inheritance with approximate to 50% of familial cases being heterozygous for mutations in the receptor tyrosine

  6. The MAP kinase-encoding gene MgFus3 of the non-appressorium phytopathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola is required for penetration and in vitro pycnidia formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousin, A.; Mehrabi, R.; Guilleroux, M.; Dufresne, M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Waalwijk, C.; Langin, T.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    In eukaryotes, a family of serine/threonine protein kinases known as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is involved in the transduction of a variety of extracellular signals and in the regulation of growth and development. We identified a MAPK-encoding gene in Mycosphaerella graminicola

  7. A Novel WRKY transcription factor is required for induction of PR-1a gene expression by salicylic acid and bacterial elicitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Verk, Marcel C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/327618671; Pappaioannou, Dimitri; Neeleman, Lyda; Bol, John F; Linthorst, Huub J M

    PR-1a is a salicylic acid-inducible defense gene of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). One-hybrid screens identified a novel tobacco WRKY transcription factor (NtWRKY12) with specific binding sites in the PR-1a promoter at positions -564 (box WK(1)) and -859 (box WK(2)). NtWRKY12 belongs to the class of

  8. A Genetic Screen for Pathogenicity Genes in the Hemibiotrophic Fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum Identifies the Plasma Membrane Proton Pump Pma2 Required for Host Penetration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Korn

    Full Text Available We used insertional mutagenesis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation (ATMT to isolate pathogenicity mutants of Colletotrichum higginsianum. From a collection of 7200 insertion mutants we isolated 75 mutants with reduced symptoms. 19 of these were affected in host penetration, while 17 were affected in later stages of infection, like switching to necrotrophic growth. For 16 mutants the location of T-DNA insertions could be identified by PCR. A potential plasma membrane H(+-ATPase Pma2 was targeted in five independent insertion mutants. We genetically inactivated the Ku80 component of the non-homologous end-joining pathway in C. higginsianum to establish an efficient gene knockout protocol. Chpma2 deletion mutants generated by homologous recombination in the ΔChku80 background form fully melanized appressoria but entirely fail to penetrate the host tissue and are non-pathogenic. The ChPMA2 gene is induced upon appressoria formation and infection of A. thaliana. Pma2 activity is not important for vegetative growth of saprophytically growing mycelium, since the mutant shows no growth penalty under these conditions. Colletotrichum higginsianum codes for a closely related gene (ChPMA1, which is highly expressed under most growth conditions. ChPMA1 is more similar to the homologous yeast genes for plasma membrane pumps. We propose that expression of a specific proton pump early during infection may be common to many appressoria forming fungal pathogens as we found ChPMA2 orthologs in several plant pathogenic fungi.

  9. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.; Amati, G.; Andersen, K.K.; Arnaud, M.; Asai, K.; Ashikaga, S.; Aymerich, S.; Bessieres, P.; Boland, F.; Brignell, S.C.; Bron, S; Bunai, K.; Chapuis, J; Christiansen, L.C.; Danchin, A.; Debarbouille, M.; Dervyn, E.; Deuerling, E.; Devine, K.; Devine, S.K.; Dreesen, O.; Errington, J.; Fillinger, S.; Foster, S.J.; Fujita, Y.; Galizzi, A.; Gardan, R.; Eschevins, C.; Fukushima, T.; Haga, K.; Harwood, C.R; Hecker, M.; Hosoya, D.; Hullo, M.F.; Kakeshita, H.; Karamata, D.; Kasahara, Y.; Kawamura, F.; Koga, K.; Koski, P.; Kuwana, R.; Imamura, D.; Ishimaru, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Ishio, I.; Le Coq, D.; Masson, A.; Mauel, C.; Meima, Roelf; Mellado, R.P.; Moir, A.; Moriya, S.; Nagakawa, E.; Nanamiya, H.; Nakai, S.; Nygaard, P.; Ogura, M.; Ohanan, T.; O'Reilly, M.; O'Rourke, M.; Pragai, Z.; Pooley, H.M.; Rapoport, G.; Rawlins, J.P.; Rivas, L.A.; Rivolta, C.; Sadaie, A.; Sadaie, Y.; Sarvas, M; Sato, T.; Saxild, H.H.; Scanlan, E.; Schumann, W; Seegers, J.F. M. L.; Sekiguchi, J.; Sekowska, A.; Seror, S.J.; Simon, M.; Stragier, P.; Studer, R.; Takamatsu, H.; Tanaka, T.; Takeuchi, M.; Thomaides, H.B.; Vagner, V.; van Dijl, J.M.; Watabe, K.; Wipat, A; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamane, K.; Yata, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Zuber, U.; Ogasawara, N.; Ishio, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were

  10. Immediate Early Genes Anchor a Biological Pathway of Proteins Required for Memory Formation, Long-Term Depression and Risk for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marballi, Ketan K.; Gallitano, Amelia L.

    2018-01-01

    While the causes of myriad medical and infectious illnesses have been identified, the etiologies of neuropsychiatric illnesses remain elusive. This is due to two major obstacles. First, the risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. Second, numerous genes influence susceptibility for these illnesses. Genome-wide association studies have identified at least 108 genomic loci for schizophrenia, and more are expected to be published shortly. In addition, numerous biological processes contribute to the neuropathology underlying schizophrenia. These include immune dysfunction, synaptic and myelination deficits, vascular abnormalities, growth factor disruption, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction. However, the field of psychiatric genetics lacks a unifying model to explain how environment may interact with numerous genes to influence these various biological processes and cause schizophrenia. Here we describe a biological cascade of proteins that are activated in response to environmental stimuli such as stress, a schizophrenia risk factor. The central proteins in this pathway are critical mediators of memory formation and a particular form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, long-term depression (LTD). Each of these proteins is also implicated in schizophrenia risk. In fact, the pathway includes four genes that map to the 108 loci associated with schizophrenia: GRIN2A, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc3), early growth response 1 (EGR1) and NGFI-A Binding Protein 2 (NAB2); each of which contains the “Index single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)” (most SNP) at its respective locus. Environmental stimuli activate this biological pathway in neurons, resulting in induction of EGR immediate early genes: EGR1, EGR3 and NAB2. We hypothesize that dysfunction in any of the genes in this pathway disrupts the normal activation of Egrs in response to stress. This may result in

  11. Immediate Early Genes Anchor a Biological Pathway of Proteins Required for Memory Formation, Long-Term Depression and Risk for Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan K. Marballi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While the causes of myriad medical and infectious illnesses have been identified, the etiologies of neuropsychiatric illnesses remain elusive. This is due to two major obstacles. First, the risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. Second, numerous genes influence susceptibility for these illnesses. Genome-wide association studies have identified at least 108 genomic loci for schizophrenia, and more are expected to be published shortly. In addition, numerous biological processes contribute to the neuropathology underlying schizophrenia. These include immune dysfunction, synaptic and myelination deficits, vascular abnormalities, growth factor disruption, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR hypofunction. However, the field of psychiatric genetics lacks a unifying model to explain how environment may interact with numerous genes to influence these various biological processes and cause schizophrenia. Here we describe a biological cascade of proteins that are activated in response to environmental stimuli such as stress, a schizophrenia risk factor. The central proteins in this pathway are critical mediators of memory formation and a particular form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, long-term depression (LTD. Each of these proteins is also implicated in schizophrenia risk. In fact, the pathway includes four genes that map to the 108 loci associated with schizophrenia: GRIN2A, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc3, early growth response 1 (EGR1 and NGFI-A Binding Protein 2 (NAB2; each of which contains the “Index single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP” (most SNP at its respective locus. Environmental stimuli activate this biological pathway in neurons, resulting in induction of EGR immediate early genes: EGR1, EGR3 and NAB2. We hypothesize that dysfunction in any of the genes in this pathway disrupts the normal activation of Egrs in response to stress. This may

  12. Semicircular canal morphogenesis in the zebrafish inner ear requires the function of gpr126 (lauscher), an adhesion class G protein-coupled receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Fan-Suo; Abbas, Leila; Baxendale, Sarah; Holdsworth, Celia J.; Swanson, A. George; Slanchev, Krasimir; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Topczewski, Jacek; Whitfield, Tanya T.

    2013-01-01

    Morphogenesis of the semicircular canal ducts in the vertebrate inner ear is a dramatic example of epithelial remodelling in the embryo, and failure of normal canal development results in vestibular dysfunction. In zebrafish and Xenopus, semicircular canal ducts develop when projections of epithelium, driven by extracellular matrix production, push into the otic vesicle and fuse to form pillars. We show that in the zebrafish, extracellular matrix gene expression is high during projection outgrowth and then rapidly downregulated after fusion. Enzymatic disruption of hyaluronan in the projections leads to their collapse and a failure to form pillars: as a result, the ears swell. We have cloned a zebrafish mutant, lauscher (lau), identified by its swollen ear phenotype. The primary defect in the ear is abnormal projection outgrowth and a failure of fusion to form the semicircular canal pillars. Otic expression of extracellular matrix components is highly disrupted: several genes fail to become downregulated and remain expressed at abnormally high levels into late larval stages. The lau mutations disrupt gpr126, an adhesion class G protein-coupled receptor gene. Expression of gpr126 is similar to that of sox10, an ear and neural crest marker, and is partially dependent on sox10 activity. Fusion of canal projections and downregulation of otic versican expression in a hypomorphic lau allele can be restored by cAMP agonists. We propose that Gpr126 acts through a cAMP-mediated pathway to control the outgrowth and adhesion of canal projections in the zebrafish ear via the regulation of extracellular matrix gene expression. PMID:24067352

  13. Cdk7 Is Required for Activity-Dependent Neuronal Gene Expression, Long-Lasting Synaptic Plasticity and Long-Term Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiqin He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, de novo gene expression driven by learning-associated neuronal activities is critical for the formation of long-term memories. However, the signaling machinery mediating neuronal activity-induced gene expression, especially the rapid transcription of immediate-early genes (IEGs remains unclear. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks are a family of serine/threonine kinases that have been firmly established as key regulators of transcription processes underling coordinated cell cycle entry and sequential progression in nearly all types of proliferative cells. Cdk7 is a subunit of transcriptional initiation factor II-H (TFIIH and the only known Cdk-activating kinase (CAK in metazoans. Recent studies using a novel Cdk7 specific covalent inhibitor, THZ1, revealed important roles of Cdk7 in transcription regulation in cancer cells. However, whether Cdk7 plays a role in the regulation of transcription in neurons remains unknown. In this study, we present evidence demonstrating that, in post-mitotic neurons, Cdk7 activity is positively correlated with neuronal activities in cultured primary neurons, acute hippocampal slices and in the brain. Cdk7 inhibition by THZ1 significantly suppressed mRNA levels of IEGs, selectively impaired long-lasting synaptic plasticity induced by 4 trains of high frequency stimulation (HFS and prevented the formation of long-term memories.

  14. Major vault protein, a candidate gene in 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome, is required for the homeostatic regulation of visual cortical plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Jacque P K; Nagakura, Ikue; Petravicz, Jeremy; Li, Keji; Wiemer, Erik A C; Sur, Mriganka

    2018-03-14

    Microdeletion of a region in chromosome 16p11.2 increases susceptibility to autism. Although this region contains exons of 29 genes, disrupting only a small segment of the region, which spans 5 genes, is sufficient to cause autistic traits. One candidate gene in this critical segment is MVP , which encodes for the major vault protein (MVP) that has been implicated in regulation of cellular transport mechanisms. MVP expression levels in MVP +/- mice closely phenocopy those of 16p11.2 mutant mice, suggesting that MVP +/- mice may serve as a model of MVP function in 16p11.2 microdeletion. Here we show that MVP regulates the homeostatic component of ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in primary visual cortex (V1). MVP +/- mice of both sexes show impairment in strengthening of open-eye responses after several days of monocular deprivation (MD) while closed-eye responses are weakened as normal, resulting in reduced overall OD plasticity. The frequency of mEPSCs in pyramidal neurons is decreased in MVP +/- mice after extended MD, suggesting a reduction of functional synapses. Correspondingly, upregulation of surface GluA1 AMPA receptors is reduced in MVP +/- mice after extended MD, and is accompanied by altered expression of STAT1 and phosphorylated ERK, which have been previously implicated in OD plasticity. Normalization of STAT1 levels by introducing STAT1 shRNA rescues surface GluA1 and open-eye responses, implicating STAT1 as a downstream effector of MVP. These findings demonstrate a specific role for MVP as a key molecule influencing the homeostatic component of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, and potentially the corresponding phenotypes of 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome. Significance Statement Major vault protein (MVP), a candidate gene in 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome, has been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms and scaffold signaling. However, its role in brain function and plasticity remains unknown

  15. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  16. HCN4 ion channel function is required for early events that regulate anatomical left-right patterning in a nodal and lefty asymmetric gene expression-independent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav P. Pai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterality is a basic characteristic of all life forms, from single cell organisms to complex plants and animals. For many metazoans, consistent left-right asymmetric patterning is essential for the correct anatomy of internal organs, such as the heart, gut, and brain; disruption of left-right asymmetry patterning leads to an important class of birth defects in human patients. Laterality functions across multiple scales, where early embryonic, subcellular and chiral cytoskeletal events are coupled with asymmetric amplification mechanisms and gene regulatory networks leading to asymmetric physical forces that ultimately result in distinct left and right anatomical organ patterning. Recent studies have suggested the existence of multiple parallel pathways regulating organ asymmetry. Here, we show that an isoform of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN family of ion channels (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4, HCN4 is important for correct left-right patterning. HCN4 channels are present very early in Xenopus embryos. Blocking HCN channels (Ih currents with pharmacological inhibitors leads to errors in organ situs. This effect is only seen when HCN4 channels are blocked early (pre-stage 10 and not by a later block (post-stage 10. Injections of HCN4-DN (dominant-negative mRNA induce left-right defects only when injected in both blastomeres no later than the 2-cell stage. Analysis of key asymmetric genes' expression showed that the sidedness of Nodal, Lefty, and Pitx2 expression is largely unchanged by HCN4 blockade, despite the randomization of subsequent organ situs, although the area of Pitx2 expression was significantly reduced. Together these data identify a novel, developmental role for HCN4 channels and reveal a new Nodal-Lefty-Pitx2 asymmetric gene expression-independent mechanism upstream of organ positioning during embryonic left-right patterning.

  17. Epigenetic activation of the Foxa2 gene is required for maintaining the potential of neural precursor cells to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons after expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, So-Young; Kwon, So Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Yi, Sang Ah; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Jang, Choon-Gon; You, Jueng Soo; Lee, Sang-Hun; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2015-02-15

    Dysregulation of forkhead box protein A2 (Foxa2) expression in fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM)-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) appears to be associated with the loss of their potential to differentiate into dopaminergic (DA) neurons after mitogenic expansion in vitro, hindering their efficient use as a transplantable cell source. Here, we report that epigenetic activation of Foxa2 in VM-derived NPCs by inducing histone hyperacetylation rescues the mitogenic-expansion-dependent decrease of differentiation potential to DA neurons. The silencing of Foxa2 gene expression after expansion is accompanied by repressive histone modifications, including hypoacetylation of histone H3 and H4 and trimethylation of H3K27 on the Foxa2 promoter, as well as on the global level. In addition, histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) is highly expressed during differentiation and recruited to the Foxa2 promoter. Induction of histone acetylation in VM-derived NPCs by either knockdown of HDAC7 or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor apicidin upregulates Foxa2 expression via hyperacetylation of H3 and a decrease in H3K27 trimethylation on the promoter regions, leading to the expression of DA neuron developmental genes and enhanced differentiation of DA neurons. These effects are antagonized by the expression of shRNAs specific for Foxa2 but enhanced by shRNA for HDAC7. Collectively, these findings indicate that loss of differentiation potential of expanded VM-derived NPCs is attributed to a decrease in Foxa2 expression and suggest that activation of the endogenous Foxa2 gene by epigenetic regulation might be an approach to enhance the generation of DA neurons.

  18. RNA transcribed from a distal enhancer is required for activating the chromatin at the promoter of the gonadotropin α-subunit gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnueli, Lilach; Rudnizky, Sergei; Yosefzon, Yahav; Melamed, Philippa

    2015-04-07

    Since the discovery that many transcriptional enhancers are transcribed into long noncoding RNAs termed "enhancer RNAs" (eRNAs), their putative role in enhancer function has been debated. Very recent evidence has indicted that some eRNAs play a role in initiating or activating transcription, possibly by helping recruit and/or stabilize binding of the general transcription machinery to the proximal promoter of their target genes. The distal enhancer of the gonadotropin hormone α-subunit gene, chorionic gonadotropin alpha (Cga), is responsible for Cga cell-specific expression in gonadotropes and thyrotropes, and we show here that it encodes two bidirectional nonpolyadenylated RNAs whose levels are increased somewhat by exposure to gonadotropin-releasing hormone but are not necessarily linked to Cga transcriptional activity. Knockdown of the more distal eRNA led to a drop in Cga mRNA levels, initially without effect on the forward eRNA levels. With time, however, the repression on the Cga increased, and the forward eRNA levels were suppressed also. We demonstrate that the interaction of the enhancer with the promoter is lost after eRNA knockdown. Dramatic changes also were seen in the chromatin, with an increase in total histone H3 occupancy throughout this region and a virtual loss of histone H3 Lys 4 trimethylation at the promoter following the eRNA knockdown. Moreover, histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27) acetylation, which was found at both enhancer and promoter in wild-type cells, appeared to have been replaced by H3K27 trimethylation at the enhancer. Thus, the Cga eRNA mediates the physical interaction between these genomic regions and determines the chromatin structure of the proximal promoter to allow gene expression.

  19. A novel brown adipocyte-enriched long non-coding RNA that is required for brown adipocyte differentiation and sufficient to drive thermogenic gene program in white adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Yue, Feng; Jia, Zhihao; Gao, Yun; Jin, Wen; Hu, Keping; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Dahai; Yang, Gongshe; Kuang, Shihuan

    2018-04-01

    The thermogenic activities of brown and beige adipocytes can be exploited to reduce energy surplus and counteract obesity. Recent RNA sequencing studies have uncovered a number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) uniquely expressed in white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT), but whether and how these lncRNAs function in adipogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a novel brown adipocyte-enriched LncRNA (AK079912), and its nuclear localization, function and regulation. The expression of AK079912 increases during brown preadipocyte differentiation and in response to cold-stimulated browning of white adipocytes. Knockdown of AK079912 inhibits brown preadipocyte differentiation, manifested by reductions in lipid accumulation and down-regulation of adipogenic and BAT-specific genes. Conversely, ectopic expression of AK079912 in white preadipocytes up-regulates the expression of genes involved in thermogenesis. Mechanistically, inhibition of AK079912 reduces mitochondrial copy number and protein levels of mitochondria electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, whereas AK079912 overexpression increases the levels of ETC proteins. Lastly, reporter and pharmacological assays identify Pparγ as an upstream regulator of AK079912. These results provide new insights into the function of non-coding RNAs in brown adipogenesis and regulating browning of white adipocytes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PARP-1 is required for retrieval of cocaine-associated memory by binding to the promoter of a novel gene encoding a putative transposase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, E; Friedman, A; Massart, R; Barnea, R; Abraham, L; Cheishvili, D; Zada, M; Ahdoot, H; Bareli, T; Warhaftig, G; Visochek, L; Suderman, M; Cohen-Armon, M; Szyf, M; Yadid, G

    2017-04-01

    Reward-related memory is an important factor in cocaine seeking. One necessary signaling mechanism for long-term memory formation is the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We demonstrate herein that auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of activated PARP-1 was significantly pronounced during retrieval of cocaine-associated contextual memory, in the central amygdala (CeA) of rats expressing cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). Intra-CeA pharmacological and short hairpin RNA depletion of PARP-1 activity during cocaine-associated memory retrieval abolished CPP. In contrast, PARP-1 inhibition after memory retrieval did not affect CPP reconsolidation process and subsequent retrievals. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed that PARP-1 binding in the CeA is highly enriched in genes involved in neuronal signaling. We identified among PARP targets in CeA a single gene, yet uncharacterized and encoding a putative transposase inhibitor, at which PARP-1 enrichment markedly increases during cocaine-associated memory retrieval and positively correlates with CPP. Our findings have important implications for understanding drug-related behaviors, and suggest possible future therapeutic targets for drug abuse.

  1. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 Is required for the transcriptional repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjun Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, catalysing demethylation of mono- and di-methylated histone H3-K4 or K9, exhibits diverse transcriptional activities by mediating chromatin reconfiguration. The telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene, encoding an essential component for telomerase activity that is involved in cellular immortalization and transformation, is silent in most normal human cells while activated in up to 90% of human cancers. It remains to be defined how exactly the transcriptional activation of the hTERT gene occurs during the oncogenic process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we determined the effect of LSD1 on hTERT transcription. In normal human fibroblasts with a tight hTERT repression, a pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 led to a weak hTERT expression, and a robust induction of hTERT mRNA was observed when LSD1 and histone deacetylases (HDACs were both inhibited. Small interference RNA-mediated depletion of both LSD1 and CoREST, a co-repressor in HDAC-containing complexes, synergistically activated hTERT transcription. In cancer cells, inhibition of LSD1 activity or knocking-down of its expression led to significant increases in levels of hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that LSD1 occupied the hTERT proximal promoter, and its depletion resulted in elevated di-methylation of histone H3-K4 accompanied by increased H3 acetylation locally in cancer cells. Moreover, during the differentiation of leukemic HL60 cells, the decreased hTERT expression was accompanied by the LSD1 recruitment to the hTERT promoter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LSD1 represses hTERT transcription via demethylating H3-K4 in normal and cancerous cells, and together with HDACs, participates in the establishment of a stable repression state of the hTERT gene in normal or differentiated malignant cells. The findings contribute to better understandings of h

  2. Gene Expression of Pneumocystis murina after Treatment with Anidulafungin Results in Strong Signals for Sexual Reproduction, Cell Wall Integrity, and Cell Cycle Arrest, Indicating a Requirement for Asci Formation for Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushion, Melanie T; Ashbaugh, Alan; Hendrix, Keeley; Linke, Michael J; Tisdale, Nikeya; Sayson, Steven G; Porollo, Aleksey

    2018-02-20

    The echinocandins are a class of anti-fungal agents that target β-1,3-D-glucan (BG) biosynthesis. In the ascigerous Pneumocystis species, treatment with these drugs deplete the asci life cycle stage which contain BG, but large numbers of forms which do not express BG remain in the infected lungs. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of Pneumocystis murina were compared between infected untreated mice and those treated with anidulafungin for 2 weeks to understand the metabolism of the persisting forms. Almost 80 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated. Like other fungi exposed to echinocandins, genes associated with sexual replication, cell wall integrity, cell cycle arrest and stress comprised the strongest up-regulated signals in P. murina from the treated mice. The up-regulation of the P. murina β-1,3-D-glucan endohydrolase and endo-1,3-glucanase was notable and may explain the disappearance of the existing asci in the lungs of treated mice since both enzymes can degrade BG. The biochemical measurement of BG in the lungs of treated mice and fluorescent microscopy with an anti-BG antibody supported the loss of BG. Down-regulated signals included genes involved in cell replication, genome stability, ribosomal biogenesis and function, and the Pneumocystis -specific genes encoding the major surface glycoproteins (Msg). These studies suggest that P. murina attempted to undergo sexual replication in response to a stressed environment and were halted in any type of proliferative cycle, likely due to a lack of BG. Asci appear to be a required part of the life cycle stage of Pneumocystis and BG may be needed to facilitate progression through the life cycle via sexual replication. Copyright © 2018 Cushion et al.

  3. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

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    Donna J Palmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3 necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  4. The Rat Diabetes Susceptibility Locus Iddm4 And At Least One Additional Gene Are Required For Autoimmune Diabetes Induced By Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.; Rodemich, Lucy; Martin-Fernandez, Cristina; Leif, Jean; Greiner, Dale L.; Mordes, John P.

    2005-01-01

    BBDR rats develop autoimmune diabetes mellitus only after challenge with environmental perturbants. These include polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C, a ligand of toll-like receptor 3), agents that deplete regulatory T cell populations (Tregs), and a non-beta-cell-cytopathic parvovirus (Kilham rat virus, KRV). The dominant diabetes susceptibility locus Iddm4 is required for diabetes induced by treatment with poly I:C plus Treg depletion. Iddm4 is penetrant in congenic heterozygote rats ...

  5. The pioneer factor OCT4 requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1 to support gene regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Hamish W; Klose, Robert J

    2017-03-13

    Pioneer transcription factors recognise and bind their target sequences in inaccessible chromatin to establish new transcriptional networks throughout development and cellular reprogramming. During this process, pioneer factors establish an accessible chromatin state to facilitate additional transcription factor binding, yet it remains unclear how different pioneer factors achieve this. Here, we discover that the pluripotency-associated pioneer factor OCT4 binds chromatin to shape accessibility, transcription factor co-binding, and regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells. Chromatin accessibility at OCT4-bound sites requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1, which is recruited to these sites by OCT4 to support additional transcription factor binding and expression of the pluripotency-associated transcriptome. Furthermore, the requirement for BRG1 in shaping OCT4 binding reflects how these target sites are used during cellular reprogramming and early mouse development. Together this reveals a distinct requirement for a chromatin remodeller in promoting the activity of the pioneer factor OCT4 and regulating the pluripotency network.

  6. Successful Establishment of Plasmids R1 and pMV158 in a New Host Requires the Relief of the Transcriptional Repression of Their Essential rep Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Á. Ruiz-Masó

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although differing in size, encoded traits, host range, and replication mechanism, both narrow-host-range theta-type conjugative enterobacterial plasmid R1 and promiscuous rolling-circle-type mobilizable streptococcal plasmid pMV158 encode a transcriptional repressor protein, namely CopB in R1 and CopG in pMV158, involved in replication control. The gene encoding CopB or CopG is cotranscribed with a downstream gene that encodes the replication initiator Rep protein of the corresponding plasmid. However, whereas CopG is an auto-repressor that inhibits transcription of the entire copG-repB operon, CopB is expressed constitutively and represses a second, downstream promoter that directs transcription of repA. As a consequence of the distinct regulatory pathways implied by CopB and CopG, these repressor proteins play a different role in control of plasmid replication during the steady state: while CopB has an auxiliary role by keeping repressed the regulated promoter whenever the plasmid copy number is above a low threshold, CopG plays a primary role by acting coordinately with RNAII. Here, we have studied the role of the regulatory circuit mediated by these transcriptional repressors during the establishment of these two plasmids in a new host cell, and found that excess Cop repressor molecules in the recipient cell result in a severe decrease in the frequency and/or the velocity of appearance of transformant colonies for the cognate plasmid but not for unrelated plasmids. Using the pMV158 replicon as a model system, together with highly sensitive real-time qPCR and inverse PCR methods, we have also analyzed the effect of CopG on the kinetics of repopulation of the plasmid in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that, whereas in the absence of CopG pMV158 repopulation occurs mainly during the first 45 min following plasmid transfer, the presence of the transcriptional repressor in the recipient cell severely impairs the replicon repopulation and makes

  7. PLS1, a gene encoding a tetraspanin-like protein, is required for penetration of rice leaf by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clergeot, Pierre-Henri; Gourgues, Mathieu; Cots, Joaquim; Laurans, F.; Latorse, Marie-Pascale; Pépin, Régis; Tharreau, Didier; Notteghem, Jean-Loup; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2001-01-01

    We describe in this study punchless, a nonpathogenic mutant from the rice blast fungus M. grisea, obtained by plasmid-mediated insertional mutagenesis. As do most fungal plant pathogens, M. grisea differentiates an infection structure specialized for host penetration called the appressorium. We show that punchless differentiates appressoria that fail to breach either the leaf epidermis or artificial membranes such as cellophane. Cytological analysis of punchless appressoria shows that they have a cellular structure, turgor, and glycogen content similar to those of wild type before penetration, but that they are unable to differentiate penetration pegs. The inactivated gene, PLS1, encodes a putative integral membrane protein of 225 aa (Pls1p). A functional Pls1p-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was detected only in appressoria and was localized in plasma membranes and vacuoles. Pls1p is structurally related to the tetraspanin family. In animals, these proteins are components of membrane signaling complexes controlling cell differentiation, motility, and adhesion. We conclude that PLS1 controls an appressorial function essential for the penetration of the fungus into host leaves. PMID:11391010

  8. The Arabidopsis MUM2 gene encodes a beta-galactosidase required for the production of seed coat mucilage with correct hydration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Gillian H; Zheng, Huanquan; Tewari, Jagdish; Huang, Jun; Young, Diana S; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Western, Tamara L; Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C; Mansfield, Shawn D; Haughn, George W

    2007-12-01

    Seed coat development in Arabidopsis thaliana involves a complex pathway where cells of the outer integument differentiate into a highly specialized cell type after fertilization. One aspect of this developmental process involves the secretion of a large amount of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast. When the mature seed coat is exposed to water, this mucilage expands to break the primary cell wall and encapsulate the seed. The mucilage-modified2 (mum2) mutant is characterized by a failure to extrude mucilage on hydration, although mucilage is produced as normal during development. The defect in mum2 appears to reside in the mucilage itself, as mucilage fails to expand even when the barrier of the primary cell wall is removed. We have cloned the MUM2 gene and expressed recombinant MUM2 protein, which has beta-galactosidase activity. Biochemical analysis of the mum2 mucilage reveals alterations in pectins that are consistent with a defect in beta-galactosidase activity, and we have demonstrated that MUM2 is localized to the cell wall. We propose that MUM2 is involved in modifying mucilage to allow it to expand upon hydration, establishing a link between the galactosyl side-chain structure of pectin and its physical properties.

  9. Floral Induction in Arabidopsis by FLOWERING LOCUS T Requires Direct Repression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE Genes by the Homeodomain Protein PENNYWISE1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Fernando; Romera-Branchat, Maida; Martínez-Gallegos, Rafael; Patel, Vipul; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Jang, Seonghoe; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Coupland, George

    2015-01-01

    Flowers form on the flanks of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in response to environmental and endogenous cues. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the photoperiodic pathway acts through FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) to promote floral induction in response to day length. A complex between FT and the basic leucine-zipper transcription factor FD is proposed to form in the SAM, leading to activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY and thereby promoting floral meristem identity. We identified mutations that suppress FT function and recovered a new allele of the homeodomain transcription factor PENNYWISE (PNY). Genetic and molecular analyses showed that ectopic expression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2, which encode transcriptional coactivators, in the SAM during vegetative development, confers the late flowering of pny mutants. In wild-type plants, BOP1 and BOP2 are expressed in lateral organs close to boundaries of the SAM, whereas in pny mutants, their expression occurs in the SAM. This ectopic expression lowers FD mRNA levels, reducing responsiveness to FT and impairing activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY. We show that PNY binds to the promoters of BOP1 and BOP2, repressing their transcription. These results demonstrate a direct role for PNY in defining the spatial expression patterns of boundary genes and the significance of this process for floral induction by FT. PMID:26417007

  10. Identification of two Arabidopsis genes encoding a peroxisomal oxidoreductase-like protein and an acyl-CoA synthetase-like protein that are required for responses to pro-auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewski, Andrew A G; Zhou, Wenxu; Smith, Steven M; Bussell, John D

    2009-03-01

    Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid (2,4-DB) are metabolised by peroxisomal beta-oxidation to active auxins that inhibit root growth. We screened Arabidopsis mutants for resistance to IBA and 2,4-DB and identified two new 2,4-DB resistant mutants. The mutant genes encode a putative oxidoreductase (SDRa) and a putative acyl-activating enzyme (AAE18). Both proteins are localised to peroxisomes. SDRa is coexpressed with core beta-oxidation genes, but germination, seedling growth and the fatty acid profile of sdra seedlings are indistinguishable from wild type. The sdra mutant is also resistant to IBA, but aae18 is not. AAE18 is the first example of a gene required for response to 2,4-DB but not IBA. The closest relative of AAE18 is AAE17. AAE17 is predicted to be peroxisomal, but an aae17 aae18 double mutant responded similarly to aae18 for all assays. We propose that AAE18 is capable of activating 2,4-DB but IBA activating enzymes remain to be discovered. We present an updated model for peroxisomal pro-auxin metabolism in Arabidopsis that includes SDRa and AAE18.

  11. v-erbA overexpression is required to extinguish c-erbA function in erythroid cell differentiation and regulation of the erbA target gene CAII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disela, C; Glineur, C; Bugge, T

    1991-01-01

    The v-erbA oncoprotein represents a retrovirus-transduced oncogenic version of the thyroid hormone (T3/T4) receptor c-erbA (type alpha). It contributes to virus-induced erythroleukemia by efficiently arresting differentiation of red cell progenitors and by suppressing transcription of erythrocyte...... of this CAII reporter construct could only be suppressed by very high amounts of v-erbA. Our results suggest that overexpression of v-erbA is required for its function as an oncoprotein....

  12. Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow in Maize: Implications for Isolation Requirements and Coexistence in Mexico, the Center of Origin of Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Marco Antonio; Guzmán Rodríguez, José Luis; Horak, Michael J.; Madueño Martínez, Jesús Ignacio; Schapaugh, Adam W.; Stojšin, Duška; Uribe Montes, Hugo Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Mexico, the center of origin of maize (Zea mays L.), has taken actions to preserve the identity and diversity of maize landraces and wild relatives. Historically, spatial isolation has been used in seed production to maintain seed purity. Spatial isolation can also be a key component for a strategy to minimize pollen-mediated gene flow in Mexico between transgenic maize and sexually compatible plants of maize conventional hybrids, landraces, and wild relatives. The objective of this research was to generate field maize-to-maize outcrossing data to help guide coexistence discussions in Mexico. In this study, outcrossing rates were determined and modeled from eight locations in six northern states, which represent the most economically important areas for the cultivation of hybrid maize in Mexico. At each site, pollen source plots were planted with a yellow-kernel maize hybrid and surrounded by plots with a white-kernel conventional maize hybrid (pollen recipient) of the same maturity. Outcrossing rates were then quantified by assessing the number of yellow kernels harvested from white-kernel hybrid plots. The highest outcrossing values were observed near the pollen source (12.9% at 1 m distance). The outcrossing levels declined sharply to 4.6, 2.7, 1.4, 1.0, 0.9, 0.5, and 0.5% as the distance from the pollen source increased to 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 25 m, respectively. At distances beyond 20 m outcrossing values at all locations were below 1%. These trends are consistent with studies conducted in other world regions. The results suggest that coexistence measures that have been implemented in other geographies, such as spatial isolation, would be successful in Mexico to minimize transgenic maize pollen flow to conventional maize hybrids, landraces and wild relatives. PMID:26162097

  13. Seamless Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Naumchev, Alexandr; Meyer, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Popular notations for functional requirements specifications frequently ignore developers' needs, target specific development models, or require translation of requirements into tests for verification; the results can give out-of-sync or downright incompatible artifacts. Seamless Requirements, a new approach to specifying functional requirements, contributes to developers' understanding of requirements and to software quality regardless of the process, while the process itself becomes lighter...

  14. A Burkholderia cenocepacia gene encoding a non-functional tyrosine phosphatase is required for the delayed maturation of the bacteria-containing vacuoles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Angel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infects patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that B. cenocepacia can survive in macrophages within membrane vacuoles [B. cenocepacia-containing vacuoles (BcCVs)] that preclude fusion with the lysosome. The bacterial factors involved in B. cenocepacia intracellular survival are not fully elucidated. We report here that deletion of BCAM0628, encoding a predicted low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) that is restricted to B. cenocepacia strains of the transmissible ET-12 clone, accelerates the maturation of the BcCVs. Compared to the parental strain and deletion mutants in other LMW-PTPs that are widely conserved in Burkholderia species, a greater proportion of BcCVs containing the ΔBCAM0628 mutant were targeted to the lysosome. Accelerated BcCV maturation was not due to reduced intracellular viability since ΔBCAM0628 survived and replicated in macrophages similarly to the parental strain. Therefore, BCAM0628 was referred to as dpm (delayed phagosome maturation). We provide evidence that the Dpm protein is secreted during growth in vitro and upon macrophage infection. Dpm secretion requires an N-terminal signal peptide. Heterologous expression of Dpm in Burkholderia multivorans confers to this bacterium a similar phagosomal maturation delay to that found with B. cenocepacia. We demonstrate that Dpm is an inactive phosphatase, suggesting that its contribution to phagosomal maturation arrest must be unrelated to tyrosine phosphatase activity. © 2014 The Authors.

  15. The Arabidopsis gene YS1 encoding a DYW protein is required for editing of rpoB transcripts and the rapid development of chloroplasts during early growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenbin; Cheng, Yuxiang; Yap, Aaron; Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Delannoy, Etienne; Hammani, Kamel; Small, Ian; Huang, Jirong

    2009-04-01

    Virescence, a phenotype in which leaves green more slowly than usual, is recognized to play a role in protection from photo-oxidative damage before healthy chloroplasts are developed. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying virescence will provide insights into how the development of chloroplasts is controlled. In this study, we find that knockout alleles of Yellow Seedlings 1 (YS1) in Arabidopsis lead to a virescent phenotype, which disappears by 3 weeks after germination. The ys1 mutation resulted in marked decreases in photosynthetic capacity and photosynthetic pigment complexes, and disturbed ultrastructure of thylakoid membranes in 8-day-old seedlings. However, cotyledons of ys1 seedlings pre-treated in the dark for 5 days turn green almost as fast as the wild type in light, revealing that the developmental defects in ys1 are limited to the first few days after germination. Inspection of all known plastid RNA editing and splicing events revealed that YS1 is absolutely required for editing of site 25992 in rpoB transcripts encoding the beta subunit of the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP). YS1 is a nuclear-encoded chloroplast-localized pentatricopeptide repeat protein differing from previously described editing factors in that it has a C-terminal DYW motif. A defect in PEP activity is consistent with the changes in plastid transcript patterns observed in ys1 seedlings. We conclude that the activity of PEP containing RpoB translated from unedited transcripts is insufficient to support rapid chloroplast differentiation. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie E Westcot

    Full Text Available Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP, an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish. In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity

  17. Protein-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis Uncovers New Genes Involved in Zebrafish Skin Development, Including a Neuregulin 2a-Based ErbB Signaling Pathway Required during Median Fin Fold Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcot, Stephanie E; Hatzold, Julia; Urban, Mark D; Richetti, Stefânia K; Skuster, Kimberly J; Harm, Rhianna M; Lopez Cervera, Roberto; Umemoto, Noriko; McNulty, Melissa S; Clark, Karl J; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Ekker, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Skin disorders are widespread, but available treatments are limited. A more comprehensive understanding of skin development mechanisms will drive identification of new treatment targets and modalities. Here we report the Zebrafish Integument Project (ZIP), an expression-driven platform for identifying new skin genes and phenotypes in the vertebrate model Danio rerio (zebrafish). In vivo selection for skin-specific expression of gene-break transposon (GBT) mutant lines identified eleven new, revertible GBT alleles of genes involved in skin development. Eight genes--fras1, grip1, hmcn1, msxc, col4a4, ahnak, capn12, and nrg2a--had been described in an integumentary context to varying degrees, while arhgef25b, fkbp10b, and megf6a emerged as novel skin genes. Embryos homozygous for a GBT insertion within neuregulin 2a (nrg2a) revealed a novel requirement for a Neuregulin 2a (Nrg2a)-ErbB2/3-AKT signaling pathway governing the apicobasal organization of a subset of epidermal cells during median fin fold (MFF) morphogenesis. In nrg2a mutant larvae, the basal keratinocytes within the apical MFF, known as ridge cells, displayed reduced pAKT levels as well as reduced apical domains and exaggerated basolateral domains. Those defects compromised proper ridge cell elongation into a flattened epithelial morphology, resulting in thickened MFF edges. Pharmacological inhibition verified that Nrg2a signals through the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase network. Moreover, knockdown of the epithelial polarity regulator and tumor suppressor lgl2 ameliorated the nrg2a mutant phenotype. Identifying Lgl2 as an antagonist of Nrg2a-ErbB signaling revealed a significantly earlier role for Lgl2 during epidermal morphogenesis than has been described to date. Furthermore, our findings demonstrated that successive, coordinated ridge cell shape changes drive apical MFF development, making MFF ridge cells a valuable model for investigating how the coordinated regulation of cell polarity and cell shape

  18. A Functional, Genome-wide Evaluation of Liposensitive Yeast Identifies the “ARE2 Required for Viability” (ARV1) Gene Product as a Major Component of Eukaryotic Fatty Acid Resistance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Kelly V.; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S.; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A.; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Repa, Joyce J.; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the “ARE2 required for viability” (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease. PMID:24273168

  19. A functional, genome-wide evaluation of liposensitive yeast identifies the "ARE2 required for viability" (ARV1) gene product as a major component of eukaryotic fatty acid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Kelly V; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B; Repa, Joyce J; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L

    2014-02-14

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the "ARE2 required for viability" (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease.

  20. RDR1 and SGS3, Components of RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing, Are Required for the Regulation of Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Developing Inflorescence Stems of Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Zhao, Lifang; McFarlane, Heather E.; Aiga, Mytyl; Lam, Vivian; Hooker, Tanya S.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2012-01-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer that coats the primary aerial surfaces of land plants and mediates plant interactions with the environment. It is synthesized by epidermal cells and is composed of a cutin polyester matrix that is embedded and covered with cuticular waxes. Recently, we have discovered a novel regulatory mechanism of cuticular wax biosynthesis that involves the ECERIFERUM7 (CER7) ribonuclease, a core subunit of the exosome. We hypothesized that at the onset of wax production, the CER7 ribonuclease degrades an mRNA specifying a repressor of CER3, a wax biosynthetic gene whose protein product is required for wax formation via the decarbonylation pathway. In the absence of this repressor, CER3 is expressed, leading to wax production. To identify the putative repressor of CER3 and to unravel the mechanism of CER7-mediated regulation of wax production, we performed a screen for suppressors of the cer7 mutant. Our screen resulted in the isolation of components of the RNA-silencing machinery, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE1 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3, implicating RNA silencing in the control of cuticular wax deposition during inflorescence stem development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:22689894

  1. Threshold levels of hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 (HNF-6) acting in synergy with HNF-4 and PGC-1alpha are required for time-specific gene expression during liver development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Pierreux, Christophe E; Hayhurst, Graham P; Plumb-Rudewiez, Nicolas; Weiss, Mary C; Rousseau, Guy G; Lemaigre, Frédéric P

    2006-08-01

    During liver development, hepatocytes undergo a maturation process that leads to the fully differentiated state. This relies at least in part on the coordinated action of liver-enriched transcription factors (LETFs), but little is known about the dynamics of this coordination. In this context we investigate here the role of the LETF hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 (HNF-6; also called Onecut-1) during hepatocyte differentiation. We show that HNF-6 knockout mouse fetuses have delayed expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (g6pc), which catalyzes the final step of gluconeogenesis and is a late marker of hepatocyte maturation. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that HNF-6 stimulates endogenous g6pc gene expression directly via a synergistic and interdependent action with HNF-4 and that it involves coordinate recruitment of the coactivator PGC-1alpha. The expression of HNF-6, HNF-4, and PGC-1alpha rises steadily during liver development and precedes that of g6pc. We provide evidence that threshold levels of HNF-6 are required to allow synergism between HNF-6, HNF-4, and PGC-1alpha to induce time-specific expression of g6pc. Our observations on the regulation of g6pc by HNF-6 provide a model whereby synergism, interdependency, and threshold concentrations of LETFs and coactivators determine time-specific expression of genes during liver development.

  2. A novel genetic technique in Plasmodium berghei allows liver stage analysis of genes required for mosquito stage development and demonstrates that de novo heme synthesis is essential for liver stage development in the malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upeksha L Rathnapala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of drug resistance, lack of an effective vaccine, and ongoing conflict and poverty means that malaria remains a major global health crisis. Understanding metabolic pathways at all parasite life stages is important in prioritising and targeting novel anti-parasitic compounds. The unusual heme synthesis pathway of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, requires eight enzymes distributed across the mitochondrion, apicoplast and cytoplasm. Deletion of the ferrochelatase (FC gene, the final enzyme in the pathway, confirms that heme synthesis is not essential in the red blood cell stages of the life cycle but is required to complete oocyst development in mosquitoes. The lethality of FC deletions in the mosquito stage makes it difficult to study the impact of these mutations in the subsequent liver stage. To overcome this, we combined locus-specific fluorophore expression with a genetic complementation approach to generate viable, heterozygous oocysts able to produce a mix of FC expressing and FC deficient sporozoites. These sporozoites show normal motility and can invade liver cells, where FC deficient parasites can be distinguished by fluorescence and phenotyped. Parasites lacking FC exhibit a severe growth defect within liver cells, with development failure detectable in the early to mid stages of liver development in vitro. FC deficient parasites could not complete liver stage development in vitro nor infect naïve mice, confirming liver stage arrest. These results validate the heme pathway as a potential target for prophylactic drugs targeting liver stage parasites. In addition, we demonstrate that our simple genetic approach can extend the phenotyping window beyond the insect stages, opening considerable scope for straightforward reverse genetic analysis of genes that are dispensable in blood stages but essential for completing mosquito development.

  3. A novel genetic technique in Plasmodium berghei allows liver stage analysis of genes required for mosquito stage development and demonstrates that de novo heme synthesis is essential for liver stage development in the malaria parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnapala, Upeksha L; Goodman, Christopher D; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2017-06-01

    The combination of drug resistance, lack of an effective vaccine, and ongoing conflict and poverty means that malaria remains a major global health crisis. Understanding metabolic pathways at all parasite life stages is important in prioritising and targeting novel anti-parasitic compounds. The unusual heme synthesis pathway of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, requires eight enzymes distributed across the mitochondrion, apicoplast and cytoplasm. Deletion of the ferrochelatase (FC) gene, the final enzyme in the pathway, confirms that heme synthesis is not essential in the red blood cell stages of the life cycle but is required to complete oocyst development in mosquitoes. The lethality of FC deletions in the mosquito stage makes it difficult to study the impact of these mutations in the subsequent liver stage. To overcome this, we combined locus-specific fluorophore expression with a genetic complementation approach to generate viable, heterozygous oocysts able to produce a mix of FC expressing and FC deficient sporozoites. These sporozoites show normal motility and can invade liver cells, where FC deficient parasites can be distinguished by fluorescence and phenotyped. Parasites lacking FC exhibit a severe growth defect within liver cells, with development failure detectable in the early to mid stages of liver development in vitro. FC deficient parasites could not complete liver stage development in vitro nor infect naïve mice, confirming liver stage arrest. These results validate the heme pathway as a potential target for prophylactic drugs targeting liver stage parasites. In addition, we demonstrate that our simple genetic approach can extend the phenotyping window beyond the insect stages, opening considerable scope for straightforward reverse genetic analysis of genes that are dispensable in blood stages but essential for completing mosquito development.

  4. Requirement for digestible calcium by eleven- to twenty-five-kilogram pigs as determined by growth performance, bone ash concentration, calcium and phosphorus balances, and expression of genes involved in transport of calcium in intestinal and kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vega, J C; Liu, Y; McCann, J C; Walk, C L; Loor, J J; Stein, H H

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the requirement for standardized total tract digestible (STTD) Ca by 11- to 25-kg pigs based on growth performance, bone ash, or Ca and P retention and to determine the effect of dietary Ca on expression of genes related to Ca transport in the jejunum and kidneys. Six diets were formulated to contain 0.36% STTD P and 0.32, 0.40, 0.48, 0.56, 0.64, or 0.72% STTD Ca by including increasing quantities of calcium carbonate in the diets at the expense of cornstarch. Two additional diets contained 0.72% STTD Ca and 0.33% or 0.40% STTD P to determine if 0.36% STTD P had negative effects on the Ca requirement. The same batch of all diets was used in both experiments. In Exp. 1, 256 pigs (11.39 ± 1.21 kg initial BW) were randomly allotted to the 8 diets with 4 pigs per pen and 8 replicate pens per diet in a randomized complete block design. On the last day of the experiment, 1 pig from each pen was euthanized and the right femur and intestine and kidney samples were collected. Results indicated that ADG and G:F started to decline (linear and quadratic, urine samples were collected using the marker-to-marker approach. Results indicated that the requirement for STTD Ca to maximize Ca and P retention (g/d) was 0.60 and 0.49%, respectively. In conclusion, the STTD Ca requirement by 11- to 25-kg pigs to maximize bone ash was 0.48%; however, ADG and G:F declined if more than 0.54 or 0.50% STTD Ca, respectively, was fed, and the minimum concentration of Ca needed to maximize ADG and G:F could not be determined under the conditions of this experiment. Increasing dietary Ca decreased the mRNA expression of several genes related to transcellular Ca transport in the jejunum and the kidneys.

  5. Pentosan polysulfate binds to STRO-1+mesenchymal progenitor cells, is internalized, and modifies gene expression: a novel approach of pre-programing stem cells for therapeutic application requiring their chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiehua; Shimmon, Susan; Paton, Sharon; Daly, Christopher; Goldschlager, Tony; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Ghosh, Peter

    2017-12-13

    expression of 42 genes. This study has shown that priming of MPCs with low concentrations of PPS enhanced chondrogenesis and MPC proliferation by modifying their characteristic basal gene and protein expression. These findings offer a novel approach to re-programming mesenchymal stem cells for clinical indications which require the repair or regeneration of cartilaginous tissues such as in osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease.

  6. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  7. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanavichit, Apichart

    2002-01-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  8. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  9. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...... predicted to be essential. The vast majority of essential genes were categorized in relatively few domains of cell metabolism, with about half involved in information processing, one-fifth involved in the synthesis of cell envelope and the determination of cell shape and division, and one-tenth related...... to cell energetics. Only 4% of essential genes encode unknown functions. Most essential genes are present throughout a wide range of Bacteria, and almost 70% can also be found in Archaea and Eucarya. However, essential genes related to cell envelope, shape, division, and respiration tend to be lost from...

  10. Studying Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Studying Genes Studying Genes Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area PDF Version (382 KB) Other Fact Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions ...

  11. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  12. Gene cluster statistics with gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Narayanan; Durand, Dannie

    2009-05-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such "gene clusters" is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  13. Recombinant gene expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuan, Rocky S

    1997-01-01

    .... A fundamental requirement for successful recombinant gene expression is the design of the cloning vector and the choice of the host organism for expression. Recombinant Gene Expression Protocols grows out of the need for a laboratory manual that provides the reader the background and rationale, as well as the practical protocols for the preparation of...

  14. The DMI1 and DMI2 Early Symbiotic Genes of Medicago truncatula Are Required for a High-Affinity Nodulation Factor-Binding Site Associated to a Particulate Fraction of Roots1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Bridget V.; Cullimore, Julie V.; Ranjeva, Raoul; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis between Medicago spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti is dependent on the production of sulfated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation (Nod) factors by the bacterial partner. In this article, using a biochemical approach to characterize putative Nod factor receptors in the plant host, we describe a high-affinity binding site (Kd = 0.45 nm) for the major Nod factor produced by S. meliloti. This site is termed Nod factor-binding site 3 (NFBS3). NFBS3 is associated to a high-density fraction prepared from roots of Medicago truncatula and shows binding specificity for lipo-chitooligosaccharidic structures. As for the previously characterized binding sites (NFBS1 and NFBS2), NFBS3 does not recognize the sulfate group on the S. meliloti Nod factor. Studies of Nod factor binding in root extracts of early symbiotic mutants of M. truncatula reveals that the new site is present in Nod factor perception and does not make infections 3 (dmi3) mutants but is absent in dmi1 and dmi2 mutants. Roots and cell cultures of all these mutants still contain sites similar to NFBS1 and NFBS2, respectively. These results suggest that NFBS3 is different from NFBS2 and NFBS1 and is dependent on the common symbiotic genes DMI1 and DMI2 required for establishment of symbioses with both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The potential role of this site in the establishment of root endosymbioses is discussed. PMID:16377749

  15. Requirements Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hull, Elizabeth; Dick, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Written for those who want to develop their knowledge of requirements engineering process, whether practitioners or students.Using the latest research and driven by practical experience from industry, Requirements Engineering gives useful hints to practitioners on how to write and structure requirements. It explains the importance of Systems Engineering and the creation of effective solutions to problems. It describes the underlying representations used in system modeling and introduces the UML2, and considers the relationship between requirements and modeling. Covering a generic multi-layer r

  16. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  17. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e. g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental

  18. PRMT5-Mediated Methylation of NF-κB p65 at Arg174 Is Required for Endothelial CXCL11 Gene Induction in Response to TNF-α and IFN-γ Costimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel P.; Chandrasekharan, Unnikrishnan M.; Bandyopadhyay, Smarajit; Willard, Belinda; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory agonists differentially activate gene expression of the chemokine family of proteins in endothelial cells (EC). TNF is a weak inducer of the chemokine CXCL11, while TNF and IFN-γ costimulation results in potent CXCL11 induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying TNF plus IFN-γ-mediated CXCL11 induction are not fully understood. We have previously reported that the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 catalyzes symmetrical dimethylation of the NF-κB subunit p65 in EC at multiple arginine residues. Methylation of Arg30 and Arg35 on p65 is critical for TNF induction of CXCL10 in EC. Here we show that PRMT5-mediated methylation of p65 at Arg174 is required for induction of CXCL11 when EC are costimulated with TNF and IFN-γ. Knockdown of PRMT5 by RNAi reduced CXCL11 mRNA and protein levels in costimulated cells. Reconstitution of p65 Arg174Ala or Arg174Lys mutants into EC that were depleted of endogenous p65 blunted TNF plus IFN-γ-mediated CXCL11 induction. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that p65 Arg174 arginine methylation is enhanced by TNF plus IFN-γ costimulation, and is catalyzed by PRMT5. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) demonstrated that PRMT5 is necessary for p65 association with the CXCL11 promoter in response to TNF plus IFN-γ. Further, reconstitution of p65 Arg174Lys mutant in EC abrogated this p65 association with the CXCL11 promoter. Finally, ChIP and Re-ChIP assays revealed that symmetrical dimethylarginine-containing proteins complexed with the CXCL11 promoter were diminished in p65 Arg174Lys-reconstituted EC stimulated with TNF and IFN-γ. In total, these results indicate that PRMT5-mediated p65 methylation at Arg174 is essential for TNF plus IFN-γ-mediated CXCL11 gene induction. We therefore suggest that the use of recently developed small molecule inhibitors of PRMT5 may present a therapeutic approach to moderating chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:26901772

  19. PRMT5-Mediated Methylation of NF-κB p65 at Arg174 Is Required for Endothelial CXCL11 Gene Induction in Response to TNF-α and IFN-γ Costimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Harris

    Full Text Available Inflammatory agonists differentially activate gene expression of the chemokine family of proteins in endothelial cells (EC. TNF is a weak inducer of the chemokine CXCL11, while TNF and IFN-γ costimulation results in potent CXCL11 induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying TNF plus IFN-γ-mediated CXCL11 induction are not fully understood. We have previously reported that the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 catalyzes symmetrical dimethylation of the NF-κB subunit p65 in EC at multiple arginine residues. Methylation of Arg30 and Arg35 on p65 is critical for TNF induction of CXCL10 in EC. Here we show that PRMT5-mediated methylation of p65 at Arg174 is required for induction of CXCL11 when EC are costimulated with TNF and IFN-γ. Knockdown of PRMT5 by RNAi reduced CXCL11 mRNA and protein levels in costimulated cells. Reconstitution of p65 Arg174Ala or Arg174Lys mutants into EC that were depleted of endogenous p65 blunted TNF plus IFN-γ-mediated CXCL11 induction. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that p65 Arg174 arginine methylation is enhanced by TNF plus IFN-γ costimulation, and is catalyzed by PRMT5. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP demonstrated that PRMT5 is necessary for p65 association with the CXCL11 promoter in response to TNF plus IFN-γ. Further, reconstitution of p65 Arg174Lys mutant in EC abrogated this p65 association with the CXCL11 promoter. Finally, ChIP and Re-ChIP assays revealed that symmetrical dimethylarginine-containing proteins complexed with the CXCL11 promoter were diminished in p65 Arg174Lys-reconstituted EC stimulated with TNF and IFN-γ. In total, these results indicate that PRMT5-mediated p65 methylation at Arg174 is essential for TNF plus IFN-γ-mediated CXCL11 gene induction. We therefore suggest that the use of recently developed small molecule inhibitors of PRMT5 may present a therapeutic approach to moderating chronic inflammatory pathologies.

  20. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and seedling leaves were sampled at 6 h after the treatment. For cold stress, the seedlings were transferred to 4◦C growth chamber for 30 min. Control seedlings were exposed to none of these treatments. To examine the expression patterns of these predicted genes in Poplar and to further confirm their stress responsive-.

  1. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene ( BDNF ), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  2. The Short-Stature Homeobox-Containing Gene (shox/SHOX Is Required for the Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Bone Differentiation in Zebrafish Embryo and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Yokokura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The short-stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX was originally discovered as one of genes responsible for idiopathic short-stature syndromes in humans. Previous studies in animal models have shown the evolutionarily conserved link between this gene and skeletal formation in early embryogenesis. Here, we characterized developmental roles of shox/SHOX in zebrafish embryos and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs using loss-of-function approaches. Morpholino oligo-mediated knockdown of zebrafish shox markedly hindered cell proliferation in the anterior region of the pharyngula embryos, which was accompanied by reduction in the dlx2 expression at mesenchymal core sites for future pharyngeal bones. In addition, the impaired shox expression transiently increased expression levels of skeletal differentiation genes in early larval stage. In cell culture studies, we found that hMSCs expressed SHOX; the siRNA-mediated blockade of SHOX expression significantly blunted cell proliferation in undifferentiated hMSCs but the loss of SHOX expression did augment the expressions of subsets of early osteogenic genes during early osteoblast differentiation. These data suggest that shox/SHOX maintains the population of embryonic bone progenitor cells by keeping its proliferative status and by repressing the onset of early osteogenic gene expression. The current study for the first time shows cellular and developmental responses caused by shox/SHOX deficiency in zebrafish embryos and hMSCs, and it expands our understanding of the role of this gene in early stages of skeletal growth.

  3. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  4. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  5. Characterization of the CrbS/R Two-Component System in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveals a New Set of Genes under Its Control and a DNA Motif Required for CrbR-Mediated Transcriptional Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Sepulveda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The CrbS/R system is a two-component signal transduction system that regulates acetate utilization in Vibrio cholerae, P. aeruginosa, and P. entomophila. CrbS is a hybrid histidine kinase that belongs to a recently identified family, in which the signaling domain is fused to an SLC5 solute symporter domain through aSTAC domain. Upon activation by CrbS, CrbR activates transcription of the acs gene, which encodes an acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS, and the actP gene, which encodes an acetate/solute symporter. In this work, we characterized the CrbS/R system in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. Through the quantitative proteome analysis of different mutants, we were able to identify a new set of genes under its control, which play an important role during growth on acetate. These results led us to the identification of a conserved DNA motif in the putative promoter region of acetate-utilization genes in the Gammaproteobacteria that is essential for the CrbR-mediated transcriptional activation of genes under acetate-utilizing conditions. Finally, we took advantage of the existence of a second SLC5-containing two-component signal transduction system in P. fluorescens, CbrA/B, to demonstrate that the activation of the response regulator by the histidine kinase is not dependent on substrate transport through the SLC5 domain.

  6. Metabolic consequences of knocking out UGT85B1, the gene encoding the glucosyltransferase required for synthesis of dhurrin in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstedt, Cecilia K; O'Donnell, Natalie H; Bjarnholt, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    Many important food crops produce cyanogenic glucosides as natural defense compounds to protect against herbivory or pathogen attack. It has also been suggested that these nitrogen-based secondary metabolites act as storage reserves of nitrogen. In sorghum, three key genes, CYP79A1, CYP71E1 and UGT......-MS) shows that tcd2 mutants accumulate numerous dhurrin pathway-derived metabolites, some of which are similar to those observed in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 genes. Our results demonstrate that UGT85B1 is essential for formation of dhurrin in sorghum with no co...

  7. Tet-Mediated DNA Demethylation Is Required for SWI/SNF-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling and Histone-Modifying Activities That Trigger Expression of the Sp7 Osteoblast Master Gene during Mesenchymal Lineage Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Hugo; Villagra, Alejandro; Montecino, Martin

    2017-10-15

    Here we assess histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation processes that coordinately control the expression of the bone master transcription factor Sp7 (osterix) during mesenchymal lineage commitment in mammalian cells. We find that Sp7 gene silencing is mediated by DNA methyltransferase1/3 (DNMT1/3)-, histone deacetylase 1/2/4 (HDAC1/2/4)-, Setdb1/Suv39h1-, and Ezh1/2-containing complexes. In contrast, Sp7 gene activation involves changes in histone modifications, accompanied by decreased nucleosome enrichment and DNA demethylation mediated by SWI/SNF- and Tet1/Tet2-containing complexes, respectively. Inhibition of DNA methylation triggers changes in the histone modification profile and chromatin-remodeling events leading to Sp7 gene expression. Tet1/Tet2 silencing prevents Sp7 expression during osteoblast differentiation as it impairs DNA demethylation and alters the recruitment of histone methylase (COMPASS)-, histone demethylase (Jmjd2a/Jmjd3)-, and SWI/SNF-containing complexes to the Sp7 promoter. The dissection of these interconnected epigenetic mechanisms that govern Sp7 gene activation reveals a hierarchical process where regulatory components mediating DNA demethylation play a leading role. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Nucleotide excision repair genes are expressed at low levels and are not detectably inducible in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues, but their function is required for normal adult life after UVC exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Windy A.; Crocker, Tracey L.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Leung, Maxwell C.K.; Wade Lehmann, D.; Freedman, Jonathan H.; Van Houten, Ben; Meyer, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments to characterize the inducibility of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in Caenorhabditis elegans, and to examine global gene expression in NER-deficient and -proficient strains as well as germline vs. somatic tissues, with and without genotoxic stress. We also carried out experiments to elucidate the importance of NER in the adult life of C. elegans under genotoxin-stressed and control conditions. Adult lifespan was not detectably different between wild-type and NER-deficient xpa-1 nematodes under control conditions. However, exposure to 6 J/m 2 /day of ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) decreased lifespan in xpa-1 nematodes more than a dose of 100 J/m 2 /day in wild-type. Similar differential sensitivities were observed for adult size and feeding. Remarkably, global gene expression was nearly identical in young adult wild-type and xpa-1 nematodes, both in control conditions and 3 h after exposure to 50 J/m 2 UVC. Neither NER genes nor repair activity were detectably inducible in young adults that lacked germ cells and developing embryos (glp-1 strain). However, expression levels of dozens of NER and other DNA damage response genes were much (5-30-fold) lower in adults lacking germ cells and developing embryos, suggesting that somatic and post-mitotic cells have a much lower DNA repair ability. Finally, we describe a refinement of our DNA damage assay that allows damage measurement in single nematodes.

  9. Nucleotide excision repair genes are expressed at low levels and are not detectably inducible in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues, but their function is required for normal adult life after UVC exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Windy A. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Crocker, Tracey L. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Rodriguez, Ana M. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Leung, Maxwell C.K. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wade Lehmann, D. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Freedman, Jonathan H. [Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Van Houten, Ben [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Meyer, Joel N., E-mail: joel.meyer@duke.edu [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2010-01-05

    We performed experiments to characterize the inducibility of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in Caenorhabditis elegans, and to examine global gene expression in NER-deficient and -proficient strains as well as germline vs. somatic tissues, with and without genotoxic stress. We also carried out experiments to elucidate the importance of NER in the adult life of C. elegans under genotoxin-stressed and control conditions. Adult lifespan was not detectably different between wild-type and NER-deficient xpa-1 nematodes under control conditions. However, exposure to 6 J/m{sup 2}/day of ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) decreased lifespan in xpa-1 nematodes more than a dose of 100 J/m{sup 2}/day in wild-type. Similar differential sensitivities were observed for adult size and feeding. Remarkably, global gene expression was nearly identical in young adult wild-type and xpa-1 nematodes, both in control conditions and 3 h after exposure to 50 J/m{sup 2} UVC. Neither NER genes nor repair activity were detectably inducible in young adults that lacked germ cells and developing embryos (glp-1 strain). However, expression levels of dozens of NER and other DNA damage response genes were much (5-30-fold) lower in adults lacking germ cells and developing embryos, suggesting that somatic and post-mitotic cells have a much lower DNA repair ability. Finally, we describe a refinement of our DNA damage assay that allows damage measurement in single nematodes.

  10. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  11. ROS signalling - specificity is required

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian M; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increases in plants under stress. ROS can damage cellular components, but they can also act in signal transduction to help the cell counteract the oxidative damage in the stressed compartment. H2O2 might induce a general stress response, but it does not have...... the required specificity to selectively regulate nuclear genes required for dealing with localized stress, e.g. in chloroplasts or mitochondria. Here we argue that peptides deriving from proteolytic breakdown of oxidatively damaged proteins have the requisite specificity to act as secondary ROS messengers...... and regulate source-specific genes and in this way contribute to retrograde ROS signalling during oxidative stress. Likewise, unmodified peptides deriving from the breakdown of redundant proteins could help coordinate organellar and nuclear gene expression...

  12. A defect in epithelial barrier integrity is not required for a systemic response to bacterial antigens or intestinal injury in T cell receptor-alpha gene-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, Beate C; Tavernini, Michele M; Doyle, Jason; Fedorak, Richard N

    2006-08-01

    Genetically induced disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier leads to development of intestinal inflammation. In the interleukin-10 gene-deficient inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) mouse model, for instance, a primary defect in intestinal epithelial integrity occurs before the development of enterocolitis. In humans, a causal role for epithelial barrier disruption is still controversial. Although studies with first-degree relatives of IBD patients suggests an underlying role of impaired barrier function, a primary epithelial barrier defect in IBD patients has not been confirmed. The purpose of this article is to examine whether a primary epithelial barrier disruption is a prerequisite for the development of intestinal inflammation or whether intestinal inflammation can develop in the absence of epithelial disruption. We examined the intestinal epithelial integrity of the T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha gene-deficient mouse model of IBD. In vivo colonic permeability, determined by mannitol transmural flux, was assessed in 6-week-, 12-week-, and 25-week-old TCR-alpha gene-deficient and wild-type control mice using a single-pass perfusion technique. Mice were scored for intestinal histological injury and intestinal cytokine levels measured in organ cultures. Systemic responses to bacterial antigens were determined through 48-h spleen cell cultures stimulated with sonicate derived from endogenous bacterial strains. In contrast with previous findings in the interleukin-10 gene-deficient IBD model, TCR-alpha gene-deficient mice did not demonstrate evidence of primary intestinal epithelial barrier disruption at any age, despite developing a moderate to severe colitis within 12 weeks. A rise in intestinal interferon (IFN)-gamma levels preceded the onset of mucosal inflammation and then correlated closely with the degree of intestinal inflammation and injury. Spleen cells from TCR-alpha gene-deficient mice released IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with endogenous

  13. The uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans required for UV-mutagenesis encodes a homolog to REV3, a subunit of the DNA polymerase zeta of yeast involved in translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K Y; Chae, S K; Han, D M

    1998-07-01

    Defects in the uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans resulted in high UV sensitivity and reductions of spontaneous and UV-induced reversion of certain alleles, uvsl;uvsA double mutants exhibited high methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitivity in contrast to the slight sensitivity of the component single mutants. Using such a double mutant as recipient, a clone complementing uvsI501 has been isolated from a chromosome III specific library. The deduced amino acid sequence from the 1.1-kb sequenced region, a part of the 5.2-kb DNA fragment showing uvsI-complementing activity, had a 62% identity with REV3 of yeast. Disruptants of the cloned gene demonstrated the same level of sensitivity to UV light as uvsI and failed to complement uvsI501 in heterozygous diploids.

  14. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  15. What is a gene? From molecules to metaphysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Holmes

    2006-01-01

    Mendelian genes have become molecular genes, with increasing puzzlement about locating them, due to increasing complexity in genomic webworks. Genome science finds modular and conserved units of inheritance, identified as homologous genes. Such genes are cybernetic, transmitting information over generations; this too requires multi-leveled analysis, from DNA transcription to development and reproduction of the whole organism. Genes are conserved; genes are also dynamic and creative in evolutionary speciation-most remarkably producing humans capable of wondering about what genes are.

  16. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2005-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  17. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2006-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  18. Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1994-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene

  19. Immunoglobulin genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honjo, T; Alt, F. W; Rabbitts, T. H

    1989-01-01

    ... Cataloguing in Publication Data Immunoglobulin genes 1. Vertebrates. Immunoglobulins 1. Honjo, T. II. Alt, F.W. III. Rabbitts, T.H. 612'. 118223 ISBN 0-12-354865-9 This book is printed on acid-free paper ( T...

  20. Ageing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2018-01-01

    The idea of gerontogenes is in line with the evolutionary explanation of ageing as being an emergent phenomenon as a result of the imperfect maintenance and repair systems. Although evolutionary processes did not select for any specific ageing genes that restrict and determine the lifespan...... of an individual, the term ‘gerontogenes’ primarily refers to any genes that may seem to influence ageing and longevity, without being specifically selected for that role. Such genes can also be called ‘virtual gerontogenes’ by virtue of their indirect influence on the rate and process of ageing. More than 1000...... virtual gerontogenes have been associated with ageing and longevity in model organisms and humans. The ‘real’ genes, which do influence the essential lifespan of a species, and have been selected for in accordance with the evolutionary life history of the species, are known as the longevity assurance...

  1. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  2. Three cis-Regulatory Motifs, AuxRE, MYCRS1 and MYCRS2, are Required for Modulating the Auxin- and Mycorrhiza-Responsive Expression of a Tomato GH3 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Liao, Dehua; Yang, Xiaofeng; Ji, Minjie; Wang, Shuangshuang; Gu, Mian; Chen, Aiqun; Xu, Guohua

    2017-04-01

    Auxin is well known to be a key regulator that acts in almost all physiological processes during plant growth, and in interactions between plants and microbes. However, to date, the regulatory mechanisms underlying auxin-mediated plant-arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi symbiosis have not been well deciphered. Previously we identified a GH3 gene, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to both auxin induction and mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, we reported a refined dissection of the SlGH3.4 promoter activity using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter. The SlGH3.4 promoter could drive GUS expression strongly in mycorrhizal roots of soybean and rice plants, and in IAA-treated soybean roots, but not in IAA-treated rice roots. A promoter deletion assay revealed three cis-acting motifs, i.e. the auxin-responsive element, AuxRE, and two newly identified motifs named MYCRS1 and MYCRS2, involved in the activation of auxin- and AM-mediated expression of SlGH3.4. Deletion of the AuxRE from the SlGH3.4 promoter caused almost complete abolition of GUS staining in response to external IAA induction. Seven repeats of AuxRE fused to the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S minimal promoter could direct GUS expression in both IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots of tobacco plants. Four repeats of MYCRS1 or MYCRS2 fused to the CaMV35S minimal promoter was sufficient to drive GUS expression in arbuscule-containing cells, but not in IAA-treated tobacco roots. In summary, our results offer new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the potential cross-talk between the auxin and the AM regulatory pathways in modulating the expression of AM-responsive GH3 genes in diverse mycorrhizal plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The yiaKLX1X2PQRS and ulaABCDEFG Gene Systems Are Required for the Aerobic Utilization of l-Ascorbate in Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain 13882 with l-Ascorbate-6-Phosphate as the Inducer▿

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Evangelina; de la Riva, Lucia; Garces, Fernando; Giménez, Rosa; Aguilar, Juan; Baldoma, Laura; Badia, Josefa

    2008-01-01

    The capacity to both ferment and oxidize l-ascorbate has been widely documented for a number of enteric bacteria. Here we present evidence that all the strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae tested in this study ferment l-ascorbate using the ula regulon-encoded proteins. Under aerobic conditions, several phenotypes were observed for the strains. Our results showed that the yiaK-S system is required for this aerobic metabolic process. Gel shift experiments performed with UlaR and YiaJ and probes cor...

  4. Gene circuit analysis of the terminal gap gene huckebein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksat Ashyraliyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network.

  5. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation

  6. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...... of flexibility in calculating genetic linkage and displaying linkage group. Among other features, this software enables user to identify linkage groups with output visualized graphically. The program calculates interference and coefficient of coincidence with elevated accuracy in sample datasets. AVAILABILITY......: The database is available for free at http://www.moperandib.com....

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  8. Reranking candidate gene models with cross-species comparison for improved gene prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Fernando CN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most gene finders score candidate gene models with state-based methods, typically HMMs, by combining local properties (coding potential, splice donor and acceptor patterns, etc. Competing models with similar state-based scores may be distinguishable with additional information. In particular, functional and comparative genomics datasets may help to select among competing models of comparable probability by exploiting features likely to be associated with the correct gene models, such as conserved exon/intron structure or protein sequence features. Results We have investigated the utility of a simple post-processing step for selecting among a set of alternative gene models, using global scoring rules to rerank competing models for more accurate prediction. For each gene locus, we first generate the K best candidate gene models using the gene finder Evigan, and then rerank these models using comparisons with putative orthologous genes from closely-related species. Candidate gene models with lower scores in the original gene finder may be selected if they exhibit strong similarity to probable orthologs in coding sequence, splice site location, or signal peptide occurrence. Experiments on Drosophila melanogaster demonstrate that reranking based on cross-species comparison outperforms the best gene models identified by Evigan alone, and also outperforms the comparative gene finders GeneWise and Augustus+. Conclusion Reranking gene models with cross-species comparison improves gene prediction accuracy. This straightforward method can be readily adapted to incorporate additional lines of evidence, as it requires only a ranked source of candidate gene models.

  9. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene...... be met by using promoter libraries. This approach generally consists of inserting a library of promoters in front of the gene to be studied, whereby the individual promoters might deviate either in their spacer sequences or bear slight deviations from the consensus sequence of a vegetative promoter. Here......, we describe the two different methods for obtaining promoter libraries and compare their applicability....

  10. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  11. Multiobjective differential evolution-based multifactor dimensionality reduction for detecting gene-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Lin, Yu-Da

    2017-10-09

    Epistasis within disease-related genes (gene-gene interactions) was determined through contingency table measures based on multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Most MDR-based methods use the single contingency table measure to detect gene-gene interactions; however, some gene-gene interactions may require identification through multiple contingency table measures. In this study, a multiobjective differential evolution method (called MODEMDR) was proposed to merge the various contingency table measures based on MDR to detect significant gene-gene interactions. Two contingency table measures, namely the correct classification rate and normalized mutual information, were selected to design the fitness functions in MODEMDR. The characteristics of multiobjective optimization enable MODEMDR to use multiple measures to efficiently and synchronously detect significant gene-gene interactions within a reasonable time frame. Epistatic models with and without marginal effects under various parameter settings (heritability and minor allele frequencies) were used to assess existing methods by comparing the detection success rates of gene-gene interactions. The results of the simulation datasets show that MODEMDR is superior to existing methods. Moreover, a large dataset obtained from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium was used to assess MODEMDR. MODEMDR exhibited efficiency in identifying significant gene-gene interactions in genome-wide association studies.

  12. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  13. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most...... of these findings still require independent replications and/or functional studies to confirm the exact role in LDL metabolism and the clinical implications for human health. SUMMARY: GWAS, exome sequencing studies, and recently 'exome chip' studies have suggested several novel genes with effects on LDL cholesterol...

  14. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouriki, A.; Farrow, N.; Clements, M.A.; Dobson, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength) on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase) of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™. PMID:22110859

  15. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fouriki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods: non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results: Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion: In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™.

  16. Search for missing schizophrenia genes will require a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... ADHD. J. Psychiatr. Neurosci. 33, 10–16. Gropman A. L. and Batshaw M. L. 2010 Epigenetics, copy number variation, and other molecular mechanisms underlying neurode- velopmental disabilities: new insights and diagnostic approaches. J. Dev. Behav. Pediatr. 31, 582–591. Huang C. R., Schneider A. M. ...

  17. Search for missing schizophrenia genes will require a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Even the most powerful experimental designs in search of genetic causes of schizophrenia have not met the desired goal. It is imperative to review the reasons for such an outcome and to formulate novel strategies for the future direction of this research in the new era of individual genomes. Here, we will review aspects of ...

  18. Search for missing schizophrenia genes will require a new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. H. B. Kiran Kumar1 Christina Castellani1 Sujit Maiti1 Richard O'Reilly1 Shiva M. Singh1. Molecular Genetics Unit, Department of Biology and Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5B7 ...

  19. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  20. Surfeit locus gene homologs are widely distributed in invertebrate genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Armes, N; Fried, M

    1996-01-01

    The mouse Surfeit locus contains six sequence-unrelated genes (Surf-1 to -6) arranged in the tightest gene cluster so far described for mammals. The organization and juxtaposition of five of the Surfeit genes (Surf-1 to -5) are conserved between mammals and birds, and this may reflect a functional or regulatory requirement for the gene clustering. We have undertaken an evolutionary study to determine whether the Surfeit genes are conserved and clustered in invertebrate genomes. Drosophila mel...

  1. Exploring the optimal strategy to predict essential genes in microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jingyuan; Tan, Lirong; Lin, Xiaodong; Lu, Yao; Lu, Long J

    2011-12-27

    Accurately predicting essential genes is important in many aspects of biology, medicine and bioengineering. In previous research, we have developed a machine learning based integrative algorithm to predict essential genes in bacterial species. This algorithm lends itself to two approaches for predicting essential genes: learning the traits from known essential genes in the target organism, or transferring essential gene annotations from a closely related model organism. However, for an understudied microbe, each approach has its potential limitations. The first is constricted by the often small number of known essential genes. The second is limited by the availability of model organisms and by evolutionary distance. In this study, we aim to determine the optimal strategy for predicting essential genes by examining four microbes with well-characterized essential genes. Our results suggest that, unless the known essential genes are few, learning from the known essential genes in the target organism usually outperforms transferring essential gene annotations from a related model organism. In fact, the required number of known essential genes is surprisingly small to make accurate predictions. In prokaryotes, when the number of known essential genes is greater than 2% of total genes, this approach already comes close to its optimal performance. In eukaryotes, achieving the same best performance requires over 4% of total genes, reflecting the increased complexity of eukaryotic organisms. Combining the two approaches resulted in an increased performance when the known essential genes are few. Our investigation thus provides key information on accurately predicting essential genes and will greatly facilitate annotations of microbial genomes.

  2. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  3. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruissen, Fred; Baas, Frank

    2007-01-01

    In 1995, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was developed as a versatile tool for gene expression studies. SAGE technology does not require pre-existing knowledge of the genome that is being examined and therefore SAGE can be applied to many different model systems. In this chapter, the SAGE

  4. The Interleukin-17 Gene of Herpesvirus Saimiri

    OpenAIRE

    Knappe, Andrea; Hiller, Christian; Niphuis, Henk; Fossiez, François; Thurau, Mathias; Wittmann, Sabine; Kuhn, Eva-Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Banchereau, Jacques; Rosenwirth, Brigitte; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Heeney, Jonathan; Fickenscher, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    In comparison to wild-type herpesvirus saimiri, viral interleukin-17 gene knockout mutants have unaltered behavior regarding viral replication, T-cell transformation in vitro, and pathogenicity in cottontop tamarins. Thus, this gene is not required for T-cell lymphoma induction but may contribute to apathogenic viral persistence in the natural host, the squirrel monkey.

  5. The Interleukin-17 Gene of Herpesvirus Saimiri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, Andrea; Hiller, Christian; Niphuis, Henk; Fossiez, François; Thurau, Mathias; Wittmann, Sabine; Kuhn, Eva-Maria; Lebecque, Serge; Banchereau, Jacques; Rosenwirth, Brigitte; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Heeney, Jonathan; Fickenscher, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    In comparison to wild-type herpesvirus saimiri, viral interleukin-17 gene knockout mutants have unaltered behavior regarding viral replication, T-cell transformation in vitro, and pathogenicity in cottontop tamarins. Thus, this gene is not required for T-cell lymphoma induction but may contribute to apathogenic viral persistence in the natural host, the squirrel monkey. PMID:9621039

  6. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  7. Evaluating the consistency of gene sets used in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintle Nathan L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analyses of whole genome expression data require functional information about genes in order to yield meaningful biological conclusions. The Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG are common sources of functionally grouped gene sets. For bacteria, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide alternative, complementary sources of gene sets. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the data obtained from these resources has been performed. Results We define a series of gene set consistency metrics directly related to the most common classes of statistical analyses for gene expression data, and then perform a comprehensive analysis of 3581 Affymetrix® gene expression arrays across 17 diverse bacteria. We find that gene sets obtained from GO and KEGG demonstrate lower consistency than those obtained from the SEED and MicrobesOnline, regardless of gene set size. Conclusions Despite the widespread use of GO and KEGG gene sets in bacterial gene expression data analysis, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide more consistent sets for a wide variety of statistical analyses. Increased use of the SEED and MicrobesOnline gene sets in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data may improve statistical power and utility of expression data.

  8. Molecular requirements for radiation-activated recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Craig W.; Zeng Ming; Stamato, Thomas; Cerniglia, George

    1997-01-01

    % of treated cells) into cellular DNA. The mechanism of radiation enhanced stable gene transfer requires effector proteins to accomplish the recombination. The Ku proteins, which are required for V(D)J recombination, account for at least 90% of radiation induced recombination. There is also an absolute requirement for the Ataxia Telangiectasia gene (ATM) for any radiation induced recombination to occur, although the transfection efficiency in unirradiated cells is unaffected by ATM. Removal of p53 by transfection of E6 (Human Papilloma Virus) significantly inhibits radiation activated recombination, and this is confirmed in nuclear extract recombination assays. Conclusions: Ionizing radiation activates a recombination pathway which may be useful in gene therapy. The molecular mechanism of radiation activated recombination requires a number of DNA-damage-repair proteins

  9. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which they are found e.g. the evolution of the gene coding for the protein cytochrome-C which is part ofthe respiratory apparatus. On the contrary, paralogous genes are descendants of a duplicated gene. Paralogous genes therefore evolve within the same species as well as in different species e.g. genes coding for alpha ...

  10. Postmarket Requirements and Commitments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides information to the public on postmarket requirements and commitments. The phrase postmarket requirements and commitments refers to studies and clinical...

  11. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  12. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  13. Future Home Network Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbonnier, Benoit; Wessing, Henrik; Lannoo, Bart

    This paper presents the requirements for future Home Area Networks (HAN). Firstly, we discuss the applications and services as well as their requirements. Then, usage scenarios are devised to establish a first specification for the HAN. The main requirements are an increased bandwidth (towards 1...

  14. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products

  15. User Requirements for Wireless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In most IT system development processes, the identification or elicitation of user requirements is recognized as a key building block. In practice, the identification of user needs and wants is a challenge and inadequate or faulty identifications in this step of an IT system development can cause...... involvement and requirements elicitation Usable security requirements for design of privacy...

  16. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, D.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study is an empirical investigation of requirements evolution for groupware systems in use by means of case studies. Its goal is to contribute to the development of a theory of requirements evolution. A conceptual framework offering an integrated view of requirements as a collection of domains

  17. Delimiting Coalescence Genes (C-Genes) in Phylogenomic Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2018-02-26

    coalescence methods have emerged as a popular alternative for inferring species trees with large genomic datasets, because these methods explicitly account for incomplete lineage sorting. However, statistical consistency of summary coalescence methods is not guaranteed unless several model assumptions are true, including the critical assumption that recombination occurs freely among but not within coalescence genes (c-genes), which are the fundamental units of analysis for these methods. Each c-gene has a single branching history, and large sets of these independent gene histories should be the input for genome-scale coalescence estimates of phylogeny. By contrast, numerous studies have reported the results of coalescence analyses in which complete protein-coding sequences are treated as c-genes even though exons for these loci can span more than a megabase of DNA. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints suggest that c-genes may be much shorter, especially when large clades with many species are the focus of analysis. Although this idea has been challenged recently in the literature, the inverse relationship between c-gene size and increased taxon sampling in a dataset-the 'recombination ratchet'-is a fundamental property of c-genes. For taxonomic groups characterized by genes with long intron sequences, complete protein-coding sequences are likely not valid c-genes and are inappropriate units of analysis for summary coalescence methods unless they occur in recombination deserts that are devoid of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). Finally, it has been argued that coalescence methods are robust when the no-recombination within loci assumption is violated, but recombination must matter at some scale because ILS, a by-product of recombination, is the raison d'etre for coalescence methods. That is, extensive recombination is required to yield the large number of independently segregating c-genes used to infer a species tree. If coalescent methods are powerful

  18. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document establishes the Transportation system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are derived from the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document (CRD). The Transportation System Requirements Document (TSRD) was developed in accordance with LP-3.1Q-OCRWM, Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of National Transportation Level-2 Baseline Requirements. As illustrated in Figure 1, the TSRD forms a part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Technical Baseline

  19. Transportation System Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  20. Gene Expression Profile Analysis is Directly Affected by the Selected Reference Gene: The Case of Leaf-Cutting Atta Sexdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalynka G. do Livramento

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although several ant species are important targets for the development of molecular control strategies, only a few studies focus on identifying and validating reference genes for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR data normalization. We provide here an extensive study to identify and validate suitable reference genes for gene expression analysis in the ant Atta sexdens, a threatening agricultural pest in South America. The optimal number of reference genes varies according to each sample and the result generated by RefFinder differed about which is the most suitable reference gene. Results suggest that the RPS16, NADH and SDHB genes were the best reference genes in the sample pool according to stability values. The SNF7 gene expression pattern was stable in all evaluated sample set. In contrast, when using less stable reference genes for normalization a large variability in SNF7 gene expression was recorded. There is no universal reference gene suitable for all conditions under analysis, since these genes can also participate in different cellular functions, thus requiring a systematic validation of possible reference genes for each specific condition. The choice of reference genes on SNF7 gene normalization confirmed that unstable reference genes might drastically change the expression profile analysis of target candidate genes.

  1. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  2. Semantic Requirements Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Motoshi

    Requirements engineering (RE) techniques play a crucial role in information systems development processes. There are many excellent techniques of RE to assist requirements analysts and stakeholders in producing requirements specification of higher quality, and some of them are put into practice in industry. However, one of the issues of these RE techniques is that they do not handle semantic aspects of requirements. If we can deal with the meaning of requirements by using automated techniques, we can get more effective RE techniques to produce requirements specifications of higher quality. In this chapter, we consider an ontology as a semantic domain so as to provide the meaning for requirements, and discuss the potentials of the RE techniques using an ontology as a semantic basis. Especially, we illustrate an extension of goal-oriented requirements analysis where this idea is embedded, i.e. we provide the semantics for goal descriptions written in natural language using a mapping from them to an ontology. The inference mechanisms of the ontology allow us to decompose a goal into sub-goals and to find missing goals. Furthermore, in this chapter we discuss the possibilities of the techniques to support the other activities of RE processes using this ontological technique, e.g. measuring quality metrics and controlling versions of requirements from a semantic view. Due to similarity to Semantic Web techniques, we call a family of these engineering techniques Semantic Requirements Engineering in this chapter.

  3. Effects of gene disruptions in the nisin gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis on nisin production and producer immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ra, Runar; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Saris, Per E.J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1999-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The chromosomally located gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG is required for biosynthesis, development of immunity, and regulation of gene expression. In-frame deletions in the nisB and nisT genes, and disruption of

  4. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  5. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs

  6. Environmental Requirements Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  7. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly ...

  8. Reference genes for gene expression studies in wheat flag leaves grown under different farming conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Raposo Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internal control genes with highly uniform expression throughout the experimental conditions are required for accurate gene expression analysis as no universal reference genes exists. In this study, the expression stability of 24 candidate genes from Triticum aestivum cv. Cubus flag leaves grown under organic and conventional farming systems was evaluated in two locations in order to select suitable genes that can be used for normalization of real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR reactions. The genes were selected among the most common used reference genes as well as genes encoding proteins involved in several metabolic pathways. Findings Individual genes displayed different expression rates across all samples assayed. Applying geNorm, a set of three potential reference genes were suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR reactions in winter wheat flag leaves cv. Cubus: TaFNRII (ferredoxin-NADP(H oxidoreductase; AJ457980.1, ACT2 (actin 2; TC234027, and rrn26 (a putative homologue to RNA 26S gene; AL827977.1. In addition of these three genes that were also top-ranked by NormFinder, two extra genes: CYP18-2 (Cyclophilin A, AY456122.1 and TaWIN1 (14-3-3 like protein, AB042193 were most consistently stably expressed. Furthermore, we showed that TaFNRII, ACT2, and CYP18-2 are suitable for gene expression normalization in other two winter wheat varieties (Tommi and Centenaire grown under three treatments (organic, conventional and no nitrogen and a different environment than the one tested with cv. Cubus. Conclusions This study provides a new set of reference genes which should improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses when using wheat flag leaves as those related to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency for cereal production.

  9. Sequence biases in large scale gene expression profiling data

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Asim S.; Delaney, Allen D.; Schnerch, Angelique; Griffith, Obi L.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a simple, statistical assay that measures the G+C content sensitivity bias of gene expression experiments without the requirement of a duplicate experiment. We analyse five gene expression profiling methods: Affymetrix GeneChip, Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (LongSAGE), LongSAGELite, ‘Classic’ Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) and ‘Signature’ MPSS. We demonstrate the methods have systematic and random errors leading to a different G+C content s...

  10. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    The human genome codes for ~35,000 genes and all these genes are not expressed in every cell. The time and site of gene expression is very precisely regulated. In any cell, only. Silence of the Genes. 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath and Saumitra Das. Keywords. RNA interference, siRNA,.

  11. Creativity in Requirement Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Olesen, Henning

    Traditional requirements engineering focuses mainly on analysis and elicitation. However, current trends in new system, device and software are towards involving all stakeholders in the early stages of the engineering process to define the user requirements. Creativity is here seen as a major...

  12. Navigating the Requirements Jungle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Boris; Tautschnig, Michael

    Research on validation and verification of requirements specifications has thus far focused on functional properties. Yet, in embedded systems, functional requirements constitute only a small fraction of the properties that must hold to guarantee proper and safe operation of the system under design.

  13. Writing testable software requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knirk, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This tutorial identifies common problems in analyzing requirements in the problem and constructing a written specification of what the software is to do. It deals with two main problem areas: identifying and describing problem requirements, and analyzing and describing behavior specifications.

  14. User Requirements for Wireless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In most IT system development processes, the identification or elicitation of user requirements is recognized as a key building block. In practice, the identification of user needs and wants is a challenge and inadequate or faulty identifications in this step of an IT system development can cause...... huge problems with the final product. The elicitation of user requirements as such changes according to age groups;, to gender,; to cultural settings,; and into time; and experience in the use of the system/software. User requirements, therefore, cannot be used between projects, IT systems......, and different software. That makes the elicitation of user requirements an inherent part of any software development project and a resourceful activity as well. This book provides insights to the process of identifying user requirements and to different types by describing varying case studies in which...

  15. pbx is required for pole and eye regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh G; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Planarian regeneration involves regionalized gene expression that specifies the body plan. After amputation, planarians are capable of regenerating new anterior and posterior poles, as well as tissues polarized along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes. Wnt and several Hox genes are expressed at the posterior pole, whereas Wnt inhibitory genes, Fgf inhibitory genes, and prep, which encodes a TALE-family homeodomain protein, are expressed at the anterior pole. We found that Smed-pbx (pbx for short), which encodes a second planarian TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, is required for restored expression of these genes at anterior and posterior poles during regeneration. Moreover, pbx(RNAi) animals gradually lose pole gene expression during homeostasis. By contrast, pbx was not required for initial anterior-posterior polarized responses to wounds, indicating that pbx is required after wound responses for development and maintenance of poles during regeneration and homeostatic tissue turnover. Independently of the requirement for pbx in pole regeneration, pbx is required for eye precursor formation and, consequently, eye regeneration and eye replacement in homeostasis. Together, these data indicate that pbx promotes pole formation of body axes and formation of regenerative progenitors for eyes.

  16. Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Ali Y; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Brown, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Chemical detoxification and physical destruction of aflatoxins in foods and feed commodities are mostly unattainable in a way that preserves the edibility of the food. Therefore, preventing mycotoxins in general and aflatoxins in particular from entering the food chain is a better approach. This requires early detection of the aflatoxin-causing organisms. Detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing fungi has always been a challenge, especially within species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. Culture-based methods require a high level of expertise and a list of sophisticated equipment. Furthermore, even for a trained taxonomist, species that are identical in morphology, physiology, and nutritional aspects can be challenging to classify. Fungal taxonomy has changed over the past few decades; more species are being reclassified, and new species are being described due to advances in sequencing and genome assembly. These developments make the use of PCR-based approaches practical, rapid, and more reliable for the identification of fungi to the species level. This chapter presents a variety of protocols to detect and quantify aflatoxin-producing fungi using mycotoxin biosynthesis pathway genes.

  17. Requirements in engineering projects

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, João M

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on various topics related to engineering and management of requirements, in particular elicitation, negotiation, prioritisation, and documentation (whether with natural languages or with graphical models). The book provides methods and techniques that help to characterise, in a systematic manner, the requirements of the intended engineering system.  It was written with the goal of being adopted as the main text for courses on requirements engineering, or as a strong reference to the topics of requirements in courses with a broader scope. It can also be used in vocational courses, for professionals interested in the software and information systems domain.   Readers who have finished this book will be able to: - establish and plan a requirements engineering process within the development of complex engineering systems; - define and identify the types of relevant requirements in engineering projects; - choose and apply the most appropriate techniques to elicit the requirements of a giv...

  18. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Boryana S; Apperson, Michelle; Walker, Wynn L; Tian, Yingfang; Xu, Huichun; Adamczy, Peter; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, Da-Zhi; Ander, Bradley P; Liao, Isaac H; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Turner, Renee J; Jickling, Glen; Lit, Lisa; Sharp, Frank R

    2009-08-05

    Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT), 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS) and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder). The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  19. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  20. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Missing genes in the annotation of prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wu-chun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-coding gene detection in prokaryotic genomes is considered a much simpler problem than in intron-containing eukaryotic genomes. However there have been reports that prokaryotic gene finder programs have problems with small genes (either over-predicting or under-predicting. Therefore the question arises as to whether current genome annotations have systematically missing, small genes. Results We have developed a high-performance computing methodology to investigate this problem. In this methodology we compare all ORFs larger than or equal to 33 aa from all fully-sequenced prokaryotic replicons. Based on that comparison, and using conservative criteria requiring a minimum taxonomic diversity between conserved ORFs in different genomes, we have discovered 1,153 candidate genes that are missing from current genome annotations. These missing genes are similar only to each other and do not have any strong similarity to gene sequences in public databases, with the implication that these ORFs belong to missing gene families. We also uncovered 38,895 intergenic ORFs, readily identified as putative genes by similarity to currently annotated genes (we call these absent annotations. The vast majority of the missing genes found are small (less than 100 aa. A comparison of select examples with GeneMark, EasyGene and Glimmer predictions yields evidence that some of these genes are escaping detection by these programs. Conclusions Prokaryotic gene finders and prokaryotic genome annotations require improvement for accurate prediction of small genes. The number of missing gene families found is likely a lower bound on the actual number, due to the conservative criteria used to determine whether an ORF corresponds to a real gene.

  2. TWRSview system requirements specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.A.; Lee, A.K.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the system requirements specification for the TWRSview software system. The TWRSview software system is being developed to integrate electronic data supporting the development of the TWRS technical baseline

  3. Turning Desirements into Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    27 Defense AT&L: September–October 2015 Turning “Desirements” into Requirements Charles Court Court is the Requirements Center Director at the...Defense Systems Management College at the Defense Acquisition University at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He is a former Wild Weasel Electronic Warfare Officer...a Mustang would do much better. (The author wanted the Aston Martin from the movie “Goldfinger.” You know: The one with the ejection seat, automated

  4. Automatic requirements traceability

    OpenAIRE

    Andžiulytė, Justė

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on automatic requirements traceability and algorithms that automatically find recommendation links for requirements. The main objective of this paper is the evaluation of these algorithms and preparation of the method defining algorithms to be used in different cases. This paper presents and examines probabilistic, vector space and latent semantic indexing models of information retrieval and association rule mining using authors own implementations of these algorithms and o...

  5. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  6. BRD usability requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Alina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-12

    This document describes the usability requirements for the Biosurveillance resource directory (BRD); that is, who will be using the tool and what tasks they will be using it for. It does not include information on technical implementation (e.g., whether specific information is contained in the database or pulled on demand from other sources). It also avoids specific design ideas (such as widget descriptions) unless they are necessary to illustrate a requirement.

  7. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    and s ubsequently amp lified at the Yale University sequenc ing facility for Illumina sequencing. However, it required a lot of effort to obtain this...and Polyak K. (2008). Genome-wide functi onal synergy between amp lified and mutated genes in human breast cancer. Cancer Res. 68: 9532-9540...east cancer patient samples. Other co-amp lified genes, within the HER2 amplicon and/or at other regions, could serve as additional novel target s for

  8. Utility requirements for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondrasek, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes work done and results obtained during performance of Task 1 of a study of Utility Requirements and Criteria for Fusion Options. The work consisted of developing a list of utility requirements for fusion optics containing definition of the requirements and showing their relative importance to the utility industry. The project team members developed a preliminary list which was refined by discussions and literature searches. The refined list was recast as a questionnaire which was sent to a substantial portion of the utility industry in this country. Forty-three questionnaire recipients responded including thirty-two utilities. A workshop was held to develop a revised requirements list using the survey responses as a major input. The list prepared by the workshop was further refined by a panel consisting of vice presidents of the three project team firms. The results of the study indicate that in addition to considering the cost of energy for a power plant, utilities consider twenty-three other requirements. Four of the requirements were judged to be vital to plant acceptability: Plant Capital Cost, Financial Liability, Plant Safety and Licensability

  9. Caleydo: connecting pathways and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Marc; Lex, Alexander; Kalkusch, Michael; Zatloukal, Kurt; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2009-10-15

    Understanding the relationships between pathways and the altered expression of their components in disease conditions can be addressed in a visual data analysis process. Caleydo uses novel visualization techniques to support life science experts in their analysis of gene expression data in the context of pathways and functions of individual genes. Pathways and gene expression visualizations are placed in a 3D scene where selected entities (i.e. genes) are visually connected. This allows Caleydo to seamlessly integrate interactive gene expression visualization with cross-database pathway exploration. The Caleydo visualization framework is freely available on www.caleydo.org for non-commercial use. It runs on Windows and Linux and requires a 3D capable graphics card.

  10. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  11. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  12. Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2012-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe neuromuscular disorder for which there is currently no cure. Years of research have come to fruition during the past 18 months with publications on clinical trials for several gene therapy approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review covers the present status of these approaches. The exon skipping approach is most advanced in the process of clinical application. Encouraging results have been obtained in two systemic clinical trials and further optimization has increased delivery to the heart in animal models. Limitations of the approach are the mutation-specificity and the anticipated requirement for lifelong treatment. Gene therapy by means of gene transfer holds the promise of more long-lasting effects. Results of a first, early-stage gene therapy trial, using viral vectors to deliver a minidystrophin gene, were reported. Animal studies suggest that it may be possible to overcome the main challenges currently facing gene therapy (immunogenicity of the vector and systemic body-wide delivery). Significant steps have been made in the development of gene therapy approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These approaches aim to slow down disease progression, requiring robust outcome measures to assess efficacy.

  13. Gene-disease relationship discovery based on model-driven data integration and database view definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, S; Jonveaux, P; Bicep, C; Pierron, L; Smaïl-Tabbone, M; Devignes, M D

    2009-01-15

    Computational methods are widely used to discover gene-disease relationships hidden in vast masses of available genomic and post-genomic data. In most current methods, a similarity measure is calculated between gene annotations and known disease genes or disease descriptions. However, more explicit gene-disease relationships are required for better insights into the molecular bases of diseases, especially for complex multi-gene diseases. Explicit relationships between genes and diseases are formulated as candidate gene definitions that may include intermediary genes, e.g. orthologous or interacting genes. These definitions guide data modelling in our database approach for gene-disease relationship discovery and are expressed as views which ultimately lead to the retrieval of documented sets of candidate genes. A system called ACGR (Approach for Candidate Gene Retrieval) has been implemented and tested with three case studies including a rare orphan gene disease.

  14. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  15. Horizontal acquisition of multiple mitochondrial genes from a parasitic plant followed by gene conversion with host mitochondrial genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Weilong

    2010-12-01

    mitochondrial copies suggests that transferred genes may be evolutionarily important in generating mitochondrial genetic diversity. Finally, the complex relationships within each lineage of transferred genes imply a surprisingly complicated history of these genes in Plantago subsequent to their acquisition via HGT and this history probably involves some combination of additional transfers (including intracellular transfer, gene duplication, differential loss and mutation-rate variation. Unravelling this history will probably require sequencing multiple mitochondrial and nuclear genomes from Plantago. See Commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/147.

  16. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  18. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  19. Identification of optimal housekeeping genes for examination of gene expression in bovine corpus luteum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekawiecki, Robert; Rutkowska, Joanna; Kotwica, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The selection of proper housekeeping genes for studies requiring genes expression normalization is an important step in the appropriate interpretation of results. The expression of housekeeping genes is regulated by many factors including age, gender, type of tissue or disease. The aim of the study was to identify optimal housekeeping genes in the corpus luteum obtained from cyclic or pregnant cows. The mRNA expression of thirteen housekeeping genes: C2orf29, SUZ12, TBP, TUBB2B, ZNF131, HPRT1, 18s RNA, GAPDH, SF3A1, SDHA, MRPL12, B2M and ACTB was measured by Real-time PCR. Range of cycle threshold (C(t)) values of the tested genes varied between 12 and 30 cycles, and 18s RNA had the highest coefficient of variation, whereas C2orf29 had the smallest coefficient. GeNorm software demonstrated C2orf29 and TBP as the most stable and 18s RNA and B2M as the most unstable housekeeping genes. Using the proposed cut-off value (0.15), no more than two of the best GeNorm housekeeping genes are proposed to be used in studies requiring gene expression normalization. NormFinder software demonstrated C2orf29 and SUZ12 as the best and 18s RNA and B2M as the worst housekeeping genes. The study indicates that selection of housekeeping genes may essentially affect the quality of the gene expression results. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  20. Exploring the Optimal Strategy to Predict Essential Genes in Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Lu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurately predicting essential genes is important in many aspects of biology, medicine and bioengineering. In previous research, we have developed a machine learning based integrative algorithm to predict essential genes in bacterial species. This algorithm lends itself to two approaches for predicting essential genes: learning the traits from known essential genes in the target organism, or transferring essential gene annotations from a closely related model organism. However, for an understudied microbe, each approach has its potential limitations. The first is constricted by the often small number of known essential genes. The second is limited by the availability of model organisms and by evolutionary distance. In this study, we aim to determine the optimal strategy for predicting essential genes by examining four microbes with well-characterized essential genes. Our results suggest that, unless the known essential genes are few, learning from the known essential genes in the target organism usually outperforms transferring essential gene annotations from a related model organism. In fact, the required number of known essential genes is surprisingly small to make accurate predictions. In prokaryotes, when the number of known essential genes is greater than 2% of total genes, this approach already comes close to its optimal performance. In eukaryotes, achieving the same best performance requires over 4% of total genes, reflecting the increased complexity of eukaryotic organisms. Combining the two approaches resulted in an increased performance when the known essential genes are few. Our investigation thus provides key information on accurately predicting essential genes and will greatly facilitate annotations of microbial genomes.

  1. Gene therapy of inherited immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Giorgia; Thornhill, Susannah I; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a group of inherited diseases that affect the development or activity of the immune system. In severe cases allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has proved to be a successful curative modality but it is limited by toxicity and reduced efficacy in mismatched donor settings. Gene therapy for PID has been developed as an alternative strategy and has entered the clinical arena. In this review we discuss the outcomes of recent gene therapy trials and some of the problems that remain to be tackled. Results from clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), adenosine deaminase deficient SCID (ADA-SCID), and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) are discussed. In addition, other conditions are highlighted such as the Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) for which gene therapy has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies, and are currently being translated into novel clinical approaches. Whilst these encouraging results demonstrate that gene therapy can be used successfully to treat monogenic PID, the occurrence of vector-related side effects has highlighted the need for accurate assessment of the associated risks and a requirement for improvements in vector design.

  2. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  3. Epigenetics: beyond genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fossey, A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory processes lead to differential gene expression and are referred to as epigenetic phenomena; these are ubiquitous processes in the biological world. These reversible heritable changes concern DNA and RNA, their interactions...

  4. NP Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-08-26

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. To support SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In August 2011, ESnet and the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP), of the DOE SC, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by NP. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  5. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. MR REPORTER GENES

    OpenAIRE

    Gilad, Assaf A.; Ziv, Keren; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Neeman, Michal; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging of dynamic processes has benefited tremendously from the use of reporter genes. These genes encode for proteins that emit light, bind radiolabeled probes or, as covered in this review, modulate magnetic resonance (MR) contrast. Reporter genes play a pivotal role in monitoring cell trafficking, gene replacement therapy, protein-protein interactions, neuronal plasticity and embryonic development. Several strategies exist for generating MR contrast: enzyme-catalyze...

  7. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  8. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    tary to the endogenous sense mRNA produced by the normal gene. The antisense strand binds to the sense strand and blocks protein synthesis. This method of gene inhibition was termed antisense technology. The antisense technology soon became a. RNA interference. (RNAi) is a novel mechanism for controlling gene.

  9. Gene therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, T R; Laube, B L

    2001-09-01

    Theoretically, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene replacement during the neonatal period can decrease morbidity and mortality from cystic fibrosis (CF). In vivo gene transfers have been accomplished in CF patients. Choice of vector, mode of delivery to airways, translocation of genetic information, and sufficient expression level of the normalized CFTR gene are issues that currently are being addressed in the field. The advantages and limitations of viral vectors are a function of the parent virus. Viral vectors used in this setting include adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Initial studies with Ad vectors resulted in a vector that was efficient for gene transfer with dose-limiting inflammatory effects due to the large amount of viral protein delivered. The next generation of Ad vectors, with more viral coding sequence deletions, has a longer duration of activity and elicits a lesser degree of cell-mediated immunity in mice. A more recent generation of Ad vectors has no viral genes remaining. Despite these changes, the problem of humoral immunity remains with Ad vectors. A variety of strategies such as vector systems requiring single, or widely spaced, administrations, pharmacologic immunosuppression at administration, creation of a stealth vector, modification of immunogenic epitopes, or tolerance induction are being considered to circumvent humoral immunity. AAV vectors have been studied in animal and human models. They do not appear to induce inflammatory changes over a wide range of doses. The level of CFTR messenger RNA expression is difficult to ascertain with AAV vectors since the small size of the vector relative to the CFTR gene leaves no space for vector-specific sequences on which to base assays to distinguish endogenous from vector-expressed messenger RNA. In general, AAV vectors appear to be safe and have superior duration profiles. Cationic liposomes are lipid-DNA complexes. These vectors generally have been

  10. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  11. RNAi-Based Identification of Gene-Specific Nuclear Cofactor Networks Regulating Interleukin-1 Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Meier-Soelch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The potent proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-1 triggers gene expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the cofactor requirements of strongly regulated IL-1 target genes whose expression is impaired in p65 NF-κB-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts. By two independent small-hairpin (shRNA screens, we examined 170 genes annotated to encode nuclear cofactors for their role in Cxcl2 mRNA expression and identified 22 factors that modulated basal or IL-1-inducible Cxcl2 levels. The functions of 16 of these factors were validated for Cxcl2 and further analyzed for their role in regulation of 10 additional IL-1 target genes by RT-qPCR. These data reveal that each inducible gene has its own (quantitative requirement of cofactors to maintain basal levels and to respond to IL-1. Twelve factors (Epc1, H2afz, Kdm2b, Kdm6a, Mbd3, Mta2, Phf21a, Ruvbl1, Sin3b, Suv420h1, Taf1, and Ube3a have not been previously implicated in inflammatory cytokine functions. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that they are components of complex nuclear protein networks that regulate chromatin functions and gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that downstream from the essential NF-κB signal each cytokine-inducible target gene has further subtle requirements for individual sets of nuclear cofactors that shape its transcriptional activation profile.

  12. A stochastic approach to multi-gene expression dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J.C.; Akutsu, T.

    2005-01-01

    In the last years, tens of thousands gene expression profiles for cells of several organisms have been monitored. Gene expression is a complex transcriptional process where mRNA molecules are translated into proteins, which control most of the cell functions. In this process, the correlation among genes is crucial to determine the specific functions of genes. Here, we propose a novel multi-dimensional stochastic approach to deal with the gene correlation phenomena. Interestingly, our stochastic framework suggests that the study of the gene correlation requires only one theoretical assumption-Markov property-and the experimental transition probability, which characterizes the gene correlation system. Finally, a gene expression experiment is proposed for future applications of the model

  13. Quantifying requirements volatility effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulk, G.P.; Verhoef, C.

    2008-01-01

    In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements volatility. This representative portfolio

  14. Data Crosscutting Requirements Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, Arie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Plata, Charity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    In April 2013, a diverse group of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientific community assembled to assess data requirements associated with DOE-sponsored scientific facilities and large-scale experiments. Participants in the review included facilities staff, program managers, and scientific experts from the offices of Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, High Energy Physics, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research. As part of the meeting, review participants discussed key issues associated with three distinct aspects of the data challenge: 1) processing, 2) management, and 3) analysis. These discussions identified commonalities and differences among the needs of varied scientific communities. They also helped to articulate gaps between current approaches and future needs, as well as the research advances that will be required to close these gaps. Moreover, the review provided a rare opportunity for experts from across the Office of Science to learn about their collective expertise, challenges, and opportunities. The "Data Crosscutting Requirements Review" generated specific findings and recommendations for addressing large-scale data crosscutting requirements.

  15. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ely, James H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Harper, Warren W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heimbigner, Tom R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, Charles W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Humble, Paul H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Madison, Jill C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Panisko, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ripplinger, Mike D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stewart, Timothy L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-30

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  16. Requirements for Xenon International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  17. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression studies in peach using real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RT-qPCR is a preferred method for rapid and reliable quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR in such studies requires the use of reference gene(s as an internal control to normalize mRNA levels between different samples for an exact comparison of gene expression level. However, recent studies have shown that no single reference gene is universal for all experiments. Thus, the identification of high quality reference gene(s is of paramount importance for the interpretation of data generated by RT-qPCR. Only a few studies on reference genes have been done in plants and none in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch. Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify suitable reference gene(s for normalization of gene expression in peach. Results In this work, eleven reference genes were investigated in different peach samples using RT-qPCR with SYBR green. These genes are: actin 2/7 (ACT, cyclophilin (CYP2, RNA polymerase II (RP II, phospholipase A2 (PLA2, ribosomal protein L13 (RPL13, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA, tubblin beta (TUB, tubblin alpha (TUA, translation elongation factor 2 (TEF2 and ubiquitin 10 (UBQ10. All eleven reference genes displayed a wide range of Cq values in all samples, indicating that they expressed variably. The stability of these genes except for RPL13 was determined by three different descriptive statistics, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper, which produced highly comparable results. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that expression stability varied greatly between genes studied in peach. Based on the results from geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper analyses, for all the sample pools analyzed, TEF2, UBQ10 and RP II were found to be the most suitable reference genes with a very high statistical reliability, and TEF2 and RP II for the other sample series, while 18S rRNA, RPL13 and PLA2 were unsuitable as internal controls

  18. Carboxylesterase 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Madsen, Majbritt Busk

    2018-01-01

    The carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) encodes a hydrolase that metabolizes commonly used drugs. The CES1-related pseudogene, carboxylesterase 1 pseudogene 1 (CES1P1), has been implicated in gene exchange with CES1 and in the formation of hybrid genes including the carboxylesterase 1A2 gene (CES1A2...... region was revealed. In conclusion, many procedures for CES1, CES1A2 and CES1P1 genotyping appear to lack specificity. Knowledge about the segmental duplications may improve the typing of these genes....

  19. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    As humans continue to explore deep into space, microorganisms will travel with them. The primary means to mitigate the risk of infectious disease are a combination of prudent spacecraft design and rigorous operational controls. The effectiveness of these methods are evaluated by microbiological monitoring of spacecraft, food, water, and the crew that is performed preflight, in-flight, and post-flight. Current NASA requirements associated with microbiological monitoring are based on culture-based methodology where microorganisms are grown on a semi-solid growth medium and enumerated. Subsequent identification of the organisms requires specialized labor and large equipment, which historically has been performed on Earth. Requirements that rely strictly on culture-based units limit the use of non-culture based monitoring technology. Specifically, the culture-based "measurement criteria" are Colony Forming Units (CFU, representing the growth of one microorganism at a single location on the agar medium) per a given volume, area, or sample size. As the CFU unit by definition is culture-based, these requirements limit alternative technologies for spaceflight applications. As spaceflight missions such as those to Mars extend further into space, culture-based technology will become difficult to implement due to the (a) limited shelf life of the culture media, (b) mass/volume necessary to carry these consumables, and (c) problems associated with the production of biohazardous material in the habitable volume of the spacecraft. In addition, an extensive amount of new knowledge has been obtained during the Space Shuttle, NASA-Mir, and International Space Station Programs, which gave direction for new or modified microbial control requirements for vehicle design and mission operations. The goal of this task is to develop and recommend a new set of requirements for vehicle design and mission operations, including microbiological monitoring, based upon "lessons learned" and new

  20. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  1. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  2. Human gene essentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; di Iulio, Julia; Venter, J Craig; Telenti, Amalio

    2018-01-01

    A gene can be defined as essential when loss of its function compromises viability of the individual (for example, embryonic lethality) or results in profound loss of fitness. At the population level, identification of essential genes is accomplished by observing intolerance to loss-of-function variants. Several computational methods are available to score gene essentiality, and recent progress has been made in defining essentiality in the non-coding genome. Haploinsufficiency is emerging as a critical aspect of gene essentiality: approximately 3,000 human genes cannot tolerate loss of one of the two alleles. Genes identified as essential in human cell lines or knockout mice may be distinct from those in living humans. Reconciling these discrepancies in how we evaluate gene essentiality has applications in clinical genetics and may offer insights for drug development.

  3. Inferring Drosophila gap gene regulatory network: A parameter sensitivity and perturbation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fomekong-Nanfack, Y.; Postma, M.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Inverse modelling of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) capable of simulating continuous spatio-temporal biological processes requires accurate data and a good description of the system. If quantitative relations between genes cannot be extracted from direct measurements, an efficient

  4. Inferring gene regression networks with model trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Ruiz Jesus S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel strategies are required in order to handle the huge amount of data produced by microarray technologies. To infer gene regulatory networks, the first step is to find direct regulatory relationships between genes building the so-called gene co-expression networks. They are typically generated using correlation statistics as pairwise similarity measures. Correlation-based methods are very useful in order to determine whether two genes have a strong global similarity but do not detect local similarities. Results We propose model trees as a method to identify gene interaction networks. While correlation-based methods analyze each pair of genes, in our approach we generate a single regression tree for each gene from the remaining genes. Finally, a graph from all the relationships among output and input genes is built taking into account whether the pair of genes is statistically significant. For this reason we apply a statistical procedure to control the false discovery rate. The performance of our approach, named REGNET, is experimentally tested on two well-known data sets: Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and E.coli data set. First, the biological coherence of the results are tested. Second the E.coli transcriptional network (in the Regulon database is used as control to compare the results to that of a correlation-based method. This experiment shows that REGNET performs more accurately at detecting true gene associations than the Pearson and Spearman zeroth and first-order correlation-based methods. Conclusions REGNET generates gene association networks from gene expression data, and differs from correlation-based methods in that the relationship between one gene and others is calculated simultaneously. Model trees are very useful techniques to estimate the numerical values for the target genes by linear regression functions. They are very often more precise than linear regression models because they can add just different linear

  5. Entrepreneurial learning requires action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove; Madsen, Svend Ole

    2014-01-01

    apply in industry. The findings of this study show that SME managers employ a practice-shaped holistic multi- and cross-disciplinary approach to learning. This learning approach is supported by theory dissemination, business challenge applications, and organisational prerequisites. Diversified learning......This paper reveals how managers of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can utilise their participation in research-based training. Empirical research from a longitudinal study of 10 SMEs managers in the wind turbine industry is provided to describe a learning approach that SME managers can...... that is enhanced by essential large-scale industry players and other SME managers are required to create action and value in learning. An open-mindedness to new learning approaches by SME managers and an open-mindedness to multi- and cross-disciplinary collaboration with SME managers by facilitators is required....

  6. Ecodesign requirements for televisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huulgaard, Rikke Dorothea; Dalgaard, Randi; Merciai, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    phase. This is not in line with the scientific understanding of ecodesign, where attention should be put on all life cycle phases and all relevant environmental impact categories. This study focuses on the requirements for televisions (TV). A life cycle assessment (LCA) is carried out on two TVs...... to analyse if other environmental hotspots and life cycle phases should be included in the requirements in the IM of the Ecodesign Directive besides energy consumption in the use phase analysis. Methods The consequential approach is used. The data for the LCA have been gathered from two manufacturers of TVs....... In one case, the data were delivered in Excel spreadsheets; in the other case, the authors of this paper together with the manufacturer disassembled a TV and collected the data manually. Results and discussion When applying the consequential approach, the production phase has the highest environmental...

  7. Preanalytical requirements of urinalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanghe, Joris; Speeckaert, Marijn

    2014-01-01

    Urine may be a waste product, but it contains an enormous amount of information. Well-standardized procedures for collection, transport, sample preparation and analysis should become the basis of an effective diagnostic strategy for urinalysis. As reproducibility of urinalysis has been greatly improved due to recent technological progress, preanalytical requirements of urinalysis have gained importance and have become stricter. Since the patients themselves often sample urine specimens, urinalysis is very susceptible to preanalytical issues. Various sampling methods and inappropriate specimen transport can cause important preanalytical errors. The use of preservatives may be helpful for particular analytes. Unfortunately, a universal preservative that allows a complete urinalysis does not (yet) exist. The preanalytical aspects are also of major importance for newer applications (e.g. metabolomics). The present review deals with the current preanalytical problems and requirements for the most common urinary analytes. PMID:24627718

  8. LHCb Online Networking Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, B

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the networking requirements of the LHCb online installation. It lists both quantitative aspects such as the number of required switch ports, as well as some qualitative features of the equipment, such as minimum buffer sizes in switches. The document comprises both the data acquisition network and the controls/general-purpose network. While the numbers represent our best current knowledge and are intended to give (in particular) network equipment manufacturers an overview of our needs, this document should not be confused with a market survey questionnaire or a formal tendering document. However the information contained in this document will be the input of any such document. A preliminary schedule for procurement and installation is also given.

  9. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  10. Utility requirements for HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Eskom, the state utility of South Africa, is currently evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the helium cooled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor with a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system for future power generating additions to its electric system. This paper provides an overview of the Eskom system including the needs of the utility for future generation capacity and the key performance requirements necessary for incorporation of this gas cooled reactor plant. (author)

  11. BER Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alapaty, Kiran; Allen, Ben; Bell, Greg; Benton, David; Brettin, Tom; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Cotter, Steve; Crivelli, Silvia; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Desai, Narayan; Egan, Richard; Tierney, Brian; Goodwin, Ken; Gregurick, Susan; Hicks, Susan; Johnston, Bill; de Jong, Bert; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Livny, Miron; Markowitz, Victor; McGraw, Jim; McCord, Raymond; Oehmen, Chris; Regimbal, Kevin; Shipman, Galen; Strand, Gary; Flick, Jeff; Turnbull, Susan; Williams, Dean; Zurawski, Jason

    2010-11-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  12. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM

  13. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  14. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  15. Evolution of evolvability in gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crombach

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks are perhaps the most important organizational level in the cell where signals from the cell state and the outside environment are integrated in terms of activation and inhibition of genes. For the last decade, the study of such networks has been fueled by large-scale experiments and renewed attention from the theoretical field. Different models have been proposed to, for instance, investigate expression dynamics, explain the network topology we observe in bacteria and yeast, and for the analysis of evolvability and robustness of such networks. Yet how these gene regulatory networks evolve and become evolvable remains an open question. An individual-oriented evolutionary model is used to shed light on this matter. Each individual has a genome from which its gene regulatory network is derived. Mutations, such as gene duplications and deletions, alter the genome, while the resulting network determines the gene expression pattern and hence fitness. With this protocol we let a population of individuals evolve under Darwinian selection in an environment that changes through time. Our work demonstrates that long-term evolution of complex gene regulatory networks in a changing environment can lead to a striking increase in the efficiency of generating beneficial mutations. We show that the population evolves towards genotype-phenotype mappings that allow for an orchestrated network-wide change in the gene expression pattern, requiring only a few specific gene indels. The genes involved are hubs of the networks, or directly influencing the hubs. Moreover, throughout the evolutionary trajectory the networks maintain their mutational robustness. In other words, evolution in an alternating environment leads to a network that is sensitive to a small class of beneficial mutations, while the majority of mutations remain neutral: an example of evolution of evolvability.

  16. The multicellularity genes of dictyostelid social amoebas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Gernot; Lawal, Hajara M.; Felder, Marius; Singh, Reema; Singer, Gail; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity enabled specialization of cells, but required novel signalling mechanisms for regulating cell differentiation. Early multicellular organisms are mostly extinct and the origins of these mechanisms are unknown. Here using comparative genome and transcriptome analysis across eight uni- and multicellular amoebozoan genomes, we find that 80% of proteins essential for the development of multicellular Dictyostelia are already present in their unicellular relatives. This set is enriched in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, and protein kinases. The remaining 20%, unique to Dictyostelia, mostly consists of extracellularly exposed and secreted proteins, with roles in sensing and recognition, while several genes for synthesis of signals that induce cell-type specialization were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Across Dictyostelia, changes in gene expression correspond more strongly with phenotypic innovation than changes in protein functional domains. We conclude that the transition to multicellularity required novel signals and sensors rather than novel signal processing mechanisms. PMID:27357338

  17. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  18. Development of Plant Gene Vectors for Tissue-Specific Expression Using GFP as a Reporter Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jacquelyn; Egnin, Marceline; Xue, Qi-Han; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Reporter genes are widely employed in plant molecular biology research to analyze gene expression and to identify promoters. Gus (UidA) is currently the most popular reporter gene but its detection requires a destructive assay. The use of jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from Aequorea Victoria holds promise for noninvasive detection of in vivo gene expression. To study how various plant promoters are expressed in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we are transcriptionally fusing the intron-modified (mGFP) or synthetic (modified for codon-usage) GFP coding regions to these promoters: double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) with AMV translational enhancer, ubiquitin7-intron-ubiquitin coding region (ubi7-intron-UQ) and sporaminA. A few of these vectors have been constructed and introduced into E. coli DH5a and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105. Transient expression studies are underway using protoplast-electroporation and particle bombardment of leaf tissues.

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vitamin B12 and riboflavin that are required in Hcy metabolic pathway. Gene that encodes the methylenete- trahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme that .... tors like climate, food habits, lifestyle and genetic makeup are common. Validation of the results of the present study in different ethnic groups with larger sample ...

  20. Snowball: Strain aware gene assembly of Metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Gregor; A. Schönhuth (Alexander); A.C. McHardy (Alice)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractGene assembly is an important step in functional analysis of shotgun metagenomic data. Nonetheless, strain aware assembly remains a challenging task, as current assembly tools often fail to distinguish among strain variants or require closely related reference genomes of the studied

  1. Snowball: strain aware gene assembly of metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Gregor; A. Schönhuth (Alexander); A.C. McHardy (Alice)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMotivation: Gene assembly is an important step in functional analysis of shotgun metagenomic data. Nonetheless, strain aware assembly remains a challenging task, as current assembly tools often fail to distinguish among strain variants or require closely related reference genomes of the

  2. genes polymorphism on tacrolimus concentrations and dosage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marwa Helal

    2016-11-30

    Nov 30, 2016 ... transplant donors and recipients on blood level and dose requirements of oral tacrolimus, to help in designing an .... groups [11]. The aim of this pilot study is to assess the influence of ABCB1. (3435 C>T) and CYP3A5 (6986 A>G) genes polymorphisms of both donors and ..... liver graft rejection [24].

  3. BES Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biocca, Alan; Carlson, Rich; Chen, Jackie; Cotter, Steve; Tierney, Brian; Dattoria, Vince; Davenport, Jim; Gaenko, Alexander; Kent, Paul; Lamm, Monica; Miller, Stephen; Mundy, Chris; Ndousse, Thomas; Pederson, Mark; Perazzo, Amedeo; Popescu, Razvan; Rouson, Damian; Sekine, Yukiko; Sumpter, Bobby; Dart, Eli; Wang, Cai-Zhuang -Z; Whitelam, Steve; Zurawski, Jason

    2011-02-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  4. BES Science Network Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  5. NIRVANA network requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, B.J.

    1990-08-01

    NIRVANA is an effort to standardize electrical computer-aided design workstations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The early effect of this project will be the introduction of at least 60 new engineering workstations at Sandia National Laboratories. Albuquerque, and at Allied Signal, Kansas City Division. These workstations are expected to begin arriving in September 1990. This paper proposes a design and outlines the requirements for a network to support the NIRVANA project. The author proposes a near-term network design, describes the security profile and caveats of this design, and proposes a long-term networking strategy for NIRVANA. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Validation of suitable reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis in Panax ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen eWang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription-qPCR (RT-qPCR has become a popular method for gene expression studies. Its results require data normalization by housekeeping genes. No single gene is proved to be stably expressed under all experimental conditions. Therefore, systematic evaluation of reference genes is necessary. With the aim to identify optimum reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of gene expression in different tissues of Panax ginseng and the seedlings grown under heat stress, we investigated the expression stability of eight candidate reference genes, including elongation factor 1-beta (EF1-β, elongation factor 1-gamma (EF1-γ, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3G (IF3G, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3B (IF3B, actin (ACT, actin11 (ACT11, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and cyclophilin ABH-like protein (CYC, using four widely used computational programs: geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the comparative ΔCt method. The results were then integrated using the web-based tool RefFinder. As a result, EF1-γ, IF3G and EF1-β were the three most stable genes in different tissues of P. ginseng, while IF3G, ACT11 and GAPDH were the top three-ranked genes in seedlings treated with heat. Using three better reference genes alone or in combination as internal control, we examined the expression profiles of MAR, a multiple function-associated mRNA-like non-coding RNA (mlncRNA in P. ginseng. Taken together, we recommended EF1-γ/IF3G and IF3G/ACT11 as the suitable pair of reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of gene expression in different tissues of P. ginseng and the seedlings grown under heat stress, respectively. The results serve as a foundation for future studies on P. ginseng functional genomics.

  7. Cancer suicide gene therapy: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Saúl Abenhamar; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Martín, Ana; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Boulaiz, Houria

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is considered the second leading cause of death worldwide despite the progress made in early detection and advances in classical therapies. Advancing in the fight against cancer requires the development of novel strategies, and the suicide gene transfer to tumor cells is providing new possibilities for cancer therapy. In this manuscript, authors present an overview of suicide gene systems and the latest innovations done to enhance cancer suicide gene therapy strategies by i) improving vectors for targeted gene delivery using tissue specific promoter and receptors; ii) modification of the tropism; and iii) combining suicide genes and/or classical therapies for cancer. Finally, the authors highlight the main challenges to be addressed in the future. Even if many efforts are needed for suicide gene therapy to be a real alternative for cancer treatment, we believe that the significant progress made in the knowledge of cancer biology and characterization of cancer stem cells accompanied by the development of novel targeted vectors will enhance the effectiveness of this type of therapeutic strategy. Moreover, combined with current treatments, suicide gene therapy will improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer in the future.

  8. Genomic organization and evolution of ruminant lysozyme c genes

    OpenAIRE

    IRWIN, David M

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant stomach lysozyme is a long established model of adaptive gene evolution. Evolution of stomach lysozyme function required changes in the site of expression of the lysozyme c gene and changes in the enzymatic properties of the enzyme. In ruminant mammals, these changes were associated with a change in the size of the lysozyme c gene family. The recent release of near complete genome sequences from several ruminant species allows a more complete examination of the evolution and diversif...

  9. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. ► Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. ► DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. ► The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 °C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) γH2AX immunostaining to detect γH2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 °C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 °C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by γH2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and telomere functions are denatured. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide direct evidence of hyperthermia induced gene amplification.

  10. Finding Incorrect and Missing Quality Requirements Definitions Using Requirements Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Haruhiko; Ohnishi, Atsushi

    Defining quality requirements completely and correctly is more difficult than defining functional requirements because stakeholders do not state most of quality requirements explicitly. We thus propose a method to measure a requirements specification for identifying the amount of quality requirements in the specification. We also propose another method to recommend quality requirements to be defined in such a specification. We expect stakeholders can identify missing and unnecessary quality requirements when measured quality requirements are different from recommended ones. We use a semi-formal language called X-JRDL to represent requirements specifications because it is suitable for analyzing quality requirements. We applied our methods to a requirements specification, and found our methods contribute to defining quality requirements more completely and correctly.

  11. Section 4: Requirements Intertwining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucopoulos, Pericles

    Business analysts are being asked to develop increasingly complex and varied business systems that need to cater to the changing and dynamic market conditions of the new economy. This is particularly acute in today’s turbulent business environment where powerful forces such as deregulation, globalisation, mergers, advances in information and telecommunications technologies, and increasing education of people provide opportunities for organising work in ways that have never before been possible. Enterprises attempt to create wealth either by getting better at improving their products and services or by harnessing creativity and human-centred management to create innovative solutions. In these business settings, requirements become critical in bridging system solutions to organisational and societal problems. They intertwine organisational, social, cognitive, and implementation considerations and they can provide unique insights to change in systems and their business context. Such design situations often involve multiple stakeholders from different participating organisations, subcontractors, divisions, etc., who may have a diversity of expertise, come from different organisational cultures and often have competing goals. The success or failure of many projects depends, to a large extent, on understanding the contextual setting of requirements and their interaction amongst a diverse population of stakeholders.

  12. Beauty Requires Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brielmann, Aenne A; Pelli, Denis G

    2017-05-22

    The experience of beauty is a pleasure, but common sense and philosophy suggest that feeling beauty differs from sensuous pleasures such as eating or sex. Immanuel Kant [1, 2] claimed that experiencing beauty requires thought but that sensuous pleasure can be enjoyed without thought and cannot be beautiful. These venerable hypotheses persist in models of aesthetic processing [3-7] but have never been tested. Here, participants continuously rated the pleasure felt from a nominally beautiful or non-beautiful stimulus and then judged whether they had experienced beauty. The stimuli, which engage various senses, included seeing images, tasting candy, and touching a teddy bear. The observer reported the feelings that the stimulus evoked. The time course of pleasure, across stimuli, is well-fit by a model with one free parameter: pleasure amplitude. Pleasure amplitude increases linearly with the feeling of beauty. To test Kant's claim of a need for thought, we reduce cognitive capacity by adding a "two-back" task to distract the observer's thoughts. The distraction greatly reduces the beauty and pleasure experienced from stimuli that otherwise produce strong pleasure and spares that of less-pleasant stimuli. We also find that strong pleasure is always beautiful, whether produced reliably by beautiful stimuli or just occasionally by sensuous stimuli. In sum, we confirm Kant's claim that only the pleasure associated with feeling beauty requires thought and disprove his claim that sensuous pleasures cannot be beautiful. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Finding Incorrect and Missing Quality Requirements Definitions Using Requirements Frame

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiya, Haruhiko; Ohnishi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Defining quality requirements completely and correctly is more difficult than defining functional requirements because stakeholders do not state most of quality requirements explicitly. We thus propose a method to measure a requirements specification for identifying the amount of quality requirements in the specification. We also propose another method to recommend quality requirements to be defined in such a specification. We expect stakeholders can identify missing and unnecessary quality r...

  14. Genes and Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2008-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence beh...

  15. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is an estrogen induced egg yolk and white protein. Eggs from hens which have a splice mutation in RCP gene fail to hatch, indicating an absolute requirement of RCP for the transport of riboflavin to the oocyte. In order to understand the mechanism of regulation of this gene by ...

  17. Importance of globin gene order for correct developmental expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Hanscombe (Olivia); D. Whyatt (David); P.J. Fraser (Peter); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); D.R. Greaves (David); N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe have used transgenic mice to study the influence of position of the human globin genes relative to the locus control region (LCR) on their expression pattern during development. The LCR, which is located 5' of the globin gene cluster, is normally required for the activation of all the

  18. prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    fications made hitherto might require re-evaluation. All these cases are discussed in detail. [Aggarwal G and Ramaswamy R 2002 Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER;. J. Biosci. (Suppl. 1) 27 7–14]. 1. Introduction. The increased effort in genome sequencing has led to a.

  19. RNA preparation and characterization for gene expression studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Much information can be obtained from knowledge of the relative expression level of each gene in the transcriptome. With the current advances in technology as little as a single cell is required as starting material for gene expression experiments. The mRNA from a single cell may be linearly...

  20. Validation of a reference gene for transcript analysis in cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RT-qPCR) is a well-established method for the precise quantification of gene expression. For accurate relative real-time RT-qPCR analysis, validation of the expression of an appropriate reference gene is required. In this study, the expression of ...

  1. Identification of epigenetically silenced genes in tumor endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, Debby M. E. I.; Melotte, Veerle; Vire, Emmanuelle; Langenkamp, Elise; Molema, Grietje; Fuks, Francois; Herman, James G.; Van Criekinge, Wim; Griffioen, Arjan W.; van Engeland, Manon

    2007-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis requires intricate regulation of gene expression in endothelial cells. We recently showed that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors directly repress endothelial cell growth and tumor angiogenesis, suggesting that epigenetic modifications mediated

  2. Display Parameters and Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  3. Analysis of the structural genes encoding M-factor in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: identification of a third gene, mfm3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1994-01-01

    that is not rescued by addition of exogenous M-factor. A mutational analysis reveals that all three mfm genes contribute to the production of M-factor. Their transcription is limited to M cells and requires the mat1-Mc and ste11 gene products. Each gene is induced when the cells are starved of nitrogen and further...

  4. SOFG: Standards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerganov, T.; Grigorov, S.; Kozhukharov, V.; Brashkova, N.

    2005-01-01

    It is well-known that Solid Oxide Fuel Cells will have industrial application in the nearest future. In this context, the problem of SOFC materials and SOFC systems standardization is of high level of priority. In the present study the attention is focused on the methods for physical and chemical characterization of the materials for SOFC components fabrication and about requirements on single SOFC cells tests. The status of the CEN, ISO, ASTM (ANSI, ASSN) and JIS class of standards has been verified. Standards regarding the test methods for physical-chemical characterization of vitreous materials (as sealing SOFC component), ceramic materials (as electrodes and electrolyte components, including alternative materials used) and metallic materials (interconnect components) are subject of overview. It is established that electrical, mechanical, surface and interfacial phenomena, chemical durability and thermal corrosion behaviour are the key areas for standardization of the materials for SOFC components

  5. SDC detector foundation requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western, J.L.; Butalla, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) Detector weighs approximately 32,000 metric tons, and its ability to perform to design specifications is directly related to its internal alignment. The limits of the misalignment tolerance envelope in combination with the detector weight impose a set of tolerance limits of performance directly upon the foundation structure. The foundation must accommodate different detector loading conditions during installation, operation, maintenance, and future enhancements. The foundation must also respond to the loading conditions within a restrictive set of displacement limitations in order to maintain the detector's critical alignment, thereby guaranteeing its operational integrity. This paper will present the results of this study, which has been issued to the Architect Engineer/Construction Manager as user requirements of design. The total structural system performance of the combination of both the detector and its foundation will be discussed

  6. Equipment Operational Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  7. Genome-wide identification of bacterial plant colonization genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Robert J.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Mucyn, Tatiana S.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Wang, Gaoyan; Ul-Hasan, Sabah; McDonald, Meredith; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Visel, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Diverse soil-resident bacteria can contribute to plant growth and health, but the molecular mechanisms enabling them to effectively colonize their plant hosts remain poorly understood. We used randomly barcoded transposon mutagenesis sequencing (RB-TnSeq) in Pseudomonas simiae, a model root-colonizing bacterium, to establish a genome-wide map of bacterial genes required for colonization of the Arabidopsis thaliana root system. We identified 115 genes (2% of all P. simiae genes) with functions that are required for maximal competitive colonization of the root system. Among the genes we identified were some with obvious colonization-related roles in motility and carbon metabolism, as well as 44 other genes that had no or vague functional predictions. Independent validation assays of individual genes confirmed colonization functions for 20 of 22 (91%) cases tested. To further characterize genes identified by our screen, we compared the functional contributions of P. simiae genes to growth in 90 distinct in vitro conditions by RB-TnSeq, highlighting specific metabolic functions associated with root colonization genes. Our analysis of bacterial genes by sequence-driven saturation mutagenesis revealed a genome-wide map of the genetic determinants of plant root colonization and offers a starting point for targeted improvement of the colonization capabilities of plant-beneficial microbes. PMID:28938018

  8. Development of a Web-Enabled Informatics Platform for Manipulation of Gene Expression Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peel, Sheila A; Kopydlowski, Karen; Carel, Roland

    2004-01-01

    High-throughput gene expression technologies such as Affymetrix and De Novo 2-Color Microarrays generate large scale measurements that require sophisticated bioinformatic platforms for data archival...

  9. Human housekeeping genes, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2013-10-01

    Housekeeping genes are involved in basic cell maintenance and, therefore, are expected to maintain constant expression levels in all cells and conditions. Identification of these genes facilitates exposure of the underlying cellular infrastructure and increases understanding of various structural genomic features. In addition, housekeeping genes are instrumental for calibration in many biotechnological applications and genomic studies. Advances in our ability to measure RNA expression have resulted in a gradual increase in the number of identified housekeeping genes. Here, we describe housekeeping gene detection in the era of massive parallel sequencing and RNA-seq. We emphasize the importance of expression at a constant level and provide a list of 3804 human genes that are expressed uniformly across a panel of tissues. Several exceptionally uniform genes are singled out for future experimental use, such as RT-PCR control genes. Finally, we discuss both ways in which current technology can meet some of past obstacles encountered, and several as yet unmet challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. One gene's shattering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kenneth M

    2012-05-29

    A new study shows that three independent mutations in the Sh1 gene, which encodes a YABBY transcription factor, gave rise to the non-shattering seed phenotype in domesticated sorghum. This same gene may have also had a role in the domestication of other cereals, including maize and rice.

  11. Your Genes, Your Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table of Contents Your Genes, Your Choices describes the Human Genome Project, the science behind it, and the ethical, legal, and social issues that are ... Nothing could be further from the truth. Your Genes, Your Choices points out how the progress of ...

  12. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high

  13. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases

  14. Requirements of quality standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture traces the development of nuclear standards, codes, and Federal regulations on quality assurance (QA) for nuclear power plants and associated facilities. The technical evolution of the last twelve years, especially in the area of nuclear technology, led to different activities and regulatory initiatives, and the present result is: several nations have their own homemade standards. The lecture discusses the former and especially current activities in standard development, and gives a description of the requirements of QA-standards used in USA and Europe, especially Western Germany. Furthermore the lecture attempts to give a comparison and an evaluation of the international quality standards from the author's viewpoint. Finally the lecture presents an outlook for the future international implications of QA-standards. There is an urgent need within the nuclear industry for simplification and standardization of QA-standards. The relationship between the various standards, and the applicability of the standards need clarification and a better transparancy. To point out these problems is the purpose of the lecture. (orig.) [de

  15. Internationalization of regulatory requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillet, Y

    2003-02-01

    The aim of harmonisation of medicines regulatory requirements is to allow the patient quicker access to new drugs and to avoid animal and human duplications. Harmonisation in the European Union (EU) is now completed, and has led to the submission of one dossier in one language study leading to European marketing authorizations, thanks in particular to efficacy guidelines published at the European level. With the benefit of the European experience since 1989, more than 40 guidelines have been harmonised amongst the EU, Japan and the USA through the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH). ICH is a unique process gathering regulators and industry experts from the three regions. Its activity is built on expertise and trust. The Common Technical Document (CTD), an agreed common format for application in the three regions, is a logical follow-up to the ICH first phase harmonising the content of the dossier. The CTD final implementation in July 2003 will have considerable influence on the review process and on the exchange of information in the three regions.

  16. Concurrent growth rate and transcript analyses reveal essential gene stringency in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Goh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genes essential for bacterial growth are of particular scientific interest. Many putative essential genes have been identified or predicted in several species, however, little is known about gene expression requirement stringency, which may be an important aspect of bacterial physiology and likely a determining factor in drug target development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Working from the premise that essential genes differ in absolute requirement for growth, we describe silencing of putative essential genes in E. coli to obtain a titration of declining growth rates and transcript levels by using antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNA and expressed antisense RNA. The relationship between mRNA decline and growth rate decline reflects the degree of essentiality, or stringency, of an essential gene, which is here defined by the minimum transcript level for a 50% reduction in growth rate (MTL(50. When applied to four growth essential genes, both RNA silencing methods resulted in MTL(50 values that reveal acpP as the most stringently required of the four genes examined, with ftsZ the next most stringently required. The established antibacterial targets murA and fabI were less stringently required. CONCLUSIONS: RNA silencing can reveal stringent requirements for gene expression with respect to growth. This method may be used to validate existing essential genes and to quantify drug target requirement.

  17. Cellular components required for mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elledge, S.J.; Perry, K.L.; Krueger, J.H.; Mitchell, B.B.; Walker, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    We have cloned the umuD and umuC genes of Escherichia coli and have shown that they code for two proteins of 16,000 and 45,000 daltons respectively; the two genes are organized in an operon that is repressed by the LexA protein. Similarly, we have shown that the mucA and mucB genes of the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101 code for proteins of 16,000 and 45,000 daltons respectively and, like umuD/C, the genes are organized in an operon. Preliminary sequencing studies have indicated that the umuD/C and mucA/B loci are approximately 50% homologous at both the nucleic acid and deduced protein sequence levels and that the umuD gene is preceeded by two putative LexA binding sites separated by 4 basepairs. Like umuD/C, the mucA/B genes of pKM101 are induced by DNA damage and are repressed by LexA. In addition to inducing recA + lexA + -regulated din genes, DNA damaging agents such as uv and nalidixic acid also induce the heat shock proteins GroEL and DnaK in an htpR-dependent fashion. 22 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  18. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  19. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-30

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds' escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds' cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  20. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  1. Gene and protein nomenclature in public databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmer Ralf

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequently, several alternative names are in use for biological objects such as genes and proteins. Applications like manual literature search, automated text-mining, named entity identification, gene/protein annotation, and linking of knowledge from different information sources require the knowledge of all used names referring to a given gene or protein. Various organism-specific or general public databases aim at organizing knowledge about genes and proteins. These databases can be used for deriving gene and protein name dictionaries. So far, little is known about the differences between databases in terms of size, ambiguities and overlap. Results We compiled five gene and protein name dictionaries for each of the five model organisms (yeast, fly, mouse, rat, and human from different organism-specific and general public databases. We analyzed the degree of ambiguity of gene and protein names within and between dictionaries, to a lexicon of common English words and domain-related non-gene terms, and we compared different data sources in terms of size of extracted dictionaries and overlap of synonyms between those. The study shows that the number of genes/proteins and synonyms covered in individual databases varies significantly for a given organism, and that the degree of ambiguity of synonyms varies significantly between different organisms. Furthermore, it shows that, despite considerable efforts of co-curation, the overlap of synonyms in different data sources is rather moderate and that the degree of ambiguity of gene names with common English words and domain-related non-gene terms varies depending on the considered organism. Conclusion In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of data contained in different databases allows the generation of gene and protein name dictionaries that contain significantly more used names than dictionaries obtained from individual data sources. Furthermore, curation of

  2. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

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    Marko Premzl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomenclature of eutherian lysozyme genes.

  3. Gene amplification in carcinogenesis

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    Lucimari Bizari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification increases the number of genes in a genome and can give rise to karyotype abnormalities called double minutes (DM and homogeneously staining regions (HSR, both of which have been widely observed in human tumors but are also known to play a major role during embryonic development due to the fact that they are responsible for the programmed increase of gene expression. The etiology of gene amplification during carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood but can be considered a result of genetic instability. Gene amplification leads to an increase in protein expression and provides a selective advantage during cell growth. Oncogenes such as CCND1, c-MET, c-MYC, ERBB2, EGFR and MDM2 are amplified in human tumors and can be associated with increased expression of their respective proteins or not. In general, gene amplification is associated with more aggressive tumors, metastases, resistance to chemotherapy and a decrease in the period during which the patient stays free of the disease. This review discusses the major role of gene amplification in the progression of carcinomas, formation of genetic markers and as possible therapeutic targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of some types of tumors.

  4. Genes and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E A; Newhouse, S; Caulfield, M J; Munroe, P B

    2003-01-01

    The combination of investigation of rare Mendelian forms of hypertension, candidate gene studies, comparative mapping and genome-wide screening in both animal models and man has led to significant progress in determining new mechanisms of blood pressure control. In this review, the newly discovered blood pressure/cardiovascular genes, WNK kinases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and the development of a new anti-hypertensive agent PST2238 are discussed. Major genes causing essential hypertension have yet to be discovered, however, there are now over 20 published genome-wide screens for blood pressure controlling genes. Several regions demonstrate suggestive linkage to the trait and there is some overlap of regions between the different studies. It is hoped that new blood pressure genes will ultimately be discovered using this method. Pharmacogenetic studies in hypertension have only been initiated recently, some are described in this paper. Small studies upon single candidate genes, suggest that the contribution of genetics to the inter-individual variation in blood pressure response to anti-hypertensive therapy, is small, approximately 3-5%. Recently micro-arrays with multiple polymorphisms in multiple genes have been used. After accounting for the additive affects of multiple blood pressure loci, an individual's genetic profile appeared to explain up to 50% of the variation in blood pressure response to therapy. Knowledge of the genetic variants that cause hypertension and influence response to anti-hypertensive therapy will ultimately provide a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying blood pressure control.

  5. The secretion ATPase ComGA is required for the binding and transport of transforming DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Briley, Kenneth; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J.; Mann, Jessica M.; Dubnau, David

    2011-01-01

    Transformation requires specialized proteins to facilitate the binding and uptake of DNA. The genes of the B. subtilis comG operon (comGA–G) are required for transformation and to assemble a structure, the pseudopilus, in the cell envelope. No role for the pseudopilus has been established and the functions of the individual comG genes are unknown. We show that among the comG genes, only comGA is absolutely required for DNA binding to the cell surface. ComEA, an integral membrane DNA binding p...

  6. THE EQUALITY PRINCIPLE REQUIREMENTS

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    CLAUDIA ANDRIŢOI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem premises and the objectives followed: the idea of inserting the equality principle between the freedom and the justice principles is manifested in positive law in two stages, as a general idea of all judicial norms and as requirement of the owner of a subjective right of the applicants of an objective law. Equality in face of the law and of public authorities can not involve the idea of standardization, of uniformity, of enlisting of all citizens under the mark of the same judicial regime, regardless of their natural or socio-professional situation. Through the Beijing Platform and the position documents of the European Commission we have defined the integrative approach of equality as representing an active and visible integration of the gender perspective in all sectors and at all levels. The research methods used are: the conceptualist method, the logical method and the intuitive method necessary as means of reasoning in order to argue our demonstration. We have to underline the fact that the system analysis of the research methods of the judicial phenomenon doesn’t agree with “value ranking”, because one value cannot be generalized in rapport to another. At the same time, we must fight against a methodological extremism. The final purpose of this study is represented by the reaching of the perfecting/excellence stage by all individuals through the promotion of equality and freedom. This supposes the fact that the existence of a non-discrimination favourable frame (fairness represents a means and a condition of self-determination, and the state of perfection/excellency is a result of this self-determination, the condition necessary for the obtaining of this nondiscrimination frame for all of us and in conditions of freedom for all individuals, represents the same condition that promotes the state of perfection/excellency. In conclusion we may state the fact that the equality principle represents a true catalyst of the

  7. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  8. Screening for the Most Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Equine Milk Somatic Cells.

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    Jakub Cieslak

    Full Text Available Apart from the well-known role of somatic cell count as a parameter reflecting the inflammatory status of the mammary gland, the composition of cells isolated from milk is considered as a valuable material for gene expression studies in mammals. Due to its unique composition, in recent years an increasing interest in mare's milk consumption has been observed. Thus, investigating the geneti