WorldWideScience

Sample records for swing-assist un-motorized exoskeletons

  1. System and process for polarity swing assisted regeneration of gas selective capture liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Tegrotenhuis, Ward E.; Freeman, Charles J.; Elliott, Michael L.; Koech, Phillip K.; Humble, Paul H.; Zheng, Feng; Zhang, Jian

    2017-07-18

    A polarity swing-assisted regeneration (PSAR) process is disclosed for improving the efficiency of releasing gases chemically bound to switchable ionic liquids. Regeneration of the SWIL involves addition of a quantity of non-polar organic compound as an anti-solvent to destabilize the SWIL, which aids in release of the chemically bound gas. The PSAR decreases gas loading of a SWIL at a given temperature and increases the rate of gas release compared to heating in the absence of anti-solvent.

  2. CO2 Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldebrant, David [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-05-31

    This report outlines the comprehensive bench-scale testing of the CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) solvent platform and its unique Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study outlines all efforts on a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule, including solvent synthesis, material characterization, preliminary toxicology studies, and measurement of all physical, thermodynamic and kinetic data, including bench-scale testing. Equilibrium and kinetic models and analysis were made using Aspen Plus™. Preliminary process configurations, a technoeconomic assessment and solvent performance projections for separating CO2 from a subcritical coal-fired power plant are compared to the U.S. Department of Energy's Case 10 monoethanolamine baseline.

  3. Control de un motor paso a paso: PIC, USB, C#

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Aragón, Iñigo

    2011-01-01

    El objetivo de este proyecto fin de carrera es crear un equipo con el que comprender y controlar, desde el ordenador, el funcionamiento de un motor paso a paso bifásico de imanes permanentes, a través de una comunicación USB, la ayuda de un microprocesador y el imprescindible driver del motor paso a paso. Uno de los elementos utilizados en el control de un motor paso a paso es el microprocesador, encargado tanto de enviar las consignas al controlador (driver), como de captar...

  4. The exoskeletons are here.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-06-09

    It is a fantastic time for the field of robotic exoskeletons. Recent advances in actuators, sensors, materials, batteries, and computer processors have given new hope to creating the exoskeletons of yesteryear's science fiction. While the most common goal of an exoskeleton is to provide superhuman strength or endurance, scientists and engineers around the world are building exoskeletons with a wide range of diverse purposes. Exoskeletons can help patients with neurological disabilities improve their motor performance by providing task specific practice. Exoskeletons can help physiologists better understand how the human body works by providing a novel experimental perturbation. Exoskeletons can even help power mobile phones, music players, and other portable electronic devices by siphoning mechanical work performed during human locomotion. This special thematic series on robotic lower limb exoskeletons and orthoses includes eight papers presenting novel contributions to the field. The collective message of the papers is that robotic exoskeletons will contribute in many ways to the future benefit of humankind, and that future is not that distant.

  5. A robotic exoskeleton to treat crouch gait from cerebral palsy: Initial kinematic and neuromuscular evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Bulea, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    A robotic exoskeleton was designed for individuals with crouch gait caused by cerebral palsy with the intent to supplement existing muscle function during walking. The aim of this study was to evaluate how powered knee extension assistance provided during stance and swing phases of the gait cycle affect knee kinematics, and knee flexor and extensor muscle activity. Muscle activity and kinematic data were collected from four individuals with crouch gait from cerebral palsy during their normal walking condition and while walking with the exoskeleton under stance, swing, and stance & swing assistance. The exoskeleton was effective in reducing crouch by an average of 13.8° in three of the four participants when assistance was provided during the stance phase; assistance during the swing phase alone was ineffective. Peak knee extensor activity was maintained for all of the conditions during the stance and swing phases. Integrated (i.e. area under the curve) knee extensor activity decreased in two of the subjects indicating a more well-modulated activation pattern. Modest increases in peak and integrated antagonist knee flexor activity were exhibited in all participants; the subject without kinematic improvement had the greatest increase. While the exoskeleton was well tolerated, additional training with a focus on reducing knee flexor activity may lead to further improvements in crouch gait reduction.

  6. Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusak, Z.; Luijten, J.; Kooijman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates a wearable exoskeleton for a user having a torso with an upper limb to support motion of the said upper limb. The wearable exoskeleton comprises a first fixed frame mountable to the torso, an upper arm brace and a first group of actuators for moving the upper arm brace

  7. Exoskeleton plantarflexion assistance for elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Derave, W; Bossuyt, F; Calders, P; Malcolm, P; De Clercq, D

    2017-02-01

    Elderly are confronted with reduced physical capabilities and increased metabolic energy cost of walking. Exoskeletons that assist walking have the potential to restore walking capacity by reducing the metabolic cost of walking. However, it is unclear if current exoskeletons can reduce energy cost in elderly. Our goal was to study the effect of an exoskeleton that assists plantarflexion during push-off on the metabolic energy cost of walking in physically active and healthy elderly. Seven elderly (age 69.3±3.5y) walked on treadmill (1.11ms 2 ) with normal shoes and with the exoskeleton both powered (with assistance) and powered-off (without assistance). After 20min of habituation on a prior day and 5min on the test day, subjects were able to walk with the exoskeleton and assistance of the exoskeleton resulted in a reduction in metabolic cost of 12% versus walking with the exoskeleton powered-off. Walking with the exoskeleton was perceived less fatiguing for the muscles compared to normal walking. Assistance resulted in a statistically nonsignificant reduction in metabolic cost of 4% versus walking with normal shoes, likely due to the penalty of wearing the exoskeleton powered-off. Also, exoskeleton mechanical power was relatively low compared to previously identified optimal assistance magnitude in young adults. Future exoskeleton research should focus on further optimizing exoskeleton assistance for specific populations and on considerate integration of exoskeletons in rehabilitation or in daily life. As such, exoskeletons should allow people to walk longer or faster than without assistance and could result in an increase in physical activity and resulting health benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Control difuso de un motor de inducción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Garzón Carbonell

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la simulación de un esquema de control de velocidad de un motor de inducción en coordenadas decampo, con controlador difuso sin la necesidad de realizar las compensaciones en los ejes d-q, lo que simplificasustancialmente el control. La inferencia difusa se implementó por el método de mínimo máximo. Para eldesemborronado, el método del centro de gravedad. Se muestra el comportamiento del sistema de controlsometido a cambios bruscos de carga y referencia, observándose la robustez del control difuso frente a un PIDclásico.  In this article the simulation  of speed control  of  induction motor is presented in field coordinates with fuzzycontroller without the necessity of carrying out the compensations in the d-q axes, simplifying substantially thecontrol. The diffuse inference was implemented by the maximum minimum method. For defuzzification, themethod of the center of gravity is used. The system behaviour is shown from control to abrupt changes of loadand it indexes being observed the robustness of the diffuse control in front of a classic PID.

  9. Towards exoskeletons with balance capacities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, Herman; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; Vlutters, Mark; González-Vargas, José; Ibáñez, Jaime; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.; van der Kooij, Herman; Pons, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Current exoskeletons replay pre-programmed trajectories at the actuated joints. Towards the employment of exoskeletons with more flexible and adaptive behavior, we investigate human balance control during gait. We study human balance control by applying brief force pulses at the pelvis in different

  10. Evaluation of the Achilles Ankle Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Wietse; Meijneke, Cory; van der Kooij, Herman

    2017-02-01

    This paper evaluates the Achilles exoskeleton. The exoskeleton is intended to provide push-off assistance for healthy subjects during walking. The assistance is provided by a series elastic actuator that has been optimized to provide maximal push-off power. The paper presents the control method of the exoskeleton and the evaluation of the exoskeleton.

  11. Small Business Innovations (Exoskeletons)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM), a 1989 winner of an R&D 100 Award, is an exoskeleton device for measuring the joints of the human hand with extreme precision. It was originally developed for NASA by Arthur D. Little, and is sold commercially by EXOS, Inc. The DHM is worn on the hand and connected to a computer that records hand motions. The resulting data is transmitted as control signals to robots and other computers, enabling robotic hands to emulate human hand actions. Two additional spinoff products were also inspired by the DHM.

  12. Running With an Elastic Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Michael S; Kota, Sridhar; Young, Aaron; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many lower limb robotic exoskeletons that have been tested for human walking, few devices have been tested for assisting running. It is possible that a pseudo-passive elastic exoskeleton could benefit human running without the addition of electrical motors due to the spring-like behavior of the human leg. We developed an elastic lower limb exoskeleton that added stiffness in parallel with the entire lower limb. Six healthy, young subjects ran on a treadmill at 2.3 m/s with and without the exoskeleton. Although the exoskeleton was designed to provide ~50% of normal leg stiffness during running, it only provided 24% of leg stiffness during testing. The difference in added leg stiffness was primarily due to soft tissue compression and harness compliance decreasing exoskeleton displacement during stance. As a result, the exoskeleton only supported about 7% of the peak vertical ground reaction force. There was a significant increase in metabolic cost when running with the exoskeleton compared with running without the exoskeleton (ANOVA, P exoskeletons for human running are human-machine interface compliance and the extra lower limb inertia from the exoskeleton.

  13. CO2-Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Full Technology Feasibility Study B1 - Solvent-based Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldebrant, David J

    2014-08-31

    PNNL, Fluor Corporation and Queens University (Kingston, ON) successfully completed a three year comprehensive study of the CO2BOL water-lean solvent platform with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed solvent synthesis, characterization, environmental toxicology, physical, thermodynamic and kinetic property measurements, Aspen Plus™ modeling and bench-scale testing of a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule. Key Program Findings The key program findings are summarized as follows: • PSAR favorably reduced stripper duties and reboiler temperatures with little/no impact to absorption column • >90% CO2 capture was achievable at reasonable liquid-gas ratios in the absorber • High rich solvent viscosities (up to 600 cP) were successfully demonstrated in the bench-scale system. However, the projected impacts of high viscosity to capital cost and operational limits compromised the other levelized cost of electricity benefits. • Low thermal conductivity of organics significantly increased the required cross exchanger surface area, and potentially other heat exchange surfaces. • CO2BOL had low evaporative losses during bench-scale testing • There was no evidence of foaming during bench scale testing • Current CO2BOL formulation costs project to be $35/kg • Ecotoxicity (Water Daphnia) was comparable between CO2BOL and MEA (169.47 versus 103.63 mg/L) • Full dehydration of the flue gas was determined to not be economically feasible. However, modest refrigeration (13 MW for the 550 MW reference system) was determined to be potentially economically feasible, and still produce a water-lean condition for the CO2BOLs (5 wt% steady-state water loading). • CO2BOLs testing with 5 wt% water loading did not compromise anhydrous performance behavior, and showed actual enhancement of CO2 capture performance. • Mass transfer of CO2BOLs was not greatly impeded by viscosity • Facile separation of antisolvent from lean CO2BOL was

  14. A Portable Passive Physiotherapeutic Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasheek Naidu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The public healthcare system in South Africa is in need of urgent attention in no small part because there has been an escalation in the number of stroke victims which could be due to the increase in hypertension in this urbanizing society. There is a growing need for physiotherapists and occupational therapists in the country, which is further hindered by the division between urban and rural areas. A possible solution is a portable passive physiotherapeutic exoskeleton device. The exoskeleton device has been formulated to encapsulate methodologies that enable the anthropomorphic integration between a biological and mechatronic limb. A physiotherapeutic mechanism was designed to be portable and adjustable, without limiting the spherical motion and workspace of the human arm. The exoskeleton was designed to be portable in the sense that it could be transported geographically. It is a complete device allowing for motion in the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand joints. The inverse kinematics was solved iteratively via the Damped Least Squares (DLS method. The electronic and computer system allowed for professional personnel to either change an individual joint or a combination of joints angles via the kinematic models. A ramp PI controller was established to provide a smooth response to simulate the passive therapy motion.

  15. Evaluation of the achilles ankle exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Wietse; Meijneke, Cory; Van Der Kooij, Herman

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the Achilles exoskeleton. The exoskeleton is intended to provide push-off assistance for healthy subjects during walking. The assistance is provided by a series elastic actuator that has been optimized to provide maximal push-off power. The paper presents the control method of

  16. Estudi i modelització d'un motor striling amb dymola

    OpenAIRE

    Juvanteny Planagumà, Nil

    2015-01-01

    L’objectiu d’aquest projecte es l’estudi, disseny ,simulació i optimització d’un motor Stirling utilitzant el software Dymola. Aquest software permet infinitat d’opcions de treball: disseny, implementació del model, desenvolupament, validació, comprovació i simulació tant gràfica, com numèrica, com dinàmica, entre moltes altres funcions. Aquest projecte està pensat amb l’objectiu de que alguna persona interessada en el motor Stirling pugui fer-se una idea de tot el que és i avarca aquest moto...

  17. Control de un motor mediante PWM y comunicación CAN

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso Reinon, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    La finalidad de este proyecto es el control de un motor de corriente continua. El tipo de control que establecemos fija y mantiene una velocidad constante. El entorno de trabajo se realiza mediante una memoria USB de la Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, que contiene el sistema operativo UBUNTU. La parte de programación de software se realiza mediante el programa MPLabx y la parte de simulación, cálculo se realiza con MATLab, también incluidos en la memoria USB de la U...

  18. Exoskeleton Motion Control for Children Walking Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ploscaru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a quick method for motion control of an exoskeleton used on children walking rehabilitation with ages between four to seven years old. The exoskeleton used on this purpose has six servomotors which work independently and actuates each human lower limb joints (hips, knees and ankles. For obtaining the desired motion laws, a high-speed motion analysis equipment was used. The experimental rough data were mathematically modeled in order to obtain the proper motion equations for controlling the exoskeleton servomotors.

  19. Customizable Rehabilitation Lower Limb Exoskeleton System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaan Stopforth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Disabled people require assistance with the motion of their lower limbs to improve rehabilitation. Exoskeletons used for lower limb rehabilitation are highly priced and are not affordable to the lowerincome sector of the population. This paper describes an exoskeleton lower limb system that was designed keeping in mind that the cost must be as low as possible. The forward kinematic system that is used must be a simplified model to decrease computational time, yet allow the exoskeleton to be adjustable according to the patient's leg dimensions.

  20. Acondicionamiento de un motor AFPM para el uso en moto eléctrica de competición

    OpenAIRE

    Canto Silvestre, Oscar; Guzmán Ribera, Oriol; Morató Inglada, Sergi; Sendra Rovira, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    El acondicionamiento de un motor AFPM para el uso en moto eléctrica de competición, consiste en adoptar todas las acciones necesarias para adaptar un motor eléctrico con todas las partes implicadas, tales como baterías, controller, electrónica asociada y diferentes componentes para la maniobra de todo el conjunto. Además, se realiza el diseño y simulación de las pletinas de anclaje del motor al chasis y de la suspensión trasera de un prototipo de moto eléctrica de competición. Se presenta ...

  1. Development of Exoskeletons and Applications on Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For over a century, the development of exoskeletons experienced five periods including sprout, exploration, dormancy, accumulation and climax period from a concept in 19th century to applications in distinctive fields in 21th century. Recently, exoskeletons are applied in military, civilian and rehabilitation to augment the travel and loading abilities of soldiers, increase an operator’s load-handling capabilities, reduce the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders, and improve the lost functions and quality of life of patients, respectively. Aiming at lessening the strain on physical therapists to train patients with severe or degenerative disabilities, motor cognitive limitation and improving their quality of life, exoskeletons are applied on the field of rehabilitation, mainly on patient training and locomotion. Although great progress has been made in the century long effort to design and implement exoskeletons, many design challenges still remain including powered devices, the comfort of human-machine interface and how to effectively understand the wearer’s intensions.

  2. Force Reflection Algorithms for Exoskeleton Controllers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryfogle, Mark

    1991-01-01

    This research effort investigated the kinematics and dynamics of open chain, serial linkage mechanisms with specific emphasis placed upon the application of this linkage as a force reflecting exoskeleton mechanism...

  3. Preliminary Assessment of a Compliant Gait Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Manuel; Sanz-Merodio, Daniel; Garcia, Elena

    2017-06-01

    Current commercial wearable gait exoskeletons contain joints with stiff actuators that cannot adapt to unpredictable environments. These actuators consume a significant amount of energy, and their stiffness may not be appropriate for safe human-machine interactions. Adjustable compliant actuators are being designed and implemented because of their ability to minimize large forces due to shocks, to safely interact with the user, and to store and release energy in passive elastic elements. Introduction of such compliant actuation in gait exoskeletons, however, has been limited by the larger power-to-weight and volume ratio requirement. This article presents a preliminary assessment of the first compliant exoskeleton for children. Compliant actuation systems developed by our research group were integrated into the ATLAS exoskeleton prototype. The resulting device is a compliant exoskeleton, the ATLAS-C prototype. The exoskeleton is coupled with a special standing frame to provide balance while allowing a semi-natural gait. Experiments show that when comparing the behavior of the joints under different stiffness conditions, the inherent compliance of the implemented actuators showed natural adaptability during the gait cycle and in regions of shock absorption. Torque tracking of the joint is achieved, identifying the areas of loading response. The implementation of a state machine in the control of knee motion allowed reutilization of the stored energy during deflection at the end of the support phase to partially propel the leg and achieve a more natural and free swing.

  4. Buckling failures in insect exoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parle, Eoin; Herbaj, Simona; Sheils, Fiona; Larmon, Hannah; Taylor, David

    2015-12-17

    Thin walled tubes are often used for load-bearing structures, in nature and in engineering, because they offer good resistance to bending and torsion at relatively low weight. However, when loaded in bending they are prone to failure by buckling. It is difficult to predict the loading conditions which cause buckling, especially for tubes whose cross sections are not simple shapes. Insights into buckling prevention might be gained by studying this phenomenon in the exoskeletons of insects and other arthropods. We investigated the leg segments (tibiae) of five different insects: the locust (Schistocerca gergaria), American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), death's head cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis), stick insect (Parapachymorpha zomproi) and bumblebee (Bombus terrestris audax). These were tested to failure in cantilever bending and modelled using finite element analysis (FEA). The tibiae of the locust and the cockroaches were found to be approximately circular in shape. Their buckling loads were well predicted by linear elastic FEA, and also by one of the analytical solutions available in the literature for elastic buckling. The legs of the stick insect are also circular in cross section but have several prominent longitudinal ridges. We hypothesised that these ridges might protect the legs against buckling but we found that this was not the case: the loads necessary for elastic buckling were not reached in practice because yield occurred in the material, causing plastic buckling. The legs of bees have a non-circular cross section due to a pollen-carrying feature (the corbicula). We found that this did not significantly affect their resistance to buckling. Our results imply that buckling is the dominant failure mode in the tibia of insects; it likely to be a significant consideration for other arthropods and any organisms with stiff exoskeletons. The interactions displayed here between material properties and cross sectional geometry may provide insights for the

  5. EMG patterns during assisted walking in the exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylos-Labini, F.; La Scaleia, V.; d'Avella, A.; Pisotta, I.; Tamburella, F.; Scivoletto, G.; Molinari, M.; Wang, S.; Wang, L.; Van Asseldonk, E.; Van der Kooij, H.; Hoellinger, T.; Cheron, G.; Thorsteinsson, F.; Ilzkovitz, M.; Gancet, J.; Hauffe, R.; Zanov, F.; Lacquaniti, F.; Ivanenko, Y.P.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology and robotic exoskeletons are being developed to facilitate stepping, reduce muscle efforts, and promote motor recovery. Nevertheless, the guidance forces of an exoskeleton may influence the sensory inputs, sensorimotor interactions and resulting muscle activity patterns

  6. The potential and acceptance of exoskeletons in industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Looze, Michiel P.; Krause, Frank; O’Sullivan, Leonard W.

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, a significant interest in wearable robots or exoskeletons does exist, also from an industrial background. This paper provides an overview of assistive exoskeletons that have specifically been developed for industrial purposes. It discusses their potential in increasing performance and

  7. Upper-limb exoskeleton for human muscle fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, SK; Tokhi, MO

    2017-01-01

    Human muscle fatigue is identified as one of the causes to musculuskeletal disorder (MSD). The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of an exoskeleton in dealing with muscle fatigue in a virtual environment. The focus of this work is, for the exoskeleton to provide support as needed by human joint. A (Proportional, Integration and Derivative) controller is used for both human and exoskeleton. Simmechanics and Simulink are used to evaluate the performance of the exoskeleton. Exp...

  8. Kinematic and Dynamic Analysis of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Tawakal Hasnain Baluch; Adnan Masood; Javaid Iqbal; Umer Izhar; Umar Shahbaz Khan

    2012-01-01

    This paper will provide the kinematic and dynamic analysis of a lower limb exoskeleton. The forward and inverse kinematics of proposed exoskeleton is performed using Denevit and Hartenberg method. The torques required for the actuators will be calculated using Lagrangian formulation technique. This research can be used to design the control of the proposed exoskeleton.

  9. Controlling pneumatic artificial muscles in exoskeletons with surface electromyography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuis, Vincent; Chandrapal, Mervin; Stramigioli, Stefano; Chen, XiaoQi

    2014-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons are gaining more interest in the last few years, as useful devices to provide assistance to elderly and disabled people. Many different types of powered exoskeletons have been studied in the past. In this research paper, a soft lower limb exoskeleton driven by pneumatic

  10. ESTIMACIÓN DE PARÁMETROS INVARIANTES PARA UN MOTOR DE INDUCCIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADOLFO ANDRÉS JARAMILLO-MATTA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo muestra un algoritmo que implementa una nueva técnica de estimación de parámetros invariantes para el motor de inducción trifásico con rotor de jaula de ardilla, para dos de los modelos de comportamiento más utilizados: modelo de jaula sencilla y modelo de doble jaula sin pérdidas en el entrehierro. Esta técnica parte únicamente de los datos proporcionados por el fabricante y disminuye de manera considerable los errores identificados con otras técnicas. Los resultados obtenidos se comparan con los datos experimentales de un motor de inducción trifásico de 100  hp de potencia, y muestran diferencias muy marcadas entre el comportamiento obtenido con el modelo de jaula sencilla y el obtenido con el modelo de doble jaula. Esta diferencia puede afectar el desempeño de aplicaciones que incluyen motores de inducción tales como: sistemas de control, análisis, simulación y emulación de los accionamientos eléctricos, entre otros.

  11. Muscle recruitment and coordination with an ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Jackson, Rachel W; Shuman, Benjamin R; Collins, Steven H

    2017-07-05

    Exoskeletons have the potential to assist and augment human performance. Understanding how users adapt their movement and neuromuscular control in response to external assistance is important to inform the design of these devices. The aim of this research was to evaluate changes in muscle recruitment and coordination for ten unimpaired individuals walking with an ankle exoskeleton. We evaluated changes in the activity of individual muscles, cocontraction levels, and synergistic patterns of muscle coordination with increasing exoskeleton work and torque. Participants were able to selectively reduce activity of the ankle plantarflexors with increasing exoskeleton assistance. Increasing exoskeleton net work resulted in greater reductions in muscle activity than increasing exoskeleton torque. Patterns of muscle coordination were not restricted or constrained to synergistic patterns observed during unassisted walking. While three synergies could describe nearly 95% of the variance in electromyography data during unassisted walking, these same synergies could describe only 85-90% of the variance in muscle activity while walking with the exoskeleton. Synergies calculated with the exoskeleton demonstrated greater changes in synergy weights with increasing exoskeleton work versus greater changes in synergy activations with increasing exoskeleton torque. These results support the theory that unimpaired individuals do not exclusively use central pattern generators or other low-level building blocks to coordinate muscle activity, especially when learning a new task or adapting to external assistance, and demonstrate the potential for using exoskeletons to modulate muscle recruitment and coordination patterns for rehabilitation or performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure design of lower limb exoskeletons for gait training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ziqiang; Tao, Chunjing; Ji, Run

    2015-09-01

    Due to the close physical interaction between human and machine in process of gait training, lower limb exoskeletons should be safe, comfortable and able to smoothly transfer desired driving force/moments to the patients. Correlatively, in kinematics the exoskeletons are required to be compatible with human lower limbs and thereby to avoid the uncontrollable interactional loads at the human-machine interfaces. Such requirement makes the structure design of exoskeletons very difficult because the human-machine closed chains are complicated. In addition, both the axis misalignments and the kinematic character difference between the exoskeleton and human joints should be taken into account. By analyzing the DOF(degree of freedom) of the whole human-machine closed chain, the human-machine kinematic incompatibility of lower limb exoskeletons is studied. An effective method for the structure design of lower limb exoskeletons, which are kinematically compatible with human lower limb, is proposed. Applying this method, the structure synthesis of the lower limb exoskeletons containing only one-DOF revolute and prismatic joints is investigated; the feasible basic structures of exoskeletons are developed and classified into three different categories. With the consideration of quasi-anthropopathic feature, structural simplicity and wearable comfort of lower limb exoskeletons, a joint replacement and structure comparison based approach to select the ideal structures of lower limb exoskeletons is proposed, by which three optimal exoskeleton structures are obtained. This paper indicates that the human-machine closed chain formed by the exoskeleton and human lower limb should be an even-constrained kinematic system in order to avoid the uncontrollable human-machine interactional loads. The presented method for the structure design of lower limb exoskeletons is universal and simple, and hence can be applied to other kinds of wearable exoskeletons.

  13. SPEXOR : Towards a passive spinal exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rijcke, L.; Näf, M.; Rodriguez-Guerrero, C.; Graimann, B.; Houdijk, H.; van Dieën, J.; Mombaur, K.; Russold, M.; Sarabon, N.; Babič, J.; Lefeber, D.

    2017-01-01

    Most assistive robotic devices are exoskeletons which assist or augment the motion of the limbs and neglect the role of the spinal column in transferring load from the upper body and arms to the legs. In this part of the SPEXOR project we will fill this gap and design a novel, passive spinal

  14. Design and Control of the MINDWALKER Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Shiqian; Wang, Letian; Meijneke, C.; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; Hoellinger, T.; Cheron, G.; Ivanenko, Y.; La Scaleia, V.; Sylos-Labini, F.; Molinari, M.; Tamburella, F.; Pisotta, I.; Thorsteinsson, F.; Ilzkovitz, M.; Gancet, J.; Nevatia, Y.; Hauffe, R.; Zanow, F.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons can empower paraplegics to stand and walk. Actively controlled hip ab/adduction (HAA) is needed for weight shift and for lateral foot placement to support dynamic balance control and to counteract disturbances in the frontal plane. Here, we describe the design, control, and

  15. Gravity compensation of an upper extremity exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubarak, S; Pham, M T; Moreau, R; Redarce, T

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new gravity compensation method for an upper extremity exoskeleton mounted on a wheel chair. This new device is dedicated to regular and efficient rehabilitation training for post-stroke and injured people without the continuous presence of a therapist. The exoskeleton is a wearable robotic device attached to the human arm. The user provides information signals to the controller by means of the force sensors around the wrist and the arm, and the robot controller generates the appropriate control signals for different training strategies and paradigms. This upper extremity exoskeleton covers four basic degrees of freedom of the shoulder and the elbow joints with three additional adaptability degrees of freedom in order to match the arm anatomy of different users. For comfortable and efficient rehabilitation, a new heuristic method have been studied and applied on our prototype in order to calculate the gravity compensation model without the need to identify the mass parameters. It is based on the geometric model of the robot and accurate torque measurements of the prototype's actuators in a set of specifically chosen joint positions. The weight effect has been successfully compensated so that the user can move his arm freely while wearing the exoskeleton without feeling its mass.

  16. Exoskeleton for Soldier Enhancement Systems Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.F.

    2000-09-28

    The development of a successful exoskeleton for human performance augmentation (EHPA) will require a multi-disciplinary systems approach based upon sound biomechanics, power generation and actuation systems, controls technology, and operator interfaces. The ability to integrate key components into a system that enhances performance without impeding operator mobility is essential. The purpose of this study and report are to address the issue of feasibility of building a fieldable EHPA. Previous efforts, while demonstrating progress and enhancing knowledge, have not approached the level required for a fully functional, fieldable system. It is doubtless that the technologies required for a successful exoskeleton have advanced, and some of them significantly. The question to be addressed in this report is have they advanced to the point of making a system feasible in the next three to five years? In this study, the key technologies required to successfully build an exoskeleton have been examined. The primary focus has been on the key technologies of power sources, actuators, and controls. Power sources, including internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, super capacitors, and hybrid sources have been investigated and compared with respect to the exoskeleton application. Both conventional and non-conventional actuator technologies that could impact EHPA have been assessed. In addition to the current state of the art of actuators, the potential for near-term improvements using non-conventional actuators has also been addressed. Controls strategies, and their implication to the design approach, and the exoskeleton to soldier interface have also been investigated. In addition to these key subsystems and technologies, this report addresses technical concepts and issues relating to an integrated design. A recommended approach, based on the results of the study is also presented.

  17. Identificación y Control Wavenet de un Motor de CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Ramos Velasco

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En el presente artículo se muestra un esquema de identificación y control que sintoniza en línea las ganancias proporcional, integral y derivativa de un controlador PID discreto aplicado a un sistema dinámico SISO. Esto se logra empleando una red neuronal de base radial con funciones de activación wavelet hijas Morlet (wavenet adicionalmente en cascada un filtro de respuesta infinita al impulso (IIR. Dicho esquema es aplicado en tiempo real para controlar la velocidad de un motor de inducción de CA trifásico del tipo jaula de ardilla (MIJA alimentado con un variador de frecuencia trifásico, de esta forma se muestra cómo este esquema de identificación y control en línea, puede ser implementado en este tipo de plantas que son ampliamente utilizadas en la industria, sin la necesidad de obtener los parámetros del modelo matemático del conjunto variador de frecuencia-motor de inducción trifásico. Se presentan los resultados obtenidos en simulación numérica y experimentales, empleando para esto la plataforma de LabVIEW. Abstract: This paper presents a control scheme to tune online the proportional, integral and derivative gains of a discrete PID controller, through the identification and control of a SISO stable and minimum phase dynamic system. This is accomplished using a radial basis network neural with daughter Morlet wavelets activation functions in cascaded with an infinite impulse response (IIR filter. This scheme is applied in real time to control the speed of an AC three-phase induction motor supplied with a three-phase inverter. So in this way we show how the identification and control scheme can be implemented in this type of plants that are widely used in industry, without the need of mathematical model parameters of the induction motor. We present numerical simulation and experimental results. Palabras clave: Control de motores, Controlador PID, Redes neuronales wavelets, Algoritmos auto-ajustables, Keywords

  18. Transformation of a car diesel engine with direct injection and common rail into a dual fuel engine; Trasformazione di un motore automobilistico diesel ad iniezione diretta dotato di common rail in un motore dual fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Risi, A.; Laforgia, D. [Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienza dei Materiali

    1999-08-01

    The reduced polluting emissions make natural gas a quite interesting alternative fuel for automotive applications. Therefore a car diesel engine has been transformed into a dual fuel engine with pilot injection via the common rail injection system used to ignite the methane-air charge. Standard injection pumps show a certain instability at low flow rates and high engine speed. On the opposite the new common rail system allows to ignite the fuel in all conditions with an amount of gas oil less than 8% of the entire energy required by the engine was enough to ignite the fuel. Furthermore, a power increase has been obtained, with an overall efficiency equal to or even higher than a conventional engine. The article deals with a series of test carried out on 1929 cm{sup 3} direct injection turbo-charged engine and presents the preliminary results. [Italian] La riduzione delle emissioni inquinanti rende il metano un combustibile alternativo piuttosto interessante per applicazioni automobilistiche. Per quasta ragione e' stata realizzata la trasformazione di un motore automobilitico diesel ad iniezione diretta in un motore dual fuel con iniezione pilota prodotta da un sistema common rail. L'adozione del sistema common rail consente l'accensione in ogni condizione con una quantita' di combustibile inferiore all'8% dell'intera energia richiesta alla potenza nominale del motore risolvendo i problemi di instabilita' che una pompa normale presenta a basse portate e ad alta velocita'. In alcuni casi e' stato sufficiente il 3% dell'energia totale richiesta dal motore per accendere la carica. Inoltre si e' ottenuto un aumento della potenza con un'efficienza globale analoga a qualla del motore tradizionale o addirittura migliore. Si riportano i risultati di una campagna di prove condotta su un motore sovralimentato ad iniezione diretta (1929 cm{sup 3}).

  19. Autonomous hip exoskeleton saves metabolic cost of walking uphill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Keehong; Lee, Jusuk; Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a hip joint exoskeleton to boost gait function in the elderly and rehabilitation of post-stroke patients. To quantitatively evaluate the impact of the power and mass of the exoskeleton, we measured the metabolic cost of walking on slopes of 0, 5, and 10% grade, once not wearing the exoskeleton and then wearing it. The exoskeleton reduced the metabolic cost by 13.5,15.5 and 9.8% (31.9, 51.6 and 45.6 W) at 0, 5, and 10% grade, respectively. The exoskeleton performance index was computed as 0.97, 1.24, and 1.24 at each grade, implicating that the hip exoskeleton was more effective on slopes than level ground in saving the metabolic cost.

  20. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-11-03

    Passive exoskeletons that assist with human locomotion are often lightweight and compact, but are unable to provide net mechanical power to the exoskeletal wearer. In contrast, powered exoskeletons often provide biologically appropriate levels of mechanical power, but the size and mass of their actuator/power source designs often lead to heavy and unwieldy devices. In this study, we extend the design and evaluation of a lightweight and powerful autonomous exoskeleton evaluated for loaded walking in (J Neuroeng Rehab 11:80, 2014) to the case of unloaded walking conditions. The metabolic energy consumption of seven study participants (85 ± 12 kg body mass) was measured while walking on a level treadmill at 1.4 m/s. Testing conditions included not wearing the exoskeleton and wearing the exoskeleton, in both powered and unpowered modes. When averaged across the gait cycle, the autonomous exoskeleton applied a mean positive mechanical power of 26 ± 1 W (13 W per ankle) with 2.12 kg of added exoskeletal foot-shank mass (1.06 kg per leg). Use of the leg exoskeleton significantly reduced the metabolic cost of walking by 35 ± 13 W, which was an improvement of 10 ± 3% (p = 0.023) relative to the control condition of not wearing the exoskeleton. The results of this study highlight the advantages of developing lightweight and powerful exoskeletons that can comfortably assist the body during walking.

  1. Design and evaluation of a new exoskeleton for gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Geonea

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design and numerical characterization of a new exoskeleton solution for human leg motion assistance and rehabilitation. The exoskeleton solution is anthropomorphic, simple, low cost and easy to adapt on the human subject. The design aspect concerns the exoskeleton mechatronic structure, achieved in SolidWorks virtual environment. Numerical simulation is performed in MSC.ADAMS simulation environment. Obtained results for the exoskeleton computed motion are compared with those obtained from experimental walking of healthy subject. The prototype feasibility is studied both for design and operation aspect.

  2. Perfiles de Velocidad en el Cilindro de un Motor Alternativo Velocity Profiles in an Alternative Engine Cilinder

    OpenAIRE

    Simón J Fygueroa; Jesús O Araque; Carlos G Villamar

    2007-01-01

    El objetivo del presente trabajo es mostrar los resultados de la medición de las componentes de la velocidad del aire admitido en el cilindro simulado de un motor CFR (Cooperative Fuels Research) instalado en un banco de flujo estacionario al cual se ha conectado un sistema de adquisición de datos. Para determinar las velocidades se empleó un anemómetro de hilo caliente previamente calibrado. Se realizaron mediciones sobre diferentes puntos de varios planos transversales del cilindro para dif...

  3. Pre-diseño de un motor eléctrico para el accionamiento de un automotor

    OpenAIRE

    Pernia Nieto, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    El presente proyecto versa sobre el pre-diseño de un motor síncrono de imanes permanentes. La motivación que ha llevado al planteamiento y realización de este trabajo es la necesidad actual de mejorar los motores eléctricos utilizados en tracción ferroviaria. Estos motores son en su mayor parte motores trifásicos de tipo asíncrono, seguidos en número por motores trifásicos síncronos y, en muy pocos casos, de corriente continua, siendo la mayoría de estos últimos usados en ferrocarriles antig...

  4. Diseño de un motor síncrono con imanes permanentes para un ascensor

    OpenAIRE

    Pistonit Pumareta, Josué

    2017-01-01

    Este proyecto se basa en la realización del diseño de un motor síncrono con imanes permanentes de rotor interior para propulsar un sistema de elevación (de unas determinadas especificaciones) mediante transmisión directa. El motor tiene una potencia de 7kW, es capaz de mover una carga nominal de 600 kg equivalente a 8 personas por un recorrido de 10 plantas de altura a una velocidad de 1.6 m/s. Los motores Gearless tienen muchas ventajas, entre ellas, la capacidad de ofrecer un par cons...

  5. Control de un motor brushless con aumento de la resolución del resolver mediante "oversampling"

    OpenAIRE

    Gross Igor, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    Premi al millor Projecte de Fi de Carrera presentat durant el curs 2003-2004 en l'àmbit d'Electricitat-Electrònica-Automàtica que atorga SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC En este proyecto se ha diseñado y montado el control completo de un motor brushless senoidal con un DSP (Digital Signal Processor). En el DSP no se solo se ha programado el control propiamente dicho, sino también un algoritmo para adquirir la posición del motor con más resolución de la que nos permite el algoritmo tradicional (basado en...

  6. Human Grasp Assist Device With Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelin, Bryan J (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon B. J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A grasp assist system includes a glove, actuator assembly, and controller. The glove includes a digit, i.e., a finger or thumb, and a force sensor. The sensor measures a grasping force applied to an object by an operator wearing the glove. Phalange rings are positioned with respect to the digit. A flexible tendon is connected at one end to one of the rings and is routed through the remaining rings. An exoskeleton positioned with respect to the digit includes hinged interconnecting members each connected to a corresponding ring, and/or a single piece of slotted material. The actuator assembly is connected to another end of the tendon. The controller calculates a tensile force in response to the measured grasping force, and commands the tensile force from the actuator assembly to thereby pull on the tendon. The exoskeleton offloads some of the tensile force from the operator's finger to the glove.

  7. Interfase para censar temperatura en un motor utilizando la tarjeta de adquisición de datos PCI-6025E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Garrido Díaz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Se implementa la elaboración de una interfase para censar la temperatura de un motor . Se utiliza un censorPhilips KTY84-130 colocado en el interior de un motor asincrónico y se elabora un circuito electrónico impresopara adecuar la señal obtenida por este censor a una señal que pueda ser interpretada por la tarjeta de adquisiciónde datos de National Instrument: PCI-6025E. Se confeccionan software desarrollados en Labview 5.1 sobreLinux , para el diseño y ajuste del circuito impreso y se plantea un pequeño ejemplo de la utilización de estainterfase desde un instrumento virtual desarrollado en Labview 5.1 sobre Linux.  Its article is about the implementation of a temperature censor interface for measure motor temperature. Is useda Philips KTY84-130 censor situated inside of an asynchrony motor an is elaborated an printed electronic circuitto adequate the censor signal   to a signal that can be read  for  a PCI-6025E National Instrument acquisitiontarget. Is been construed a   software based in  Labview 5.1 over Linux.

  8. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuromechanical adaptations during a robotic powered exoskeleton assisted walking session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Arvind; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M; Garbarini, Erica; Asselin, Pierre; Pilkar, Rakesh; Forrest, Gail F

    2017-04-20

    To evaluate gait parameters and neuromuscular profiles of exoskeleton-assisted walking under Max Assist condition during a single-session for; (i) able bodied (AB) individuals walking assisted with (EXO) and without (non-EXO) a powered exoskeleton, (ii) non-ambulatory SCI individuals walking assisted with a powered exoskeleton. Single-session. Motion analysis laboratory. Four AB individuals and four individuals with SCI. Powered lower extremity exoskeleton. Temporal-spatial parameters, kinematics, walking velocity and electromyography data. AB individuals in exoskeleton showed greater stance time and a significant reduction in walking velocity (P exoskeleton movements, they walked with an increased velocity and lowered stance time to resemble that of slow walking. For SCI individuals, mean percent stance time was higher and walking velocity was lower compared to all AB walking conditions (P exoskeleton and moreover with voluntary control there is a greater temporal-spatial response of the lower limbs. Also, there are neuromuscular phasic adaptions for both AB and SCI groups while walking in the exoskeleton that are inconsistent to non-EXO gait muscle activation.

  10. The clinical aspects of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR" use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, A. A.; Krivonozhkina, P. S.; Andryushchenko, F. A.; Zasypkina, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    The article considers some of indications and contraindications for the use of the exoskeleton "EXAR". Our experience with the present construction use shows that the exoskeleton "EXAR" is able to make up the following lost or disturbed muscle functions:- an arm raise; a drawing of the arm aside from the trunk;- a bending of the arm in shoulder or elbow joints.

  11. [Study on an Exoskeleton Hand Function Training Device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jicai; Yi, Jinhua; Yu, Hongliu; He, Rongrong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the structure and motion bionic principle of the normal adult fingers, biological characteristics of human hands were analyzed, and a wearable exoskeleton hand function training device for the rehabilitation of stroke patients or patients with hand trauma was designed. This device includes the exoskeleton mechanical structure and the electromyography (EMG) control system. With adjustable mechanism, the device was capable to fit different finger lengths, and by capturing the EMG of the users' contralateral limb, the motion state of the exoskeleton hand was controlled. Then driven by the device, the user's fingers conducting adduction/abduction rehabilitation training was carried out. Finally, the mechanical properties and training effect of the exoskeleton hand were verified through mechanism simulation and the experiments on the experimental prototype of the wearable exoskeleton hand function training device.

  12. Design and Implementation of NTU Wearable Exoskeleton as an Enhancement and Assistive Device

    OpenAIRE

    Low, K. H.; Liu, X.; Yu, H.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a wearable lower extremity exoskeleton (LEE) developed to enhance the ability of a human’s walking while carrying heavy loads. The ultimate goal of the current research work is to design and control a power assist system that integrates a human’s intellect for feedback and sensory purposes. The exoskeleton system in this work consists of an inner exoskeleton and an outer exoskeleton. The inner exoskeleton measures the movements of the wearer and provides these measuremen...

  13. Shoulder-elbow exoskeleton as rehabilitation exerciser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianoşi, A.; Dimitrova, A.; Noveanu, S.; Tătar, O. M.; Mândru, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a 2 degree of freedom exoskeleton designed for the rehabilitation of the shoulder and elbow movement in the sagittal plane; a semi-portable design strategy was chosen, which enables an easy attachment to a standard medical chair as well as the patient upper limb. A dedicated driver enables the control from a graphical user interface, which also provides the option of customized rehabilitation exercises. The potential of future improvements is assessed, and recommendations of research direction are made in order to broaden the usability of the proposed device.

  14. Diagnóstico exergético del proceso de combustión en un motor Diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Agudelo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se desarrolla un modelo de diagnóstico exergético de una zona y dos especies, y se aplica para caracterizar la operación de un motor diesel. El modelo permite estudiar el proceso en el interior del cilindro durante el período de válvulas cerradas y determinar cómo se distribuye la exergía y cuál es el potencial exergético de las pérdidas. La experimentación se realizó en un motor diesel de automoción turboalimentado, de inyección directa montado en un banco de ensayos, operando bajo diferentes grados de carga. El diagnostico de combustión se realizó a partir de la presión instantánea en la cámara de combustión y se midieron y controlaron las principales variables de funcionamiento del motor para garantizar estado estacionario. Se determinaron las irreversibilidades y la distribución de la exergía a lo largo del proceso, encontrando que la combustión es la principal fuente de irreversibilidades. Los resultados mostraron que al aumentar el grado de carga disminuye la destrucción de exergía, lo cual se traduce principalmente en un aumento de la exergía de los gases de escape. Adicionalmente se identificó el potencial de cogeneración del motor, mostrando diferencias significativas entre los resultados de primera y segunda ley.

  15. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  16. Spring uses in exoskeleton actuation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiqian; van Dijk, Wietse; van der Kooij, Herman

    2011-01-01

    An exoskeleton has to be lightweight, compliant, yet powerful to fulfill the demanding task of walking. This imposes a great challenge for the actuator design. Electric motors, by far the most common actuator in robotic, orthotic, and prosthetic devices, cannot provide sufficiently high peak and average power and force/torque output, and they normally require high-ratio, heavy reducer to produce the speeds and high torques needed for human locomotion. Studies on the human muscle-tendon system have shown that muscles (including tendons and ligaments) function as a spring, and by storing energy and releasing it at a proper moment, locomotion becomes more energy efficient. Inspired by the muscle behavior, we propose a novel actuation strategy for exoskeleton design. In this paper, the collected gait data are analyzed to identify the spring property of the human muscle-tendon system. Theoretical optimization results show that adding parallel springs can reduce the peak torque by 66%, 53%, and 48% for hip flexion/extension (F/E), hip abduction/adduction (A/A), and ankle dorsi/plantar flexion (D/PF), respectively, and the rms power by 50%, 45%, and 61%, respectively. Adding a series spring (forming a Series Elastic Actuator, SEA) reduces the peak power by 79% for ankle D/PF, and by 60% for hip A/A. A SEA does not reduce the peak power demand at other joints. The optimization approach can be used for designing other wearable robots as well. © 2011 IEEE

  17. Exoskeleton Power and Torque Requirements Based on Human Biomechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowell, Harrison

    2002-01-01

    .... In providing design guidance, the authors had two goals. The first goal was to provide estimates of the angles, torques, and powers for the ankles, knees, and hips of an exoskeleton based on data collected from humans...

  18. A survey of stakeholder perspectives on exoskeleton technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jamie; Parker, Claire; Borisoff, Jaimie; Mortenson, W Ben; Mattie, Johanne

    2014-12-19

    Exoskeleton technology has potential benefits for wheelchair users' health and mobility. However, there are practical barriers to their everyday use as a mobility device. To further understand potential exoskeleton use, and facilitate the development of new technologies, a study was undertaken to explore perspectives of wheelchair users and healthcare professionals on reasons for use of exoskeleton technology, and the importance of a variety of device characteristics. An online survey with quantitative and qualitative components was conducted with wheelchair users and healthcare professionals working directly with individuals with mobility impairments. Respondents rated whether they would use or recommend an exoskeleton for four potential reasons. Seventeen design features were rated and compared in terms of their importance. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to categorize the 17 design features into meaningful groupings. Content analysis was used to identify themes for the open ended questions regarding reasons for use of an exoskeleton. 481 survey responses were analyzed, 354 from wheelchair users and 127 from healthcare professionals. The most highly rated reason for potential use or recommendation of an exoskeleton was health benefits. Of the design features, 4 had a median rating of very important: minimization of falls risk, comfort, putting on/taking off the device, and purchase cost. Factor analysis identified two main categories of design features: Functional Activities and Technology Characteristics. Qualitative findings indicated that health and physical benefits, use for activity and access reasons, and psychosocial benefits were important considerations in whether to use or recommend an exoskeleton. This study emphasizes the importance of developing future exoskeletons that are comfortable, affordable, minimize fall risk, and enable functional activities. Findings from this study can be utilized to inform the priorities for future

  19. Phase I Report: DARPA Exoskeleton Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.F.

    2004-01-21

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) inaugurated a program addressing research and development for an Exoskeleton for Human Performance Augmentation in FY!2001. A team consisting of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the prime contractor, AeroVironment, Inc., the Army Research Laboratory, the University of Minnesota, and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute has recently completed an 18-month Phase I effort in support of this DARPA program. The Phase I effort focused on the development and proof-of-concept demonstrations for key enabling technologies, laying the foundation for subsequently building and demonstrating a prototype exoskeleton. The overall approach was driven by the need to optimize energy efficiency while providing a system that augmented the operator in as transparent manner as possible (non-impeding). These needs led to the evolution of two key distinguishing features of this team's approach. The first is the ''no knee contact'' concept. This concept is dependent on a unique Cartesian-based control scheme that uses force sensing at the foot and backpack attachments to allow the exoskeleton to closely follow the operator while avoiding the difficulty of connecting and sensing position at the knee. The second is an emphasis on energy efficiency manifested by an energetic, power, actuation and controls approach designed to enhance energy efficiency as well as a reconfigurable kinematic structure that provides a non-anthropomorphic configuration to support an energy saving long-range march/transport mode. The enabling technologies addressed in the first phase were controls and sensing, the soft tissue interface between the machine and the operator, the power system, and actuation. The controller approach was implemented and demonstrated on a test stand with an actual operator. Control stability, low operator fatigue, force amplification and the human interface were all successfully demonstrated, validating the controls

  20. Powered exoskeleton with palm degrees of freedom for hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Daniel S; Georgilas, Ioannis; Dagnino, Giulio; Dogramadzi, Sanja

    2015-08-01

    Robotic rehabilitation is a currently underutilised field with the potential to allow huge cost savings within healthcare. Existing rehabilitation exoskeletons oversimplify the importance of movement of the hand while undertaking everyday tasks. Within this study, an investigation was undertaken to establish the extent to which the degrees of freedom within the palm affect ability to undertake everyday tasks. Using a 5DT data glove, bend sensing resistors and restrictors of palm movement, 20 participants were recruited to complete tasks that required various hand shapes. Collected data was processed and palm arching trends were identified for each grasping task. It was found that the extent of utilizing arches in the palm varied with each exercise, but was extensively employed throughout. An exoskeleton was subsequently designed with consideration of the identified palm shapes. This design included a number of key features that accommodated for a variety of hand sizes, a novel thumb joint and a series of dorsally mounted servos. Initial exoskeleton testing was undertaken by having a participant complete the same exercises while wearing the exoskeleton. The angles formed by the user during this process were then compared to those recorded by 2 other participants who had completed the same tasks without exoskeleton. It was found that the exoskeleton was capable of forming the required arches for completing the tasks, with differences between participants attributed to individual ergonomic differences.

  1. Design and preliminary assessment of Vanderbilt hand exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Benjamin W; Bennett, Daniel A; Durrough, Christina M; Goldfarb, Michael

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the design of a hand exoskeleton intended to enable or facilitate bimanual activities of daily living (ADLs) for individuals with chronic upper extremity hemiparesis resulting from stroke. The paper describes design of the battery-powered, self-contained exoskeleton and presents the results of initial testing with a single subject with hemiparesis from stroke. Specifically, an experiment was conducted requiring the subject to repeatedly remove the lid from a water bottle both with and without the hand exoskeleton. The relative times required to remove the lid from the bottles was considerably lower when using the exoskeleton. Specifically, the average amount of time required to grasp the bottle with the paretic hand without the exoskeleton was 25.9 s, with a standard deviation of 33.5 s, while the corresponding average amount of time required to grasp the bottle with the exoskeleton was 5.1 s, with a standard deviation of 1.9 s. Thus, the task time involving the paretic hand was reduced by a factor of five, while the standard deviation was reduced by a factor of 16.

  2. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaird, Catherine R.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to “fight” the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations. PMID:23307949

  3. Design and Implementation of NTU Wearable Exoskeleton as an Enhancement and Assistive Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Low

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a wearable lower extremity exoskeleton (LEE developed to enhance the ability of a human’s walking while carrying heavy loads. The ultimate goal of the current research work is to design and control a power assist system that integrates a human’s intellect for feedback and sensory purposes. The exoskeleton system in this work consists of an inner exoskeleton and an outer exoskeleton. The inner exoskeleton measures the movements of the wearer and provides these measurements to the outer exoskeleton, which supports the whole exoskeleton system to walk following the wearer. A special footpad, which is designed and attached to the outer exoskeleton, can measure the zero moment point (ZMP of the human as well as that of the exoskeleton in time. Using the measured human ZMP as the reference, the exoskeleton’s ZMP is controlled by trunk compensation so that the exoskeleton can walk stably. A simulation platform has first been developed to examine the gait coordination through inner and outer exoskeletons. A commercially available software, xPC Target, together with other toolboxes from MATLAB, has then been used to provide a real-time operating system for controlling the exoskeleton. Real-time locomotion control of the exoskeleton is implemented in the developed environment. Finally, some experiments on different objects showed that the stable walking can be achieved in the real environment.

  4. Design and evaluation of a modular lower limb exoskeleton for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Wilian M; Nogueira, Samuel L; de Oliveira, Gustavo C; Pena, Guido G; Siqueira, Adriano A G

    2017-07-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of an exoskeleton designed for assisting individuals to rehabilitate compromised lower limb movements resulting from stroke or incomplete spinal cord injury. The exoskeleton is composed of lightweight tubular structures and six free joints that provide a modular feature to the system. This feature allows the exoskeleton to be adapted to assist the movement of one or more patient joints. The actuation of the exoskeleton is also modular, and can be performed passively, by means of springs and dampers, or actively through actuators. In addition, its telescopic tubular links, developed to adjust the size of the links in order to align the joints of the exoskeleton with patient joints, allows the exoskeleton to be adjustable to fit different patients. Experiments considering the interaction between a healthy subject and the exoskeleton are performed to evaluate the influence of the exoskeleton structure on kinematic and muscular activity profiles during walking.

  5. Design of a Quasi-Passive Parallel Leg Exoskeleton to Augment Load Carrying for Walking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valiente, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    .... The exoskeleton structure runs parallel to the legs, transferring payload forces to the ground. In an attempt to make the exoskeleton more efficient, passive hip and ankle springs are employed to store and release energy throughout the gait cycle...

  6. Design-validation of a hand exoskeleton using musculoskeletal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Clint; Gosselin, Florian; Ben Mansour, Khalil; Devos, Pierre; Marin, Frederic

    2018-04-01

    Exoskeletons are progressively reaching homes and workplaces, allowing interaction with virtual environments, remote control of robots, or assisting human operators in carrying heavy loads. Their design is however still a challenge as these robots, being mechanically linked to the operators who wear them, have to meet ergonomic constraints besides usual robotic requirements in terms of workspace, speed, or efforts. They have in particular to fit the anthropometry and mobility of their users. This traditionally results in numerous prototypes which are progressively fitted to each individual person. In this paper, we propose instead to validate the design of a hand exoskeleton in a fully digital environment, without the need for a physical prototype. The purpose of this study is thus to examine whether finger kinematics are altered when using a given hand exoskeleton. Therefore, user specific musculoskeletal models were created and driven by a motion capture system to evaluate the fingers' joint kinematics when performing two industrial related tasks. The kinematic chain of the exoskeleton was added to the musculoskeletal models and its compliance with the hand movements was evaluated. Our results show that the proposed exoskeleton design does not influence fingers' joints angles, the coefficient of determination between the model with and without exoskeleton being consistently high (R 2 ¯=0.93) and the nRMSE consistently low (nRMSE¯ = 5.42°). These results are promising and this approach combining musculoskeletal and robotic modeling driven by motion capture data could be a key factor in the ergonomics validation of the design of orthotic devices and exoskeletons prior to manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EMG patterns during assisted walking in the exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eSylos-Labini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic technology and robotic exoskeletons are being developed to facilitate stepping, reduce muscle efforts and promote motor recovery. Nevertheless, the guidance forces of an exoskeleton may influence the sensory inputs, sensorimotor interactions and resulting muscle activity patterns during stepping. The aim of this study was to report the muscle activation patterns in a sample of intact and injured subjects while walking with a robotic exoskeleton and, in particular, to quantify the level of muscle activity during assisted gait. We recorded electromyographic (EMG activity of different leg and arm muscles during overground walking in an exoskeleton in six healthy individuals and four spinal cord injury (SCI participants. In SCI patients, EMG activity of the upper limb muscles was augmented while activation of leg muscles was typically small. Contrary to our expectations, however, in neurologically intact subjects, EMG activity of leg muscles was similar or even larger during exoskeleton-assisted walking compared to normal overground walking. In addition, significant variations in the EMG waveforms were found across different walking conditions. The most variable pattern was observed in the hamstring muscles. Overall, the results are consistent with a non-linear reorganization of the locomotor output when using the robotic stepping devices. The findings may contribute to our understanding of human-machine interactions and adaptation of locomotor activity patterns.

  8. EMG patterns during assisted walking in the exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; d'Avella, Andrea; Pisotta, Iolanda; Tamburella, Federica; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Wang, Shiqian; Wang, Letian; van Asseldonk, Edwin; van der Kooij, Herman; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cheron, Guy; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Ilzkovitz, Michel; Gancet, Jeremi; Hauffe, Ralf; Zanov, Frank; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology and robotic exoskeletons are being developed to facilitate stepping, reduce muscle efforts, and promote motor recovery. Nevertheless, the guidance forces of an exoskeleton may influence the sensory inputs, sensorimotor interactions and resulting muscle activity patterns during stepping. The aim of this study was to report the muscle activation patterns in a sample of intact and injured subjects while walking with a robotic exoskeleton and, in particular, to quantify the level of muscle activity during assisted gait. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of different leg and arm muscles during overground walking in an exoskeleton in six healthy individuals and four spinal cord injury (SCI) participants. In SCI patients, EMG activity of the upper limb muscles was augmented while activation of leg muscles was typically small. Contrary to our expectations, however, in neurologically intact subjects, EMG activity of leg muscles was similar or even larger during exoskeleton-assisted walking compared to normal overground walking. In addition, significant variations in the EMG waveforms were found across different walking conditions. The most variable pattern was observed in the hamstring muscles. Overall, the results are consistent with a non-linear reorganization of the locomotor output when using the robotic stepping devices. The findings may contribute to our understanding of human-machine interactions and adaptation of locomotor activity patterns. PMID:24982628

  9. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs (e.g., optical and electromagnetic to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  10. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  11. Innovative hand exoskeleton design for extravehicular activities in space

    CERN Document Server

    Freni, Pierluigi; Randazzo, Luca; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions and pressurized spacesuits expose astronauts to problems of fatigue during lengthy extravehicular activities, with adverse impacts especially on the dexterity, force and endurance of the hands and arms. A state-of-the-art exploration in the field of hand exoskeletons revealed that available products are unsuitable for space applications because of their bulkiness and mass. This book proposes a novel approach to the development of hand exoskeletons, based on an innovative soft robotics concept that relies on the exploitation of electroactive polymers operating as sensors and actuators, on a combination of electromyography and mechanomyography for detection of the user’s will and on neural networks for control. The result is a design that should enhance astronauts’ performance during extravehicular activities. In summary, the advantages of the described approach are a low-weight, high-flexibility exoskeleton that allows for dexterity and compliance with the user’s will.

  12. A Finger Exoskeleton Robot for Finger Movement Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Heng Hsu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a finger exoskeleton robot has been designed and presented. The prototype device was designed to be worn on the dorsal side of the hand to assist in the movement and rehabilitation of the fingers. The finger exoskeleton is 3D-printed to be low-cost and has a transmission mechanism consisting of rigid serial links which is actuated by a stepper motor. The actuation of the robotic finger is by a sliding motion and mimics the movement of the human finger. To make it possible for the patient to use the rehabilitation device anywhere and anytime, an Arduino™ control board and a speech recognition board were used to allow voice control. As the robotic finger follows the patients voice commands the actual motion is analyzed by Tracker image analysis software. The finger exoskeleton is designed to flex and extend the fingers, and has a rotation range of motion (ROM of 44.2°.

  13. Design and control of hybrid actuation lower limb exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipolito Aguilar-Sierra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, two types of actuators are applied for a lower limb exoskeleton. They are DC motors with the harmonic drive and the pneumatic artificial muscles. This combination takes advantages of both the harmonic drive and the pneumatic artificial muscle. It provides both high accuracy position control and high ratio of strength and weight. The shortcomings of the two actuators are overcome by the hybrid actuation, for example, low control accuracy and modeling difficult of pneumatic artificial muscle, compactness, and structural flexibility of DC motors. The design and modeling processes are discussed to show the proposed exoskeleton can increase the strength of human lower limbs. Experiments and analysis of the exoskeleton are given to evaluate the effectiveness of the design and modeling.

  14. Design of a Passive Exoskeleton for the Upper Extremity through Co-simulation with a Biomechanical Human Arm Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lelai; Bai, Shaoping; Rasmussen, John

    2013-01-01

    An approach of designing exoskeletons on the basis of simulation of the exoskeleton and a human body model is proposed in this paper. The new approach, addressing the problem of physical human-exoskeleton interactions, models and simulates the mechanics for both the exoskeleton and the human body......, which allows designers to analyze and evaluate an exoskeleton for its functioning, effectively. A simulation platform is developed by integrating a biomechanical model of human body and the exoskeleton. With the proposed approach, two types of exoskeletons with gravity compensating capability...... are designed for assisting patients with neuromuscular injuries. Results of the design analysis and optimization are included....

  15. Modeling and Design of a Spring-loaded, Cable-driven, Wearable Exoskeleton for the Upper Extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelai Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An approach to the design of wearable exoskeletons on the basis of simulation of the exoskeleton and a human body model is proposed in this paper. The new approach, addressing the problem of physical human-exoskeleton interactions, models and simulates the mechanics of both the exoskeleton and the human body, which allows designers to effectively analyze and evaluate an exoskeleton design for their function in concert with the human body. A simulation platform is developed by integrating a biomechanical model of the human body and the exoskeleton. With the proposed approach, an exoskeleton is designed for assisting patients with neuromuscular injuries. Results of the analysis and optimization are included.

  16. Structural Design of a 6-DoF Hip Exoskeleton using Linear Series Elastic Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    A novel hip exoskeleton with six degrees of freedom (DoF) was developed, and multiple prototypes of this product were created in this thesis. The device was an upper level of the 12-DoF lower-body exoskeleton project, which was known as the Orthotic Lower-body Locomotion Exoskeleton (OLL-E). The hip exoskeleton had three motions per leg, which were roll, yaw, and pitch. Currently, the sufferers of hemiplegia and paraplegia can be addressed by using a wheelchair or operating an exoskeleton wi...

  17. Kinematic analysis of the finger exoskeleton using MATLAB/Simulink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiłowski, Krzysztof; Awrejcewicz, Jan; Lewandowski, Donat

    2014-01-01

    A paralyzed and not fully functional part of human body can be supported by the properly designed exoskeleton system with motoric abilities. It can help in rehabilitation, or movement of a disabled/paralyzed limb. Both suitably selected geometry and specialized software are studied applying the MATLAB environment. A finger exoskeleton was the base for MATLAB/Simulink model. Specialized software, such as MATLAB/Simulink give us an opportunity to optimize calculation reaching precise results, which help in next steps of design process. The calculations carried out yield information regarding movement relation between three functionally connected actuators and showed distance and velocity changes during the whole simulation time.

  18. Series elastic actuation of an elbow rehabilitation exoskeleton with axis misalignment adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuan-Yi; Su, Yin-Yu; Yu, Ying-Lung; Lin, Kuei-You; Lan, Chao-Chieh

    2017-07-01

    Powered exoskeletons can facilitate rehabilitation of patients with upper limb disabilities. Designs using rotary motors usually result in bulky exoskeletons to reduce the problem of moving inertia. This paper presents a new linearly actuated elbow exoskeleton that consists of a slider crank mechanism and a linear motor. The linear motor is placed beside the upper arm and closer to shoulder joint. Thus better inertia properties can be achieved while lightweight and compactness are maintained. A passive joint is introduced to compensate for the exoskeleton-elbow misalignment and intersubject size variation. A linear series elastic actuator (SEA) is proposed to obtain accurate force and impedance control at the exoskeleton-elbow interface. Bidirectional actuation between exoskeleton and forearm is verified, which is required for various rehabilitation processes. We expect this exoskeleton can provide a means of robot-aided elbow rehabilitation.

  19. Real-Time Strap Pressure Sensor System for Powered Exoskeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Tamez-Duque

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Assistive and rehabilitative powered exoskeletons for spinal cord injury (SCI and stroke subjects have recently reached the clinic. Proper tension and joint alignment are critical to ensuring safety. Challenges still exist in adjustment and fitting, with most current systems depending on personnel experience for appropriate individual fastening. Paraplegia and tetraplegia patients using these devices have impaired sensation and cannot signal if straps are uncomfortable or painful. Excessive pressure and blood-flow restriction can lead to skin ulcers, necrotic tissue and infections. Tension must be just enough to prevent slipping and maintain posture. Research in pressure dynamics is extensive for wheelchairs and mattresses, but little research has been done on exoskeleton straps. We present a system to monitor pressure exerted by physical human-machine interfaces and provide data about levels of skin/body pressure in fastening straps. The system consists of sensing arrays, signal processing hardware with wireless transmission, and an interactive GUI. For validation, a lower-body powered exoskeleton carrying the full weight of users was used. Experimental trials were conducted with one SCI and one able-bodied subject. The system can help prevent skin injuries related to excessive pressure in mobility-impaired patients using powered exoskeletons, supporting functionality, independence and better overall quality of life.

  20. Design of a lightweight, tethered, torque-controlled knee exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Kirby Ann; Fatschel, Andreas M; Collins, Steven H

    2017-07-01

    Lower-limb exoskeletons show promise for improving gait rehabilitation for those with chronic gait abnormalities due to injury, stroke or other illness. We designed and built a tethered knee exoskeleton with a strong lightweight frame and comfortable, four-point contact with the leg. The device is structurally compliant in select directions, instrumented to measure joint angle and applied torque, and is lightweight (0.76 kg). The exoskeleton is actuated by two off-board motors. Closed loop torque control is achieved using classical proportional feedback control with damping injection in conjunction with iterative learning. We tested torque measurement accuracy and found root mean squared (RMS) error of 0.8 Nm with a max load of 62.2 Nm. Bandwidth was measured to be phase limited at 45 Hz when tested on a rigid test stand and 23 Hz when tested on a person's leg. During bandwidth tests peak extension torques were measured up to 50 Nm. Torque tracking was tested during walking on a treadmill at 1.25 m/s with peak flexion torques of 30 Nm. RMS torque tracking error averaged over a hundred steps was 0.91 Nm. We intend to use this knee exoskeleton to investigate robotic assistance strategies to improve gait rehabilitation and enhance human athletic ability.

  1. Estudio termodinámico de un motor de encendido por comprensión utilizando aceite residual de frituras como combustible alterno

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Basantes, Alex Marcelo; Álvarez Basantes, Carlos David; Montesdeoca Pichucho, Oscar Fabián

    2013-01-01

    El presente estudio consiste; en someter a un motor de encendido por compresión a otro tipo de combustible como es el aceite residual de frituras, realizando un análisis termodinámico a través de las temperaturas medidas en la admisión, el escape, el cabezote y la temperatura ambiente, además se muestra el análisis de gases obtenido al usar diesel comercial y aceite residual de frituras (ARF). The present study is, to submit to a compression ignition engine to another type of fuel and resi...

  2. Proceeding of human exoskeleton technology and discussions on future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Xie, Hanxing; Li, Weilin; Yao, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    After more than half a century of intense efforts, the development of exoskeleton has seen major advances, and several remarkable achievements have been made. Reviews of developing history of exoskeleton are presented, both in active and passive categories. Major models are introduced, and typical technologies are commented on. Difficulties in control algorithm, driver system, power source, and man-machine interface are discussed. Current researching routes and major developing methods are mapped and critically analyzed, and in the process, some key problems are revealed. First, the exoskeleton is totally different from biped robot, and relative studies based on the robot technologies are considerably incorrect. Second, biomechanical studies are only used to track the motion of the human body, the interaction between human and machines are seldom studied. Third, the traditional developing ways which focused on servo-controlling have inborn deficiency from making portable systems. Research attention should be shifted to the human side of the coupling system, and the human ability to learn and adapt should play a more significant role in the control algorithms. Having summarized the major difficulties, possible future works are discussed. It is argued that, since a distinct boundary cannot be drawn in such strong-coupling human-exoskeleton system, the more complex the control system gets, the more difficult it is for the user to learn to use. It is suggested that the exoskeleton should be treated as a simple wearable tool, and downgrading its automatic level may be a change toward a brighter research outlook. This effort at simplification is definitely not easy, as it necessitates theoretical supports from fields such as biomechanics, ergonomics, and bionics.

  3. A discreet control of sliding ways of an induction motor; Control discreto de modos deslizantes de un motor de induccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera Dominguez, Jorge

    2001-12-15

    son aplicadas al modelo discreto no lineal de un motor de induccion que se encontro aqui, que posee dinamicas electricas y mecanicas, en donde el par de carga se considera una perturbacion desconocida. Con mediciones completas de los estados, se satisfacen objetivos de seguimiento de la velocidad del rotor y de la amplitud del flujo magnetico del rotor, en donde la carga desconocida no afecta la regulacion de la velocidad. Luego, es implementado un observador de orden reducido en donde las mediciones de velocidad y de corriente se emplean para estimar el par de carga y los flujos que son muy dificiles de medir. El metodo propuesto tiene un diseno y procedimiento de estabilidad de analisis directos, conservando una estructura simple de la ley de control. Las simulaciones predicen que el sistema es robusto con respecto a varios tipos de pares de carga. Las respuestas de velocidad y de amplitud del flujo del rotor a las referencias de entrada se desempenaron muy bien. Estas referencias tienen una dinamica lineal de segundo orden con constantes de tiempo que pueden ser elegidas por el usuario del motor. Se consideran los aspectos practicos para una futura implementacion digital de la ley de control, incluyendo los sensores de velocidad y corrientes, el acondicionamiento de senales, la transformacion de la corriente al marco de referencia estacionario, PWM y modulos inversores, los cuales fueron vistos con detalle. Los resultados experimentales se dejan como trabajo futuro.

  4. WheelWalker: a foot-wheel driving exoskeleton for the alternate walk of paraplegic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Qingchuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Upright walk is the fundamental need of paraplegic patients. In this study, we proposed a novel lower-limb exoskeleton for assisting the patients to walk alternately and further improve their engagement in the rehabilitation training. The exoskeleton was driven by a hub motor which was mounted under the foot, and a pair of custom-made crutch with wireless controller was used to control the walking condition of exoskeleton and maintain balance. This paper mainly introduced the general designing concept and detailed specifications of each modules of the exoskeleton. A pilot using experiment was performed on two healthy subjects to qualitatively analyse the capability of this exoskeleton when adopting different gaits. The results showed that the subjects with different body characteristics could complete continued walk by wearing this exoskeleton either in a three-point gait mode or four-point gait mode.

  5. Mathematical modelling of a hand crank generator for powering lower-limb exoskeletons

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Singla; Saurav Dhand; Gurvinder Singh Virk

    2016-01-01

    With advances in technology and ageing societal concerns growing, personal care devices are gaining importance globally. One such area is lower-limb exoskeletons, used to assist persons to move around for normal daily living. Most of the commercially available assistive exoskeletons use rechargeable Li-ion batteries, which require frequent charging to meet the operational needs. Charging becomes a problem when a person relying on a mobility exoskeleton has to go outdoors for shopping or a lei...

  6. JackEx: The New Digital Manufacturing Resource for Optimization of Exoskeleton-based Factory Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Carmen; Muresan, Paul-Cristian; Simon, Gabriel-Marian

    2016-01-01

    The employment of Exoskeletons for manual handling work in manufacturing industries aims at increased employment, productivity, safety and security at workplace. This paper highlights several challenges, current results and future steps of our work in optimization of Exoskeleton based factory environments. “JackEx” is the enhancement of the standard digital humanoid “Jack” with concepts and elements of passive Exoskeletons. For the development of JackEx, a new digital manufacturing resource, ...

  7. Linking the mechanics and energetics of hopping with elastic ankle exoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Dominic James; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2012-12-15

    The springlike mechanics of the human leg during bouncing gaits has inspired the design of passive assistive devices that use springs to aid locomotion. The purpose of this study was to test whether a passive spring-loaded ankle exoskeleton could reduce the mechanical and energetic demands of bilateral hopping on the musculoskeletal system. Joint level kinematics and kinetics were collected with electromyographic and metabolic energy consumption data for seven participants hopping at four frequencies (2.2, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.2 Hz). Hopping was performed without an exoskeleton; with an springless exoskeleton; and with a spring-loaded exoskeleton. Spring-loaded ankle exoskeletons reduced plantar flexor muscle activity and the biological contribution to ankle joint moment (15-25%) and average positive power (20-40%). They also facilitated reductions in metabolic power (15-20%) across frequencies from 2.2 to 2.8 Hz compared with hopping with a springless exoskeleton. Reductions in metabolic power compared with hopping with no exoskeleton were restricted to hopping at 2.5 Hz only (12%). These results highlighted the importance of reducing the rate of muscular force production and work to achieve metabolic reductions. They also highlighted the importance of assisting muscles acting at the knee joint. Exoskeleton designs may need to be tuned to optimize exoskeleton mass, spring stiffness, and spring slack length to achieve greater metabolic reductions.

  8. Cooperative Control for A Hybrid Rehabilitation System Combining Functional Electrical Stimulation and Robotic Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingguo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional electrical stimulation (FES and robotic exoskeletons are two important technologies widely used for physical rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. We developed a hybrid rehabilitation system (FEXO Knee that combined FES and an exoskeleton for swinging movement control of human knee joints. This study proposed a novel cooperative control strategy, which could realize arbitrary distribution of torque generated by FES and exoskeleton, and guarantee harmonic movements. The cooperative control adopted feedfoward control for FES and feedback control for exoskeleton. A parameter regulator was designed to update key parameters in real time to coordinate FES controller and exoskeleton controller. Two muscle groups (quadriceps and hamstrings were stimulated to generate active torque for knee joint in synchronization with torque compensation from exoskeleton. The knee joint angle and the interactive torque between exoskeleton and shank were used as feedback signals for the control system. Central pattern generator (CPG was adopted that acted as a phase predictor to deal with phase confliction of motor patterns, and realized synchronization between the two different bodies (shank and exoskeleton. Experimental evaluation of the hybrid FES-exoskeleton system was conducted on five healthy subjects and four paraplegic patients. Experimental results and statistical analysis showed good control performance of the cooperative control on torque distribution, trajectory tracking, and phase synchronization.

  9. Cooperative Control for A Hybrid Rehabilitation System Combining Functional Electrical Stimulation and Robotic Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dingguo; Ren, Yong; Gui, Kai; Jia, Jie; Xu, Wendong

    2017-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) and robotic exoskeletons are two important technologies widely used for physical rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. We developed a hybrid rehabilitation system (FEXO Knee) that combined FES and an exoskeleton for swinging movement control of human knee joints. This study proposed a novel cooperative control strategy, which could realize arbitrary distribution of torque generated by FES and exoskeleton, and guarantee harmonic movements. The cooperative control adopted feedfoward control for FES and feedback control for exoskeleton. A parameter regulator was designed to update key parameters in real time to coordinate FES controller and exoskeleton controller. Two muscle groups (quadriceps and hamstrings) were stimulated to generate active torque for knee joint in synchronization with torque compensation from exoskeleton. The knee joint angle and the interactive torque between exoskeleton and shank were used as feedback signals for the control system. Central pattern generator (CPG) was adopted that acted as a phase predictor to deal with phase confliction of motor patterns, and realized synchronization between the two different bodies (shank and exoskeleton). Experimental evaluation of the hybrid FES-exoskeleton system was conducted on five healthy subjects and four paraplegic patients. Experimental results and statistical analysis showed good control performance of the cooperative control on torque distribution, trajectory tracking, and phase synchronization.

  10. Biomechanical modeling and load-carrying simulation of lower limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanhe; Zhang, Guoan; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Gangfeng; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces novel modern equipment-a lower extremity exoskeleton, which can implement the mutual complement and the interaction between human intelligence and the robot's mechanical strength. In order to provide a reference for the exoskeleton structure and the drive unit, the human biomechanics were modeled and analyzed by LifeModeler and Adams software to derive each joint kinematic parameter. The control was designed to implement the zero-force interaction between human and exoskeleton. Furthermore, simulations were performed to verify the control and assist effect. In conclusion, the system scheme of lower extremity exoskeleton is demonstrated to be feasible.

  11. A hybrid joint based controller for an upper extremity exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Taha, Zahari; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Hakeem Deboucha, Abdel; Azraai Mohd Razman, Mohd; Aziz Jaafar, Abdul; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton. The Euler-Lagrange formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the human upper limb as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. The human model is based on anthropometrical measurements of the upper limb. The proportional-derivative (PD) computed torque control (CTC) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives specifically in rehabilitating the elbow and shoulder joints along the sagittal plane. An active force control (AFC) algorithm is also incorporated into the PD-CTC to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. It was found that the AFC- PD-CTC performs well against the disturbances introduced into the system whilst achieving acceptable trajectory tracking as compared to the conventional PD-CTC control architecture.

  12. Modelling and control of an upper extremity exoskeleton for rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Tze, Mohd Yashim Wong Paul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Azraai Mohd Razman, Mohd

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton for rehabilitation. The Lagrangian formulation was employed to obtain the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometric based human upper limb as well as the exoskeleton that comprises of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed to investigate its efficacy performing a joint task trajectory tracking in performing flexion/extension on the elbow joint as well as the forward adduction/abduction on the shoulder joint. An active force control (AFC) algorithm is also incorporated into the aforementioned controller to examine its effectiveness in compensating disturbances. It was found from the study that the AFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system without compromising its tracking performances as compared to the conventional PD control architecture.

  13. A planar 3DOF robotic exoskeleton for rehabilitation and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephen J; Brown, Ian E; Scott, Stephen H

    2007-01-01

    A new robotic exoskeleton for the upper-limb has been designed and constructed. Its primary purpose is to act as a proof-of-concept prototype for a more sophisticated rehabilitation and assessment device that is currently in development. Simultaneously, it is intended to extend the capabilities of an existing planar exoskeleton device. The robot operates in the horizontal plane and provides independent control of a user's shoulder, elbow and wrist joints using a cable-driven actuation system. The novel component of the design is a curved track and carriage which allows the mechanism that drives the shoulder joint to be located away from the user, underneath their arm. This paper describes the design of the robot, and provides an initial indication of its performance.

  14. Human movement training with a cable driven ARm EXoskeleton (CAREX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ying; Jin, Xin; Gera Dutta, Geetanjali; Scholz, John P; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the authors have proposed lightweight exoskeleton designs for upper arm rehabilitation using multi-stage cable-driven parallel mechanism. Previously, the authors have demonstrated via experiments that it is possible to apply "assist-as-needed" forces in all directions at the end-effector with such an exoskeleton acting on an anthropomorphic machine arm. A human-exoskeleton interface was also presented to show the feasibility of CAREX on human subjects. The goals of this paper are to 1) further address issues when CAREX is mounted on human subjects, e.g., generation of continuous cable tension trajectories 2) demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of CAREX on movement training of healthy human subjects and a stroke patient. In this research, CAREX is rigidly attached to an arm orthosis worn by human subjects. The cable routing points are optimized to achieve a relatively large "tensioned" static workspace. A new cable tension planner based on quadratic programming is used to generate continuous cable tension trajectory for smooth motion. Experiments were carried out on eight healthy subjects. The experimental results show that CAREX can help the subjects move closer to a prescribed circular path using the force fields generated by the exoskeleton. The subjects also adapt to the path shortly after training. CAREX was also evaluated on a stroke patient to test the feasibility of its use on patients with neural impairment. The results show that the patient was able to move closer to a prescribed straight line path with the "assist-as-needed" force field.

  15. An EMG-Controlled Robotic Hand Exoskeleton for Bilateral Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, Daniele; Barsotti, Michele; Loconsole, Claudio; Solazzi, Massimiliano; Troncossi, Marco; Mazzotti, Claudio; Castelli, Vincenzo Parenti; Procopio, Caterina; Lamola, Giuseppe; Chisari, Carmelo; Bergamasco, Massimo; Frisoli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel electromyography (EMG)-driven hand exoskeleton for bilateral rehabilitation of grasping in stroke. The developed hand exoskeleton was designed with two distinctive features: (a) kinematics with intrinsic adaptability to patient's hand size, and (b) free-palm and free-fingertip design, preserving the residual sensory perceptual capability of touch during assistance in grasping of real objects. In the envisaged bilateral training strategy, the patient's non paretic hand acted as guidance for the paretic hand in grasping tasks. Grasping force exerted by the non paretic hand was estimated in real-time from EMG signals, and then replicated as robotic assistance for the paretic hand by means of the hand-exoskeleton. Estimation of the grasping force through EMG allowed to perform rehabilitation exercises with any, non sensorized, graspable objects. This paper presents the system design, development, and experimental evaluation. Experiments were performed within a group of six healthy subjects and two chronic stroke patients, executing robotic-assisted grasping tasks. Results related to performance in estimation and modulation of the robotic assistance, and to the outcomes of the pilot rehabilitation sessions with stroke patients, positively support validity of the proposed approach for application in stroke rehabilitation.

  16. Kinematics and Dynamics Analysis of a 3-DOF Upper-Limb Exoskeleton with an Internally Rotated Elbow Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The contradiction between self-weight and load capacity of a power-assisted upper-limb exoskeleton for material hanging is unresolved. In this paper, a non-anthropomorphic 3-degree of freedom (DOF upper-limb exoskeleton with an internally rotated elbow joint is proposed based on an anthropomorphic 5-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton for power-assisted activity. The proposed 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton contains a 2-DOF shoulder joint and a 1-DOF internally rotated elbow joint. The structural parameters of the 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton were determined, and the differences and singularities of the two exoskeletons were analyzed. The workspace, the joint torques and the power consumption of two exoskeletons were analyzed by kinematics and dynamics, and an exoskeleton prototype experiment was performed. The results showed that, compared with a typical anthropomorphic upper-limb exoskeleton, the non-anthropomorphic 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton had the same actual workspace; eliminated singularities within the workspace; improved the elbow joint force situation; and the maximum elbow joint torque, elbow external-flexion/internal-extension and shoulder flexion/extension power consumption were significantly reduced. The proposed non-anthropomorphic 3-DOF upper-limb exoskeleton can be applied to a power-assisted upper-limb exoskeleton in industrial settings.

  17. Desarrollo de un controlador de velocidad de un motor de imanes permanentes utilizando técnicas de realización rápida de prototipos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy Edimer Hoyos Velasco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prácticamente todo desarrollo de ingeniería sobre sistemas de control suele ser analizado mediante simulación para prever su desempeño. Sin embargo, no se debe dejar de tener en cuenta que el destino final del algoritmo será su aplicación en un sistema de tiempo real. Utilizando como herramientas de desarrollo una placa con tecnología DSP y el Simulink con RTW, se pueden realizar simulaciones en tiempo real (es decir, la simulación interactúa con la planta física. Para poder apreciar las considerables ventajas que brindan estas herramientas se ha planteado ensayar un lazo de control de velocidad a un motor de corriente continua de imanes permanentes.

  18. Diseño de un motor síncrono con imanes de ferritas para motocicleta eléctrica.

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar Gamarra, Harry Nick

    2014-01-01

    En el presente proyecto se realiza el diseño de un motor síncrono con imanes permanentes de ferritas, para propulsar a través de una transmisión mecánica una motocicleta eléctrica. Primeramente se introduce a los diferentes tipos de motores que se utilizan para tracción eléctrica, se presentan sus características principales y se explica la elección del motor síncrono. Se hace una introducción a los imanes utilizados y se documenta la elección de los imanes permanentes de ferritas en contr...

  19. Exoskeletons for industrial application and their potential effects on physical work load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looze, M.P. de; Bosch, T.; Krause, F.; Stadler, K.S.; O'Sullivan, L.W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to provide an overview of assistive exoskeletons that have specifically been developed for industrial purposes and to assess the potential effect of these exoskeletons on reduction of physical loading on the body. The search resulted in 40 papers describing 26 different

  20. An Upper-Limb Power-Assist Exoskeleton Using Proportional Myoelectric Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhichuan; Zhang, Kejun; Sun, Shouqian; Gao, Zenggui; Zhang, Lekai; Yang, Zhongliang

    2014-01-01

    We developed an upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton actuated by pneumatic muscles. The exoskeleton included two metal links: a nylon joint, four size-adjustable carbon fiber bracers, a potentiometer and two pneumatic muscles. The proportional myoelectric control method was proposed to control the exoskeleton according to the user's motion intention in real time. With the feature extraction procedure and the classification (back-propagation neural network), an electromyogram (EMG)-angle model was constructed to be used for pattern recognition. Six healthy subjects performed elbow flexion-extension movements under four experimental conditions: (1) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation and for different periods (2-s, 4-s and 8-s periods); (2) holding a 1-kg load, without wearing the exoskeleton, for a fixed period; (3) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation, for a fixed period; (4) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton under proportional myoelectric control, for a fixed period. The EMG signals of the biceps brachii, the brachioradialis, the triceps brachii and the anconeus and the angle of the elbow were collected. The control scheme's reliability and power-assist effectiveness were evaluated in the experiments. The results indicated that the exoskeleton could be controlled by the user's motion intention in real time and that it was useful for augmenting arm performance with neurological signal control, which could be applied to assist in elbow rehabilitation after neurological injury. PMID:24727501

  1. Tracking control of time-varying knee exoskeleton disturbed by interaction torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan; Ma, Wenhao; Yin, Ziguang; Guo, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    Knee exoskeletons have been increasingly applied as assistive devices to help lower-extremity impaired people to make their knee joints move through providing external movement compensation. Tracking control of knee exoskeletons guided by human intentions often encounters time-varying (time-dependent) issues and the disturbance interaction torque, which may dramatically put an influence up on their dynamic behaviors. Inertial and viscous parameters of knee exoskeletons can be estimated to be time-varying due to unexpected mechanical vibrations and contact interactions. Moreover, the interaction torque produced from knee joint of wearers has an evident disturbance effect on regular motions of knee exoskeleton. All of these points can increase difficultly of accurate control of knee exoskeletons to follow desired joint angle trajectories. This paper proposes a novel control strategy for controlling knee exoskeleton with time-varying inertial and viscous coefficients disturbed by interaction torque. Such designed controller is able to make the tracking error of joint angle of knee exoskeletons exponentially converge to zero. Meanwhile, the proposed approach is robust to guarantee the tracking error bounded when the interaction torque exists. Illustrative simulation and experiment results are presented to show efficiency of the proposed controller. Additionally, comparisons with gradient dynamic (GD) approach and other methods are also presented to demonstrate efficiency and superiority of the proposed control strategy for tracking joint angle of knee exoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton to assist walking post-stroke: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Lewek, Michael D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-02-25

    In persons post-stroke, diminished ankle joint function can contribute to inadequate gait propulsion. To target paretic ankle impairments, we developed a neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton. Specifically, this exoskeleton supplies plantarflexion assistance that is proportional to the user's paretic soleus electromyography (EMG) amplitude only during a phase of gait when the stance limb is subjected to an anteriorly directed ground reaction force (GRF). The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine the short-term effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on the mechanics and energetics of gait. Five subjects with stroke walked with a powered ankle exoskeleton on the paretic limb for three 5 minute sessions. We analyzed the peak paretic ankle plantarflexion moment, paretic ankle positive work, symmetry of GRF propulsion impulse, and net metabolic power. The exoskeleton increased the paretic plantarflexion moment by 16% during the powered walking trials relative to unassisted walking condition (p exoskeleton assistance appeared to reduce the net metabolic power gradually with each 5 minute repetition, though no statistical significance was found. In three of the subjects, the paretic soleus activation during the propulsion phase of stance was reduced during the powered assistance compared to unassisted walking (35% reduction in the integrated EMG amplitude during the third powered session). This feasibility study demonstrated that the exoskeleton can enhance paretic ankle moment. Future studies with greater sample size and prolonged sessions are warranted to evaluate the effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on overall gait outcomes in persons post-stroke.

  3. An upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton using proportional myoelectric control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhichuan; Zhang, Kejun; Sun, Shouqian; Gao, Zenggui; Zhang, Lekai; Yang, Zhongliang

    2014-04-10

    We developed an upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton actuated by pneumatic muscles. The exoskeleton included two metal links: a nylon joint, four size-adjustable carbon fiber bracers, a potentiometer and two pneumatic muscles. The proportional myoelectric control method was proposed to control the exoskeleton according to the user's motion intention in real time. With the feature extraction procedure and the classification (back-propagation neural network), an electromyogram (EMG)-angle model was constructed to be used for pattern recognition. Six healthy subjects performed elbow flexion-extension movements under four experimental conditions: (1) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation and for different periods (2-s, 4-s and 8-s periods); (2) holding a 1-kg load, without wearing the exoskeleton, for a fixed period; (3) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation, for a fixed period; (4) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton under proportional myoelectric control, for a fixed period. The EMG signals of the biceps brachii, the brachioradialis, the triceps brachii and the anconeus and the angle of the elbow were collected. The control scheme's reliability and power-assist effectiveness were evaluated in the experiments. The results indicated that the exoskeleton could be controlled by the user's motion intention in real time and that it was useful for augmenting arm performance with neurological signal control, which could be applied to assist in elbow rehabilitation after neurological injury.

  4. On the energetics of the walking gait of a human operator using a passive exoskeleton apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrovskii, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    We study the energy expenditures and the peak values of control torques which a human operator must apply in the process of exoskeleton displacement for various types of regular, plane, and single-support gaits. The obtained results allow us to estimate the performance of the passive exoskeleton apparatus.

  5. A novel self-aligning mechanism to decouple force and torques for a planar exoskeleton joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorsch, J.F.; Keemink, Arvid Quintijn Leon; Stienen, Arno; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Abbink, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    The design of exoskeletons is a popular and promising area of research both for restoring lost function and rehabilitation, and for augmentation in military and industrial applications. A major practical challenge to the comfort and usability for exoskeletons is the need to avoid misalignment of the

  6. Biomechanical walking mechanisms underlying the metabolic reduction caused by an autonomous exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Herr, Hugh M

    2016-01-28

    Ankle exoskeletons can now reduce the metabolic cost of walking in humans without leg disability, but the biomechanical mechanisms that underlie this augmentation are not fully understood. In this study, we analyze the energetics and lower limb mechanics of human study participants walking with and without an active autonomous ankle exoskeleton previously shown to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. We measured the metabolic, kinetic and kinematic effects of wearing a battery powered bilateral ankle exoskeleton. Six participants walked on a level treadmill at 1.4 m/s under three conditions: exoskeleton not worn, exoskeleton worn in a powered-on state, and exoskeleton worn in a powered-off state. Metabolic rates were measured with a portable pulmonary gas exchange unit, body marker positions with a motion capture system, and ground reaction forces with a force-plate instrumented treadmill. Inverse dynamics were then used to estimate ankle, knee and hip torques and mechanical powers. The active ankle exoskeleton provided a mean positive power of 0.105 ± 0.008 W/kg per leg during the push-off region of stance phase. The net metabolic cost of walking with the active exoskeleton (3.28 ± 0.10 W/kg) was an 11 ± 4 % (p = 0.019) reduction compared to the cost of walking without the exoskeleton (3.71 ± 0.14 W/kg). Wearing the ankle exoskeleton significantly reduced the mean positive power of the ankle joint by 0.033 ± 0.006 W/kg (p = 0.007), the knee joint by 0.042 ± 0.015 W/kg (p = 0.020), and the hip joint by 0.034 ± 0.009 W/kg (p = 0.006). This study shows that the ankle exoskeleton does not exclusively reduce positive mechanical power at the ankle joint, but also mitigates positive power at the knee and hip. Furthermore, the active ankle exoskeleton did not simply replace biological ankle function in walking, but rather augmented the total (biological + exoskeletal) ankle moment and power. This study

  7. Experiments and kinematics analysis of a hand rehabilitation exoskeleton with circuitous joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuhai; Fu, Yili; Zhang, Qinchao; Wang, Shuguo

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients, a wearable hand exoskeleton with circuitous joint is proposed. The circuitous joint adopts the symmetric pinion and rack mechanism (SPRM) with the parallel mechanism. The exoskeleton finger is a serial mechanism composed of three closed-chain SPRM joints in series. The kinematic equations of the open chain of the finger and the closed chains of the SPRM joints were built to analyze the kinematics of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton. The experimental setup of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton was built and the continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation experiment and the test of human-robot interaction force measurement were conducted. Experiment results show that the mechanical design of the hand rehabilitation robot is reasonable and that the kinematic analysis is correct, thus the exoskeleton can be used for the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  8. BioMot exoskeleton - Towards a smart wearable robot for symbiotic human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacek, Tomislav; Moltedo, Marta; Langlois, Kevin; Prieto, Guillermo Asin; Sanchez-Villamanan, Maria Carmen; Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk; Moreno, Juan C

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents design of a novel modular lower-limb gait exoskeleton built within the FP7 BioMot project. Exoskeleton employs a variable stiffness actuator in all 6 joints, a directional-flexibility structure and a novel physical humanrobot interfacing, which allows it to deliver the required output while minimally constraining user's gait by providing passive degrees of freedom. Due to modularity, the exoskeleton can be used as a full lower-limb orthosis, a single-joint orthosis in any of the three joints, and a two-joint orthosis in a combination of any of the two joints. By employing a simple torque control strategy, the exoskeleton can be used to deliver user-specific assistance, both in gait rehabilitation and in assisting people suffering musculoskeletal impairments. The result of the presented BioMot efforts is a low-footprint exoskeleton with powerful compliant actuators, simple, yet effective torque controller and easily adjustable flexible structure.

  9. Kinematic effects of inertia and friction added by a robotic knee exoskeleton after prolonged walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, C; Tucker, M R; Lambercy, O; Gassert, R

    2017-07-01

    The capabilities of robotic gait assistive devices are ever increasing; however, their adoption outside of the lab is still limited. A critical barrier for the functionality of these devices are the still unknown mechanical properties of the human leg during dynamic conditions such as walking. We built a robotic knee exoskeleton to address this problem. Here, we present the effects of our device on the walking pattern of four subjects. We assessed the effects after a short period of acclimation as well as after a 1.5h walking protocol. We found that the knee exoskeleton decreased (towards extension) the peak hip extension and peak knee flexion of the leg with the exoskeleton, while minimally affecting the non-exoskeleton leg. Comparatively smaller changes occurred after prolonged walking. These results suggest that walking patterns attained after a few minutes of acclimation with a knee exoskeleton are stable for at least a couple of hours.

  10. Exoskeleton Heterogeneity in Crustaceans: Quantifying Compositional and Structural Variations Across Body Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. N.; Mergelsberg, S. T.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Crustacean exoskeletons are a complex biocomposite of organic macromolecules and calcium carbonate minerals. The highly divergent functions and diverse morphologies of these biominerals across taxa raise the question of whether these differences are systematically reflected in exoskeleton composition and structure. Previous studies that investigated element concentrations in exoskeletons used spectroscopic methods. However, the findings were largely inconclusive because of analytical limitations and most studies concluded that magnesium, phosphorus, and other trace elements are mostly contained in the mineral fraction because concentrations in the organic framework could not be resolved. This experimental study was designed to quantify the distributions of Ca, P, Mg, and Sr in the mineral versus organic fractions of exoskeletons from the American Lobster (H. americanus), Dungeness Crab (M. magister), and Red Rock Crab (M. productus). Samples of exoskeleton from 10 body parts were collected in triplicate and dissolved using three procedures specific to extracting the 1) mineral, 2) protein, and 3) chitin phases separately. Chemical analyses of the resulting effluents using ICP-OES show the mineral fraction of the skeleton can contain significant amounts of mineralized Mg and P particularly for body parts associated with a significant difference in mineral structural ordering. The protein fraction contains more Mg and P than expected based on estimates from previous studies (Hild et al., 2008). While the element distributions vary greatly depending on the location, in body parts with thicker cuticle (e.g. claw) the mineral component appears to control overall composition. The findings have implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions based upon exoskeleton composition. First, the chemical composition of an exoskeleton cannot be assumed constant across the different body parts of an entire organism. This is particularly true when the exoskeleton of the claw is

  11. Morphological Dependence of Element Stoichiometry in the H. americanus Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Ulrich, R. N.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    The crustacean exoskeleton is a complex biocomposite of inorganic mineral and organic macromolecules that expresses highly divergent morphologies across different taxa. While the structures and compositions of the organic framework show complex links to environmental and developmental pressures, little is known about the mineral chemistry. Previous studies of the cuticle have assumed that magnesium, phosphorous, and other trace metals are largely contained in the inorganic mineral fraction. Due to analytical limitations of structural analyses and in situ spectroscopic methods, the stoichiometry of the organic and inorganic portions could not be resolved. For example, previous Raman and XRD studies conclude the higher concentrations of trace elements, such as P and Mg measured in reinforced structures, e.g. the claw and abdomen, are primarily determined by the mineral fraction. Using the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) as a model organism to establish relationships between body part function and cuticle composition, this study quantified the distributions of Mg and P in the mineral and organic fractions. The experiments were designed to dissolve the exoskeleton of 10 body parts using three types of solutions that were specific to extracting 1) the mineral phase, 2) protein, and 3) polysaccharide. Analysis of the solutions by ICP-OES shows the mineral phase contains magnesium and phosphorous at concentrations sufficient to support the formation of calcium-magnesium and phosphate minerals. The protein fraction of the body parts contains significantly more Mg and P than previously hypothesized, while the levels of P contained in the organic portion are fairly constant. The findings demonstrate the lobster cuticle contains a significant amount of non-mineralized P and Mg that is readily water-soluble in the protein component. However, for those body parts used for defense and food acquisition, such as the claw, the mineral component determines the overall

  12. A Review on Compliant Joint Mechanisms for Lower Limb Exoskeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Gálvez-Zúñiga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower limb exoskeletons are experiencing a rapid development that may suggest a prompt introduction to the market. These devices have an inherent close interaction with the human body; therefore, it is necessary to ensure user’s safety and comfort. The first exoskeletal designs used to represent the human joints as simple revolute joints. This approximation introduces an axial misalignment issue, which generates uncontrollable internal forces. A mathematical description of the said misalignments is provided to better understand the concept and its consequences. This review will only focus on mechanisms aiming to comply with its user.

  13. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 minutes of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-minute training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  14. Double closed-loop cascade control for lower limb exoskeleton with elastic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanhe; Zheng, Tianjiao; Jin, Hongzhe; Yang, Jixing; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Unlike traditional rigid actuators, the significant features of Series Elastic Actuator (SEA) are stable torque control, lower output impedance, impact resistance and energy storage. Recently, SEA has been applied in many exoskeletons. In such applications, a key issue is how to realize the human-exoskeleton movement coordination. In this paper, double closed-loop cascade control for lower limb exoskeleton with SEA is proposed. This control method consists of inner SEA torque loop and outer contact force loop. Utilizing the SEA torque control with a motor velocity loop, actuation performances of SEA are analyzed. An integrated exoskeleton control system is designed, in which joint angles are calculated by internal encoders and resolvers and contact forces are gathered by external pressure sensors. The double closed-loop cascade control model is established based on the feedback signals of internal and external sensor. Movement experiments are accomplished in our prototype of lower limb exoskeleton. Preliminary results indicate the exoskeleton movements with pilot can be realized stably by utilizing this double closed-loop cascade control method. Feasibility of the SEA in our exoskeleton robot and effectiveness of the control method are verified.

  15. A Simple Exoskeleton That Assists Plantarflexion Can Reduce the Metabolic Cost of Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Philippe; Derave, Wim; Galle, Samuel; De Clercq, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though walking can be sustained for great distances, considerable energy is required for plantarflexion around the instant of opposite leg heel contact. Different groups attempted to reduce metabolic cost with exoskeletons but none could achieve a reduction beyond the level of walking without exoskeleton, possibly because there is no consensus on the optimal actuation timing. The main research question of our study was whether it is possible to obtain a higher reduction in metabolic cost by tuning the actuation timing. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured metabolic cost by means of respiratory gas analysis. Test subjects walked with a simple pneumatic exoskeleton that assists plantarflexion with different actuation timings. We found that the exoskeleton can reduce metabolic cost by 0.18±0.06 W kg−1 or 6±2% (standard error of the mean) (p = 0.019) below the cost of walking without exoskeleton if actuation starts just before opposite leg heel contact. Conclusions/Significance The optimum timing that we found concurs with the prediction from a mathematical model of walking. While the present exoskeleton was not ambulant, measurements of joint kinetics reveal that the required power could be recycled from knee extension deceleration work that occurs naturally during walking. This demonstrates that it is theoretically possible to build future ambulant exoskeletons that reduce metabolic cost, without power supply restrictions. PMID:23418524

  16. Reducing the metabolic cost of walking with an ankle exoskeleton: interaction between actuation timing and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Samuel; Malcolm, Philippe; Collins, Steven Hartley; De Clercq, Dirk

    2017-04-27

    Powered ankle-foot exoskeletons can reduce the metabolic cost of human walking to below normal levels, but optimal assistance properties remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of different assistance timing and power characteristics in an experiment with a tethered ankle-foot exoskeleton. Ten healthy female subjects walked on a treadmill with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons in 10 different assistance conditions. Artificial pneumatic muscles assisted plantarflexion during ankle push-off using one of four actuation onset timings (36, 42, 48 and 54% of the stride) and three power levels (average positive exoskeleton power over a stride, summed for both legs, of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.5 W∙kg -1 ). We compared metabolic rate, kinematics and electromyography (EMG) between conditions. Optimal assistance was achieved with an onset of 42% stride and average power of 0.4 W∙kg -1 , leading to 21% reduction in metabolic cost compared to walking with the exoskeleton deactivated and 12% reduction compared to normal walking without the exoskeleton. With suboptimal timing or power, the exoskeleton still reduced metabolic cost, but substantially less so. The relationship between timing, power and metabolic rate was well-characterized by a two-dimensional quadratic function. The assistive mechanisms leading to these improvements included reducing muscular activity in the ankle plantarflexors and assisting leg swing initiation. These results emphasize the importance of optimizing exoskeleton actuation properties when assisting or augmenting human locomotion. Our optimal assistance onset timing and average power levels could be used for other exoskeletons to improve assistance and resulting benefits.

  17. Simultaneous estimation of human and exoskeleton motion: A simplified protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M T; Torricelli, D; Del-Ama, A J; Pinto, D; Gonzalez-Vargas, J; Moreno, J C; Gil-Agudo, A; Pons, J L

    2017-07-01

    Adequate benchmarking procedures in the area of wearable robots is gaining importance in order to compare different devices on a quantitative basis, improve them and support the standardization and regulation procedures. Performance assessment usually focuses on the execution of locomotion tasks, and is mostly based on kinematic-related measures. Typical drawbacks of marker-based motion capture systems, gold standard for measure of human limb motion, become challenging when measuring limb kinematics, due to the concomitant presence of the robot. This work answers the question of how to reliably assess the subject's body motion by placing markers over the exoskeleton. Focusing on the ankle joint, the proposed methodology showed that it is possible to reconstruct the trajectory of the subject's joint by placing markers on the exoskeleton, although foot flexibility during walking can impact the reconstruction accuracy. More experiments are needed to confirm this hypothesis, and more subjects and walking conditions are needed to better characterize the errors of the proposed methodology, although our results are promising, indicating small errors.

  18. Mechatronic Wearable Exoskeletons for Bionic Bipedal Standing and Walking: A New Synthetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onose, Gelu; Cârdei, Vladimir; Crăciunoiu, Ştefan T; Avramescu, Valeriu; Opriş, Ioan; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Constantinescu, Marian Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, interest has been growing to mechatronic and robotic technologies utilized in wearable powered exoskeletons that assist standing and walking. The available literature includes single-case reports, clinical studies conducted in small groups of subjects, and several recent systematic reviews. These publications have fulfilled promotional and marketing objectives but have not yet resulted in a fully optimized, practical wearable exoskeleton. Here we evaluate the progress and future directions in this field from a joint perspective of health professionals, manufacturers, and consumers. We describe the taxonomy of existing technologies and highlight the main improvements needed for the development and functional optimization of the practical exoskeletons.

  19. A Biomechanical Comparison of Proportional Electromyography Control to Biological Torque Control Using a Powered Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    Despite a large increase in robotic exoskeleton research, there are few studies that have examined human performance with different control strategies on the same exoskeleton device. Direct comparison studies are needed to determine how users respond to different types of control. The purpose of this study was to compare user performance using a robotic hip exoskeleton with two different controllers: a controller that targeted a biological hip torque profile and a proportional myoelectric controller. We tested both control approaches on 10 able-bodied subjects using a pneumatically powered hip exoskeleton. The state machine controller targeted a biological hip torque profile. The myoelectric controller used electromyography (EMG) of lower limb muscles to produce a proportional control signal for the hip exoskeleton. Each subject performed two 30-min exoskeleton walking trials (1.0 m/s) using each controller and a 10-min trial with the exoskeleton unpowered. During each trial, we measured subjects' metabolic cost of walking, lower limb EMG profiles, and joint kinematics and kinetics (torques and powers) using a force treadmill and motion capture. Compared to unassisted walking in the exoskeleton, myoelectric control significantly reduced metabolic cost by 13% ( p  = 0.005) and biological hip torque control reduced metabolic cost by 7% ( p  = 0.261). Subjects reduced muscle activity relative to the unpowered condition for a greater number of lower limb muscles using myoelectric control compared to the biological hip torque control. More subjects subjectively preferred the myoelectric controller to the biological hip torque control. Myoelectric control had more advantages (metabolic cost and muscle activity reduction) compared to a controller that targeted a biological torque profile for walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton. However, these results were obtained with a single exoskeleton device with specific control configurations while level walking at a

  20. A Biomechanical Comparison of Proportional Electromyography Control to Biological Torque Control Using a Powered Hip Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Young

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite a large increase in robotic exoskeleton research, there are few studies that have examined human performance with different control strategies on the same exoskeleton device. Direct comparison studies are needed to determine how users respond to different types of control. The purpose of this study was to compare user performance using a robotic hip exoskeleton with two different controllers: a controller that targeted a biological hip torque profile and a proportional myoelectric controller.MethodsWe tested both control approaches on 10 able-bodied subjects using a pneumatically powered hip exoskeleton. The state machine controller targeted a biological hip torque profile. The myoelectric controller used electromyography (EMG of lower limb muscles to produce a proportional control signal for the hip exoskeleton. Each subject performed two 30-min exoskeleton walking trials (1.0 m/s using each controller and a 10-min trial with the exoskeleton unpowered. During each trial, we measured subjects’ metabolic cost of walking, lower limb EMG profiles, and joint kinematics and kinetics (torques and powers using a force treadmill and motion capture.ResultsCompared to unassisted walking in the exoskeleton, myoelectric control significantly reduced metabolic cost by 13% (p = 0.005 and biological hip torque control reduced metabolic cost by 7% (p = 0.261. Subjects reduced muscle activity relative to the unpowered condition for a greater number of lower limb muscles using myoelectric control compared to the biological hip torque control. More subjects subjectively preferred the myoelectric controller to the biological hip torque control.ConclusionMyoelectric control had more advantages (metabolic cost and muscle activity reduction compared to a controller that targeted a biological torque profile for walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton. However, these results were obtained with a single exoskeleton device with specific

  1. Musculoskeletal modelling deconstructs the paradoxical effects of elastic ankle exoskeletons on plantar-flexor mechanics and energetics during hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Dominic James; Hicks, Jennifer L; Delp, Scott L; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-11-15

    Experiments have shown that elastic ankle exoskeletons can be used to reduce ankle joint and plantar-flexor muscle loading when hopping in place and, in turn, reduce metabolic energy consumption. However, recent experimental work has shown that such exoskeletons cause less favourable soleus (SO) muscle-tendon mechanics than is observed during normal hopping, which might limit the capacity of the exoskeleton to reduce energy consumption. To directly link plantar-flexor mechanics and energy consumption when hopping in exoskeletons, we used a musculoskeletal model of the human leg and a model of muscle energetics in simulations of muscle-tendon dynamics during hopping with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. Simulations were driven by experimental electromyograms, joint kinematics and exoskeleton torque taken from previously published data. The data were from seven males who hopped at 2.5 Hz with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. The energetics model showed that the total rate of metabolic energy consumption by ankle muscles was not significantly reduced by an ankle exoskeleton. This was despite large reductions in plantar-flexor force production (40-50%). The lack of larger metabolic reductions with exoskeletons was attributed to increases in plantar-flexor muscle fibre velocities and a shift to less favourable muscle fibre lengths during active force production. This limited the capacity for plantar-flexors to reduce activation and energy consumption when hopping with exoskeleton assistance. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Evaluación del desempeño de un motor Yuchai trabajando con biodiesel cubano; Performance evaluation of Yuchai Engine working with Biodiesel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Piloto Rodríguez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se realiza una característica exterior de velocidad para un motor trabajando con Biodiesel y sus mezclas, así como se analiza la composición en NOx de los gases contaminantes producto de la combustión. Se comprueba la perdida en prestaciones del motor y aumento del consumo especifico de combustible a medida que aumentamos la cantidad de Biodiesel en la mezcla. Esto se debe al menor poder calórico del Biodiesel. Se observa como la carga contaminante disminuye en mas de un 40% cuando se utiliza Biodiesel y se hace un análisis de la posibles causas de este comportamiento. Finalmente se hace una proposición de la mezcla carburante mas recomendable para su utilización.  At the present work, the authors obtain the engine outer velocity characterization working with Biodiesel and its mixtures, and show the chemical composition of the exhaust gases respect to NOx. Is observed a decrease in the engine performance when the Biodiesel per cent is growing. This behaviour must be due to the lower heat power for Biodiesel respect to Diesel. They obtain a 40% decrease in the NOx formation respect to Diesel and it is developed an analysis of the reasons of that. Finally they propose the optimized mixture for the use in an internal combustion engine, about the 20% of Biodiesel, because this is the equilibrium between contamination and engine performance.

  3. Aproximación al mantenimiento eléctrico predictivo de un motor impulsor de una bomba centrífuga utilizando inteligencia artificial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Javier Gil Arrieta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta en este documento los resultados preliminares obtenidos a partir de la medición de algunas de las variables de funcionamiento más importantes de un motor trifásico de inducción que acciona una bomba centrífuga (grupo motor-bomba, mediante las cuales fue posible establecer acciones que indican que es factible relacionar diferentes regímenes de operación del grupo bajo estudio con algunas técnicas de mantenimiento predictivo aplicando a su vez herramientas de inteligencia artificial que permitirán establecer fechas de mantenimiento en función de la eficiencia del motor y otros aspectos técnico-constructivos como por ejemplo, la temperatura máxima de operación según el fabricante, conformando así un conjunto de estrategias que permitirán en última instancia “construir una curva inteligente de información aplicable a la gestión del mantenimiento antes que suceda la falla”

  4. Diagnóstico de problemas de asimetrías rotóricas en un motor de inducción de gran potencia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Soto Salvá

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Este diagnóstico se ha realizado en un total de 14 motores de inducción, todos ellos de jaula de ardilla y de 6 000 voltios. Se hará referencia al último diagnóstico realizado que se trata de un motor de una bomba de agua de alimentar caldera tipo 4A3M-2500/6000 CT4 de una unidad generadora de electricidad de 100 MW. Mediante las técnicas de diagnóstico empleadas se logró determinar roturas de barras en la jaula de ardilla del rotor del motor.This diagnosis has been carried out in a total of 14 induction motors, all them of squirrel cage and of 6 000 volts. Reference will be made to the last carried out diagnosis that it is a motor of a bomb of water of feeding boiler type 4A3M-2500/6000 CT4 of a generating unit of electricity of 100 MW. By means of the techniques of diagnosis employees it was possible to determine breaks of bars in the cage of squirrel of the rotor in the motor.

  5. Development and pilot testing of HEXORR: hand EXOskeleton rehabilitation robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabowsky, Christopher N; Godfrey, Sasha B; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2010-07-28

    Following acute therapeutic interventions, the majority of stroke survivors are left with a poorly functioning hemiparetic hand. Rehabilitation robotics has shown promise in providing patients with intensive therapy leading to functional gains. Because of the hand's crucial role in performing activities of daily living, attention to hand therapy has recently increased. This paper introduces a newly developed Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot (HEXORR). This device has been designed to provide full range of motion (ROM) for all of the hand's digits. The thumb actuator allows for variable thumb plane of motion to incorporate different degrees of extension/flexion and abduction/adduction. Compensation algorithms have been developed to improve the exoskeleton's backdrivability by counteracting gravity, stiction and kinetic friction. We have also designed a force assistance mode that provides extension assistance based on each individual's needs. A pilot study was conducted on 9 unimpaired and 5 chronic stroke subjects to investigate the device's ability to allow physiologically accurate hand movements throughout the full ROM. The study also tested the efficacy of the force assistance mode with the goal of increasing stroke subjects' active ROM while still requiring active extension torque on the part of the subject. For 12 of the hand digits'15 joints in neurologically normal subjects, there were no significant ROM differences (P > 0.05) between active movements performed inside and outside of HEXORR. Interjoint coordination was examined in the 1st and 3rd digits, and no differences were found between inside and outside of the device (P > 0.05). Stroke subjects were capable of performing free hand movements inside of the exoskeleton and the force assistance mode was successful in increasing active ROM by 43 +/- 5% (P hand's digits through nearly the entire ROM with physiologically accurate trajectories. Stroke subjects received the device intervention well and

  6. Development and pilot testing of HEXORR: Hand EXOskeleton Rehabilitation Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Sasha B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following acute therapeutic interventions, the majority of stroke survivors are left with a poorly functioning hemiparetic hand. Rehabilitation robotics has shown promise in providing patients with intensive therapy leading to functional gains. Because of the hand's crucial role in performing activities of daily living, attention to hand therapy has recently increased. Methods This paper introduces a newly developed Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot (HEXORR. This device has been designed to provide full range of motion (ROM for all of the hand's digits. The thumb actuator allows for variable thumb plane of motion to incorporate different degrees of extension/flexion and abduction/adduction. Compensation algorithms have been developed to improve the exoskeleton's backdrivability by counteracting gravity, stiction and kinetic friction. We have also designed a force assistance mode that provides extension assistance based on each individual's needs. A pilot study was conducted on 9 unimpaired and 5 chronic stroke subjects to investigate the device's ability to allow physiologically accurate hand movements throughout the full ROM. The study also tested the efficacy of the force assistance mode with the goal of increasing stroke subjects' active ROM while still requiring active extension torque on the part of the subject. Results For 12 of the hand digits'15 joints in neurologically normal subjects, there were no significant ROM differences (P > 0.05 between active movements performed inside and outside of HEXORR. Interjoint coordination was examined in the 1st and 3rd digits, and no differences were found between inside and outside of the device (P > 0.05. Stroke subjects were capable of performing free hand movements inside of the exoskeleton and the force assistance mode was successful in increasing active ROM by 43 ± 5% (P Conclusions Our pilot study shows that this device is capable of moving the hand's digits through

  7. Mechanical design of EFW Exo II: A hybrid exoskeleton for elbow-forearm-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hui; Chen, Ziye; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Tieshi

    2017-07-01

    The use of rehabilitation exoskeleton has become an important means for the treatment of stroke patients. A hybrid exoskeleton named EFW Exo II is developed for the motor function rehabilitation of elbow, forearm and wrist. The EFW Exo II is based on a parallel 2-URR/RRS mechanism and a serial R mechanism. It could fit both left and right arms for the symmetrical and open structure, and the distance between the elbow and wrist could automatically adjust for different forearm length. Details of the mechanical design are introduced. Brushless DC servo motors with planetary gear reducer are used as the actuators of the exoskeleton. Gear drive and belt drive are used for power transmission. A three dimensional force sensor is mounted in the handle to regulate the interaction between the exoskeleton and patient. The EFW Exo II can realize rehabilitation exercise for each joint and the ranges of motion meet the rehabilitation demands of daily living.

  8. Design of a minimally constraining, passively supported gait training exoskeleton: ALEX II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Kyle N; Stegall, Paul; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a new, minimally constraining, passively supported gait training exoskeleton known as ALEX II. This device builds on the success and extends the features of the ALEX I device developed at the University of Delaware. Both ALEX (Active Leg EXoskeleton) devices have been designed to supply a controllable torque to a subject's hip and knee joint. The current control strategy makes use of an assist-as-needed algorithm. Following a brief review of previous work motivating this redesign, we discuss the key mechanical features of the new ALEX device. A short investigation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the control strategy and impact of the exoskeleton on the gait of six healthy subjects. This paper concludes with a comparison between the subjects' gait both in and out of the exoskeleton. © 2011 IEEE

  9. Design of a wearable cable-driven upper limb exoskeleton based on epicyclic gear trains structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feiyun; Gao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yong; Zhu, Yanhe; Zhao, Jie

    2017-07-20

    Many countries, including Japan, Italy, and China are experiencing demographic shifts as their populations age. Some basic activities of daily living (ADLs) are difficult for elderly people to complete independently due to declines in motor function. In this paper, a 6-DOF wearable cable-driven upper limb exoskeleton (CABexo) based on epicyclic gear trains structure is proposed. The main structure of the exoskeleton system is composed of three epicyclic gear train sections. This new exoskeleton has a parallel mechanical structure to the traditional serial structure, but is stiffer and has a stronger carrying capacity. The traditional gear transmission structure is replaced with a cable transmission system, which is quieter, and has higher accuracy and smoother transmission. The static workspace of the exoskeleton is large enough to meet the demand of assisting aged and disabled individuals in completing most of their activities of daily living (ADLs).

  10. Biomechanical design of escalading lower limb exoskeleton with novel linkage joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoan; Liu, Gangfeng; Ma, Sun; Wang, Tianshuo; Zhao, Jie; Zhu, Yanhe

    2017-07-20

    In this paper, an obstacle-surmounting-enabled lower limb exoskeleton with novel linkage joints that perfectly mimicked human motions was proposed. Currently, most lower exoskeletons that use linear actuators have a direct connection between the wearer and the controlled part. Compared to the existing joints, the novel linkage joint not only fitted better into compact chasis, but also provided greater torque when the joint was at a large bend angle. As a result, it extended the angle range of joint peak torque output. With any given power, torque was prioritized over rotational speed, because instead of rotational speed, sufficiency of torque is the premise for most joint actions. With insufficient torque, the exoskeleton will be a burden instead of enhancement to its wearer. With optimized distribution of torque among the joints, the novel linkage method may contribute to easier exoskeleton movements.

  11. Prey exoskeletons influence the course of gastric evacuation in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couturier, C. S.; Andersen, N. G.; Audet, C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prey exoskeleton characteristics on gastric evacuation patterns in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. Three distinct stages were highlighted in the gastric evacuation of crustacean prey characterized by a robust exoskeleton. The experiments confirmed that the three shrimp...... of the prey exoskeleton all affected gastric evacuation: duration of initial delay, overall evacuation rate and a decreased evacuation rate at the end of the process. The power exponential function (PEF), with its shape parameter, described the course of evacuation for these prey types well, especially...... the initial delay. The PEF does not, however, allow describing evacuation by the current stomach content mass independent of meal size, which limits its usefulness in estimating consumption rates of wild G. morhua. To predict and describe gastric evacuation of prey with a robust exoskeleton, it is therefore...

  12. Design of a wearable hand exoskeleton for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Inseong; Lee, Jeongsoo; Park, Yeongyu; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, design of a wearable hand exoskeleton system for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers, is proposed. The exoskeleton was designed with a simple and wearable structure to aid finger motions in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). A hand grasping experiment by fully-abled people was performed to investigate general hand flexion/extension motions and the polynomial curve of general hand motions was obtained. To customize the hand exoskeleton for the user, the polynomial curve was adjusted to the joint range of motion (ROM) of the user and the optimal design of the exoskeleton structure was obtained using the optimization algorithm. A prototype divided into two parts (one part for the thumb, the other for rest fingers) was actuated by only two linear motors for compact size and light weight.

  13. Robotic exoskeletons for reengaging in everyday activities: promises, pitfalls, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Heather; Patzer, Diane; Galen, Sujay S

    2017-11-07

    Media images and marketing materials suggest a future in which individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) can utilize robotic exoskeletons to reengage in everyday activities, yet these narratives may not align with the current technological realities. The purpose of this paper is to present and describe the current use of robotic exoskeletons in rehabilitation and home settings and discuss the benefits and limitations of the devices. We provide an overview of the features and limitations of the four robotic exoskeleton products (EKSO Bionics, ReWalk, Rex Bionics, and Indego) that are currently being used in in the United States in rehabilitation settings. We follow by suggesting ways that these devices fall short of fulfilling the promise of reengage in everyday activities in real-world life contexts. Available devices appear to be better suited for rehabilitation settings than for home use. Device weight, the need for upper extremity supports, supervision requirements, and a limited range of movements are all issues that limit functionality and restrict opportunities for using such devices in real-world contexts. Designing the next generation of exoskeletons to be more useful in everyday life will require further collaboration among engineers, clinicians, and patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Exoskeletons offer the promise of allowing individuals with neurological injury to reengage in everyday activities from a standing position. Several exoskeleton devices are currently available for use in the United States. Weight of exoskeleton devices, the need for upper extremity supports, supervision requirements of hone units, and a limited range of movements are issues that restrict opportunities for using such devices in real-world contexts. Further development of exoskeleton technologies is warranted to improve the devices for real-world use.

  14. A springs actuated finger exoskeleton: From mechanical design to spring variables evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletto, Roberto; Mello, Ashley N; Piovesan, Davide

    2017-07-01

    In the context of post-stroke patients, suffering of hemiparesis of the hand, robot-aided neuro-motor rehabilitation allows for intensive rehabilitation treatments and quantitative evaluation of patients' progresses. This work presents the design and evaluation of a spring actuated finger exoskeleton. In particular, the spring variables and the interaction forces between the assembly and the hand were investigated, in order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed exoskeleton.

  15. The Lower Extremities Exoskeleton Actuator Dynamics Research Taking into Account Support Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vereikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows high relevance of research, aimed at the robotic exoskeleton creation. It defines some problems related to the process of their designing; including a lack of power supply to provide enough autonomy, and difficulties of man-machine complex control. There is a review of literature on the walking robots with tree-like kinematic structure development. This work reflects the continuing investigations, currently conducted by the authors, and relies heavily on the results of previous works, devoted to this subject.The article presents the exoskeleton dynamics equation, taking into account the impact of external forces and torques, as well as external relations imposed. Using a model of lower extremities exoskeleton developed in SolidWorks software complex, baricentric parameters of the actuator links were found. The different types of movements, committed due to harmonic changes of generalized coordinates in exoskeleton degrees of mobility, equipped with electrohydraulic actuators, were analyzed. The laws of generalized coordinate changes in time, corresponding to the worst case loading, were found. All the necessary input data for the exoskeleton dynamics equation solution were determined.The numerical values of all components of the dynamics equation were obtained as result of the dynamics equation simulation. In this case, the exoskeleton actuator load capacity was assumed to be 50 kg. The article shows dependences of torque and power in the actuator degrees of mobility on the time, as well as a curve of total capacity of all drives both, ignoring and taking into consideration the support surface reactions. Obtained dependences are the initial data for the calculation of the drive system.The proposed method for determination of exoskeleton energy parameters allows developer to perform a prompt evaluation of various options for the actuator design in accordance with the selected criteria. As a main evaluation criterion, a minimum

  16. Modulation of shoulder muscle and joint function using a powered upper-limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Fong, Justin; Crocher, Vincent; Lee, Peter V S; Oetomo, Denny; Tan, Ying; Ackland, David C

    2018-02-21

    Robotic-assistive exoskeletons can enable frequent repetitive movements without the presence of a full-time therapist; however, human-machine interaction and the capacity of powered exoskeletons to attenuate shoulder muscle and joint loading is poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify shoulder muscle and joint force during assisted activities of daily living using a powered robotic upper limb exoskeleton (ArmeoPower, Hocoma). Six healthy male subjects performed abduction, flexion, horizontal flexion, reaching and nose touching activities. These tasks were repeated under two conditions: (i) the exoskeleton compensating only for its own weight, and (ii) the exoskeleton providing full upper limb gravity compensation (i.e., weightlessness). Muscle EMG, joint kinematics and joint torques were simultaneously recorded, and shoulder muscle and joint forces calculated using personalized musculoskeletal models of each subject's upper limb. The exoskeleton reduced peak joint torques, muscle forces and joint loading by up to 74.8% (0.113 Nm/kg), 88.8% (5.8%BW) and 68.4% (75.6%BW), respectively, with the degree of load attenuation strongly task dependent. The peak compressive, anterior and superior glenohumeral joint force during assisted nose touching was 36.4% (24.6%BW), 72.4% (13.1%BW) and 85.0% (17.2%BW) lower than that during unassisted nose touching, respectively. The present study showed that upper limb weight compensation using an assistive exoskeleton may increase glenohumeral joint stability, since deltoid muscle force, which is the primary contributor to superior glenohumeral joint shear, is attenuated; however, prominent exoskeleton interaction moments are required to position and control the upper limb in space, even under full gravity compensation conditions. The modeling framework and results may be useful in planning targeted upper limb robotic rehabilitation tasks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 6-REXOS: Upper Limb Exoskeleton Robot with Improved pHRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Gunasekara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Close interaction can be observed between an exoskeleton robot and its wearer. Therefore, appropriate physical human-robot interaction (pHRI should be considered when designing an exoskeleton robot to provide safe and comfortable motion assistance. Different features have been used in recent studies to enhance the pHRI in upper-limb exoskeleton robots. However, less attention has been given to integrating kinematic redundancy into upper-limb exoskeleton robots to improve the pHRI. In this context, this paper proposes a six-degrees-of-freedom (DoF upper-limb exoskeleton robot (6-REXOS for the motion assistance of physically weak individuals. The 6-REXOS uses a kinematically different structure to that of the human lower arm, where the exoskeleton robot is worn. The 6-REXOS has four active DoFs to generate the motion of the human lower arm. Furthermore, two flexible bellow couplings are attached to the wrist and elbow joints to generate two passive DoFs. These couplings not only allow translational motion in wrist and elbow joints but also a redundancy in the robot. Furthermore, the compliance of the flexible coupling contributes to avoiding misalignments between human and robot joint axes. The redundancy in the 6-REXOS is verified based on manipulability index, minimum singular value, condition number and manipulability ellipsoids. The 6-REXOS and a four-DoF exoskeleton robot are compared to verify the manipulation advantage due to the redundancy. The four-DoF exoskeleton robot is designed by excluding the two passive DoFs of the 6-REXOS. In addition, a kinematic model is proposed for the human lower arm to validate the performance of the 6-REXOS. Kinematic analysis and simulations are carried out to validate the 6-REXOS and human-lower-arm model.

  18. An assistive control approach for a lower-limb exoskeleton to facilitate recovery of walking following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Spencer A; Ha, Kevin H; Hartigan, Clare; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a control approach for a lower-limb exoskeleton intended to facilitate recovery of walking in individuals with lower-extremity hemiparesis after stroke. The authors hypothesize that such recovery is facilitated by allowing the patient rather than the exoskeleton to provide movement coordination. As such, an assistive controller that provides walking assistance without dictating the spatiotemporal nature of joint movement is described here. Following a description of the control laws and finite state structure of the controller, the authors present the results of an experimental implementation and preliminary validation of the control approach, in which the control architecture was implemented on a lower limb exoskeleton, and the exoskeleton implemented in an experimental protocol on three subjects with hemiparesis following stroke. In a series of sessions in which each patient used the exoskeleton, all patients showed substantial single-session improvements in all measured gait outcomes, presumably as a result of using the assistive controller and exoskeleton.

  19. Production and characterization of chitosan obtained from shrimp exoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Leticia P.; Aguiar, Nayara V.; Rodrigues, Willias da L.; Silva, Rafael S. da; Moreira, Carly K.P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a natural polymer, biocompatible, biodegradable and non-toxic. It's derived from the deacetylation of chitin, which constitutes the most part of the exoskeleton of insects, crustaceans and fungal cell wall. After cellulose, chitin is more organic compound found in nature. The Chitin was separated from others components of shrimp waste (Macrobrachium amazonicum) by a chemical process that involves three steps: demineralization, deproteination and depigmentation. The chitosan produced was characterized by potentiometric titration, to find the degree of deacetylation (85,32 %), determining the intrinsic viscosity to define its molecular weight (503.223 g/mol), and X-ray diffraction to determine its crystallinity index (58,4 %). (author)

  20. Design of a biologically inspired lower limb exoskeleton for human gait rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Mingxing; Chen, Weihai; Ding, Xilun; Wang, Jianhua; Bai, Shaoping; Ren, Huichao

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel bionic model of the human leg according to the theory of physiology. Based on this model, we present a biologically inspired 3-degree of freedom (DOF) lower limb exoskeleton for human gait rehabilitation, showing that the lower limb exoskeleton is fully compatible with the human knee joint. The exoskeleton has a hybrid serial-parallel kinematic structure consisting of a 1-DOF hip joint module and a 2-DOF knee joint module in the sagittal plane. A planar 2-DOF parallel mechanism is introduced in the design to fully accommodate the motion of the human knee joint, which features not only rotation but also relative sliding. Therefore, the design is consistent with the requirements of bionics. The forward and inverse kinematic analysis is studied and the workspace of the exoskeleton is analyzed. The structural parameters are optimized to obtain a larger workspace. The results using MATLAB-ADAMS co-simulation are shown in this paper to demonstrate the feasibility of our design. A prototype of the exoskeleton is also developed and an experiment performed to verify the kinematic analysis. Compared with existing lower limb exoskeletons, the designed mechanism has a large workspace, while allowing knee joint rotation and small amount of sliding.

  1. Mathematical modelling of a hand crank generator for powering lower-limb exoskeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With advances in technology and ageing societal concerns growing, personal care devices are gaining importance globally. One such area is lower-limb exoskeletons, used to assist persons to move around for normal daily living. Most of the commercially available assistive exoskeletons use rechargeable Li-ion batteries, which require frequent charging to meet the operational needs. Charging becomes a problem when a person relying on a mobility exoskeleton has to go outdoors for shopping or a leisure walk. Experimental data from on-going research to develop assistive mobility exoskeletons for elderly persons indicates that, the power required for exoskeletons is around 45–60 W which falls in the output range of hand-crank generators. So use of hand-crank generators as a charging source is discussed. In this work, we develop a mathematical model to investigate the potential of hand-crank devices in charging mobility exoskeletons and to give relation between input cranking speed and output charging power, and estimate the cranking time.

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of Intelligent Intention Estimation Algorithms for an Actuated Lower-Limb Exoskeleton

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    Mervin Chandrapal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the experimental testing of an actuated lower-limb exoskeleton. The exoskeleton is designed to alleviate the loading at the knee joint by supplying assistive torque. It is hypothesized that the support provided will reduce the muscular effort required to perform activities of daily living and thus facilitate the execution of these movements by those who previously had limited mobility. The exoskeleton is actuated by four pneumatic artificial muscles, each providing 150N of pulling force to assist in the flexion and extension of the knee joint. The exoskeleton system estimates the user's intended motion using muscle activity information recorded from five thigh muscles, together with the knee angle. To experimentally evaluate the performance of the device, the exoskeleton was worn by an able-bodied user, whilst performing the sit-to-stand-to-sit movement. In addition, the three intention estimation algorithms were also tested to determine the influence of the various algorithms on the support provided. The results show a significant reduction in the user's muscle activity (≈ 20% when assisted by the exoskeleton in a predictable manner.

  3. Design of a pneumatically powered wearable exoskeleton with biomimetic support and actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, A.; Alaraje, N.; Seidel, C.; Carlson, Z.; Breda, B.

    Powered exoskeletons are designed to assist and protect the wearer. Depending on the situation they may be used to protect soldiers and construction workers, aid the survival of people in dangerous environments, or assist patients in rehabilitation. Regardless of the application there are strict requirements for designing and producing exoskeleton suites. They must be durable but light weight and flexible, have reliable power control and modulation, capable of detecting unsafe and invalid motions, and may require significant weight lifting capabilities. In this article we present an on-going research on robotic exoskeleton replicating of human muscle functions. A single wearable knee-joint prototype described in this article combines the use of soft pneumatic muscle-like actuators and a control system based off the users own natural muscle signals. The Pneumatic Exoskeleton uses bioelectrical signals to detect movement intention from the pilot. This paper details the technical design aspects of a lower-limb robotic exoskeleton with possibility of further expansion to fully functioning robotic exoskeleton suit.

  4. Gait Phase Recognition for Lower-Limb Exoskeleton with Only Joint Angular Sensors

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    Du-Xin Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait phase is widely used for gait trajectory generation, gait control and gait evaluation on lower-limb exoskeletons. So far, a variety of methods have been developed to identify the gait phase for lower-limb exoskeletons. Angular sensors on lower-limb exoskeletons are essential for joint closed-loop controlling; however, other types of sensors, such as plantar pressure, attitude or inertial measurement unit, are not indispensable.Therefore, to make full use of existing sensors, we propose a novel gait phase recognition method for lower-limb exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors. The method consists of two procedures. Firstly, the gait deviation distances during walking are calculated and classified by Fisher’s linear discriminant method, and one gait cycle is divided into eight gait phases. The validity of the classification results is also verified based on large gait samples. Secondly, we build a gait phase recognition model based on multilayer perceptron and train it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result of cross-validation shows that the model has a 94.45% average correct rate of set (CRS and an 87.22% average correct rate of phase (CRP on the testing set, and it can predict the gait phase accurately. The novel method avoids installing additional sensors on the exoskeleton or human body and simplifies the sensory system of the lower-limb exoskeleton.

  5. Analysis of the Human Interaction with a Wearable Lower-Limb Exoskeleton

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    Juan C. Moreno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a wearable robotic exoskeleton needs to consider the interaction, either physical or cognitive, between the human user and the robotic device. This paper presents a method to analyse the interaction between the human user and a unilateral, wearable lower-limb exoskeleton. The lower-limb exoskeleton function was to compensate for muscle weakness around the knee joint. It is shown that the cognitive interaction is bidirectional; on the one hand, the robot gathered information from the sensors in order to detect human actions, such as the gait phases, but the subjects also modified their gait patterns to obtain the desired responses from the exoskeleton. The results of the two-phase evaluation of learning with healthy subjects and experiments with a patient case are presented, regarding the analysis of the interaction, assessed in terms of kinematics, kinetics and/or muscle recruitment. Human-driven response of the exoskeleton after training revealed the improvements in the use of the device, while particular modifications of motion patterns were observed in healthy subjects. Also, endurance (mechanical tests provided criteria to perform experiments with one post-polio patient. The results with the post-polio patient demonstrate the feasibility of providing gait compensation by means of the presented wearable exoskeleton, designed with a testing procedure that involves the human users to assess the human-robot interaction.

  6. Novel In-Shoe Exoskeleton for Offloading of Forefoot Pressure for Individuals With Diabetic Foot Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, Mark C; Canavan, Paul K; Najafi, Bijan; Cooper Watchman, Marcy; Vaishnav, Kairavi; Armstrong, David G

    2017-09-01

    Infected diabetic foot ulcers are the leading cause of lower limb amputation. This study evaluated the ability of in-shoe exoskeletons to redirect forces outside of body and through an exoskeleton as an effective means of offloading plantar pressure, the major contributing factor of ulceration. We compared pressure in the forefoot and hind-foot of participants (n = 5) shod with novel exoskeleton footwear. Plantar pressure readings were taken during a 6-m walk at participant's self-selected speed, and five strides were averaged. Results were taken with Achilles exotendon springs disengaged as a baseline, followed by measurements taken with the springs engaged. When springs were engaged, all participants demonstrated a decrease in forefoot pressure, averaging a 22% reduction ( P exoskeleton solution. Results suggest that when the novel exoskeletons were deployed in footwear and exotendon springs engaged, force was successfully transferred from the lower leg through the exoskeleton-enabled shoe to ground, reducing load on the forefoot. The results need to be confirmed in a larger sample. Another study is warranted to examine the effectiveness of this offloading to prevent diabetic foot ulcer, while minimizing gait alteration in daily physical activities.

  7. Gait Phase Recognition for Lower-Limb Exoskeleton with Only Joint Angular Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Du-Xin; Wu, Xinyu; Du, Wenbin; Wang, Can; Xu, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    Gait phase is widely used for gait trajectory generation, gait control and gait evaluation on lower-limb exoskeletons. So far, a variety of methods have been developed to identify the gait phase for lower-limb exoskeletons. Angular sensors on lower-limb exoskeletons are essential for joint closed-loop controlling; however, other types of sensors, such as plantar pressure, attitude or inertial measurement unit, are not indispensable.Therefore, to make full use of existing sensors, we propose a novel gait phase recognition method for lower-limb exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors. The method consists of two procedures. Firstly, the gait deviation distances during walking are calculated and classified by Fisher’s linear discriminant method, and one gait cycle is divided into eight gait phases. The validity of the classification results is also verified based on large gait samples. Secondly, we build a gait phase recognition model based on multilayer perceptron and train it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result of cross-validation shows that the model has a 94.45% average correct rate of set (CRS) and an 87.22% average correct rate of phase (CRP) on the testing set, and it can predict the gait phase accurately. The novel method avoids installing additional sensors on the exoskeleton or human body and simplifies the sensory system of the lower-limb exoskeleton. PMID:27690023

  8. Muscle-tendon mechanics explain unexpected effects of exoskeleton assistance on metabolic rate during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rachel W; Dembia, Christopher L; Delp, Scott L; Collins, Steven H

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study was to gain insight into how ankle exoskeletons affect the behavior of the plantarflexor muscles during walking. Using data from previous experiments, we performed electromyography-driven simulations of musculoskeletal dynamics to explore how changes in exoskeleton assistance affected plantarflexor muscle-tendon mechanics, particularly for the soleus. We used a model of muscle energy consumption to estimate individual muscle metabolic rate. As average exoskeleton torque was increased, while no net exoskeleton work was provided, a reduction in tendon recoil led to an increase in positive mechanical work performed by the soleus muscle fibers. As net exoskeleton work was increased, both soleus muscle fiber force and positive mechanical work decreased. Trends in the sum of the metabolic rates of the simulated muscles correlated well with trends in experimentally observed whole-body metabolic rate ( R 2 =0.9), providing confidence in our model estimates. Our simulation results suggest that different exoskeleton behaviors can alter the functioning of the muscles and tendons acting at the assisted joint. Furthermore, our results support the idea that the series tendon helps reduce positive work done by the muscle fibers by storing and returning energy elastically. We expect the results from this study to promote the use of electromyography-driven simulations to gain insight into the operation of muscle-tendon units and to guide the design and control of assistive devices. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Static and Dynamic Analysis in Design of Exoskeleton Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivánkova, Ol’ga; Méri, Dávid; Vojteková, Eva

    2017-10-01

    This paper introduces a numerical experiment of creating the load bearing system of a high rise building. When designing the high-rise building, it is always an important task to find the right proportion between the height of the building and its perceptive width from the various angles of street view. Investigated high rise building in this article was designed according to these criteria. The load bearing structure of the analysed object consists of a reinforced core, plates and steel tubes of an exoskeleton. Eight models of the building were created using the spatial variant of FEM in Scia Engineer Software. Individual models varied in number and dimensions of diagrids in the exoskeleton. In the models, loadings due to the own weight, weight of external glass cladding, and due to the wind according to the Standard, have been considered. The building was loaded by wind load from all four main directions with respect to its shape. Wind load was calculated using the 3D wind generator, which is a part of the Scia Engineer Software. For each model the static analysis was performed. Its most important criterion was the maximum or minimum horizontal displacement (rotation) of the highest point of the building. This displacement was compared with the limit values of the displacement of the analysed high-rise building. By step-by-step adding diagrids and optimizing their dimensions the building model was obtained that complied with the criteria of the Limit Serviceability State. The last model building was assessed also for the Ultimate Limit State. This model was loaded also by seismic loads for comparison with the load due to the wind.

  10. The effects of gait training using powered lower limb exoskeleton robot on individuals with complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Hua; Mao, Hui-Fen; Hu, Jwu-Sheng; Wang, Ting-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Jeng; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2018-03-05

    Powered exoskeleton can improve the mobility for people with movement deficits by providing mechanical support and facilitate the gait training. This pilot study evaluated the effect of gait training using a newly developed powered lower limb exoskeleton robot for individuals with complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Two participants with a complete SCI were recruited for this clinical study. The powered exoskeleton gait training was 8 weeks, 1 h per session, and 2 sessions per week. The evaluation was performed before and after the training for (1) the time taken by the user to don and doff the powered exoskeleton independently, (2) the level of exertion perceived by participants while using the powered exoskeleton, and (3) the mobility performance included the timed up-and-go test, 10-m walk test, and 6-min walk test with the powered exoskeleton. The safety of the powered exoskeleton was evaluated on the basis of injury reports and the incidence of falls or imbalance while using the device. The results indicated that the participants were donning and doffing the powered lower limb exoskeleton robot independently with a lower level of exertion and walked faster and farther without any injury or fall incidence when using the powered exoskeleton than when using a knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Bone mineral densities was also increased after the gait training. No adverse effects, such as skin abrasions, or discomfort were reported while using the powered exoskeleton. The findings demonstrated that individuals with complete SCI used the powered lower limb exoskeleton robot independently without any assistance after 8 weeks of powered exoskeleton gait training. Trial registration: National Taiwan University Hospital. 201210051RIB . Name of registry: Hui-Fen Mao. URL of registry: Not available. Date of registration: December 12th, 2012. Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: January 3rd, 2013.

  11. Transcriptome analysis on the exoskeleton formation in early developmetal stages and reconstruction scenario in growth-moulting in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Wei, Jiankai; Yuan, Jianbo; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2017-04-24

    Exoskeleton construction is an important issue in shrimp. To better understand the molecular mechanism of exoskeleton formation, development and reconstruction, the transcriptome of the entire developmental process in Litopenaeus vannamei, including nine early developmental stages and eight adult-moulting stages, was sequenced and analysed using Illumina RNA-seq technology. A total of 117,539 unigenes were obtained, with 41.2% unigenes predicting the full-length coding sequence. Gene Ontology, Clusters of Orthologous Group (COG), the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis and functional annotation of all unigenes gave a better understanding of the exoskeleton developmental process in L. vannamei. As a result, more than six hundred unigenes related to exoskeleton development were identified both in the early developmental stages and adult-moulting. A cascade of sequential expression events of exoskeleton-related genes were summarized, including exoskeleton formation, regulation, synthesis, degradation, mineral absorption/reabsorption, calcification and hardening. This new insight on major transcriptional events provide a deep understanding for exoskeleton formation and reconstruction in L. vannamei. In conclusion, this is the first study that characterized the integrated transcriptomic profiles cover the entire exoskeleton development from zygote to adult-moulting in a crustacean, and these findings will serve as significant references for exoskeleton developmental biology and aquaculture research.

  12. Análisis de irreversibilidades en el comportamiento de un motor Stirling // Analysis of irreversibilities on performance of a Stirling engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José González-Bayón

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio es determinar el efecto de las irreversibilidades (internas y externasdebidas a la transferencia de calor y las pérdidas de presión debidas a la fricción sobre elrendimiento de Segunda Ley de un motor Stirling de tipo considerando el volumen muerto. Elmotor Stirling es analizado usando un modelo matemático basado en las leyes de la termodinámicapara procesos con una velocidad finita. Se asume un modelo isotérmico de motor con volúmenes deespacio muerto en la zona caliente, zona fría y en el regenerador. Los resultados obtenidos muestranque a pesar de que teóricamente el motor Stirling posee un rendimiento igual al de Carnot, en lapráctica su rendimiento puede ser de 2 a 5 veces menor que éste, dependiendo de la eficiencia delregenerador, del volumen muerto, de la diferencia de temperatura entre fluido y focos térmicos y delas rpm a que se opere el motor.Palabras claves: motor Stirling, motor térmico regenerativo, análisis de irreversibilidades.____________________________________________________________________AbstractThe study aims to determine the effect of the internal and external irreversibilities caused by heattransfer and pressure losses due to friction on the Second Law performance of a Stirling engine tipewith death volume include. The Stirling engine is analyzed using a mathematical model based onthe laws of thermodynamics for processes with finite speed. It is assumed an isothermic model of themotor with death volume on hot zone, cold zone and regenerator. The results of this study show thatthe real cycle efficiency of the Sirling engine is approximately 2 to 5 times minor than the efficiency ofCarnot cycle as function of the regenerator efficiency, death volume, temperature difference betweenfluid and termic source and motor speed.Key words: stirling engine, regenerative heat engine, irreversibilities analysis.

  13. Investigacion experimental de la prestaciones de un motor monocilíndrico usando combustible diesel emulsionado; Experimental investigation of the single cylinder engine performance using emulsified diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Ahmed- Melo Espinosa y otros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available En esta investigación se realiza un análisis de las prestaciones y emisiones de un motor Petter mono-cilíndrico de inyección directa al usar como combustible una emulsión de 5% de agua, 2% de surfactante y combustible diesel. Los resultados obtenidos con la emulsión muestran un ligero incremento en el torque y la potencia efectiva, así como en el consumo específico de combustible y el retardo de la ignición. Respecto a las emisiones de gases contaminantes, los hidrocarburos noquemados (HC y el monóxido de carbono (CO para la emulsió aumentaron en comparación con los resultados obtenidos para el combustible diesel. En ambos casos, los aumentos son unaconsecuencia de la disminución de las temperaturas en el interior de la cámara de combustión, los aumentos en el retardo de la ignición y al enfriamiento de la llama.In this investigation an analysis based on the performances and emission of a Petter single cylinderdirect injection diesel engine when using an emulsion of 5% of water, 2% of surfactant and diesel fuel as fuel is carried out. The result obtained with the emulsion tested shown slight increase ineffective torque and power output, but also increases in brake specific fuel consumption and ignition delay. Concerning the exhausts, increases in hydrocarbons (HC and carbon monoxide(CO emissions for emulsion were obtained. In both cases the increases are due to the effect of lower temperatures inside the combustion chamber, longer ignition delays and quenching of theflame.

  14. Investigacion experimental de la prestaciones de un motor monocilíndrico usando combustible diesel emulsionado; Experimental investigation of the single cylinder engine performance using emulsified diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Ahmed Melo Espinosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available En esta investigación se realiza un análisis de las prestaciones y emisiones de un motor Petter mono-cilíndrico de inyección directa al usar como combustible una emulsión de 5% de agua, 2%de surfactante y combustible diesel. Los resultados obtenidos con la emulsión muestran un ligero incremento en el torque y la potencia efectiva, así como en el consumo específico de combustible y el retardo de la ignición. Respecto a las emisiones de gases contaminantes, los hidrocarburos noquemados (HC y el monóxido de carbono (CO para la emulsión aumentaron en comparación con los resultados obtenidos para el combustible diesel. En ambos casos, los aumentos son unaconsecuencia de la disminución de las temperaturas en el interior de la cámara de combustión, los aumentos en el retardo de la ignición y al enfriamiento de la llama. In this investigation an analysis based on the performances and emission of a Petter single cylinder direct injection diesel engine when using an emulsion of 5% of water, 2% of surfactant and dieselfuel as fuel is carried out. The result obtained with the emulsion tested shown slight increase in effective torque and power output, but also increases in brake specific fuel consumption and ignition delay. Concerning the exhausts, increases in hydrocarbons (HC and carbon monoxide(CO emissions for emulsion were obtained. In both cases the increases are due to the effect of lower temperatures inside the combustion chamber, longer ignition delays and quenching of the flame.

  15. Learning to walk with an adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller for a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Jeffrey R; Jacobs, Daniel A; Ferris, Daniel P; Remy, C David

    2015-11-04

    Robotic ankle exoskeletons can provide assistance to users and reduce metabolic power during walking. Our research group has investigated the use of proportional myoelectric control for controlling robotic ankle exoskeletons. Previously, these controllers have relied on a constant gain to map user's muscle activity to actuation control signals. A constant gain may act as a constraint on the user, so we designed a controller that dynamically adapts the gain to the user's myoelectric amplitude. We hypothesized that an adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller would reduce metabolic energy expenditure compared to walking with the ankle exoskeleton unpowered because users could choose their preferred control gain. We tested eight healthy subjects walking with the adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller with bilateral ankle exoskeletons. The adaptive gain was updated each stride such that on average the user's peak muscle activity was mapped to maximal power output of the exoskeleton. All subjects participated in three identical training sessions where they walked on a treadmill for 50 minutes (30 minutes of which the exoskeleton was powered) at 1.2 ms(-1). We calculated and analyzed metabolic energy consumption, muscle recruitment, inverse kinematics, inverse dynamics, and exoskeleton mechanics. Using our controller, subjects achieved a metabolic reduction similar to that seen in previous work in about a third of the training time. The resulting controller gain was lower than that seen in previous work (β=1.50±0.14 versus a constant β=2). The adapted gain allowed users more total ankle joint power than that of unassisted walking, increasing ankle power in exchange for a decrease in hip power. Our findings indicate that humans prefer to walk with greater ankle mechanical power output than their unassisted gait when provided with an ankle exoskeleton using an adaptive controller. This suggests that robotic assistance from an exoskeleton can allow

  16. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking during load carriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Many soldiers are expected to carry heavy loads over extended distances, often resulting in physical and mental fatigue. In this study, the design and testing of an autonomous leg exoskeleton is presented. The aim of the device is to reduce the energetic cost of loaded walking. In addition, we present the Augmentation Factor, a general framework of exoskeletal performance that unifies our results with the varying abilities of previously developed exoskeletons. Methods We developed an autonomous battery powered exoskeleton that is capable of providing substantial levels of positive mechanical power to the ankle during the push-off region of stance phase. We measured the metabolic energy consumption of seven subjects walking on a level treadmill at 1.5 m/s, while wearing a 23 kg vest. Results During the push-off portion of the stance phase, the exoskeleton applied positive mechanical power with an average across the gait cycle equal to 23 ± 2 W (11.5 W per ankle). Use of the autonomous leg exoskeleton significantly reduced the metabolic cost of walking by 36 ± 12 W, which was an improvement of 8 ± 3% (p = 0.025) relative to the control condition of not wearing the exoskeleton. Conclusions In the design of leg exoskeletons, the results of this study highlight the importance of minimizing exoskeletal power dissipation and added limb mass, while providing substantial positive power during the walking gait cycle. PMID:24885527

  17. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait.

  18. Enhancing performance during inclined loaded walking with a powered ankle-foot exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Samuel; Malcolm, Philippe; Derave, Wim; De Clercq, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    A simple ankle-foot exoskeleton that assists plantarflexion during push-off can reduce the metabolic power during walking. This suggests that walking performance during a maximal incremental exercise could be improved with an exoskeleton if the exoskeleton is still efficient during maximal exercise intensities. Therefore, we quantified the walking performance during a maximal incremental exercise test with a powered and unpowered exoskeleton: uphill walking with progressively higher weights. Nine female subjects performed two incremental exercise tests with an exoskeleton: 1 day with (powered condition) and another day without (unpowered condition) plantarflexion assistance. Subjects walked on an inclined treadmill (15%) at 5 km h(-1) and 5% of body weight was added every 3 min until exhaustion. At volitional termination no significant differences were found between the powered and unpowered condition for blood lactate concentration (respectively, 7.93 ± 2.49; 8.14 ± 2.24 mmol L(-1)), heart rate (respectively, 190.00 ± 6.50; 191.78 ± 6.50 bpm), Borg score (respectively, 18.57 ± 0.79; 18.93 ± 0.73) and VO₂ peak (respectively, 40.55 ± 2.78; 40.55 ± 3.05 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). Thus, subjects were able to reach the same (near) maximal effort in both conditions. However, subjects continued the exercise test longer in the powered condition and carried 7.07 ± 3.34 kg more weight because of the assistance of the exoskeleton. Our results show that plantarflexion assistance during push-off can increase walking performance during a maximal exercise test as subjects were able to carry more weight. This emphasizes the importance of acting on the ankle joint in assistive devices and the potential of simple ankle-foot exoskeletons for reducing metabolic power and increasing weight carrying capability, even during maximal intensities.

  19. A lower-extremity exoskeleton improves knee extension in children with crouch gait from cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Bulea, Thomas C

    2017-08-23

    The ability to walk contributes considerably to physical health and overall well-being, particularly in children with motor disability, and is therefore prioritized as a rehabilitation goal. However, half of ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP), the most prevalent childhood movement disorder, cease to walk in adulthood. Robotic gait trainers have shown positive outcomes in initial studies, but these clinic-based systems are limited to short-term programs of insufficient length to maintain improved function in a lifelong disability such as CP. Sophisticated wearable exoskeletons are now available, but their utility in treating childhood movement disorders remains unknown. We evaluated an exoskeleton for the treatment of crouch (or flexed-knee) gait, one of the most debilitating pathologies in CP. We show that the exoskeleton reduced crouch in a cohort of ambulatory children with CP during overground walking. The exoskeleton was safe and well tolerated, and all children were able to walk independently with the device. Rather than guiding the lower limbs, the exoskeleton dynamically changed the posture by introducing bursts of knee extension assistance during discrete portions of the walking cycle, a perturbation that resulted in maintained or increased knee extensor muscle activity during exoskeleton use. Six of seven participants exhibited postural improvements equivalent to outcomes reported from invasive orthopedic surgery. We also demonstrate that improvements in crouch increased over the course of our multiweek exploratory trial. Together, these results provide evidence supporting the use of wearable exoskeletons as a treatment strategy to improve walking in children with CP. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Distribution of magnesium and phosphorous in the H. americanus exoskeleton: Insights for chemical signatures in biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Ulrich, R. N.; Dove, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Crustacean exoskeletons provide a unique opportunity to study biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), a common intermediate phase in the biomineralization of invertebrate skeletons. The lobster exoskeleton is of particular interest as a complex biocomposite of organic matrix (primarily chitin) and CaCO3 mineral (ACC with minor calcite). This metastable ACC remarkably persists for up to one year. Previous investigations demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of Mg and P in the exoskeleton but a broader understanding of elemental signatures is limited. Despite the discrepancies, the data suggest anecdotal evidence for underlying systematic relationships. To test this idea, we designed a series of experiments that used three extraction procedures to isolate the mineral (ACC plus calcite) fraction from the organic (chitin and protein each) fractions for seven body parts of the lobster exoskeleton. A parallel structural study of the mineral component was conducted using high energy X-ray scattering. We confirm previous reports that the mineral component compromises ≈30% of the main body exoskeleton and is ≈85% ACC, with the remainder as calcite. Chelae (claws) contain a still-greater proportion of ACC (>90%). Measurements show the Mg, P, Ca concentrations in the bulk and mineral fractions are variable and body part-specific. However, the ratios of these elements are highly regulated at Mg/Ca ≈ 0.084±0.011 (n=108) and P/Ca ≈ 0.098±0.003 (n=108) for all body parts except the chelae, where Mg and P ratios relative to Ca are offset to higher values. There is no evidence of a separate phosphate phase. The mineral fraction dominates the bulk trends of total Mg and P. The systematic relationships reported here for the lobster exoskeleton hold promise for establishing compositional correlations between body parts for studies that lack complete animal samples. In addition, we compare composition ratios of four exoskeleton-forming species and find the Mg/Ca and P

  1. Bi-articular Knee-Ankle-Foot Exoskeleton Produces Higher Metabolic Cost Reduction than Weight-Matched Mono-articular Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Philippe; Galle, Samuel; Derave, Wim; De Clercq, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The bi-articular m. gastrocnemius and the mono-articular m. soleus have different and complementary functions during walking. Several groups are starting to use these biological functions as inspiration to design prostheses with bi-articular actuation components to replace the function of the m. gastrocnemius. Simulation studies indicate that a bi-articular configuration and spring that mimic the m. gastrocnemius could be beneficial for orthoses or exoskeletons. Our aim was to test the effect of a bi-articular and spring configuration that mimics the m. gastrocnemius and compare this to a no-spring and mono-articular configuration. We tested nine participants during walking with knee-ankle-foot exoskeletons with dorsally mounted pneumatic muscle actuators. In the bi-articular plus spring condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the thigh segment with an elastic cord. In the bi-articular no-spring condition the pneumatic muscles were also attached to the thigh segment but with a non-elastic cord. In the mono-articular condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the shank segment. We found the highest reduction in metabolic cost of 13% compared to walking with the exoskeleton powered-off in the bi-articular plus spring condition. Possible explanations for this could be that the exoskeleton delivered the highest total positive work in this condition at the ankle and the knee and provided more assistance during the isometric phase of the biological plantarflexors. As expected we found that the bi-articular conditions reduced m. gastrocnemius EMG more than the mono-articular condition but this difference was not significant. We did not find that the mono-articular condition reduces the m. soleus EMG more than the bi-articular conditions. Knowledge of specific effects of different exoskeleton configurations on metabolic cost and muscle activation could be useful for providing customized assistance for specific gait impairments. PMID:29551959

  2. Bi-articular Knee-Ankle-Foot Exoskeleton Produces Higher Metabolic Cost Reduction than Weight-Matched Mono-articular Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Malcolm

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The bi-articular m. gastrocnemius and the mono-articular m. soleus have different and complementary functions during walking. Several groups are starting to use these biological functions as inspiration to design prostheses with bi-articular actuation components to replace the function of the m. gastrocnemius. Simulation studies indicate that a bi-articular configuration and spring that mimic the m. gastrocnemius could be beneficial for orthoses or exoskeletons. Our aim was to test the effect of a bi-articular and spring configuration that mimics the m. gastrocnemius and compare this to a no-spring and mono-articular configuration. We tested nine participants during walking with knee-ankle-foot exoskeletons with dorsally mounted pneumatic muscle actuators. In the bi-articular plus spring condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the thigh segment with an elastic cord. In the bi-articular no-spring condition the pneumatic muscles were also attached to the thigh segment but with a non-elastic cord. In the mono-articular condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the shank segment. We found the highest reduction in metabolic cost of 13% compared to walking with the exoskeleton powered-off in the bi-articular plus spring condition. Possible explanations for this could be that the exoskeleton delivered the highest total positive work in this condition at the ankle and the knee and provided more assistance during the isometric phase of the biological plantarflexors. As expected we found that the bi-articular conditions reduced m. gastrocnemius EMG more than the mono-articular condition but this difference was not significant. We did not find that the mono-articular condition reduces the m. soleus EMG more than the bi-articular conditions. Knowledge of specific effects of different exoskeleton configurations on metabolic cost and muscle activation could be useful for providing customized assistance for specific gait impairments.

  3. Bi-articular Knee-Ankle-Foot Exoskeleton Produces Higher Metabolic Cost Reduction than Weight-Matched Mono-articular Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Philippe; Galle, Samuel; Derave, Wim; De Clercq, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The bi-articular m. gastrocnemius and the mono-articular m. soleus have different and complementary functions during walking. Several groups are starting to use these biological functions as inspiration to design prostheses with bi-articular actuation components to replace the function of the m. gastrocnemius. Simulation studies indicate that a bi-articular configuration and spring that mimic the m. gastrocnemius could be beneficial for orthoses or exoskeletons. Our aim was to test the effect of a bi-articular and spring configuration that mimics the m. gastrocnemius and compare this to a no-spring and mono-articular configuration. We tested nine participants during walking with knee-ankle-foot exoskeletons with dorsally mounted pneumatic muscle actuators. In the bi-articular plus spring condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the thigh segment with an elastic cord. In the bi-articular no-spring condition the pneumatic muscles were also attached to the thigh segment but with a non-elastic cord. In the mono-articular condition the pneumatic muscles were attached to the shank segment. We found the highest reduction in metabolic cost of 13% compared to walking with the exoskeleton powered-off in the bi-articular plus spring condition . Possible explanations for this could be that the exoskeleton delivered the highest total positive work in this condition at the ankle and the knee and provided more assistance during the isometric phase of the biological plantarflexors. As expected we found that the bi-articular conditions reduced m. gastrocnemius EMG more than the mono-articular condition but this difference was not significant. We did not find that the mono-articular condition reduces the m. soleus EMG more than the bi-articular conditions . Knowledge of specific effects of different exoskeleton configurations on metabolic cost and muscle activation could be useful for providing customized assistance for specific gait impairments.

  4. Electromagnetic model of a three phase induction motor using finite elements; Modelo electromagnetico de un motor de induccion trifasico usando elementos finitos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvalcaba Marquez, Carlos

    2003-02-15

    This thesis shows a non-linear electromagnetic analysis of a three-phase induction machine using the two-dimensional finite element method (2D FEM). It is necessary to solve the diffusion equation to obtain the average magnetic vector potential of the FE machine model. The solution of this equation gives the induced eddy currents locally or globally inside the FE machine model. The induction machine is rated at 2.2 kw, 220 V, 60 Hz, and it can handle two different speeds, 1750/1150 rpm with a current consumption of 9.6/11.0 A, respectively. This machine is at the Laboratorio de Propulsion of the Instituto Tecnologico de la Laguna. The eddy currents induced in the conducting material appear because the FE model of the machine model is supplied by a sinusoidal current; finally, the depth penetration factor is considered on the FE mesh to achieve a better skin effect representation. [Spanish] En este trabajo de tesis se realiza un analisis electromagnetico no lineal de un motor de induccion trifasico empleando el metodo del elemento finito en dos dimensiones. De manera especifica, se calcula el potencial magnetico vectorial promedio del modelo de elemento finito del motor mediante la solucion de la ecuacion de difusion. Al resolver la ecuacion de difusion se obtiene la densidad de corrientes de eddy que se inducen ya sea en sentido local o global en el modelo del motor. El motor de induccion analizado esta disenado para operar a dos velocidades, 1750/1150 rpm, tiene una capacidad de 2.2 kW, 220 V, 9.6/11.0 A, 60 Hz, y se encuentra instalado en el Laboratorio de Propulsion del Instituto Tecnologico de la Laguna. Debido a que el modelo electromagnetico del motor de induccion es alimentado por una fuente de corriente senoidal, se tiene una induccion de corrientes de eddy en el material conductor. En el diseno de la malla se considero el factor de penetracion para lograr una mejor representacion del efecto piel.

  5. Electromagnetic modeling of the rings of the squirrel cage of an induction motor; Modelado electromagnetico de los anillos de la jaula de ardilla de un motor de induccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limones Montoya, Juan Carlos

    2004-03-15

    An electromagnetic lineal model of a three-phase induction motor was developed in this thesis. The Finite element method in two dimensions was used. The model formulation takes into account the coupling with the stator wires and solid conductors of the rotor. In other words, the stator phases and squirrel-cage end-rings are considered in the model. The resulting set of electric-circuit and magnetic-field equations are solved simultaneously with the Incomplete Cholesky Bi-Conjugate Gradient Method using a matrix storage technique known as symmetric coordinate storage. The model was programmed in the C programming language. The magnetic field model is represented by the diffusion equation, which allows to compute the induced Eddy currents in the conducting material due to the sinusoidal stator excitation. The modelled induction motor has a rated power of 2.2 kW, 220 V, 9.6/11.0 A, 60 Hz and it can be operated at the speeds of 1750/1150 rpm. It is located in the Laboratorio de Propulsion at the Instituto Tecnologico de la Laguna. [Spanish] En este trabajo de tesis se desarrollo un modelo electromagnetico lineal de un motor de induccion trifasico utilizando el Metodo de Elemento Finito en dos dimensiones, en el cual se incluye la formulacion de sistemas acoplados para los conductores delgados y gruesos presentes en el estator y rotor respectivamente. Es decir, se incluyen en el modelo las fases de alimentacion y los anillos de cortocircuito del rotor de jaula de ardilla. Las ecuaciones electricas y magneticas derivadas del modelo se resuelven de manera acoplada con el Metodo del Gradiente BiConjugado con Precondicionamiento de Cholesky Incompleto empleando el sistema de Empaquetamiento de Coordenadas, cuyo codigo se desarrollo en el lenguaje de programacion C. En este modelo se resuelve la ecuacion de difusion, mediante la cual se determinan las corrientes de Eddy que se inducen en el material conductor debido a la presencia de fuentes de alimentacion senoidales. El

  6. Diagnostico de un motor de gasolina de cuatro cilindros mediante el análisis de vibraciones//Diagnostic of a four cylinder gasoline engine using vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Andrés-Grajales

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta el análisis de vibraciones de un motor de combustión interna, operando con diferentes mezclas de combustible, para identificar condiciones de operación con falla, utilizando un banco de pruebas y la falla estudiada fue el “misfire”. Tres mezclas de combustible fueron probadas: E8, E20 y E30. Aplicando la transformada rápida de Fourier a las señales, se compararon las condiciones de operación normal y con falla entre combustibles, buscando componentes de frecuencia característicos para evaluar la validez de los estudios realizados hasta ahora en gasolina pura. Los resultados muestran que el comportamiento utilizando las diferentes mezclas de combustible es similar al reportado con gasolina pura, y los componentes de frecuencia que diferencian la condición normal y con falla también están presentes en las mezclas de combustible. Se extrajeron características estadísticas de las señales en el dominio de la frecuencia para simplificar el proceso de identificación. Palabras clave: motor de combustión interna, vibraciones, detección de fallas, problema de encendido, mezclas gasolina-etanol.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThis paper presents the vibration analysis of an internal combustion engine, using different fuel blends, to identify fault operating conditions. A purpose built engine test bench was used and the fault studied was misfire. Three fuel blends were used: E8, E20 and E30. Fast Fourier transform was applied to the signals. A comparison between normal and faulty operating conditions was carried with every fuel used, looking for characteristic frequency components, to assess the validity of past studies on misfire performed on pure gasoline. The results show that the behavior using the different fuel blends is similar to the one reported on pure gasoline, and that the frequency components that differentiate normal and faulty conditions are also

  7. Adaptive Control of Exoskeleton Robots for Periodic Assistive Behaviours Based on EMG Feedback Minimisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Peternel

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an exoskeleton control method for adaptive learning of assistive joint torque profiles in periodic tasks. We use human muscle activity as feedback to adapt the assistive joint torque behaviour in a way that the muscle activity is minimised. The user can then relax while the exoskeleton takes over the task execution. If the task is altered and the existing assistive behaviour becomes inadequate, the exoskeleton gradually adapts to the new task execution so that the increased muscle activity caused by the new desired task can be reduced. The advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require biomechanical or dynamical models. Our proposed learning system uses Dynamical Movement Primitives (DMPs as a trajectory generator and parameters of DMPs are modulated using Locally Weighted Regression. Then, the learning system is combined with adaptive oscillators that determine the phase and frequency of motion according to measured Electromyography (EMG signals. We tested the method with real robot experiments where subjects wearing an elbow exoskeleton had to move an object of an unknown mass according to a predefined reference motion. We further evaluated the proposed approach on a whole-arm exoskeleton to show that it is able to adaptively derive assistive torques even for multiple-joint motion.

  8. Adaptive Control of Exoskeleton Robots for Periodic Assistive Behaviours Based on EMG Feedback Minimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternel, Luka; Noda, Tomoyuki; Petrič, Tadej; Ude, Aleš; Morimoto, Jun; Babič, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose an exoskeleton control method for adaptive learning of assistive joint torque profiles in periodic tasks. We use human muscle activity as feedback to adapt the assistive joint torque behaviour in a way that the muscle activity is minimised. The user can then relax while the exoskeleton takes over the task execution. If the task is altered and the existing assistive behaviour becomes inadequate, the exoskeleton gradually adapts to the new task execution so that the increased muscle activity caused by the new desired task can be reduced. The advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require biomechanical or dynamical models. Our proposed learning system uses Dynamical Movement Primitives (DMPs) as a trajectory generator and parameters of DMPs are modulated using Locally Weighted Regression. Then, the learning system is combined with adaptive oscillators that determine the phase and frequency of motion according to measured Electromyography (EMG) signals. We tested the method with real robot experiments where subjects wearing an elbow exoskeleton had to move an object of an unknown mass according to a predefined reference motion. We further evaluated the proposed approach on a whole-arm exoskeleton to show that it is able to adaptively derive assistive torques even for multiple-joint motion. PMID:26881743

  9. Enhancing brain-machine interface (BMI) control of a hand exoskeleton using electrooculography (EOG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Matthias; Cortese, Mario; Cempini, Marco; Mellinger, Jürgen; Vitiello, Nicola; Soekadar, Surjo R

    2014-12-16

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) allow direct translation of electric, magnetic or metabolic brain signals into control commands of external devices such as robots, prostheses or exoskeletons. However, non-stationarity of brain signals and susceptibility to biological or environmental artifacts impede reliable control and safety of BMIs, particularly in daily life environments. Here we introduce and tested a novel hybrid brain-neural computer interaction (BNCI) system fusing electroencephalography (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) to enhance reliability and safety of continuous hand exoskeleton-driven grasping motions. 12 healthy volunteers (8 male, mean age 28.1 ± 3.63y) used EEG (condition #1) and hybrid EEG/EOG (condition #2) signals to control a hand exoskeleton. Motor imagery-related brain activity was translated into exoskeleton-driven hand closing motions. Unintended motions could be interrupted by eye movement-related EOG signals. In order to evaluate BNCI control and safety, participants were instructed to follow a visual cue indicating either to move or not to move the hand exoskeleton in a random order. Movements exceeding 25% of a full grasping motion when the device was not supposed to be moved were defined as safety violation. While participants reached comparable control under both conditions, safety was frequently violated under condition #1 (EEG), but not under condition #2 (EEG/EOG). EEG/EOG biosignal fusion can substantially enhance safety of assistive BNCI systems improving their applicability in daily life environments.

  10. Implementation of a Surface Electromyography-Based Upper Extremity Exoskeleton Controller Using Learning from Demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Chit Siu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Upper-extremity exoskeletons have demonstrated potential as augmentative, assistive, and rehabilitative devices. Typical control of upper-extremity exoskeletons have relied on switches, force/torque sensors, and surface electromyography (sEMG, but these systems are usually reactionary, and/or rely on entirely hand-tuned parameters. sEMG-based systems may be able to provide anticipatory control, since they interface directly with muscle signals, but typically require expert placement of sensors on muscle bodies. We present an implementation of an adaptive sEMG-based exoskeleton controller that learns a mapping between muscle activation and the desired system state during interaction with a user, generating a personalized sEMG feature classifier to allow for anticipatory control. This system is robust to novice placement of sEMG sensors, as well as subdermal muscle shifts. We validate this method with 18 subjects using a thumb exoskeleton to complete a book-placement task. This learning-from-demonstration system for exoskeleton control allows for very short training times, as well as the potential for improvement in intent recognition over time, and adaptation to physiological changes in the user, such as those due to fatigue.

  11. Feasibility and reliability of using an exoskeleton to emulate muscle contractures during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, M; Bonnefoy-Mazure, A; De Coulon, G; Cheze, L; Armand, S

    2016-10-01

    Contracture is a permanent shortening of the muscle-tendon-ligament complex that limits joint mobility. Contracture is involved in many diseases (cerebral palsy, stroke, etc.) and can impair walking and other activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reliability of an exoskeleton designed to emulate lower limb muscle contractures unilaterally and bilaterally during walking. An exoskeleton was built according to the following design criteria: adjustable to different morphologies; respect of the principal lines of muscular actions; placement of reflective markers on anatomical landmarks; and the ability to replicate the contractures of eight muscles of the lower limb unilaterally and bilaterally (psoas, rectus femoris, hamstring, hip adductors, gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis posterior, and peroneus). Sixteen combinations of contractures were emulated on the unilateral and bilateral muscles of nine healthy participants. Two sessions of gait analysis were performed at weekly intervals to assess the reliability of the emulated contractures. Discrete variables were extracted from the kinematics to analyse the reliability. The exoskeleton did not affect normal walking when contractures were not emulated. Kinematic reliability varied from poor to excellent depending on the targeted muscle. Reliability was good for the bilateral and unilateral gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis posterior as well as the bilateral hamstring and unilateral hip adductors. The exoskeleton can be used to replicate contracture on healthy participants. The exoskeleton will allow us to differentiate primary and compensatory effects of muscle contractures on gait kinematics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptive Control of Exoskeleton Robots for Periodic Assistive Behaviours Based on EMG Feedback Minimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternel, Luka; Noda, Tomoyuki; Petrič, Tadej; Ude, Aleš; Morimoto, Jun; Babič, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose an exoskeleton control method for adaptive learning of assistive joint torque profiles in periodic tasks. We use human muscle activity as feedback to adapt the assistive joint torque behaviour in a way that the muscle activity is minimised. The user can then relax while the exoskeleton takes over the task execution. If the task is altered and the existing assistive behaviour becomes inadequate, the exoskeleton gradually adapts to the new task execution so that the increased muscle activity caused by the new desired task can be reduced. The advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require biomechanical or dynamical models. Our proposed learning system uses Dynamical Movement Primitives (DMPs) as a trajectory generator and parameters of DMPs are modulated using Locally Weighted Regression. Then, the learning system is combined with adaptive oscillators that determine the phase and frequency of motion according to measured Electromyography (EMG) signals. We tested the method with real robot experiments where subjects wearing an elbow exoskeleton had to move an object of an unknown mass according to a predefined reference motion. We further evaluated the proposed approach on a whole-arm exoskeleton to show that it is able to adaptively derive assistive torques even for multiple-joint motion.

  13. Initial Outcomes from a Multicenter Study Utilizing the Indego Powered Exoskeleton in Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefertiller, Candy; Hays, Kaitlin; Jones, Janell; Jayaraman, Arun; Hartigan, Clare; Bushnik, Tamara; Forrest, Gail F

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To assess safety and mobility outcomes utilizing the Indego powered exoskeleton in indoor and outdoor walking conditions with individuals previously diagnosed with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: We conducted a multicenter prospective observational cohort study in outpatient clinics associated with 5 rehabilitation hospitals. A convenience sample of nonambulatory individuals with SCI ( N = 32) completed an 8-week training protocol consisting of walking training 3 times per week utilizing the Indego powered exoskeleton in indoor and outdoor conditions. Participants were also trained in donning/doffing the exoskeleton during each session. Safety measures such as adverse events (AEs) were monitored and reported. Time and independence with donning/doffing the exoskeleton as well as walking outcomes to include the 10-meter walk test (10MWT), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Timed Up & Go test (TUG), and 600-meter walk test were evaluated from midpoint to final evaluations. Results: All 32 participants completed the training protocol with limited device-related AEs, which resulted in no interruption in training. The majority of participants in this trial were able to don and doff the Indego independently. Final walking speed ranged from 0.19 to 0.55 m/s. Final average indoor and outdoor walking speeds among all participants were 0.37 m/s ( SD = 0.08, 0.09, respectively), after 8 weeks of training. Significant ( p exoskeleton.

  14. Implementation of a Surface Electromyography-Based Upper Extremity Exoskeleton Controller Using Learning from Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Ana M.; Sun, Tingxiao

    2018-01-01

    Upper-extremity exoskeletons have demonstrated potential as augmentative, assistive, and rehabilitative devices. Typical control of upper-extremity exoskeletons have relied on switches, force/torque sensors, and surface electromyography (sEMG), but these systems are usually reactionary, and/or rely on entirely hand-tuned parameters. sEMG-based systems may be able to provide anticipatory control, since they interface directly with muscle signals, but typically require expert placement of sensors on muscle bodies. We present an implementation of an adaptive sEMG-based exoskeleton controller that learns a mapping between muscle activation and the desired system state during interaction with a user, generating a personalized sEMG feature classifier to allow for anticipatory control. This system is robust to novice placement of sEMG sensors, as well as subdermal muscle shifts. We validate this method with 18 subjects using a thumb exoskeleton to complete a book-placement task. This learning-from-demonstration system for exoskeleton control allows for very short training times, as well as the potential for improvement in intent recognition over time, and adaptation to physiological changes in the user, such as those due to fatigue. PMID:29401754

  15. Adaptive control based on an on-line parameter estimation of an upper limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riani, Akram; Madani, Tarek; Hadri, Abdelhafid El; Benallegue, Abdelaziz

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control strategy for an upper-limb exoskeleton based on an on-line dynamic parameter estimator. The objective is to improve the control performance of this system that plays a critical role in assisting patients for shoulder, elbow and wrist joint movements. In general, the dynamic parameters of the human limb are unknown and differ from a person to another, which degrade the performances of the exoskeleton-human control system. For this reason, the proposed control scheme contains a supplementary loop based on a new efficient on-line estimator of the dynamic parameters. Indeed, the latter is acting upon the parameter adaptation of the controller to ensure the performances of the system in the presence of parameter uncertainties and perturbations. The exoskeleton used in this work is presented and a physical model of the exoskeleton interacting with a 7 Degree of Freedom (DoF) upper limb model is generated using the SimMechanics library of MatLab/Simulink. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an example of passive rehabilitation movements is performed using multi-body dynamic simulation. The aims is to maneuver the exoskeleton that drive the upper limb to track desired trajectories in the case of the passive arm movements.

  16. Robust Sliding Mode Control Based on GA Optimization and CMAC Compensation for Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yi; Du, Zhi-Jiang; Wang, Wei-Dong; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A lower limb assistive exoskeleton is designed to help operators walk or carry payloads. The exoskeleton is required to shadow human motion intent accurately and compliantly to prevent incoordination. If the user's intention is estimated accurately, a precise position control strategy will improve collaboration between the user and the exoskeleton. In this paper, a hybrid position control scheme, combining sliding mode control (SMC) with a cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) neural network, is proposed to control the exoskeleton to react appropriately to human motion intent. A genetic algorithm (GA) is utilized to determine the optimal sliding surface and the sliding control law to improve performance of SMC. The proposed control strategy (SMC_GA_CMAC) is compared with three other types of approaches, that is, conventional SMC without optimization, optimal SMC with GA (SMC_GA), and SMC with CMAC compensation (SMC_CMAC), all of which are employed to track the desired joint angular position which is deduced from Clinical Gait Analysis (CGA) data. Position tracking performance is investigated with cosimulation using ADAMS and MATLAB/SIMULINK in two cases, of which the first case is without disturbances while the second case is with a bounded disturbance. The cosimulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy which can be employed in similar exoskeleton systems.

  17. The effects of a passive exoskeleton on muscle activity, discomfort and endurance time in forward bending work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Tim; van Eck, Jennifer; Knitel, Karlijn; de Looze, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Exoskeletons may form a new strategy to reduce the risk of developing low back pain in stressful jobs. In the present study we examined the potential of a so-called passive exoskeleton on muscle activity, discomfort and endurance time in prolonged forward-bended working postures.Eighteen subjects

  18. Design of a Walking Assistance Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Paraplegic Patients and Hardware Validation Using CoP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hoon Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The design of an assistive lower limb exoskeleton robot for paraplegic patients that can measure the centre of pressure is presented. In contrast with most biped walking robots, the centre of pressure (CoP or zero moment point (ZMP has not been actively used in the operation of exoskeleton robots. In order to measure CoP in our exoskeleton robot, two kinds of force sensor units are installed in the exoskeleton: low profile force sensors in foot modules to measure the human weight transferred to the ground and a load cell at the shank frame to measure the supporting force. The CoP of the exoskeleton robot is calculated from the above force sensors, an inclinometer at the waist, and the positions of 14 DOF exoskeleton joints with an algorithm to change the fixed pivot using a foot contact sensor. Experiments on an able-bodied person wearing the designed exoskeleton and walking on the ground are performed to validate the designed hardware system. Through the experiments, the trajectory of the CoP of the exoskeleton with a wearer are calculated based on the proposed algorithm and it is compared with the value measured by a commercial pressure measurement system.

  19. Balancing Control of AIT Leg Exoskeleton Using ZMP based FLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narong Aphiratsakun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the use of Zero Moment Point (ZMP concept for balancing control of the Asian Institute of Technology Leg EXoskeleton-I (ALEX-I. ALEX-I has been developed to assist patients who suffer from paraplegia or immobility due to the loss of power on lower limbs. The balanced posture set-points (joint trajectories under ZMP criterion are generated offline. The ZMP based set points are provided as the desired postures to ALEX-I. Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC determines the modified set points based on postures balancing sensed by loadcells. Ground Contact Point (GCP is used to find the “ZMP-like in real time”. GCP data is obtained by placing 4 loadcells forming a force plate on each foot of ALEX-I. This GCP data is then compared with the reference ZMP. Uncertainties of the model parameters, backlash, and joint tolerance are considered as disturbance. The differences of ZMP and GCP on x-z plane are used as the inputs to the FLC. The 4 outputs from FLC are the compensated angles of left and right ankles joints in roll and pitch axes that make the actual ZMP locate in the convex hull of the supporting area.

  20. A Bioinspired 10 DOF Wearable Powered Arm Exoskeleton for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Kanti Manna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed exoskeleton device (Exorn has ten degrees of freedom to control joints starting from shoulder griddle to wrist to provide better redundancy, portability, and flexibility to the human arm motion. A 3D conceptual model is being designed to make the system wearable by human arm. All the joints are simple revolute joints with desired motion limit. A Simulink model of the human arm is being developed with proper mass and length to determine proper torque required for actuating those joints. Forward kinematics of the whole system has been formulated for getting desired dexterous workspace. A proper and simple Graphical User Interface (GUI and the required embedded system have been designed for providing physiotherapy lessons to the patients. In the literature review it has been found that researchers have generally ignored the motion of shoulder griddle. Here we have implemented those motions in our design. It has also been found that people have taken elbow pronation and supination motion as a part of shoulder internal and external rotation though both motions are quite different. A predefined resolved motion rate control structure with independent joint control is used so that all movements can be controlled in a predefined way.

  1. A multi-DOF robotic exoskeleton interface for hand motion assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Jamshed; Tsagarakis, Nikos G; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the design and development of a robotic exoskeleton based rehabilitation system. A portable direct-driven optimized hand exoskeleton system has been proposed. The optimization procedure primarily based on matching the exoskeleton and finger workspaces guided the system design. The selection of actuators for the proposed system has emerged as a result of experiments with users of different hand sizes. Using commercial sensors, various hand parameters, e.g. maximum and average force levels have been measured. The results of these experiments have been mapped directly to the mechanical design of the system. An under-actuated optimum mechanism has been analysed followed by the design and realization of the first prototype. The system provides both position and force feedback sensory information which can improve the outcomes of a professional rehabilitation exercise.

  2. Right-Arm Robotic-Aided-Therapy with the Light-Exoskeleton: A General Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Villeda, Luis I.; Frisoli, Antonio; Sotgiu, Edoardo; Greco, Giovanni; Bergamasco, Massimo

    Rehabilitation robotics applications and their developments have been spreading out as consequences of the actual needs in the human activities of daily living (ADL). Exoskeletons for rehabilitation are one of them, whose intrinsic characteristics are quite useful for applications where repetitive, robustness and accurate performance are a must. As a part of robotic-mediated-rehabilitation programme into the worldwide, the exoskeletons are trying to improve the ADL of disable people through the fusion of several disciplines that lets to expand the capabilities of wearing a powered robotic exoskeletal device for rehabilitation tasks. This fact deserves to present this contribution from a general scope point of view, i.e., the technologies integration and its associated knowledge. So far, the Light-Exoskeleton which is intended for human arm rehabilitation in post-stroke patients is introduced. Preliminary experimental results as well as the involved stages about the system show the capabilities of using a robotic-constrained-rehabilitation for human arm.

  3. Intrinsic Sensing and Evolving Internal Model Control of Compact Elastic Module for a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To achieve strength augmentation, endurance enhancement, and human assistance in a functional autonomous exoskeleton, control precision, back drivability, low output impedance, and mechanical compactness are desired. In our previous work, two elastic modules were designed for human–robot interaction sensing and compliant control, respectively. According to the intrinsic sensing properties of the elastic module, in this paper, only one compact elastic module is applied to realize both purposes. Thus, the corresponding control strategy is required and evolving internal model control is proposed to address this issue. Moreover, the input signal to the controller is derived from the deflection of the compact elastic module. The human–robot interaction is considered as the disturbance which is approximated by the output error between the exoskeleton control plant and evolving forward learning model. Finally, to verify our proposed control scheme, several experiments are conducted with our robotic exoskeleton system. The experiment shows a satisfying result and promising application feasibility.

  4. Exoskeleton may influence the internal body temperatures of Neotropical dung beetles (Col. Scarabaeinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Amore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The insect exoskeleton is a multifunctional coat with a continuum of mechanical and structural properties constituting the barrier between electromagnetic waves and the internal body parts. This paper examines the ability of beetle exoskeleton to regulate internal body temperature considering its thermal permeability or isolation to simulated solar irradiance and infrared radiation. Seven Neotropical species of dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae differing in colour, surface sculptures, size, sexual dimorphism, period of activity, guild category and altitudinal distribution were studied. Specimens were repeatedly subjected to heating trials under simulated solar irradiance and infrared radiation using a halogen neodymium bulb light with a balanced daylight spectrum and a ceramic infrared heat emitter. The volume of exoskeleton and its weight per volume unit were significantly more important for the heating rate at the beginning of the heating process than for the asymptotic maximum temperature reached at the end of the trials: larger beetles with relatively thicker exoskeletons heated more slowly. The source of radiation greatly influences the asymptotic temperature reached, but has a negligible effect in determining the rate of heat gain by beetles: they reached higher temperatures under artificial sunlight than under infrared radiation. Interspecific differences were negligible in the heating rate but had a large magnitude effect on the asymptotic temperature, only detectable under simulated sun irradiance. The fact that sun irradiance is differentially absorbed dorsally and transformed into heat among species opens the possibility that differences in dorsal exoskeleton would facilitate the heat gain under restrictive environmental temperatures below the preferred ones. The findings provided by this study support the important role played by the exoskeleton in the heating process of beetles, a cuticle able to act passively in the thermal

  5. Risk management and regulations for lower limb medical exoskeletons: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yongtian He, David Eguren, Trieu Phat Luu, Jose L Contreras-Vidal Laboratory for Noninvasive Brain-Machine Interface Systems, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Gait disability is a major health care problem worldwide. Powered exoskeletons have recently emerged as devices that can enable users with gait disabilities to ambulate in an upright posture, and potentially bring other clinical benefits. In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved marketing of the ReWalk™ Personal Exoskeleton as a class II medical device with special controls. Since then, Indego™ and Ekso™ have also received regulatory approval. With similar trends worldwide, this industry is likely to grow rapidly. On the other hand, the regulatory science of powered exoskeletons is still developing. The type and extent of probable risks of these devices are yet to be understood, and industry standards are yet to be developed. To address this gap, Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience, Clinicaltrials.gov, and PubMed databases were searched for reports of adverse events and inclusion and exclusion criteria involving the use of lower limb powered exoskeletons. Current inclusion and exclusion criteria, which can determine probable risks, were found to be diverse. Reported adverse events and identified risks of current devices are also wide-ranging. In light of these findings, current regulations, standards, and regulatory procedures for medical device applications in the USA, Europe, and Japan were also compared. There is a need to raise awareness of probable risks associated with the use of powered exoskeletons and to develop adequate countermeasures, standards, and regulations for these human–machine systems. With appropriate risk mitigation strategies, adequate standards, comprehensive reporting of adverse events, and regulatory oversight, powered exoskeletons may one day allow individuals

  6. Learning by Demonstration for Motion Planning of Upper-Limb Exoskeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, Clemente; Cordella, Francesca; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Trigili, Emilio; Catalan, Jose Maria; Badesa, Francisco Javier; Crea, Simona; Pagliara, Silvio Marcello; Sterzi, Silvia; Vitiello, Nicola; Garcia Aracil, Nicolas; Zollo, Loredana

    2018-01-01

    The reference joint position of upper-limb exoskeletons is typically obtained by means of Cartesian motion planners and inverse kinematics algorithms with the inverse Jacobian; this approach allows exploiting the available Degrees of Freedom (i.e. DoFs) of the robot kinematic chain to achieve the desired end-effector pose; however, if used to operate non-redundant exoskeletons, it does not ensure that anthropomorphic criteria are satisfied in the whole human-robot workspace. This paper proposes a motion planning system, based on Learning by Demonstration, for upper-limb exoskeletons that allow successfully assisting patients during Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) in unstructured environment, while ensuring that anthropomorphic criteria are satisfied in the whole human-robot workspace. The motion planning system combines Learning by Demonstration with the computation of Dynamic Motion Primitives and machine learning techniques to construct task- and patient-specific joint trajectories based on the learnt trajectories. System validation was carried out in simulation and in a real setting with a 4-DoF upper-limb exoskeleton, a 5-DoF wrist-hand exoskeleton and four patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy. Validation was addressed to (i) compare the performance of the proposed motion planning with traditional methods; (ii) assess the generalization capabilities of the proposed method with respect to the environment variability. Three ADLs were chosen to validate the system: drinking, pouring and lifting a light sphere. The achieved results showed a 100% success rate in the task fulfillment, with a high level of generalization with respect to the environment variability. Moreover, an anthropomorphic configuration of the exoskeleton is always ensured. PMID:29527161

  7. Learning by Demonstration for Motion Planning of Upper-Limb Exoskeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Lauretti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The reference joint position of upper-limb exoskeletons is typically obtained by means of Cartesian motion planners and inverse kinematics algorithms with the inverse Jacobian; this approach allows exploiting the available Degrees of Freedom (i.e. DoFs of the robot kinematic chain to achieve the desired end-effector pose; however, if used to operate non-redundant exoskeletons, it does not ensure that anthropomorphic criteria are satisfied in the whole human-robot workspace. This paper proposes a motion planning system, based on Learning by Demonstration, for upper-limb exoskeletons that allow successfully assisting patients during Activities of Daily Living (ADLs in unstructured environment, while ensuring that anthropomorphic criteria are satisfied in the whole human-robot workspace. The motion planning system combines Learning by Demonstration with the computation of Dynamic Motion Primitives and machine learning techniques to construct task- and patient-specific joint trajectories based on the learnt trajectories. System validation was carried out in simulation and in a real setting with a 4-DoF upper-limb exoskeleton, a 5-DoF wrist-hand exoskeleton and four patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy. Validation was addressed to (i compare the performance of the proposed motion planning with traditional methods; (ii assess the generalization capabilities of the proposed method with respect to the environment variability. Three ADLs were chosen to validate the system: drinking, pouring and lifting a light sphere. The achieved results showed a 100% success rate in the task fulfillment, with a high level of generalization with respect to the environment variability. Moreover, an anthropomorphic configuration of the exoskeleton is always ensured.

  8. Uphill walking with a simple exoskeleton: plantarflexion assistance leads to proximal adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    While level walking with a pneumatic ankle-foot exoskeleton is studied extensively, less is known on uphill walking. The goals of this study were to get a better understanding of the biomechanical adaptations and the influence of actuation timing on metabolic cost during uphill walking with a plantarflexion assisting exoskeleton. Seven female subjects walked on a treadmill with 15% inclination at 1.36 ms(-1) in five conditions (4 min): one condition with an unpowered exoskeleton and four with a powered exoskeleton with onset of pneumatic muscle actuation at 19, 26, 34 and 41% of stride. During uphill walking the metabolic cost was more than 10% lower for all powered conditions compared to the unpowered condition. When actuation onset was in between 26 and 34% of the stride, metabolic cost was suggested to be minimal. While it was expected that exoskeleton assistance would reduce muscular activity of the plantarflexors during push-off, subjects used the additional power to raise the body centre of mass in the beginning of each step to a higher point compared to unpowered walking. This reduced the muscular activity in the m. vastus lateralis and the m. biceps femoris as less effort was necessary to reach the highest body centre of mass position in the single support phase. In conclusion, subjects can use plantarflexion assistance during the push-off to reduce muscular activity in more proximal joints in order to minimize energy cost during uphill locomotion. Kinetic data seem necessary to fully understand this mechanism, which highlights the complexity of human-exoskeleton interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exoskeleton may influence the internal body temperatures of Neotropical dung beetles (Col. Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amore, Valentina; Hernández, Malva I M; Carrascal, Luis M; Lobo, Jorge M

    2017-01-01

    The insect exoskeleton is a multifunctional coat with a continuum of mechanical and structural properties constituting the barrier between electromagnetic waves and the internal body parts. This paper examines the ability of beetle exoskeleton to regulate internal body temperature considering its thermal permeability or isolation to simulated solar irradiance and infrared radiation. Seven Neotropical species of dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae) differing in colour, surface sculptures, size, sexual dimorphism, period of activity, guild category and altitudinal distribution were studied. Specimens were repeatedly subjected to heating trials under simulated solar irradiance and infrared radiation using a halogen neodymium bulb light with a balanced daylight spectrum and a ceramic infrared heat emitter. The volume of exoskeleton and its weight per volume unit were significantly more important for the heating rate at the beginning of the heating process than for the asymptotic maximum temperature reached at the end of the trials: larger beetles with relatively thicker exoskeletons heated more slowly. The source of radiation greatly influences the asymptotic temperature reached, but has a negligible effect in determining the rate of heat gain by beetles: they reached higher temperatures under artificial sunlight than under infrared radiation. Interspecific differences were negligible in the heating rate but had a large magnitude effect on the asymptotic temperature, only detectable under simulated sun irradiance. The fact that sun irradiance is differentially absorbed dorsally and transformed into heat among species opens the possibility that differences in dorsal exoskeleton would facilitate the heat gain under restrictive environmental temperatures below the preferred ones. The findings provided by this study support the important role played by the exoskeleton in the heating process of beetles, a cuticle able to act passively in the thermal control of body

  10. Diseño y optimización del sistema de renovación de la carga de un motor dual fuel para transporte pesado mediante sobrealimentación en doble etapa

    OpenAIRE

    SIRVENT SANJOSÉ, ROBERTO ANDRÉS

    2016-01-01

    El trabajo consiste en el diseño del sistema de admisión y escape de un motor dual-fuel para transporte pesado. Se deberá seleccionar la arquitectura adecuada para poder conseguir las condiciones de deseadas en el interior del cilindro (sistema de sobrealimentación, producción de EGR). Se deberá también seleccionar la estrategia adecuada para el control de cada uno de los elementos utilizados. Sirvent Sanjosé, RA. (2016). Diseño y optimización del sistema de renovación de la carga de un mo...

  11. Aplicación de un modelo de diagnóstico de la combustión para la detección de la dispersión de EGR en un motor diesel euro5

    OpenAIRE

    AÑÓN GARCÍA, DAVID

    2015-01-01

    [ES] El objetivo principal de este trabajo es poder estimar ese porcentaje de reparto de gas EGR en cada uno de los cilindros de un motor Diesel de inyecci on directa sobrealimentado con turbina de geometr a variable a partir del an alisis de los par ametros de combusti on. De forma secundaria, se aprovecha este estudio para determinar la posible in uencia del cambio de la geometr a de la admisi on en el reparto del gas del escape recirculado entre cilindros. Añón Ga...

  12. Caracterización de un motor diesel trabajando con mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel ; Characterization of a diesel engine fueled with Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Errasti Cabrera; Ramón Piloto Rodríguez; Noel Ferrer Frontela; Eliezer Ahmed Melo Espinoza; Antonio Werner de Dios Ortega; Leonardo Goyos Pérez

    2013-01-01

    El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo caracterizar el desempeño de un motor diesel en cuanto a sus prestaciones y al retardo de la ignición, al operar bajo diferentes regímenes de carga, empleando mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel. Para esto se determinó la característica exterior de velocidad al emplear las mezclas, y se compararon estos resultados con los obtenidos durante los ensayos con combustible diesel patrón; estableciendo el grado de afectación del motor al sustitu...

  13. Estudio e implementación de un sistema Dual para optimizar la combustión de un motor Otto mediante el uso de gas de Brown (HHO)

    OpenAIRE

    Cujilema Cujilema, José Sebastián; Ramírez Gonzaga, Carlos Manuel

    2011-01-01

    La implementación de un sistema Dual para optimizar la combustión de un motor Otto surge debido a que existen millones de vehículos a gasolina circulando por el mundo y cada uno de ellos es una fuente de contaminación y consumo. En ciudades grandes la contaminación de estos vehículos presentan altos índices de gases nocivos para la salud y el medio ambiente. Los altos índices de emisiones contaminantes están determinados por algunos factores como la mala calidad del combustible, la falta d...

  14. Implementación de un mantenimiento basado en la condición usando modelado y simulación: caso de estudio de un motor sin-crónico de imanes permanentes

    OpenAIRE

    Jabid Quiroga Méndez; Silvia Oviedo Castillo

    2011-01-01

    Este artículo introduce la arquitectura de un CBM (mantenimiento basado en la condición) en una aplicación eléctrica. La detección de fallas de manera oportuna y eficiente constituye uno de los retos más importantes asociados al CBM y el enfoque basado en modelos en el medio para conseguirlo. Un caso de estudio en un motor sincrónico de imanes permanentes (PMSM) es ejecutado para ilustrar cómo el modelado es utilizado en la implementación de un CBM. El monitoreo fue implementado en tiempo rea...

  15. Diagnóstico de fallas en el sistema de lubricación de un motor de combustión interna a gasolina Hyundai Accent DOHC 1.5L mediante análisis de vibraciones

    OpenAIRE

    Buestán Ramírez, Christian Santiago; Jarama Herrera, Carlos Teodoro

    2016-01-01

    En este documento se presenta el diagnóstico de fallas en el sistema de lubricación de un motor de combustión interna Hyundai Accent 1.5L mediante análisis de vibraciones, en el cual mediante el uso de un diseño experimental se adquirió las señales vibroacústicas, las que fueron procesadas mediante la Transformada de Fourier; para el posterior análisis de resultados por Comparación Espectral y Análisis de Componentes Principales (ACP). This research presents the fault diagnosis in the lubr...

  16. The first results of the development and implementation of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, A. A.; Krivonozhkina, P. S.; Zasypkina, O. A.; Andrewshenko, F. A.

    2015-11-01

    This research considers the first results of the development and implementation of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR". Made anatomical parameterization developed the device the testing of the apparatus have been conducted in accordance with the bioethics regulations with the girl I. Sh. at the age of 4 years suffering the artrogryposis. The parameters of the exoskeleton "EXAR" selected according to our methods allowed us to conduct its use in the period of 4 months. There have been no defects at all. By the analysis of the first results of the passive upper limb skeleton EXAR development we should consider them as positive and worthy of the widespread adoption in the remedial practice.

  17. Interfaz para censar velocidad en un motor utilizando la tarjeta de adquisición de datos PCI-6025E; Interface for Measure Motor Velocity Used the Adquisition Target PCI-6025E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Garrido Díaz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se implementa la elaboración de una interfaz para censar la velocidad de un motor. Se utilizaun taco generador TDP 0,09 LT 3 que se encuentra acoplado al eje de un motor asincrónico y se elabora uncircuito electrónico impreso para adecuar la señal obtenida por este taco generador a una señal que puedaser interpretada por la tarjeta de adquisición de datos de National Instrument: PCI-6025E. Se plantea unpequeño ejemplo de la utilización de esta interfaz desde un instrumento virtual desarrollado en Labview 5.1sobre Linux .  Its article is about the implementation of an interface for measure motor velocity. Is used a TDP 0,09 LT 3tachogenerator  situated in the  asynchrony motor and is elaborated a printed electronic circuit to adequatethe censor signal to a signal that can be read  for  a PCI-6025E National Instrument acquisition target. Itsshow an example of  the used of  this interface from a software based in Labview 5.1 over Linux

  18. Robotic exoskeletons: a perspective for the rehabilitation of arm coordination in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael eJarrassé

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Upper-limb impairment after stroke is caused by weakness, loss of individual joint control, spasticity and abnormal synergies. Upper limb movement frequently involves abnormal, stereotyped and fixed synergies, likely related to the increased use of subcortical networks following the stroke. The flexible coordination of the shoulder and elbow joints is also disrupted. New methods for motor learning, based on the stimulation of activity-dependent neural plasticity have been developed. These include robots that can adaptively assist active movements and generate many movement repetitions. However, most of these robots only control the movement of the hand in space. The aim of the present text is to analyse the potential of robotic exoskeletons to specifically rehabilitate joint motion and particularly inter-joint coordination. Firstly, a review of studies on upper-limb coordination in stroke patients is presented and the potential for recovery of coordination is examined. Secondly, issues relating to the mechanical design of exoskeletons and the transmission of constraints between the robotic and human limbs are discussed. The third section considers the development of different methods to control exoskeletons: existing rehabilitation devices and approaches to the control and rehabilitation of joint coordinations are then reviewed, along with preliminary clinical results available. Finally, perspectives and future strategies for the design of control mechanisms for rehabilitation exoskeletons are discussed.

  19. Development of a parametric kinematic model of the human hand and a novel robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, T M W; Vaidyanathan, R; Burgess, S C; Turton, A J; Melhuish, C

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the integration of a kinematic model of the human hand during cylindrical grasping, with specific focus on the accurate mapping of thumb movement during grasping motions, and a novel, multi-degree-of-freedom assistive exoskeleton mechanism based on this model. The model includes thumb maximum hyper-extension for grasping large objects (~> 50 mm). The exoskeleton includes a novel four-bar mechanism designed to reproduce natural thumb opposition and a novel synchro-motion pulley mechanism for coordinated finger motion. A computer aided design environment is used to allow the exoskeleton to be rapidly customized to the hand dimensions of a specific patient. Trials comparing the kinematic model to observed data of hand movement show the model to be capable of mapping thumb and finger joint flexion angles during grasping motions. Simulations show the exoskeleton to be capable of reproducing the complex motion of the thumb to oppose the fingers during cylindrical and pinch grip motions. © 2011 IEEE

  20. Design and Evaluation of the LOPES Exoskeleton Robot for Interactive Gait Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, J.F.; Kruidhof, R.; Hekman, Edsko E.G.; Ekkelenkamp, R.; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a newly developed gait rehabilitation device. The device, called LOPES, combines a freely translatable and 2-D-actuated pelvis segment with a leg exoskeleton containing three actuated rotational joints: two at the hip and one at the knee. The joints are impedance controlled to

  1. Review of hybrid exoskeletons to restore gait following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del-Ama, Antonio J; Koutsou, Aikaterini D; Moreno, Juan C; de-los-Reyes, Ana; Gil-Agudo, Angel; Pons, José L

    2012-01-01

    Different approaches are available to compensate gait in persons with spinal cord injury, including passive orthoses, functional electrical stimulation (FES), and robotic exoskeletons. However, several drawbacks arise from each specific approach. Orthotic gait is energy-demanding for the user and functionally ineffective. FES uses the muscles as natural actuators to generate gait, providing not only functional but also psychological benefits to the users. However, disadvantages are also related to the early appearance of muscle fatigue and the control of joint trajectories. Robotic exoskeletons that provide joint moment compensation or substitution to the body during walking have been developed in recent years. Significant advances have been achieved, but the technology itself is not mature yet because of many limitations related to both physical and cognitive interaction as well as portability and energy-management issues. Meanwhile, the combination of FES technology and exoskeletons has emerged as a promising approach to both gait compensation and rehabilitation, bringing together technologies, methods, and rehabilitation principles that can overcome the drawbacks of each individual approach. This article presents an overview of hybrid lower-limb exoskeletons, related technologies, and advances in actuation and control systems. Also, we highlight the functional assessment of individuals with spinal cord injury.

  2. Design and preliminary evaluation of an exoskeleton for upper limb resistance training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzong-Ming; Chen, Dar-Zen

    2012-06-01

    Resistance training is a popular form of exercise recommended by national health organizations, such as the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA). This form of training is available for most populations. A compact design of upper limb exoskeleton mechanism for homebased resistance training using a spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton with a three degree-of-freedom shoulder joint and a one degree-of-freedom elbow joint allows a patient or a healthy individual to move the upper limb with multiple joints in different planes. It can continuously increase the resistance by adjusting the spring length to train additional muscle groups and reduce the number of potential injuries to upper limb joints caused by the mass moment of inertia of the training equipment. The aim of this research is to perform a preliminary evaluation of the designed function by adopting an appropriate motion analysis system and experimental design to verify our prototype of the exoskeleton and determine the optimal configuration of the spring-loaded upper limb exoskeleton.

  3. Assessment of an active industrial exoskeleton to aid dynamic lifting and lowering manual handling tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysamen, K.; Looze, M.P. de; Bosch, T.; Ortiz, J.; Toxin, S.; O'Sullivan, L.W.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an industrial exoskeleton on muscle activity, perceived musculoskeletal effort, measured and perceived contact pressure at the trunk, thighs and shoulders, and subjective usability for simple sagittal plane lifting and lowering conditions. Twelve

  4. Absence of preserved glucosamine and amino acids in fossil crustacean exoskeletons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Krause, R.G.F.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    No glucosamine and only traces of amino acids were detected in kerogen prepared from fossil crustacean exoskeletons. The elemental C/N ratios of the kerogen samples were above 20, indicating that most of the organic nitrogen was eliminated from the chitin biopolymer during diagenesis. The results contradict earlier reports of the stability of chitin during fossilization.

  5. Design and Voluntary Motion Intention Estimation of a Novel Wearable Full-Body Flexible Exoskeleton Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The wearable full-body exoskeleton robot developed in this study is one application of mobile cyberphysical system (CPS, which is a complex mobile system integrating mechanics, electronics, computer science, and artificial intelligence. Steel wire was used as the flexible transmission medium and a group of special wire-locking structures was designed. Additionally, we designed passive joints for partial joints of the exoskeleton. Finally, we proposed a novel gait phase recognition method for full-body exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors, plantar pressure sensors, and inclination sensors. The method consists of four procedures. Firstly, we classified the three types of main motion patterns: normal walking on the ground, stair-climbing and stair-descending, and sit-to-stand movement. Secondly, we segregated the experimental data into one gait cycle. Thirdly, we divided one gait cycle into eight gait phases. Finally, we built a gait phase recognition model based on k-Nearest Neighbor perception and trained it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result shows that the model has a 98.52% average correct rate of classification of the main motion patterns on the testing set and a 95.32% average correct rate of phase recognition on the testing set. So the exoskeleton robot can achieve human motion intention in real time and coordinate its movement with the wearer.

  6. Beetle Exoskeleton May Facilitate Body Heat Acting Differentially across the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Luis M; Ruiz, Yolanda Jiménez; Lobo, Jorge M

    Exoskeletons of beetles and their associated morphological characteristics can serve many different functions, including thermoregulation. We study the thermal role of the exoskeleton in 13 Geotrupidae dung beetle species using heating experiments under controlled conditions. The main purpose was to measure the influence of heating sources (solar radiance vs. infrared), animal position (dorsal exposure vs. ventral exposure), species identity, and phylogenetic relationships on internal asymptotic temperatures and heating rates. The thermal response was significantly influenced by phylogenetic relatedness, although it was not affected by the apterous condition. The asymptotic internal temperature of specimens was not affected by the thoracic volume but was significantly higher under simulated sunlight conditions than under infrared radiation and when exposed dorsally as opposed to ventrally. There was thus a significant interaction between heating source and body position. Heating rate was negatively and significantly influenced by thoracic volume, and, although insignificantly slower under simulated sunlight, it was significantly affected by body position, being faster under dorsal exposure. The results constitute the first evidence supporting the hypothesis that the beetle exoskeleton acts differentially across the electromagnetic spectrum determining internal body temperatures. This interesting finding suggests the existence of a kind of passive physiology imposed by the exoskeleton and body size, where interspecific relationships play a minor role.

  7. Design and Control of a Powered Hip Exoskeleton for Walking Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingcong Wu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wearable powered exoskeleton is a human-robot cooperation system that integrates the strength of a robot with human intelligence. This paper presents the research results into a powered hip exoskeleton (PH-EXOS designed to provide locomotive assistance to individuals with walking impediments. The Bowden cable actuated exoskeleton has an anthropomorphic structure with six degrees of freedom (DOF in order to match the human hip anatomy and enable natural interaction with the user. The mechanical structure, the actuation system, and the interaction kinematics of PH-EXOS are optimized to achieve preferable manoeuvrability and harmony. For the control of the exoskeleton, a real-time control system is established in xPC target environment based on Matlab/RTW. A Cascaded PID controller is developed to perform the trajectories tracking tasks in passive control mode. Besides, based on the pressure information on the thigh, a fuzzy adaptive controller is developed to perform walking assistance tasks in active control mode. Preliminary treadmill walking experiments on a healthy subject were conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed device and control approaches in reducing walking effort.

  8. Physiological consequences of using an upper limb exoskeleton during manual handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurel, Jean; Desbrosses, Kevin; Roux, Terence; Savescu, Adriana

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the physiological consequences of using an upper limb exoskeleton during manual handling task, as muscle activity, upper limb kinematics, postural balance and cardiac cost. Participants performed three tasks (load lifting (LIFT), carrying (WALK) and stacking-unstacking (STACK)) with (EXOS) and without (FREE) an exoskeleton. During LIFT and STACK, the activity of the deltoid anterior muscle was significantly lower for EXOS than for FREE. During LIFT, the activity of the triceps brachii (TB) and tibialis anterior muscles significantly increased for EXO. The TB muscle activity significantly decreased for EXOS during WALK. The cardiac cost tended to increase with the use of the exoskeleton during LIFT, compared to FREE. The upper limb kinematics significantly differed between the EXOS and FREE conditions for all tasks. The benefits of the upper limb exoskeleton to reduce shoulder flexor muscle activity has been demonstrated, while broader physiological consequences have also been evidenced as increased antagonist muscle activity, postural strains, cardiovascular demand, and modified kinematics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exergaming with a pediatric exoskeleton: Facilitating rehabilitation and research in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulea, Thomas C; Lerner, Zachary F; Gravunder, Andrew J; Damiano, Diane L

    2017-07-01

    Effective rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy (CP) requires intensive task-specific exercise but many in this population lack the motor capabilities to complete the desired training tasks. Providing robotic assistance is a potential solution yet the effects of this assistance are unclear. We combined a novel exoskeleton and exercise video game (exergame) to create a new rehabilitation paradigm for children with CP. We incorporated high density electroencephalography (EEG) to assess cortical activity. Movement to targets in the game was controlled by knee extension while standing. The distance between targets was the same with and without the exoskeleton to isolate the effect of robotic assistance. Our results show that children with CP maintain or increase knee extensor muscle activity during knee extension in the presence of synergistic robotic assistance. Our EEG findings also demonstrate that participants remained engaged in the exercise with robotic assistance. Interestingly we observed a developmental trajectory of sensorimotor mu rhythm in children with CP similar, though delayed, to those reported in typically developing children. While not the goal here, the exoskeleton significantly increased knee extension in 3/6 participants during use. Future work will focus on utilizing the exoskeleton to enhance volitional knee extension capability and in combination with EMG and EEG to study sensorimotor cortex response to progressive exercise in children with CP.

  10. Inverse Kinematics for Upper Limb Compound Movement Estimation in Exoskeleton-Assisted Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Camilo; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Scorza, Davide; Bertelsen, Álvaro; Carrasco, Eduardo; Gil-Agudo, Ángel; Ruiz-Salguero, Oscar; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) is relevant for treating patients affected by nervous system injuries (e.g., stroke and spinal cord injury). The accurate estimation of the joint angles of the patient limbs in RAR is critical to assess the patient improvement. The economical prevalent method to estimate the patient posture in Exoskeleton-based RAR is to approximate the limb joint angles with the ones of the Exoskeleton. This approximation is rough since their kinematic structures differ. Motion capture systems (MOCAPs) can improve the estimations, at the expenses of a considerable overload of the therapy setup. Alternatively, the Extended Inverse Kinematics Posture Estimation (EIKPE) computational method models the limb and Exoskeleton as differing parallel kinematic chains. EIKPE has been tested with single DOF movements of the wrist and elbow joints. This paper presents the assessment of EIKPE with elbow-shoulder compound movements (i.e., object prehension). Ground-truth for estimation assessment is obtained from an optical MOCAP (not intended for the treatment stage). The assessment shows EIKPE rendering a good numerical approximation of the actual posture during the compound movement execution, especially for the shoulder joint angles. This work opens the horizon for clinical studies with patient groups, Exoskeleton models, and movements types.

  11. A lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady state visual evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, No-Sang; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2015-10-01

    Objective. We have developed an asynchronous brain-machine interface (BMI)-based lower limb exoskeleton control system based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). Approach. By decoding electroencephalography signals in real-time, users are able to walk forward, turn right, turn left, sit, and stand while wearing the exoskeleton. SSVEP stimulation is implemented with a visual stimulation unit, consisting of five light emitting diodes fixed to the exoskeleton. A canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for the extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP was used in combination with k-nearest neighbors. Main results. Overall, 11 healthy subjects participated in the experiment to evaluate performance. To achieve the best classification, CCA was first calibrated in an offline experiment. In the subsequent online experiment, our results exhibit accuracies of 91.3 ± 5.73%, a response time of 3.28 ± 1.82 s, an information transfer rate of 32.9 ± 9.13 bits/min, and a completion time of 1100 ± 154.92 s for the experimental parcour studied. Significance. The ability to achieve such high quality BMI control indicates that an SSVEP-based lower limb exoskeleton for gait assistance is becoming feasible.

  12. Simulation Architecture for Modelling Interaction Between User and Elbow-articulated Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, B.J. de; Schmidhauser, E.; Stadler, K.S.; O'Sullivan, L.W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our work is to improve the existing user-exoskeleton models by introducing a simulation architecture that can simulate its dynamic interaction, thereby altering the initial motion of the user. A simulation architecture is developed that uses the musculoskeletal models from OpenSim, and

  13. LIMPACT:A Hydraulically Powered Self-Aligning Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Alexander; Voort, Hendrik Carsten; Stienen, Arno; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2015-01-01

    The LIMPACT is an exoskeleton developed to be used in identifying the reflex properties of the arm in stroke survivors. Information on joint reflexes helps in designing optimal patient specific therapy programs. The LIMPACT is dynamically transparent by combining a lightweight skeleton with high

  14. Optimal Design of a 3-DOF Cable-Driven Upper Arm Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Feng Shao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With outstanding advantages, such as large workspace, flexibility, and lightweight and low inertia, cable-driven parallel manipulator shows great potential for application as the exoskeleton rehabilitation robot. However, the optimal design is still a challenging problem to be solved. In this paper, the optimal design of a 3-DOF (3-degree-of-freedom cable-driven upper arm exoskeleton is accomplished considering the force exerted on the arm. After analysis of the working conditions, two promising configurations of the cable-driven upper arm exoskeleton are put forward and design parameters are simplified. Then, candidate ranges of two angle parameters are determined with the proposed main workspace requirement. Further, global force indices are defined to evaluate the force applied to the arm by the exoskeleton, in order to enhance the system safety and comfort. Finally, the optimal design of each configuration is obtained with proposed force indices. In addition, atlases and charts given in this paper well illustrate trends of workspace and force with different values of design parameters.

  15. Compact Hip-Force Sensor for a Gait-Assistance Exoskeleton System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyundo; Seo, Keehong; Hyung, Seungyong; Shim, Youngbo; Lim, Soo-Chul

    2018-02-13

    In this paper, we propose a compact force sensor system for a hip-mounted exoskeleton for seniors with difficulties in walking due to muscle weakness. It senses and monitors the delivered force and power of the exoskeleton for motion control and taking urgent safety action. Two FSR (force-sensitive resistors) sensors are used to measure the assistance force when the user is walking. The sensor system directly measures the interaction force between the exoskeleton and the lower limb of the user instead of a previously reported force-sensing method, which estimated the hip assistance force from the current of the motor and lookup tables. Furthermore, the sensor system has the advantage of generating torque in the walking-assistant actuator based on directly measuring the hip-assistance force. Thus, the gait-assistance exoskeleton system can control the delivered power and torque to the user. The force sensing structure is designed to decouple the force caused by hip motion from other directional forces to the sensor so as to only measure that force. We confirmed that the hip-assistance force could be measured with the proposed prototype compact force sensor attached to a thigh frame through an experiment with a real system.

  16. Markov Jump Linear Systems-Based Position Estimation for Lower Limb Exoskeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with Markov Jump Linear Systems-based filtering applied to robotic rehabilitation. The angular positions of an impedance-controlled exoskeleton, designed to help stroke and spinal cord injured patients during walking rehabilitation, are estimated. Standard position estimate approaches adopt Kalman filters (KF to improve the performance of inertial measurement units (IMUs based on individual link configurations. Consequently, for a multi-body system, like a lower limb exoskeleton, the inertial measurements of one link (e.g., the shank are not taken into account in other link position estimation (e.g., the foot. In this paper, we propose a collective modeling of all inertial sensors attached to the exoskeleton, combining them in a Markovian estimation model in order to get the best information from each sensor. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, simulation results regarding a set of human footsteps, with four IMUs and three encoders attached to the lower limb exoskeleton, are presented. A comparative study between the Markovian estimation system and the standard one is performed considering a wide range of parametric uncertainties.

  17. Robotic Exoskeletons: A Perspective for the Rehabilitation of Arm Coordination in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Proietti, Tommaso; Crocher, Vincent; Robertson, Johanna; Sahbani, Anis; Morel, Guillaume; Roby-Brami, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Upper-limb impairment after stroke is caused by weakness, loss of individual joint control, spasticity, and abnormal synergies. Upper-limb movement frequently involves abnormal, stereotyped, and fixed synergies, likely related to the increased use of sub-cortical networks following the stroke. The flexible coordination of the shoulder and elbow joints is also disrupted. New methods for motor learning, based on the stimulation of activity-dependent neural plasticity have been developed. These include robots that can adaptively assist active movements and generate many movement repetitions. However, most of these robots only control the movement of the hand in space. The aim of the present text is to analyze the potential of robotic exoskeletons to specifically rehabilitate joint motion and particularly inter-joint coordination. First, a review of studies on upper-limb coordination in stroke patients is presented and the potential for recovery of coordination is examined. Second, issues relating to the mechanical design of exoskeletons and the transmission of constraints between the robotic and human limbs are discussed. The third section considers the development of different methods to control exoskeletons: existing rehabilitation devices and approaches to the control and rehabilitation of joint coordinations are then reviewed, along with preliminary clinical results available. Finally, perspectives and future strategies for the design of control mechanisms for rehabilitation exoskeletons are discussed. PMID:25520638

  18. A hybrid BMI-based exoskeleton for paresis: EMG control for assisting arm movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Toshihiro; Sakurada, Takeshi; Koike, Yasuharu; Kansaku, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interface (BMI) technologies have succeeded in controlling robotic exoskeletons, enabling some paralyzed people to control their own arms and hands. We have developed an exoskeleton asynchronously controlled by EEG signals. In this study, to enable real-time control of the exoskeleton for paresis, we developed a hybrid system with EEG and EMG signals, and the EMG signals were used to estimate its joint angles. Approach. Eleven able-bodied subjects and two patients with upper cervical spinal cord injuries (SCIs) performed hand and arm movements, and the angles of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the index finger, wrist, and elbow were estimated from EMG signals using a formula that we derived to calculate joint angles from EMG signals, based on a musculoskeletal model. The formula was exploited to control the elbow of the exoskeleton after automatic adjustments. Four able-bodied subjects and a patient with upper cervical SCI wore an exoskeleton controlled using EMG signals and were required to perform hand and arm movements to carry and release a ball. Main results. Estimated angles of the MP joints of index fingers, wrists, and elbows were correlated well with the measured angles in 11 able-bodied subjects (correlation coefficients were 0.81  ±  0.09, 0.85  ±  0.09, and 0.76  ±  0.13, respectively) and the patients (e.g. 0.91  ±  0.01 in the elbow of a patient). Four able-bodied subjects successfully positioned their arms to adequate angles by extending their elbows and a joint of the exoskeleton, with root-mean-square errors  BMI-based exoskeleton for paralyzed arms and hands using real-time control was realized by designing a new method to estimate joint angles based on EMG signals, and these may be useful for practical rehabilitation and the support of daily actions.

  19. Powered robotic exoskeletons in post-stroke rehabilitation of gait: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dennis R; Eng, Janice J

    2016-06-08

    Powered robotic exoskeletons are a potential intervention for gait rehabilitation in stroke to enable repetitive walking practice to maximize neural recovery. As this is a relatively new technology for stroke, a scoping review can help guide current research and propose recommendations for advancing the research development. The aim of this scoping review was to map the current literature surrounding the use of robotic exoskeletons for gait rehabilitation in adults post-stroke. Five databases (Pubmed, OVID MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials) were searched for articles from inception to October 2015. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Articles were included if they utilized a robotic exoskeleton as a gait training intervention for adult stroke survivors and reported walking outcome measures. Of 441 records identified, 11 studies, all published within the last five years, involving 216 participants met the inclusion criteria. The study designs ranged from pre-post clinical studies (n = 7) to controlled trials (n = 4); five of the studies utilized a robotic exoskeleton device unilaterally, while six used a bilateral design. Participants ranged from sub-acute (6 months) stroke. Training periods ranged from single-session to 8-week interventions. Main walking outcome measures were gait speed, Timed Up and Go, 6-min Walk Test, and the Functional Ambulation Category. Meaningful improvement with exoskeleton-based gait training was more apparent in sub-acute stroke compared to chronic stroke. Two of the four controlled trials showed no greater improvement in any walking outcomes compared to a control group in chronic stroke. In conclusion, clinical trials demonstrate that powered robotic exoskeletons can be used safely as a gait training intervention for stroke. Preliminary findings suggest that exoskeletal gait training is equivalent to traditional therapy for chronic stroke

  20. Isotropy of an Upper Limb Exoskeleton and the Kinematics and Dynamics of the Human Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Perry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of human and robot into a single system offers remarkable opportunities for a new generation of assistive technology. Despite the recent prominence of upper limb exoskeletons in assistive applications, the human arm kinematics and dynamics are usually described in single or multiple arm movements that are not associated with any concrete activity of daily living (ADL. Moreover, the design of an exoskeleton, which is physically linked to the human body, must have a workspace that matches as close as possible with the workspace of the human body, while at the same time avoid singular configurations of the exoskeleton within the human workspace. The aims of the research reported in this manuscript are (1 to study the kinematics and the dynamics of the human arm during daily activities in a free and unconstrained environment, (2 to study the manipulability (isotropy of a 7-degree-of-freedom (DOF-powered exoskeleton arm given the kinematics and the dynamics of the human arm in ADLs. Kinematic data of the upper limb were acquired with a motion capture system while performing 24 daily activities from six subjects. Utilising a 7-DOF model of the human arm, the equations of motion were used to calculate joint torques from measured kinematics. In addition, the exoskeleton isotropy was calculated and mapped with respect to the spacial distribution of the human arm configurations during the 24 daily activities. The results indicate that the kinematic joint distributions representing all 24 actions appear normally distributed except for elbow flexion–extension with the emergence of three modal centres. Velocity and acceleration components of joint torque distributions were normally distributed about 0 Nm, whereas gravitational component distributions varied with joint. Additionally, velocity effects were found to contribute only 1/100th of the total joint torque, whereas acceleration components contribute 1/10th of the total torque at the

  1. Three-dimensional graphic reconstruction of the insect exoskeleton through confocal imaging of endogenous fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, S; Frazier, S F; Neff, D; Quimby, L; Carney, M; DiCaprio, R; Thuma, J; Norton, M

    2000-03-15

    The exoskeleton of the cockroach leg was imaged via confocal microscopy to generate digital graphic reconstructions of its three-dimensional structure. The cuticle is autofluorescent and can be visualized without staining, but is maximally imaged in aldehyde-fixed preparations viewed under krypton-argon laser illumination (yellow green (568 nm) excitation, commonly used in confocal microscopes). Images of the entire trochanteral segment of the leg were constructed as montages from optical sections taken as overlapping series that were coincident in the z-axis. Reconstructions of the exoskeleton from these images showed that strain sensing mechanoreceptors are located in association with buttresses and thickenings that form a consistent internal architecture in both juvenile and adult animals. Accuracy of reconstructions was gauged by embedding specimens in Spurr's resin and histologically sectioning them perpendicular to the optical plane of section (z-axis). Comparison of plastic sections with two-dimensional images generated by "resectioning" the software model showed that reconstructed exoskeleton had a high level of accuracy. Imaging of older and larger animals was limited by the sclerotization and increased thickness of the cuticle. Surface extraction algorithms were used to generate vector graphic files in CAD format for export to software used in engineering and design. Among other potential uses, these models have been studied by Finite Element Analysis to examine the distribution of mechanical strains in the exoskeleton that occur during posture and locomotion. The advantages and limitations of the techniques are discussed. These methods may be used in studying the exoskeleton and the anatomy of cuticular mechanoreceptors of other arthropods to similar advantage. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A series elastic- and Bowden-cable-based actuation system for use as torque actuator in exoskeleton-type robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, J.F.; Ekkelenkamp, R.; Kruidhof, R.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2006-01-01

    Within the context of impedance controlled exoskeletons, common actuators have important drawbacks. Either the actuators are heavy, have a complex structure or are poor torque sources, due to gearing or heavy nonlinearity. Considering our application, an impedance controlled gait rehabilitation

  3. Transcriptome analysis on the exoskeleton formation in early developmetal stages and reconstruction scenario in growth-moulting in Litopenaeus vannamei

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Gao; Jiankai Wei; Jianbo Yuan; Xiaojun Zhang; Fuhua Li; Jianhai Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Exoskeleton construction is an important issue in shrimp. To better understand the molecular mechanism of exoskeleton formation, development and reconstruction, the transcriptome of the entire developmental process in Litopenaeus vannamei, including nine early developmental stages and eight adult-moulting stages, was sequenced and analysed using Illumina RNA-seq technology. A total of 117,539 unigenes were obtained, with 41.2% unigenes predicting the full-length coding sequence. Gene Ontology...

  4. Design and evaluation of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton for investigation of motor adaptation in lower extremity joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaei, Kamran; Cenciarini, Massimo; Adams, Albert A; Gregorczyk, Karen N; Schiffman, Jeffrey M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we describe the mechanical design and control scheme of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton intended to investigate the biomechanical behavior of the knee joint during interaction with externally applied impedances. As the human knee behaves much like a linear spring during the stance phase of normal walking gait, the exoskeleton implements a spring across the knee in the weight acceptance (WA) phase of the gait while allowing free motion throughout the rest of the gait cycle, accomplished via an electromechanical clutch. The stiffness of the device is able to be varied by swapping springs, and the timing of engagement/disengagement changed to accommodate different loading profiles. After describing the design and control, we validate the mechanical performance and reliability of the exoskeleton through cyclic testing on a mechanical knee simulator. We then describe a preliminary experiment on three healthy adults to evaluate the functionality of the device on both left and right legs. The kinetic and kinematic analyses of these subjects show that the exoskeleton assistance can partially/fully replace the function of the knee joint and obtain nearly invariant moment and angle profiles for the hip and ankle joints, and the overall knee joint and exoskeleton complex under the applied moments of the exoskeleton versus the control condition, implying that the subjects undergo a considerable amount of motor adaptation in their lower extremities to the exoskeletal impedances, and encouraging more in-depth future experiments with the device.

  5. A muscle-driven approach to restore stepping with an exoskeleton for individuals with paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sarah R; Nandor, Mark J; Li, Lu; Kobetic, Rudi; Foglyano, Kevin M; Schnellenberger, John R; Audu, Musa L; Pinault, Gilles; Quinn, Roger D; Triolo, Ronald J

    2017-05-30

    Functional neuromuscular stimulation, lower limb orthosis, powered lower limb exoskeleton, and hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) technologies can restore stepping in individuals with paraplegia due to spinal cord injury (SCI). However, a self-contained muscle-driven controllable exoskeleton approach based on an implanted neural stimulator to restore walking has not been previously demonstrated, which could potentially result in system use outside the laboratory and viable for long term use or clinical testing. In this work, we designed and evaluated an untethered muscle-driven controllable exoskeleton to restore stepping in three individuals with paralysis from SCI. The self-contained HNP combined neural stimulation to activate the paralyzed muscles and generate joint torques for limb movements with a controllable lower limb exoskeleton to stabilize and support the user. An onboard controller processed exoskeleton sensor signals, determined appropriate exoskeletal constraints and stimulation commands for a finite state machine (FSM), and transmitted data over Bluetooth to an off-board computer for real-time monitoring and data recording. The FSM coordinated stimulation and exoskeletal constraints to enable functions, selected with a wireless finger switch user interface, for standing up, standing, stepping, or sitting down. In the stepping function, the FSM used a sensor-based gait event detector to determine transitions between gait phases of double stance, early swing, late swing, and weight acceptance. The HNP restored stepping in three individuals with motor complete paralysis due to SCI. The controller appropriately coordinated stimulation and exoskeletal constraints using the sensor-based FSM for subjects with different stimulation systems. The average range of motion at hip and knee joints during walking were 8.5°-20.8° and 14.0°-43.6°, respectively. Walking speeds varied from 0.03 to 0.06 m/s, and cadences from 10 to 20 steps/min. A self-contained muscle

  6. Influencia de la configuración del kit de conversión en el desempeño mecánico-ambiental de un motor de encendido provocado (MEP) bicombustible gasolina-gas natural vehicular

    OpenAIRE

    John Ramiro Agudelo; Ricardo Moreno; Iván Darío Bedoya

    2004-01-01

    Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio experimental realizado sobre un motor Toyota Hilux de 2.400 cm3 en el que se determinó la influencia de la modificación de varios factores (el tamaño del regulador, el tamaño del venturi de un mezclador fijo y su ubicación en ducto de admisión o sobre carburador) en los parámetros de operación mecánico-ambientales (consumo de combustible, rendimiento volumétrico, dosado relativo, emisiones de monóxido de carbono (CO) y emisiones de metano...

  7. New Exoskeleton Arm Concept Design And Actuation For Haptic Interaction With Virtual Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarov, D.; Veneva, I.; Tsveov, M.; Tiankov, T.

    2014-12-01

    In the work presented in this paper the conceptual design and actuation of one new exoskeleton of the upper limb is presented. The device is designed for application where both motion tracking and force feedback are required, such as human interaction with virtual environment or rehabilitation tasks. The choice is presented of mechanical structure kinematical equivalent to the structure of the human arm. An actuation system is selected based on braided pneumatic muscle actuators. Antagonistic drive system for each joint is shown, using pulley and cable transmissions. Force/displacement diagrams are presented of two antagonistic acting muscles. Kinematics and dynamic estimations are performed of the system exoskeleton and upper limb. Selected parameters ensure in the antagonistic scheme joint torque regulation and human arm range of motion.

  8. Design and fabrication of a three dimensional printable non-assembly articulated hand exoskeleton for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Cui; Phan, Anthony; Allison, Garry

    2015-08-01

    Robotic rehabilitation has proven to be cost-effective in accelerating the rehabilitation process by eliminating the constant need for supervision by a therapist. This work aimed to design and develop a novel three-dimensional (3D) printable non-assembly five-fingered robotic hand exoskeleton for rehabilitation. A single degree-of-freedom (DOF) linkage was designed to actuate each finger with 3 output links that correspond to the three phalanxes of the human finger. We used a parametric modelling approach that suits the dimensions of individual's hand. The fabrication of this dynamic model was achieved by printing the complete assembly including all the driving links, output links, and joints. We manufactured a prototype and developed real-time actuation and control. The reported unique linkage design, combined with parametric modelling and 3D printing technology, will pave the way for mass customization of active assistive and resistive hand exoskeletons.

  9. Unidirectional variable stiffness hydraulic actuator for load-carrying knee exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design and experimental testing of a unidirectional variable stiffness hydraulic actuator for load-carrying knee exoskeleton. The proposed actuator is designed for mimicking the high-efficiency passive behavior of biological knee and providing actively assistance in locomotion. The adjustable passive compliance of exoskeletal knee is achieved through a variable ratio lever mechanism with linear elastic element. A compact customized electrohydraulic system is also designed to accommodate application demands. Preliminary experimental results show the prototype has good performances in terms of stiffness regulation and joint torque control. The actuator is also implemented in an exoskeleton knee joint, resulting in anticipant human-like passive compliance behavior.

  10. Hysteresis compensation technique applied to polymer optical fiber curvature sensor for lower limb exoskeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Leal-Junior, Arnaldo; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; José Pontes, Maria; Rodrigues Botelho, Thomaz

    2017-12-01

    Polymer optical fiber (POF) curvature sensors present some advantages over conventional techniques for angle measurements, such as their light weight, compactness and immunity to electromagnetic fields. However, high hysteresis can occur in POF curvature sensors due to the polymer viscoelastic response. In order to overcome this limitation, this paper shows how the hysteresis sensor can be compensated by a calibration equation relating the measured output signal to the sensor’s angular velocity. The proposed method is validated using an exoskeleton with an active joint on the knee for flexion and extension rehabilitation exercises. The results show a decrease in sensor hysteresis and a decrease by more than two times in the error between the POF sensor and the potentiometer, which is employed for the angle measurement of the exoskeleton knee joint.

  11. An intelligent active force control algorithm to control an upper extremity exoskeleton for motor recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbullah Mohd Isa, Wan; Taha, Zahari; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Fikri Muhammad, Khairul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton by means of an intelligent active force control (AFC) mechanism. The Newton-Euler formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometry based human upper extremity as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives. An intelligent AFC algorithm is also incorporated into the PD to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. The Mamdani Fuzzy based rule is employed to approximate the estimated inertial properties of the system to ensure the AFC loop responds efficiently. It is found that the IAFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system as compared to the conventional PD control architecture in performing the desired trajectory tracking.

  12. Design and Development of a Hand Exoskeleton Robot for Active and Passive Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Sandoval-Gonzalez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work, which describes the mechatronic design and development of a novel rehabilitation robotic exoskeleton hand, aims to present a solution for neuromusculoskeletal rehabilitation. It presents a full range of motion for all hand phalanges and was specifically designed to carry out position and force-position control for passive and active rehabilitation routines. System integration and preliminary clinical tests are also presented.

  13. An investigation into environment dependent nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) exoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas, E-mail: tomar@purdue.edu

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation focuses on understanding the influence of change from wet to dry environment on nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp exoskeleton. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based measurements suggest that the shrimp exoskeleton has Bouligand structure, a key characteristic of the crustaceans. As expected, wet samples are found to be softer than dry samples. Reduced modulus values of dry samples are found to be 24.90 ± 1.14 GPa as compared to the corresponding values of 3.79 ± 0.69 GPa in the case of wet samples. Hardness values are found to be 0.86 ± 0.06 GPa in the case of dry samples as compared to the corresponding values of 0.17 ± 0.02 GPa in the case of wet samples. In order to simulate the influence of underwater pressure on the exoskeleton strength, constant load creep experiments as a function of wet and dry environments are performed. The switch in deformation mechanism as a function of environment is explained based on the role played by water molecules in assisting interface slip and increased ductility of matrix material in wet environment in comparison to the dry environment. - Highlights: • Environment dependent (dry-wet) properties of shrimp exoskeleton are analyzed. • Mechanical properties are correlated with the structure and composition. • Presence of water leads to lower reduced modulus and hardness. • SEM images shows the Bouligand pattern based structure. • Creep-relaxation of polymer chains, interface slip is high in presence of water.

  14. Training Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Ambulate Using a Powered Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Pierre K.; Avedissian, Manuel; Knezevic, Steven; Kornfeld, Stephen; Spungen, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have become available for overground ambulation in persons with paralyses due to spinal cord injury (SCI) who have intact upper extremity function and are able to maintain upright balance using forearm crutches. To ambulate in an exoskeleton, the user must acquire the ability to maintain balance while standing, sitting and appropriate weight shifting with each step. This can be a challenging task for those with deficits in sensation and proprioception in their lower extremities. This manuscript describes screening criteria and a training program developed at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY to teach users the skills needed to utilize these devices in institutional, home or community environments. Before training can begin, potential users are screened for appropriate range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Persons with SCI are at an increased risk of sustaining lower extremity fractures, even with minimal strain or trauma, therefore a bone mineral density assessment is performed to reduce the risk of fracture. Also, as part of screening, a physical examination is performed in order to identify additional health-related contraindications. Once the person has successfully passed all screening requirements, they are cleared to begin the training program. The device is properly adjusted to fit the user. A series of static and dynamic balance tasks are taught and performed by the user before learning to walk. The person is taught to ambulate in various environments ranging from indoor level surfaces to outdoors over uneven or changing surfaces. Once skilled enough to be a candidate for home use with the exoskeleton, the user is then required to designate a companion-walker who will train alongside them. Together, the pair must demonstrate the ability to perform various advanced tasks in order to be permitted to use the exoskeleton in their home/community environment. PMID:27340808

  15. Exoskeleton anchoring to tendon cells and muscles in molting isopod crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Žnidaršič

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Specialized mechanical connection between exoskeleton and underlying muscles in arthropods is a complex network of interconnected matrix constituents, junctions and associated cytoskeletal elements, which provides prominent mechanical attachment of the epidermis to the cuticle and transmits muscle tensions to the exoskeleton. This linkage involves anchoring of the complex extracellular matrix composing the cuticle to the apical membrane of tendon cells and linking of tendon cells to muscles basally. The ultrastructural arhitecture of these attachment complexes during molting is an important issue in relation to integument integrity maintenance in the course of cuticle replacement and in relation to movement ability. The aim of this work was to determine the ultrastructural organization of exoskeleton – muscles attachment complexes in the molting terrestrial isopod crustaceans, in the stage when integumental epithelium is covered by both, the newly forming cuticle and the old detached cuticle. We show that the old exoskeleton is extensively mechanically connected to the underlying epithelium in the regions of muscle attachment sites by massive arrays of fibers in adult premolt Ligia italica and in prehatching embryos and premolt marsupial mancas of Porcellio scaber. Fibers expand from the tendon cells, traverse the new cuticle and ecdysal space and protrude into the distal layers of the detached cuticle. They likely serve as final anchoring sites before exuviation and may be involved in animal movements in this stage. Tendon cells in the prehatching embryo and in marsupial mancas display a substantial apicobasally oriented transcellular arrays of microtubules, evidently engaged in myotendinous junctions and in apical anchoring of the cuticular matrix. The structural framework of musculoskeletal linkage is basically established in described intramarsupial developmental stages, suggesting its involvement in animal motility within the marsupium.

  16. ROBOT-ASSISTED SURGERY AND ROBOTS EXOSKELETONS FOR REHABILITATION: WORLD TECHNOLOGICAL LEADERS AND PERSPECTIVES OF RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Cherchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There was analysed the publication and patent activity with regard to two actively developing areas in the field of medical robototronics: robots-exoskeletons for rehabilitation of people with muscoloskeletal disorders and robot-assisted surgery. There was identified discrepancy in the structure of global and national publication and patent flows. There were revealed disadvantages of foreign innovations on robot-assisted surgery, which create prerequisites for promoting import-substituting innovations of domestic engineers. 

  17. Individual muscle control using an exoskeleton robot for muscle function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Ming, Ding; Krishnamoorthy, Vijaya; Shinohara, Minoru; Ogasawara, Tsukasa

    2010-08-01

    Healthy individuals modulate muscle activation patterns according to their intended movement and external environment. Persons with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and spinal cord injury), however, have problems in movement control due primarily to their inability to modulate their muscle activation pattern in an appropriate manner. A functionality test at the level of individual muscles that investigates the activity of a muscle of interest on various motor tasks may enable muscle-level force grading. To date there is no extant work that focuses on the application of exoskeleton robots to induce specific muscle activation in a systematic manner. This paper proposes a new method, named "individual muscle-force control" using a wearable robot (an exoskeleton robot, or a power-assisting device) to obtain a wider variety of muscle activity data than standard motor tasks, e.g., pushing a handle by hand. A computational algorithm systematically computes control commands to a wearable robot so that a desired muscle activation pattern for target muscle forces is induced. It also computes an adequate amount and direction of a force that a subject needs to exert against a handle by his/her hand. This individual muscle control method enables users (e.g., therapists) to efficiently conduct neuromuscular function tests on target muscles by arbitrarily inducing muscle activation patterns. This paper presents a basic concept, mathematical formulation, and solution of the individual muscle-force control and its implementation to a muscle control system with an exoskeleton-type robot for upper extremity. Simulation and experimental results in healthy individuals justify the use of an exoskeleton robot for future muscle function testing in terms of the variety of muscle activity data.

  18. The H2 robotic exoskeleton for gait rehabilitation after stroke: early findings from a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortole, Magdo; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Zhu, Fangshi; Moreno, Juan C; Francisco, Gerard E; Pons, Jose L; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2015-06-17

    Stroke significantly affects thousands of individuals annually, leading to considerable physical impairment and functional disability. Gait is one of the most important activities of daily living affected in stroke survivors. Recent technological developments in powered robotics exoskeletons can create powerful adjunctive tools for rehabilitation and potentially accelerate functional recovery. Here, we present the development and evaluation of a novel lower limb robotic exoskeleton, namely H2 (Technaid S.L., Spain), for gait rehabilitation in stroke survivors. H2 has six actuated joints and is designed to allow intensive overground gait training. An assistive gait control algorithm was developed to create a force field along a desired trajectory, only applying torque when patients deviate from the prescribed movement pattern. The device was evaluated in 3 hemiparetic stroke patients across 4 weeks of training per individual (approximately 12 sessions). The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Houston. The main objective of this initial pre-clinical study was to evaluate the safety and usability of the exoskeleton. A Likert scale was used to measure patient's perception about the easy of use of the device. Three stroke patients completed the study. The training was well tolerated and no adverse events occurred. Early findings demonstrate that H2 appears to be safe and easy to use in the participants of this study. The overground training environment employed as a means to enhance active patient engagement proved to be challenging and exciting for patients. These results are promising and encourage future rehabilitation training with a larger cohort of patients. The developed exoskeleton enables longitudinal overground training of walking in hemiparetic patients after stroke. The system is robust and safe when applied to assist a stroke patient performing an overground walking task. Such device opens the opportunity to study means

  19. Development and Control of a Robotic Exoskeleton for Shoulder, Elbow and Forearm Movement Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Habibur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available World health organization reports, annually more than 15 million people worldwide suffer a stroke and cardiovascular disease, among which 85% of stroke patients incur acute arm impairment, and 40% of victims are chronically impaired or permanently disabled. This results a burden on the families, communities and to the country as well. Rehabilitation programs are the main way to promote functional recovery in these individuals. Since the number of such cases is constantly growing and that the duration of treatment is long, an intelligent robot could significantly contribute to the success of these programs. We therefore developed a new 5DoFs robotic exoskeleton named MARSE-5 (motion assistive robotic-exoskeleton for superior extremity that supposed to be worn on the lateral side of upper arm to rehabilitate and ease the shoulder, elbow and forearm movements. This paper focused on the design, modeling, development and control of the proposed MARSE-5. To control the exoskeleton, a nonlinear sliding mode control (SMC technique was employed. In experiments, trajectory tracking that corresponds to typical passive rehabilitation exercises was carried out. Experimental results reveal that the controller is able to maneuver the MARSE-5 efficiently to track the desired trajectories.

  20. Analysis of relative displacement between the HX wearable robotic exoskeleton and the user's hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cempini, Marco; Marzegan, Alberto; Rabuffetti, Marco; Cortese, Mario; Vitiello, Nicola; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2014-10-18

    Advances in technology are allowing for the production of several viable wearable robotic devices to assist with activities of daily living and with rehabilitation. One of the most pressing limitations to user satisfaction is the lack of consistency in motion between the user and the robotic device. The displacement between the robot and the body segment may not correspond because of differences in skin and tissue compliance, mechanical backlash, and/or incorrect fit. This report presents the results of an analysis of relative displacement between the user's hand and a wearable exoskeleton, the HX. HX has been designed to maximize comfort, wearability and user safety, exploiting chains with multiple degrees-of-freedom with a modular architecture. These appealing features may introduce several uncertainties in the kinematic performances, especially when considering the anthropometry, morphology and degree of mobility of the human hand. The small relative displacements between the hand and the exoskeleton were measured with a video-based motion capture system, while the user executed several different grips in different exoskeleton modes. The analysis furnished quantitative results about the device performance, differentiated among device modules and test conditions. In general, the global relative displacement for the distal part of the device was in the range 0.5-1.5 mm, while within 3 mm (worse but still acceptable) for displacements nearest to the hand dorsum. Conclusions over the HX design principles have been drawn, as well as guidelines for future developments.

  1. Bilateral, Misalignment-Compensating, Full-DOF Hip Exoskeleton: Design and Kinematic Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junius, Karen; Degelaen, Marc; Lefeber, Nina; Swinnen, Eva; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    A shared design goal for most robotic lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of locomotion for the user. Despite this, only a limited amount of devices was able to actually reduce user metabolic consumption. Preservation of the natural motion kinematics was defined as an important requirement for a device to be metabolically beneficial. This requires the inclusion of all human degrees of freedom (DOF) in a design, as well as perfect alignment of the rotation axes. As perfect alignment is impossible, compensation for misalignment effects should be provided. A misalignment compensation mechanism for a 3-DOF system is presented in this paper. It is validated by the implementation in a bilateral hip exoskeleton, resulting in a compact and lightweight device that can be donned fast and autonomously, with a minimum of required adaptations. Extensive testing of the prototype has shown that hip range of motion of the user is maintained while wearing the device and this for all three hip DOFs. This allowed the users to maintain their natural motion patterns when they are walking with the novel hip exoskeleton.

  2. Design of human controlled 1 DOF right hand exoskeleton using electromyography signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, M.; Wijaya, S. K.; Prawito

    2017-07-01

    Exoskeleton in general is a structure that is anatomically designed to be able to accommodate the physical movement of its user and provide additional strength. The use of EMG signal to control a 1 DOF right arm exoskeleton is evaluated in this research. This research aims to achieve optimum control using EMG signal. EMG signal is a variation of voltage that occurs when muscle contracts hence its strong correlation with the user's intention of movement. The RMS values of each EMG signal that originates from bicep and tricep muscle are calculated and processed to determine the direction and speed of rotation of a DC motor that actuates the exoskeleton. The RMS calculation is conducted at various array length that will theoretically affect its accuracy. The difference between those two RMS values is then calculated and interpreted as the intention of flexion or extension movement that will control the DC motor rotational direction. The absolute value of the RMS difference multiplied with a gain factor is used to regulate the duty cycle of a PWM signal that is used to control the rotational speed of the DC motor. To achieve the smallest settling time, array length and gain factor were varied. The test was conducted in two stages, static and dynamic tests. The test result shows a trend where the settling time decreases when array length is shortened and gain is increased. It shows that optimum control can be achieved by selecting the right array length and gain.

  3. A brain-controlled lower-limb exoskeleton for human gait training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Weihai; Pei, Zhongcai; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces have been a novel approach to translate human intentions into movement commands in robotic systems. This paper describes an electroencephalogram-based brain-controlled lower-limb exoskeleton for gait training, as a proof of concept towards rehabilitation with human-in-the-loop. Instead of using conventional single electroencephalography correlates, e.g., evoked P300 or spontaneous motor imagery, we propose a novel framework integrated two asynchronous signal modalities, i.e., sensorimotor rhythms (SMRs) and movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs). We executed experiments in a biologically inspired and customized lower-limb exoskeleton where subjects (N = 6) actively controlled the robot using their brain signals. Each subject performed three consecutive sessions composed of offline training, online visual feedback testing, and online robot-control recordings. Post hoc evaluations were conducted including mental workload assessment, feature analysis, and statistics test. An average robot-control accuracy of 80.16% ± 5.44% was obtained with the SMR-based method, while estimation using the MRCP-based method yielded an average performance of 68.62% ± 8.55%. The experimental results showed the feasibility of the proposed framework with all subjects successfully controlled the exoskeleton. The current paradigm could be further extended to paraplegic patients in clinical trials.

  4. Preliminary assessment of a lower-limb exoskeleton controller for guiding leg movement in overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Andres; Lawson, Brian; Goldfarb, Michael

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation, and preliminary validation of a controller for a powered lower-limb exoskeleton that reshapes a user's leg movement during over-ground walking. The intended application of the controller is to facilitate gait training for individuals suffering from post-stroke hemiparesis. The controller mimics a kinematic constraint between the knee and hip joints during the swing phase of gait, such that movement is not dependent on time (i.e., step time is determined entirely by the user). The controller additionally incorporates real-time path planning adjustment that allows step length to be adjusted by the user. As such, the controller provides movement coordination, but still enables a user to retain the step-to-step variability required to maintain balance during walking. As a preliminary assessment of efficacy, the controller was implemented on a lower limb exoskeleton and tested on a healthy subject, who walked at varying speeds without the use of a stability aid, with and without the proposed controller. The data indicates that the exoskeleton with controller provided the intended extent of movement coordination, while still allowing the subject to maintain walking balance.

  5. Clinical effects of using HEXORR (Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot) for movement therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sasha Blue; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2013-11-01

    The goals of this pilot study were to quantify the clinical benefits of using the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot for hand rehabilitation after stroke and to determine the population best served by this intervention. Nine subjects with chronic stroke (one excluded from analysis) completed 18 sessions of training with the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot and a preevaluation, a postevaluation, and a 90-day clinical evaluation. Overall, the subjects improved in both range of motion and clinical measures. Compared with the preevaluation, the subjects showed significant improvements in range of motion, grip strength, and the hand component of the Fugl-Meyer (mean changes, 6.60 degrees, 8.84 percentage points, and 1.86 points, respectively). A subgroup of six subjects exhibited lower tone and received a higher dosage of training. These subjects had significant gains in grip strength, the hand component of the Fugl-Meyer, and the Action Research Arm Test (mean changes, 8.42 percentage points, 2.17 points, and 2.33 points, respectively). Future work is needed to better manage higher levels of hypertonia and provide more support to subjects with higher impairment levels; however, the current results support further study into the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot treatment.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of hand functions using a wearable hand exoskeleton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suin; Lee, Jeongsoo; Park, Wookeun; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-07-01

    To investigate, improve, and observe the effect of rehabilitation therapy, many studies have been conducted on evaluating the motor function quantitatively by developing various types of robotic systems. Even though the robotic systems have been developed, functional evaluation of the hand has been rarely investigated, because it is difficult to install a number of actuators or sensors to the hand due to limited space around the fingers. Therefore, in this study, a hand exoskeleton was developed to satisfy the required specifications for evaluating the hand functions including spasticity of finger flexors, finger independence, and multi-digit synergy and algorithms to evaluate such functions were proposed. The hand exoskeleton was composed with the four 4-bar linkages, two motors, and three loadcells for each finger, and it was able to flex/extend the metacarpal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal(PIP) joints independently while measuring the pulling force at each phalanx. Using the hand exoskeleton, the hand functions of the three healthy subject were evaluated and the experimental results were analyzed.

  7. Thermal analysis and structural characterization of chitinous exoskeleton from two marine invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez-de la Rosa, B.A., E-mail: balej05@yahoo.com.mx [Laboratory of Natural Polymers, CIAD – Coordinación Guaymas, Carretera al Varadero Nacional km. 6.6, Col. Las Playitas, 85480 Guaymas, Sonora (Mexico); Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Mérida, Carretera antigua a Progreso, km. 6. Apdo, Postal 73, Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatan (Mexico); May-Crespo, J.; Quintana-Owen, P.; Gónzalez-Gómez, W.S. [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Mérida, Carretera antigua a Progreso, km. 6. Apdo, Postal 73, Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatan (Mexico); Yañez-Limón, J.M. [Materials and Engineering Science, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, 76230 Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro (Mexico); Alvarado-Gil, J.J., E-mail: jjag@mda.cinvestav.mx [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Mérida, Carretera antigua a Progreso, km. 6. Apdo, Postal 73, Cordemex, 97310 Mérida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2015-06-20

    Highlights: • Thermal analysis of exoskeletons: Antipathes caribbeana and Limulus polyphemus. • DMTA revealed Limulus has a stronger structure with a stepper glass transition. • DSC measurements exhibited a much larger water holding capacity in Antipathes. • X-ray diffraction analysis shows a higher crystallinity index in Limulus • FTIR showed α-chitin structures and high temperature C–N groups prevalence. - ABSTRACT: Thermomechanical and structural properties of two marine species exoskeletons, Antipathes caribbeana (black coral) and Limulus polyphemus (xiphosure), were studied using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). DMTA curves indicate the viscoelastic behavior and glass transition around 255 °C, black coral presented a second transition (175 °C) associated to the acetamide group attached to the α-chitin chain. DSC measurements showed a endothermic peak around 100 °C, with enthalpies of 4.02 and 118.04 J/g, indicating strong differences between exoskeletons respect to their water holding capacity and strength water–polymer interaction. A comparative analysis involving DSC and X-ray diffraction showed that lower values ΔH in xiphosure correspond to a material with a higher crystallinity (30), in contrast black coral exhibits higher values ΔH and a lower crystallinity (19). FTIR confirmed α-chitin based structure, at higher temperature diminishes the amide bands and a new one appears, related to C–N groups.

  8. Bilateral, Misalignment-Compensating, Full-DOF Hip Exoskeleton: Design and Kinematic Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Junius

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A shared design goal for most robotic lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of locomotion for the user. Despite this, only a limited amount of devices was able to actually reduce user metabolic consumption. Preservation of the natural motion kinematics was defined as an important requirement for a device to be metabolically beneficial. This requires the inclusion of all human degrees of freedom (DOF in a design, as well as perfect alignment of the rotation axes. As perfect alignment is impossible, compensation for misalignment effects should be provided. A misalignment compensation mechanism for a 3-DOF system is presented in this paper. It is validated by the implementation in a bilateral hip exoskeleton, resulting in a compact and lightweight device that can be donned fast and autonomously, with a minimum of required adaptations. Extensive testing of the prototype has shown that hip range of motion of the user is maintained while wearing the device and this for all three hip DOFs. This allowed the users to maintain their natural motion patterns when they are walking with the novel hip exoskeleton.

  9. Gym- based exoskeleton walking: A preliminary exploration of non-ambulatory end- user perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Aoife; Ginley, Orna Mc; Bertrand, Courtney; Lennon, Olive

    2018-02-01

    Robotic walking devices (RWD) have shown many physical benefits in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) rehabilitation. No study to date has explored end-user perceptions of these devices or gained insight into the use of these devices in a gym-based setting. This preliminary study explores the perspectives of four non-ambulatory individuals with SCI on using an exoskeleton walking device in a gym-based community setting. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with four SCI individuals living in the community. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Inductive thematic analysis established common overarching themes and subthemes. Four primary themes emerged addressing "The Psychological Adjustments Around Using RWDs with Respect to Disability", "Perceived Physical, Social and Psychological Benefits of Using an Exoskeleton", "The Role of External Influences", and "A Wellness Model to Health". A fully integrated gym setting was found to provide a positive and encouraging space to utilise the device. In addition, both the ability to set training goals and the positive attitude of robotic trainers were deemed to be important factors. This preliminary study provides detailed perspectives of four non-ambulatory individuals with SCI on utilising an exoskeleton walking device in a community setting. It suggests that gym-based RWDs impact positively on the users' lives and enhance their perceived wellbeing and sense of community integration. Enabling access to similar, community-based facilities should be prioritised for those with longstanding SCI disability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of an active industrial exoskeleton to aid dynamic lifting and lowering manual handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysamen, Kirsten; de Looze, Michiel; Bosch, Tim; Ortiz, Jesus; Toxiri, Stefano; O'Sullivan, Leonard W

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an industrial exoskeleton on muscle activity, perceived musculoskeletal effort, measured and perceived contact pressure at the trunk, thighs and shoulders, and subjective usability for simple sagittal plane lifting and lowering conditions. Twelve male participants lifted and lowered a box of 7.5 kg and 15 kg, respectively, from mid-shin height to waist height, five times, both with and without the exoskeleton. The device significantly reduced muscle activity of the Erector Spinae (12%-15%) and Biceps Femoris (5%). Ratings of perceived musculoskeletal effort in the trunk region were significantly less with the device (9.5%-11.4%). The measured contact pressure was highest on the trunk (91.7 kPa-93.8 kPa) and least on shoulders (47.6 kPa-51.7 kPa), whereas pressure was perceived highest on the thighs (35-44% of Max LPP). Six of the users rated the device usability as acceptable. The exoskeleton reduced musculoskeletal loading on the lower back and assisted with hip extensor torque during lifting and lowering. Contact pressures fell below the Pain Pressure Threshold. Perceived pressure was not exceptionally high, but sufficiently high to cause discomfort if used for long durations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation of proteolytic bacteria from mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) exoskeletons to produce chitinous material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernanda Kerche Paes; Brück, Dieter W; Brück, Wolfram M

    2017-09-15

    The use of insects as a source of protein is becoming an important factor for feeding an increasing population. After protein extraction for food use, the insect exoskeleton may offer the possibility for the production of added value products. Here, the aim was to isolate bacteria from the surface of farmed mealworms (Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, 1758) for the production of chitinous material from insect exoskeletons using microbial fermentation. Isolates were screened for proteases and acid production that may aid deproteination and demineralisation of insects through fermentation to produce chitin. Selected isolates were used single-step (isolated bacteria only) or two-step fermentations with Lactobacillus plantarum (DSM 20174). Two-step fermentations with isolates from mealworm exoskeletons resulted in a demineralisation of 97.9 and 98.5% from deproteinated mealworm fractions. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier- transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that crude chitin was produced. However, further optimisation is needed before the process can be upscaled. This is, to our knowledge, the first report using microbial fermentation for the extraction of chitin from insects. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Feasibility of an Exoskeleton-Based Interactive Video Game System for Upper Extremity Burn Contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jeffrey C; Ozsecen, Muzaffer Y; Muraoka, Nicholas K; Mancinelli, Chiara; Della Croce, Ugo; Ryan, Colleen M; Bonato, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Burn contractures are common and difficult to treat. Measuring continuous joint motion would inform the assessment of contracture interventions; however, it is not standard clinical practice. This study examines use of an interactive gaming system to measure continuous joint motion data. To assess the usability of an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system in the rehabilitation of upper extremity burn contractures. Feasibility study. Eight subjects with a history of burn injury and upper extremity contractures were recruited from the outpatient clinic of a regional inpatient rehabilitation facility. Subjects used an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system to play 4 different video games. Continuous joint motion data were collected at the shoulder and elbow during game play. Visual analog scale for engagement, difficulty and comfort. Angular range of motion by subject, joint, and game. The study population had an age of 43 ± 16 (mean ± standard deviation) years and total body surface area burned range of 10%-90%. Subjects reported satisfactory levels of enjoyment, comfort, and difficulty. Continuous joint motion data demonstrated variable characteristics by subject, plane of motion, and game. This study demonstrates the feasibility of use of an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system in the burn population. Future studies are needed that examine the efficacy of tailoring interactive video games to the specific joint impairments of burn survivors. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomimetics in the design of a robotic exoskeleton for upper limb therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniqued, Paul Dominick E.; Dungao, Jade R.; Manguerra, Michael V.; Baldovino, Renann G.; Abad, Alexander C.; Bugtai, Nilo T.

    2018-02-01

    Current methodologies in designing robotic exoskeletons for upper limb therapy simplify the complex requirements of the human anatomy. As a result, such devices tend to compromise safety and biocompatibility with the intended user. However, a new design methodology uses biological analogues as inspiration to address these technical issues. This approach follows that of biomimetics, a design principle that uses the extraction and transfer of useful information from natural morphologies and processes to solve technical design issues. In this study, a biomimetic approach in the design of a 5-degree-of-freedom robotic exoskeleton for upper limb therapy was performed. A review of biomimetics was first discussed along with its current contribution to the design of rehabilitation robots. With a proposed methodological framework, the design for an upper limb robotic exoskeleton was generated using CATIA software. The design was inspired by the morphology of the bones and the muscle force transmission of the upper limbs. Finally, a full design assembly presented had integrated features extracted from the biological analogue. The successful execution of a biomimetic design methodology made a case in providing safer and more biocompatible robots for rehabilitation.

  14. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas; Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity.

  15. A survey of stakeholder perspectives on a proposed combined exoskeleton-wheelchair technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Ben Mortensen, W; Mattie, Johanne; Wolff, Jamie; Parker, Claire; Borisoff, Jaimie

    2017-07-01

    Exoskeleton technology has potential benefits for wheelchair users' health and mobility. However, there are practical barriers to their everyday use as a mobility device. In particular, challenges related to travelling longer distances and transitioning between using a wheelchair and exoskeleton walking may present significant deterrents to regular exoskeleton use. In an effort to remove these barriers, a combined exoskeleton-wheelchair concept ('COMBO') has been proposed, which aims to achieve the benefits of both these mobility technologies. Given the inherent importance of including user-stakeholder opinions when designing an assistive technology solution, a study was undertaken to explore the perspectives of wheelchair users and healthcare professionals on the proposed conceptual design of the COMBO. An online survey with quantitative and qualitative components was conducted with wheelchair users and healthcare professionals working directly with individuals with mobility impairments. Respondents rated whether they would use or recommend a COMBO for four potential reasons. Nine design features were rated and compared in terms of their importance. Content analysis was used to analyze data from an open-ended question regarding additional perceptions about using or recommending a COMBO. A total of 481 survey responses were analyzed, 354 from wheelchair users and 127 from healthcare professionals. Potential health benefits was the most highly rated reason for potential use or recommendation of a COMBO. Of the 9 design features, 2 had a median rating of very important: inclusion of a fall-protection mechanism, and the ability for the operator to use their hands while standing. Qualitative findings indicated that health and physical benefits, use for daily life activities, and psychosocial benefits were important considerations in whether to use or recommend the COMBO. This study captures the opinions and perspectives of two stakeholder groups for an exoskeleton

  16. Motor modules during adaptation to walking in a powered ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Daniel A; Koller, Jeffrey R; Steele, Katherine M; Ferris, Daniel P

    2018-01-03

    Modules of muscle recruitment can be extracted from electromyography (EMG) during motions, such as walking, running, and swimming, to identify key features of muscle coordination. These features may provide insight into gait adaptation as a result of powered assistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes (module size, module timing and weighting patterns) of surface EMG data during assisted and unassisted walking in an powered, myoelectric, ankle-foot orthosis (ankle exoskeleton). Eight healthy subjects wore bilateral ankle exoskeletons and walked at 1.2 m/s on a treadmill. In three training sessions, subjects walked for 40 min in two conditions: unpowered (10 min) and powered (30 min). During each session, we extracted modules of muscle recruitment via nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF) from the surface EMG signals of ten muscles in the lower limb. We evaluated reconstruction quality for each muscle individually using R 2 and normalized root mean squared error (NRMSE). We hypothesized that the number of modules needed to reconstruct muscle data would be the same between conditions and that there would be greater similarity in module timings than weightings. Across subjects, we found that six modules were sufficient to reconstruct the muscle data for both conditions, suggesting that the number of modules was preserved. The similarity of module timings and weightings between conditions was greater then random chance, indicating that muscle coordination was also preserved. Motor adaptation during walking in the exoskeleton was dominated by changes in the module timings rather than module weightings. The segment number and the session number were significant fixed effects in a linear mixed-effect model for the increase in R 2 with time. Our results show that subjects walking in a exoskeleton preserved the number of modules and the coordination of muscles within the modules across conditions. Training (motor adaptation within the session and

  17. Volition-adaptive control for gait training using wearable exoskeleton: preliminary tests with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Aranda, Joan; Montesano, Luis; Del-Ama, Antonio J; Pons, Jose L

    2018-01-03

    Gait training for individuals with neurological disorders is challenging in providing the suitable assistance and more adaptive behaviour towards user needs. The user specific adaptation can be defined based on the user interaction with the orthosis and by monitoring the user intentions. In this paper, an adaptive control model, commanded by the user intention, is evaluated using a lower limb exoskeleton with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals (SCI). A user intention based adaptive control model has been developed and evaluated with 4 incomplete SCI individuals across 3 sessions of training per individual. The adaptive control model modifies the joint impedance properties of the exoskeleton as a function of the human-orthosis interaction torques and the joint trajectory evolution along the gait sequence, in real time. The volitional input of the user is identified by monitoring the neural signals, pertaining to the user's motor activity. These volitional inputs are used as a trigger to initiate the gait movement, allowing the user to control the initialization of the exoskeleton movement, independently. A Finite-state machine based control model is used in this set-up which helps in combining the volitional orders with the gait adaptation. The exoskeleton demonstrated an adaptive assistance depending on the patients' performance without guiding them to follow an imposed trajectory. The exoskeleton initiated the trajectory based on the user intention command received from the brain machine interface, demonstrating it as a reliable trigger. The exoskeleton maintained the equilibrium by providing suitable assistance throughout the experiments. A progressive change in the maximum flexion of the knee joint was observed at the end of each session which shows improvement in the patient performance. Results of the adaptive impedance were evaluated by comparing with the application of a constant impedance value. Participants reported that the movement of the

  18. Development of VariLeg, an exoskeleton with variable stiffness actuation: first results and user evaluation from the CYBATHLON 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrade, Stefan O; Dätwyler, Katrin; Stücheli, Marius; Studer, Kathrin; Türk, Daniel-Alexander; Meboldt, Mirko; Gassert, Roger; Lambercy, Olivier

    2018-03-13

    Powered exoskeletons are a promising approach to restore the ability to walk after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, current exoskeletons remain limited in their walking speed and ability to support tasks of daily living, such as stair climbing or overcoming ramps. Moreover, training progress for such advanced mobility tasks is rarely reported in literature. The work presented here aims to demonstrate the basic functionality of the VariLeg exoskeleton and its ability to enable people with motor complete SCI to perform mobility tasks of daily life. VariLeg is a novel powered lower limb exoskeleton that enables adjustments to the compliance in the leg, with the objective of improving the robustness of walking on uneven terrain. This is achieved by an actuation system with variable mechanical stiffness in the knee joint, which was validated through test bench experiments. The feasibility and usability of the exoskeleton was tested with two paraplegic users with motor complete thoracic lesions at Th4 and Th12. The users trained three times a week, in 60 min sessions over four months with the aim of participating in the CYBATHLON 2016 competition, which served as a field test for the usability of the exoskeleton. The progress on basic walking skills and on advanced mobility tasks such as incline walking and stair climbing is reported. Within this first study, the exoskeleton was used with a constant knee stiffness. Test bench evaluation of the variable stiffness actuation system demonstrate that the stiffness could be rendered with an error lower than 30 Nm/rad. During training with the exoskeleton, both users acquired proficient skills in basic balancing, walking and slalom walking. In advanced mobility tasks, such as climbing ramps and stairs, only basic (needing support) to intermediate (able to perform task independently in 25% of the attempts) skill levels were achieved. After 4 months of training, one user competed at the CYBATHLON 2016 and was able to perform 3

  19. Genes involved in thoracic exoskeleton formation during the pupal-to-adult molt in a social insect model, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Michelle Prioli Miranda; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Dos Santos Cristino, Alexandre; de Paula Freitas, Flávia Cristina; Canhos, Luísa Lange; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile

    2013-08-28

    The insect exoskeleton provides shape, waterproofing, and locomotion via attached somatic muscles. The exoskeleton is renewed during molting, a process regulated by ecdysteroid hormones. The holometabolous pupa transforms into an adult during the imaginal molt, when the epidermis synthe3sizes the definitive exoskeleton that then differentiates progressively. An important issue in insect development concerns how the exoskeletal regions are constructed to provide their morphological, physiological and mechanical functions. We used whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays to screen for genes involved in exoskeletal formation in the honeybee thoracic dorsum. Our analysis included three sampling times during the pupal-to-adult molt, i.e., before, during and after the ecdysteroid-induced apolysis that triggers synthesis of the adult exoskeleton. Gene ontology annotation based on orthologous relationships with Drosophila melanogaster genes placed the honeybee differentially expressed genes (DEGs) into distinct categories of Biological Process and Molecular Function, depending on developmental time, revealing the functional elements required for adult exoskeleton formation. Of the 1,253 unique DEGs, 547 were upregulated in the thoracic dorsum after apolysis, suggesting induction by the ecdysteroid pulse. The upregulated gene set included 20 of the 47 cuticular protein (CP) genes that were previously identified in the honeybee genome, and three novel putative CP genes that do not belong to a known CP family. In situ hybridization showed that two of the novel genes were abundantly expressed in the epidermis during adult exoskeleton formation, strongly implicating them as genuine CP genes. Conserved sequence motifs identified the CP genes as members of the CPR, Tweedle, Apidermin, CPF, CPLCP1 and Analogous-to-Peritrophins families. Furthermore, 28 of the 36 muscle-related DEGs were upregulated during the de novo formation of striated fibers attached to the exoskeleton. A

  20. Weight Bearing Over-ground Stepping in an Exoskeleton with Non-invasive Spinal Cord Neuromodulation after Motor Complete Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zdunowski, Sharon; Turner, Amanda; Sayenko, Dimitry; Lu, Daniel C; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2017-01-01

    We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 year) and completely absent of vision (>15 year) using two novel strategies-transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spine as well as pharmacological neuromodulation by buspirone. We also asked whether these neuromodulatory strategies could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics, CA) that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation and drug enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton along with changes in autonomic functions including cardiovascular and thermoregulation. Based on these data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the over-ground step training in an exoskeleton, combined with transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation either without or with pharmacological modulation.

  1. Weight Bearing Over-ground Stepping in an Exoskeleton with Non-invasive Spinal Cord Neuromodulation after Motor Complete Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Gad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 year and completely absent of vision (>15 year using two novel strategies—transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spine as well as pharmacological neuromodulation by buspirone. We also asked whether these neuromodulatory strategies could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics, CA that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation and drug enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton along with changes in autonomic functions including cardiovascular and thermoregulation. Based on these data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the over-ground step training in an exoskeleton, combined with transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation either without or with pharmacological modulation.

  2. Self-aligning exoskeleton hip joint: Kinematic design with five revolute, three prismatic and one ball joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Jonas; Marquardt, Charlotte; Asfour, Tamim

    2017-07-01

    Kinematic compatibility is of paramount importance in wearable robotic and exoskeleton design. Misalignments between exoskeletons and anatomical joints of the human body result in interaction forces which make wearing the exoskeleton uncomfortable and even dangerous for the human. In this paper we present a kinematically compatible design of an exoskeleton hip to reduce kinematic incompatibilities, so called macro- and micro-misalignments, between the human's and exoskeleton's joint axes, which are caused by inter-subject variability and articulation. The resulting design consists of five revolute, three prismatic and one ball joint. Design parameters such as range of motion and joint velocities are calculated based on the analysis of human motion data acquired by motion capture systems. We show that the resulting design is capable of self-aligning to the human hip joint in all three anatomical planes during operation and can be adapted along the dorsoventral and mediolateral axis prior to operation. Calculation of the forward kinematics and FEM-simulation considering kinematic and musculoskeletal constraints proved sufficient mobility and stiffness of the system regarding the range of motion, angular velocity and torque admissibility needed to provide 50 % assistance for an 80 kg person.

  3. Iron 'ElectriRx' man: Overground stepping in an exoskeleton combined with noninvasive spinal cord stimulation after paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag N; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Zdunowski, Sharon; Sayenko, Dimitry; Haakana, Piia; Turner, Amanda; Lu, Daniel; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2015-08-01

    We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 yr) and completely absent of vision (>15 yr) using a novel strategy - transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spinal vertebrae with just one week of training. We also asked whether this stimulation strategy could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics) that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton. These stepping sessions in the presence of stimulation were accompanied by greater cardiac responses and sweating than could be attained without the stimulation. Based on the data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the overground stepping in an exoskeleton, a novel transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation paradigm, and daily training.

  4. A Brain-Machine Interface Based on ERD/ERS for an Upper-Limb Exoskeleton Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhichuan; Sun, Shouqian; Zhang, Sanyuan; Chen, Yumiao; Li, Chao; Chen, Shi

    2016-12-02

    To recognize the user's motion intention, brain-machine interfaces (BMI) usually decode movements from cortical activity to control exoskeletons and neuroprostheses for daily activities. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether self-induced variations of the electroencephalogram (EEG) can be useful as control signals for an upper-limb exoskeleton developed by us. A BMI based on event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) is proposed. In the decoder-training phase, we investigate the offline classification performance of left versus right hand and left hand versus both feet by using motor execution (ME) or motor imagery (MI). The results indicate that the accuracies of ME sessions are higher than those of MI sessions, and left hand versus both feet paradigm achieves a better classification performance, which would be used in the online-control phase. In the online-control phase, the trained decoder is tested in two scenarios (wearing or without wearing the exoskeleton). The MI and ME sessions wearing the exoskeleton achieve mean classification accuracy of 84.29% ± 2.11% and 87.37% ± 3.06%, respectively. The present study demonstrates that the proposed BMI is effective to control the upper-limb exoskeleton, and provides a practical method by non-invasive EEG signal associated with human natural behavior for clinical applications.

  5. A Robotic Exoskeleton for Treatment of Crouch Gait in Children With Cerebral Palsy: Design and Initial Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Park, Hyung-Soon; Gravunder, Andrew J; Bulea, Thomas C

    2017-06-01

    Crouch gait, a pathological pattern of walking characterized by excessive knee flexion, is one of the most common gait disorders observed in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Effective treatment of crouch during childhood is critical to maintain mobility into adulthood, yet current interventions do not adequately alleviate crouch in most individuals. Powered exoskeletons provide an untapped opportunity for intervention. The multiple contributors to crouch, including spasticity, contracture, muscle weakness, and poor motor control make design and control of such devices challenging in this population. To our knowledge, no evidence exists regarding the feasibility or efficacy of utilizing motorized assistance to alleviate knee flexion in crouch gait. Here, we present the design of and first results from a powered exoskeleton for extension assistance as a treatment for crouch gait in children with CP. Our exoskeleton, based on the architecture of a knee-ankle-foot orthosis, is lightweight (3.2 kg) and modular. On board sensors enable knee extension assistance to be provided during distinct phases of the gait cycle. We tested our device on one six-year-old male participant with spastic diplegia from CP. Our results show that the powered exoskeleton improved knee extension during stance by 18.1° while total knee range of motion improved 21.0°. Importantly, we observed no significant decrease in knee extensor muscle activity, indicating the user did not rely solely on the exoskeleton to extend the limb. These results establish the initial feasibility of robotic exoskeletons for treatment of crouch and provide impetus for continued investigation of these devices with the aim of deployment for long term gait training in this population.

  6. Open loop control of an induction motor's velocity using PWM with space vectors; Control en lazo abierto de la velocidad de un motor de induccion utilizando PWM con vectores espaciales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Lopez, Manuel

    2001-10-15

    This work describes the design and implementation of an open loop speed controller for an induction motor. This controller is based on a DSP TMS320F240 chip from Texas Instruments. Speed control is achieved by maintaining the magnetic flux constant through the regularization of stator voltage/frequency relationship. Voltage and frequency variation are achieved using the strategy of pulse width modulation with space vectors. Hardware design is presented (current source and the printed circuit for the intelligent power module) and the software (control algorithms and the modulation strategy using space vectors). The algorithms given were implement using the TMS320F240 language. [Spanish] Este trabajo describe el diseno y la implementacion de un control de la velocidad en lazo abierto de un motor de induccion, basado en el DSP TMS320F240 de Texas Instruments. El control de la velocidad se logra manteniendo el flujo en el entre hierro constante, lo cual es realizado al regular el valor de la relacion voltaje/frecuencia en el estator. La variacion del voltaje y la frecuencia se realiza utilizando la estrategia de modulacion del ancho de los pulsos con vectores espaciales. Se presenta el diseno de los circuitos (fuente de corriente continua y circuito impreso para el modulo inteligente de potencia) y de los programas (algoritmos de control y de la estrategia de modulacion con vectores espaciales) necesarios que se utilizaron durante la implementacion del accionamiento del motor. Los algoritmos dados fueron implementados en el lenguaje ensamblador del TMS320F240.

  7. Implementación de un mantenimiento basado en la condición usando modelado y simulación: caso de estudio de un motor sin-crónico de imanes permanentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabid Quiroga Méndez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo introduce la arquitectura de un CBM (mantenimiento basado en la condición en una aplicación eléctrica. La detección de fallas de manera oportuna y eficiente constituye uno de los retos más importantes asociados al CBM y el enfoque basado en modelos en el medio para conseguirlo. Un caso de estudio en un motor sincrónico de imanes permanentes (PMSM es ejecutado para ilustrar cómo el modelado es utilizado en la implementación de un CBM. El monitoreo fue implementado en tiempo real usando Matlab® y dSpace®. Se emplea como indicadora de falla la diferencia entre los valores de la componente secuencial negativa para las corrientes predichas usando una red neuronal multicapa y la corriente obtenida del motor. Resultados experimentales demostraron la efectividad del modelo propuesto en la detección de la falla de cortocircuito en el estator en distintos niveles de severidad y carga, obteniendo una confiabilidad en la detección mayor al 95%.

  8. Diagnóstico de problemas de asimetrías rotóricas en un motor de inducción de gran potencia. // Diagnostic of high power induction motors failures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Soto Salvá

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Este diagnóstico se ha realizado en un total de 14 motores de inducción, todos ellos de jaula de ardilla y de 6 000 voltios.Se hará referencia al último diagnóstico realizado que se trata de un motor de una bomba de agua de alimentar caldera tipo4A3M-2500/6000 CT4 de una unidad generadora de electricidad de 100 MW. Mediante las técnicas de diagnósticoempleadas se logró determinar roturas de barras en la jaula de ardilla del rotor del motor.Palabras claves: Motor de Inducción, espectros, diagnóstico, jaula de ardilla, fallas.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract:This diagnosis has been carried out in a total of 14 induction motors, all them of squirrel cage and of 6 000 volts.Reference will be made to the last carried out diagnosis that it is a motor of a bomb of water of feeding boiler type 4A3M-2500/6000 CT4 of a generating unit of electricity of 100 MW. By means of the techniques of diagnosis employees it waspossible to determine breaks of bars in the cage of squirrel of the rotor in the motor.Key Words: Motor of induction, spectrum, diagnostic, squirrel cage, failures..

  9. Exoskeleton Training May Improve Level of Physical Activity After Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Wade, Rodney; Sumrell, Ryan; Villadelgado, Lynette; Khalil, Refka E; Lavis, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the use of a powered exoskeleton can improve parameters of physical activity as determined by walking time, stand up time, and number of steps in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Three men with complete (1 C5 AIS A and 2 T4 AIS A) and one man with incomplete (C5 AIS D) SCI participated in a clinical rehabilitation program. In the training program, the participants walked once weekly using a powered exoskeleton (Ekso) for approximately 1 hour over the course of 10 to 15 weeks. Walking time, stand up time, ratio of walking to stand up time, and number of steps were determined. Oxygen uptake (L/min), energy expenditure, and body composition were measured in one participant after training. Results: Over the course of 10 to 15 weeks, the maximum walking time increased from 12 to 57 minutes and the number of steps increased from 59 to 2,284 steps. At the end of the training, the 4 participants were able to exercise for 26 to 59 minutes. For one participant, oxygen uptake increased from 0.27 L/min during rest to 0.55 L/min during walking. Maximum walking speed was 0.24 m/s, and delta energy expenditure increased by 1.4 kcal/min during walking. Body composition showed a modest decrease in absolute fat mass in one participant. Conclusion: Exoskeleton training may improve parameters of physical activity after SCI by increasing the number of steps and walking time. Other benefits may include increasing energy expenditure and improving the profile of body composition.

  10. Confidence in the curve: Establishing instantaneous cost mapping techniques using bilateral ankle exoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Jeffrey R; Gates, Deanna H; Ferris, Daniel P; Remy, C David

    2017-02-01

    Lower extremity robotic prostheses and exoskeletons can require tuning a large number of control parameters on a subject-specific basis to reduce users' metabolic power during locomotion. We refer to the functional relationship between control parameter configurations and users' metabolic power as the metabolic cost landscape. Standard practice for estimating a metabolic cost landscape, and thus identifying optimal parameter configurations, is to vary control parameters while measuring steady-state metabolic power during walking. This approach is time consuming, tedious, and inefficient. We have developed an instantaneous cost mapping analysis that allows for an estimate of the metabolic cost landscape without the explicit need for steady-state measurements. Here we present novel methods to quantify the confidence in an estimated metabolic cost landscape, allowing for an objective subject-specific comparison of protocols regardless of which metabolic analysis is used. We validated these techniques by estimating metabolic cost landscapes for healthy subjects walking with bilateral robotic ankle exoskeletons using a standard practice protocol and two innovative protocols that use an instantaneous cost mapping analysis. All cost landscapes were a function of the devices' actuation timing. Results showed that for this device a protocol using an instantaneous cost mapping analysis could accurately identify optimal parameter configurations in 20 min, where the standard practice protocol required 42 min. Additionally, using an instantaneous cost mapping analysis with the standard practice's parameter exploration significantly improved fit confidence. These methods could greatly improve real-time optimization of robotic assistive devices or studies focused on biomechanical manipulations of locomotion. We are presenting novel subject-specific metabolic cost landscape confidence analyses. These confidence analyses can greatly improve experimental design, intersubject

  11. A bio-inspired design of a hand robotic exoskeleton for rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Aira Patrice R.; Bugtai, Nilo T.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the methodology for the design of a five-degree of freedom wearable robotic exoskeleton for hand rehabilitation. The design is inspired by the biological structure and mechanism of the human hand. One of the distinct features of the device is the cable-driven actuation, which provides the flexion and extension motion. A prototype of the orthotic device has been developed to prove the model of the system and has been tested in a 3D printed mechanical hand. The result showed that the proposed device was consistent with the requirements of bionics and was able to demonstrate the flexion and extension of the system.

  12. Automatic Setting Procedure for Exoskeleton-Assisted Overground Gait: Proof of Concept on Stroke Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolla, Marta; Guanziroli, Eleonora; D'Angelo, Andrea; Cannaviello, Giovanni; Molteni, Franco; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    Stroke-related locomotor impairments are often associated with abnormal timing and intensity of recruitment of the affected and non-affected lower limb muscles. Restoring the proper lower limbs muscles activation is a key factor to facilitate recovery of gait capacity and performance, and to reduce maladaptive plasticity. Ekso is a wearable powered exoskeleton robot able to support over-ground gait training. The user controls the exoskeleton by triggering each single step during the gait cycle. The fine-tuning of the exoskeleton control system is crucial-it is set according to the residual functional abilities of the patient, and it needs to ensure lower limbs powered gait to be the most physiological as possible. This work focuses on the definition of an automatic calibration procedure able to detect the best Ekso setting for each patient. EMG activity has been recorded from Tibialis Anterior, Soleus, Rectus Femoris, and Semitendinosus muscles in a group of 7 healthy controls and 13 neurological patients. EMG signals have been processed so to obtain muscles activation patterns. The mean muscular activation pattern derived from the controls cohort has been set as reference. The developed automatic calibration procedure requires the patient to perform overground walking trials supported by the exoskeleton while changing parameters setting. The Gait Metric index is calculated for each trial, where the closer the performance is to the normative muscular activation pattern, in terms of both relative amplitude and timing, the higher the Gait Metric index is. The trial with the best Gait Metric index corresponds to the best parameters set. It has to be noted that the automatic computational calibration procedure is based on the same number of overground walking trials, and the same experimental set-up as in the current manual calibration procedure. The proposed approach allows supporting the rehabilitation team in the setting procedure. It has been demonstrated to be

  13. Automatic Setting Procedure for Exoskeleton-Assisted Overground Gait: Proof of Concept on Stroke Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gandolla

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke-related locomotor impairments are often associated with abnormal timing and intensity of recruitment of the affected and non-affected lower limb muscles. Restoring the proper lower limbs muscles activation is a key factor to facilitate recovery of gait capacity and performance, and to reduce maladaptive plasticity. Ekso is a wearable powered exoskeleton robot able to support over-ground gait training. The user controls the exoskeleton by triggering each single step during the gait cycle. The fine-tuning of the exoskeleton control system is crucial—it is set according to the residual functional abilities of the patient, and it needs to ensure lower limbs powered gait to be the most physiological as possible. This work focuses on the definition of an automatic calibration procedure able to detect the best Ekso setting for each patient. EMG activity has been recorded from Tibialis Anterior, Soleus, Rectus Femoris, and Semitendinosus muscles in a group of 7 healthy controls and 13 neurological patients. EMG signals have been processed so to obtain muscles activation patterns. The mean muscular activation pattern derived from the controls cohort has been set as reference. The developed automatic calibration procedure requires the patient to perform overground walking trials supported by the exoskeleton while changing parameters setting. The Gait Metric index is calculated for each trial, where the closer the performance is to the normative muscular activation pattern, in terms of both relative amplitude and timing, the higher the Gait Metric index is. The trial with the best Gait Metric index corresponds to the best parameters set. It has to be noted that the automatic computational calibration procedure is based on the same number of overground walking trials, and the same experimental set-up as in the current manual calibration procedure. The proposed approach allows supporting the rehabilitation team in the setting procedure. It has been

  14. Kinematics and design of a portable and wearable exoskeleton for hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cempini, Marco; De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Lenzi, Tommaso; Cortese, Mario; Giovacchini, Francesco; Vitiello, Nicola; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2013-06-01

    We present the kinematic design and actuation mechanics of a wearable exoskeleton for hand rehabilitation of post-stroke. Our design method is focused on achieving maximum safety, comfort and reliability in the interaction, and allowing different users to wear the device with no manual regulations. In particular, we propose a kinematic and actuation solution for the index finger flexion/extension, which leaves full movement freedom on the abduction-adduction plane. This paper presents a detailed kineto-static analysis of the system and a first prototype of the device.

  15. Phase-II Clinical Validation of a Powered Exoskeleton for the Treatment of Elbow Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Crea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasticity is a typical motor disorder in patients affected by stroke. Typically post-stroke rehabilitation consists of repetition of mobilization exercises on impaired limbs, aimed to reduce muscle hypertonia and mitigate spastic reflexes. It is currently strongly debated if the treatment's effectiveness improves with the timeliness of its adoption; in particular, starting intensive rehabilitation as close as possible to the stroke event may counteract the growth and postpone the onset of spasticity. In this paper we present a phase-II clinical validation of a robotic exoskeleton in treating subacute post-stroke patients.Methods: Seventeen post-stroke patients participated in 10 daily rehabilitation sessions using the NEUROExos Elbow Module exoskeleton, each one lasting 45 min: the exercises consisted of isokinetic passive mobilization of the elbow, with torque threshold to detect excessive user's resistance to the movement. We investigated the safety by reporting possible adverse events, such as mechanical, electrical or software failures of the device or injuries or pain experienced by the patient. As regards the efficacy, the Modified Ashworth Scale, was identified as primary outcome measure and the NEEM metrics describing elbow joint resistance to passive extension (i.e., maximum extension torque and zero-torque angle as secondary outcomes.Results: During the entire duration of the treatments no failures or adverse events for the patients were reported. No statistically significant differences were found in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores, between pre-treatment and post-treatment and between post-treatment and follow-up sessions, indicating the absence of spasticity increase throughout (14 days and after (3–4 months follow-up the treatment. Exoskeleton metrics confirmed the absence of significant difference in between pre- and post-treatment data, whereas intra-session data highlighted significant differences in the

  16. Phase-II Clinical Validation of a Powered Exoskeleton for the Treatment of Elbow Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Simona; Cempini, Marco; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Posteraro, Federico; Vitiello, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Spasticity is a typical motor disorder in patients affected by stroke. Typically post-stroke rehabilitation consists of repetition of mobilization exercises on impaired limbs, aimed to reduce muscle hypertonia and mitigate spastic reflexes. It is currently strongly debated if the treatment's effectiveness improves with the timeliness of its adoption; in particular, starting intensive rehabilitation as close as possible to the stroke event may counteract the growth and postpone the onset of spasticity. In this paper we present a phase-II clinical validation of a robotic exoskeleton in treating subacute post-stroke patients. Methods: Seventeen post-stroke patients participated in 10 daily rehabilitation sessions using the NEUROExos Elbow Module exoskeleton, each one lasting 45 min: the exercises consisted of isokinetic passive mobilization of the elbow, with torque threshold to detect excessive user's resistance to the movement. We investigated the safety by reporting possible adverse events, such as mechanical, electrical or software failures of the device or injuries or pain experienced by the patient. As regards the efficacy , the Modified Ashworth Scale, was identified as primary outcome measure and the NEEM metrics describing elbow joint resistance to passive extension (i.e., maximum extension torque and zero-torque angle) as secondary outcomes. Results: During the entire duration of the treatments no failures or adverse events for the patients were reported. No statistically significant differences were found in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores, between pre-treatment and post-treatment and between post-treatment and follow-up sessions, indicating the absence of spasticity increase throughout (14 days) and after (3-4 months follow-up) the treatment. Exoskeleton metrics confirmed the absence of significant difference in between pre- and post-treatment data, whereas intra-session data highlighted significant differences in the secondary outcomes

  17. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas, E-mail: tomar@purdue.edu

    2015-04-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 80 °C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26 ± 0.89 GPa at 25 °C that reduces to 7.61 ± 0.65 GPa at 80 °C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38 ± 2.3 GPa at 25 °C to 24.58 ± 1.71 GPa at 80 °C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. - Highlights: • Shrimp species Pandalus platyceros and Rimicaris exoculata exoskeletons are analyzed. • Temperature dependent properties of shrimp exoskeleton are compared. • Mechanical properties are correlated with structure and composition of exoskeleton. • Mechanical properties reduce with increase in temperature. • Presence of biominerals gives better thermal stability to structure.

  18. Clinical effectiveness and safety of powered exoskeleton-assisted walking in patients with spinal cord injury: systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E; Zimmermann, Angela K; Herbert, William G

    2016-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons are designed to safely facilitate ambulation in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). We conducted the first meta-analysis of the available published research on the clinical effectiveness and safety of powered exoskeletons in SCI patients. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for studies of powered exoskeleton-assisted walking in patients with SCI. Main outcomes were analyzed using fixed and random effects meta-analysis models. A total of 14 studies (eight ReWalk™, three Ekso™, two Indego(®), and one unspecified exoskeleton) representing 111 patients were included in the analysis. Training programs were typically conducted three times per week, 60-120 minutes per session, for 1-24 weeks. Ten studies utilized flat indoor surfaces for training and four studies incorporated complex training, including walking outdoors, navigating obstacles, climbing and descending stairs, and performing activities of daily living. Following the exoskeleton training program, 76% of patients were able to ambulate with no physical assistance. The weighted mean distance for the 6-minute walk test was 98 m. The physiologic demand of powered exoskeleton-assisted walking was 3.3 metabolic equivalents and rating of perceived exertion was 10 on the Borg 6-20 scale, comparable to self-reported exertion of an able-bodied person walking at 3 miles per hour. Improvements in spasticity and bowel movement regularity were reported in 38% and 61% of patients, respectively. No serious adverse events occurred. The incidence of fall at any time during training was 4.4%, all occurring while tethered using a first-generation exoskeleton and none resulting in injury. The incidence of bone fracture during training was 3.4%. These risks have since been mitigated with newer generation exoskeletons and refinements to patient eligibility criteria. Powered exoskeletons allow patients with SCI to safely ambulate in real-world settings at a physical activity intensity conducive to

  19. Fine finger motor skill training with exoskeleton robotic hand in chronic stroke: stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenfeld, Corinna; Tong, Raymond K Y; Susanto, Evan A; Ho, Sze-Kit; Hu, Xiao-ling

    2013-06-01

    Background and Purpose. Stroke survivors often show a limited recovery in the hand function to perform delicate motions, such as full hand grasping, finger pinching and individual finger movement. The purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of an exoskeleton robotic hand together with fine finger motor skill training on 2 chronic stroke patients. Case Descriptions. Two post-stroke patients participated in a 20-session training program by integrating 10 minutes physical therapy, 20 minutes robotic hand training and 15 minutes functional training tasks with delicate objects(card, pen and coin). These two patients (A and B) had cerebrovascular accident at 6 months and 11 months respectively when enrolled in this study. Outcomes. The results showed that both patients had improvements in Fugl-Meyer assessment (FM), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Patients had better isolation of the individual finger flexion and extension based on the reduced muscle co-contraction from the electromyographic(EMG) signals and finger extension force after 20 sessions of training. Discussion. This preliminary study showed that by focusing on the fine finger motor skills together with the exoskeleton robotic hand, it could improve the motor recovery of the upper extremity in the fingers and hand function, which were showed in the ARAT. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness.

  20. Design and characterization of a magneto-rheological series elastic actuator for a lower extremity exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Zhao, Xuan; Ma, Hao; Qin, Ling; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative actuator named magneto-rheological series elastic actuator (MRSEA) is designed for the knee joints of a lower extremity exoskeleton CUHK-EXO. MRSEA is designed to reduce the mechanical impedance of the exoskeleton and filter out unwanted collisions. It can also provide large controllable braking torque with low power, and hence improve the system energy efficiency. A description of CUHK-EXO developed to help paraplegic patients regain the mobility to stand up, sit down and walk is firstly introduced, followed by the mechanical design of MRSEA and simulation of the torsion spring pack (TSP) and magneto-rheological (MR) brake of MRSEA. Prototype of MRSEA is fabricated. Preliminary tests are performed to investigate the characteristics of the TSP and MR brake, and walking experiments with a paraplegic patient are performed to evaluate the performance of MRSEA. Experimental results of MRSEA match the modeling and simulation. As compared with the electric motor, the energy efficiency of the innovative MRSEA is improved by 52.8% during a gait cycle.

  1. Design and implementation of a training strategy in chronic stroke with an arm robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisoli, Antonio; Sotgiu, Edoardo; Procopio, Caterina; Bergamasco, Massimo; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    The distinguishing features of active exoskeletons are the capability of guiding arm movement at the level of the full kinematic chain of the human arm, and training full 3D spatial movements. We have specifically developed a PD sliding mode control for upper limb rehabilitation with gain scheduling for providing "assistance as needed", according to the force capability of the patient, and an automatic measurement of the impaired arm joint torques, to evaluate the hypertonia associated to the movement during the execution of the training exercise. Two different training tasks in Virtual Reality were devised, that make use of the above control, and allow to make a performance based evaluation of patient's motor status. The PERCRO L-Exos (Light-Exoskeleton) was used to evaluate the proposed algorithms and training exercises in two clinical case studies of patients with chronic stroke, that performed 6 weeks of robotic assisted training. Clinical evaluation (Fugl-Meyer Scale, Modified Ashworth Scale, Bimanual Activity Test) was conducted before and after treatment and compared to the scores and the quantitative indices, such as task time, position/joint error and resistance torques, associated to the training exercises. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Inverse Modeling of Human Knee Joint Based on Geometry and Vision Systems for Exoskeleton Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Piña-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current trends in Robotics aim to close the gap that separates technology and humans, bringing novel robotic devices in order to improve human performance. Although robotic exoskeletons represent a breakthrough in mobility enhancement, there are design challenges related to the forces exerted to the users’ joints that result in severe injuries. This occurs due to the fact that most of the current developments consider the joints as noninvariant rotational axes. This paper proposes the use of commercial vision systems in order to perform biomimetic joint design for robotic exoskeletons. This work proposes a kinematic model based on irregular shaped cams as the joint mechanism that emulates the bone-to-bone joints in the human body. The paper follows a geometric approach for determining the location of the instantaneous center of rotation in order to design the cam contours. Furthermore, the use of a commercial vision system is proposed as the main measurement tool due to its noninvasive feature and for allowing subjects under measurement to move freely. The application of this method resulted in relevant information about the displacements of the instantaneous center of rotation at the human knee joint.

  3. A method to accurately estimate the muscular torques of human wearing exoskeletons by torque sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Beomsoo; Jeon, Doyoung

    2015-04-09

    In exoskeletal robots, the quantification of the user's muscular effort is important to recognize the user's motion intentions and evaluate motor abilities. In this paper, we attempt to estimate users' muscular efforts accurately using joint torque sensor which contains the measurements of dynamic effect of human body such as the inertial, Coriolis, and gravitational torques as well as torque by active muscular effort. It is important to extract the dynamic effects of the user's limb accurately from the measured torque. The user's limb dynamics are formulated and a convenient method of identifying user-specific parameters is suggested for estimating the user's muscular torque in robotic exoskeletons. Experiments were carried out on a wheelchair-integrated lower limb exoskeleton, EXOwheel, which was equipped with torque sensors in the hip and knee joints. The proposed methods were evaluated by 10 healthy participants during body weight-supported gait training. The experimental results show that the torque sensors are to estimate the muscular torque accurately in cases of relaxed and activated muscle conditions.

  4. ARMin III – Arm Therapy Exoskeleton with an Ergonomic Shoulder Actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Nef

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation robots have become important tools in stroke rehabilitation. Compared to manual arm training, robot-supported training can be more intensive, of longer duration and more repetitive. Therefore, robots have the potential to improve the rehabilitation process in stroke patients. Whereas a majority of previous work in upper limb rehabilitation robotics has focused on end-effector-based robots, a shift towards exoskeleton robots is taking place because they offer a better guidance of the human arm, especially for movements with a large range of motion. However, the implementation of an exoskeleton device introduces the challenge of reproducing the motion of the human shoulder, which is one of the most complex joints of the body. Thus, this paper starts with describing a simplified model of the human shoulder. On the basis of that model, a new ergonomic shoulder actuation principle that provides motion of the humerus head is proposed, and its implementation in the ARMin III arm therapy robot is described. The focus lies on the mechanics and actuation principle. The ARMin III robot provides three actuated degrees of freedom for the shoulder and one for the elbow joint. An additional module provides actuated lower arm pro/supination and wrist flexion/extension. Five ARMin III devices have been manufactured and they are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in hospitals in Switzerland and in the United States.

  5. Development of hand exoskeleton for rehabilitation of post-stroke patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Amran Mohd; Chean, Tee Chu; Sukor, Jumadi Abdul; Hanafi, Dirman

    2017-10-01

    Degenerative muscle diseases characterized by loss of strength in human hand significantly affect the physical of affected individuals. A soft assistive exoskeleton glove is designed to help post-stroke patient with their rehabilitation process. The glove uses soft bending actuator which has a rubber like tender characteristic. Due to its rubber like characteristic, flexion of finger can be achieved easily through pneumatic air without considering other hand motions. The application involves a post-stroke patient to wear the soft exoskeleton glove on his paralyzed hand and control the actuation of the glove by using pneumatic air source. The fabrication of the soft bending actuator involves silicone rubber Mold Star® 15 SLOW which falls within the soft category of shore A hardness scale. The soft bending actuator is controlled by Arduino Mega 2560 as main controller board and relay module is used to trigger the 3/2-way single solenoid valve by switching on the 24VDC power supply. The actuation of the soft bending actuator can be manipulated by setting delay ON and OFF for the relay switching. Thus, the repetition of the bending motion can be customized to fulfil the rehabilitation needs of the patient.

  6. A Method to Accurately Estimate the Muscular Torques of Human Wearing Exoskeletons by Torque Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beomsoo Hwang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In exoskeletal robots, the quantification of the user’s muscular effort is important to recognize the user’s motion intentions and evaluate motor abilities. In this paper, we attempt to estimate users’ muscular efforts accurately using joint torque sensor which contains the measurements of dynamic effect of human body such as the inertial, Coriolis, and gravitational torques as well as torque by active muscular effort. It is important to extract the dynamic effects of the user’s limb accurately from the measured torque. The user’s limb dynamics are formulated and a convenient method of identifying user-specific parameters is suggested for estimating the user’s muscular torque in robotic exoskeletons. Experiments were carried out on a wheelchair-integrated lower limb exoskeleton, EXOwheel, which was equipped with torque sensors in the hip and knee joints. The proposed methods were evaluated by 10 healthy participants during body weight-supported gait training. The experimental results show that the torque sensors are to estimate the muscular torque accurately in cases of relaxed and activated muscle conditions.

  7. ADAPTIVE BUILDING EXOSKELETONS: A biomimetic model for the rehabilitation of social housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Scuderi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is an attempt to describe a new biomimetic model for the rehabilitation of social housing. In particular, the constructions built in Europe in the post Second World War period suffer of material and social degradation requiring architectural, functional and structural interventions. The analysis of the state of the art underlined the importance of the envelope in the definition of new performances and standards. Through a bio-mimicry approach, the paper shows the process leading to the definition of a building exoskeleton: a structural envelope able to solve complex sets of problems integrating different building systems. Adaptability results being a fundamental property to define an effective seismic and structural behavior but also to respond to changing user’s needs and environmental conditions. In the last part of the paper, information about feasible technologies and techniques to realize the exoskeleton are presented. Finally, the conclusions show the potentiality of the model if applied in critical contexts where intensive and diffusive interventions of recovery of social housing are needed.

  8. Studying the implementation of iterative impedance control for assistive hand rehabilitation using an exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, T; Vaidyanathan, R

    2017-07-01

    A positive training synergy can be obtained when two individuals attempt to learn the same motor task while mechanically coupled to one another. In this paper, we have studied how mimicking this interaction through impedance control can be exploited to improve assistance delivered by hand exoskeleton devices during rehabilitation. In this context, the machine and user take complementary roles akin to two coupled individuals. We present the derivation of a dynamic model of the human hand for the purpose of controller development for new hand exoskeleton platforms. Using this model, we have simulated the behavior of an iterative impedance controller programmed for rehabilitative training. The controller interacts with cylindrical objects to be grasped by means of an inverse kinematic mapping and tuning of mechanical impedance characteristic of the finger joints. Through fusion of concepts from motor control theory, muscle impedance and task oriented control, the controller is capable of iteratively learn to accomplish simple tasks involving grasping and lifting while cooperating with a user. The controller is also capable of adapting to more complex dynamics for more dexterous tasks, such as pulling on a hand-bar or loosening the cap of a jar. We believe the human-robot synergy established in this investigation has benefits to therapy. It can be combined with a broad range of training exercises and represents an incremental step towards mimicking natural human motor responses.

  9. Development of a wearable exoskeleton rehabilitation system based on hybrid control mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Long

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower limb rehabilitation exoskeletons usually help patients walk based on fixed gait trajectories. However, it is not suitable for unilateral lower limb disorders. In this article, a hybrid training mode is proposed to be applied in rehabilitation for unilateral lower limb movement disorders. The hybrid training includes two modes, that is, the passive training mode and the active assist mode. At an early stage of the rehabilitation therapy, the passive training mode is utilized, in which microelectromechanical systems-based attitude and heading reference system is used to collect the gait trajectory of the healthy limb. The exoskeleton on the unhealthy limb will be driven to track the joint trajectory of the healthy limb. If the patient’s abilities recovered, the rehabilitation system can be switched to the active assist mode. Two force sensors are imbedded into the interface on the thigh to measure the interaction information in order to detect the patient’s initiative walking intention. In the active mode, the walking gait trajectory is modified and generated based on the gait trajectory of the healthy side via the attitude and heading reference system. In this article, a position close control loop is designed to drive the mechanical leg to help the unhealthy limb walk. Laboratory experiments are performed on a healthy human subject to illustrate the proposed approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method can be applied and extended in the passive and active rehabilitation mode for the unilateral lower limb disorders.

  10. Optimization of stepped-cone CVT for lower-limb exoskeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wearable exoskeletons offer interesting possibilities to address the global concerns of the ageing society and hence many researchers and industries are investing significant resources to develop new innovations in the area of physical assistance. An important issue in providing effective physical assistance is how the needed torques can be generated efficiently and effectively. This paper considers this area and explores the use of continuous variable transmissions (CVT for up-grading/downgrading torques so that the torque variations for performing motions of normal daily living can be provided. The knee joint is focused upon to develop the key stages of the CVT based approach in generating motion torques. From our on-going research to developing assistive exoskeletons for support activities of daily living it has been found that 6.3–20.6 Nm torque is required to provide 10–20% assistance at the knee joint of a healthy elderly person having weight 70–90 kg. The challenge here is to miniaturize conventional CVTs developed for the automobiles where large torques are needed. To achieve the required torque range for supporting human joints in various motions, a CVT is designed and its parameters optimized. Results are validated via a professional optimization software.

  11. A rotary pneumatic actuator for the actuation of the exoskeleton knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobin Varghese

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rotary pneumatic actuators that are made out of linear one are always best suited for exoskeleton joint actuation due to its inherent power to weight ratio. This work is a modified version of knee actuation system that has already been developed and major modifications are made in order to make it more suitable for human wearing and also to reduce its bulkiness and complexity. The considered actuator system is a rotary actuator where a pulley converts the linear motion of the standard pneumatic piston into the rotary motion. To prove the capability of the actuator, its performance characteristics such as torque and power produced are compared to the required torque and power at the knee joint of the exoskeleton in swing phase and are found to be excellent. The two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA is performed to find the effect of the throat area valve on knee angle. The ANOVA shows the significant effect of the throat area variation on the knee angle flexion made by the proposed actuator. A relationship between the throat area of flow control valve, that is connected to the exit port of the direction control valve, and angular displacement of the knee joint has been formulated. This relationship can be used to design a control system to regulate the mass flow rate of air at the exit and hence the angular velocity of the knee joint can be controlled. Keywords: Driven pulley, Flow control valve, Rotary, Pneumatic cylinder

  12. The influence of active vision on the exoskeleton of intelligent agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrice; Terry, Theodore B.

    2016-04-01

    Chameleonization occurs when a self-learning autonomous mobile system's (SLAMR) active vision scans the surface of which it is perched causing the exoskeleton to changes colors exhibiting a chameleon effect. Intelligent agents having the ability to adapt to their environment and exhibit key survivability characteristics of its environments would largely be due in part to the use of active vision. Active vision would allow the intelligent agent to scan its environment and adapt as needed in order to avoid detection. The SLAMR system would have an exoskeleton, which would change, based on the surface it was perched on; this is known as the "chameleon effect." Not in the common sense of the term, but from the techno-bio inspired meaning as addressed in our previous paper. Active vision, utilizing stereoscopic color sensing functionality would enable the intelligent agent to scan an object within its close proximity, determine the color scheme, and match it; allowing the agent to blend with its environment. Through the use of its' optical capabilities, the SLAMR system would be able to further determine its position, taking into account spatial and temporal correlation and spatial frequency content of neighboring structures further ensuring successful background blending. The complex visual tasks of identifying objects, using edge detection, image filtering, and feature extraction are essential for an intelligent agent to gain additional knowledge about its environmental surroundings.

  13. X1: A Robotic Exoskeleton for In-Space Countermeasures and Dynamometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Rochelle; Beck, Christopher; Rovekamp, Roger; Diftler, Myron; Neuhaus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bone density loss and muscle atrophy are among the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) highest concerns for crew health in space. Countless hours are spent maintaining an exercise regimen aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to counteract the effect of zero-gravity. Looking toward the future, NASA researchers are developing new compact and innovative exercise technologies to maintain crew health as missions increase in length and take humans further out into the solar system. The X1 Exoskeleton, initially designed for assisted mobility on Earth, was quickly theorized to have far-reaching potential as both an in-space countermeasures device and a dynamometry device to measure muscle strength. This lower-extremity device has the ability to assist or resist human movement through the use of actuators positioned at the hips and knees. Multiple points of adjustment allow for a wide range of users, all the while maintaining correct joint alignment. This paper discusses how the X1 Exoskeleton may fit NASA's onorbit countermeasures needs.

  14. [The efficacy of the exoskeleton ExoAtlet to restore walking in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, S V; Lijdvoy, V Yu; Sekirin, A B; Petrushanskaya, K A; Pismennaya, E V

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of the exoskeleton ExoAtlet in complex therapy of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A pilot study within the prospective open controlled program was conducted. Eighteen patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) in remission and secondary progressive MS (SPMS) with the level of neurological deficit on the EDSS from 3 to 7 points have completed the study. EDSS, MSFC, HADS, MoCA scales were administered and the force measuring insoles F-Scan Tekscan (USA) were used to study the biomechanics of walking. Good tolerability of workload within 30-40 min. was observed. The improvement in the EDSS was detected in 9 patients, in whole, a significant positive trend (pexoskeleton, the walking speed and stability increased, oscillation of the body decreased, support function increased, the phenomenon of cyclical changes of the vertical component of support reactions reduced. The results of the pilot study showed promising future research opportunities for robotic-assisted walking and maintenance of the vertical posture with the help of the exoskeleton ExoAtlet to restore the abilities of movement in MS patients with locomotor disorders.

  15. A Method to Accurately Estimate the Muscular Torques of Human Wearing Exoskeletons by Torque Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Beomsoo; Jeon, Doyoung

    2015-01-01

    In exoskeletal robots, the quantification of the user’s muscular effort is important to recognize the user’s motion intentions and evaluate motor abilities. In this paper, we attempt to estimate users’ muscular efforts accurately using joint torque sensor which contains the measurements of dynamic effect of human body such as the inertial, Coriolis, and gravitational torques as well as torque by active muscular effort. It is important to extract the dynamic effects of the user’s limb accurately from the measured torque. The user’s limb dynamics are formulated and a convenient method of identifying user-specific parameters is suggested for estimating the user’s muscular torque in robotic exoskeletons. Experiments were carried out on a wheelchair-integrated lower limb exoskeleton, EXOwheel, which was equipped with torque sensors in the hip and knee joints. The proposed methods were evaluated by 10 healthy participants during body weight-supported gait training. The experimental results show that the torque sensors are to estimate the muscular torque accurately in cases of relaxed and activated muscle conditions. PMID:25860074

  16. Design of an exoskeleton ankle robot for robot-assisted gait training of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ling-Fung; Ockenfeld, Corinna; Pang, Man-Kit; Wai, Hon-Wah; Soo, Oi-Yan; Li, Sheung-Wai; Tong, Kai-Yu

    2017-07-01

    Lower Limb Exoskeleton robot that can facilitate stair walking is a big challenge, most systems could only provide level ground walking. In this study, a lightweight (0.5kg at ankle, 0.5kg at waist for control box) and autonomous exoskeleton Ankle Robot was proposed to provide power assistance for gait training of chronic stroke patients and it can facilitate three walking conditions in real-time: (1) level walking, (2) stair ascending, and (3) stair descending. Chronic stroke patients (n=3) with drop foot gait deficit and moderate motor impairment were recruited to evaluate the system under different walking conditions (Functional Ambulatory Category: FAC=4.7±0.5 and Fugl-Meyer Assessment for lower-extremity: FMA-LE=13.7±2.9). The system consisted of a specially designed carbon fiber AFO, servomotor, gear transmission system, IMU and force sensors, and control box. The IMU sensors embedded in the shank measured acceleration and angular velocity to identify distinct features in leg tilting angle and leg angular velocity between the three walking conditions. The results showed the powered ankle dorsiflexion assistance could reduce dropped foot of the stroke patients in swing phase and provide better gait pattern. A demo of the ankle robot will be conducted in the conference.

  17. Control of the seven-degree-of-freedom upper limb exoskeleton for an improved human-robot interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Jungsuk

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes a practical scheme for controlling an exoskeleton robot with seven degrees of freedom (DOFs) that supports natural movements of the human arm. A redundant upper limb exoskeleton robot with seven DOFs is mechanically coupled to the human body such that it becomes a natural extension of the body. If the exoskeleton robot follows the movement of the human body synchronously, the energy exchange between the human and the robot will be reduced significantly. In order to achieve this, the redundancy of the human arm, which is represented by the swivel angle, should be resolved using appropriate constraints and applied to the robot. In a redundant 7-DOF upper limb exoskeleton, the pseudoinverse of the Jacobian with secondary objective functions is widely used to resolve the redundancy that defines the desired joint angles. A secondary objective function requires the desired joint angles for the movement of the human arm, and the angles are estimated by maximizing the projection of the longest principle axis of the manipulability ellipsoid for the human arm onto the virtual destination toward the head region. Then, they are fed into the muscle model with a relative damping to achieve more realistic robot-arm movements. Various natural arm movements are recorded using a motion capture system, and the actual swivel-angle is compared to that estimated using the proposed swivel angle estimation algorithm. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm provides a precise reference for estimating the desired joint angle with an error less than 5°.

  18. Ambulatory and Non-Ambulatory Benefits of Lower Limb Exoskeleton Use, with and without FES, in Clinical and Community Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    home and community use. The respective studies will characterize effects of exoskeleton walking on pain, spasticity , bowel and bladder function, body...or research tool that makes a meaningful contribution toward the understanding, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment , and/or rehabilitation...PT Researcher Identifier: n/a Nearest person month worked: 1 Contribution to Project: Mr. Veith oversees treatment for some subjects. Name

  19. Development of a lower limb rehabilitation exoskeleton based on real-time gait detection and gait tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemiplegia, apoplexia, or traffic accidents often lead to unilateral lower limb movement disorders. Traditional lower limb rehabilitation equipments usually execute walk training based on fixed gait trajectory; however, this type is unsuitable for unilateral lower limb disorders because they still have athletic ability and initiative walking intention on the healthy side. This article describes a wearable lower limb rehabilitation exoskeleton with a walk-assisting platform for safety and anti-gravity support. The exoskeleton detects and tracks the motion of the healthy leg, which is then used as the control input of the dyskinetic leg with half a gate-cycle delay. The patient can undergo walk training on his own intention, including individual walking habit, stride length, and stride frequency, which likely contribute to the training initiative. The series elastic actuator is chosen for the exoskeleton because the torque output can be accurately detected and used to calculate the assisted torque on the dyskinetic leg. This parameter corresponds to the recovery level of a patient’s muscle force. Finally, the walk-assisting experiments reveal that the rehabilitation exoskeleton in this article can provide the necessary assisting torques on the dyskinetic leg, which can be accurately monitored in real time to evaluate a patient’s rehabilitation status.

  20. Method for Walking Gait Identification in a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton Based on C4.5 Decision Tree Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A gait identification method for a lower extremity exoskeleton is presented in order to identify the gait sub-phases in human-machine coordinated motion. First, a sensor layout for the exoskeleton is introduced. Taking the difference between human lower limb motion and human-machine coordinated motion into account, the walking gait is divided into five sub-phases, which are ‘double standing’, ‘right leg swing and left leg stance’, ‘double stance with right leg front and left leg back’, ‘right leg stance and left leg swing’, and ‘double stance with left leg front and right leg back’. The sensors include shoe pressure sensors, knee encoders, and thigh and calf gyroscopes, and are used to measure the contact force of the foot, and the knee joint angle and its angular velocity. Then, five sub-phases of walking gait are identified by a C4.5 decision tree algorithm according to the data fusion of the sensors' information. Based on the simulation results for the gait division, identification accuracy can be guaranteed by the proposed algorithm. Through the exoskeleton control experiment, a division of five sub-phases for the human-machine coordinated walk is proposed. The experimental results verify this gait division and identification method. They can make hydraulic cylinders retract ahead of time and improve the maximal walking velocity when the exoskeleton follows the person's motion.

  1. Influencia de la configuración del kit de conversión en el desempeño mecánico-ambiental de un motor de encendido provocado (MEP bicombustible gasolina-gas natural vehicular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ramiro Agudelo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio experimental realizado sobre un motor Toyota Hilux de 2.400 cm3 en el que se determinó la influencia de la modificación de varios factores (el tamaño del regulador, el tamaño del venturi de un mezclador fijo y su ubicación en ducto de admisión o sobre carburador en los parámetros de operación mecánico-ambientales (consumo de combustible, rendimiento volumétrico, dosado relativo, emisiones de monóxido de carbono (CO y emisiones de metano (CH4 del motor en cinco modos de operación diferentes (factor secundario.Utilizando un diseño experimental multifactor y el análisis de varianza (tabla Anova se evaluó estadísticamente el efecto que cada factor tuvo sobre la variación de cada una de los parámetros de operación, con la respectiva validación de los supuestos estadísticos de no autocorrelación y homoscedasticidad.Los resultados mostraron una marcada influencia del tamaño del regulador y la ubicación del mezclador en el consumo de combustible y en la concentración de CO (proceso de combustión, mientras que el tamaño del venturi del mezclador afectó considerablemente la concentración de CH4 (combustión incompleta

  2. Evaluación de un motor de encendido por chispa trabajando con mezclas etanol-gasolina; Evaluation of the spark-ignition engine fueled with ethanol–gasoline blends

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    Eliezer Ahmed Melo Espinosa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available En la presente investigación se realiza un análisis del rendimiento de un motor de encendido por chispa (Lada 1300 al usar como combustible mezclas de etanol con gasolina en un 10%, 20% y 30%. Los parámetros analizados en cada experimento fueron el torque efectivo, la potencia efectiva, el consumo específico de combustible y las emisiones de monóxido de carbono. Los resultados obtenidos se analizaron estadísticamente mediante una comparación de muestras múltiples en el software estadístico Statgraphics Centurion XV.II. Este análisis fue hecho con él con el objetivo de analizar las posibles diferencias entre los parámetros evaluados para cada combustible a una misma rpm. A partir de los resultados obtenidos se pudieron establecer satisfactoriamente dos porcientos adecuados de la mezcla etanol-gasolina para ser utilizado en motores de encendido por chispa (Lada en las condiciones de Cuba y sin hacer modificacionesen el motor. In this investigation an analysis based on the performances of an engine when using blends of anhydrous ethanol with regular gasoline as fuels is carried out. The experiments of the Lada 1300 engine were carriedout for different blends in 10%, 20% and 30% of ethanol in gasoline. The analyzed parameters for each experiment were the effective torque, the effective power, the specific fuel consumption and the carbon monoxide exhausts emissions. The obtained results were statistically analyzed through multiple-sample comparison in the software Statgraphics Centurion XV.II. This analysis was made with the objective of analyzing the possible differences among the evaluated parameters for each fuel to the same rpm. The appropriate percent of the anhydrous ethanol - regular gasoline blends for use in engine (Lada under the Cuba conditions and without making modifications were satisfactorily established.

  3. Caracterización de un motor diesel trabajando con mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel ; Characterization of a diesel engine fueled with Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends

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    Michel Errasti Cabrera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo caracterizar el desempeño de un motor diesel en cuanto a sus prestaciones y al retardo de la ignición, al operar bajo diferentes regímenes de carga, empleando mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel. Para esto se determinó la característica exterior de velocidad al emplear las mezclas, y se compararon estos resultados con los obtenidos durante los ensayos con combustible diesel patrón; estableciendo el grado de afectación del motor al sustituir parte del combustible diesel por aceite de Jatropha. Se observó una disminución del torque y la potencia efectiva, y un aumento del consumo específico de combustible al emplear un mayor porciento de aceite de Jatropha en las mezclas. Por otra parte, en comparación con el combustible diesel, el retardo de la ignición no mostró una variación significativa al emplear las mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel.The present study aims to characterize the benefits of a diesel engine in terms of performance and ignition delay, operating under different loading regimes, using Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends. We determined the speed exterior feature when using mixtures, and compared these results with those obtained during tests with standard diesel fuel, establishing the degree of involvement of the engine to replace some diesel fuel for Jatropha oil. There was a decrease in the torque and effective power, and increased specific fuel consumption by using a higher percentage of Jatropha oil in blends. Moreover, compared to diesel fuel, the ignition delay showed no significant variation by employing Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends.

  4. Caracterización de un motor diesel trabajando con mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel Characterization of a diesel engine fueled with Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends

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    Michel Errasti Cabrera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo caracterizar el desempeño de un motor diesel en cuanto a sus prestaciones y al retardo de la ignición, al operar bajo diferentes regímenes de carga, empleando mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel. Para esto se determinó la característica exterior de velocidad al emplear las mezclas, y se compararon estos resultados con los obtenidos durante los ensayos con combustible diesel patrón; estableciendo el grado de afectación del motor al sustituir parte del combustible diesel por aceite de Jatropha. Se observó una disminución del torque y la potencia efectiva, y un aumento del consumo específico de combustible al emplear un mayor porciento de aceite de Jatropha en las mezclas. Por otra parte, en comparación con el combustible diesel, el retardo de la ignición no mostró una variación significativa al emplear las mezclas de aceite de Jatropha y combustible diesel.  The present study aims to characterize the benefits of a diesel engine in terms of performance and ignition delay, operating under different loading regimes, using Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends. We determined the speed exterior feature when using mixtures, and compared these results with those obtained during tests with standard diesel fuel, establishing the degree of involvement of the engine to replace some diesel fuel for Jatropha oil. There was a decrease in the torque and effective power, and increased specific fuel consumption by using a higher percentage of Jatropha oil in blends. Moreover, compared to diesel fuel, the ignition delay showed no significant variation by employing Jatropha oil and diesel fuel blends.Key words: Jatropha curcas oil, outer velocity characteristic, diesel engine, ignition delay.

  5. Using a brain-machine interface to control a hybrid upper limb exoskeleton during rehabilitation of patients with neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortal, Enrique; Planelles, Daniel; Resquin, Francisco; Climent, José M; Azorín, José M; Pons, José L

    2015-10-17

    As a consequence of the increase of cerebro-vascular accidents, the number of people suffering from motor disabilities is raising. Exoskeletons, Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) devices and Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) could be combined for rehabilitation purposes in order to improve therapy outcomes. In this work, a system based on a hybrid upper limb exoskeleton is used for neurological rehabilitation. Reaching movements are supported by the passive exoskeleton ArmeoSpring and FES. The movement execution is triggered by an EEG-based BMI. The BMI uses two different methods to interact with the exoskeleton from the user's brain activity. The first method relies on motor imagery tasks classification, whilst the second one is based on movement intention detection. Three healthy users and five patients with neurological conditions participated in the experiments to verify the usability of the system. Using the BMI based on motor imagery, healthy volunteers obtained an average accuracy of 82.9 ± 14.5 %, and patients obtained an accuracy of 65.3 ± 9.0 %, with a low False Positives rate (FP) (19.2 ± 10.4 % and 15.0 ± 8.4 %, respectively). On the other hand, by using the BMI based on detecting the arm movement intention, the average accuracy was 76.7 ± 13.2 % for healthy users and 71.6 ± 15.8 % for patients, with 28.7 ± 19.9 % and 21.2 ± 13.3 % of FP rate (healthy users and patients, respectively). The accuracy of the results shows that the combined use of a hybrid upper limb exoskeleton and a BMI could be used for rehabilitation therapies. The advantage of this system is that the user is an active part of the rehabilitation procedure. The next step will be to verify what are the clinical benefits for the patients using this new rehabilitation procedure.

  6. Modelo experimental de un motor unipolar

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    Luz Karine Sandoval

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la caracterización experimental de un prototipo de motor unipolar con el objeto de validar su modelo matemático. Este tipo de motor es bastante controversial a la hora de pretender explicar su modelo y fundamento de operación. Ha existido por cerca de casi dos siglos y aún persiste su misteriosa forma de funcionamiento; parece eludir cualquier explicación convencional a la luz de las ecuaciones de Maxwell. Es un dispositivo que genera una fuerza electromotriz (fem, aunque el flujo magnético que atraviesa el circuito no varía con el tiempo. El prototipo construido mostró la validez del modelo, esto es, una resistencia eléctrica y una fuente de tensión, puesto que al medir la velocidad angular alcanzada durante un intervalo de tiempo, se observó su crecimiento exponencial. La función de transferencia del motor es de primer orden, justo como se esperaba, dado que carece de elementos como bobinas o capacitores; sin embargo, tarda de treinta a cuarenta segundos en alcanzar su estado estable. Esto se debe, según el modelo planteado, a la resistencia eléctrica interna de este dispositivo.

  7. Mechanical Design of a Hybrid Leg Exoskeleton to Augment Load-Carrying for Walking

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    Yunjie Miao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An innovative lower extremity exoskeleton, SJTU-EX, is demonstrated in Shanghai JiaoTong University, which mainly aims to help soldiers and workers to support a payload in motion. This paper summarizes the mechanical design of SJTU-EX. Each pseudo-anthropomorphic leg of SJTU-EX has four active joints and two passive joints, and the joint ranges are optimized in consideration of both safety factors and the realization of typical motions. Springs are applied in the leg to eliminate the effect of gravity. The results of dynamic simulations are used to determine the actuated joints and the passive joints. Novel Hy-Mo actuators are introduced for SJTU-EX and the layout of the actuator for Diamond Side 2 is described in detail as a design example.

  8. Human-Robot Interaction during Walking with a Powered Compliant Knee Exoskeleton

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    Meeusen Romain

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Determinants of locomotor training involve taskspecificity, repeatability, variability, intensity and self-initiative. KNEXO, a unilateral knee exoskeleton has been developed to study the effects of compliant assistance during treadmill gait. Overall, walking within KNEXO, leads to asymmetric kinematics (Figure 1 and changes in naturally occurring muscle activity. Walking without KNEXO and with KNEXO in unassisted mode is difficult to compare as the device is unilateral and the pneumatic muscles give, although weight-compensated, a certain amount of inertia to the movement. Walking with KNEXO in high compliance resembles walking with KNEXO in unassisted mode. Overall, kinematic and EMG data show that the device has its shortcomings (unilateral, 1 DoF, 1 joint when assisting healthy gait, yet it gives opportunities to study the effects of assistanceas-needed on gait biomechanics.

  9. Towards a parameterizable exoskeleton for training of hand function after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Patrick; Heyer, Lars; Munte, Thomas F; Heldmann, Marcus; Schweikard, Achim; Maehle, Erik

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, actuation and sensing of an exoskeleton for hand function training after stroke. The frame is 3D-printed in one piece including the joints. Apart from saving assembly time, this enables parametrization of the link sizes in order to adapt it to the patient's hand and reduce joint misalignment. The joint angles are determined using Hall effect sensors. They measure the change of the magnetic field of in the joints integrated magnets achieving an average accuracy of 1.25 °. Tendons attached to the finger tips transmit forces from motors. The armature current, which is proportional to the force transmitting tendons is measured using a shunt and controlled by a custom-made current-limiter circuit. Preliminary experiments with a force/torque-sensor showed high linearity and accuracy with a root mean square error of 0.5937 N in comparison to the corresponding forces derived from the motor torque constant.

  10. Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators With Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    In order to minimize steady-state error with respect to uncertainties in robot control, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control needs a big integral gain, or a neural compensator is added to the classical proportional-derivative (PD) control with a large derivative gain. Both of them deteriorate transient performances of the robot control. In this paper, we extend the popular neural PD control into neural PID control. This novel control is a natural combination of industrial linear PID control and neural compensation. The main contributions of this paper are semiglobal asymptotic stability of the neural PID control and local asymptotic stability of the neural PID control with a velocity observer which are proved with standard weight training algorithms. These conditions give explicit selection methods for the gains of the linear PID control. An experimental study on an upper limb exoskeleton with this neural PID control is addressed.

  11. Control Architecture of a 10 DOF Lower Limbs Exoskeleton for Gait Rehabilitation

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    Natasa Koceska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the control architecture of a 10 DOF (Degrees of Freedom lower limbs exoskeleton for the gait rehabilitation of patients with gait dysfunction. The system has 4 double-acting rod pneumatic actuators (two for each leg that control the hip and knee joints. The motion of each cylinder's piston is controlled by two proportional pressure valves, connected to both cylinder chambers. The control strategy has been specifically designed in order to ensure a proper trajectory control for guiding patient's legs along a fixed reference gait pattern. An adaptive fuzzy controller which is capable of compensating for the influence of the dry friction was successfully designed, implemented and tested on an embedded real-time PC/104. In order to verify the proposed control architecture, laboratory experiments without a patient were carried out and the results are reported here and discussed.

  12. Constraint Study for a Hand Exoskeleton: Human Hand Kinematics and Dynamics

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    Fai Chen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, the number of projects studying the human hand from the robotic point of view has increased rapidly, due to the growing interest in academic and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the complexity of the human hand given its large number of degrees of freedom (DoF within a significantly reduced space requires an exhaustive analysis, before proposing any applications. The aim of this paper is to provide a complete summary of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the human hand as a preliminary step towards the development of hand devices such as prosthetic/robotic hands and exoskeletons imitating the human hand shape and functionality. A collection of data and constraints relevant to hand movements is presented, and the direct and inverse kinematics are solved for all the fingers as well as the dynamics; anthropometric data and dynamics equations allow performing simulations to understand the behavior of the finger.

  13. Ethical considerations in providing an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulboacă, Adriana E; Bolboacă, Sorana D; Bulboacă, Angelo C

    2017-04-01

    The health care system needs to face new and advanced medical technologies that can improve the patients' quality of life by replacing lost or decreased functions. In stroke patients, the disabilities that follow cerebral lesions may impair the mandatory daily activities of an independent life. These activities are dependent mostly on the patient's upper limb function so that they can carry out most of the common activities associated with a normal life. Therefore, an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients can contribute a real improvement of quality of their life. The ethical problems that need to be considered are linked to the correct adjustment of the upper limb skills in order to satisfy the patient's expectations, but within physiological limits. The debate regarding the medical devices dedicated to neurorehabilitation is focused on their ability to be beneficial to the patient's life, keeping away damages, injustice, and risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Movement Intention Prediction to Find a New Exoskeleton Design with Light and Comfortable Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza Torres, Ing. Mauricio; Fredy Bernal, Ing; Andrés Cifuentes, Ing.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a discussion about the design a novel exoskeleton and the implementation of superficial magnetic sensor and pressure sensor for find patterns and parameters in order to predicting the intention of movement for people with musculoskeletal system problem in lower limbs. The information is obtained through reading position and movement by magnetic and pressure sensor installed in different parts of the body. The advantage of this sensor is the location of the position reference of the every part of the body. Using the sensor in some parts of the body is possible to calculate the muscle contraction for the prediction of intended movement and to find a new design with light and comfortable materials.

  15. Epibiotic ciliates Scyphidia sp. and diatoms on Tigriopus fulvus (Copepoda: Harpacticoida exoskeleton

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    Luigi Pane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several microorganisms – epibionts – can adhere to living supports taking advantage for their survival, feeding and movement. Epibiosis occurs particularly in aquatic environments, on both benthic and planktonic organisms, among which copepods and cladocerans represent an important living support. The harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus fulvus, living in the splashpools of rocky coasts, was studied to recognize the occurrence of epibionts on the exoskeleton surface using scanning electon microscopy techniques. The first evidence of ciliate Scyphidia sp. on Tigriopus fulvus has been described and the occurrence of algae Cocconeis sp. has been observed as well. Epibionts were found to adhere to antennae, a site linked to the exploitation of water currents carrying food particles to mouthparts and to swimming legs. The reason of the occurrence on swimming legs is less clear and needs further observations. Pertinent results are described and discussed and the influence of epibionts on life cycle and behavior of Tigriopus fulvus is considered.

  16. A restrained-torque-based motion instructor: forearm flexion/extension-driving exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    When learning complicated movements by ourselves, we encounter such problems as a self-rightness. The self-rightness results in a lack of detail and objectivity, and it may cause to miss essences and even twist the essences. Thus, we sometimes fall into the habits of doing inappropriate motions. To solve these problems or to alleviate the problems as could as possible, we have been developed mechanical man-machine human interfaces to support us learning such motions as cultural gestures and sports form. One of the promising interfaces is a wearable exoskeleton mechanical system. As of the first try, we have made a prototype of a 2-link 1-DOF rotational elbow joint interface that is applied for teaching extension-flexion operations with forearms and have found its potential abilities for teaching the initiating and continuing flection motion of the elbow.

  17. Quantifying anti-gravity torques in the design of a powered exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonesi, Daniel; Agrawal, Sunil; Sample, Whitney; Rahman, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Designing an upper extremity exoskeleton for people with arm weakness requires knowledge of the passive and active residual force capabilities of users. This paper experimentally measures the passive gravitational torques of 3 groups of subjects: able-bodied adults, able bodied children, and children with neurological disabilities. The experiment involves moving the arm to various positions in the sagittal plane and measuring the gravitational force at the wrist. This force is then converted to static gravitational torques at the elbow and shoulder. Data are compared between look-up table data based on anthropometry and empirical data. Results show that the look-up torques deviate from experimentally measured torques as the arm reaches up and down. This experiment informs designers of Upper Limb orthoses on the contribution of passive human joint torques.

  18. Kinetic modelling of the demineralization of shrimp exoskeleton using citric acid

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    Alewo Opuada AMEH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid was used in the demineralization of shrimp exoskeleton and the kinetics of the demineralization process was studied. Kinetic data was obtained by demineralisation using five acid concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5M. The obtained kinetic data were fitted to the shrinking core model for fluid particle reactions. The concentration of calcium was found to decrease with time. For all acid concentrations considered, the best predictive mechanism for the demineralization process was determined to be Ash Layer Diffusion Control Mechanism. This was indicated by the high R2 values obtained (0.965 with 150% excess of citric acid.

  19. Comparison of Knee and Ankle Dynamometry between NASA's X1 Exoskeleton and Biodex System 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, K. L.; Newby, N. J.; Hackney, K. J.; DeWitt, J. K.; Beck, C. E.; Rovekamp, R. N.; Rea, R. L.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Pre- and post-flight dynamometry is performed on International Space Station crewmembers to characterize microgravity-induced strength changes. Strength is not assessed in flight due to hardware limitations and there is poor understanding of the time course of in-flight changes. PURPOSE: To assess the reliability of a prototype dynamometer, the X1 Exoskeleton (EXO) and its agreement with a Biodex System 4 (BIO). METHODS: Eight subjects (4 M/4 F) completed 2 counterbalanced testing sessions of knee extension/flexion (KE/KF), 1 with BIO and 1 with EXO, with repeated measures within each session in normal gravity. Test-retest reliability (test 1 and 2) and device agreement (BIO vs. EXO) were evaluated. Later, to assess device agreement for ankle plantarflexion (PF), 10 subjects (4 M/6 F) completed 3 test conditions (BIO, EXO, and BIOEXO); BIOEXO was a hybrid condition comprised of the Biodex dynamometer motor and the X1 footplate and ankle frame. Ankle comparisons were: BIO vs. BIOEXO (footplate differences), BIOEXO vs. EXO (motor differences), and BIO vs. EXO (all differences). Reliability for KE/KF was determined by intraclass correlation (ICC). Device agreement was assessed with: 1) repeated measures ANOVA, 2) a measure of concordance (rho), and 3) average difference. RESULTS: ICCs for KE/KF were 0.99 for BIO and 0.96 to 0.99 for EXO. Agreement was high for KE (concordance: 0.86 to 0.95; average differences: -7 to +9 Nm) and low to moderate for KF (concordance: 0.64 to 0.78; average differences: -4 to -29 Nm, Pankle PF, torque differences due to the two footplates were small. However, the X1 motor reports greater torques than the Biodex motor during PF. This first prototype provides proof of concept for a reliable, robotic-based exoskeleton to perform portable dynamometry for large muscle groups of the lower body.

  20. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  1. Desempeño y emisiones de un motor de combustión interna con combustible dual Diesel – Gas natural ;Performance and emissions study of an internal combustion engine with dual fuel diesel - natural gas

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    Juan Miguel Mantilla González

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Muchos de los problemas reportados para los sistemas duales diesel- gas natural ocurren por mala dosificación del gas. Por esta razón se adaptó un sistema de alimentación dual con inyección electrónica de gas natural a un motor de combustión interna encendido por compresión. Se plantea un diseño experimental controlando el dosado de gas natural.Como resultado se obtiene un análisis comparativo entre los valoresde desempeño y emisiones desde la operación Diesel y Diesel-Gas natural. A partir de este análisis es posible observar que el desempeño del motor no se ve afectado por la operación del motor bajo el esquema Dual Diesel-GN, es decir que el motor funcionando bajo modo dual puede sostener las cargas solicitadas al motor. También se observa que la eficiencia volumétrica mejora bajo todas las condiciones de operación dual y las emisiones son mejores sólo cuando el motor trabaja a altas cargas. Many of the problems reported for dual diesel-natural gas systems occur due to poor gas dosage. For this reason a natural gas electronic injection feeding system was adapted to a compression ignitios internal combustion engine. An experimental design controlling the natural gas dosage is considered. As a result a comparative analysis between performance and emissions from the Diesel-and diesel-Natural Gas operation is obtained. From this analysis it is possible to see that engine performance is not affected by operation of the engine under the dual mode, i.e. the motor running under dual mode can support the loads applied to the engine. It is also observed that the volumetric efficiency improves under all conditions of operation and emissions from the dual mode of operation are better only when working at high engine loads.

  2. A Neural Network-Based Gait Phase Classification Method Using Sensors Equipped on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jun-Young; Heo, Wonho; Yang, Hyundae; Park, Hyunsub

    2015-10-30

    An exact classification of different gait phases is essential to enable the control of exoskeleton robots and detect the intentions of users. We propose a gait phase classification method based on neural networks using sensor signals from lower limb exoskeleton robots. In such robots, foot sensors with force sensing registers are commonly used to classify gait phases. We describe classifiers that use the orientation of each lower limb segment and the angular velocities of the joints to output the current gait phase. Experiments to obtain the input signals and desired outputs for the learning and validation process are conducted, and two neural network methods (a multilayer perceptron and nonlinear autoregressive with external inputs (NARX)) are used to develop an optimal classifier. Offline and online evaluations using four criteria are used to compare the performance of the classifiers. The proposed NARX-based method exhibits sufficiently good performance to replace foot sensors as a means of classifying gait phases.

  3. A Neural Network-Based Gait Phase Classification Method Using Sensors Equipped on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jun-Young; Heo, Wonho; Yang, Hyundae; Park, Hyunsub

    2015-01-01

    An exact classification of different gait phases is essential to enable the control of exoskeleton robots and detect the intentions of users. We propose a gait phase classification method based on neural networks using sensor signals from lower limb exoskeleton robots. In such robots, foot sensors with force sensing registers are commonly used to classify gait phases. We describe classifiers that use the orientation of each lower limb segment and the angular velocities of the joints to output the current gait phase. Experiments to obtain the input signals and desired outputs for the learning and validation process are conducted, and two neural network methods (a multilayer perceptron and nonlinear autoregressive with external inputs (NARX)) are used to develop an optimal classifier. Offline and online evaluations using four criteria are used to compare the performance of the classifiers. The proposed NARX-based method exhibits sufficiently good performance to replace foot sensors as a means of classifying gait phases. PMID:26528986

  4. Exoskeleton-assisted gait training to improve gait in individuals with spinal cord injury: a pilot randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Afzal, Taimoor; Berliner, Jeffrey; Francisco, Gerard E

    2018-01-01

    Robotic wearable exoskeletons have been utilized as a gait training device in persons with spinal cord injury. This pilot study investigated the feasibility of offering exoskeleton-assisted gait training (EGT) on gait in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) in preparation for a phase III RCT. The objective was to assess treatment reliability and potential efficacy of EGT and conventional physical therapy (CPT). Forty-four individuals were screened, and 13 were eligible to participate in the study. Nine participants consented and were randomly assigned to receive either EGT or CPT with focus on gait. Subjects received EGT or CPT, five sessions a week (1 h/session daily) for 3 weeks. American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and gait characteristics including stride and step length, cadence and stance, and swing phase durations were assessed at the pre- and immediate post- training. Mean difference estimates with 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze the differences. After training, improvement was observed in the 6MWT for the EGT group. The CPT group showed significant improvement in the TUG test. Both the EGT and the CPT groups showed significant increase in the right step length. EGT group also showed improvement in the stride length. EGT could be applied to individuals with iSCI to facilitate gait recovery. The subjects were able to tolerate the treatment; however, exoskeleton size range may be a limiting factor in recruiting larger cohort of patients. Future studies with larger sample size are needed to investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of exoskeleton-assisted gait training as single gait training and combined with other gait training strategies. Clinicaltrials.org, NCT03011099, retrospectively registered on January 3, 2017.

  5. Ambulatory activity classification with dendogram-based support vector machine: Application in lower-limb active exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Oishee; Kundu, Ananda Sankar; Lenka, Prasanna Kumar; Bhaumik, Subhasis

    2016-10-01

    Ambulatory activity classification is an active area of research for controlling and monitoring state initiation, termination, and transition in mobility assistive devices such as lower-limb exoskeletons. State transition of lower-limb exoskeletons reported thus far are achieved mostly through the use of manual switches or state machine-based logic. In this paper, we propose a postural activity classifier using a 'dendogram-based support vector machine' (DSVM) which can be used to control a lower-limb exoskeleton. A pressure sensor-based wearable insole and two six-axis inertial measurement units (IMU) have been used for recognising two static and seven dynamic postural activities: sit, stand, and sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, level walk, fast walk, slope walk, stair ascent and stair descent. Most of the ambulatory activities are periodic in nature and have unique patterns of response. The proposed classification algorithm involves the recognition of activity patterns on the basis of the periodic shape of trajectories. Polynomial coefficients extracted from the hip angle trajectory and the centre-of-pressure (CoP) trajectory during an activity cycle are used as features to classify dynamic activities. The novelty of this paper lies in finding suitable instrumentation, developing post-processing techniques, and selecting shape-based features for ambulatory activity classification. The proposed activity classifier is used to identify the activity states of a lower-limb exoskeleton. The DSVM classifier algorithm achieved an overall classification accuracy of 95.2%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Time and Effort Required by Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Learn to Use a Powered Exoskeleton for Assisted Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Allan J; Bryce, Thomas N; Dijkers, Marcel P

    2015-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have been demonstrated as being safe for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), but little is known about how users learn to manage these devices. To quantify the time and effort required by persons with SCI to learn to use an exoskeleton for assisted walking. A convenience sample was enrolled to learn to use the first-generation Ekso powered exoskeleton to walk. Participants were given up to 24 weekly sessions of instruction. Data were collected on assistance level, walking distance and speed, heart rate, perceived exertion, and adverse events. Time and effort was quantified by the number of sessions required for participants to stand up, walk for 30 minutes, and sit down, initially with minimal and subsequently with contact guard assistance. Of 22 enrolled participants, 9 screen-failed, and 7 had complete data. All of these 7 were men; 2 had tetraplegia and 5 had motor-complete injuries. Of these, 5 participants could stand, walk, and sit with contact guard or close supervision assistance, and 2 required minimal to moderate assistance. Walk times ranged from 28 to 94 minutes with average speeds ranging from 0.11 to 0.21 m/s. For all participants, heart rate changes and reported perceived exertion were consistent with light to moderate exercise. This study provides preliminary evidence that persons with neurological weakness due to SCI can learn to walk with little or no assistance and light to somewhat hard perceived exertion using a powered exoskeleton. Persons with different severities of injury, including those with motor complete C7 tetraplegia and motor incomplete C4 tetraplegia, may be able to learn to use this device.

  7. Voluntary driven exoskeleton as a new tool for rehabilitation in chronic spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aach, Mirko; Cruciger, Oliver; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Höffken, Oliver; Meindl, Renate Ch; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schwenkreis, Peter; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Schildhauer, Thomas A

    2014-12-01

    Treadmill training after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has become an established therapy to improve walking capabilities. The hybrid assistive limb (HAL) exoskeleton has been developed to support motor function and is tailored to the patients' voluntary drive. To determine whether locomotor training with the exoskeleton HAL is safe and can increase functional mobility in chronic paraplegic patients after SCI. A single case experimental A-B (pre-post) design study by repeated assessments of the same patients. The subjects performed 90 days (five times per week) of HAL exoskeleton body weight supported treadmill training with variable gait speed and body weight support. Eight patients with chronic SCI classified by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) consisting of ASIA A (zones of partial preservation [ZPP] L3-S1), n=4; ASIA B (with motor ZPP L3-S1), n=1; and ASIA C/D, n=3, who received full rehabilitation in the acute and subacute phases of SCI. Functional measures included treadmill-associated walking distance, speed, and time, with additional analysis of functional improvements using the 10-m walk test (10MWT), timed-up and go test (TUG test), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and the walking index for SCI II (WISCI II) score. Secondary physiologic measures including the AIS with the lower extremity motor score (LEMS), the spinal spasticity (Ashworth scale), and the lower extremity circumferences. Subjects performed standardized functional testing before and after the 90 days of intervention. Highly significant improvements of HAL-associated walking time, distance, and speed were noticed. Furthermore, significant improvements have been especially shown in the functional abilities without the exoskeleton for over-ground walking obtained in the 6MWT, TUG test, and the 10MWT, including an increase in the WISCI II score of three patients. Muscle strength (LEMS) increased in all patients accompanied by a gain of the lower limb

  8. Comparison of soft tissue artifact and its effects on knee kinematics between non-obese and obese subjects performing a squatting activity recorded using an exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Julien; de Guise, Jaques A; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2018-01-12

    Rigid attachment systems are one of the methods used to compensate for soft tissue artifact (STA) inherent in joint motion analyses. The goal of this study was to quantify STA of an exoskeleton design to reduce STA at the knee, and to assess the accuracy of 3D knee kinematics recorded with the exoskeleton in non-obese and obese subjects during quasi-static weight-bearing squatting activity using biplane radiography. Nine non-obese and eight obese subjects were recruited. The exoskeleton was calibrated on each subject before they performed a quasistatic squatting activity in the EOS ® imaging system. 3D models of exoskeleton markers and knee bones were reconstructed from EOS ® radiographs; they served to quantify STA and to evaluate differences between the markers and bones knee kinematics during the squatting activity. The results showed that STA observed at the femur was larger in non-obese subjects than in obese subjects in frontal rotation (p = 0.004), axial rotation (p = 0.000), medio-lateral displacement (p = 0.000) and antero-posterior displacement (p = 0.019), while STA observed at the tibia was lower in non-obese subjects than in obese subjects for the three rotations (p exoskeleton were greater among non-obese subjects than obese subjects, which is encouraging for future biomechanical studies on pathologies such as osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of a clinically relevant upper-limb exoskeleton robot for stroke patients with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Bae, Sung Jin; Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Pyung Hun

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to propose a design of a clinically relevant upper-limb (hand, wrist, and elbow) exoskeleton that meets the clinical requirements. At first, the proposed robot was designed to have sufficient torque for passive exercise therapy and spasticity measurement of post-stroke patients with spasticity (grade 3 or lower in Modified Ashworth Scale). Because the therapy of patients with high level spasticity could be laborious for therapists by increased muscle tone, and the patients tend not to get enough rehabilitation treatment. Secondly, this robot was designed to have user friendly features like as modularity, so that users have easy approach to assemble and disassemble for practical use. Thirdly, this robot system was designed to guarantee the safety for robot-aided passive training of patients with spasticity. As a result, we were able to see the usability of the robot system, even though it was a pilot test. This shows the possibility of measuring and classifying the spasticity.

  10. Design and Evaluation of the AIRGAIT Exoskeleton: Leg Orthosis Control for Assistive Gait Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Azuwan Mat Dzahir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the body weight support gait training system known as the AIRGAIT exoskeleton and delves into the design and evaluation of its leg orthosis control algorithm. The implementation of the mono- and biarticular pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs as the actuation system was initiated to generate more power and precisely control the leg orthosis. This research proposes a simple paradigm for controlling the mono- and bi-articular actuator movements cocontractively by introducing a cocontraction model. Three tests were performed. The first test involved control of the orthosis with monoarticular actuators alone without a subject (WO/S; the second involved control of the orthosis with mono- and bi-articular actuators tested WO/S; and the third test involved control of the orthosis with mono- and bi-articular actuators tested with a subject (W/S. Full body weight support (BWS was implemented in this study during the test W/S as the load supported by the orthosis was at its maximum capacity. This assessment will optimize the control system strategy so that the system operates to its full capacity. The results revealed that the proposed control strategy was able to co-contractively actuate the mono- and bi-articular actuators simultaneously and increase stiffness at both hip and knee joints.

  11. Exoskeleton-Based Robotic Platform Applied in Biomechanical Modelling of the Human Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to study the human motor system, and specifically the motor strategies implied during postural tasks of the upper limbs, is to manipulate the mechanical conditions of each joint of the upper limbs independently. At the same time, it is essential to pick up biomechanical signals and bio-potentials generated while the human motor system adapts to the new condition. The aim of this paper is two-fold: first, to describe the design, development and validation of an experimental platform designed to modify or perturb the mechanics of human movement, and simultaneously acquire, process, display and quantify bioelectric and biomechanical signals; second, to characterise the dynamics of the elbow joint during postural control. A main goal of the study was to determine the feasibility of estimating human elbow joint dynamics using EMG-data during maintained posture. In particular, the experimental robotic platform provides data to correlate electromyographic (EMG activity, kinetics and kinematics information from the upper limb motion. The platform aims consists of an upper limb powered exoskeleton, an EMG acquisition module, a control unit and a software system. Important concerns of the platform such as dependability and safety were addressed in the development. The platform was evaluated with 4 subjects to identify, using system identification methods, the human joint dynamics, i.e. visco-elasticity. Results obtained in simulations and experimental phase are introduced.

  12. Quantifying anti-gravity torques for the design of a powered exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonesi, Daniel; Agrawal, Sunil K; Sample, Whitney; Rahman, Tariq

    2013-03-01

    Designing an upper extremity exoskeleton for people with arm weakness requires knowledge of the joint torques due to gravity and joint stiffness, as well as, active residual force capabilities of users. The objective of this research paper is to describe the characteristics of the upper limb of children with upper limb impairment. This paper describes the experimental measurements of the torque on the upper limb due to gravity and joint stiffness of three groups of subjects: able-bodied adults, able-bodied children, and children with neuromuscular disabilities. The experiment involves moving the arm to various positions in the sagittal plane and measuring the resultant force at the forearm. This force is then converted to torques at the elbow and shoulder. These data are compared to a two-link lumped mass model based on anthropomorphic data. Results show that the torques based on anthropometry deviate from experimentally measured torques as the arm goes through the range. Subjects with disabilities also maximally pushed and pulled against the force sensor to measure maximum strength as a function of arm orientation. For all subjects, the maximum voluntary applied torque at the shoulder and elbow in the sagittal plane was found to be lower than gravity torques throughout the disabled subjects' range of motion. This experiment informs designers of upper limb orthoses on the contribution of passive human joint torques due to gravity and joint stiffness and the strength capability of targeted users.

  13. Evolution of novel functions: cryptocyanin helps build new exoskeleton in Cancer magister.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, N B; Ryan, M C; Towle, D

    2005-07-01

    Hemocyanin, the blue blood protein of many arthropods and molluscs, reversibly binds oxygen at its highly conserved copper-oxygen-binding sites and supplies tissues with oxygen. Cryptocyanin, closely related structurally and phylogenetically to arthropod hemocyanin, lacks several of the six critical copper-binding histidines, however, and has lost the ability to bind oxygen. Despite this loss of function, cryptocyanin continues to be synthesized, an indication that it has been exploited to carry out new functions. Here, we show that cryptocyanin is present in extremely high concentrations in the hemolymph of the crab during the premolt portion of the molt cycle. Both proteins are specifically expressed in the same type of cell in the hepatopancreas and secreted into the hemolymph, but cryptocyanin plays a major role in forming the new exoskeleton, while hemocyanin functions in oxygen transport. A cessation in cryptocyanin, but not hemocyanin, synthesis after eyestalk ablation supports our hypothesis that cryptocyanin is closely regulated by molting hormones. The contrasts between the two gene products illustrate how a gene duplication of a copper-oxygen protein and its subsequent mutation may work in concert with the evolution of new regulatory mechanisms, leading to the assumption of new functions.

  14. Forward and Inverse Predictive Model for the Trajectory Tracking Control of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Gait Rehabilitation: Simulation modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, M. A.; Majeed, A. P. P. A.; Taha, Z.; Alim, M. M.; Baarath, K.

    2018-03-01

    The movement of a lower limb exoskeleton requires a reasonably accurate control method to allow for an effective gait therapy session to transpire. Trajectory tracking is a nontrivial means of passive rehabilitation technique to correct the motion of the patients’ impaired limb. This paper proposes an inverse predictive model that is coupled together with the forward kinematics of the exoskeleton to estimate the behaviour of the system. A conventional PID control system is used to converge the required joint angles based on the desired input from the inverse predictive model. It was demonstrated through the present study, that the inverse predictive model is capable of meeting the trajectory demand with acceptable error tolerance. The findings further suggest the ability of the predictive model of the exoskeleton to predict a correct joint angle command to the system.

  15. Satisfaction and perceptions of long-term manual wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury upon completion of a locomotor training program with an overground robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dany H; Vermette, Martin; Duclos, Cyril; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Ahmed, Sara; Kairy, Dahlia

    2017-12-19

    The main objectives of this study were to quantify clients' satisfaction and perception upon completion of a locomotor training program with an overground robotic exoskeleton. A group of 14 wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury, who finished a 6-8-week locomotor training program with the robotic exoskeleton (18 training sessions), were invited to complete a web-based electronic questionnaire. This questionnaire encompassed 41 statements organized around seven key domains: overall satisfaction related to the training program, satisfaction related to the overground robotic exoskeleton, satisfaction related to the program attributes, perceived learnability, perceived health benefits and risks and perceived motivation to engage in physical activity. Each statement was rated using a visual analogue scale ranging from "0 = totally disagree" to "100 = completely agree". Overall, respondents unanimously considered themselves satisfied with the locomotor training program with the robotic exoskeleton (95.7 ± 0.7%) and provided positive feedback about the robotic exoskeleton itself (82.3 ± 6.9%), the attributes of the locomotor training program (84.5 ± 6.9%) and their ability to learn to perform sit-stand transfers and walk with the robotic exoskeleton (79.6 ± 17%). Respondents perceived some health benefits (67.9 ± 16.7%) and have reported no fear of developing secondary complications or of potential risk for themselves linked to the use of the robotic exoskeleton (16.7 ± 8.2%). At the end of the program, respondents felt motivated to engage in a regular physical activity program (91.3 ± 0.1%). This study provides new insights on satisfaction and perceptions of wheelchair users while also confirming the relevance to continue to improve such technologies, and informing the development of future clinical trials. Implications for Rehabilitation All long-term manual wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury who participated in the

  16. Changes of exoskeleton surface roughness and expression of crucial participation genes for chitin formation and digestion in the mud crab (Macrophthalmus japonicus) following the antifouling biocide irgarol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiyun; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Won-Seok; Kwak, Tae-Soo; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2016-10-01

    Irgarol is a common antifoulant present in coastal sediment. The mud crab Macrophthalmus japonicus is one of the most abundant of the macrobenthos in the costal environment, and its exoskeleton has a protective function against various environmental threats. We evaluated the effects of irgarol toxicity on the exoskeleton of M. japonicus, which is the outer layer facing the environment. We analyzed transcriptional expression of exoskeleton, molting, and proteolysis-related genes in the gill and hepatopancreas of these exposed M. japonicus. In addition, changes in survival and exoskeleton surface characteristics were investigated. In the hepatopancreas, mRNA expression of chitinase 1 (Mj-chi1), chitinase 4 (Mj-chi4), and chitinase 5 (Mj-chi5) increased in M. japonicus exposed to all concentrations of irgarol. Mj-chi1 and Mj-chi4 expressions from 1 to 10μgL(-1) were dose- and time-dependent. Ecdysteroid receptor (Mj-EcR), trypsin (Mj-Tryp), and serine proteinase (Mj-SP) in the hepatopancreas were upregulated in response to different exposure levels of irgarol at day 1, 4, or 7. In contrast, gill Mj-chi5, Mj-Tryp, and Mj-SP exhibited late upregulated responses to 10μgL(-1) irgarol compared to the control at day 7. Mj-chi1 showed early upregulation upon exposure to 10μgL(-1) irgarol and Mj-chi4 showed no changes in transcription in the gill. Gill Mj-EcR presented generally downregulated expression patterns. In addition, decreased survival and change of exoskeleton surface roughness were observed in M. japonicus exposed to the three concentrations of irgarol. These results suggest that exposure to irgarol induces changes in the exoskeleton, molting, and proteolysis metabolism of M. japonicus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. More is not always better: modeling the effects of elastic exoskeleton compliance on underlying ankle muscle–tendon dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Farris, Dominic J; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    Development of robotic exoskeletons to assist/enhance human locomotor performance involves lengthy prototyping, testing, and analysis. This process is further convoluted by variability in limb/body morphology and preferred gait patterns between individuals. In an attempt to expedite this process, and establish a physiological basis for actuator prescription, we developed a simple, predictive model of human neuromechanical adaptation to a passive elastic exoskeleton applied at the ankle joint during a functional task. We modeled the human triceps surae–Achilles tendon muscle tendon unit (MTU) as a single Hill-type muscle, or contractile element (CE), and series tendon, or series elastic element (SEE). This modeled system was placed under gravitational load and underwent cyclic stimulation at a regular frequency (i.e. hopping) with and without exoskeleton (Exo) assistance. We explored the effect that both Exo stiffness (k Exo ) and muscle activation (A stim ) had on combined MTU and Exo (MTU + Exo), MTU, and CE/SEE mechanics and energetics. Model accuracy was verified via qualitative and quantitative comparisons between modeled and prior experimental outcomes. We demonstrated that reduced A stim can be traded for increased k Exo to maintain consistent MTU + Exo mechanics (i.e. average positive power ( P-bar mech + ) output) from an unassisted condition (i.e. k Exo =0 kN⋅m −1 ). For these regions of parameter space, our model predicted a reduction in MTU force, SEE energy cycling, and metabolic rate ( P-bar met ), as well as constant CE P-bar mech + output compared to unassisted conditions. This agreed with previous experimental observations, demonstrating our model’s predictive ability. Model predictions also provided insight into mechanisms of metabolic cost minimization, and/or enhanced mechanical performance, and we concluded that both of these outcomes cannot be achieved simultaneously, and that one must come at the detriment of the other in a spring

  18. Gastrocnemius Myoelectric Control of a Robotic Hip Exoskeleton Can Reduce the User's Lower-Limb Muscle Activities at Push Off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Grazi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel assistive control strategy for a robotic hip exoskeleton for assisting hip flexion/extension, based on a proportional Electromyography (EMG strategy. The novelty of the proposed controller relies on the use of the Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM EMG signal instead of a hip flexor muscle, to control the hip flexion torque. This strategy has two main advantages: first, avoiding the placement of the EMG electrodes at the human–robot interface can reduce discomfort issues for the user and motion artifacts of the recorded signals; second, using a powerful signal for control, such as the GM, could improve the reliability of the control system. The control strategy has been tested on eight healthy subjects, walking with the robotic hip exoskeleton on the treadmill. We evaluated the controller performance and the effect of the assistance on muscle activities. The tuning of the assistance timing in the controller was subject dependent and varied across subjects. Two muscles could benefit more from the assistive strategy, namely the Rectus Femoris (directly assisted and the Tibialis Anterior (indirectly assisted. A significant correlation was found between the timing of the delivered assistance (i.e., synchronism with the biological hip torque, and reduction of the hip flexors muscular activity during walking; instead, no significant correlations were found for peak torque and peak power. Results suggest that the timing of the assistance is the most significant parameter influencing the effectiveness of the control strategy. The findings of this work could be important for future studies aimed at developing assistive strategies for walking assistance exoskeletons.

  19. Organelle-Specific Triggered Release of Immunostimulatory Oligonucleotides from Intrinsically Coordinated DNA-Metal-Organic Frameworks with Soluble Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejun; Fu, Yao; Kang, Zhengzhong; Liu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Nan; Wang, Qi; Tu, Yaoquan; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Ling, Daishun; Song, Haiyun; Kong, Xueqian; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-11-08

    DNA has proven of high utility to modulate the surface functionality of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, current methods for preparing DNA-MOF nanoparticles rely on either inefficient covalent conjugation or specific modification of oligonucleotides. In this work, we report that unmodified oligonucleotides can be loaded on MOFs with high density (∼2500 strands/particle) via intrinsic, multivalent coordination between DNA backbone phosphate and unsaturated zirconium sites on MOFs. More significantly, surface-bound DNA can be efficiently released in either bulk solution or specific organelles in live cells when free phosphate ions are present. As a proof-of-concept for using this novel type of DNA-MOFs in immunotherapy, we prepared a construct of immunostimulatory DNA-MOFs (isMOFs) by intrinsically coordinating cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) oligonucleotides on biocompatible zirconium MOF nanoparticles, which was further armed by a protection shell of calcium phosphate (CaP) exoskeleton. We demonstrated that isMOFs exhibited high cellular uptake, organelle specificity, and spatiotemporal control of Toll-like receptors (TLR)-triggered immune responses. When isMOF reached endolysosomes via microtubule-mediated trafficking, the CaP exoskeleton dissolved in the acidic environment and in situ generated free phosphate ions. As a result, CpG was released from isMOFs and stimulated potent immunostimulation in living macrophage cells. Compared with naked CpG-MOF, isMOFs exhibited 83-fold up-regulation in stimulated secretion of cytokines. We thus expect this isMOF design with soluble CaP exoskeleton and an embedded sequential "protect-release" program provides a highly generic approach for intracellular delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids.

  20. Morphological study of chitin from Xiphopenaeus kroyeri exoskeletons by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and CPMAS 13 C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, K.M.; Tavares, M.I.; Andrade, C.T.; Simao, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    A sample of α chitin was isolated from exoskeletons of Xiphopenaeus kroyeri. This sample ws dissolved in phosphoric acid and recovered as a fibrous precipitate. Atomic force microscopy was used in noncontact mode to obtain images of the native chitin sample. Different morphological features were observed, including rigid rod crystals 200-300 nm wide. Solid state 13 C NMR techniques were used to investigate chitin samples, and revealed molecular order in both samples. The differences observed in the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T H1 p were attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds in preferential sites in the samples. (author)

  1. Control of an Ambulatory Exoskeleton with a Brain-Machine Interface for Spinal Cord Injury Gait Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; Pérez-Nombela, Soraya; Del-Ama, Antonio J; Aranda, Joan; Minguez, Javier; Gil-Agudo, Angel; Montesano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The closed-loop control of rehabilitative technologies by neural commands has shown a great potential to improve motor recovery in patients suffering from paralysis. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) can be used as a natural control method for such technologies. BMI provides a continuous association between the brain activity and peripheral stimulation, with the potential to induce plastic changes in the nervous system. Paraplegic patients, and especially the ones with incomplete injuries, constitute a potential target population to be rehabilitated with brain-controlled robotic systems, as they may improve their gait function after the reinforcement of their spared intact neural pathways. This paper proposes a closed-loop BMI system to control an ambulatory exoskeleton-without any weight or balance support-for gait rehabilitation of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The integrated system was validated with three healthy subjects, and its viability in a clinical scenario was tested with four SCI patients. Using a cue-guided paradigm, the electroencephalographic signals of the subjects were used to decode their gait intention and to trigger the movements of the exoskeleton. We designed a protocol with a special emphasis on safety, as patients with poor balance were required to stand and walk. We continuously monitored their fatigue and exertion level, and conducted usability and user-satisfaction tests after the experiments. The results show that, for the three healthy subjects, 84.44 ± 14.56% of the trials were correctly decoded. Three out of four patients performed at least one successful BMI session, with an average performance of 77.6 1 ± 14.72%. The shared control strategy implemented (i.e., the exoskeleton could only move during specific periods of time) was effective in preventing unexpected movements during periods in which patients were asked to relax. On average, 55.22 ± 16.69% and 40.45 ± 16.98% of the trials (for healthy subjects and

  2. Ambulatory and Non-Ambulatory Benefits of Lower Limb Exoskeleton Use, with and without FES, in Clinical and Community Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    certification to use exoskeletons in clinical practice. 3.4. How were the results disseminated to communities of interest? No results yet...l e le ct ric al s tim ul at io n (F ES ) o f le g an d tru nk m us cl e gr ou ps , w ill re su lt in e nh an ce d th er ap eu tic an d ne...la r u se o f a n ex os ke le to n i n th e ho m e an d co m m un ity w ill re su lt in e nh an ce d th

  3. Inter-rater reliability of kinesthetic measurements with the KINARM robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrau, Jennifer A; Herter, Troy M; Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2017-05-22

    Kinesthesia (sense of limb movement) has been extremely difficult to measure objectively, especially in individuals who have survived a stroke. The development of valid and reliable measurements for proprioception is important to developing a better understanding of proprioceptive impairments after stroke and their impact on the ability to perform daily activities. We recently developed a robotic task to evaluate kinesthetic deficits after stroke and found that the majority (~60%) of stroke survivors exhibit significant deficits in kinesthesia within the first 10 days post-stroke. Here we aim to determine the inter-rater reliability of this robotic kinesthetic matching task. Twenty-five neurologically intact control subjects and 15 individuals with first-time stroke were evaluated on a robotic kinesthetic matching task (KIN). Subjects sat in a robotic exoskeleton with their arms supported against gravity. In the KIN task, the robot moved the subjects' stroke-affected arm at a preset speed, direction and distance. As soon as subjects felt the robot begin to move their affected arm, they matched the robot movement with the unaffected arm. Subjects were tested in two sessions on the KIN task: initial session and then a second session (within an average of 18.2 ± 13.8 h of the initial session for stroke subjects), which were supervised by different technicians. The task was performed both with and without the use of vision in both sessions. We evaluated intra-class correlations of spatial and temporal parameters derived from the KIN task to determine the reliability of the robotic task. We evaluated 8 spatial and temporal parameters that quantify kinesthetic behavior. We found that the parameters exhibited moderate to high intra-class correlations between the initial and retest conditions (Range, r-value = [0.53-0.97]). The robotic KIN task exhibited good inter-rater reliability. This validates the KIN task as a reliable, objective method for quantifying

  4. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisoli Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients’ group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0–66 points, Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0–60 pts and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space. These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved

  5. Acetylation, crystalline and morphological properties of structural polysaccharide from shrimp exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.P. Gbenebor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of a structural polysaccharide, α-chitin, from shrimp exoskeleton via chemical means using hydrochloric acid (HCl and sodium hydroxide (NaOH has been done. Concentrations of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 M for both HCl and NaOH were chosen to evaluate the acetylation degree (DA, crystalline structure and morphology of the chitin. The N-acetyl groups’ content in the structural polysaccharide ranged between 65.6 and 99.4% in decreasing order of both acid and alkali concentrations combination used. The magnitude of chitin average hydrogen bond energy EH was majorly influenced by OH(6…OC intra and CO…HN intermolecular hydrogen bonds as they showed more predominance than OH(3…O(5 and OH…OC intra and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Chitin diffraction planes, crystalline index (Crl and crystallite size (Dhkl were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD with reflections observed on (021, (110, (130 and (013 planes. The Crl occurred between 79.4 and 87.4%, while crystallite sizes were between 0.544 and 3.64 Å for the samples. Morphological study using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy SEM/EDS showed strong calcium and oxygen peaks. This established the shrimp shell surface to be composed of calcite and trace elements such as nitrogen and silicon. The observed α-chitin rough surfaces were attributed to the low degree deacetylation recorded during alkali treatment.

  6. Adaptive Admittance Control for an Ankle Exoskeleton Using an EMG-Driven Musculoskeletal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Yao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Various rehabilitation robots have been employed to recover the motor function of stroke patients. To improve the effect of rehabilitation, robots should promote patient participation and provide compliant assistance. This paper proposes an adaptive admittance control scheme (AACS consisting of an admittance filter, inner position controller, and electromyography (EMG-driven musculoskeletal model (EDMM. The admittance filter generates the subject's intended motion according to the joint torque estimated by the EDMM. The inner position controller tracks the intended motion, and its parameters are adjusted according to the estimated joint stiffness. Eight healthy subjects were instructed to wear the ankle exoskeleton robot, and they completed a series of sinusoidal tracking tasks involving ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The robot was controlled by the AACS and a non-adaptive admittance control scheme (NAACS at four fixed parameter levels. The tracking performance was evaluated using the jerk value, position error, interaction torque, and EMG levels of the tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius (GAS. For the NAACS, the jerk value and position error increased with the parameter levels, and the interaction torque and EMG levels of the TA tended to decrease. In contrast, the AACS could maintain a moderate jerk value, position error, interaction torque, and TA EMG level. These results demonstrate that the AACS achieves a good tradeoff between accurate tracking and compliant assistance because it can produce a real-time response to stiffness changes in the ankle joint. The AACS can alleviate the conflict between accurate tracking and compliant assistance and has potential for application in robot-assisted rehabilitation.

  7. PSO-SVM-Based Online Locomotion Mode Identification for Rehabilitation Robotic Exoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yi; Du, Zhi-Jiang; Wang, Wei-Dong; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Xu, Guo-Qiang; He, Long; Mao, Xi-Wang; Dong, Wei

    2016-09-02

    Locomotion mode identification is essential for the control of a robotic rehabilitation exoskeletons. This paper proposes an online support vector machine (SVM) optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO) to identify different locomotion modes to realize a smooth and automatic locomotion transition. A PSO algorithm is used to obtain the optimal parameters of SVM for a better overall performance. Signals measured by the foot pressure sensors integrated in the insoles of wearable shoes and the MEMS-based attitude and heading reference systems (AHRS) attached on the shoes and shanks of leg segments are fused together as the input information of SVM. Based on the chosen window whose size is 200 ms (with sampling frequency of 40 Hz), a three-layer wavelet packet analysis (WPA) is used for feature extraction, after which, the kernel principal component analysis (kPCA) is utilized to reduce the dimension of the feature set to reduce computation cost of the SVM. Since the signals are from two types of different sensors, the normalization is conducted to scale the input into the interval of [0, 1]. Five-fold cross validation is adapted to train the classifier, which prevents the classifier over-fitting. Based on the SVM model obtained offline in MATLAB, an online SVM algorithm is constructed for locomotion mode identification. Experiments are performed for different locomotion modes and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm with an accuracy of 96.00% ± 2.45%. To improve its accuracy, majority vote algorithm (MVA) is used for post-processing, with which the identification accuracy is better than 98.35% ± 1.65%. The proposed algorithm can be extended and employed in the field of robotic rehabilitation and assistance.

  8. An EMG-driven exoskeleton hand robotic training device on chronic stroke subjects: task training system for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, N S K; Tong, K Y; Hu, X L; Fung, K L; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A

    2011-01-01

    An exoskeleton hand robotic training device is specially designed for persons after stroke to provide training on their impaired hand by using an exoskeleton robotic hand which is actively driven by their own muscle signals. It detects the stroke person's intention using his/her surface electromyography (EMG) signals from the hemiplegic side and assists in hand opening or hand closing functional tasks. The robotic system is made up of an embedded controller and a robotic hand module which can be adjusted to fit for different finger length. Eight chronic stroke subjects had been recruited to evaluate the effects of this device. The preliminary results showed significant improvement in hand functions (ARAT) and upper limb functions (FMA) after 20 sessions of robot-assisted hand functions task training. With the use of this light and portable robotic device, stroke patients can now practice more easily for the opening and closing of their hands at their own will, and handle functional daily living tasks at ease. A video is included together with this paper to give a demonstration of the hand robotic system on chronic stroke subjects and it will be presented in the conference. © 2011 IEEE

  9. Constraining upper limb synergies of hemiparetic patients using a robotic exoskeleton in the perspective of neuro-rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocher, Vincent; Sahbani, Anis; Robertson, Johanna; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Morel, Guillaume

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore how an upper limb exoskeleton can be programmed to impose specific joint coordination patterns during rehabilitation. Based on rationale which emphasizes the importance of the quality of movement coordination in the motor relearning process, a robot controller was developed with the aim of reproducing the individual corrections imposed by a physical therapist on a hemiparetic patient during pointing movements. The approach exploits a description of the joint synergies using principal component analysis (PCA) on joint velocities. This mathematical tool is used both to characterize the patient's movements, with or without the assistance of a physical therapist, and to program the exoskeleton during active-assisted exercises. An original feature of this controller is that the hand trajectory is not imposed on the patient: only the coordination law is modified. Experiments with hemiparetic patients using this new active-assisted mode were conducted. Obtained results demonstrate that the desired inter-joint coordination was successfully enforced, without significantly modifying the trajectory of the end point.

  10. An integrated gait rehabilitation training based on Functional Electrical Stimulation cycling and overground robotic exoskeleton in complete spinal cord injury patients: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, S; Battini, E; Rustici, A; Stampacchia, G

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an integrated gait rehabilitation training based on Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)-cycling and overground robotic exoskeleton in a group of seven complete spinal cord injury patients on spasticity and patient-robot interaction. They underwent a robot-assisted rehabilitation training based on two phases: n=20 sessions of FES-cycling followed by n= 20 sessions of robot-assisted gait training based on an overground robotic exoskeleton. The following clinical outcome measures were used: Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) on spasticity, Penn Spasm Frequency Scale (PSFS), Spinal Cord Independence Measure Scale (SCIM), NRS on pain and International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Data Set (ISCI). Clinical outcome measures were assessed before (T0) after (T1) the FES-cycling training and after (T2) the powered overground gait training. The ability to walk when using exoskeleton was assessed by means of 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT), 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), standing time, walking time and number of steps. Statistically significant changes were found on the MAS score, NRS-spasticity, 6MWT, TUG, standing time and number of steps. The preliminary results of this study show that an integrated gait rehabilitation training based on FES-cycling and overground robotic exoskeleton in complete SCI patients can provide a significant reduction of spasticity and improvements in terms of patient-robot interaction.

  11. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

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    Thomas Platz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL. Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™. Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™ indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  12. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity : A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; Otter, den Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background: For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study

  13. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  14. A benchtop biorobotic platform for in vitro observation of muscle-tendon dynamics with parallel mechanical assistance from an elastic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Vadakkeveedu, Siddarth; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2017-05-24

    We present a novel biorobotic framework comprised of a biological muscle-tendon unit (MTU) mechanically coupled to a feedback controlled robotic environment simulation that mimics in vivo inertial/gravitational loading and mechanical assistance from a parallel elastic exoskeleton. Using this system, we applied select combinations of biological muscle activation (modulated with rate-coded direct neural stimulation) and parallel elastic assistance (applied via closed-loop mechanical environment simulation) hypothesized to mimic human behavior based on previously published modeling studies. These conditions resulted in constant system-level force-length dynamics (i.e., stiffness), reduced biological loads, increased muscle excursion, and constant muscle average positive power output-all consistent with laboratory experiments on intact humans during exoskeleton assisted hopping. Mechanical assistance led to reduced estimated metabolic cost and MTU apparent efficiency, but increased apparent efficiency for the MTU+Exo system as a whole. Findings from this study suggest that the increased natural resonant frequency of the artificially stiffened MTU+Exo system, along with invariant movement frequencies, may underlie observed limits on the benefits of exoskeleton assistance. Our novel approach demonstrates that it is possible to capture the salient features of human locomotion with exoskeleton assistance in an isolated muscle-tendon preparation, and introduces a powerful new tool for detailed, direct examination of how assistive devices affect muscle-level neuromechanics and energetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Extraction, partial characterization and evaluation of in vitro digestibility of the protein associated with the exoskeleton of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

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    Escobedo-Lozano, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The need of new food sources to satisfy human requirements forces researchers to study any possible alternative supplies. Therefore this study aimed to explore the quality and digestibility evaluation of the protein fractions obtained as a by-product of processing the shrimp exoskeleton Litopenaeus vannamei. Shrimp exoskeletons were washed, they were dried, mincedand they were brought under acid hydrolysis and alkaline hydrolysis; released proteins were then precipitated and characterized. 496 g of demineralized exoskeleton were obtained from 1 kg of shrimp shell; out of these, 376 g corresponded to chitin and 120 g corresponded to protein Total protein content was 33.80 ± 0.34 %. The digestible protein fractions were 26.7 g and 92.1 g were insoluble proteins. Of this latter fraction, the largest proportion belonged to the scleroprotein type. The amino acid profile analysis from the recovered proteins indicated that there were present nine amino acids out of the ten essential ones, being leucine the one with the highest proportion. In vitro digestibility was shown to be up to an 83.7 %. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the recovery of digestibleproteins from shrimp exoskeleton may be useful in diet formulation.

  16. Design of a Series Elastic- and Bowdencable-based actuation system for use as torque-=actuator in exoskeleton-type training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veneman, J.F.; Ekkelenkamp, R.; Kruidhof, R.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2005-01-01

    Common actuators have important drawbacks for use in an exoskeleton type of rehabilitation (training) robot. Either the actuators are heavy, complex or poor torque sources. A new actuation system is proposed and tested that combines a lightweight joint and a simple structure with adequate torque

  17. Assessment of body work condition by RULA method in a motor vehicle industry in order to design an effective exoskeleton system

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    M Bahrami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims : physical activities in occupations like handling, static and dynamic postures, sudden movements, and repetitive postures are amongst most important risk factors of Work related Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs. There are many ergonomic methods for assessing WMSDs which can be used in different cases, but these assessments and analyses can not be beneficial by themselves and should be promoted with usable, practical suggestions to improve the work condition. Such quality is brought to this research paper by first assessing ergonomic risks level, resulted by postural stresses, with special emphasis on improper postures, forces and repeating and then using these information to design assisting device called exoskeleton for improving work condition and industrial tasks.   Methods: For assessing and analyzing upper body work condition, postures in 17 different tasks were analyzed by RULA (Rapid upper limb assessment method and a set of 60 worksheets were created out of them. Also biomechanical movement observation during normal tasks was done. Then HONDA company`s exoskeleton for lower body was analyzed and some design elements were extracted from it, to design an upper body exoskeleton based on the same design language.   Results: This Research shows that none of tasks were completely acceptable, and neck, trunk and legs were more affected by improper postures. There was no meaningful difference between right and left hand conditions in overall task and posture assessment. Research also shows dominant effect of force and repeat risk factors in tasks being harmful for upper body. Analyzing HONDA company`s exoskeleton shows the likelihood of success in upper body exoskeleton for improving work conditions and minimizing WMSDs.   Conclusion: Although redistribution or regular rotation of personnel, changing and optimizing work cycles and proper training might reduce WMSDs and improve work condition, but using an assisting device

  18. Evaluation of the effects of the Arm Light Exoskeleton on movement execution and muscle activities: a pilot study on healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirondini, Elvira; Coscia, Martina; Marcheschi, Simone; Roas, Gianluca; Salsedo, Fabio; Frisoli, Antonio; Bergamasco, Massimo; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-23

    Exoskeletons for lower and upper extremities have been introduced in neurorehabilitation because they can guide the patient's limb following its anatomy, covering many degrees of freedom and most of its natural workspace, and allowing the control of the articular joints. The aims of this study were to evaluate the possible use of a novel exoskeleton, the Arm Light Exoskeleton (ALEx), for robot-aided neurorehabilitation and to investigate the effects of some rehabilitative strategies adopted in robot-assisted training. We studied movement execution and muscle activities of 16 upper limb muscles in six healthy subjects, focusing on end-effector and joint kinematics, muscle synergies, and spinal maps. The subjects performed three dimensional point-to-point reaching movements, without and with the exoskeleton in different assistive modalities and control strategies. The results showed that ALEx supported the upper limb in all modalities and control strategies: it reduced the muscular activity of the shoulder's abductors and it increased the activity of the elbow flexors. The different assistive modalities favored kinematics and muscle coordination similar to natural movements, but the muscle activity during the movements assisted by the exoskeleton was reduced with respect to the movements actively performed by the subjects. Moreover, natural trajectories recorded from the movements actively performed by the subjects seemed to promote an activity of muscles and spinal circuitries more similar to the natural one. The preliminary analysis on healthy subjects supported the use of ALEx for post-stroke upper limb robotic assisted rehabilitation, and it provided clues on the effects of different rehabilitative strategies on movement and muscle coordination.

  19. Hybrid Assistive Limb Exoskeleton HAL in the Rehabilitation of Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: Proof of Concept; the Results in 21 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Oliver; Grasmuecke, Dennis; Meindl, Renate C; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schwenkreis, Peter; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Wessling, Martin; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Fisahn, Christian; Aach, Mirko

    2018-02-01

    The use of mobile exoskeletons is becoming more and more common in the field of spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation. The hybrid assistive limb (HAL) exoskeleton provides a tailored support depending on the patient's voluntary drive. After a pilot study in 2014 that included 8 patients with chronic SCI, this study of 21 patients with chronic SCI serves as a proof of concept. It was conducted to provide further evidence regarding the efficacy of exoskeletal-based rehabilitation. Functional assessment included walking speed, distance, and time on a treadmill, with additional analysis of functional mobility using the following tests: 10-meter walk test (10MWT), timed up and go (TUG) test, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and the walking index for SCI II (WISCI-II) score. After a training period of 90 days, all 21 patients significantly improved their functional and ambulatory mobility without the exoskeleton. Patients were assessed by the 6MWT, the TUG test, and the 10MWT, which also indicated an increase in the WISCI-II score along with significant improvements in HAL-associated walking speed, distance, and time. Although, exoskeletons are not yet an established treatment in the rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries, the devices will play a more important role in the future. The HAL exoskeleton training enables effective, body weight-supported treadmill training and is capable of improving ambulatory mobility. Future controlled studies are required to enable a comparison of the new advances in the field of SCI rehabilitation with traditional over-ground training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Single-Session Preliminary Evaluation of an Affordable BCI-Controlled Arm Exoskeleton and Motor-Proprioception Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnady, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Zhen Gang; Yong, Xinyi; Randhawa, Bubblepreet Kaur; Boyd, Lara; Menon, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Traditional, hospital-based stroke rehabilitation can be labor-intensive and expensive. Furthermore, outcomes from rehabilitation are inconsistent across individuals and recovery is hard to predict. Given these uncertainties, numerous technological approaches have been tested in an effort to improve rehabilitation outcomes and reduce the cost of stroke rehabilitation. These techniques include brain–computer interface (BCI), robotic exoskeletons, functional electrical stimulation (FES), and proprioceptive feedback. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have combined all these approaches into a rehabilitation platform that facilitates goal-directed motor movements. Therefore, in this paper, we combined all these technologies to test the feasibility of using a BCI-driven exoskeleton with FES (robotic training device) to facilitate motor task completion among individuals with stroke. The robotic training device operated to assist a pre-defined goal-directed motor task. Because it is hard to predict who can utilize this type of technology, we considered whether the ability to adapt skilled movements with proprioceptive feedback would predict who could learn to control a BCI-driven robotic device. To accomplish this aim, we developed a motor task that requires proprioception for completion to assess motor-proprioception ability. Next, we tested the feasibility of robotic training system in individuals with chronic stroke (n = 9) and found that the training device was well tolerated by all the participants. Ability on the motor-proprioception task did not predict the time to completion of the BCI-driven task. Both participants who could accurately target (n = 6) and those who could not (n = 3), were able to learn to control the BCI device, with each BCI trial lasting on average 2.47 min. Our results showed that the participants’ ability to use proprioception to control motor output did not affect their ability to use the BCI

  1. Wearable robotic exoskeleton for overground gait training in sub-acute and chronic hemiparetic stroke patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Franco; Gasperini, Giulio; Gaffuri, Marina; Colombo, Maria; Giovanzana, Chiara; Lorenzon, Chiara; Farina, Nico; Cannaviello, Giovanni; Scarano, Stefano; Proserpio, Davide; Liberali, Davide; Guanziroli, Eleonora

    2017-10-01

    Recovery of therapeutic or functional ambulatory capacity in post-stroke patients is a primary goal of rehabilitation. Wearable powered exoskeletons allow patients with gait dysfunctions to perform over-ground gait training, even immediately after the acute event. To investigate the feasibility and the clinical effects of an over-ground walking training with a wearable powered exoskeleton in sub-acute and chronic stroke patients. Prospective, pilot pre-post, open label, non-randomized experimental study. A single neurological rehabilitation center for inpatients and outpatients. Twenty-three post-stroke patients were enrolled: 12 sub-acute (mean age: 43.8±13.3 years, 5 male and 7 female, 7 right hemiparesis and 5 left hemiparesis) and 11 chronic (mean age: 55.5±15.9 years, 7 male and 4 female, 4 right hemiparesis and 7 left hemiparesis) patients. Patients underwent 12 sessions (60 min/session, 3 times/week) of walking rehabilitation training using Ekso™, a wearable bionic suit that enables individuals with lower extremity disabilities and minimal forearm strength to stand up, sit down and walk over a flat hard surface with a full weight-bearing reciprocal gait. Clinical evaluations were performed at the beginning of the training period (t0), after 6 sessions (t1) and after 12 sessions (t2) and were based on the Ashworth scale, Motricity Index, Trunk Control Test, Functional Ambulation Scale, 10-Meter Walking Test, 6-Minute Walking Test, and Walking Handicap Scale. Wilcoxon's test (PScale, 10-meter walking test, and 6-minute walking test. Sub-acute patients achieved statistically significant improvement in Trunk Control Test and Walking Handicap Scale at t0-t2. Sub-acute and chronic patient did not achieve significant improvement in Ashworth scale at t0-t2. Twelve sessions of over-ground gait training using a powered wearable robotic exoskeleton improved ambulatory functions in sub-acute and chronic post-stroke patients. Large, randomized multicenter studies are

  2. Control of an Ambulatory Exoskeleton with a Brain–Machine Interface for Spinal Cord Injury Gait Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; Pérez-Nombela, Soraya; del-Ama, Antonio J.; Aranda, Joan; Minguez, Javier; Gil-Agudo, Angel; Montesano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The closed-loop control of rehabilitative technologies by neural commands has shown a great potential to improve motor recovery in patients suffering from paralysis. Brain–machine interfaces (BMI) can be used as a natural control method for such technologies. BMI provides a continuous association between the brain activity and peripheral stimulation, with the potential to induce plastic changes in the nervous system. Paraplegic patients, and especially the ones with incomplete injuries, constitute a potential target population to be rehabilitated with brain-controlled robotic systems, as they may improve their gait function after the reinforcement of their spared intact neural pathways. This paper proposes a closed-loop BMI system to control an ambulatory exoskeleton—without any weight or balance support—for gait rehabilitation of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The integrated system was validated with three healthy subjects, and its viability in a clinical scenario was tested with four SCI patients. Using a cue-guided paradigm, the electroencephalographic signals of the subjects were used to decode their gait intention and to trigger the movements of the exoskeleton. We designed a protocol with a special emphasis on safety, as patients with poor balance were required to stand and walk. We continuously monitored their fatigue and exertion level, and conducted usability and user-satisfaction tests after the experiments. The results show that, for the three healthy subjects, 84.44 ± 14.56% of the trials were correctly decoded. Three out of four patients performed at least one successful BMI session, with an average performance of 77.6 1 ± 14.72%. The shared control strategy implemented (i.e., the exoskeleton could only move during specific periods of time) was effective in preventing unexpected movements during periods in which patients were asked to relax. On average, 55.22 ± 16.69% and 40.45 ± 16.98% of the trials (for healthy subjects and

  3. EFFICACY OF COMPLEX NEUROREHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH A POST-STROKE ARM PARESIS WITH THE USE OF A BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE+EXOSKELETON SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Frolov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rehabilitation of patients with poststroke motor disorders with the use of a brain-computer interface (BCI+exoskeleton may raise the rehabilitation to a  new high-tech level and allow for an effective correction of the post-stroke dysfunction. Aim: To assess the efficacy of BCI+exoskeleton procedures for neurorehabilitation of patients with post-stroke motor dysfunction. Materials and methods: The study included 40 patients with a history of cerebral stroke (mean age 59±10.4 years, 26 male and 14 female. Thirty six of them had had an ischemic stroke and 4, a hemorrhagic stroke from 2 months to 4 years before the study entry. All patients had a various degree post-stroke hemiparesis predominantly of the arm. The main group patients (n=20, in addition to conventional therapy, had 10  sessions (3  times daily of BCI+exoskeleton. The BCI recognized the hand ungripping imagined by the patient and, by a  feedback signal, the exoskeleton exerted the passive movement in the paretic arm. The control group patients (n=10 had 10  BCI+exoskeleton sessions without imaginary movements, and the exoskeleton functioned in a  random mode. The comparison group included 10  patients who received only standard treatment. Results: At the end of rehabilitation treatment (day 14, all study groups demonstrated an improvement in the function of the paretic extremity. There was an improvement of functioning and daily activities in the main group, compared to the control and the comparison groups: the change in the modified Rankin scale score was 0.4±0.1, 0.1±0.1  and 0±0.2 (p<0.05, in the Bartel scale score, 5.6±0.8, 2.3±0.3 and 1±0.2 (p<0.001, respectively. In the BCI+exoskeleton group the motor function of the paretic arm assessed by the ARAT scale, improved by 5.5±1.3  points (2.4±0.6  points in the control group and 1.9±0.7  in the comparison group, р<0.05, and as assessed by the Fugl-Meyer scale, by 10.8±1.5 points (3.8

  4. Assessment of Congo red as a fluorescence marker for the exoskeleton of small crustaceans and the cuticle of polychaetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, J; Büntzow, M

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the potential of the common dye Congo red as a fluorescence marker for chitin in the exoskeleton of small crustaceans and collagen in the polychaete cuticle was tested. The Congo red staining turned out to be rather efficient and yielded intensively fluorescing structures, which made a very detailed visualization by confocal laser scanning microscopy possible. The excellent results are comparable to those described for the utilization of other efficient fluorescence dyes and intense autofluorescence. The application of Congo red is easy, the fluorescence of this dye is very stable, and the excitation maximum of the structures stained with Congo red is in a range, which is covered by the lasers of most of the confocal laser scanning microscopes. These advantageous properties make the fluorescence staining by Congo red a method of choice for the detailed visualization of the external morphology of small crustaceans and polychaetes.

  5. Human-Robot Interfaces in Exoskeletons for Gait Training after Stroke: State of the Art and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Lagoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic rehabilitation of CVA (stroke survivors is an emerging field. However, the development of effective gait rehabilitation robots used to treat stroke survivors is and remains a challenging task. This article discusses existing approaches and gives an overview of limitations with existing wearable robots. Challenges and potential solutions are being discussed in this article. Most difficulties lie in the implementation of physical and cognitive human robot interfaces. Many issues like actuation principles, control strategies, portability and wearing comfort, such as correct determination of user intention and effective guidance have to be tackled in future designs. Different solutions are being proposed. Clever anthropometric design and smart brain computer interfaces are key factors in effective exoskeleton design.

  6. Estudio del empleo de un convertidor catalítico para las emisiones gaseosas en un motor de ignición por chispa usando etanol como combustible. // Study of the employment of a catalytic convertor for the gassy emissions in an spark ignition engine using et

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. R. Martins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Con este trabajo de investigación se estudia el índice de emisiones gaseosas en un motor de ignición por chispa movido conetanol y se analiza el control de estas emisiones con aplicación de un convertidor catalítico platino/paladio (Pt/Pd en elsistema de descarga del motor. Fueron realizados ensayos dinamométricos de un motor de combustión interna MCI paraanalizar las emisiones y el control de estas, en condiciones operacionales, en función de la rotación y ángulo de avance deignición. El convertidor catalítico alcanzó un 75% de eficiencia cuando el ángulo de avance de ignición del motor aumentópara 16o. Se observó que en rotaciones de 2000 r.p.m el convertidor catalítico presentó mayor reducción de las emisionesde hidrocarburos no quemados HC, monóxido de carbono CO y óxidos de nitrógeno NOx. Con la aplicación de unconvertidor catalítico en un vehículo se debe estandarizar nuevas regulaciones en cuanto al ángulo de avance de igniciónpara optimizar el funcionamiento del motor.Palabras claves: Convertidor catalítico; emisiones de escape; eficiencia catalítica; etanol.____________________________________________________________________________Summary.With this investigation work the index of gassy emissions is studied in an spark ignition engine using ethanol, the control ofthese emissions is analyzed with application of a platinum/palladium (Pt/Pd catalytic convector in the engine dischargesystem. Rehearsals carried out in engines in order to analyze the emissions and the control of these, under operationalconditions, in function of the rotation and angle of ignition advance were carried out. The catalytic convector reaches 75%of efficiency when the ignition advance angle of the engine increased to 16o. It was observed that in rotations of 2000r.p.m the catalytic convector presented bigger reduction of the emissions of non-burnt hydrocarbons HC, monoxide ofcarbon CO and nitrogen oxides NOx. With the application of a

  7. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased.

  8. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  9. The combined effects of body weight support and gait speed on gait related muscle activity: a comparison between walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton and regular treadmill walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaske Van Kammen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. METHODS: Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants' body weight and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h, while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. RESULTS: The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged, but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. CONCLUSION: Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible.

  10. Feasibility and Safety of a Powered Exoskeleton for Assisted Walking for Persons With Multiple Sclerosis: A Single-Group Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Allan J; Fabian, Michelle; Lad, Dipan; Delgado, Andrew D

    2017-07-01

    To examine the feasibility, safety, and secondary benefit potential of exoskeleton-assisted walking with one device for persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Single-group longitudinal preliminary study with 8-week baseline, 8-week intervention, and 4-week follow-up. Outpatient MS clinic, tertiary care hospital. Participants (N=13; age range, 38-62y) were mostly women with Expanded Disability Status Scale scores ranging from 5.5 to 7.0. Exoskeleton-assisted walk training. Primary outcomes were accessibility (enrollment/screen pass), tolerability (completion/dropout), learnability (time to event for standing, walking, and sitting with little or no assistance), acceptability (satisfaction on the device subscale of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology version 2), and safety (event rates standardized to person-time exposure in the powered exoskeleton). Secondary outcomes were walking without the device (timed 25-foot walk test and 6-minute walk test distance), spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), and health-related quality of life (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement and Information System pain interference and Quality of Life in Neurological Conditions fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and positive affect and well-being). The device was accessible to 11 and tolerated by 5 participants. Learnability was moderate, with 5 to 15 sessions required to walk with minimal assistance. Safety was good; the highest adverse event rate was for skin issues at 151 per 1000 hours' exposure. Acceptability ranged from not very satisfied to very satisfied. Participants who walked routinely improved qualitatively on sitting, standing, or walking posture. Two participants improved and 2 worsened on ≥1 quality of life domain. The pattern of spasticity scores may indicate potential benefit. The device appeared feasible and safe for about a third of our sample, for whom routine exoskeleton-assisted walking may offer secondary benefits. Copyright

  11. Gait training after spinal cord injury: safety, feasibility and gait function following 8 weeks of training with the exoskeletons from Ekso Bionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Baunsgaard, Carsten; Vig Nissen, Ulla; Katrin Brust, Anne; Frotzler, Angela; Ribeill, Cornelia; Kalke, Yorck-Bernhard; León, Natacha; Gómez, Belén; Samuelsson, Kersti; Antepohl, Wolfram; Holmström, Ulrika; Marklund, Niklas; Glott, Thomas; Opheim, Arve; Benito, Jesus; Murillo, Narda; Nachtegaal, Janneke; Faber, Willemijn; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2018-02-01

    Prospective quasi-experimental study, pre- and post-design. Assess safety, feasibility, training characteristics and changes in gait function for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) using the robotic exoskeletons from Ekso Bionics. Nine European rehabilitation centres. Robotic exoskeleton gait training, three times weekly over 8 weeks. Time upright, time walking and steps in the device (training characteristics) were recorded longitudinally. Gait and neurological function were measured by 10 Metre Walk Test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI) II and Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS). Fifty-two participants completed the training protocol. Median age: 35.8 years (IQR 27.5-52.5), men/women: N = 36/16, neurological level of injury: C1-L2 and severity: AIS A-D (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale). Time since injury (TSI)  1 year, N = 27. No serious adverse events occurred. Three participants dropped out following ankle swelling (overuse injury). Four participants sustained a Category II pressure ulcer at contact points with the device but completed the study and skin normalized. Training characteristics increased significantly for all subgroups. The number of participants with TSI  1 year and gait function, increased from 41 to 44% and TUG and BBS results improved (P < 0.05). Exoskeleton training was generally safe and feasible in a heterogeneous sample of persons with SCI. Results indicate potential benefits on gait function and balance.

  12. Design and Validation of Exoskeleton Actuated by Soft Modules toward Neurorehabilitation—Vision-Based Control for Precise Reaching Motion of Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria W. Oguntosin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated the design, production, and functional properties of the Exoskeleton Actuated by the Soft Modules (EAsoftM. Integrating the 3D printed exoskeleton with passive joints to compensate gravity and with active joints to rotate the shoulder and elbow joints resulted in ultra-light system that could assist planar reaching motion by using the vision-based control law. The EAsoftM can support the reaching motion with compliance realized by the soft materials and pneumatic actuation. In addition, the vision-based control law has been proposed for the precise control over the target reaching motion within the millimeter scale. Aiming at rehabilitation exercise for individuals, typically soft actuators have been developed for relatively small motions, such as grasping motion, and one of the challenges has been to extend their use for a wider range reaching motion. The proposed EAsoftM presented one possible solution for this challenge by transmitting the torque effectively along the anatomically aligned with a human body exoskeleton. The proposed integrated systems will be an ideal solution for neurorehabilitation where affordable, wearable, and portable systems are required to be customized for individuals with specific motor impairments.

  13. Design and Validation of Exoskeleton Actuated by Soft Modules toward Neurorehabilitation—Vision-Based Control for Precise Reaching Motion of Upper Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntosin, Victoria W.; Mori, Yoshiki; Kim, Hyejong; Nasuto, Slawomir J.; Kawamura, Sadao; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated the design, production, and functional properties of the Exoskeleton Actuated by the Soft Modules (EAsoftM). Integrating the 3D printed exoskeleton with passive joints to compensate gravity and with active joints to rotate the shoulder and elbow joints resulted in ultra-light system that could assist planar reaching motion by using the vision-based control law. The EAsoftM can support the reaching motion with compliance realized by the soft materials and pneumatic actuation. In addition, the vision-based control law has been proposed for the precise control over the target reaching motion within the millimeter scale. Aiming at rehabilitation exercise for individuals, typically soft actuators have been developed for relatively small motions, such as grasping motion, and one of the challenges has been to extend their use for a wider range reaching motion. The proposed EAsoftM presented one possible solution for this challenge by transmitting the torque effectively along the anatomically aligned with a human body exoskeleton. The proposed integrated systems will be an ideal solution for neurorehabilitation where affordable, wearable, and portable systems are required to be customized for individuals with specific motor impairments. PMID:28736514

  14. Design and Validation of Exoskeleton Actuated by Soft Modules toward Neurorehabilitation-Vision-Based Control for Precise Reaching Motion of Upper Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntosin, Victoria W; Mori, Yoshiki; Kim, Hyejong; Nasuto, Slawomir J; Kawamura, Sadao; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated the design, production, and functional properties of the Exoskeleton Actuated by the Soft Modules (EAsoftM). Integrating the 3D printed exoskeleton with passive joints to compensate gravity and with active joints to rotate the shoulder and elbow joints resulted in ultra-light system that could assist planar reaching motion by using the vision-based control law. The EAsoftM can support the reaching motion with compliance realized by the soft materials and pneumatic actuation. In addition, the vision-based control law has been proposed for the precise control over the target reaching motion within the millimeter scale. Aiming at rehabilitation exercise for individuals, typically soft actuators have been developed for relatively small motions, such as grasping motion, and one of the challenges has been to extend their use for a wider range reaching motion. The proposed EAsoftM presented one possible solution for this challenge by transmitting the torque effectively along the anatomically aligned with a human body exoskeleton. The proposed integrated systems will be an ideal solution for neurorehabilitation where affordable, wearable, and portable systems are required to be customized for individuals with specific motor impairments.

  15. Estimación de los parámetros de operación de un motor de inducción con mínimos recursos de medición; Estimation of Motor Operation Parameters with Minimal Measurement Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Pérez Ab

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo se muestra un procedimiento simple para estimar, con mínimos recursos de medición, los parámetros deoperación de un motor de inducción con carga arbitraria. El método propuesto mezcla la estimación del circuitoequivalente del motor mediante datos del fabricante con mediciones de voltaje y corriente que son perfectamenterealizables en la industria con instrumentos tan asequibles como un amperímetro de gancho. Con la ayuda delMatlab 6.5, se ha desarrollado un programa que implementa prácticamente el método desarrollado y ha permitidocomprobarlo en casos prácticos. El método presentado consigue estimaciones más precisas que las que se ofrecenen sistemas computacionales que se emplean internacionalmente.  The presented paper shows a simple procedure for the estimation of the operation parameters of inductionmotors with arbitrary load. The proposed method combine the equivalent circuit estimation by manufacturerdata, as well as voltage and current measurements obtained with hook-on instruments. Using Matlab 6.5 apractical implementation of this method was obtained and it has served to proof several practical cases. Thepresented procedure is more accurate than other methods offered by commercial software

  16. Modifying upper-limb inter-joint coordination in healthy subjects by training with a robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Tommaso; Guigon, Emmanuel; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Jarrassé, Nathanaël

    2017-06-12

    The possibility to modify the usually pathological patterns of coordination of the upper-limb in stroke survivors remains a central issue and an open question for neurorehabilitation. Despite robot-led physical training could potentially improve the motor recovery of hemiparetic patients, most of the state-of-the-art studies addressing motor control learning, with artificial virtual force fields, only focused on the end-effector kinematic adaptation, by using planar devices. Clearly, an interesting aspect of studying 3D movements with a robotic exoskeleton, is the possibility to investigate the way the human central nervous system deals with the natural upper-limb redundancy for common activities like pointing or tracking tasks. We asked twenty healthy participants to perform 3D pointing or tracking tasks under the effect of inter-joint velocity dependant perturbing force fields, applied directly at the joint level by a 4-DOF robotic arm exoskeleton. These fields perturbed the human natural inter-joint coordination but did not constrain directly the end-effector movements and thus subjects capability to perform the tasks. As a consequence, while the participants focused on the achievement of the task, we unexplicitly modified their natural upper-limb coordination strategy. We studied the force fields direct effect on pointing movements towards 8 targets placed in the 3D peripersonal space, and we also considered potential generalizations on 4 distinct other targets. Post-effects were studied after the removal of the force fields (wash-out and follow up). These effects were quantified by a kinematic analysis of the pointing movements at both end-point and joint levels, and by a measure of the final postures. At the same time, we analysed the natural inter-joint coordination through PCA. During the exposition to the perturbative fields, we observed modifications of the subjects movement kinematics at every level (joints, end-effector, and inter-joint coordination

  17. Developing a multi-joint upper limb exoskeleton robot for diagnosis, therapy, and outcome evaluation in neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yupeng; Kang, Sang Hoon; Park, Hyung-Soon; Wu, Yi-Ning; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2013-05-01

    Arm impairments in patients post stroke involve the shoulder, elbow and wrist simultaneously. It is not very clear how patients develop spasticity and reduced range of motion (ROM) at the multiple joints and the abnormal couplings among the multiple joints and the multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF) during passive movement. It is also not clear how they lose independent control of individual joints/DOFs and coordination among the joints/DOFs during voluntary movement. An upper limb exoskeleton robot, the IntelliArm, which can control the shoulder, elbow, and wrist, was developed, aiming to support clinicians and patients with the following integrated capabilities: 1) quantitative, objective, and comprehensive multi-joint neuromechanical pre-evaluation capabilities aiding multi-joint/DOF diagnosis for individual patients; 2) strenuous and safe passive stretching of hypertonic/deformed arm for loosening up muscles/joints based on the robot-aided diagnosis; 3) (assistive/resistive) active reaching training after passive stretching for regaining/improving motor control ability; and 4) quantitative, objective, and comprehensive neuromechanical outcome evaluation at the level of individual joints/DOFs, multiple joints, and whole arm. Feasibility of the integrated capabilities was demonstrated through experiments with stroke survivors and healthy subjects.

  18. Design and characterization of the OpenWrist: A robotic wrist exoskeleton for coordinated hand-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezent, Evan; Rose, Chad G; Deshpande, Ashish D; O'Malley, Marcia K

    2017-07-01

    Robotic devices have been clinically verified for use in long duration and high intensity rehabilitation needed for motor recovery after neurological injury. Targeted and coordinated hand and wrist therapy, often overlooked in rehabilitation robotics, is required to regain the ability to perform activities of daily living. To this end, a new coupled hand-wrist exoskeleton has been designed. This paper details the design of the wrist module and several human-related considerations made to maximize its potential as a coordinated hand-wrist device. The serial wrist mechanism has been engineered to facilitate donning and doffing for impaired subjects and to insure compatibility with the hand module in virtual and assisted grasping tasks. Several other practical requirements have also been addressed, including device ergonomics, clinician-friendliness, and ambidextrous reconfigurability. The wrist module's capabilities as a rehabilitation device are quantified experimentally in terms of functional workspace and dynamic properties. Specifically, the device possesses favorable performance in terms of range of motion, torque output, friction, and closed-loop position bandwidth when compared with existing devices. The presented wrist module's performance and operational considerations support its use in a wide range of future clinical investigations.

  19. Experimental Validation of Motor Primitive-Based Control for Leg Exoskeletons during Continuous Multi-Locomotion Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Garate, Virginia; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Munih, Marko; Molino Lova, Raffaele; Vitiello, Nicola; Ronsse, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    An emerging approach to design locomotion assistive devices deals with reproducing desirable biological principles of human locomotion. In this paper, we present a bio-inspired controller for locomotion assistive devices based on the concept of motor primitives. The weighted combination of artificial primitives results in a set of virtual muscle stimulations. These stimulations then activate a virtual musculoskeletal model producing reference assistive torque profiles for different locomotion tasks (i.e., walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The paper reports the validation of the controller through a set of experiments conducted with healthy participants. The proposed controller was tested for the first time with a unilateral leg exoskeleton assisting hip, knee, and ankle joints by delivering a fraction of the computed reference torques. Importantly, subjects performed a track involving ground-level walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs and several transitions between these tasks. These experiments highlighted the capability of the controller to provide relevant assistive torques and to effectively handle transitions between the tasks. Subjects displayed a natural interaction with the device. Moreover, they significantly decreased the time needed to complete the track when the assistance was provided, as compared to wearing the device with no assistance. PMID:28367121

  20. Cardiorespiratory demand and rate of perceived exertion during overground walking with a robotic exoskeleton in long-term manual wheelchair users with chronic spinal cord injury: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona, Manuel J; Brosseau, Rachel; Vermette, Martin; Comtois, Alain Steve; Duclos, Cyril; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Gagnon, Dany H

    2018-01-31

    Many wheelchair users adopt a sedentary lifestyle, which results in progressive physical deconditioning with increased risk of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and endocrine/metabolic morbidity and mortality. Engaging in a walking program with an overground robotic exoskeleton may be an effective strategy for mitigating these potential negative health consequences and optimizing fitness in this population. However, additional research is warranted to inform the development of adapted physical activity programs incorporating this technology. To determine cardiorespiratory demands during sitting, standing and overground walking with a robotic exoskeleton and to verify whether such overground walking results in at least moderate-intensity physical exercise. We enrolled 13 long-term wheelchair users with complete motor spinal cord injury in a walking program with an overground robotic exoskeleton. Cardiorespiratory measures and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded by using a portable gas analyzer system during sitting, standing and four 10m walking tasks with the robotic exoskeleton. Each participant also performed an arm crank ergometer test to determine maximal cardiorespiratory ability (i.e., peak heart rate and O 2 uptake [HR peak , VO 2peak ]). Cardiorespiratory measures increased by a range of 9%-35% from sitting to standing and further increased by 22%-52% from standing to walking with the robotic exoskeleton. During walking, median oxygen cost (O 2Walking ), relative HR (%HR peak ), relative O 2 consumption (%VO 2peak ) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) reached 0.29mL/kg/m, 82.9%, 41.8% and 0.9, respectively, whereas median RPE reached 3.2/10. O 2Walking was moderately influenced by total number of sessions and steps taken with the robotic exoskeleton since the start of the walking program. Overground walking with the robotic exoskeleton over a short distance allowed wheelchair users to achieve a moderate-intensity level of exercise. Hence, an

  1. Compensation or Restoration: Closed-Loop Feedback of Movement Quality for Assisted Reach-to-Grasp Exercises with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Florian; Naros, Georgios; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Assistive technology allows for intensive practice and kinematic measurements during rehabilitation exercises. More recent approaches attach a gravity-compensating multi-joint exoskeleton to the upper extremity to facilitate task-oriented training in three-dimensional space with virtual reality feedback. The movement quality, however, is mostly captured through end-point measures that lack information on proximal inter-joint coordination. This limits the differentiation between compensation strategies and genuine restoration both during the exercise and in the course of rehabilitation. We extended in this proof-of-concept study a commercially available seven degree-of-freedom arm exoskeleton by using the real-time sensor data to display a three-dimensional multi-joint visualization of the user's arm. Ten healthy subjects and three severely affected chronic stroke patients performed reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living assisted by the attached exoskeleton and received closed-loop online feedback of the three-dimensional movement in virtual reality. Patients in this pilot study differed significantly with regard to motor performance (accuracy, temporal efficiency, range of motion) and movement quality (proximal inter-joint coordination) from the healthy control group. In the course of 20 training and feedback sessions over 4 weeks, these pathological measures improved significantly toward the reference parameters of healthy participants. It was moreover feasible to capture the evolution of movement pattern kinematics of the shoulder and elbow and to quantify the individual degree of natural movement restoration for each patient. The virtual reality visualization and closed-loop feedback of joint-specific movement kinematics makes it possible to detect compensation strategies and may provide a tool to achieve the rehabilitation goals in accordance with the individual capacity for genuine functional restoration; a proposal that warrants

  2. A Fuzzy Controller for Lower Limb Exoskeletons during Sit-to-Stand and Stand-to-Sit Movement Using Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Muhammad Taslim Reza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human motion is a daily and rhythmic activity. The exoskeleton concept is a very positive scientific approach for human rehabilitation in case of lower limb impairment. Although the exoskeleton shows potential, it is not yet applied extensively in clinical rehabilitation. In this research, a fuzzy based control algorithm is proposed for lower limb exoskeletons during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. Surface electromyograms (EMGs are acquired from the vastus lateralis muscle using a wearable EMG sensor. The resultant acceleration angle along the z-axis is determined from a kinematics sensor. Twenty volunteers were chosen to perform the experiments. The whole experiment was accomplished in two phases. In the first phase, acceleration angles and EMG data were acquired from the volunteers during both sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit motions. During sit-to-stand movements, the average acceleration angle at activation was 11°–48° and the EMG varied from −0.19 mV to +0.19 mV. On the other hand, during stand-to-sit movements, the average acceleration angle was found to be 57.5°–108° at the activation point and the EMG varied from −0.32 mV to +0.32 mV. In the second phase, a fuzzy controller was designed from the experimental data. The controller was tested and validated with both offline and real time data using LabVIEW.

  3. A crossover pilot study evaluating the functional outcomes of two different types of robotic movement training in chronic stroke survivors using the arm exoskeleton BONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Bobrow, James E; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-12-19

    To date, the limited degrees of freedom (DOF) of most robotic training devices hinders them from providing functional training following stroke. We developed a 6-DOF exoskeleton ("BONES") that allows movement of the upper limb to assist in rehabilitation. The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate the impact of training with BONES on function of the affected upper limb, and to assess whether multijoint functional robotic training would translate into greater gains in arm function than single joint robotic training also conducted with BONES. Twenty subjects with mild to moderate chronic stroke participated in this crossover study. Each subject experienced multijoint functional training and single joint training three sessions per week, for four weeks, with the order of presentation randomized. The primary outcome measure was the change in Box and Block Test (BBT). The secondary outcome measures were the changes in Fugl-Meyer Arm Motor Scale (FMA), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and quantitative measures of strength and speed of reaching. These measures were assessed at baseline, after each training period, and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation session. Training with the robotic exoskeleton resulted in significant improvements in the BBT, FMA, WMFT, MAL, shoulder and elbow strength, and reaching speed (p robotic training programs. However, for the BBT, WMFT and MAL, inequality of carryover effects were noted; subsequent analysis on the change in score between the baseline and first period of training again revealed no difference in the gains obtained between the types of training. Training with the 6 DOF arm exoskeleton improved motor function after chronic stroke, challenging the idea that robotic therapy is only useful for impairment reduction. The pilot results presented here also suggest that multijoint functional robotic training is not decisively superior to single joint robotic training. This challenges the idea that

  4. Principles of Motor Recovery in Post-Stroke Patients using Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by the Brain-Computer Interface Based on Motor Imagery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, A. A.; Húsek, Dušan; Biryukova, E. V.; Bobrov, P.; Mokienko, O.; Alexandrov, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2017), s. 107-137 ISSN 1210-0552 Grant - others:Russian Ministry of Education and Science(RU) RFMEFI60715X0128 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : brain computer interface * motor imagery * post-stroke and post-traumatic patients * arm and hand exoskeleton * proportional derivative controller * motor synergy * clinical application Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.394, year: 2016

  5. Feasibility study of a wearable exoskeleton for children: is the gait altered by adding masses on lower limbs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rossi

    Full Text Available We are designing a pediatric exoskeletal ankle robot (pediatric Anklebot to promote gait habilitation in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP. Few studies have evaluated how much or whether the unilateral loading of a wearable exoskeleton may have the unwanted effect of altering significantly the gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether adding masses up to 2.5 kg, the estimated overall added mass of the mentioned device, at the knee level alters the gait kinematics. Ten healthy children and eight children with CP, with light or mild gait impairment, walked wearing a knee brace with several masses. Gait parameters and lower-limb joint kinematics were analyzed with an optoelectronic system under six conditions: without brace (natural gait and with masses placed at the knee level (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 kg. T-tests and repeated measures ANOVA tests were conducted in order to find noteworthy differences among the trial conditions and between loaded and unloaded legs. No statistically significant differences in gait parameters for both healthy children and children with CP were observed in the five "with added mass" conditions. We found significant differences among "natural gait" and "with added masses" conditions in knee flexion and hip extension angles for healthy children and in knee flexion angle for children with CP. This result can be interpreted as an effect of the mechanical constraint induced by the knee brace rather than the effect associated with load increase. The study demonstrates that the mechanical constraint induced by the brace has a measurable effect on the gait of healthy children and children with CP and that the added mass up to 2.5 kg does not alter the lower limb kinematics. This suggests that wearable devices weighing 25 N or less will not noticeably modify the gait patterns of the population examined here.

  6. Proposal by simple design of the lower limb exoskeleton of continuous use, provided of own mobility and body load support. Case: application due to an illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Rafael; Lopez-Amaya, Julio Alberto; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, Guillermo; Romero-Ángeles, Beatriz; Urriolagoitia-Calderón, Guillermo Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In recent times it has established a debate between experts and academics about the social and economic impact of advances in robotics. The robotic exoskeletons mounted as suits on affected parts of the human body, represent one of the most significant examples of which is oriented towards robotics. With recent technological advances have increased the fields of application of these devices widely with respect to the first applications were teleoperation and increase in strength of a human being for various tasks. The aim of this work is to contribute as much as possible, to start a discussion about the vision of offering future developments in socio-economic terms and its impact resulting from the use of robotic exoskeletons, especially with regard to its application in medical rehabilitation of lower member and especially its use permanent, replacing cumbersome devices such as crutches, walkers, canes. All this, focused on the health sector, which is most affected by different diseases cannot have access to these devices. In this paper, only it proposes a design that could be inexpensive and used for various ailments.

  7. An EEG/EOG-based hybrid brain-neural computer interaction (BNCI) system to control an exoskeleton for the paralyzed hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Witkowski, Matthias; Vitiello, Nicola; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The loss of hand function can result in severe physical and psychosocial impairment. Thus, compensation of a lost hand function using assistive robotics that can be operated in daily life is very desirable. However, versatile, intuitive, and reliable control of assistive robotics is still an unsolved challenge. Here, we introduce a novel brain/neural-computer interaction (BNCI) system that integrates electroencephalography (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) to improve control of assistive robotics in daily life environments. To evaluate the applicability and performance of this hybrid approach, five healthy volunteers (HV) (four men, average age 26.5 ± 3.8 years) and a 34-year-old patient with complete finger paralysis due to a brachial plexus injury (BPI) used EEG (condition 1) and EEG/EOG (condition 2) to control grasping motions of a hand exoskeleton. All participants were able to control the BNCI system (BNCI control performance HV: 70.24 ± 16.71%, BPI: 65.93 ± 24.27%), but inclusion of EOG significantly improved performance across all participants (HV: 80.65 ± 11.28, BPI: 76.03 ± 18.32%). This suggests that hybrid BNCI systems can achieve substantially better control over assistive devices, e.g., a hand exoskeleton, than systems using brain signals alone and thus may increase applicability of brain-controlled assistive devices in daily life environments.

  8. An Adaptive Neuromuscular Controller for Assistive Lower-Limb Exoskeletons: A Preliminary Study on Subjects with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Versatility is important for a wearable exoskeleton controller to be responsive to both the user and the environment. These characteristics are especially important for subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI, where active recruitment of their own neuromuscular system could promote motor recovery. Here we demonstrate the capability of a novel, biologically-inspired neuromuscular controller (NMC which uses dynamical models of lower limb muscles to assist the gait of SCI subjects. Advantages of this controller include robustness, modularity, and adaptability. The controller requires very few inputs (i.e., joint angles, stance, and swing detection, can be decomposed into relevant control modules (e.g., only knee or hip control, and can generate walking at different speeds and terrains in simulation. We performed a preliminary evaluation of this controller on a lower-limb knee and hip robotic gait trainer with seven subjects (N = 7, four with complete paraplegia, two incomplete, one healthy to determine if the NMC could enable normal-like walking. During the experiment, SCI subjects walked with body weight support on a treadmill and could use the handrails. With controller assistance, subjects were able to walk at fast walking speeds for ambulatory SCI subjects—from 0.6 to 1.4 m/s. Measured joint angles and NMC-provided joint torques agreed reasonably well with kinematics and biological joint torques of a healthy subject in shod walking. Some differences were found between the torques, such as the lack of knee flexion near mid-stance, but joint angle trajectories did not seem greatly affected. The NMC also adjusted its torque output to provide more joint work at faster speeds and thus greater joint angles and step length. We also found that the optimal speed-step length curve observed in healthy humans emerged for most of the subjects, albeit with relatively longer step length at faster speeds. Therefore, with very few sensors and no predefined

  9. An Adaptive Neuromuscular Controller for Assistive Lower-Limb Exoskeletons: A Preliminary Study on Subjects with Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy R; Dzeladini, Florin; Brug, Tycho J H; Tamburella, Federica; Tagliamonte, Nevio L; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; van der Kooij, Herman; Ijspeert, Auke J

    2017-01-01

    Versatility is important for a wearable exoskeleton controller to be responsive to both the user and the environment. These characteristics are especially important for subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI), where active recruitment of their own neuromuscular system could promote motor recovery. Here we demonstrate the capability of a novel, biologically-inspired neuromuscular controller (NMC) which uses dynamical models of lower limb muscles to assist the gait of SCI subjects. Advantages of this controller include robustness, modularity, and adaptability. The controller requires very few inputs (i.e., joint angles, stance, and swing detection), can be decomposed into relevant control modules (e.g., only knee or hip control), and can generate walking at different speeds and terrains in simulation. We performed a preliminary evaluation of this controller on a lower-limb knee and hip robotic gait trainer with seven subjects ( N = 7, four with complete paraplegia, two incomplete, one healthy) to determine if the NMC could enable normal-like walking. During the experiment, SCI subjects walked with body weight support on a treadmill and could use the handrails. With controller assistance, subjects were able to walk at fast walking speeds for ambulatory SCI subjects-from 0.6 to 1.4 m/s. Measured joint angles and NMC-provided joint torques agreed reasonably well with kinematics and biological joint torques of a healthy subject in shod walking. Some differences were found between the torques, such as the lack of knee flexion near mid-stance, but joint angle trajectories did not seem greatly affected. The NMC also adjusted its torque output to provide more joint work at faster speeds and thus greater joint angles and step length. We also found that the optimal speed-step length curve observed in healthy humans emerged for most of the subjects, albeit with relatively longer step length at faster speeds. Therefore, with very few sensors and no predefined settings for

  10. A methodology for quantifying trace elements in the exoskeletons of Florida stone crab (Menippe mercenaria) larvae using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP–OES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravinese, Philip M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.; Toth, Lauren T.

    2016-11-23

    The larvae of the Florida stone crab, Menippe mercenaria, migrate through a variety of habitats as they develop and, therefore, experience a broad range of environmental conditions through ontogeny. Environmental variability experienced by the larvae may result in distinct elemental signatures within the exoskeletons, which could provide a tool for tracking the environmental history of larval stone crab populations. A method was developed to examine trace-element ratios, specifically magnesium-to-calcium (Mg/Ca) and strontium-to-calcium (Sr/Ca) ratios, in the exoskeletons of M. mercenaria larvae. Two developmental stages of stone crab larvae were analyzed—stage III and stage V. Specimens were reared in a laboratory environment under stable conditions to quantify the average ratios of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca of larval stone crab exoskeletons and to determine if the ratios differed through ontogeny. The elemental compositions (Ca, Mg, and Sr) in samples of stage III larvae (n = 50 per sample) from 11 different broods (mean Sr/Ca = 5.916 ± 0.161 millimole per mole [mmol mol−1]; mean Mg/Ca = 218.275 ± 59.957 mmol mol−1) and stage V larvae (n = 10 per sample) from 12 different broods (mean Sr/Ca = 6.110 ± 0.300 mmol mol−1; mean Mg/Ca = 267.081 ± 67.211 mmol mol–1) were measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP–OES). The ratio of Sr/Ca significantly increased from stage III to stage V larvae, suggesting an ontogenic shift in Sr/Ca ratios between larval stages. The ratio of Mg/Ca did not change significantly between larval stages, but variability among broods was high. The method used to examine the trace-element ratios provided robust, highly reproducible estimates of Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios in the larvae of M. mercenaria, demonstrating that ICP–OES can be used to determine the trace-element composition of chitinous organisms like the Florida stone crab.

  11. Locomotor training using an overground robotic exoskeleton in long-term manual wheelchair users with a chronic spinal cord injury living in the community: Lessons learned from a feasibility study in terms of recruitment, attendance, learnability, performance and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dany H; Escalona, Manuel J; Vermette, Martin; Carvalho, Lívia P; Karelis, Antony D; Duclos, Cyril; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène

    2018-03-01

    For individuals who sustain a complete motor spinal cord injury (SCI) and rely on a wheelchair as their primary mode of locomotion, overground robotic exoskeletons represent a promising solution to stand and walk again. Although overground robotic exoskeletons have gained tremendous attention over the past decade and are now being transferred from laboratories to clinical settings, their effects remain unclear given the paucity of scientific evidence and the absence of large-scale clinical trials. This study aims to examine the feasibility of a locomotor training program with an overground robotic exoskeleton in terms of recruitment, attendance, and drop-out rates as well as walking performance, learnability, and safety. Individuals with a SCI were invited to participate in a 6 to 8-week locomotor training program with a robotic exoskeleton encompassing 18 sessions. Selected participants underwent a comprehensive screening process and completed two familiarization sessions with the robotic exoskeleton. The outcome measures were the rate of recruitment of potential participants, the rate of attendance at training sessions, the rate of drop-outs, the ability to walk with the exoskeleton, and its progression over the program as well as the adverse events. Out of 49 individuals who expressed their interest in participating in the study, only 14 initiated the program (recruitment rate = 28.6%). Of these, 13 individuals completed the program (drop-out rate = 7.1%) and attended 17.6 ± 1.1 sessions (attendance rate = 97.9%). Their greatest standing time, walking time, and number of steps taken during a session were 64.5 ± 10.2 min, 47.2 ± 11.3 min, and 1843 ± 577 steps, respectively. During the training program, these last three parameters increased by 45.3%, 102.1%, and 248.7%, respectively. At the end of the program, when walking with the exoskeleton, most participants required one therapist (85.7%), needed stand-by or contact

  12. To move as a human. Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Christina

    2016-03-01

    I agree with the authors, that ;there have been very few attempts to develop user-centered medical technologies; [1] in the field of rehabilitation for persons with disabilities and wheelchair users in particular. The human-environment context in which humans plan and inhabit their actions as wheelchair users has not been extensively studied. The authors' unique work explores how a person embodies an exoskeleton (robotic legs or a wheelchair) in their everyday life and focuses on proprioception and brain's capacity to enlarge one's body schema in order to understand users' perspectives. Ultimately, Pazzaglia and Molinari wish to support persons who use assistive devices adapt and have successful, meaningful lives. The work is neuro-scientifically grounded, but doesn't forget the emotional or affective aspects of the user.

  13. Production and characterization of chitosan obtained from shrimp exoskeleton; Producao e caracterizacao de quitosana obtida a partir do exoesqueleto do camarao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Leticia P.; Aguiar, Nayara V.; Rodrigues, Willias da L.; Silva, Rafael S. da; Moreira, Carly K.P., E-mail: leticiaalmeida_26@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Amapa (UEAP), Macapa, AP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Chitosan is a natural polymer, biocompatible, biodegradable and non-toxic. It's derived from the deacetylation of chitin, which constitutes the most part of the exoskeleton of insects, crustaceans and fungal cell wall. After cellulose, chitin is more organic compound found in nature. The Chitin was separated from others components of shrimp waste (Macrobrachium amazonicum) by a chemical process that involves three steps: demineralization, deproteination and depigmentation. The chitosan produced was characterized by potentiometric titration, to find the degree of deacetylation (85,32 %), determining the intrinsic viscosity to define its molecular weight (503.223 g/mol), and X-ray diffraction to determine its crystallinity index (58,4 %). (author)

  14. The kinematic portrait of a patient as an objective indicator of motor function in the process of neurorehabilitation with hand exoskeleton controlled by the brain – computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Kondur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of biomechanical analysis of the motor function of the arm of poststroke patient in the process of neuroreha bilitation with exoskeleton of the hand controlled by brain – computer interface are presented in this paper. At the beginning and end of the course it was registered the kinematic portrait of the patient– isolated random movements for each of the seven degrees of freedom as the paretic and intact arms.Angular accelerations were taken as an assessment of muscle forces, the number of reverse movements was taken as an assessment of joint spasticity, and the kinematic content of the movement as a description of pathological synergy arising after stroke. These parameters give an objective numerical asses sment of motor function as well as of rehabilitation technology effectiveness.

  15. Embodying prostheses - how to let the body welcome assistive devices. Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R.; Sadibolova, Renata; Tamè, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    A growing body of research has focused on the development of assistive devises to improve the recovery and ameliorate the quality of life of people suffering from spinal cord injuries (SCI). In their stimulating and timely paper, Pazzaglia and Molinari [1] review the significant progress made by biotechnology studies in providing increasing sophisticated assistive tools (e.g., prostheses and exoskeletons) that extend the functionality of patients' bodies. However, despite this extraordinary technological effort [2], it remains uncertain how these devices can be appropriately embedded into the mental representation of the body. Here, we wish to amplify the points raised by Pazzaglia and Molinari by discussing three challenges facing work on embodying prostheses raised by experimental research on body representation.

  16. Brain-state dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBrauchle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input.We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reach-to-grasp movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band only. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function.Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns – but different aptitudes – of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e. when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject’s arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task.Brain-robot interfaces may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants’ efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration.

  17. Cadmium bound to metal rich granules and exoskeleton from Gammarus pulex causes increased gut lipid peroxidation in zebrafish following single dietary exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, F.R., E-mail: fkhan@wlu.ca [Nutritional Sciences Division, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Bury, N.R.; Hogstrand, C. [Nutritional Sciences Division, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-31

    There has been a growing interest in establishing how the sub-cellular distribution of metals in macro-invertebrate prey affects metal trophic bioavailability and toxicity. In this study, the crustacean Gammarus pulex was exposed to 300 {mu}g Cd l{sup -1} spiked with {sup 109}Cd for 13 days, from which the two principal metal containing sub-cellular fractions, the metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) and the metal rich granule and exoskeleton (MRG + exo) were isolated. These fractions were produced at equal metal content, incorporated into gelatin and fed to zebrafish as a single meal; assimilation efficiency (AE), carcass and gut tissue metal concentrations and gut lipid peroxidative damage measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed. The AE of cadmium bound to the MTLP fraction was 32.1 {+-} 5.6% which was significantly greater than the AE of MRG + exo bound Cd, 13.0 {+-} 2.1% (p < 0.05). Of the metal retained by the fish at 72 h post-feeding, 94% of MTLP-Cd had been incorporated into the carcass, whereas a significant proportion (46%) of MRG + exo-Cd, although assimilated, appeared to remain associated with intestinal tissue. However, this did not translate into a gut tissue concentration difference with 6.8 {+-} 1.2 ng Cd g{sup -1} in fish fed MTLP-Cd compared to 9.5 {+-} 1.4 ng Cd g{sup -1} in fish fed MRG + exo fraction. Both feeds led to significantly increased MDA levels compared to the control group (gelatin only feed), but MRG + exo feed caused significantly more oxidative damage than the MTLP feed (p < 0.01). Thus, MTLP-Cd is more bioavailable than the cadmium bound to granules and exoskeleton, but it was the latter fraction, largely considered as having limited bioavailability, that appeared to exert a greater localised oxidative injury to the digestive tract of zebrafish.

  18. Design and Optimization of an EEG-Based Brain Machine Interface (BMI) to an Upper-Limb Exoskeleton for Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Nikunj A.; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Abibullaev, Berdakh; Artz, Edward J.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Blank, Amy A.; French, James; Karmonik, Christof; Grossman, Robert G.; O'Malley, Marcia K.; Francisco, Gerard E.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain machine interface (BMI). Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs) measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II), to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: (1) an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; (2) training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and (3) BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG) activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR) = 62.7 ± 21.4% on day 4 and 67.1 ± 14.6% on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR) across subjects was 27.74 ± 37.46% on day 4 and 27.5 ± 35.64% on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration. PMID:27065787

  19. Exoskeletons and economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Misha; Bertone, Matthew A.; Bayless, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    In urban ecosystems, socioeconomics contribute to patterns of biodiversity. The 'luxury effect', in which wealthier neighbourhoods are more biologically diverse, has been observed for plants, birds, bats and lizards. Here, we used data from a survey of indoor arthropod diversity (defined througho...

  20. Human-Exoskeleton Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, W.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is a very efficient way of getting around and covering large distances. Due to impairments or in extreme conditions, such as carrying a heavy load, one might encounter difficulties while walking. In many cases, wheeled vehicles offer a solution. However, wheeled vehicles are often not

  1. Design and Optimization of an EEG-Based Brain Machine Interface (BMI) to an Upper-Limb Exoskeleton for Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Nikunj A; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Abibullaev, Berdakh; Artz, Edward J; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Blank, Amy A; French, James; Karmonik, Christof; Grossman, Robert G; O'Malley, Marcia K; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain machine interface (BMI). Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs) measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II), to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: (1) an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; (2) training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and (3) BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG) activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR) = 62.7 ± 21.4% on day 4 and 67.1 ± 14.6% on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR) across subjects was 27.74 ± 37.46% on day 4 and 27.5 ± 35.64% on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (< 10%). On average, motor intent was detected -367 ± 328 ms before movement onset during closed-loop operation. These findings provide evidence that closed-loop EEG-based BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration.

  2. Closed-loop task difficulty adaptation during virtual reality reach-to-grasp training assisted with an exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Grimm

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke patients with severe motor deficits of the upper extremity may practice rehabilitation exercises with the assistance of a multi-joint exoskeleton. Although this technology enables intensive task-oriented training, it may also lead to slacking when the assistance is too supportive. Preserving the engagement of the patients while providing assistance-as-needed during the exercises, therefore remains an ongoing challenge.We applied a commercially available seven degree-of-freedom arm exoskeleton to provide passive gravity compensation during task-oriented training in a virtual environment. During this four-week pilot study, five severely affected chronic stroke patients performed reach-to-grasp exercises resembling activities of daily living. The subjects received virtual reality feedback from their three-dimensional movements. The level of difficulty for the exercise was adjusted by a performance-dependent real-time adaptation algorithm. The goal of this algorithm was the automated improvement of the range of motion. In the course of 20 training and feedback sessions, this unsupervised adaptive training concept led to a progressive increase of the virtual training space (p<0.001 in accordance with the subjects’ abilities. This learning curve was paralleled by a concurrent improvement of real world kinematic parameters, i.e., range of motion (p=0.008, accuracy of movement (p=0.01, and movement velocity (p<0.001. Notably, these kinematic gains were paralleled by motor improvements such as increased elbow movement (p=0.001, grip force (p<0.001, and upper extremity Fugl-Meyer-Assessment score from 14.3 ± 5 to 16.9 ± 6.1 (p=0.026.Combining gravity-compensating assistance with adaptive closed-loop feedback in virtual reality provides customized rehabilitation environments for severely affected stroke patients. This approach may facilitate motor learning by progressively challenging the subject in accordance with the individual capacity for

  3. Design and optimization of an EEG-based brain machine interface (BMI to an upper-limb exoskeleton for stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikunj Arunkumar Bhagat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG-based brain machine interface (BMI. Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II, to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: 1 an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; 2 training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and 3 BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR = 62.7 +/- 21.4 % on day 4 and 67.1 +/- 14.6 % on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR across subjects was 27.74 +/- 37.46 % on day 4 and 27.5 +/- 35.64 % on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (< 10 %. On average, motor intent was detected -367 +/- 328 ms before movement onset during closed-loop operation. These findings provide evidence that closed-loop EEG-based BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration.

  4. The combined action of a passive exoskeleton and an EMG-controlled neuroprosthesis for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: First results of the RETRAINER project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, E; Ferrante, S; Zajc, J; Bulgheroni, M; Baccinelli, W; d'Amico, E; Schauer, T; Wiesener, C; Russold, M; Gfoehler, M; Puchinger, M; Weber, M; Becker, S; Krakow, K; Rossini, M; Proserpio, D; Gasperini, G; Molteni, F; Ferrigno, G; Pedrocchi, A

    2017-07-01

    The combined use of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and robotic technologies is advocated to improve rehabilitation outcomes after stroke. This work describes an arm rehabilitation system developed within the European project RETRAINER. The system consists of a passive 4-degrees-of-freedom exoskeleton equipped with springs to provide gravity compensation and electromagnetic brakes to hold target positions. FES is integrated in the system to provide additional support to the most impaired muscles. FES is triggered based on the volitional EMG signal of the same stimulated muscle; in order to encourage the active involvement of the patient the volitional EMG is also monitored throughout the task execution and based on it a happy or sad emoji is visualized at the end of each task. The control interface control of the system provides a GUI and multiple software tools to organize rehabilitation exercises and monitor rehabilitation progress. The functionality and the usability of the system was evaluated on four stroke patients. All patients were able to use the system and judged positively its wearability and the provided support. They were able to trigger the stimulation based on their residual muscle activity and provided different levels of active involvement in the exercise, in agreement with their level of impairment. A randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the RETRAINER system to improve arm function after stroke is currently ongoing.

  5. The exoskeleton of bacterial cells (the sacculus): still a highly attractive target for antibacterial agents that will last for a long time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    2000-01-01

    Most bacteria are entirely surrounded by a strong cell wall held together by covalent bonds of strength similar to those holding the atoms in a diamond together. This exoskeleton is a coat of armor or corset and is usually called a sacculus. It protects the bacterium from the stresses resulting from the higher osmotic pressure of the cytoplasm when compared with its environment. This strategy of constructing an external mechanical support has the weakness that the wall barrier has to be cleaved and new wall material inserted outside of the cell proper in order for the bacterium to grow and divide. Because of the unique chemistry and the necessity of selectively cleaving old stress-bearing wall for growth, the wall of the bacterial cell has been a key target for chemotherapeutic treatment of bacterial diseases. Currently, many infectious organisms are becoming resistant to overused antibiotics. Still the wall is a good target, and there could possibly be several entirely new classes of antibiotics targeted toward other parts of wall metabolism and function. The essential autolysins may be a particularly relevant target. To find chemotherapeutic agents we must use and extend our present understanding of the structural mechanics of bacterial wall and their biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology. Moreover, if we use our knowledge of biophysics/genetics and of the evolution of antibiotic resistance mutations that occurred millions of years ago, as well as our knowledge of ones that have arisen recently, quite novel antibiotics may be designed.

  6. Morphological study of chitin from Xiphopenaeus kroyeri exoskeletons by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and CPMAS {sup 13} C NMR; Estudo morfologico de quitina da exocuticula de Xiphopenaeus kroyeri por AFM e por CPMAS {sup 13} C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, K.M.; Tavares, M.I.; Andrade, C.T. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Simao, R.A. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    1999-07-01

    A sample of {alpha} chitin was isolated from exoskeletons of Xiphopenaeus kroyeri. This sample ws dissolved in phosphoric acid and recovered as a fibrous precipitate. Atomic force microscopy was used in noncontact mode to obtain images of the native chitin sample. Different morphological features were observed, including rigid rod crystals 200-300 nm wide. Solid state {sup 13} C NMR techniques were used to investigate chitin samples, and revealed molecular order in both samples. The differences observed in the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T{sup H1}{sub p} were attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds in preferential sites in the samples. (author)

  7. Feedback control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, Christian; Schauer, Thomas; Reichenfelser, Werner; Karner, Jakob; Zwicker, Sven; Gandolla, Marta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Hack, Marco; Jedlitschka, Andreas; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Gföhler, Margit; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm and shoulder due to high level spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs) passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e., a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 s. PMID:25228853

  8. Feedback Control of arm movements using Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES combined with a lockable, passive exoskeleton for gravity compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eKlauer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project MUNDUS, an assistive framework was developed for the support of arm and hand functions during daily life activities in severely impaired people. Potential users of this system are patients with high-level spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative neuromuscular diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich ataxia, and multiple sclerosis. This contribution aims at designing a feedback control system for Neuro-Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES to enable reaching functions in people with no residual voluntary control of the arm due to upper motor neuron lesions after spinal cord injury. NMES is applied to the deltoids and the biceps muscles and integrated with a three degrees of freedom (DoFs passive exoskeleton, which partially compensates gravitational forces and allows to lock each DOF. The user is able to choose the target hand position and to trigger actions using an eyetracker system. The target position is selected by using the eyetracker and determined by a marker-based tracking system using Microsoft Kinect. A central controller, i.e. a finite state machine, issues a sequence of basic movement commands to the real-time arm controller. The NMES control algorithm sequentially controls each joint angle while locking the other DoFs. Daily activities, such as drinking, brushing hair, pushing an alarm button, etc., can be supported by the system. The robust and easily tunable control approach was evaluated with five healthy subjects during a drinking task. Subjects were asked to remain passive and to allow NMES to induce the movements. In all of them, the controller was able to perform the task, and a mean hand positioning error of less than five centimeters was achieved. The average total time duration for moving the hand from a rest position to a drinking cup, for moving the cup to the mouth and back, and for finally returning the arm to the rest position was 71 seconds.

  9. Impact of locomotion training with a neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL) exoskeleton on neuropathic pain and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic SCI: a case study (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciger, Oliver; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Meindl, Renate C; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schwenkreis, Peter; Citak, Mustafa; Aach, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain (CNP) is a common condition associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been reported to be severe, disabling and often treatment-resistant and therefore remains a clinical challenge for the attending physicians. The treatment usually includes pharmacological and/or nonpharmacological approaches. Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and locomotion training with driven gait orthosis (DGO) have evolved over the last decades and are now considered to be an established part in the rehabilitation of SCI patients. Conventional locomotion training goes along with improvements of the patients' walking abilities in particular speed and gait pattern. The neurologic controlled hybrid assistive limb (HAL®, Cyberdyne Inc., Ibraki, Japan) exoskeleton, however, is a new tailored approach to support motor functions synchronously to the patient's voluntary drive. This report presents two cases of severe chronic and therapy resistant neuropathic pain due to chronic SCI and demonstrates the beneficial effects of neurologic controlled exoskeletal intervention on pain severity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Both of these patients were engaged in a 12 weeks period of daily HAL®-supported locomotion training. In addition to improvements in motor functions and walking abilities, both show significant reduction in pain severity and improvements in all HRQoL domains. Although various causal factors likely contribute to abatement of CNP, the reported results occurred due to a new approach in the rehabilitation of chronic spinal cord injury patients. These findings suggest not only the feasibility of this new approach but in conclusion, demonstrate the effectiveness of neurologic controlled locomotion training in the long-term management of refractory neuropathic pain. Implications for Rehabilitation CNP remains a challenge in the rehabilitation of chronic SCI patients. Locomotion training with the HAL exoskeleton seems to improve CNP

  10. Arranque de un motor de inducción usando control difuso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Barriga Turriago

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of fuzzy logic as part of artiÞ cial intelligence in the area of power electronics and motor drivers to improve performance during the startup of an induction motor. To feed the induction motor, two circuit configurations have been chosen to use: a series of thyristors connected in ant parallel and a threephaseinverter. Control strategies such as soft start and Direct Torque Control incorporating fuzzy control have been current proposals to reduce and improve torque. The results of a simulated induction motor squirrel cage of 1.1 KW to these electronic methods show an improvement in performance at boot time, reducing power and increasingthe torque.

  11. Análisis experimental de un motor ultrasónico de elevado par

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo Prous, C.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic engines are useful in several applications due to low weight, small size, good position and speed regulation, and high torque. Nowadays there are only low and medium torque engines. We are working on high torque ultrasonic engines, which can be used as power actuators. Among all possible configurations, we are dealing with a standard piezoelectric ceramic excited one, which works in the no linear zone and resonant mode. A static, modal, harmonic and transitory finite elements analysis is being carrying on. The final goal is to obtain all components design criteria in order to optimise the obtained result. The finite element analysis and motor functioning are explained, showing two prototype results, and describing the improvements of the second one and his reason.

    Los motores ultrasónicos son útiles en diversas aplicaciones debido a su poco peso, pequeñas dimensiones, buena regulación de la posición y velocidad, y elevado par. Hoy en día tan sólo existen motores que desarrollan un par bajo o medio. En esta línea, estamos trabajando en motores ultrasónicos de par elevado, que pueden ser utilizados como actuadores de potencia. Entre todas las configuraciones inicialmente propuestas, se está analizando en detalle una que es excitada por cerámica piezoeléctrica estándar, que trabaja en la zona no lineal y en modo resonante. El análisis, realizado por elementos finitos, abarca el estático y el modal, el armónico y el transitorio. En este artículo se describen el funcionamiento del motor y su análisis por elementos finitos, mostrando los resultados experimentales de dos prototipos, y describiendo las mejoras que aporta el segundo debidamente justificadas.

  12. Pla de manteniment d'un motor diesel destinat a embarcacions de lleure

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaria Vicario, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    El present PFC descriurà de manera concisa el tipus de manteniment a realitzar en una embarcació de lleure amb unes característiques determinades. Es tracta d'una embarcació de tipus menorquina que té les característiques principals següents: Eslora màxima: 10,45 metres. Mànega total: 3,70 metres. Potencia màxima : 125kW. Velocitat de creuer: 8 nusos. Desplaçament en rosca: 9.38 tones. S'ha d'esmentar el tipus d'ús que se li donarà a aquesta embarcació per poder realit...

  13. Estudio de un Motor Stirling con Absorbedor Interno Alimentado con Energía Solar

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Ráez, Isidro María

    2016-01-01

    La importancia de la energía desde un punto de vista socioeconómico es indiscutible, siendo la energía solar una de las fuentes renovables más atractiva e interesante. Dentro de las múltiples aplicaciones del motor Stirling, cabe destacar su empleo en instalaciones solares de concentración (CSP - Sistemas Dish Stirling), donde se ha demostrado que el diseño del mismo juega un papel relevante en la producción de energía eléctrica. En este trabajo se ha realizado un análisis térmico del diseño ...

  14. Feasibility and efficacy of high-speed gait training with a voluntary driven exoskeleton robot for gait and balance dysfunction in patients with chronic stroke: nonrandomized pilot study with concurrent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Shimizu, Issei; Hiroi, Yasuhiro; Kawaki, Masahiro; Sato, Daichi; Nagasawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of high-speed gait training with an exoskeleton robot hybrid assistive limb (HAL) in patients with chronic stroke, and to examine the efficacy of eight sessions (8 weeks) of gait training with a HAL compared with conventional physical therapy. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke were included in this study (nine each in the HAL and control groups). The HAL group underwent high-speed gait training with the HAL once a week for 8 weeks (20 min/session). The control group underwent conventional physical therapy for gait disturbance. Outcome measures were walking speed, number of steps, and cadence during a 10 m walking test, a timed up and go test, a functional reach test, and the Berg Balance Scale. Assessments were performed in the absence of the HAL before training and after the fourth and eighth training sessions. All patients in the HAL group completed the high-speed gait training without adverse events. The HAL group improved significantly in walking speed (55.9% increase, Ptraining (Ptraining with a HAL appears to be feasible and effective in improving gait and balance dysfunction despite the limitations of this nonrandomized pilot study.

  15. Against the odds: what to expect in rehabilitation of chronic spinal cord injury with a neurologically controlled Hybrid Assistive Limb exoskeleton. A subgroup analysis of 55 patients according to age and lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmücke, Dennis; Zieriacks, Amrei; Jansen, Oliver; Fisahn, Christian; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Wessling, Martin; Meindl, Renate C; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Aach, Mirko

    2017-05-01

    Objective Age and lesion level are believed to represent outcome predictors in rehabilitation of patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). The Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) exoskeleton enables patients to perform a voluntary controlled gait pattern via an electromyography-triggered neuromuscular feedback system, and has been introduced as a temporary gait training tool in patients with SCI. The aim of this prospective pre- and postintervention study was to examine functional outcomes as a function of age and lesion level in patients with chronic incomplete SCI (iSCI) or chronic complete SCI (cSCI) with zones of partial preservation (ZPP) by using the HAL as a temporary training tool. Methods Fifty-five participants with chronic iSCI or cSCI (mean time since injury 6.85 ± 5.12 years) were classified according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) and divided by age (< 50 or ≥ 50 years), independent of lesion level, and also into 4 homogeneous groups according to lesion level. The subgroups were as follows: Subgroup 1, tetraplegic iSCI (n = 13) (C2-8, AIS C [n = 8] and AIS D [n = 5]); Subgroup 2, paraplegic iSCI with spastic motor behavior (n = 15) (T2-12, AIS C [n = 8] and AIS D [n = 7]); Subgroup 3, paraplegic cSCI with complete motor paraplegia and absence of spastic motor behavior (n = 18) (T11-L4 [AIS A], and ZPP from L-3 to S-1); and Subgroup 4, paraplegic iSCI with absence of spastic motor behavior (n = 9) (T12-L3, AIS C [n = 8] and AIS D [n = 1]). The training paradigm consisted of 12 weeks of HAL-assisted treadmill training (5 times/week). Baseline status was documented prior to intervention by using the AIS grade, Walking Index for SCI II (WISCI II) score, the 10-meter walk test (10MWT), and the 6-minute walk test (6MinWT). Training effects were assessed after 6 and 12 weeks of therapy, without HAL assistance. Results Overall, a time reduction of 47% in the 10MWT, self-selected speed (10MWTsss) (< 50 years = 56% vs

  16. HUMAN HAND STUDY FOR ROBOTIC EXOSKELETON DELVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIROUAS Flaviu Ionut

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper will be presenting research with application in the rehabilitation of hand motor functions by the aid of robotics. The focus will be on the dimensional parameters of the biological human hand from which the robotic system will be developed. The term used for such measurements is known as anthropometrics. The anthropometric parameters studied and presented in this paper are mainly related to the angular limitations of the finger joints of the human hand.

  17. Robotic Exoskeleton Hand with Pneumatic Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Hugo Miguel Mantas Costa

    2017-01-01

    With modern developments of smart portable devices and miniaturization of technologies, society has been provided with computerized assistance for almost every daily activity but the physical aspects have been frequently ne-glected. It is currently possible to make robots that process information thru neural networks, that identify and mimic facial expressions and that replace manual labour in assembly plants, getting ever closer to skills associated to human beings. In spite of these technol...

  18. HUMAN HAND STUDY FOR ROBOTIC EXOSKELETON DELVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    BIROUAS Flaviu Ionut; NILGESZ Arnold

    2016-01-01

    This paper will be presenting research with application in the rehabilitation of hand motor functions by the aid of robotics. The focus will be on the dimensional parameters of the biological human hand from which the robotic system will be developed. The term used for such measurements is known as anthropometrics. The anthropometric parameters studied and presented in this paper are mainly related to the angular limitations of the finger joints of the human hand.

  19. Innovative EVA Glove Exoskeleton, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dexterous performance degradation resulting from donning an extra-vehicular activity (EVA) glove limits the capability of astronauts to perform certain tasks in...

  20. Modelización gráfica y simulación de un motor Stirling

    OpenAIRE

    Carroggio Cabestany, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    El siguiente trabajo presenta primeramente a los motores Stirling, realizando una breve explicación de su funcionamiento y características. Una vez conocidos, se centra en los motores Stirling con configuración Alfa. Se establece un proceso de diseño de motores Stirling tipo Alfa con el que poder hacer frente a cálculos matemáticos que ayudan a conocer las características del motor diseñado antes de su fabricación. Se realizan un estudio térmico y cinemático de forma que se conozcan las...

  1. Control Adaptativo de Velocidad usando el Filtro de Kalman en un Motor de Inducción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Sanchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a control system used when the detailed parameter information of a plant in not available. Therefore, is useful to design a controller with an approximated model of the system, this is reachable through the use of parameter estimation based on the input and output signals. The estimation procedure is commonly developed with deterministic algorithms, avoiding the presented uncertainties and errors added to the system by the conditioning equipment. In this work we present an on line parameter computation, over systems that employs an error assumption in their model, the adaptive tuning of a PID controller using the Kalman filter in order to control the speed on an induction motor. Also, the control by the voltage-frequency in closed loop and the effectiveness of the control algorithm by the test developed on the asynchronous machine are described.

  2. Software para la determinación del comportamiento de un motor asincrónico trifásico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Brito Socarrás

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available El motor asincrónico trifásico es uno de los convertidores más empleados en la industria, por lo cual es de unagran necesidad conocer el comportamiento de estas máquinas. Esto se puede valorar a través de las característicasde operación. Este tipo de máquina en ocasiones sufre averías, por lo cual tienen que ser reparadas y enmuchas situaciones posteriormente determinar nuevamente sus características de operación. En el presentetrabajo  se  elabora  un  paquete  de  programas  de  computación  que  permite  obtener  las  características  de:comportamiento contra potencia de salida y comportamiento en un punto de trabajo.  The asynchronous tree-phases motor is one of the converters more employee in the industry, reason why is of agreat necessity to know the behavior of these machines. This you can value through the operation characteris-tics. This machine type in occasions suffers mishaps, reason why they have to be repaired and in many situa-tions after the same ones is necessary to determine its operation characteristics again.  Presently work iselaborated a package of calculation programs that allows to obtain the characteristics of: of behavior against exitpower and their behavior in a work point.

  3. Identificación y puesta en marcha de un motor lineal síncrono de imanes permanentes

    OpenAIRE

    FRANCÉS GALIANA, VICENT

    2015-01-01

    Conocer del funcionamiento de la máquina disponible. Analizar los motores por separado y cerciorarnos de su estado. Poner en funcionamiento dichos motores haciendo uso de los elementos disponibles en el laboratorio. En caso de que esto no sea posible, diseñar una alternativa que permita el control de dichas máquinas. Análisis y valoración de los distintos controladores de la máquina disponibles en el mercado. Programación y parametrización del controlador de la máquina. Puedes encont...

  4. Estimación de la resistencia del rotor de un motor asincrónico utilizando FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Jaimes J.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta la implementación de Redes Neuronales Artificiales en un dispositivo lógico programable como es una FPGA, la finalidad es desarrollar un modelo en Sysgen capaz de estimar la resistencia rotórica en motores de inducción. Para crear una neurona en Sysgen se debe partir del modelo estándar de una neurona artificial, la cual es, la sumatoria de los pesos menos el umbral, todo multiplicado por una función de activación, en este caso la función de activación utilizada fue Tansig para la capa oculta y Purelin para la capa de salida. La red neuronal utiliza datos decimales de entrada-salida, y la FPGA es digital, por lo tanto se diseñó en Sysgen un acondicionamiento capaz de manejar datos binarios en la tarjeta, para esto se utilizó un conversor Digital- Análogo, y se creó la manera de suprimir el número de pines utilizados en la FPGA, diseñando una etapa de registros que sirve para guardar el dato deseado y por ende enviarlo a una de las entradas de la red neuronal. La trama de datos se hace progresivamente cada registro sirve para guardar el valor decimal presente a la salida del conversor Digital-Análogo y cada vez que se cambie el dato se activa el registro correspondiente a la entrada de la red neuronal.

  5. CAMBIOS EN EL TAMAÑO DE EXOESQUELETOS CALCÁREOS DE MOLUSCOS DURANTE EL HOLOCENO TARDÍO: ARQUEOMALACOLOGÍA DE CONCHEROS EN LA COSTA NORTE DE SANTA CRUZ, PATAGONIA ARGENTINA (Size Change of Calcareous Exoskeletons of Molluscs during the Late Holocene: Archaeomalacology of Shell Middens on the Northern Coast of Santa Cruz, Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Hammond

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available En la costa norte de Santa Cruz, Patagonia Argentina, los concheros son una de las evidencias arqueológicas de ocupación por cazadores-recolectores. Se realizaron estudios biométricos sobre exoesqueletos calcáreos de moluscos recuperados en concheros con el fin de evaluar la existencia de una tendencia/patrón de cambio en el tamaño a lo largo del tiempo. Los resultados permitieron reconocer una reducción en el tamaño medio de las conchas a lo largo del Holoceno tardío. Se discuten las implicancias paleoambientales, ecológicas y/o culturales. Finalmente, se avanza en la discusión sobre la dinámica de ocupación humana y el uso de los recursos. ENGLISH: On the northern coast of Santa Cruz, Patagonia, Argentina, shell middens form part of the archaeological evidence for hunter-gatherer occupation. We performed biometric studies on calcareous exoskeletons of molluscs recovered in shell middens in order to evaluate the existence of a trend or pattern of size change over time. The results allowed us to recognize a reduction in size change over the course of the late Holocene. We discuss the paleoenvironmental, ecological and/or cultural implications of these findings. Finally, we relate the discussion to the dynamics of human occupation and resource use.

  6. Modelado, Identificación y simulación de un motor de combustión de hidrógeno

    OpenAIRE

    Folio Zabala, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    El presente Proyecto Fin de Carrera surge en el marco del Grupo Hidrógeno de la Universidad Pública de Navarra Su objetivo es la creación y validación de un modelo dinámico fiable del motor que el Grupo Hidrógeno ha adaptado a la tecnología del hidrogeno, y que se encuentra en el Laboratorio de motores “Carlos Sopena” de la Universidad Pública de Navarra, con el fin de simular la dinámica del sistema. Para alcanzar este objetivo las acciones a desarrollar son: - Monitoriz...

  7. Análisis del movimiento cinemático de un motor stirling tipo alfa aplicado al motor de una motocicleta

    OpenAIRE

    Manya Yuquilema, Héctor Geovanny; Ortiz Pinchao, Cristian Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Shows a kinematic analysis of the alpha Stirling engine alpha, applied to motorcycle internal combustion engine in V to sixty degrees, has the purpose of this project. This analysis allows seeing the compatibility between both Stirling and internal combustion engine, determining the compatibility of the two types of engines before mentioned, will be designed with the necessary elements to make both kinematics. Five chapters is divide this document, as follow: All issues of kinematics me...

  8. Análisis del efecto de la ley de combustión en el rendimiento de un motor Diesel de Inyección Directa

    OpenAIRE

    FERNÁNDEZ MARCO, MAR

    2015-01-01

    [ES] El objetivo general de este trabajo es el de evaluar de forma cualitativa y cuantitativa el efecto de la ley de combustión en el rendimiento del motor. Con el propósito de clarificar y ordenar el proceso se pueden fijar tres objetivos parciales: 1. Caracterizar el efecto de la ley de combustión en el rendimiento en diferentes condiciones de operación, y seguidamente, identificar y justificar posibles tendencias. 2. Evaluar cómo repercute el cambio de la ley de combustión e...

  9. Desarrollo de un controlador de velocidad de un motor de imanes permanentes utilizando técnicas de realización rápida de prototipos

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos Velasco, Fredy Edimer; Younes Velosa, Camilo; Cano Plata, Eduardo Antonio; Sánchez Aristizábal, Sebastián

    2010-01-01

    Prácticamente todo desarrollo de ingeniería sobre sistemas de control suele ser analizado mediante simulación para prever su desempeño. Sin embargo, no se debe dejar de tener en cuenta que el destino final del algoritmo será su aplicación en un sistema de tiempo real. Utilizando como herramientas de desarrollo una placa con tecnología DSP y el Simulink con RTW, se pueden realizar simulaciones en tiempo real (es decir, la simulación interactúa con la planta física). Para poder apreciar las con...

  10. Validación Experimental de la Metodología Motor Current Signature Analysis para un Motor de Inducción de 2 HP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia J. Oviedo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de las corrientes de estator en la monitorización de máquinas eléctricas rotativas, particularmente en motores de inducción, ha tenido un creciente interés, debido a que la información contenida en el espectro de la señal de corriente puede indicar la presencia de diversos tipos de fallas tanto eléctricas como mecánicas. En este trabajo se implementó un banco de pruebas para motores de inducción de 2 HP con el fin de validar la metodología MCSA (Motor Current Signature Analysis para la detección de: corto circuito en el devanado del estator, barras de rotor rotas y excentricidad del entrehierro bajo distintas condiciones de carga. Los resultados dejan ver el grado de dependencia entre la condición de carga del motor con falla y la posibilidad de detección de la misma, así como evaluar la viabilidad de la implementación de dicha metodología en los esquemas de mantenimiento basado en la condición (CBM.

  11. Mejorando un método de balanceo de rotores acoplados directamente a un motor de inducción utilizando la corriente residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso García-Reynoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrolla un método simplificado de balanceo dinámico, en un plano, que utiliza información de dos componentes del espectro de la corriente eléctrica de cada fase de alimentación del motor obtenidas mediante filtrado. Las lecturas del espectro, que son cantidades escalares, reflejan un valor residual complejo (magnitud y fase cuando no hay desbalance, lo cual hace que el comportamiento sea no-lineal con respecto a las fuerzas desequilibradas. Basado en esto se desarrolla un algoritmo que determina, a partir de las mediciones del valor residual correspondiente al rotor balanceado y de las lecturas con desbalance las magnitudes y los ángulos de los fasores relacionados directamente con dicho desbalance. Los errores de lectura, que son más pronunciados en estos sensores tipo Hall, son reducidos mediante un sistema de ecuaciones de perturbación y con el uso de relaciones de compatibilidad que se aplican a estos datos. El algoritmo desarrollado se verificó con varios casos de prueba, con resultados del mismo orden de precisión del método tradicional de balanceo que emplea datos de vibración. La técnica alternativa presentada en este artículo puede ofrecer ventajas en la captura de datos y monitoreo del desbalance del rotor.

  12. Modelado e implementación de un manejador eléctrico para un motor de inducción trifásico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Fajardo Jaimes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a detailed description of a non-conventional speed-variation linear model intended for a conventional three-phase induction motor. The proposed architecture consists in a single-phase unit-power-factor tap (PFC followed by three-phase inverter, which feeds the motor by using the scalar-control technique. The whole system is digitally-controlled by a Digital Signal Processor (DSP. In order to obtain the model, non-conventional use of the average operator is suggested, which involves a calculation time span that depends on the target dynamics. This type of analysis simplifies the development of lossless models in terms of model precision. The project was divided into three methodological stages. Stage one established target dynamics for each of the electric-driver parts as well as providing linear models by means of a well-defined stage-specific mobile average operator. Stage two served to validate the models through simulation-based experiments. Finally, controllers were designed and the driver was implemented so as to validate the design process experimentally. The system that was implementing through this modeling process corresponds to a speed-variation unit for a 0,5-HP reduced-voltage (22V induction motor. The implemented system was characterized in terms of the total power-factor correction, a speed regulation level lower than 5 %, and power-processing-unit efficiency (PFC-Inverter of 82 %.

  13. Hand Rehabilitation Learning System With an Exoskeleton Robotic Glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhou; Ben-Tzvi, Pinhas; Danoff, Jerome

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a hand rehabilitation learning system, the SAFE Glove, a device that can be utilized to enhance the rehabilitation of subjects with disabilities. This system is able to learn fingertip motion and force for grasping different objects and then record and analyze the common movements of hand function including grip and release patterns. The glove is then able to reproduce these movement patterns in playback fashion to assist a weakened hand to accomplish these movements, or to modulate the assistive level based on the user's or therapist's intent for the purpose of hand rehabilitation therapy. Preliminary data have been collected from healthy hands. To demonstrate the glove's ability to manipulate the hand, the glove has been fitted on a wooden hand and the grasping of various objects was performed. To further prove that hands can be safely driven by this haptic mechanism, force sensor readings placed between each finger and the mechanism are plotted. These experimental results demonstrate the potential of the proposed system in rehabilitation therapy.

  14. Assessment of Astronaut Hand Function Using a Robotic Exoskeleton

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An extended period of space exploration has deleterious effects on the neuromuscular system. Sensorimotor impairments can hinder an astronaut's performance by...

  15. Skeletal and Clinical Effects of Exoskeleton-Assisted Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biomechanical models of human locomotion are utilized to estimate the mechanical effects of the dynamic loading of the bone structures that takes...length of the limbs in order to set up the Ekso. The latter is achieved by means of parametric tables provided by Ekso Bionics . Then a physical therapist

  16. The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Mariella; Molinari, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) place a heavy burden on the healthcare system and have a high personal impact and marked socio-economic consequences. Clinically, no absolute cure for these conditions exists. However, in recent years, there has been an increased focus on new robotic technologies that can change the frame we think about the prognosis for recovery and for treating some functions of the body affected after SCIs. This review has two goals. The first is to assess the possibility of the embodiment of functional assistive tools after traumatic disruption of the neural pathways between the brain and the body. To this end, we will examine how altered sensorimotor information modulates the sense of the body in SCI. The second goal is to map the phenomenological experience of using external tools that typically extend the potential of the body physically impaired by SCI. More specifically, we will focus on the difference between the perception of one's physically augmented and non-augmented affected body based on observable and measurable behaviors. We discuss potential clinical benefits of enhanced embodiment of the external objects by way of multisensory interventions. This review argues that the future evolution of human robotic technologies will require adopting an embodied approach, taking advantage of brain plasticity to allow bionic limbs to be mapped within the neural circuits of physically impaired individuals.

  17. The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Mariella; Molinari, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) place a heavy burden on the healthcare system and have a high personal impact and marked socio-economic consequences. Clinically, no absolute cure for these conditions exists. However, in recent years, there has been an increased focus on new robotic technologies that can change the frame we think about the prognosis for recovery and for treating some functions of the body affected after SCIs. This review has two goals. The first is to assess the possibility of the embodiment of functional assistive tools after traumatic disruption of the neural pathways between the brain and the body. To this end, we will examine how altered sensorimotor information modulates the sense of the body in SCI. The second goal is to map the phenomenological experience of using external tools that typically extend the potential of the body physically impaired by SCI. More specifically, we will focus on the difference between the perception of one's physically augmented and non-augmented affected body based on observable and measurable behaviors. We discuss potential clinical benefits of enhanced embodiment of the external objects by way of multisensory interventions. This review argues that the future evolution of human robotic technologies will require adopting an embodied approach, taking advantage of brain plasticity to allow bionic limbs to be mapped within the neural circuits of physically impaired individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exoskeletons: Generating Content for Popular Music in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Casey Ann

    2016-01-01

    People all over the world are engaging with popular music, particularly through social media platforms, where views are often in the billions and climbing. Sacks (2007), a world-renowned neurologist, coined the term "earworms" to refer to songs that play repetitively in one's head for no apparent reason, sometimes for days, even years,…

  19. A Human Factors Evaluation of Exoskeleton Boot Interface Sole Thickness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boynton, Angela C; Crowell, III, Harrison P

    2006-01-01

    .... Mobility performance was assessed with five obstacles on a mobility-portability course. Participants also provided subjective feedback on each footwear condition's comfort, stability, and difficulty during the biomechanics and mobility assessments...

  20. Exoskeleton Power and Torque Requirements Based on Human Biomechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowell, Harrison

    2002-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is funding the development of exoskeletal devices that are intended to increase the speed, strength, and endurance of soldiers in combat environments...

  1. Development of an exoskeleton model in a neurorehabilittion perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Carrilho, Marta Gandaio

    2017-01-01

    Tese de mestrado integrado, Engenharia Biomédica e Biofísica (Engenharia Clínica e Instrumentação Médica) Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2017 A locomoção é uma tarefa de grande importância na vida das pessoas. Ainda que pareça uma tarefa simples, andar é um exercício complexo que envolve controlo nervoso a fim de ativar os músculos e criar um movimento coordenado. Embora exista variabilidade natural nos padrões de marcha de indivíduos saudáveis, é possível definir um padrão...

  2. Adaptación de un motor de combustión interna alternativo de gasolina para su funcionamiento con hidrógeno como combustible. Aplicaciones energética y de automoción

    OpenAIRE

    Sáinz Casas, David

    2016-01-01

    En esta tesis doctoral se presentan los trabajos de investigación realizados recientemente en la Universidad Pública de Navarra sobre la conversión de motores de gasolina para su funcionamiento con hidrógeno, así como el desarrollo de aplicaciones demostrativas prácticas empleando estos motores. Esta línea de investigación es continuación de la producción electrolítica de hidrógeno con energía eólica [15-17]. El objetivo principal de esta tesis es la demostración práctica de la viabilidad de ...

  3. Diseño de un prototipo para un sistema de alimentación de gas hidrógeno como combustible alternativo para un motor de ciclo Otto

    OpenAIRE

    Jordán Guillén, Jaime Omar; Zhigui Loja, Carlos Alfredo; Guzmán Villamar, Freddy Melquiades

    2010-01-01

    La contaminación causada al ambiente por el consumo de petróleo como fuente de energía en motores a gasolina, el agotamiento de los hidrocarburos debido a la creciente demanda de su uso en fábricas, automóviles y hogares, ha provocado que en la actualidad exista un enorme interés en la búsqueda de nuevas fuentes de energías. En este contexto, el hidrógeno constituye una importante alternativa para sustituir a los combustibles hidrocarburos usados habitualmente por el hombre. Entre las ventaja...

  4. Modelo matemático en Simulink de un Motor de Reluctancia Conmutada con configuración 4/2; Mathematical Model of a 4/2 Switched Reluctance Motor in Simulink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Álvarez Tapia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se creó un modelo matemático para el motor de reluctancia conmutada WEKA SR-30102 bifásico irregular de fabricación alemana utilizando la herramienta de diseño Simulink. Para la correcta descripción de los fenómenos eléctricos y mecánicos que ocurren dentro de la máquina se utilizaron las ecuaciones eléctricas y mecánicas, tomando en consideración las características no lineales del motor y la influencia a altas velocidades de fenómenos mecánicos. Dicho modelo se utilizó para la implementación de dos estrategias de control, dígase, control a lazo cerrado de la velocidad mediante modulación de ancho de pulso y con control por histéresis. Estas estrategias fueron aplicadas a un convertidor electrónico de potencia con una configuración 2q, que posteriormente aplica las señales de potencia al motor de reluctancia conmutada. Mediante la comparación de los resultados obtenidos en la simulación y de modo experimental se validó la precisión del modelo obtenido.In the present paper a mathematical model for the WEKA SR-30102 switched reluctance motor was created using the Simulink development suite. In order to accurately model its behavior, the non-linearity of the motor was taken into account. The mathematical equations that describe the mechanical and electrical properties of the motor were used in order to accurately model the corresponding effects that occur inside the machine. Two different control strategies were created, that is, a closed loop using pulse width modulation and another one using hysteresis control. The mathematical model was validated comparing the experimental and the simulation results.

  5. Determinación de los parámetros de un motor de inducción utilizando un algoritmo de optimización por cúmulo de partículas (PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Alzate Gómez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This document uses particle swarm optimization (PSO for determining the parameters of induction motor. The error between the measured actual stator current output of an induction motor and its model is used as the criteria to correct the required parameters. Digital simulations no-load operations are used to identify the parameters. A comparison of two variants of the PSO algorithm (local PSO and global PSO is used to verify the efficiency of each one and computational time is determined.Finally, the parameter identification sheme shown is implemented.

  6. Evaluación de la fractura por fatiga del cigüeñal de un motor Diesel. // Evaluation of the crank shaft fatigue failure of a boat diesel engine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Goytisolo Espinosa

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available En el Trabajo se presentan los resultados de una investigación realizada por el colectivo de Mecánica Aplicada de laFacultad de Ingeniería Mecánica de La Universidad de Cienfuegos, con vistas a esclarecer la causa de la fractura delcigüeñal de uno de los motores de la Moto Nave “Mar del Sur” de le Empresa EQUITALL.La investigación del material del cigüeñal arrojó que se trata de acero 30. Los cálculos realizados demostraron, que lacapacidad resistente de este acero es insuficiente para soportar las tensiones que se desarrollan en el codo de salida delcigüeñal y los factores de seguridad a la fatiga en algunos de los puntos mas críticos del cachete, por donde se produjo lafractura, dan inferiores a la unidad y la aplicación de la Mecánica de la Fractura Subcrítica, confirmó que la Vida Útil delárbol con dicho material, es muy limitada.Palabras claves: Cigüeñal diesel, fractura por fatiga, mecánica de la fractura subcrítica.__________________________________________________________________________Abstract.This research paper shows the results of an investigation carried out by the Applied Mechanics staff of the MechanicalEngineering faculty of the Cienfuegos University. It was developed in order to determine the crankshaft failure causes ofengines of a boat diesel engine.The crankshaft material investigation showed that it was steel grade 30. The calculations showed that the steel resistancecapacity is not enough to support the stresses produced in the crankshaft output elbow. The fatigue security factors in someof the most critical areas of the cheek, where the failure took place, are lower than unity. The subcritical fracture mechanicsapplication confirmed that the shaft working life is quite limited with this steel.Key words: Diesel crankshaft, fatigue fracture, subcritical fracture mechanics.

  7. Diseño y construcción de un motor virtual, para el diagnóstico de la ECU de un vehículo Chevrolet Spark

    OpenAIRE

    Mora Campoverde, José Enrique; Niola Barbecho, Fausto Lizandro

    2013-01-01

    Con la propuesta de este Motor Virtual se busca bajar los tiempos en el diagnóstico y eliminar la contaminación ambiental al comprobar el buen funcionamiento de la ECU del Vehículo Chevrolet Spark debido a que con este Motor Virtual se elimina encender el vehículo ya que el mismo consta de todos los sensores del motor y sus respectivos actuadores para saber si estos están funcionando en correctas condiciones o existe algún daño en los mismos. With Virtual Motor proposal this time is lookin...

  8. Protección computarizada de un motor de inducción utilizando el sistema dSpace y una biblioteca de protecciones eléctrica hechas en MATLAB/SIMULINK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlys Ernesto Torres Breffe

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Se describen los resultados obtenidos en la creación de una protección digital en tiempo real para unmotor de inducción de pequeña potencia mediante una biblioteca virtual realizada en MATLAB 6.05 y elsistema dSPACE. Los dispositivos virtuales mostraron el mismo comportamiento que los reales desu tipo.  This work describe of results obtained in the creation of the Digital Protection working in real time, for a lowpower induction motor using a virtual library made in MATLAB 6.05 and the dSPACE system. The virtualdevices had the same behavior that the real devices.

  9. Estudio energético de un motor de encendido por compresión y arquitectura 2-tiempos operando con el concepto de combustión parcialmente premezclada

    OpenAIRE

    ALCÁZAR LÓPEZ, ANTONIO

    2016-01-01

    [ES] Dicho proyecto se encuentra dentro de un proyecto de colaboración “Powertrain of future lightduty vehicles (POWERFUL)” cuyo fin es la investigación y desarrollo de futuros motores de vehículos ligeros para transporte terrestre. Está compuesto por los siguientes sub-proyectos:  V1. Motor de 4T MEP caracterizado por bajas emisiones y bajo coste.  V2. Motor de 4TMEC con combustible a medida e integrando el modo LTC (Low Temperature Combustion) al sistema de encendido por co...

  10. Diseño de un método para controlar la combustión en un motor 2T de gasolina basado en la medida del régimen instantáneo

    OpenAIRE

    PÉREZ PÉREZ, JUAN CARLOS

    2016-01-01

    [ES] En determinadas condiciones de operación los motores de 2T de gasolina operan con autoencendido de la mezcla, lo cual hace perder el control tradicional a través de la bujía. En esos casos es preciso conocer cuándo está teniendo lugar ese autoencendido, para así determinar si es necesario llevar a cabo alguna acción correctora para controlar que éste tenga lugar en el momento adecuado. El alumno explorará la posibilidad de utilizar la medida del régimen instantáneo del motor para consegu...

  11. Controller for the Machine-Side Power Converter of a 2kW Switched Reluctance Motor; Controlador del Convertidor Electronico de Potencia Lado Red de un Motor de Reluctancia Variable de 2kW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, C.

    2006-12-19

    The ACE2 project deals with the development of a kynetic energy storage (KES) system for power peak shaving in high speed railway substations. This KES system consists in a double power converter which drives a switched reluctance machine (SRM) along with a flywheel operating in a wide speed range. This document presents from a technical point of view the features of the controller for the machine-side power converter of a 2kW SRM prototype. Hardware and software issues are treated in detail. (Author)

  12. Controller for the Machine-Side Power Converter of a 2kW Switched Reluctance Motor; Controlador del Convertidor Electronico de Potencia Lado Maquina de un Motor de Reluctancia Variable de 2kW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, C.

    2006-07-01

    The ACE2 project deals with the development of a kynetic energy storage (KES) system for power peak shaving in high speed railway substations. This KES system consists in a double power converter which drives a switched reluctance machine (SRM) along with a flywheel operating in a wide speed range. This document presents from a technical point of view the features of the controller for the machine-side power converter of a 2kW SRM prototype. Hardware and software issues are treated in detail. (Author)

  13. Do exoskeletons dream of plastic sleep?. Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Michele; Tempesta, Daniela; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    In the science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick ;Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; [2] Blade Runners used a polygraph-like machine to determine if an individual was a replicant, by measuring his/her empathetic responses. Although made of biological materials and physically indistinguishable from humans, androids were considered to be pieces of machinery.

  14. EMG-driven models of human-machine interaction in individuals wearing the H2 exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durandau, Guillaume; Sartori, Massimo; Bortole, Magdo; Moreno, Juan C.; Pons, José L.; Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    EMG-driven modeling has been mostly used offline and on powerful desktop computers, limiting the application of this technique to neurorehabilitation settings. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of EMG-driven modeling in online (i.e. in real-time) running on a fully portable embedded system and

  15. An ecologically-controlled exoskeleton can improve balance recovery after slippage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, V.; Tropea, P.; Aprigliano, F.; Martelli, D.; Parri, A.; Cortese, M.; Molino-Lova, R.; Vitiello, N.; Micera, S.

    2017-05-01

    The evolution to bipedalism forced humans to develop suitable strategies for dynamically controlling their balance, ensuring stability, and preventing falling. The natural aging process and traumatic events such as lower-limb loss can alter the human ability to control stability significantly increasing the risk of fall and reducing the overall autonomy. Accordingly, there is an urgent need, from both end-users and society, for novel solutions that can counteract the lack of balance, thus preventing falls among older and fragile citizens. In this study, we show a novel ecological approach relying on a wearable robotic device (the Active Pelvis Orthosis, APO) aimed at facilitating balance recovery after unexpected slippages. Specifically, if the APO detects signs of balance loss, then it supplies counteracting torques at the hips to assist balance recovery. Experimental tests conducted on eight elderly persons and two transfemoral amputees revealed that stability against falls improved due to the “assisting when needed” behavior of the APO. Interestingly, our approach required a very limited personalization for each subject, and this makes it promising for real-life applications. Our findings demonstrate the potential of closed-loop controlled wearable robots to assist elderly and disabled subjects and to improve their quality of life.

  16. Bio-Inspired Control of an Arm Exoskeleton Joint with Active-Compliant Actuation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Folgheraiter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the methodology followed on the design of a multi-contact point haptic interface that uses a bio-inspired control approach and a novel actuation system. The combination of these components aims at creating a system that increases the operability of the target, and, at the same time, enables an intuitive and safe tele-operation of any complex robotic system of any given morphology. The novelty lies on the combination of a thoughtful kinematic structure driven by an active-compliant actuation system and a bio-inspired paradigm for its regulation. Due to the proposed actuation approach, the final system will achieve the condition of wearable system. On that final solution, each joint will be able to change its stiffness depending on the task to be executed, and on the anatomical features of each individual. Moreover, the system provides a variety of safety mechanisms at different levels to prevent causing any harm to the operator. In future, the system should allow the complete virtual immersion of the user within the working scenario.

  17. Exoskeleton Technology in Rehabilitation: Towards an EMG-Based Orthosis System for Upper Limb Neuromotor Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Vaca Benitez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation of patients should not only be limited to the first phases during intense hospital care but also support and therapy should be guaranteed in later stages, especially during daily life activities if the patient’s state requires this. However, aid should only be given to the patient if needed and as much as it is required. To allow this, automatic self-initiated movement support and patient-cooperative control strategies have to be developed and integrated into assistive systems. In this work, we first give an overview of different kinds of neuromuscular diseases, review different forms of therapy, and explain possible fields of rehabilitation and benefits of robotic aided rehabilitation. Next, the mechanical design and control scheme of an upper limb orthosis for rehabilitation are presented. Two control models for the orthosis are explained which compute the triggering function and the level of assistance provided by the device. As input to the model fused sensor data from the orthosis and physiology data in terms of electromyography (EMG signals are used.

  18. Force control theory and method of human load carrying exoskeleton suit

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Gui, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    This book reports on the latest advances in concepts and further development of principal component analysis (PCA), discussing in detail a number of open problems related to dimensional reduction techniques and their extensions. It brings together research findings, previously scattered throughout many scientific journal papers worldwide, and presents them in a methodologically unified form. Offering vital insights into the subject matter in self-contained chapters that balance the theory and concrete applications, and focusing on open problems, it is essential reading for all researchers and practitioners with an interest in PCA.

  19. Hand rehabilitation after stroke using a wearable, high DOF, spring powered exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianyao Chen; Lum, Peter S

    2016-08-01

    Stroke patients often have inappropriate finger flexor activation and finger extensor weakness, which makes it difficult to open their affected hand for functional grasp. The goal was to develop a passive, lightweight, wearable device to enable improved hand function during performance of activities of daily living. The device, HandSOME II, assists with opening the patient's hand using 11 elastic actuators that apply extension torques to finger and thumb joints. Device design and initial testing are described. A novel mechanical design applies forces orthogonal to the finger segments despite the fact that all of the device DOFs are not aligned with human joint DOF. In initial testing with seven stroke subjects with impaired hand function, use of HandSOME II significantly increased maximum extension angles and range of motion in all of the index finger joints (P<;0.05). HandSOME II allows performance of all the grip patterns used in daily activities and can be used as part of home-based therapy programs.

  20. Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME): a portable, passive hand exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Black, Iian; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2011-08-01

    Stroke patients often have flexor hypertonia and finger extensor weakness, which makes it difficult to open their affected hand for functional grasp. Because of this impairment, hand rehabilitation after stroke is essential for restoring functional independent lifestyles. The goal of this study is to develop a passive, lightweight, wearable device to assist with hand function during performance of activities of daily living. The device, Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME), assists with opening the patient's hand using a series of elastic cords that apply extension torques to the finger joints and compensates for the flexor hypertonia. Device design and calibration are described as well as functional and usability testing with stroke subjects with a wide range of hand impairments. In initial testing with eight stroke subjects with finger flexor hypertonia, use of the HandSOME significantly increased range of motion and functional ability (p=0.002) . There was some decrease in grip strength with the HandSOME device at the subject's ideal setting, however this was not statistically significant (p=0.167) and did not seem to have a significant effect on function. Overall HandSOME shows promise as a training tool to facilitate repetitive task practice for improving hand function in stroke patients. HandSOME can be used as part of a home-based therapy program, or as an orthotic for replacing lost function. © 2011 IEEE

  1. Upper-limb tremor suppression with a 7DOF exoskeleton power-assist robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguchi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    A tremor which is one of the involuntary motions is somewhat rhythmic motion that may occur in various body parts. Although there are several kinds of the tremor, an essential tremor is the most common tremor disorder of the arm. The essential tremor is a disorder of unknown cause, and it is common in the elderly. The essential tremor interferes with a patient's daily living activity, because it may occur during a voluntary motion. If a patient of an essential tremor uses an EMG-based controlled power-assist robot, the robot might misunderstand the user's motion intention because of the effect of the essential tremor. In that case, upper-limb power-assist robots must carry out tremor suppression as well as power-assist, since a person performs various precise tasks with certain tools by the upper-limb in daily living. Therefore, it is important to suppress the tremor at the hand and grasped tool. However, in the case of the tremor suppression control method which suppressed the vibrations of the hand and the tip of the tool, vibration of other part such as elbow might occur. In this paper, the tremor suppression control method for upper-limb power-assist robot is proposed. In the proposed method, the vibration of the elbow is suppressed in addition to the hand and the tip of the tool. The validity of the proposed method was verified by the experiments.

  2. A Monopropellant-Powered Actuator for the Development of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldfarb, Michael

    2001-01-01

    .... Specifically, the proposed system utilizes the monopropellant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to maintain a high-pressure pneumatic reservoir, which is in turn utilized as a controllable power source for a system of pneumatic actuators...

  3. Knickkopf protein protects and organizes chitin in the newly synthesized insect exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    New cuticle synthesis and molting are complex developmental processes that all insects must undergo to allow for growth. However, little is known about how insects regulate the selective degradation of the old cuticle while leaving the new one intact. In this study we show that in the red flour beet...

  4. An Unpowered Exoskeleton to Reduce Astronaut Hand Fatigue during Microgravity EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Alan John

    Improving manufacturing techniques to minimize costs have always been the ultimate goal for engineers since the dawn of technology. Working toward making the end product as affordable as possible without compromising on its quality is not just a skill set to develop but also, art. This thesis deals with changing the approach to the manufacturing of the patented XQ-139 UAV by using alternative materials to reduce production costs and time. Retaining the overall structure and utility of the UAV while eliminating the high costs to produce is the primary goal. It also includes tests performed on the new UAV airframe to prove this hypothesis and compare it to the results of the original airframe. The objective is to prove that the new airframe can cope with the structural and performance demands of the original XQ-139A, while reducing the total costs to manufacture it. This thesis only deals with the processing and manufacturing of the new XQ-139A airframe. No flight tests are involved.

  5. Pollen recovered from the exoskeleton of stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) in Gainesville, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable flies are pestiferous blood feeding flies that attack animals and humans. Besides consuming blood, these flies will also visit flowers to take nectar meals. When feeding on nectar, flies become coated with pollen which can be used to identify flowers used by the flies. Recently, flies cove...

  6. Biomimetic Design of an Under-Actuated Leg Exoskeleton for Load-Carrying Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    the 6 operator. Difficulties in human sensing, stability of the servomechanisms, safety, power requirements and system complexity kept it from...connection was terminated. Figure 4.2 In a), the Accelus digital amplifier used at the hip is shown. In b), the PCB mount Accelnet mico -module used at

  7. Application of artificial intelligent tools to modeling of glucosamine preparation from exoskeleton of shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Hadi; Pourmahmood, Mohammad; Mojarrad, Javid Shahbazi; Nemati, Mahboob; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to forecast and optimize the glucosamine production yield from chitin (obtained from Persian Gulf shrimp) by means of genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and artificial neural networks (ANNs) as tools of artificial intelligence methods. Three factors (acid concentration, acid solution to chitin ratio, and reaction time) were used as the input parameters of the models investigated. According to the obtained results, the production yield of glucosamine hydrochloride depends linearly on acid concentration, acid solution to solid ratio, and time and also the cross-product of acid concentration and time and the cross-product of solids to acid solution ratio and time. The production yield significantly increased with an increase of acid concentration, acid solution ratio, and reaction time. The production yield is inversely related to the cross-product of acid concentration and time. It means that at high acid concentrations, the longer reaction times give lower production yields. The results revealed that the average percent error (PE) for prediction of production yield by GA, PSO, and ANN are 6.84, 7.11, and 5.49%, respectively. Considering the low PE, it might be concluded that these models have a good predictive power in the studied range of variables and they have the ability of generalization to unknown cases.

  8. Modeling and Control Methods for Supporting Scapulohumeral Rhythm with a Robotic Exoskeleton

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extravehicular activities (EVA), which are activities that require a crew member to leave the spacecraft, are a key component of many missions and require a...

  9. Modeling and Analysis of a Novel Pneumatic Artificial Muscle and Pneumatic Arm Exoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hee Doo

    2017-01-01

    The soft robotics field is developing rapidly and is poised to have a wide impact in a variety of applications. Soft robots have intrinsic compliance, offering a number of benefits as compared to traditional rigid robots. Compliance can provide compatibility with biological systems such as the human body and can provide some benefits for human safety and control. Further research into soft robots can be advanced by further development of pneumatic actuators. Pneumatic actuators are a ...

  10. Exoskeletal proteins from the crab, Cancer pagurus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    1999-01-01

    Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry......Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry...

  11. Engineered embodiment: Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannape, Oliver Alan; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-03-01

    From brain-computer interfaces to wearable robotics and bionic prostheses - intelligent assistive devices have already become indispensable in the therapy of people living with reduced sensorimotor functioning of their physical body, be it due to spinal cord injury, amputation or brain lesions [1]. Rapid technological advances will continue to fuel this field for years to come. As Pazzaglia and Molinari [2] rightly point out, progress in this domain should not solely be driven by engineering prowess, but utilize the increasing psychological and neuroscientific understanding of cortical body-representations and their plasticity [3]. We argue that a core concept for such an integrated embodiment framework was introduced with the formalization of the forward model for sensorimotor control [4]. The application of engineering concepts to human movement control paved the way for rigorous computational and neuroscientific analysis. The forward model has successfully been adapted to investigate principles underlying aspects of bodily awareness such as the sense of agency in the comparator framework [5]. At the example of recent advances in lower limb prostheses, we propose a cross-disciplinary, integrated embodiment framework to investigate the sense of agency and the related sense of body ownership for such devices. The main onus now is on the engineers and cognitive scientists to embed such an approach into the design of assistive technology and its evaluation battery.

  12. Design, development and deployment of a hand/wrist exoskeleton for home-based rehabilitation after stroke - SCRIPT project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirabdollahian, F; Ates, Sedar; Basteris, A.; Cesario, A.; Buurke, Jaap; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Hofs, D.; Johansson, E.; Mountain, G.; Nasr, N.; Nijenhuis, S.M.; Prange, Grada Berendina; Rahman, N.; Sale, P.; Schätzlein, F.; van Schooten, B.; Stienen, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: this manuscript introduces the Supervised Care and Rehabilitation Involving Personal Tele-robotics (SCRIPT) project. The main goal is to demonstrate design and development steps involved in a complex intervention, while examining feasibility of using an instrumented orthotic device for

  13. Improving Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life with a Tongue Driven Exoskeleton: A Pilot Study Quantifying Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen N. Housley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability around the world. Many survivors experience upper extremity (UE impairment with few rehabilitation opportunities, secondary to a lack of voluntary muscle control. We developed a novel rehabilitation paradigm (TDS-HM that uses a Tongue Drive System (TDS to control a UE robotic device (Hand Mentor: HM while engaging with an interactive user interface. In this study, six stroke survivors with moderate to severe UE impairment completed 15 two-hour sessions of TDS-HM training over five weeks. Participants were instructed to move their paretic arm, with synchronized tongue commands to track a target waveform while using visual feedback to make accurate movements. Following TDS-HM training, significant improvements in tracking performance translated into improvements in the UE portion of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, range of motion, and all subscores for the Stroke Impact Scale. Regression modeling found daily training time to be a significant predictor of decreases in tracking error, indicating the presence of a potential dose-response relationship. The results of this pilot study indicate that the TDS-HM system can elicit significant improvements in moderate to severely impaired stroke survivors. This pilot study gives preliminary insight into the volume of treatment time required to improve outcomes.

  14. Model-based neural networks to predict emissions in a diesel engine operating with biodiesel blends of castor; Modelo basado en redes neuronales para predecir las emisiones en un motor diésel que opera con mezclas de biodiésel de higuerilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Narváez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Some identification methods of nonlinear systems using artificialneural networks are explained. Also, a model based on Neural Networks“Supervised Feed Forward” is presented, developed to identifyand predict the behavior of volumetric emissions from combustion of astationary diésel engine based on two input variables: the engine load and the mixture of castor biodiésel. The neural network training and model validation was performed by using the NNModel.

  15. Reparación de un modelo termodinámico de un motor generador diésel rápido : obtención de leyes de liberación de calor e implementación del modelo en AVL BOOST

    OpenAIRE

    Melgarejo Otálora, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Los motores de combustión interna alternativos supusieron un gran avance a principios del siglo XX para el transporte terrestre y marítimo, reemplazando a la máquina de vapor en ese propósito. Hacia la mitad del citado siglo comenzó su aplicación como máquina acoplada a un generador eléctrico con el objetivo de producir energía. Los motores de tipo estacionario como el estudiado en este proyecto trabajan a un régimen de giro y carga fijo (normalmente plena carga), acoplando la ...

  16. Análisis y validación de varios mecanismos de cinética química por comparación con datos experimentales de un motor 2T de automoción y propuesta de un nuevo combustible de sustitución para la gasolina de 98 octanos

    OpenAIRE

    LLAMAZARES LÓPEZ, MARCOS

    2016-01-01

    [ES] Debido a la nueva legislación que regula las emisiones de óxidos de nitrógeno (NOx), el estudio de nuevas formas de controlar y reducir dichas emisiones ha adquirido una mayor importancia. El control de emisiones realizando post-tratamientos a los gases de escape tiene diversos inconvenientes, siendo los principales el elevado coste económico de los mismos y la necesidad de introducir nuevos elementos en el escape del motor dificultando el mantenimiento. Por ello, es de gr...

  17. Why did the UV-A-induced photoluminescent blue–green glow in trilobite eyes and exoskeletons not cause problems for trilobites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Schoenemann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The calcitic lenses in the eyes of Palaeozoic trilobites are unique in the animal kingdom, although the use of calcite would have conveyed great advantages for vision in aquatic systems. Calcite lenses are transparent, and due to their high refractive index they would facilitate the focusing of light. In some respects, however, calcite lenses bear evident disadvantages. Birefringence would cause double images at different depths, but this is not a problem for trilobites since the difference in the paths of the ordinary and extraordinary rays is less than the diameter of the receptor cells. Another point, not discussed hitherto, is that calcite fluoresces when illuminated with UV-A. Here we show experimentally that calcite lenses fluoresce, and we discuss why fluorescence does not diminish the optical quality of these lenses and the image formed by them. In the environments in which the trilobites lived, UV-A would not have been a relevant factor, and thus fluorescence would not have disturbed or confused their visual system. We also argue that whatever the reason that calcite was never again used successfully in the visual systems of aquatic arthropods, it was not fluorescence.

  18. Development of an MR-compatible hand exoskeleton that is capable of providing interactive robotic rehabilitation during fMRI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangjoon J; Kim, Yeongjin; Lee, Hyosang; Ghasemlou, Pouya; Kim, Jung

    2018-02-01

    Following advances in robotic rehabilitation, there have been many efforts to investigate the recovery process and effectiveness of robotic rehabilitation procedures through monitoring the activation status of the brain. This work presents the development of a two degree-of-freedom (DoF) magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible hand device that can perform robotic rehabilitation procedures inside an fMRI scanner. The device is capable of providing real-time monitoring of the joint angle, angular velocity, and joint force produced by the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of four fingers. For force measurement, a custom reflective optical force sensor was developed and characterized in terms of accuracy error, hysteresis, and repeatability in the MR environment. The proposed device consists of two non-magnetic ultrasonic motors to provide assistive and resistive forces to the MCP and PIP joints. With actuation and sensing capabilities, both non-voluntary-passive movements and active-voluntary movements can be implemented. The MR compatibility of the device was verified via the analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of MR images of phantoms. SNR drops of 0.25, 2.94, and 11.82% were observed when the device was present but not activated, when only the custom force sensor was activated, and when both the custom force sensor and actuators were activated, respectively.

  19. Morfologia do exoesqueleto de adultos de Memphis moruus stheno (Pritwittz (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae Exoskeleton morphology of the adult of Memphis moruus stheno (Pritwittz (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando M. S. Dias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho visa fornecer subsídios para estudos morfológicos comparativos de Charaxinae neotropicais. Memphis moruus stheno (Prittwitz, 1865 é a segunda espécie neotropical de Anaeini e a primeira do gênero Memphis a ter sua morfologia detalhada. A morfologia externa é apresentada com descrições, ilustrações e imagens de microscopia eletrônica de varredura de estruturas da cabeça e apêndices cefálicos, região cervical, tórax e apêndices torácicos, abdome e genitálias masculina e feminina. A morfologia de M. moruus stheno é comparada com uma espécie do gênero proximamente relacionado Zaretis Hübner, [1819].This study is intended to allow further comparative morphological studies on the Neotropical Charaxinae. Memphis moruus stheno (Prittwitz, 1865 is the second species of Anaeini and the first in the genus Memphis to have its morphology published in detail. The external morphology is presented with descriptions, line drawings and scan electron microscopy of the head and its appendages, cervix, thorax and its appendages, abdomen and both male and female genital armatures. Memphis moruus stheno is compared with a species of its closely related genus Zaretis Hübner, [1819].

  20. How does wearable robotic exoskeleton affect overground walking performance measured with the 10-m and six-minute walk tests after a basic locomotor training in healthy individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dany H; Cunha, Jérémie Da; Boyer-Delestre, Mael; Bosquet, Laurent; Duclos, Cyril

    2017-10-01

    It is still unknown to what extent overground walking with a WRE is equivalent to natural overground walking without a WRE. Hence, the interpretability of the 10-m (10MWT) and six-minute (6MWT) walk tests during overground walking with a WRE against reference values collected during natural overground walking without a WRE is challenging. This study aimed to 1) compare walking performance across three different overground walking conditions: natural walking without a WRE, walking with a WRE providing minimal assistance (active walking), and walking with a WRE proving complete assistance (passive walking) and 2) assess the association and the agreement between the 10MWT and the 6MWT during passive and active walking with a WRE. Seventeen healthy individuals who underwent basic locomotor training with a WRE performed the 10MWT (preferred and maximal speeds) and the 6MWT under the three conditions. For the 10MWT, the speed progressively and significantly decreased from natural walking without a WRE (preferred: 1.40±0.18m/s; maximal: 2.16±0.19m/s), to active walking with a WRE (preferred: 0.48±0.10m/s; maximal: 0.61±0.14m/s), and to passive walking with a WRE (preferred: 0.38±0.09m/s; maximal: 0.42±0.10m/s). For the 6MWT, total distances decreased from walking without a WRE (609±53.9m), to active walking with a WRE (196.6±42.6m), and to passive walking with a WRE (144.3±33.3m). The 10MWT and 6MWT provide distinct information and can't be used interchangeably to document speed only during active walking with the WRE. Speed and distance drastically decrease during active and, even more so, passive walking with the WRE in comparison to walking without a WRE. Selection of walking tests should depend on the level of assistance provided by the WRE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Using swing resistance and assistance to improve gait symmetry in individuals post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Schmit, Brian D; Wu, Ming

    2015-08-01

    A major characteristic of hemiplegic gait observed in individuals post-stroke is spatial and temporal asymmetry, which may increase energy expenditure and the risk of falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of swing resistance/assistance applied to the affected leg on gait symmetry in individuals post-stroke. We recruited 10 subjects with chronic stroke who demonstrated a shorter step length with their affected leg in comparison to the non-affected leg during walking. They participated in two test sessions for swing resistance and swing assistance, respectively. During the adaptation period, subjects counteracted the step length deviation caused by the applied swing resistance force, resulting in an aftereffect consisting of improved step length symmetry during the post-adaptation period. In contrast, subjects did not counteract step length deviation caused by swing assistance during adaptation period and produced no aftereffect during the post-adaptation period. Locomotor training with swing resistance applied to the affected leg may improve step length symmetry through error-based learning. Swing assistance reduces errors in step length during stepping; however, it is unclear whether this approach would improve step length symmetry. Results from this study may be used to develop training paradigms for improving gait symmetry of stroke survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. "Desarrollo software de un módulo de cinética química en fase gaseosa para simulación 3D de motores de Combustión interna"

    OpenAIRE

    Forigua Rodriguez, Carlos Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Un reactor a volumen constante para (RVC) fue implementado utilizando Cantera dentro de KIVA-4 en un acople multifísico con el fin de simular varios motores. Se simuló un motor de encendido por compresión de carga homogénea (HCCI), un motor Diesel de inyección directa y un motor encendido por chispa. Sólo densidades parciales se intercambian entre KIVA y Cantera. Una densidad parcial inicial se calcula en KIVA para Cantera. Nuevas densidades son generadas por Cantera usando el ...

  3. Mejora del plan de mantenimiento de motores de combustión interna de gas natural Rolls-royce KVGS-18G4

    OpenAIRE

    García Ginés, Óscar

    2011-01-01

    El objetivo de este proyecto es mejorar el plan de mantenimiento de motores de combustión interna de gas natural Rolls-Royce KVGS-18G4 vigente. En la actualidad se utiliza un plan de mantenimiento basado en la experiencia en motores marinos. Debido a las diferencias existentes entre un motor marino (motor diesel) y un motor para la cogeneración (gas natural), he creído necesario realizar un nuevo plan de mantenimiento acorde a un motor que combustiona una mezcla de aire y gas natural. E...

  4. Perspectives on embodiment and prosthetic incorporation in those with spinal cord injury: Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Pazzaglia's group is introducing contemporary cognitive neuroscience research into rehabilitation after spinal cord injury (SCI), in novel ways [5]. And, importantly, this work also overlaps with the priorities of patients. In a recent statement from the UK James Lind Alliance (which sets aims for research between professionals and patients), their top priority was: 'whether activity based rehabilitation, including functional electrical stimulation coupled with physical activity and hydrotherapy, improved outcomes after SCI?' [3]. It is a propitious time for cognitive science and rehabilitation to come together.

  5. The re-embodiment of bodies, tools, and worlds after spinal cord injury: An intricate picture. Reply to comments on "The embodiment of assistive devices-From wheelchair to exoskeleton"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Mariella; Molinari, Marco

    2016-03-01

    We thank the commentators for their invaluable interdisciplinary contributions and perspectives and thought-provoking comments. Their suggestions have raised questions and provided insights that will guide future enquiries. Herein, we consider important theoretical ideas proposed by Cole [1]; Ferrara, Tempesta, and De Gennaro [2]; Kannape and Lenggenhager [3]; Longo, Sadibolova, and Tame [4]; Papadimitriou [5]; and Serino [6], alongside additional, potentially conflicting lines of discussion.

  6. Multisensory mechanisms underlying embodiment: Insights from and for spinal cord injury patients. Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a challenge both for clinical and theoretical research. On the one hand, SCIs have huge impact for the quality of life of affected individuals, their families and on the health care system; thus, translational research is needed to alleviate these issues. On the other hand, SCI represents a model where the brain is disconnected from the physical body, thus, from a theoretical point of view, it allows asking questions about the relationship between the body and the brain. In particular, the phenomenological consequences of SCI allow asking what makes this physical object, our body, so special, that we feel it as belonging to us, or even that we identify our self with.

  7. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Extreme Terrain Mobility Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During 2014, the Extreme Terrain Mobility project element is developing five technologies:Exoskeleton Development for ISS EvaluationExtreme Terrain Mobility...

  8. Fabrication of Novel Porous Chitosan Matrices as Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiang, Tao; Pilane, Cyril M; Laurencin, Cato T

    2005-01-01

    .... Chitosan, a natural polymer obtained from chitin, which forms a major component of crustacean exoskeleton, is a potential candidate for bone tissue engineering due to its excellent osteocompatibility...

  9. Rehabilitation exoskeletal robotics. The promise of an emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, José L

    2010-01-01

    Exoskeletons are wearable robots exhibiting a close cognitive and physical interaction with the human user. These are rigid robotic exoskeletal structures that typically operate alongside human limbs. Scientific and technological work on exoskeletons began in the early 1960s but have only recently been applied to rehabilitation and functional substitution in patients suffering from motor disorders. Key topics for further development of exoskeletons in rehabilitation scenarios include the need for robust human-robot multimodal cognitive interaction, safe and dependable physical interaction, true wearability and portability, and user aspects such as acceptance and usability. This discussion provides an overview of these aspects and draws conclusions regarding potential future research directions in robotic exoskeletons.

  10. SPEXOR : Spinal exoskeletal robot for low back pain prevention and vocational reintegration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babič, Jan; Mombaur, Katja; Lefeber, Dirk; van Dieën, Jaap; Graimann, Bernhard; Russold, Michael; Šarabon, Nejc; Houdijk, Han

    2017-01-01

    Most assistive robotic devices are exoskeletons which assist or augment the motion of the limbs and neglect the role of the spinal column in transferring load from the upper body and arms to the legs. In the SPEXOR project we will fill this gap and design a novel spinal exoskeleton to prevent

  11. Competitive interactions among symbiotic fungi of the southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier D. Klepzig; Richard T. Wilkens

    1997-01-01

    The southern pine beetle, a damaging pest of conifers, is intimately linked to three symbiotic fungi.Two fungi, Ceratocystiopsis ranaculosus and Entomocorticium sp. A, are transported within specialized structures (mycangia) in the beetle exoskeleton and are mutualists of the beetle.A third fungus, Ophiostoma minus, is transported externally on the beetle exoskeleton (...

  12. Control motor brushless sensorless

    OpenAIRE

    Solchaga Pérez de Lazárraga, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto consiste en la creación de un circuito capaz de controlar la velocidad de un motor brushless sensorless. Este tipo de motores eléctricos tienen como característica que no tienen escobillas para cambiar la polaridad del bobinado de su interior y tampoco precisan de un sensor que indique que ha realizado una vuelta. Los motores brushless que son controlados por este tipo de circuitos son específicos para aeronaves no tripuladas y requieren un diseño diferente a un motor brushless pe...

  13. Identification of irradiated crab using EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraby, A. [Radiation Dosimetry Department, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Ministry of Scientific Research, Haram, 12211- Giza, P.O. Box: 136 (Egypt)]. E-mail: maghrabism@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    EPR spectroscopy is a fast and powerful technique for the identification of irradiated food. Crab exoskeleton was divided into six parts: dactyl, cheliped, carapace, apron, swimming legs, and walking legs. Samples of the exoskeleton were prepared and irradiated to Cs-137 gamma radiation in the range (1.156-5.365 kGy). EPR spectra of unirradiated as well as irradiated samples were recorded and analyzed. Response to gamma radiation was plotted for each part of the exoskeleton, dactyl was found to be the most sensitive part, followed by the apron (38%), cheliped (37%), walking legs (30%), swimming legs (24%), and carapace (21%) relative to the dactyl response.

  14. Liquid cooled viscoelastic actuation for robust legged robot locomotion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work proposed here seeks to significantly improve actuation technology for mission-capable articulated robots and exoskeletons such as NASA's Robonaut 2,...

  15. Novel Control Techniques for Hand and Wrist Robotic Rehabilitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed adaptive control in this proposal has applications in exoskeletons used for resistive exercises both during and after space missions, and in the...

  16. Telerobotic Control Architecture Including Force-Reflection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the implementation of a telerobotic control architecture to manipulate a standard six-degree-of-freedom robot via a unique seven-degree-of-freedom force-reflecting exoskeleton...

  17. Diatom silicon biomineralization as an inspirational source of new approaches to silica production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, EG; Beelen, TPM; van Santen, RA; Gieskes, WWC

    1999-01-01

    The demand for new materials and products is still growing and the interest in naturally formed biopolymers and biominerals, such as chitin, calcium precipitates and silica is increasing. Photosynthesizing microalgae of the family Bacillariophyceae (diatoms) produce silica exoskeletons with a

  18. Crew Health And Recreation Gear Exercise Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid based exoskeleton leg demonstrator was developed to help long duration exploration mission crews obtain exercise with entertainment...

  19. Degradation of barnacle nauplii: Implications to chitin regulation in the marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Gaonkar, C.C.; Desai, D.V.

    in the treatment time. Bacterial abundance of the chitinase treated nauplii increased with the increase in enzyme concentration. Pathogenic bacteria such as Vibrio cholerae, V. alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus which were initially associated with the exoskeleton...

  20. Evolution of the vertebrate skeleton: morphology, embryology, and development

    OpenAIRE

    Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Two major skeletal systems?the endoskeleton and exoskeleton?are recognized in vertebrate evolution. Here, we propose that these two systems are distinguished primarily by their relative positions, not by differences in embryonic histogenesis or cell lineage of origin. Comparative embryologic analyses have shown that both types of skeleton have changed their mode of histogenesis during evolution. Although exoskeletons were thought to arise exclusively from the neural crest, recent experiments ...