WorldWideScience

Sample records for swine flu vaccine

  1. Flu Vaccine Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine Safety Information Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español ... of flu vaccines monitored? Egg Allergy Are flu vaccines safe? Flu vaccines have good safety record. Hundreds ...

  2. Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... or fungi from contaminating the vaccine. Do flu vaccines contain thimerosal? Flu vaccines in multi-dose vials ...

  3. Finding a new drug and vaccine for emerging swine flu: What is the concept?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Viroj WiwanitkitWiwanitkit House, Bangkhae, Bangkok 10160Abstract: Influenza is a well known infection of the respiratory system. The main clinical manifestations of influenza include fever, sore throat, headache, cough, coryza, and malaise. Apart from the well known classical influenza, there are also groups of influenza virus infections that are called “atypical infection”. These infections are usually due to a novel influenza virus infection. In early 2009, an emerging novel influenza originating from Mexico called swine flu was reported. The World Health Organization noted a level VI precaution, the highest level precaution possible, for this newest influenza virus infection. As of June 2009, it is not known if this disease will be successfully controlled. Finding new drugs and vaccine for the emerging swine flu is still required to cope with this emerging worldwide problem.Keywords: swine flu, drug, vaccine, concept

  4. Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnancy Questions & Answers Language: English (US) ... allergic conditions. How is the safety of flu vaccines in pregnant women monitored? CDC and FDA conduct ...

  5. Red state, blue state, flu state: media self-selection and partisan gaps in Swine flu vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Matthew A

    2011-12-01

    This study assesses the relationship between political partisanship and attitudes and behavior with respect to the H1N1 virus (swine flu) crisis of 2009 in general, and the U.S. mass vaccination program in particular. I argue that even seemingly nonpartisan political issues like public health are increasingly characterized by partisan polarization in public attitudes and that such polarization is attributable, at least partly, to the breakdown of the information commons that characterized the U.S. mass media from roughly the 1950s until the early 1990s. In its place has arisen an increasingly fragmented and niche-oriented media marketplace in which individuals are better able to limit their information exposure to attitudes and opinions that reinforce, rather than challenge, their preexisting beliefs. I test my argument against a variety of data sources, including opinion surveys and state-level swine flu vaccination rate data.

  6. H1N1 influenza (Swine flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine flu; H1N1 type A influenza ... The H1N1 virus is now considered a regular flu virus. It is one of the three viruses included in the regular (seasonal) flu vaccine . You cannot get H1N1 flu virus from ...

  7. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Variant Other Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... similar to outbreaks in humans. How many swine flu viruses are there? Like influenza viruses in humans ...

  8. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  9. Finding a new drug and vaccine for emerging swine flu: what is the concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2009-01-01

    Influenza is a well known infection of the respiratory system. The main clinical manifestations of influenza include fever, sore throat, headache, cough, coryza, and malaise. Apart from the well known classical influenza, there are also groups of influenza virus infections that are called "atypical infection". These infections are usually due to a novel influenza virus infection. In early 2009, an emerging novel influenza originating from Mexico called swine flu was reported. The World Health Organization noted a level VI precaution, the highest level precaution possible, for this newest influenza virus infection. As of June 2009, it is not known if this disease will be successfully controlled. Finding new drugs and vaccine for the emerging swine flu is still required to cope with this emerging worldwide problem.

  10. The swine flu vaccine, public attitudes, and researcher interpretations: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Benedicte; Glenton, Claire

    2016-06-24

    During pandemics, health authorities may be uncertain about the spread and severity of the disease and the effectiveness and safety of available interventions. This was the case during the swine flu (H1N1) pandemic of 2009-2010, and governments were forced to make decisions despite these uncertainties. While many countries chose to implement wide scale vaccination programmes, few accomplished their vaccination goals. Many research studies aiming to explore barriers and facilitators to vaccine uptake have been conducted in the aftermath of the pandemic, including several qualitative studies. 1. To explore public attitudes to the swine flu vaccine in different countries through a review of qualitative primary studies. 2. To describe and discuss the implications drawn by the primary study authors. Systematic review of qualitative research studies, using a broadly comparative cross case-study approach. Study quality was appraised using an adaptation of the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) quality assessment tool. The review indicates that the public had varying opinions about disease risk and prevalence and had concerns about vaccine safety. Most primary study authors concluded that participants were uninformed, and that more information about the disease and the vaccine would have led to an increase in vaccine uptake. We find these conclusions problematic. We suggest instead that people's questions and concerns were legitimate given the uncertainties of the situation at the time and the fact that the authorities did not have the necessary information to convince the public. Our quality assessment of the included studies points to a lack of reflexivity and a lack of information about study context. We suggest that these study weaknesses are tied to primary study authors' lack of acknowledgement of the uncertainties surrounding the disease and the vaccine. While primary study authors suggest that authorities could increase vaccine uptake through increased

  11. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine, without a prior appointment. The vaccine can be reimbursed directly by Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the Medical Service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor. Medical Service

  12. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  13. Flu vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor.CERN Medical Service

  14. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  15. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  16. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  17. Vaccination against seasonal flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Service once again recommends you to get your annual flu vaccination for the year.   Vaccination is the most effective way of avoiding the illness and any serious consequences and protecting those around you. The flu can have especially serious consequences for people with chronic conditions (diabetes, cardio-vascular disease, etc.), pregnant women, infants, and people over 65 years of age. Remember, anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor) with their vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement by UNIQA. NB: The Medical Service cannot provide this vaccination service for family members or retired members of the personnel. For more information: • The "Seasonal flu" flyer by the Medical Service • Recommendations of the Swiss Federal Office of Public...

  18. Swine flu - A pandemic outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jini George

    Full Text Available Hippocrates had described influenza like outbreak in 412 B.C. and since then repeated influenza like epidemics and pandemics have been recorded in recent times. One of the greatest killers of all time was the pandemic of swine flu (Spanish flu of 1918-1919, when 230 million people died. Annual influenza epidemics are estimated to affect 5–15% of the global population, resulting in severe illness in 3–5 million patients causing 250,000–500,000 deaths worldwide. Severe illness and deaths occur mainly in the high-risk populations of infants, the elderly and chronically ill patients. The 2009 outbreak of swine flu is thought to be a mutation more specifically a reassortment of four known strains of influenza A virus subtype H1N1; one endemic in humans, one endemic in birds, and two endemic in pigs. WHO officially declared the outbreak to be a pandemic on June 11, 2009, but stressed that the new designation was a result of the global "spread of the virus," not its severity. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 472-474

  19. Flu Vaccine Skin Patch Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Subscribe September 2017 Print this issue Flu Vaccine Skin Patch Tested En español Send us ... Each year, millions of people nationwide catch the flu. The best way to protect yourself is to ...

  20. Swine flu (H1N1 influenza): awareness profile of visitors of swine flu screening booths in Belgaum city, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveki, R G; Halappanavar, A B; Patil, M S; Joshi, A V; Gunagi, Praveena; Halki, Sunanda B

    2012-06-01

    The 2009 flu pandemic was a global outbreak of a new strain of H1N1 influenza virus often referred colloquially as "swine flu". The objectives of the study were: (1) To know the sociodemographic and awareness profile of visitors attending swine flu screening booths. (2) To reveal sources of information. The present cross-sectional study was undertaken among the visitors (18 years and above) attending swine flu screening booths organised within the Belgaum city during Ganesh festival from 28-08-2009 to 03-09-2009 by interviewing them using predesigned, pretested structured questionnaire on swine flu. The data was collected and analysed using SPSS software programme for windows (version 16). Chi-square test was applied. Out of 206 visitors, 132 (64.1%) were males and 107 (51.9%) were in the age group of 30-49 years; 183 (88.8%) had heard about swine flu. More than a third of the visitors (38.3%) disclosed that there was a vaccine to prevent swine flu. Majority responded that it could be transmitted by being in close proximity to pigs (49.0%) and by eating pork (51.5%). Newspaper/magazine (64.6%), television (61.7%), and public posters/pamphlets (44.2%) were common sources of information. The present study revealed that doctors/public health workers have played little role in creating awareness in the community. The improved communication between doctors and the community would help to spread correct information about the disease and the role that the community can play in controlling the spread of the disease.

  1. Key Facts about Seasonal Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Variant Pandemic Other Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... can spread through that community. How do flu vaccines work? Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in ...

  2. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices regarding Swine Flu among adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjot Kaur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevention is the most appropriate measure to control H1N1 flu pandemic and awareness of H1N1 flu is ranked very high in preventive measures. Keeping this in view, study was designed to assess the awareness level and to compare it among urban and rural participants. Aims and objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding swine flu among adult population, to assess whether there is any difference among rural and urban population and to assess the response generated by the media coverage and the Government efforts.Methods: This cross-sectional study was done from April to July 2015 on 300 houses from the urban area and 150 houses from rural area, chosen from study population by random sampling. Mean and standard deviation for continuous variables and percentages for categorical were calculated. Results: 94% of urban and 91.3% of the rural participants had previously heard about swine flu, main source being TV. 46% of urban and 74% of rural participants had myth about spread of swine flu by eating pork. 41.3% of urban and 8.7% of rural population thought that government measures are sufficient for controlling swine flu. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding swine flu pandemic is good among study participants but role of health care providers is minimal and requires more dedicated effort. Lack of awareness among study population regarding some key focus areas like health promoting habits, vaccination and myths regarding the spread is of serious concern and needs to be addressed by the media, health workers and the Government efforts

  3. Assessment of H1N1 influenza: A swine flu vaccination in Kumasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess H1N1 vaccination in the Kumasi metropolis of the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Questionnaires on the subject were administered to 504 individuals compris-ing of 254 health personnel and 250 from the general public (in a cross-sectional survey) after an initial interview of 1,686 individuals.

  4. Swine flu- a serious pandeMic threat | Rachna | IMTU Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current review focuses on pathogenesis, transmission, role of pigs as reservoirs, diagnosis, symptoms and compares swine fl u with common cold. The outbreak of swine fl u in India, its possible impact in other countries as well as pandemic preparedness plans, vaccines as a preventive measure of swine flu infection ...

  5. Public views of the uk media and government reaction to the 2009 swine flu pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Emily

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first cases of influenza A/H1N1 (swine flu were confirmed in the UK on 27th April 2009, after a novel virus first identified in Mexico rapidly evolved into a pandemic. The swine flu outbreak was the first pandemic in more than 40 years and for many, their first encounter with a major influenza outbreak. This study examines public understandings of the pandemic, exploring how people deciphered the threat and perceived they could control the risks. Methods Purposive sampling was used to recruit seventy three people (61 women and 12 men to take part in 14 focus group discussions around the time of the second wave in swine flu cases. Results These discussions showed that there was little evidence of the public over-reacting, that people believed the threat of contracting swine flu was inevitable, and that they assessed their own self-efficacy for protecting against it to be low. Respondents assessed a greater risk to their health from the vaccine than from the disease. Such findings could have led to apathy about following the UK Governments recommended health protective behaviours, and a sub-optimal level of vaccine uptake. More generally, people were confused about the difference between seasonal influenza and swine flu and their vaccines. Conclusions This research suggests a gap in public understandings which could hinder attempts to communicate about novel flu viruses in the future. There was general support for the government's handling of the pandemic, although its public awareness campaign was deemed ineffectual as few people changed their current hand hygiene practices. There was less support for the media who were deemed to have over-reported the swine flu pandemic.

  6. Initial psychological responses to Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robin; Haque, Shamsul; Neto, Felix; Myers, Lynn B

    2009-10-06

    The outbreak of the pandemic flu, Influenza A H1N1 (Swine Flu) in early 2009, provided a major challenge to health services around the world. Previous pandemics have led to stockpiling of goods, the victimisation of particular population groups, and the cancellation of travel and the boycotting of particular foods (e.g. pork). We examined initial behavioural and attitudinal responses towards Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu") in the six days following the WHO pandemic alert level 5, and regional differences in these responses. 328 respondents completed a cross-sectional Internet or paper-based questionnaire study in Malaysia (N = 180) or Europe (N = 148). Measures assessed changes in transport usage, purchase of preparatory goods for a pandemic, perceived risk groups, indicators of anxiety, assessed estimated mortality rates for seasonal flu, effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccination, and changes in pork consumption 26% of the respondents were 'very concerned' about being a flu victim (42% Malaysians, 5% Europeans, p immune compromised (mentioned by 87% respondents), pig farmers (70%), elderly (57%), prostitutes/highly sexually active (53%), and the homeless (53%). In data collected only in Europe, 64% greatly underestimated the mortality rates of seasonal flu, 26% believed seasonal flu vaccination gave protection against swine flu. 7% had reduced/stopped eating pork. 3% had purchased anti-viral drugs for use at home, while 32% intended to do so if the pandemic worsened. Initial responses to Influenza A show large regional differences in anxiety, with Malaysians more anxious and more likely to reduce travel and to buy masks and food. Discussions with family and friends may reinforce existing anxiety levels. Particular groups (homosexuals, prostitutes, the homeless) are perceived as at greater risk, potentially leading to increased prejudice during a pandemic. Europeans underestimated mortality of seasonal flu, and require more information about the protection given by

  7. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a doctor...

  8. Initial psychological responses to Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Felix

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The outbreak of the pandemic flu, Influenza A H1N1 (Swine Flu in early 2009, provided a major challenge to health services around the world. Previous pandemics have led to stockpiling of goods, the victimisation of particular population groups, and the cancellation of travel and the boycotting of particular foods (e.g. pork. We examined initial behavioural and attitudinal responses towards Influenza A, H1N1 ("Swine flu" in the six days following the WHO pandemic alert level 5, and regional differences in these responses. Methods 328 respondents completed a cross-sectional Internet or paper-based questionnaire study in Malaysia (N = 180 or Europe (N = 148. Measures assessed changes in transport usage, purchase of preparatory goods for a pandemic, perceived risk groups, indicators of anxiety, assessed estimated mortality rates for seasonal flu, effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccination, and changes in pork consumption Results 26% of the respondents were 'very concerned' about being a flu victim (42% Malaysians, 5% Europeans, p Conclusion Initial responses to Influenza A show large regional differences in anxiety, with Malaysians more anxious and more likely to reduce travel and to buy masks and food. Discussions with family and friends may reinforce existing anxiety levels. Particular groups (homosexuals, prostitutes, the homeless are perceived as at greater risk, potentially leading to increased prejudice during a pandemic. Europeans underestimated mortality of seasonal flu, and require more information about the protection given by seasonal flu inoculation.

  9. Swine flu panic shows how little we really care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckford-Ball, Jason

    I have to confess that when the first reports of swine flu started circulating, I did have a strong sense of déjà vu - after all, we've been here before. Back in 2003, the world was under threat from another potentially lethal virus that began in an economically deprived part of the world among animal stocks and briefly (according to some anyway) threatened to turn into a global pandemic--Avian flu.

  10. 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... H1N1 flu vaccine. 1 The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is safe and well tested. Clinical trials conducted ...

  11. Recent Flu Shot Shouldn't Prevent Vaccination During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167523.html Recent Flu Shot Shouldn't Prevent Vaccination During Pregnancy Study ... women and newborns are particularly vulnerable to the flu and its complications, guidelines recommend a flu shot ...

  12. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Improving the flu vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health: NLM update Transcript Improving the flu vaccine : 11/13/2017 To use the sharing features ... are committed to developing a more effective flu vaccine, explains an interesting news article recently published in ...

  13. Deciphering the Swine-Flu Pandemics of 1918 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Richard; Dos Reis, Mario; Tamuri, Asif; Hay, Alan

    The devastating "Spanish flu" of 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide, ranking it as the deadliest pandemic in recorded human history. It is generally believed that the virus transferred from birds directly to humans shortly before the start of the pandemic, subsequently jumping from humans to swine. By developing 'non-homogeneous' substitution models that consider that substitution patterns may be different in human, avian, and swine hosts, we can determine the timing of the host shift to mammals. We find it likely that the Spanish flu of 1918, like the current 2009 pandemic, was a 'swine-origin' influenza virus. Now that we are faced with a new pandemic, can we understand how influenza is able to change hosts? Again by modelling the evolutionary process, considering the different selective constraints for viruses in the different hosts, we can identify locations that seem to be under different selective constraints in humans and avian hosts. This allows us to identify changes that may have facilitated the establishment of the 2009 swine-origin flu in humans.

  14. Swine flu-have we learnt any lesson from the past ? | Yadav | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The world has suffered the pandemics due to swine flu in the past. The present epidemic in India has claimed many lives. Even, after the first outbreak of swine flu in 2009 no concrete efforts are done to prevent this infection. There is an urgent need to take radical steps to prevent such epidemics. Key words: Swine ...

  15. Personal Stories: Why Flu Vaccination Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-08

    In this podcast, moving personal stories help inform parents about the dangers of flu to children and the benefits of vaccination.  Created: 12/8/2008 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 12/8/2008.

  16. It's Not Too Late to Get Vaccinated Against Flu | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Flu Vaccination It's Not Too Late to Get Vaccinated Against Flu ... older should get the flu vaccine each year. It usually takes two weeks after you are vaccinated ...

  17. Implementation of Flu (Influenza) Vaccination into Armenian Armed Forces Pre-Emptive Vaccination Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT IMPLEMENTATION OF FLU (INFLUENZA) VACCINATION INTO ARMENIAN ARMED...DATES COVERED MBA professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IMPLEMENTATION OF FLU (INFLUENZA) VACCINATION INTO ARMENIAN ARMED FORCES PRE-EMPTIVE...Service of the Armed Forces conducts flu vaccinations . The flu is always highly prevalent in the Armenian Armed Forces personnel morbidity ranking. An

  18. Influenza (Flu) vaccine (Live, Intranasal): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Influenza Live, Intranasal Flu Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... flulive.html . CDC review information for Live, Intranasal Influenza VIS: Vaccine Information Statement Influenza Page last reviewed: ...

  19. Freshman Flu Vaccination Behavior and Intention During a Nonpandemic Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnapradipa, Kendra L; Norrenberns, Ryan; Turner, J Austin; Kunerth, Allison

    2017-09-01

    To examine predictors of flu vaccination and vaccination intention among college freshmen during a nonpandemic influenza season using the health belief model (HBM). A total of 184 college freshmen at a single institution participated in a mixed-mode (paper or online) survey in October-November 2015. Flu vaccination and intention to vaccinate were predicted using binomial logistic regression on HBM constructs (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, cues to action, and availability), prior flu vaccination history, family and peer reference behaviors, and demographics. Overall, 31.5% of participants received the seasonal flu vaccine by mid-November, and 25% intended to receive it. In full models, history of past flu vaccination (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 7.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.55-24.49) was significant for vaccination while availability (aOR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.32-3.01) and family intention (aOR = 250.59; 95% CI = 3.77 to >999) were positively associated with intent to vaccinate. Significant confounding by past behavior and family intentions existed for both outcomes. Past flu vaccination behavior and family member intentions to vaccinate were better predictors of annual flu vaccination behavior and intention than HBM constructs among college freshmen. College campuses may enhance flu vaccine coverage by highlighting benefits and availability to students and families.

  20. Pathogens gone wild? Medical anthropology and the "swine flu" pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2009-07-01

    Beginning in April 2009, global attention began focusing on the emergence in Mexico of a potentially highly lethal new influenza strain of porcine origin that has successfully jumped species barriers and is now being transmitted around the world. Reported on extensively by the mass media, commented on by public health and government officials across the globe, and focused on with nervous attention by the general public, the so-called swine flu pandemic raises important questions, addressed here, concerning the capacity of medical anthropology to respond usefully to such disease outbreaks and their health and social consequences.

  1. Continue to Vaccinate Patients and Staff Against the Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-08

    This podcast is a reminder to health care providers about the importance of annual flu vaccination—it’s not too late! Health care providers should get their flu vaccine and continue offering and encouraging flu vaccination among their staff, colleagues, and patients.  Created: 2/8/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  2. Passive immunity to pandemic H1N1 2009 by swine flu parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Nitish; Aggarwal, Pushkar

    2009-12-15

    The general population is concerned about the probable devastating effects of pandemic H1N1 2009. Based upon the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, scientific publications and theories, the idea of swine flu parties to achieve passive immunity against pandemic H1N1 2009 has been proposed. Public health officials have asked the general public not to resort to this method. However, no concrete evidence of the reasoning behind the recommendation has been given. In this paper, we have dynamically modeled the effect of swine flu parties on the immunity achieved and associated mortality for a period of two years. The simulations show that the public should not organize or participate in swine flu parties as they will likely increase swine flu-associated mortality.

  3. Awareness, perception and myths towards swine flu in school children of Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Varsha; Singh, R K; Agrawal, V K; Agarwal, Ashok; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Mahendra

    2010-01-01

    The deadly disease swine flu is, without a speck of doubt, causing a massive havoc among the common people of India and has created fear across the various strata of the society. The objective was to find out the awareness, perception, and myths of school going children of class 9 th to 12 th toward swine flu. The present cross-sectional study was carried out in two randomly selected (using random number table) senior secondary schools of Bareilly among 400 students of class 9 th to 12 th . A total of 200 students were selected from each school. Chi-square test was applied for statistical analysis. Almost all the students (97.75%) have heard about of swine flu and are aware of it as a disease entity. Fever was found to be the main symptom while coughing and sneezing were main way of spread of swine flu known to them. About 97% of the students mention use of mask as most effective way to prevent them from swine flu. Knowledge of availability of medicine was present in less than half of the students. TV was found to be the main source from which they get knowledge (79%), and they are trying to get knowledge (53.2%) of swine flu. Among them, 74% students were taking precaution against swine flu.

  4. Children, the Flu and the Flu Vaccine. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Flu is more dangerous than the common cold for children. Each year, flu places a large burden on the health and well-being of children and families. Children commonly need medical care because of influenza, especially before they turn 5 years old. Each year an average of 20,000 children under the age of 5 are hospitalized because of influenza…

  5. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This article ... should patients with immune deficiency be given the vaccine? Immune deficient patients have a decreased resistance to ...

  6. Swine-Flu Plans Put E-Learning in the Spotlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michelle R.; Ash, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Last school year, many educators were caught unprepared when schools closed in response to cases of swine flu. This time around, both the federal government and school districts are putting specific online-learning measures in place to get ready for possible closures or waves of teacher and student absences because of a flu outbreak. To prepare…

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Swine Influenza Vaccine: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Multiple scientific articles have documented that vaccinations for influenza, MMR, and HBV, to name a few, could be triggers of RA in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there is limited data regarding the association of swine flu vaccine (H1N1 and RA. We report the case of a Mexican American female who developed RA right after vaccination with H1N1 vaccine. Genetically, RA has consistently been associated with an epitope in the third hypervariable region of the HLA-DR chains, known as the “shared epitope”, which is found primarily in DR4 and DR1 regions. The presence of HLA-DRB1 alleles is associated with susceptibility to RA in Mexican Americans. Hence, certain individuals with the presence of the “shared epitope” may develop RA following specific vaccinations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RA following vaccination with the swine flu vaccine.

  8. [Miller Fisher syndrome, internal and external ophthalmoplegia after flu vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Marchite, C I; Buznego-Suárez, L; Fagúndez-Vargas, M A; Méndez-Llatas, M; Pozo-Martos, P

    2008-07-01

    Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is the most frequent variant of the Guillain-Barré Syndrome. It is characterised by the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. We present a case of a patient who developed these clinical findings 5 days after flu vaccination. Miller Fisher Syndrome is an unusual condition seen in ophthalmologic clinical practice. Although respiratory and digestive infections have been reported as antecedent infectious agents in MFS, it has not previously been described in relation to the flu vaccine.

  9. Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. ...

  10. The Evaluations of Swine Flu Magnitudes in TV News: A Comparative Analysis of Paired Influenza Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Po-Lin; Meng, Juan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how major TV news networks covered two flu pandemics in 1976 and 2009 in terms of news frames, mortality exemplars, mortality subject attributes, vaccination, evaluation approaches, and news sources. Results showed that the first pandemic was frequently framed with the medical/scientific and political/legal issues, while the second pandemic was emphasized with the health risk issue in TV news. Both flu pandemics were regularly reported with mortality exemplars, but the focus in the first pandemic was on the flu virus threat and vaccination side effects, while the vaccination shortage was frequently revealed in the second outbreak.

  11. The impact of communications about swine flu (influenza A H1N1v) on public responses to the outbreak: results from 36 national telephone surveys in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, G J; Potts, H W W; Michie, S

    2010-07-01

    To assess the association between levels of worry about the possibility of catching swine flu and the volume of media reporting about it; the role of psychological factors in predicting likely uptake of the swine flu vaccine; and the role of media coverage and advertising in predicting other swine flu-related behaviours. Data from a series of random-digit-dial telephone surveys were analysed. A time series analysis tested the association between levels of worry and the volume of media reporting on the start day of each survey. Cross-sectional regression analyses assessed the relationships between likely vaccine uptake or behaviour and predictor variables. Thirty-six surveys were run at, on average, weekly intervals across the UK between 1 May 2009 and 10 January 2010. Five surveys (run between 14 August and 13 September) were used to assess likely vaccine uptake. Five surveys (1-17 May) provided data relating to other behaviours. Between 1047 and 1173 people aged 16 years or over took part in each survey: 5175 participants provided data about their likely uptake of the swine flu vaccine; 5419 participants provided data relating to other behaviours. All participants were asked to state how worried they were about the possibility of personally catching swine flu. Subsets were asked how likely they were to take up a swine flu vaccination if offered it and whether they had recently carried tissues with them, bought sanitising hand gel, avoided using public transport or had been to see a general practitioner, visited a hospital or called NHS Direct for a flu-related reason. The percentage of 'very' or 'fairly' worried participants fluctuated between 9.6% and 32.9%. This figure was associated with the volume of media reporting, even after adjusting for the changing severity of the outbreak [chi2(1) = 6.6, p = 0.010, coefficient for log-transformed data = 2.6]. However, this effect only occurred during the UK's first summer wave of swine flu. In total, 56.1% of

  12. Flu (Influenza): Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... No, flu vaccines do not cause flu. Flu vaccine protects your child from flu illness. However, flu shots can sometimes ... will take about 2 weeks after getting his vaccine for your child to build protection against flu. Why does my ...

  13. The neuropsychiatric aspects of influenza/swine flu: A selective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Manjunatha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The world witnessed the influenza virus during the seasonal epidemics and pandemics. The current strain of H1N1 (swine flu pandemic is believed to be the legacy of the influenza pandemic (1918-19. The influenza virus has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. In view of the recent pandemic, it would be interesting to review the neuropsychiatric aspects of influenza, specifically swine flu. Author used popular search engine ′PUBMED′ to search for published articles with different MeSH terms using Boolean operator (AND. Among these, a selective review of the published literature was done. Acute manifestations of swine flu varied from behavioral changes, fear of misdiagnosis during outbreak, neurological features like seizures, encephalopathy, encephalitis, transverse myelitis, aseptic meningitis, multiple sclerosis, and Guillian-Barre Syndrome. Among the chronic manifestations, schizophrenia, Parkinson′s disease, mood disorder, dementia, and mental retardation have been hypothesized. Further research is required to understand the etiological hypothesis of the chronic manifestations of influenza. The author urges neuroscientists around the world to make use of the current swine flu pandemic as an opportunity for further research.

  14. Swine-Flu Scare Offers Lessons for Study-Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Reports of swine flu have led some colleges to pull students and faculty members out of Mexico, the epicenter of the outbreak, and to cancel study-abroad programs there. But even as the number of new cases appears to be falling, the health scare offers some lasting lessons for colleges, says Gary Rhodes, director of the Center for Global Education…

  15. HIV/AIDS and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other HIV/AIDS and the Flu Questions & Answers Language: English ( ... people with HIV and AIDS. Should people with HIV/AIDS receive the inactivated influenza vaccine? People with ...

  16. Modeling influenza epidemics and pandemics: insights into the future of swine flu (H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blower Sally

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we present a review of the literature of influenza modeling studies, and discuss how these models can provide insights into the future of the currently circulating novel strain of influenza A (H1N1, formerly known as swine flu. We discuss how the feasibility of controlling an epidemic critically depends on the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (R0. The R0 for novel influenza A (H1N1 has recently been estimated to be between 1.4 and 1.6. This value is below values of R0 estimated for the 1918–1919 pandemic strain (mean R0~2: range 1.4 to 2.8 and is comparable to R0 values estimated for seasonal strains of influenza (mean R0 1.3: range 0.9 to 2.1. By reviewing results from previous modeling studies we conclude it is theoretically possible that a pandemic of H1N1 could be contained. However it may not be feasible, even in resource-rich countries, to achieve the necessary levels of vaccination and treatment for control. As a recent modeling study has shown, a global cooperative strategy will be essential in order to control a pandemic. This strategy will require resource-rich countries to share their vaccines and antivirals with resource-constrained and resource-poor countries. We conclude our review by discussing the necessity of developing new biologically complex models. We suggest that these models should simultaneously track the transmission dynamics of multiple strains of influenza in bird, pig and human populations. Such models could be critical for identifying effective new interventions, and informing pandemic preparedness planning. Finally, we show that by modeling cross-species transmission it may be possible to predict the emergence of pandemic strains of influenza.

  17. [Cognitive, affective and behavioral changes in crisis: preventing swine flu infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Haruka; Oikawa, Masanori

    2010-10-01

    Calling attention to potential risks does not always lead to preventative actions. To investigate changes in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses towards potential risks, longitudinal studies targeting nonclinical samples of undergraduate students were conducted at 4 time points (April, May, June, and July 2009) during the outbreak of swine flu in 2009, which eventually developed in to a global pandemic. During the course of the study, the risk of swine flu infection for the seventy-nine participants became more and more self-relevant as the situation developed in the news and as their university was temporarily closed off. The results indicate that despite increasing knowledge about the swine flu, the level of anxiety showed steady decrease as the time went by. Similarly, despite the expanding infection around the globe, the level of preventative behavior remained low. Moreover, participants reported perceiving their own risk to be significantly lower than that of average undergraduate students at all time points. These findings indicate that even when potential risks are clearly communicated, too much information, saturated emotions, and optimistic bias may obstruct people from taking appropriate preventative actions.

  18. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be..., except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or exposed to pseudorabies. Pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered...

  19. Vaksin Polivalen Untuk Mencegah Penyakit Flu Burung (POLIVALEN VACCINE TO PREVENT BIRD FLU DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Suartha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the use of bird flu polyvalent vaccines containing two or threeor more virus isolates representating of circulating viruses in the region. Three seed isolates of avianinfluenza H5N1 virus were used in this experiment. The isolates were Chicken/Denpasar/Unud-01/2004,Chicken/Klungkung/Unud-12/2006, and Chicken/Jembrana/Unud-17/2006. The seeds were inactivatedusing 0.01% formaldehide than mixed (AI3G alumunium hidroxide adjuvant and then injectedintramuscularly to Isa Brown layer chicken at 3 weeks of age and repeated at the age of 5 weeks. The doseof each seed virus was 27 HA units. Sera were collected at one and two weeks after the second vaccination.The result showed that the arithmetic meant titer (AMT of sera that tested with homologous isolate washigher than the test using a heterologous isolates, in the standard haemaglutination inhibition (HI assay.The mixed AI3G vaccine produced a uniform AMT against the constituent isolates, while vaccines withindividual isolate yielded a lower and more variation in AMT. Further experiments using a commercialhomologous H5N1 and heterologous H5N2 commercial vaccines has resulted AMT that 1-4 log lower thanAI3G vaccine. It is concluded that polyvalent vaccine with field seed isolates is recommended to be appliedin the poultry farm in Indonesia.

  20. UK newspapers' representations of the 2009-10 outbreak of swine flu: one health scare not over-hyped by the media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Shona; Hunt, Kate

    2011-10-01

    A/H1N1, more commonly referred to as swine flu, emerged in Mexico in spring 2009. It rapidly spread across the world and was classed as a global pandemic on 11 June 2009. To analyse UK newsprint coverage of the swine flu pandemic. Content analysis of 2374 newsprint articles published in eight UK national newspapers between 1 March 2009 and 28 February 2010. Newsprint coverage of the swine flu epidemic was immense. The threat from swine flu was portrayed as greatest in the spring and summer of 2009 when scientific uncertainties about the impact on the UK and global population were at their height and when swine flu cases in the UK first peaked. Thereafter the number of news articles waned, failing to mirror the October peak in flu cases as the virus failed to be as virulent as first feared. Content analysis found little evidence of the media 'over-hyping' the swine flu pandemic. The news media's role as a disseminator of scientific information is particularly important in areas of risk perception. Despite a succession of health scares in recent years in which the media has been accused of exaggerating the risks and contributing to public misunderstandings of the issues, this analysis suggests that the UK newsprint reporting of swine flu in the 2009-10 outbreak was largely measured. The news media's role as disseminators of factual health information on swine flu is to be welcomed, particularly in relation to their handling and responsible reporting on scientific uncertainty.

  1. Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but thousands of people with the flu develop pneumonia or a brain infection. They need to stay ... weakened immune system Possible Complications Complications may include: Pneumonia Encephalitis (infection of the brain) Meningitis Seizures When ...

  2. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  3. CDC Recommendations to Reduce the Risk of H3N2v Flu Virus Infection for Fairgoers and Swine Exhibitors

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-09-10

    In this podcast, Dr. Lyn Finelli discusses CDC’s recommendations for reducing the risk of infection with H3N2v flu viruses for fairgoers and swine exhibitors.  Created: 9/10/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/10/2012.

  4. First Aid: Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias First Aid: The Flu KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: The Flu Print ... tiredness What to Do If Your Child Has Flu Symptoms: Call your doctor. Encourage rest. Keep your ...

  5. ‘Tis the Season for Flu Vaccine (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-12-10

    Flu season typically runs from late fall through early spring. In this podcast, Dr. Lisa Grohskopf discusses the importance of getting vaccinated against the flu.  Created: 12/10/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 12/10/2015.

  6. Anticipating crisis: towards a pandemic flu vaccination strategy through alignment of public health and industrial policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daems, Rudi; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2005-12-30

    Flu pandemics (worldwide epidemics) have occurred at irregular and unpredictable intervals, and have been associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and economic cost. In response to the emerging potential for a new pandemic to occur, national and international preparedness plans are being drawn up specifying the use of antivirals and vaccines. A number of challenges to pandemic vaccine development, large-scale production and the timing of distribution have also been highlighted. This article reviews the rationale and consequential policy for aligned public- and private sector planning in the present inter-pandemic period despite the prevalent risks and uncertainties. We propose a model for product development of pandemic flu vaccine based on public-private partnership, including push and pull incentive mechanisms for stimulating work in this therapeutic area. In addition, we argue that innovative vaccination strategies, together with special vaccine formulations which may offer cross-protection against multiple flu pandemic strains might avert the worse effects of an influenza infection.

  7. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians.

  8. [The seasonal flu vaccination among caregivers in geriatric units: Up-to-date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contal, E; Putot, A; Dipanda, M; Perrin, S; Asgassou, S; Sordet-Guépet, H; Manckoundia, P

    2016-12-01

    Flu vaccinations for healthcare professionals seems to be one of the most effective preventive actions in the face of a disease that carries a high risk of a potentially serious nosocomial epidemic in a geriatric environment. The aim of this study was to take stock of the flu vaccination status among caregivers in the geriatric units and to understand the reasons for their reluctance to be vaccinated, in order to put forward proposals to improve vaccination coverage. A literature search of articles published since 2000 in the area of geriatrics, infectious diseases or pneumology was mainly conducted on PubMed using the keywords "caregivers", "elderly", "flu", "influenza", "nosocomial" and "vaccination". After reading all abstracts in English or French and ruling out irrelevant articles, only 64 relevant articles have been listed in bibliography section. Despite official recommendations, the literature reveals insufficient vaccination coverage of healthcare personnel at both the national and international level. Vaccination coverage seems to be lower among younger female non-medical staff. The factors that determine the likelihood of vaccination are the wish to protect one's self, one's family and patients/residents, as well as the experience of earlier bouts of flu. Factors that oppose vaccination are complex and related to the fear of side effects, the use of other preventive measures, the feeling that vaccination is ineffective, poor understanding of the disease and the vaccine, forgetfulness and problems of organization. Campaigns to promote vaccination that target healthcare professionals must be multidimensional and very incentive. The pedagogical message must be centered on the benefits to the individual and adjusted to socio-professional categories. Mobile strategies in the different departments to encourage staff are a pragmatic solution to this challenge. The referring doctor has an essential role to play, as does the occupational doctor in association

  9. Know and Share the Facts about Flu Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohskopf, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and sometimes can lead to death. Symptoms of flu can include fever or a feverish feeling, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headache, fatigue, vomiting, and diarrhea. Flu…

  10. Flu Shot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flu is a respiratory infection caused by a number of viruses. Most people with the flu get better on their own. But it can ... cause complications and sometimes even death. Getting the flu vaccine every year is the best way to ...

  11. Exploring racial influences on flu vaccine attitudes and behavior: Results of a national survey of White and African American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Jamison, Amelia; Freimuth, Vicki S; An, Ji; Hancock, Gregory R; Musa, Donald

    2017-02-22

    Racial disparities in adult flu vaccination rates persist with African Americans falling below Whites in vaccine acceptance. Although the literature has examined traditional variables including barriers, access, attitudes, among others, there has been virtually no examination of the extent to which racial factors including racial consciousness, fairness, and discrimination may affect vaccine attitudes and behaviors. We contracted with GfK to conduct an online, nationally representative survey with 819 African American and 838 White respondents. Measures included risk perception, trust, vaccine attitudes, hesitancy and confidence, novel measures on racial factors, and vaccine behavior. There were significant racial differences in vaccine attitudes, risk perception, trust, hesitancy and confidence. For both groups, racial fairness had stronger direct effects on the vaccine-related variables with more positive coefficients associated with more positive vaccine attitudes. Racial consciousness in a health care setting emerged as a more powerful influence on attitudes and beliefs, particularly for African Americans, with higher scores on racial consciousness associated with lower trust in the vaccine and the vaccine process, higher perceived vaccine risk, less knowledge of flu vaccine, greater vaccine hesitancy, and less confidence in the flu vaccine. The effect of racial fairness on vaccine behavior was mediated by trust in the flu vaccine for African Americans only (i.e., higher racial fairness increased trust in the vaccine process and thus the probability of getting a flu vaccine). The effect of racial consciousness and discrimination for African Americans on vaccine uptake was mediated by perceived vaccine risk and flu vaccine knowledge. Racial factors can be a useful new tool for understanding and addressing attitudes toward the flu vaccine and actual vaccine behavior. These new concepts can facilitate more effective tailored and targeted vaccine communications

  12. Perfluoroalkyl substance serum concentrations and immune response to FluMist vaccination among healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cheryl R; Ge, Yongchao; Wolff, Mary S; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M; Kraus, Thomas; Moran, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were shown to be immunotoxic in laboratory animals. There is some epidemiological evidence that PFAS exposure is inversely associated with vaccine-induced antibody concentration. We examined immune response to vaccination with FluMist intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine in relation to four PFAS (perfluorooctanoate, perfluorononanoate, perfluorooctane sulfonate, perfluorohexane sulfonate) serum concentrations among 78 healthy adults vaccinated during the 2010-2011 influenza season. We measured anti-A H1N1 antibody response and cytokine and chemokine concentrations in serum pre-vaccination, 3 days post-vaccination, and 30 days post-vaccination. We measured cytokine, chemokine, and mucosal IgA concentration in nasal secretions 3 days post-vaccination and 30 days post-vaccination. Adults with higher PFAS concentrations were more likely to seroconvert after FluMist vaccination as compared to adults with lower PFAS concentrations. The associations, however, were imprecise and few participants seroconverted as measured either by hemagglutination inhibition (9%) or immunohistochemical staining (25%). We observed no readily discernable or consistent pattern between PFAS concentration and baseline cytokine, chemokine, or mucosal IgA concentration, or between PFAS concentration and change in these immune markers between baseline and FluMist-response states. The results of this study do not support a reduced immune response to FluMist vaccination among healthy adults in relation to serum PFAS concentration. Given the study's many limitations, however, it does not rule out impaired vaccine response to other vaccines or vaccine components in either children or adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. American Indians, Alaska Natives, and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Emails American Indians, Alaska Natives, and the Flu Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccination against ... the flu. Protect Indian Country by Getting Your Flu Vaccine A flu vaccine not only protects you ...

  14. Factors associated with acceptance of pandemic flu vaccine by healthcare professionals in Spain, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Villa, Tania; Molina, Antonio J; Torner, Nuria; Castilla, Jesus; Astray, Jenaro; García-Gutiérrez, Susana; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; Domínguez, Ángela; Martín, Vicente

    2017-10-01

    The A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus reached pandemic level in Spain in 2009, prompting a national vaccination campaign. To avoid transmission to patients, healthcare professionals' vaccination against pandemic influenza is crucial. The main objective of this study was to analyze factors associated with the failure by healthcare professionals to accept the pandemic vaccination in 2009. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of healthcare professionals in seven of Spain's autonomous regions. A questionnaire was used to collect information about personal and professional details, the respondents' flu vaccination status in the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 seasons (seasonal and pandemic vaccines), and their knowledge and attitudes. A total of 1,661 professionals completed the survey. In the 2009-2010 season, 38.2% had both the seasonal and the pandemic vaccine, 22.1% had had only the seasonal, and 4.7% only the pandemic vaccine. The strongest predictor of not receiving the pandemic vaccine was not having had seasonal vaccinations in that year or the previous year. Those who had not received the pandemic vaccine were more often female; nurses; under 45; denied contact with at-risk groups; and had negative beliefs about the vaccine effectiveness and little concern for getting the disease, being infected at work, or passing it on to patients. It would be prudent to direct preventive campaigns not only at individuals at risk of catching flu but also at health professionals with a negative view of flu vaccine, with a particular focus on nurses, who have a key role in recommending flu vaccine. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal RE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Rizal,1,* Rishi P Mediratta,1,* James Xie,1 Swetha Kambhampati,1 Kelsey Hills-Evans,1 Tamara Montacute,1 Michael Zhang,1 Catherine Zaw,2 Jimmy He,2 Magali Sanchez,2 Lauren Pischel1 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful service-learning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. Keywords: immunizations, vaccine delivery, vaccinations 

  16. Accelerating vaccine development for African swine fever virus ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... Expected results. By adopting this cutting-edge approach to the development of African swine fever vaccines, the overall expected result is the generation of a vaccine candidate that will undergo further testing and if successful, be produced as a new vaccine for ASF.

  17. CLINICAL PRESENTATION, RADIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND COURSE OF THE DISEASE IN SWINE FLU POSITIVE PATIENTS ADMITTED IN THE RESPIRATORY INTENSIVE CARE UNIT OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Since the 2009 pandemic of H1N1 or Swine Flu influenza , there have been respiratory emergencies every year throughout India , but in the early part of this year that is between January and April 2015 an explosion of cases was seen throughout the country , and so also in our state , Andhra Pradesh. The study of clinical presentation , radiological features and course of the disease helps in early suspicion , isolation , detection and institution of treatment in swine flu positive patients so that further spread of the disease can be co ntrolled and the patients saved . MATERIAL AND METHODS : This is a cross - sectional study conducted at the Department of Pulmonary Medicine , S.V.R.R. Govt. General Hospital , Tirupathi , between January 2015 and April 2015. Study sample was the total number of swine flu suspects who were admitted in the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit and swine flu wards of the Department of Pulmonary Medicine. SUMMARY : Out of 32 suspects admitted , 13 tested positive for swine flu. 8 of the 13 were females (61% and 5 were males (39%. Cold , cough and breathlessness were present in all the patients (100%. Sore throat was present in only 4 patients (30%. 11 out of the 13 patients were in respiratory failure (85%. 9 out of the 13 had comorbidities like diabetes , bronchial asthma and chronic kidney disease (70%. Chest X - ray and CT chest showed ARDS like pic ture and pneumonia in 11 out of the 13 patients (85%.

  18. Cancer, the Flu, and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Flu Publications Stay Informed Cancer Home Cancer, the Flu, and You What Cancer Patients, Survivors, and Caregivers ... Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevent Flu! Get a Flu Vaccine and Take Preventive Actions ...

  19. A Content Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of the Seasonal Flu Vaccine in Ontario, Canada, October 2001 to March 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Samantha B; Lu, Stephanie K; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie; Smale, Bryan; MacDougall, Heather; Pearce, Alex R

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal flu vaccine uptake has fallen dramatically over the past decade in Ontario, Canada, despite promotional efforts by public health officials. Media can be particularly influential in shaping the public response to seasonal flu vaccine campaigns. We therefore sought to identify the nature of the relationship between risk messages about getting the seasonal flu vaccine in newspaper coverage and the uptake of the vaccine by Ontarians between 2001 and 2010. A content analysis was conducted to quantify risk messages in newspaper content for each year of analysis. The quantification allowed us to test the correlation between the frequency of risk messages and vaccination rates. During the time period 2001-2010, vaccination rates were positively and significantly related to the frequency of risk messages in newspaper coverage (r = .691, p vaccine being ineffective, the flu vaccine being poorly understood by science, and the flu vaccine causing harm. Newspaper coverage plays an important role in shaping public response to seasonal flu vaccine campaigns. Public health officials should work alongside media to ensure that the public are exposed to information necessary for making informed decisions regarding vaccination.

  20. Swine flu. Mexico's handling of A/H1N1 in comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ear, Sophal

    2012-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose international security threats because of their potential to inflict harm upon humans, crops, livestock, health infrastructure, and economies. Despite the scale of this threat, there are inherent limitations in preventing and controlling EIDs, including the scope of current disease surveillance efforts. All of this leads to the following questions in the context of Mexico's recent swine flu experience: What were the cultural, political, and economic challenges to Influenza A/H1N1 virus response in Mexico? By way of comparison, what can we learn from the U.S. experience in 1976 with A/New Jersey/76 (Hsw1N1), later referred to as H1N1? This article explores the comparative political economy of Mexico's handling of influenza virus A/H1N1 outbreak in 2009. Research provides notable observations-based on the strengths and weaknesses of each country's response--that can be used as a starting point of discussion for the design of effective EIDs surveillance programs in developing and middle-income countries. In the U.S., the speed and efficiency of the 1976 U.S. mobilization against H1N1 was laudable. Although the U.S. response to the outbreak is seldom praised, the unity of the scientific and political communities demonstrated the national ability to respond to the situation. Mexico's strongest characteristics were its transparency, as well as the cooperation the country exhibited with other nations, particularly the U.S. and Canada. While Mexico showed savvy in its effective management of public and media relations, as the article details, political, economic, and cultural problems persisted.

  1. A study of the swine flu (H1N1 epidemic among health care providers of a medical college hospital of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Rajoura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Influenza viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that have claimed the lives of millions. Understanding the role of specific perceptions in motivating people to engage in precautionary behavior may help health communicators to improve their messages about outbreaks of new infectious disease generally and swine flu specifically. Objectives: To study the knowledge and practices of health care providers regarding swine flu and to study the attitudes and practices of health care providers toward the prevention of the swine flu epidemic. Materials and Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional (descriptive study and was conducted in the month of September, 2009, among doctors and nurses. A maximum of 40% of the total health care providers of GTB Hospital were covered because of feasibility and logistics, and, therefore, the sample size was 334. Results: Around 75% of the health care providers were aware about the symptoms of swine flu. Mostly, all study subjects were aware that it is transmitted through droplet infection. Correct knowledge of the incubation period of swine flu was known to 80% of the doctors and 69% of the nurses. Knowledge about high-risk groups (contacts, travelers, health care providers was observed among 88% of the doctors and 78.8% of the nurses. Practice of wearing mask during duty hours was observed among 82.6% of doctors and 85% of nurses, whereas of the total study population, only 40% were correctly using mask during duty hours. Conclusions: Significant gaps observed between knowledge and actual practice of the Health Care Provider regarding swine flu need to be filled by appropriate training. Data indicate that the health care providers are very intellectual, but they do not themselves practice what they preach.

  2. Assessing and responding in real time to online anti-vaccine sentiment during a flu pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Neil; Ing, Alton; Rizo, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The perceived safety of vaccination is an important explanatory factor for vaccine uptake and, consequently, for rates of illness and death. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate Canadian attitudes around the safety of the H1N1 vaccine during the fall 2009 influenza pandemic and (2) to consider how public health communications can leverage the Internet to counteract, in real time, anti-vaccine sentiment. We surveyed a random sample of 175,257 Canadian web users from October 27 to November 19, 2009, about their perceptions of the safety of the HINI vaccine. In an independent analysis, we also assessed the popularity of online flu vaccine-related information using a tool developed for this purpose. A total of 27,382 unique online participants answered the survey (15.6% response rate). Of the respondents, 23.4% considered the vaccine safe, 41.4% thought it was unsafe and 35.2% reported ambivalence over its safety. Websites and blog posts with anti-vaccine sentiment remained popular during the course of the pandemic. Current public health communication and education strategies about the flu vaccine can be complemented by web analytics that identify, track and neutralize anti-vaccine sentiment on the Internet, thus increasing perceived vaccine safety. Counter-marketing strategies can be transparent and collaborative, engaging online "influencers" who spread misinformation.

  3. GET POKED: Comparing an Incentive-Based Flu Campaign with Vaccinate-or-Mask Policies to Boost Influenza Vaccination Rates Among Healthcare Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwaha, Seema; Lorv, Bailey; Henseleit, Susanne; Iroanyah, Ngozi

    2016-01-01

    The median influenza vaccination rate for Toronto acute care facilities in 2013/14 was only 44%, well below the target rate of 90%. While many Toronto hospitals adopted a vaccinate-or-mask policy, Trillium Health Partners (THP) opted to create a multimodal incentives-based flu campaign entitled GET POKED. This campaign, which required significant additional resourcing, only increased our vaccination rate by 10%. While having some modest success, we believe it is unlikely that non-policy based interventions will efficiently and sustainably raise flu vaccine rates. Vaccinate-or-mask policies, while having some inherent challenges, may be worth exploring as part of THP's larger flu-prevention strategy.

  4. An academic-community partnership to address the flu vaccination rates of the homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Sharon Elizabeth; Sexton, Elizabeth Hilliard

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot research study was to explore the beliefs and barriers to flu vaccination from a sample homeless population in a small metropolitan community. In a collaborative academic-community partnership of a university undergraduate nursing education program, a local health department, and nonprofit agencies, a social marketing education program was developed by nursing students which included surveying the homeless for perceptions regarding flu vaccinations. There were a total of 87 homeless subjects that were surveyed. The measurements were obtained from various questions regarding flu vaccinations on a Qualtrics survey examining the barriers, beliefs, and practices of the homeless population. The focus addressed health disparities and barriers with nursing students serving as the catalyst to reach the homeless in an educational service-learning project. This project demonstrated a positive impact in meeting health care needs of homeless persons as the rate of flu vaccination was doubled from the previous year at one community day shelter. Nursing students developed their ability to impact a hard-to-reach population with positive changes in their attitudes by increased understanding of the health needs of the homeless.

  5. Burden of pediatric influenza A virus infection post swine-flu H1N1 pandemic in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Adel; Shaheen, Malak; Kamel, Terez; El Faramay, Amel; El Rahman, Safaa Abd; Nabil, Dalia; Gouda, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    To screen children with influenza like illness or with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infections for influenza A virus infection - post swine flu pandemic era - using rapid influenza diagnostic tests. During two years (2010 & 2011), 1 200 children with influenza like illness or acute respiratory tract infections (according to World Health Organization criteria) were recruited. Their ages ranged from 2-60 months. Nasopharyngeal aspirates specimens were collected from all children for rapid influenza A diagnostic test. Influenza A virus rapid test was positive in 47.5% of the children; the majority (89.6%) were presented with lower respiratory tract infections. Respiratory rate and temperature were significantly higher among positive rapid influenza test patients. Influenza A virus infection is still a major cause of respiratory tract infections in Egyptian children. It should be considered in all cases with cough and febrile episodes and influenza like symptoms even post swine flu pandemic. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2000. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  7. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2000. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  8. Note from the CERN Medical Service: FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2001. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  9. Note from the CERN Medical Service. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2000. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  10. Note from the CERN Medical Service: FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2003. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  11. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2003. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  12. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Sylvain Weisz

    2002-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2002. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  13. VACCINATION AGAINST THE FLU AMONG CHILDREN WITH DISTURBANCES IN STATES OF HEALTH AND CHRONIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Namazova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present textbook for the doctors highlights the latest data on the flu spread, its clinical manifestations, as well as opportunities for its prevention and treatment. The authors especially carefully described the methods of immunoprophylaxis, including specific like type. They listed all the registered vaccines and vaccines of local and foreign origin to be registered in the Russian federation, methods of their injection, probable undesirable phenomena. Specific stress was laid onto the own personal data of the authors as to application of the vaccines against the flu among both healthy children and those, who suffer from various disturbances or chronic diseases, including pernicious run. The textbook was approved at the meeting of the scientific council of the general directorate, scientific center of children's health, Russian academy of medical sciences, on September 14, 2006.

  14. VACCINATION AGAINST THE FLU AMONG CHILDREN WITH DISTURBANCES IN STATES OF HEALTH AND CHRONIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Namazova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present textbook for the doctors highlights the latest data on the flu spread, its clinical manifestations, as well as opportunities for its prevention and treatment. The authors especially carefully described the methods of immunoprophylaxis, including specific like type. They listed all the registered vaccines and vaccines of local and foreign origin to be registered in the russian federation, methods of their injection, probable undesirable phenomena. Specific stress was laid onto the own personal data of the authors as to application of the vaccines against the flu among both healthy children and those, who suffer from various disturbances or chronic diseases, including pernicious run. The textbook was approved at the meeting of the scientific council of the general directorate, scientific center of children's health, Russian academy of medical sciences, on September 14, 2006.

  15. Monitoring adverse events of vaccines against Mexican flu

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; van Grootheest, A C

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, a vaccination campaign against Influenza A (H1N1) was started in the Netherlands. The accelerated registration procedure of the vaccines used in this campaign and the use of these vaccines on a large scale indicated a need for real-time safety monitoring. This article looks at the

  16. NOTE FROM THE CERN MEDICAL SERVICE - FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  17. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccination without a prior appointment. The reimbursement of the vaccination can be done directly with Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the medical service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  18. Note from the CERN Medical Service - FLU VACCINATIONs

    CERN Document Server

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, Bldg. 57) with their vaccine without a prior appointment. Claims for reimbursement should be sent directly to UNIQA, accompanied by the receipt for the vaccine and the prescription you will receive from the Medical Service on the day of your injection at the Infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place before the end of November 2008 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). Influenza vaccinations are recommended for all CERN staff aged 50 or over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems or diabetics and for those recovering from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  19. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine without a prior appointment. The reimbursement of the vaccine can be done directly with Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the medical service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  20. Note from the CERN Medical Service - FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine without a prior appointment. The reimbursement of the vaccine can be done directly with Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the medical service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  1. Note from the CERN Medical Service - Flu vaccinations

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, Bldg. 57) with their vaccine without a prior appointment. Claims for reimbursement should be sent directly to UNIQA, accompanied by the receipt for the vaccine and the prescription you will receive from the Medical Service on the day of your injection at the Infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place before the end of November 2008 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). Influenza vaccinations are recommended for all CERN staff aged 50 or over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems or diabetics and for those recovering from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  2. Note from the CERN Medical Service - FLU VACCINATIONs

    CERN Document Server

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, Bldg. 57) with their vaccine without a prior appointment. Claims for reimbursement should be sent directly to UNIQA, accompanied by the receipt for the vaccine and the prescription you will receive from the Medical Service on the day of your injection at the Infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place before the end of November 2008 (preferably between 2.00 p.m. and 4.00 p.m.). Influenza vaccinations are recommended for all CERN staff aged 50 or over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems or diabetes and for those recovering from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  3. How has the flu virus infected the Web? 2010 influenza and vaccine information available on the Internet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Covolo, Loredana; Mascaretti, Silvia; Caruana, Anna; Orizio, Grazia; Caimi, Luigi; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    .... The Internet is increasingly being used as a source of health information and advice. The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of websites providing information about flu vaccine and the quality of the information provided...

  4. ECONOMICAL ANALYSIS OF FLU VACCINE PREVENTION FOR CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Yu. Belousov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinicalaeconomical analysis includes all possible treatament expenditures and possible profit from vaccinating chiladren and teenagers versus flue. It shoes that mass vaccination of children and teenagers will lead to lower disease incidence and mortality during epidemical rising of the disease and proavide significant economical effect both because of direct medaical expenses and because of collateral expenses. Collateral expenses are the main source of loss for the state of Russia from child and teenager flue and sars. Vaccination brings sick leaves and lost time payments down by 57%, expenses for treataing flue and sars together with their complications by 52%. In the Russian society total child and teenager vaccination appears as more profitable, for insurance companies as well. in this case insurance companies will be able to benefit from indirect medaical profit and, most probably, won't be needing state subsidizing for conducting total vaccination against flue of all citizens aged under 14. Antiaflue vaccination is feasible both in terms of clinical results and economic feasibility.Key words: pharmaeconomics, flue, sars, children, teenagers, vaccine prevention.

  5. Lymphadenitis as a Rare Side Effect of H1N1 Vaccine in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Gundogdu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 5-year-old boy who had the complaint of swelling and pain on the right vaccine shot and right axillary areas. The right axillary area was diagnosed as reactive lymphadenitis, which we believe is a rare local side effect of the swine flu vaccine. The key message to take away from this case is that the patient had lymphadenitis as a local side effect of the swine flu vaccine. Lymphadenitis should be reported as a possible local side effect of the swine flu vaccine.

  6. Swine Flu, in the Spanish Press/La ‘gripe A’, en la prensa española

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Idoia Camacho Markina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Mass media are faced with an exceptional challenge when they cover an epidemic, since the role of the media is to offer the most complete and accurate information in order to avoid spreading panic. However, many media outlets have been guided by financial reasons rather than public service criteria when they have covered the latest epidemic outbreak, which has resulted in a sensationalist coverage. The goal of this paper is to analyze the news coverage given by Spanish dailies to the outbreak and spread of the Novel H1N1 Virus, commonly known as the Swine Flu. This research points to the role played by print media in the coverage of this particular issue after a content analysis of the news articles published by the main five Spanish dailies during the first week after the Swine Flu outbreak.Resumen: Informar sobre epidemias constituye una situación excepcional para los medios de comunicación, cuya función debe ser ofrecer al público la información más completa posible para evitar que se extienda el pánico. Sin embargo, en las últimas epidemias muchos medios se han guiado más por criterios económicos, buscando el sensacionalismo, que por criterios de servicio público. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo estudiar el tratamiento informativo que la prensa escrita diaria española ha hecho del brote de epidemia del virus de influenza A (H1/N1. El análisis de contenido de las noticias publicadas por los cinco diarios españoles de mayor difusión en la primera semana desde que se conoció la epidemia nos indica qué papel ha adoptado la prensa en esta ocasión.

  7. Computational analysis and determination of a highly conserved surface exposed segment in H5N1 avian flu and H1N1 swine flu neuraminidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandy Ashesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalytic activity of influenza neuraminidase (NA facilitates elution of progeny virions from infected cells and prevents their self-aggregation mediated by the catalytic site located in the body region. Research on the active site of the molecule has led to development of effective inhibitors like oseltamivir, zanamivir etc, but the high rate of mutation and interspecies reassortment in viral sequences and the recent reports of oseltamivir resistant strains underlines the importance of determining additional target sites for developing future antiviral compounds. In a recent computational study of 173 H5N1 NA gene sequences we had identified a 50-base highly conserved region in 3'-terminal end of the NA gene. Results We extend the graphical and numerical analyses to a larger number of H5N1 NA sequences (514 and H1N1 swine flu sequences (425 accessed from GenBank. We use a 2D graphical representation model for the gene sequences and a Graphical Sliding Window Method (GSWM for protein sequences scanning the sequences as a block of 16 amino acids at a time. Using a protein sequence descriptor defined in our model, the protein sliding scan method allowed us to compare the different strains for block level variability, which showed significant statistical correlation to average solvent accessibility of the residue blocks; single amino acid position variability results in no correlation, indicating the impact of stretch variability in chemical environment. Close to the C-terminal end the GSWM showed less descriptor-variability with increased average solvent accessibility (ASA that is also supported by conserved predicted secondary structure of 3' terminal RNA and visual evidence from 3D crystallographic structure. Conclusion The identified terminal segment, strongly conserved in both RNA and protein sequences, is especially significant as it is surface exposed and structural chemistry reveals the probable role of this stretch in

  8. STUDY OF FACTORS INFLUENCING EARLY SYMPTOMATIC IMPROVEMENT, RETURN TO NORMOXIA AND RADIOLOGICAL RESOLUTION IN SWINE FLU PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY FAILURE IN RICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsidhar Reddy Manne

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since 2009, swine influenza outbreaks have been recorded virtually every year, although their extent and severity have varied widely. Localised outbreaks are taking place at variable intervals, usually every 1-3 years. The most recent outbreak has been from December 2016 through April 2017. We still are in the midst of one. This study of factors influencing early clinical and radiological improvement and reversion to normoxia in swine flu patients with respiratory failure helps in saving precious lives. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a cross-sectional study conducted at RICU, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, S.V.R.R. Government General Hospital/S.V. Medical College, Tirupathi, Andhra Pradesh, between January 2017 and April 2017. Study sample was the total number of swine flu patients admitted to the RICU of the Department of Pulmonary Medicine with respiratory failure. RESULTS Out of 42 patients who tested positive for swine flu, 37 had respiratory failure and were immediately admitted in RICU. Oxygen support, oseltamivir and higher antibiotics were immediately started, injectable steroids given where necessary. Comorbidities were meticulously managed. 19 were males and 18 were females. 21 patients (>50% were above 50 years. Cough and breathlessness were present in all patients (100%. At admission, all 37 showed SpO2 <85% and at discharge all of them were normoxic. 18 patients had either multilobar pneumonia or ARDS on CXR, which had resolved by the time of discharge. The shortest duration of stay was 7 days and the longest duration of stay was 11 days. 35 patients were discharged and 2 patients died. CONCLUSION Good oxygenation, starting of oseltamivir on day 1 of admission prevents further complications and hastens recovery. Swine flu patients with normal chest x-ray and no comorbidities can still end up with respiratory failure. Steroids decrease cough and breathlessness, but have no role in hastening recovery. No residual symptoms

  9. Design and performance of the CDC real-time reverse transcriptase PCR swine flu panel for detection of 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bo; Wu, Kai-Hui; Emery, Shannon; Villanueva, Julie; Johnson, Roy; Guthrie, Erica; Berman, LaShondra; Warnes, Christine; Barnes, Nathelia; Klimov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Stephen

    2011-07-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) have been shown to sporadically infect humans and are infrequently identified by the Influenza Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after being received as unsubtypeable influenza A virus samples. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) procedures for detection and characterization of North American lineage (N. Am) SIV were developed and implemented at CDC for rapid identification of specimens from cases of suspected infections with SIV. These procedures were utilized in April 2009 for detection of human cases of 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic (pdm) influenza virus infection. Based on genetic sequence data derived from the first two viruses investigated, the previously developed rRT-PCR procedures were optimized to create the CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel for detection of the 2009 A (H1N1) pdm influenza virus. The analytical sensitivity of the CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel was shown to be 5 copies of RNA per reaction and 10(-1.3 - -0.7) 50% infectious doses (ID(50)) per reaction for cultured viruses. Cross-reactivity was not observed when testing human clinical specimens or cultured viruses that were positive for human seasonal A (H1N1, H3N2) and B influenza viruses. The CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel was distributed to public health laboratories in the United States and internationally from April 2009 until June 2010. The CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel served as an effective tool for timely and specific detection of 2009 A (H1N1) pdm influenza viruses and facilitated subsequent public health response implementation.

  10. Impact of School Flu Vaccine Program on Student Absences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaspohl, Sara S.; Dixon, Betty T.; Streater, James A.; Hausauer, Elizabeth T.; Newman, Christopher P.; Vogel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Literature provides evidence that school attendance correlates with academic performance and student success. Influenza is a contributing factor to school absences. Primary prevention for influenza includes immunization. School-located influenza vaccine (SLIV) programs provide greater access for students to be immunized. A retrospective review of…

  11. Avoiding the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Avoiding the Flu Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Children ... should still get the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. H1N1 Flu: Who Should Be Vaccinated First The Centers for ...

  12. Flu in 15: a novel 15-minute education program to promote acceptance of the influenza vaccine among health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butteri, Matthew J; Radu, Charlotte; Huq, Fawzia; Wiglesworth, Aileen; Durso, Samuel C; Bellantoni, Michele

    2010-09-01

    A performance improvement project was undertaken to increase health care worker (HCW) influenza vaccination acceptance rates in the long-term care setting by using a novel 15-minute education intervention called the "Flu in 15." As a core principle, we taught that more Americans die from complications of influenza than hepatitis B, yet there remains individual reluctance and barriers to achieve high acceptance rates of influenza vaccination among HCWs. During chance encounters we offered the Flu in 15 in-service to all HCWs at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Care Center including certified nursing assistants (also called geriatric nursing assistants), registered nurses, registered dieticians, environment staff, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, respiratory therapists, social workers, and administrators. Of the 106 of 347 HCWs who participated in the Flu in 15 in-service, 58 were by chance encounters selected to be surveyed based on convenience. We surveyed 68 of 241 HCWs who did not attend the Flu in 15 in-service as a comparison. Of the 58 participants who were asked if the in-service helped them understand why a flu vaccine is needed yearly, we found that 15% responded "tremendously," 48% "a lot," 26% "some," 7% "a little," and 2% "no." We had 24% report that the program was effective in changing their behavior to accept the flu vaccination for the first time. We found that 49% responded that the in-service was effective in either changing their behavior to accept the flu vaccination for the first time or reaccept it if recently declined in previous years. With respect to motivation, 42% of the certified nursing assistants stated that the in-service made them think more about returning to school to get a license in some area of health care. Although not cause and effect, we observed an increase in the HCW acceptance rate of the influenza vaccine from 65% in 2006-2007 to 73% in 2007-2008. We noticed a decreased trend in patient deaths

  13. The Impact of Patient's Socio-Demographic Characterictics, Comorbidities and Attitudes on Flu Vaccination Uptake in Family Practice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravos, Andrej; Kračun, Lucija; Kravos, Klara; Iljaž, Rade

    2015-09-01

    In Slovenia, the role of family physicians in primary care and preventive procedures is very important. Influenza vaccination rates in Slovenia are low. The reasons for low vaccination rates in Slovenia were not clear. We suppose that patient's beliefs and attitudes are important factors. We assessed patients' opinions regarding the acceptance of flu vaccination by their family physicians and their beliefs and attitudes about flu and vaccination. The aim was to check out factors that influence the decision to take the vaccine in family physician offices. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter, observational study in the Styria region in Slovenia. We included patients from seven family physicians during regular office visits. They filled in a questionnaire about their general demographic data and attitudes regarding influenza and vaccination. The main outcome was the decision to be vaccinated. The logistic regression model identified five predictors for influenza vaccination, namely: heart disease, previous vaccination, an agreement with the beliefs 'the vaccination is an efficient measure to prevent influenza', 'after the vaccination there are usually no important side effects' and 'the vaccination is also recommended for a healthy adult person'. The belief that vaccinations harm the immune system is negatively associated with vaccination. Patients' beliefs are an important factor to decide for vaccination or not. Family physician teams should discuss with patients their beliefs and concerns about vaccination.

  14. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... methods of use as Veterinary Influenza Vaccines. Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza in... mechanism. These veterinary influenza vaccines are specifically designed for poultry, swine and equine...

  15. VACCINATION AGAINST FLU, PNEUMOCOCCAL, MENINGOCOCCAL AND HIB INFECTION OF THE SICKLY CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Namazova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This manual for doctors contains modern information about the spread of pneumotropic infections, their participation in the pathogenesis of acute diseases among children, possibilities for their prevention and treatment. Special detailed description is given to the methods of immune prevention, including specific one. The authors indicate all the registered and to be registered in russia russian and foreign vaccines, methods of their injection, possible unfavourable events. especially interesting are the authors' information on application of vaccines against flu, pneumococcal, meningococcal and hemophilic infections, bacterial vaccines, including those among the sickly children. On November 22, 2005, the manual was approved at the session of the scientific council of scientific center of children's health, Russian academy of medical sciences.

  16. Novel Vaccine Against Mycoplasma Hyosynoviae: The Immunogenic Effect of Iscom-Based Vaccines in Swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Vinther Heydenreich, Annette; Riber, Ulla

    Arthritis in swine is frequently caused by Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (Mhs). For the development of an effective vaccine we investigated the immunogenic effect of three vaccine preparations with the ISCOM adjuvant Posintro™ from Nordic Vaccine. A: formalin fixed whole-cells Mhs (300 µg/dose) mixed...... with Posintro, B: Deoxycholate extracted lipoproteins from Mhs organisms (DOC-antigen, 300 μg/dose) in Posintro and C: DOC-antigen (50 μg/dose) in Posintro. Each vaccine-group contained three pigs. Vaccinations (i.m.) were performed at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The development of specific IgG and secretion...... of IFNγ were measured. Three weeks after the second vaccination, pigs were euthanised and autopsied. Vaccine B induced a high level of specific serum IgG in all pigs a week after boost. Vaccine C gave a variable response after boost, with two pigs seroconverting, while no response was seen by vaccine A...

  17. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Archived Flu Emails Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Information on Avian Influenza Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  18. A novel M2e based flu vaccine formulation for dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Leclerc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The USA 2004 influenza virus outbreak H3N8 in dogs heralded the emergence of a new disease in this species. A new inactivated H3N8 vaccine was developed to control the spread of the disease but, as in humans and swine, it is anticipated that the virus will mutate shift and drift in the dog population. Therefore, there is a need for a vaccine that can trigger a broad protection to prevent the spread of the virus and the emergence of new strains. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The universal M2e peptide is identical in almost all the H3N8 influenza strains sequenced to date and known to infect dogs. This epitope is therefore a good choice for development of a vaccine to provide broad protection. Malva mosaic virus (MaMV nanoparticles were chosen as a vaccine platform to improve the stability of the M2e peptide and increase its immunogenicity in animals. The addition of an adjuvant (OmpC purified from Salmonella typhi membrane in the vaccine formulation increased the immune response directed to the M2e peptide significantly and enlarged the protection to include the heterosubtypic strain of influenza in a mouse model. An optimal vaccine formulation was also shown to be immunogenic in dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The MaMV vaccine platform triggered an improved immune response directed towards the universal M2e peptide. The adjuvant OmpC increased the immune response to the M2e peptide and protection to a heterosubtypic influenza strain that harbors a different M2e peptide in a mouse model. Antibodies generated by the vaccine formulation showed cross-reactivity with M2e peptides derived from influenza strains H9N2, H5N1 and H1N1. The vaccine formulation shows a potential for commercialization of a new M2e based vaccine in dogs.

  19. Synthetic Influenza vaccine (FLU-v) stimulates cell mediated immunity in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Phase I trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleguezuelos, Olga; Robinson, Stuart; Stoloff, Gregory A; Caparrós-Wanderley, Wilson

    2012-06-29

    Current Influenza vaccines elicit antibody mediated prophylactic immunity targeted to viral capsid antigens. Despite their global use these vaccines must be administered yearly to the population, cannot be manufactured until the circulating viral strain(s) have been identified and have limited efficacy. A need remains for Influenza vaccines addressing these issues and here we report the results of a Phase Ib trial of a novel synthetic Influenza vaccine (FLU-v) targeting T cell responses to NP, M1 and M2. Forty-eight healthy males aged 18-40 were recruited for this single-centre, randomised, double blind study. Volunteers received one single low (250 μg) or high (500 μg) dose of FLU-v, either alone or adjuvanted. Safety, tolerability and basic immunogenicity (IgG and IFN-γ responses) parameters were assessed pre-vaccination and for 21 days post-vaccination. FLU-v was found to be safe and well tolerated with no vaccine associated severe adverse events. Dose-dependent IFN-γ responses >2-fold the pre-vaccination level were detected in 80% and 100% of volunteers receiving, respectively, the low and high dose adjuvanted FLU-v formulations. No formulation tested induced any significant FLU-v antibody response. FLU-v is safe and induces a vaccine-specific cellular immunity. Cellular immune responses are historically known to control and mitigate infection and illness during natural infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How to Boost Flu Vaccination Rates among Employees in Your Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Perio, Marie A.; Wiegand, Douglas M.; Evans, Stefanie M.; Niemeier, Maureen T.

    2012-01-01

    Flu viruses are typically spread by droplets, when people who are sick with flu cough, sneeze, or talk. Less often, a person may get flu from touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching his own mouth, eyes, or nose. Flu can cause mild to severe illness and may even lead to death. Child care providers are at risk of…

  1. Get Your Flu Shot!| NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Shot Get Your Flu Shot! Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents ... failure, or lung disease "For the 2010–2011 flu season, the flu vaccine provides protection against the ...

  2. Help Stop the Flu | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Shot Help Stop the Flu Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents The ... vaccinated (for everyone six months or older). Find Flu Clinics Near You At www.flu.gov Use ...

  3. Credibility of the Printed Media: The Swine Flu as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Žlof

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of credibility becomes especially pronounced in times of crises, which characteristically abound in the unknown, uncertainty, and doubt. Such crises are mostly sudden, often complex, andsometimes mired in controversial events. The public subsequently craves more information in times of crises, such that they may obtain more precise guidance, and ease their ability to cope. Given the relatively low frequency of crisis situations, most people lack actual experience relevant to a given predicament. The appearance of Virus A (H1N1 at the onset of 2009 is one such case. Despite H1N1’s classification as a broad-scale, serious health hazard, preventive vaccinations failed to reach a large segment of the population. We contend that the lack of credibility in informing the public through the media contributed considerably to this failure. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to determine the level of credible information provided by the print media from which the general public could have taken an informed position on the crisis in question. Quantitative research and content analysis ascertained from a body of print media sources with national coverage reveals that the Croatian print media, contrary to our expectations, largely rely on official sources and transparently cite authors, which contributes to a higher degree of credibility. Yet further analysis of the number of sources suggests that most journalists used on average only one or no named sources, which significantly reduces the credibility of the published articles.

  4. Analyzing the interaction of a herbal compound Andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata as a folklore against swine flu (H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrabhan Seniya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find new bioactive molecules for the treatment of swine flu. Methods: The present study is an attempt to elucidate inhibition potential of andrographolide and its derivatives along with an associated binding mechanism through virtual screening and molecular docking simulation studies. Results: Our findings revealed structural conformation changes in 150 loop, secondary sialic acid binding site residues of ACZ97474 {Neuraminidase (A/Blore/NIV236/2009(H1N1}. Andrographolide have been identified as the highest binging energy of -1 0.88 Kcal/mol, 3 hydrogen bond interactions (Arg152, Lys150, and Gly197, total intermolecular energy of -12.07 Kcal/mol with bioactivity value (Ki of 10.59 nmol/L, while the Food and Drug Admistraton approved drug Oseltamivir and Zanamivir have shown 2 and 4 hydrogen bond interactions with binding energies of -6.28 Kcal/mol and -7.73Kcal/mol, respectively, which is higher than andrographolide. The guanidine group of Arg152 has binding affinities to the hydrophilic nature of the inhibitors (-OH and =O groups, as identified by docking of andrographolide (CID: 5318517 on neuraminidase. Conclusions: Hence, andrographolide has the potential to inhibit neuraminidase activity of H1N1 and may be used as an alternative medicinal therapy for swine flu positive patient. With potent antiviral activity and a potentially new mechanism of action, andrographolide may warrant further evaluation as a possible therapy for influenza.

  5. Efficacy of chimeric Pestivirus vaccine candidates against Classical Swine Fever: protection and DIVA characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eble, P.L.; Geurts, Y.; Quak, J.; Moonen-Leusen, H.W.M.; Blome, S.; Hofmann, M.A.; Koenen, F.; Beer, M.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently no live DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) are available. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chimeric pestivirus vaccine candidates (CP7_E2alf, Flc11 and Flc9) are able to protect pigs against clinical signs,

  6. Vaccine development for protection against systemic infections with Streptococcus suis and Haemophilus parasuis in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both Streptococcus suis and Haemophilus parasuis are important invasive bacterial pathogens of swine, commonly causing meningitis, arthritis, polyserositis, and septicemia. Due to the presence of many serotypes and high genotypic variability, efficacious vaccines are not readily available. We are us...

  7. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT be ... What is live, attenuated influenza vaccine-LAIV (nasal spray)?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children younger ...

  8. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of vaccines against bacterial diseases in swine: what can we expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; Chiers, Koen; Maes, Dominiek; Ducatelle, Richard; Decostere, Annemie

    2004-06-03

    This paper discusses what can be expected with regard to efficacy of antibacterial vaccines used in swine, based on the present knowledge of pathogen-host interactions. First, vaccination against bacteria that mainly cause disease by production of exotoxins is considered. Vaccines containing the inactivated toxin or a non-toxic but antigenic recombinant protein derived from the exotoxin can be expected to provide protection against disease. The degree of protection induced by such vaccines varies, however, depending amongst other things on the pathogenesis of the disease. Vaccination against clostridial infections, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infections, progressive atrophic rhinitis and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, is considered. The second part of the article deals with vaccination against extracellular bacteria. Protection against these bacteria is generally mediated by antibodies against their surface antigens and certain secreted antigens, but cellular immunity may also play a role. Efficacy of vaccines against swine erysipelas, Streptococcus suis infections, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections and swine dysentery is discussed. Finally, vaccination against facultatively intracellular bacteria is considered. For protection against these bacteria cell-mediated immunity plays an important role, but antibodies may also be involved. It is generally accepted that live-attenuated vaccines are more suitable for induction of cell-mediated immunity than inactivated vaccines, although this also depends on the adjuvant used in the vaccine. As an example, vaccination against Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is discussed.

  10. FluKB: A Knowledge-Based System for Influenza Vaccine Target Discovery and Analysis of the Immunological Properties of Influenza Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Sun, Jing

    2015-01-01

    FluKB is a knowledge-based system focusing on data and analytical tools for influenza vaccine discovery. The main goal of FluKB is to provide access to curated influenza sequence and epitope data and enhance the analysis of influenza sequence diversity and the analysis of targets of immune...... responses. FluKB consists of more than 400,000 influenza protein sequences, known epitope data (357 verified T-cell epitopes, 685 HLA binders, and 16 naturally processed MHC ligands), and a collection of 28 influenza antibodies and their structurally defined B-cell epitopes. FluKB was built using amodular...... framework allowing the implementation of analytical workflows and includes standard search tools, such as keyword search and sequence similarity queries, as well as advanced tools for the analysis of sequence variability.The advanced analytical tools for vaccine discovery include visual mapping of T- and B...

  11. Optimal Use of Vaccines for Control of Influenza A Virus in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbulte, Matthew R.; Spickler, Anna R.; Zaabel, Pamela K.; Roth, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus in swine (IAV-S) is one of the most important infectious disease agents of swine in North America. In addition to the economic burden of IAV-S to the swine industry, the zoonotic potential of IAV-S sometimes leads to serious public health concerns. Adjuvanted, inactivated vaccines have been licensed in the United States for over 20 years, and there is also widespread usage of autogenous/custom IAV-S vaccines. Vaccination induces neutralizing antibodies and protection against infection with very similar strains. However, IAV-S strains are so diverse and prone to mutation that these vaccines often have disappointing efficacy in the field. This scientific review was developed to help veterinarians and others to identify the best available IAV-S vaccine for a particular infected herd. We describe key principles of IAV-S structure and replication, protective immunity, currently available vaccines, and vaccine technologies that show promise for the future. We discuss strategies to optimize the use of available IAV-S vaccines, based on information gathered from modern diagnostics and surveillance programs. Improvements in IAV-S immunization strategies, in both the short term and long term, will benefit swine health and productivity and potentially reduce risks to public health. PMID:26344946

  12. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a rough Brucella suis vaccine delivered orally or parenterally to feral swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucella suis strain 353-1 is a stable vaccine strain that is clinically safe, does not cause positive serologic responses on conventional brucellosis surveillance tests, and induces humoral and cellular immunity in swine after vaccination. In this study, we evaluated tissue clearance and immunologi...

  13. Development of a classical swine fever subunit marker vaccine and companion diagnostic test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moormann, R.J.; Bouma, A.; Kramps, J.A.; Terpstra, C.; Smit, de H.J.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a classical swine fever (CSF) subunit marker vaccine, based on viral envelope glycoprotein E2, and a companion diagnostic test, based on a second viral envelope glycoprotein E(RNS), will be described. Important properties of the vaccine, such as onset and duration of immunity, and

  14. Classical swine fever (CSF) marker vaccine - Trial I. Challenge studies in weaner pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Le Potier, M.F.; Romero, L.

    2001-01-01

    Two commercial marker vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and companion diagnostic tests were examined in 160 conventional pigs. To test the vaccines in a "worst case scenario", group of 10 weaners were vaccinated using a single dose of an E2 (gp55) based vaccine at days -21, -14...... mirroring the delayed time point of infection. There was thus some protection against clinical illness by both marker vaccines, but not a solid protection against infection and virus shedding. The efficacy of the vaccine was best if used 3 weeks before challenge and a clear correlation between time inter...

  15. Mitigation Approaches to Combat the Flu Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Raman; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Madaan, Deepali; Dubey, Neha; Arora, Rajesh; Goel, Rajeev; Singh, Shefali; Kaushik, Vinod; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Chabbra, Vivek; Bhardwaj, Janak Raj

    2009-01-01

    Management of flu pandemic is a perpetual challenge for the medical fraternity since time immemorial. Animal to human transmission has been observed thrice in the last century within an average range of 11-39 years of antigenic recycling. The recent outbreak of influenza A (H1N1, also termed as swine flu), first reported in Mexico on April 26, 2009, occurred in the forty first year since last reported flu pandemic (July 1968). Within less than 50 days, it has assumed pandemic proportions (phase VI) affecting over 76 countries with 163 deaths/35,928 cases (as on 15th June 2009). It indicated the re-emergence of genetically reassorted virus having strains endemic to humans, swine and avian (H5N1). The World Health Organisation (WHO) member states have already pulled up their socks and geared up to combat such criticalities. Earlier outbreaks of avian flu (H5N1) in different countries led WHO to develop pandemic preparedness strategies with national/regional plans on pandemic preparedness. Numerous factors related to climatic conditions, socio-economic strata, governance and sharing of information/logistics at all levels have been considered critical indicators in monitoring the dynamics of escalation towards a pandemic situation. The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), Government of India, with the active cooperation of UN agencies and other stakeholders/experts has formulated a concept paper on role of nonhealth service providers during pandemics in April 2008 and released national guidelines - management of biological disasters in July 2008. These guidelines enumerate that the success of medical management endeavors like pharmaceutical (anti-viral Oseltamivir and Zanamivir therapies), nonpharmaceutical interventions and vaccination development etc., largely depends on level of resistance offered by mutagenic viral strain and rationale use of pharmaco therapeutic interventions. This article describes the mitigation approach to combat flu pandemic with its

  16. Design and Performance of the CDC Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Swine Flu Panel for Detection of 2009 A (H1N1) Pandemic Influenza Virus▿†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bo; Wu, Kai-Hui; Emery, Shannon; Villanueva, Julie; Johnson, Roy; Guthrie, Erica; Berman, LaShondra; Warnes, Christine; Barnes, Nathelia; Klimov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) have been shown to sporadically infect humans and are infrequently identified by the Influenza Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after being received as unsubtypeable influenza A virus samples. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) procedures for detection and characterization of North American lineage (N. Am) SIV were developed and implemented at CDC for rapid identification of specimens from cases of suspected infections with SIV. These procedures were utilized in April 2009 for detection of human cases of 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic (pdm) influenza virus infection. Based on genetic sequence data derived from the first two viruses investigated, the previously developed rRT-PCR procedures were optimized to create the CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel for detection of the 2009 A (H1N1) pdm influenza virus. The analytical sensitivity of the CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel was shown to be 5 copies of RNA per reaction and 10−1.3∼−0.7 50% infectious doses (ID50) per reaction for cultured viruses. Cross-reactivity was not observed when testing human clinical specimens or cultured viruses that were positive for human seasonal A (H1N1, H3N2) and B influenza viruses. The CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel was distributed to public health laboratories in the United States and internationally from April 2009 until June 2010. The CDC rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel served as an effective tool for timely and specific detection of 2009 A (H1N1) pdm influenza viruses and facilitated subsequent public health response implementation. PMID:21593260

  17. Mathematical modeling of influenza A virus dynamics within swine farms and the effects of vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J H Reynolds

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus infections are widespread in swine herds across the world. Influenza negatively affects swine health and production, and represents a significant threat to public health due to the risk of zoonotic infections. Swine herds can act as reservoirs for potentially pandemic influenza strains. In this study, we develop mathematical models based on experimental data, representing typical breeding and wean-to-finish swine farms. These models are used to explore and describe the dynamics of influenza infection at the farm level, which are at present not well understood. In addition, we use the models to assess the effectiveness of vaccination strategies currently employed by swine producers, testing both homologous and heterologous vaccines. An important finding is that following an influenza outbreak in a breeding herd, our model predicts a persistently high level of infectious piglets. Sensitivity analysis indicates that this finding is robust to changes in both transmission rates and farm size. Vaccination does not eliminate influenza throughout the breeding farm population. In the wean-to-finish herd, influenza infection may persist in the population only if recovered individuals become susceptible to infection again. A homologous vaccine administered to the entire wean-to-finish population after the loss of maternal antibodies eliminates influenza, but a vaccine that only induces partial protection (heterologous vaccine has little effect on influenza infection levels. Our results have important implications for the control of influenza in swine herds, which is crucial in order to reduce both losses for swine producers and the risk to public health.

  18. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. How has the flu virus infected the Web? 2010 influenza and vaccine information available on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covolo, Loredana; Mascaretti, Silvia; Caruana, Anna; Orizio, Grazia; Caimi, Luigi; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-01-29

    The 2009-10 influenza pandemic was a major public health concern. Vaccination was recommended by the health authorities, but compliance was not optimal and perception of the presumed associated risks was high among the public. The Internet is increasingly being used as a source of health information and advice. The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of websites providing information about flu vaccine and the quality of the information provided. Website selection was performed in autumn 2010 by entering eight keywords in two of the most commonly used search engines (Google.com and Yahoo.com). The first three result pages were analysed for each search, giving a total of 480 occurrences. Page rank was evaluated to assess visibility. Websites based on Web 2.0 philosophy, websites merely displaying popular news/articles and single files were excluded from the subsequent analysis. We analysed the selected websites (using WHO criteria) as well as the information provided, using a codebook for pro/neutral websites and a qualitative approach for the adverse ones. Of the 89 websites selected, 54 dealt with seasonal vaccination, three with anti-H1N1 vaccination and 32 with both. Rank analysis showed that only classic websites (ones not falling in any other category) and one social network were provided on the first pages by Yahoo; 21 classic websites, six displaying popular news/articles and one blog by Google. Analysis of the selected websites revealed that the majority of them (88.8%) had a positive/neutral attitude to flu vaccination. Pro/neutral websites distinguished themselves from the adverse ones by some revealing features like greater transparency, credibility and privacy protection. We found that the majority of the websites providing information on flu vaccination were pro/neutral and gave sufficient information. We suggest that antivaccinationist information may have been spread by a different route, such as via Web 2.0 tools, which may be

  20. Your child and the flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... severe or life-threatening flu infection. WILL THE VACCINE HARM MY CHILD? A small amount of mercury (called thimerosal) is ... have concerns about mercury, all of the routine vaccines are also ... TO PROTECT MY CHILD FROM THE FLU? Everyone who comes in close ...

  1. Evaluation of specific humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated with cell culture adapted classical swine fever vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal K. Nath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine an efficient vaccination schedule on the basis of the humoral immune response of cell culture adapted live classical swine fever virus (CSFV vaccinated pigs and maternally derived antibody (MDA in piglets of vaccinated sows. Materials and Methods: A cell culture adapted live CSFV vaccine was subjected to different vaccination schedule in the present study. Serum samples were collected before vaccination (day 0 and 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 180, 194, 208, 270, 284 and 298 days after vaccination and were analyzed by liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MDA titre was detected in the serum of piglets at 21 and 42 days of age after farrowing of the vaccinated sows. Results: On 28 days after vaccination, serum samples of 83.33% vaccinated pigs showed the desirable level of antibody titer (log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution, whereas 100% animals showed log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution after 42 days of vaccination. Animals received a booster dose at 28 and 180 days post vaccination showed stable high-level antibody titre till the end of the study period. Further, piglets born from pigs vaccinated 1 month after conception showed the desirable level of MDA up to 42 days of age. Conclusion: CSF causes major losses in pig industry. Lapinised vaccines against CSFV are used routinely in endemic countries. In the present study, a cell culture adapted live attenuated vaccine has been evaluated. Based on the level of humoral immune response of vaccinated pigs and MDA titer in piglets born from immunized sows, it may be concluded that the more effective vaccination schedule for prevention of CSF is primary vaccination at 2 months of age followed by booster vaccination at 28 and 180 days post primary vaccination and at 1 month of gestation.

  2. [Factors associated with willingness to be vaccinated against pandemic flu A/H1N1 in the adult population of the Health Department of Elche (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuells, J; Caballero, P; Nolasco, A; Montagud, E

    2012-01-01

    To assess, in the general population, the information sources, attitudes and willingness to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 in 2009. We carried out a cross sectional study between 25th November and 30th December 2009, through face to face interviews with a random sample (826) of adults resident in the Health Department of Elche (Spain). Respondents reported that television (57%) and the family doctor (47.9%) were their main sources of information about vaccinations. Eighty-two point two percent had a good opinion of vaccinations, 30.5% perceived A/H1N1 to be more severe than seasonal flu, with a higher rate among older and less educated people. Twenty-five point four percent of respondents were concerned about contracting it, especially among the less educated. Forty-two point one percent expressed their willingness to be vaccinated against seasonal flu. Eighteen point four percent intended to be vaccinated against A/H1N1. The bias towards vaccination increases with age and in the case of A/H1N1 decreases among more educated people. The family doctor was the main source of information when people wanted to be immunized against seasonal flu (OR = 1.43) and A/H1N1 (OR = 2.47). Low acceptance of the pandemic vaccination and low perceived severity of influenza A/H1N1. Previous vaccination experience with seasonal flu creates a predisposition to immunization against A/H1N1. Although the media were the leading source of information during this period, the family doctor's influence on their decision to be vaccinated was significant.

  3. Third generation DIVA vaccine towards classical swine fever virus. Efficacy in face of maternal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova

    antibodies that are significant part of the protection. However, vaccination with the only live attenuated vaccines existing on the market that contain a whole CSF virus (CSFV) with reduced infectivity, leads to production of an antibody response that does not differ from the antibody response developed...... after infection. Thus, implementation of these vaccines in case of outbreak will not give the possibility to differentiate infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA). For countries like Denmark, which are heavily dependent upon export of pigs and pig products the use of these traditional vaccines......General purpose and objectives Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious disease that causes huge economical losses and animal welfare concerns worldwide. Generally, vaccination is an effective and safe method to control the disease. Following vaccination the pig’s immune system develops...

  4. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  5. Immuogenicity and safety of a natural rough mutant of Brucella suis as a vaccine for swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and clearance of the natural rough mutant of Brucella suis strain 353-1 (353-1) as a vaccine in domestic swine. In three studies encompassing 155 animals, pigs were inoculated with 353-1 by conjunctival (5 x 10**7 CFU), p...

  6. Caring for Your Child's Cold or Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Caring for Your Child’s Cold or Flu Page Content ​Unfortunately, there's no cure for the ... Liquid Medicine Safely for more information.​ Prevention & Treatment: Flu vaccine Children 6 months or older should get ...

  7. Bye-Bye Flu Shot, Hello Patch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166897.html Bye-Bye Flu Shot, Hello Patch? Early results look promising for ... TUESDAY, June 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental flu vaccine patch with dissolving microneedles appears safe and ...

  8. Approaches and Perspectives for Development of African Swine Fever Virus Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Arias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is a complex disease of swine, caused by a large DNA virus belonging to the family Asfarviridae. The disease shows variable clinical signs, with high case fatality rates, up to 100%, in the acute forms. ASF is currently present in Africa and Europe where it circulates in different scenarios causing a high socio-economic impact. In most affected regions, control has not been effective in part due to lack of a vaccine. The availability of an effective and safe ASFV vaccines would support and enforce control–eradication strategies. Therefore, work leading to the rational development of protective ASF vaccines is a high priority. Several factors have hindered vaccine development, including the complexity of the ASF virus particle and the large number of proteins encoded by its genome. Many of these virus proteins inhibit the host’s immune system thus facilitating virus replication and persistence. We review previous work aimed at understanding ASFV–host interactions, including mechanisms of protective immunity, and approaches for vaccine development. These include live attenuated vaccines, and “subunit” vaccines, based on DNA, proteins, or virus vectors. In the shorter to medium term, live attenuated vaccines are the most promising and best positioned candidates. Gaps and future research directions are evaluated.

  9. Efficacy of a novel Pasteurella multocida vaccine against progressive atrophic rhinitis of swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Liao, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chienjin; Winton, James R.; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Chiou, Chwei-Jang; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Maw-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of a novel vaccine composed of three short recombinant subunit Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) proteins in combination with a bi-valent P. multocida whole-cell bacterin (rsPMT–PM) was evaluated in field studies for prevention and control of progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) of swine at 15 conventional farrow-to-finish farms. Experimental piglets that were immunized twice with the rsPMT–PM vaccine developed detectable titers of neutralizing antibodies (greater than 1:8) that prevented the growth retardation and pathological lesions typically observed following challenge with authentic PMT. A total of 542 sows were vaccinated once or twice prior to parturition and serum neutralizing antibody titers were evaluated. Both single and double vaccination protocols induced neutralizing antibody titers of 1:16 or higher in 62% and 74% of sows, respectively. Notably, neither sows nor piglets at a farm experiencing a severe outbreak of PAR at the time of the vaccination trial had detectable antibody titers, but antibody titers increased significantly to 1:16 or higher in 40% of sows following double vaccination. During the year after vaccination, clinical signs of PAR decreased in fattening pigs and growth performance improved sufficiently to reduce the rearing period until marketing by 2 weeks. Collectively, these results indicate that the rsPMT–PM vaccine could be used to provide protective immunity for controlling the prevalence and severity of PAR among farm-raised swine.

  10. Attitudes of the medical students from two Czech universities to pandemic flu A (H1N1) 2009 and to influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomáskov, Hana; Bohácová, Sylva; Slachtová, Hana

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to find out the approach of students to vaccination against seasonal influenza, how they perceived risk associated with influenza pandemic, and whether the pandemic influenced their approach to vaccination against seasonal flu. Data collection was conducted through an anonymous questionnaire survey. Distribution and collection of questionnaires took place from November to December 2010 at the medical faculties of two universities. Out of the total 360 distributed questionnaires, 343 were filled. The qualitative data were analysed using chi2 test and Fisher's exact test. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and two-sample t-test were used for the evaluation of quantitative data. Statistical tests were performed at a significance level of 5% in STATA 10. The proportion of students regularly vaccinated against seasonal flu was low (4%). Students rated the risk of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in 2009 as relatively low and an interest in vaccination did not increase even during the pandemic and consequently only 5% expressed their interest to get vaccinated during the pandemic. However, only 3% of respondents were vaccinated at the time of vaccine availability. In the following year, only 5% of respondents planned to get vaccinated against seasonal influenza. The results of the questionnaire study indicate that young people have not perceived vaccination against influenza as an important anti-epidemic measure and their opinion have not changed even during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in 2009.

  11. Influence of maternal antibodies on efficacy of a subunit vaccine: transmission of classical swine fever virus between pigs vaccinated at 2 weeks of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkenberg, D.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Smit, de A.J.; Bouma, A.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    This study shows the effectiveness of vaccination with an E2 subunit vaccine against classical swine fever (CSF) in 2-week-old piglets. Half of the piglets were carrying maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) at the time of vaccination. Three and 6 months later, antibody levels were compared between

  12. Flu & You: Preventive Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Preventive Steps Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... for infants should be vaccinated instead. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs. Try ...

  13. A corn-based delivery system for animal vaccines: an oral transmissible gastroenteritis virus vaccine boosts lactogenic immunity in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamphear, Barry J; Jilka, Joseph M; Kesl, Lyle; Welter, Mark; Howard, John A; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2004-06-23

    Recombinant plant expression systems offer a means to produce large quantities of selected antigens for subunit vaccines. Cereals are particularly well-suited expression vehicles since the expressed proteins can be stored at relatively high concentrations for extended periods of time without degradation and dry seed can be formulated into oral vaccines suitable for commercial applications. A subunit vaccine candidate directed against porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus and expressed in corn seed has been developed for oral delivery to swine. Here, we show that this vaccine, when administered to previously sensitized gilts, can boost neutralizing antibody levels in the animals' serum, colostrum and milk. Thus, this vaccine candidate is effective at boosting lactogenic immunity and is appropriate to pursue through large-scale field trials preceding commercialization.

  14. VACCINE IMMUNIZATION FOR PREVENTION OF PNEUMOCOCCAL, HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE AND FLU AMONG SICKLY CHILDREN, WHO OFTEN SUFFER FROM PERSISTENT HETEROSPECIFIC INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF THE BRONCHOPULMONARY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Ilienko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Among serious diseases of the lower respiratory tract a special place is taken by pneumonias and chronic infectious respiratory diseases caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae type b (HIB. The research purpose is to determine the effectiveness of vaccine combined application to treat sickly children, who often suffer from persistent infectious pathology of the respiratory tract, for flu, pneumococcal and HIB disease. 110 children aged between 3 and 12 have been vaccinated. The first part of research implied children vaccination by means of Actahib and Pneumo 23 vaccines (Sanofi Pasteur, France, the second one consisted in immunization of children with the same pathology by means of Pneumo 23, Actahib and Vaxigrip vaccines (Sanofi Pasteur, France. The researches established that within a year after HIB and Pneumo 23 vaccination the frequency of upper and lower respiratory tract acerbations reduced by 2,3 times on average; likewise, the number of system antimicrobial dosage reduced by 7,4 times along with the total duration of dosage; the carrier state of S. pneumoniae reduced by 3,7 times, H. influenzae — by 3,9 times. In the course of application of three vaccines, the frequency of persistent heat erospecific infectious bronchopulmonary pathology acerbations reduced by 3,3 times. The carrier state of S. pneumoniae reduced by 2,5 times, H. influenzae — by 4,1 times. Thus, vaccine immunization to treat for flu, pneumococcal and HIB disease in various combinations may be recoma mended for wider application to reduce the frequency and severity of heat erospecific infectious respiratory diseases among sickly children, who often suffer from various illnesses.Key words: children with recurrent diseases, vaccination, prevention, flu, H. Influenzae, S. pneumoniae.

  15. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... What is inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months through 8 years of age may need two ...

  16. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are at High Risk of Developing Complications from ...

  17. The future of influenza A virus vaccines for swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic losses due to influenza A virus (IAV) infections are substantial and a global problem, ranking among the top three major health challenges in the swine industry. Currently, H1 and H3 subtypes circulate in pigs globally associated with different combinations of N1 and N2 subtypes; however, t...

  18. Understanding Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Flu Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... McClain Whether the topic is seasonal influenza, bird flu or something called a pandemic, everyone seems to ...

  19. Communicating to increase public uptake of pandemic flu vaccination in the UK: Which messages work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Fiona; Marcu, Afrodita; Godinho, Cristina A; Michie, Susan; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-06-14

    Vaccination is considered the most effective preventive measure against influenza transmission, yet vaccination rates during the 2009/10 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic were low across the world, with the majority of people declining to receive the vaccine. Despite extensive research on the predictors of uptake of influenza vaccination, little research has focused on testing the effectiveness of evidence and theory-based messages. To examine the persuasiveness of messages promoting vaccination and antiviral use either as health-enhancing or as risk-reducing, as well as messages which conveyed evidence-based information about the costs and benefits of vaccination, or which applied anticipated regret as a motivator for vaccine uptake. We conducted 11 focus groups with forty-one members of the general population in England including young and older adults, those with lower education, parents, and those with elevated health risk. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The factual, evidence-based messages were well received with participants finding them the most convincing and useful, particularly where they gave cost-benefit comparisons. Health-enhancing messages were received with scepticism and concern that the messages were not honest about the potential lack of safety of vaccination. In contrast, risk-reduction messages were perceived as being more balanced and credible. Messages aiming to elicit feelings of anticipated regret for not getting vaccinated were generally perceived as patronising and unprofessional. Vaccination messages should be kept brief, but convey balanced, evidence-based information, and be transparent in their communication of potential side-effects. The general public seem to prefer messages that are factual and emphasise the costs and benefits of vaccination, particularly with regards to vaccine safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Wolfberry, or goji berry, has been shown to improve immune response including enhanced antibody production in response to vaccination in the aged; however, it is not known if this effect of wolfberry would tran...

  1. Benefits of pharmacist-led flu vaccination services in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkdale, C L; Nebout, G; Megerlin, F; Thornley, T

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of excess winter deaths and increased hospital admissions. There is a high level of economic burden associated with the infection. Although vaccination targets have been set to tackle this international issue, many countries struggle to reach these coverage targets for their at-risk populations using traditional delivery methods. Traditional providers include family doctors and nurses; however, pharmacist-led influenza vaccination has become a more commonly utilised aid to support vaccination targets. Community pharmacies are convenient and widely accessible and evaluations consistently demonstrate that patients are satisfied with pharmacist-led vaccinations. Allowing community pharmacists to administer influenza vaccination as an alternative option for delivery helps to increase the coverage rate of vaccination. In addition, commissioning community pharmacists to provide this service has been shown to contribute to achieving targets for those at-risk. Pharmacist-led influenza vaccination services can create value for payors and reduce pressure on health systems. This review aims to demonstrate the success of pharmacy-led influenza vaccinations, and the impact it has had in driving up immunisation rates within other countries. Experiences of countries such as England, Portugal and the United States provide evidence to demonstrate the benefit to both the patient and the health system. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Flu vaccination in elite athletes: A survey among Serie A soccer teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Carlo; Odone, Anna; Miduri, Alessia; Cella, Paola; Pasquarella, Cesira; Gozzini, Armando; Tamburrino, Pasquale; Castellacci, Enrico

    2016-09-13

    Scant data is available on immunization policies and practices among professional athletes. Following up on a recent review on the topic, we conducted a survey among Italian Serie A soccer teams during the influenza season 2015-16, to explore vaccination practices and attitudes as well as influenza vaccine uptake. The survey covered a sample of over 600 professional athletes from 20 teams and was carried out in collaboration with the Italian Association of Physicians of Professional Football Teams (L.A.M.I.CA.). For each team, the head of the medical staff was interviewed (structured telephone interviews, 100% response rate). Seasonal influenza vaccine was actively offered in 75% of Serie A teams with a median coverage rate of 40% (range 0%-100%). Vaccines are often administered after matches or training sessions. We report vaccine hesitancy associated with fear of adverse events, poor communication and other selected determinants. Vaccination in elite athletes, if correctly managed, represents a powerful, cost-effective and long lasting preventive tool. In times where vaccines are losing public confidence, our findings are a useful basis to inform the planning, implementation and evaluation of interventions to promote prevention in sports medicine.

  3. Seasonal Flu and Staph Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Seasonal Flu and Staph Infection Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend ... Compartir Staphylococcus aureus , often referred to simply as “staph,” are bacteria commonly carried on the skin or ...

  4. [Burden of influenza virus type B and mismatch with the flu vaccine in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiros-Bouza, Jose Ma; Pérez-Rubio, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Since the 80s two lineages of type B viruses are co - circulating in the world. Antigenic differences between them are important and it leads to lack of cross-reactivity. The impact on the burden of disease due to influenza B virus, poor foresight in estimating which of the two lineages of B viruses circulate in the season, and the consequent lack of immunity in case of including the wrong strain make that the availability of the quadrivalent vaccine is very useful. The aim of this paper is to analyze the past influenza seasons in Spain to assess the burden of disease, divergence between the vaccine strain and the circulating B and viral characteristics associated with type B in each seasonal epidemic. Review of all reports issued by the Influenza Surveillance System in Spain since the 2003-2004 season to 2012-2013. Over the past influenza seasons, although type A was present mostly, circulation of influenza B virus in each season was observed, even being co - dominant in some of them. In a high number of seasons the divergence between the vaccine strain and the circulating strain lineage has been observed The protective effect of influenza vaccine has varied depending on the type / subtype of influenza virus studied. The vaccine effectiveness against influenza infection by influenza B virus has varied greatly depending on the season analyzed.

  5. Birth outcomes for Australian mother-infant pairs who received an influenza vaccine during pregnancy, 2012-2014: The FluMum study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Lisa; Andrews, Ross M; Lambert, Stephen B; Viney, Kerri A; Wood, Nicholas; Perrett, Kirsten P; Marshall, Helen S; Richmond, Peter; O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F

    2017-03-07

    In Australia, influenza vaccination is recommended for all women who will be pregnant during the influenza season. Vaccine safety and effectiveness are key concerns and influencers of uptake for both vaccine providers and families. We assessed the safety of receiving an influenza vaccination during any trimester of pregnancy with respect to preterm births and infant birthweight. We conducted a nested retrospective cohort study of 'FluMum' participants (2012-2014). Our primary exposure of interest was influenza vaccination during pregnancy. The primary outcomes of interest were infant birthweight and weeks' gestation at birth for live singleton infants. Analyses included comparisons of these birth outcomes by vaccination status and trimester of pregnancy an influenza vaccine was given. We calculated means, proportions, and relative risks and performed multivariable logistic regression for potential confounding factors. In the 7126 mother-infant pairs enrolled in this study, mean maternal age at infant birth was 31.7years. Influenza vaccine uptake in pregnancy was 34%. Most mothers with a known date of vaccination received a vaccine in the second trimester (51%). Those mothers with a co-morbidity or risk factor were 13% more likely to have influenza vaccine during pregnancy compared to other mothers (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.24, p=0.007). Mean weeks' gestation at birth was 38.7 for the vaccinated and 38.8 for the unvaccinated group (p=0.051). Infants in the vaccinated group weighed 15g less in birthweight compared to the unvaccinated infants (95% CI -12.8 to 42.2, p=0.29). Results arising from this large Australian cohort study are reassuring with respect to two critical safety outcomes; preterm births and low infant birthweights. Studies examining a broader range of birth outcomes following influenza vaccination during pregnancy are required, particularly now that maternal vaccination in pregnancy has expanded to include pertussis as well as influenza. Copyright

  6. Flu Preparations Underscore Schools' Key Role in Vaccinations: Research Confirms Exemptions Lead to Higher Disease Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of each school year, the school-nurse coordinator for the 3,000-student Ashland, Oregon, district plans a "parent's night" around the topic of vaccinations for the safety and health of children. That is only the beginning of the school-nurse coordinator's contact with parents who are skeptical about the necessity of…

  7. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances the protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Junpeng; Niu, Xinli; Smith, Donald; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2014-02-01

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Although wolfberry (goji berry) has been shown to improve immune response, including enhanced antibody production, after vaccination in the aged, it is not known if this effect would translate to better protection after influenza infection, nor is its underlying mechanism well understood. To address these issues, we conducted a study using a 2 × 2 design in which aged male mice (20-22 mo) were fed a control or a 5% wolfberry diet for 30 d, then immunized with an influenza vaccine or saline (control) on days 31 and 52 of the dietary intervention, and finally challenged with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus. Mice fed wolfberry had higher influenza antibody titers and improved symptoms (less postinfection weight loss) compared with the mice treated by vaccine alone. Furthermore, an in vitro mechanistic study showed that wolfberry supplementation enhanced maturation and activity of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in aged mice, as indicated by phenotypic change in expression of DC activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD) 40, CD80, and CD86, and functional change in DC production of cytokines interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α as well as DC endocytosis. Also, adoptive transfer of wolfberry-treated bone marrow DCs (loaded with ovalbumin(323-339)-peptide) promoted antigen-specific T cell proliferation as well as interleukin-4 and interferon-γ production in CD4(+) T cells. In summary, our data indicate that dietary wolfberry enhances the efficacy of influenza vaccination, resulting in better host protection to prevent subsequent influenza infection; this effect may be partly attributed to improved DC function.

  8. VACCINATION AGAINST FLU, PNEUMOCOCCAL, MENINGOCOCCAL AND HIB INFECTION OF THE SICKLY CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    L.S. Namazova; V. K. Tatochenko; S.G. Aleksina; M.G. Galitskaya; Z.A. Izvol'skaya; M.V. Fedoseenko; N.I. Voznesenskaya

    2007-01-01

    This manual for doctors contains modern information about the spread of pneumotropic infections, their participation in the pathogenesis of acute diseases among children, possibilities for their prevention and treatment. Special detailed description is given to the methods of immune prevention, including specific one. The authors indicate all the registered and to be registered in russia russian and foreign vaccines, methods of their injection, possible unfavourable events. especially interes...

  9. Vaccine Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list . Showing availability for 25,354 locations. Influenza Vaccine Recommended for everyone greater than or equal to ... which one may be right for you! Flu Vaccines Protects again influenza, commonly called flu, a respiratory ...

  10. Protective efficacy of a Classical swine fever virus C-strain deletion mutant and ability to differentiate invected from vaccinated animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, J.A.; Ketelaar, J.H.E.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) continues to be the most economically damaging pig disease in the world. The disease can be effectively controlled by vaccination with the live C-strain vaccine. This vaccine, however, does not enable the serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals

  11. Vaccination of swine with an inactivated porcine parvovirus vaccine in the presence of passive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P S; Mengeling, W L

    1986-02-15

    A study was conducted to determine whether low hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) titers (1:5) for porcine parvovirus (PPV) block the development of immune response to a PPV vaccine. Pigs with low (1:5), medium (1:10 or 1:20), or high (1:40 or 1:80) titers were obtained by IV injections with various amounts of PPV immune serum. Pigs were inoculated with 1 or 2 doses of vaccine and were monitored for serum HI antibodies to PPV. Pigs with low titers responded to vaccine just as well as did the seronegative pigs. The HI titers of pigs with medium titers did not increase after first vaccination. After the second vaccination, however, their titers increased and were similar to those of pigs with low titers. High titers blocked the response to vaccination. The pigs that received 2 doses of vaccine had higher titers than did those of pigs that received 1 dose of vaccine. The results indicated that low titers, which would be expected in gilts at the time of vaccination, do not interfere with immunization by the inactivated PPV vaccine, and that 2 doses of vaccine may provide better and longer lasting immune response to inactivated PPV vaccine and probably longer lasting immunity against PPV-induced reproductive failure.

  12. Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs Language: English (US) ... her eyes, nose, or mouth. 6. Practice other good health habits. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at ...

  13. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  14. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  15. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  16. E-Learning's Potential Scrutinized in Flu Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie; Davis, Michelle R.

    2009-01-01

    The closing of hundreds of U.S. schools in recent weeks because of concerns about swine flu underscores the need for administrators to make plans for continuing their students' education during any extended shutdown, emergency experts and federal officials say. Fears about a severe flu pandemic had eased as of late last week, but experts say…

  17. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES.

  18. New knowledge in application of vaccines with Kina(Kstrain in control and curbing of classical swine fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanov Jasna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The program of curbing and outrooting classical swine fever (CSF in our country has for years been based on the vaccination of all categories of swine with the Kina (K strain of the CSF virus, and, after the establishment of the source of infection, with the non-harmful removal of the infected swine herd, as well as on the implementation of all measures prescribed by the valid regulations. However, in spite of the implementation of all the listed measures, CSF still occurs continually. The epizootiological situation in our country in the course of 2005 was extremely unfavorable from the aspect of the number of identified CSF crisis spots, and it can be pointed out at this time that the disease was diagnosed clinically, pathomorphologically and using laboratory methods in 51 farms in a single examined epizootiological district. Under conditions when CSF appears continually throughout the year, vaccination using a modified live vaccine must continue being the basic measure in preventing the appearance, spreading, curbing, and eradication of CSF. With the objective of securing a concept of the most efficient further strategy for control and curbing of this disease, the paper presents the most important aspects regarding efficacy, safety, as well as field experience in applying vaccines which are based on the K strain of the CSF virus. .

  19. Spying the neutralizing epitopes on E2 N-terminal by candidate epitope-vaccines against classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Nan; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2006-05-08

    Our previous study proved that the N-terminal (aa693-711) of glycoprotein E2 contained sequential neutralizing epitopes. In this study, four candidate epitope-vaccines (EVs) were separately prepared and evaluated. Among them, epitope-vaccine EV-BC1a (BC1a: aa693-699) induced high level of epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies and exhibited similar protective capability with that induced by Chinese vaccine strain (C-strain). These results confirmed CKEDYRY (aa693-699) as a principal sequential neutralizing epitope on E2 N-terminal. Moreover, these findings also indicate that epitope-vaccine is a potent candidate strategy for marker vaccine against classical swine fever virus (CSFV).

  20. Strategies for differentiating infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA) for foot-and-mouth disease, classical swine fever and avian influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Parida, Satya; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2010-01-01

    The prophylactic use of vaccines against exotic viral infections in production animals is undertaken exclusively in regions where the disease concerned is endemic. In such areas, the infection pressure is very high and so, to assure optimal protection, the most efficient vaccines are used. However......, in areas considered to be free from these diseases and in which there is the possibility of only limited outbreaks, the use of Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA) or marker vaccines allows for vaccination while still retaining the possibility of serological surveillance...... for the presence of infection. This literature review describes the current knowledge on the use of DIVA diagnostic strategies for three important transboundary animal diseases: foot-and-mouth disease in cloven-hoofed animals, classical swine fever in pigs and avian influenza in poultry....

  1. FluView National Flu Activity Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The FluView National Flu Activity Map is a complementary widget to the state-by-state flu map widget introduced in the 2007-2008 flu season. This interactive map...

  2. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Romio (Silvana); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); H.K. Olberg (Henning); C.S. de Vries (Corinne); C. Sammon (Cormac); N.J. Andrews (Nick); H. Svanström (Henrik); D. Mølgaard-Nielsen (Ditte); A. Hviid (Anders); M. Lapeyre-Mestre (Maryse); A. Sommet (Agnès); C. Saussier (Christel); A. Castot (Anne); H. Heijbel (Harald); L. Arnheim-Dahlström (Lisen); P. Sparen (Pär); M. Mosseveld (Mees); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); N.A.T. van der Maas (Nicoline); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); T. Leino (Tuija); T. Kilpi (Terhi); J. Storsaeter (Jann); K. Johansen (Kari); P Kramarz (Piotr); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following

  3. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Romio, Silvana; Weibel, Daniel; Dieleman, Jeanne; Olberg, Henning; Vries, Corinne; Sammon, Cormac; Anews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Pär; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09...

  4. Pandemic Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Pandemic Influenza Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir An influenza pandemic is a global outbreak of a new influenza A virus. Pandemics happen when new (novel) influenza A viruses emerge which are able to ...

  5. Treating Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Influenza (Flu) Information for People at High Risk for Flu Complications Do you have Asthma, Diabetes, or Chronic Heart Disease? ... risk of serious illness if you get the flu. Asthma, diabetes and chronic heart disease were among ...

  6. Preventing Flu During Pregnancy (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-26

    During the influenza season, pregnant women and infants under 6 months old are especially susceptible to severe complications from the flu. The seasonal flu vaccination is the best way to protect both mother and baby. In this podcast Dr. Stacie Greby discusses the importance of pregnant women receiving the flu vaccine.  Created: 9/26/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/26/2013.

  7. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Misconceptions about Seasonal Flu and Flu Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virus Testing Clinical Signs & Symptoms of Influenza Symptoms & Laboratory Diagnosis Information for Clinicians on Rapid Diagnostic Testing for ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  9. Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. The Underrecognized Burden of Influenza in Young Children. The New England Journal of Medicine 2006; 355:31-4 American Indian and Alaskan Native children These children are more likely to have severe ...

  10. Seasonal flu vaccination in Dutch at-risk populations was not affected by A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Mulder, J.; Verheij, R.A.; Heijnen, M.L.A.; Campbell, S.M.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    We read with interest the recent paper by Maurer and colleagues describing the attitudes toward seasonal and H1N1 vaccination and vaccination uptake among US adults (Maurer et al., 2010). They found the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) vaccine uptake as considerably lower than seasonal vaccine uptake, which

  11. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Stockhofe, N; Weesendorp, E; van Zoelen-Bos, D; Heutink, R; Quak, S; Goovaerts, D; Heldens, J G M; Maas, R; Moormann, R J; Koch, G

    2011-09-28

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named "pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009" (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to reduce exposure of human contacts with infected pigs, thereby preventing cross-species transfer, but also to protect pigs themselves, should this virus cause damage in the pig population. Three swine influenza vaccines, two of them commercially available and one experimental, were therefore tested and compared for their efficacy against an H1N1v challenge. One of the commercial vaccines is based on an American classical H1N1 influenza strain, the other is based on a European avian H1N1 influenza strain. The experimental vaccine is based on reassortant virus NYMC X179A (containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1v) and the internal genes of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)). Excretion of infectious virus was reduced by 0.5-3 log(10) by the commercial vaccines, depending on vaccine and sample type. Both vaccines were able to reduce virus replication especially in the lower respiratory tract, with less pathological lesions in vaccinated and subsequently challenged pigs than in unvaccinated controls. In pigs vaccinated with the experimental vaccine, excretion levels of infectious virus in nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, were at or below 1 log(10)TCID(50) per swab and lasted for only 1 or 2 days. An inactivated vaccine containing the HA and NA of an H1N1v is able to protect pigs from an infection with H1N1v, whereas swine influenza vaccines that are currently available are of limited efficaciousness. Whether vaccination of pigs against H1N1v will become opportune remains to be seen and will depend on future evolution of this strain in the pig population. Close monitoring of the pig population, focussing on presence and evolution of

  12. Swine torque teno virus detection in pig commercial vaccines, enzymes for laboratory use and human drugs containing components of porcine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekarainen, Tuija; Martínez-Guinó, Laura; Segalés, Joaquim

    2009-03-01

    Torque teno viruses (TTVs) are vertebrate infecting, single-stranded circular DNA viruses. Two genetically distinct TTV genogroups (TTV1 and TTV2) infect swine worldwide with high prevalence. Currently, swine TTVs are considered non-pathogenic, although TTV2 has been linked to post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, a porcine circovirus disease. On the other hand, pig materials are an important source of components used in porcine vaccine manufacturing, human drugs and commercial enzyme products. However, there is little information about the possible existence of extraneous viruses in products containing porcine-derived components. In the present study, 26 commercial swine vaccines, seven human drugs and three enzyme products from porcine origin were tested for the presence of TTV1 and TTV2 genomes by PCR. Four vaccines against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were positive for TTV2 by PCR. Three M. hyopneumoniae, one porcine parvovirus and one porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccines were PCR positive for TTV1. One human drug contained TTV1 DNA as well as a trypsin enzyme; a porcine-derived elastase product was positive for both TTV genogroups. These results show that swine TTVs are contaminants not only of swine vaccines but also of human drugs containing porcine components and enzymes for laboratory use.

  13. The nonadaptive nature of the H1N1 2009 Swine Flu pandemic contrasts with the adaptive facilitation of transmission to a new host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussamad Juwaeriah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza pandemic followed a multiple reassortment event from viruses originally circulating in swines and humans, but the adaptive nature of this emergence is poorly understood. Results Here we base our analysis on 1180 complete genomes of H1N1 viruses sampled in North America between 2000 and 2010 in swine and human hosts. We show that while transmission to a human host might require an adaptive phase in the HA and NA antigens, the emergence of the 2009 pandemic was essentially nonadaptive. A more detailed analysis of the NA protein shows that the 2009 pandemic sequence is characterized by novel epitopes and by a particular substitution in loop 150, which is responsible for a nonadaptive structural change tightly associated with the emergence of the pandemic. Conclusions Because this substitution was not present in the 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus, we posit that the emergence of pandemics is due to epistatic interactions between sites distributed over different segments. Altogether, our results are consistent with population dynamics models that highlight the epistatic and nonadaptive rise of novel epitopes in viral populations, followed by their demise when the resulting virus is too virulent.

  14. Flu: A Guide for Parents of Children or Adolescents with Chronic Health Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they get a flu shot. What types of vaccine should my child receive and how many doses? Children with or ... with chronic health conditions, get a seasonal flu vaccine. Additional Information & Resources: Preventing the Flu: Resources for Parents & Child Care Providers Preventing the Spread of Illness in ...

  15. Evaluation of classical swine fever virus antibody detection assays with an emphasis on the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, S.; von Rosen, Tanya; Blome, S.

    2012-01-01

    vaccinated animals (DIVA). The Chekit* CSF-Sero and the HerdChek* CSFV Ab, both of which detect antibodies against the E2 protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), had the highest sensitivity. Both tests were practicable and showed good reproducibility. Comparable sensitivity was shown by the Chekit......* CSF-Marker, an Erns ELISA. However, this test does not allow differentiation between antibodies directed against ruminant pestiviruses and those against CSFV. Therefore, it is not suitable for use with the chimeric marker vaccines tested. The PrioCHECK® CSFV Erns was the only ELISA suitable for use...... in DIVA with marker vaccines containing Erns proteins from ruminant pestiviruses. However, this test was less sensitive and selective than the E2-ELISAs and cannot be recommended....

  16. Los encuadres sanitarios en prensa. Gripe A y bacteria e.coli. / The Sanitary framing in Spanish press: Swine flu virus and E. coli bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma López Villafranca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEn la siguiente investigación se analizan los encuadres sobre dos crisis sanitarias, gripe A y bacteria e.coli en prensa, en los diarios de mayor tirada; El País, El Mundo y ABC. En este estudio se refleja cómo se produce un enfoque muy distinto de ambas crisis y la influencia en estos encuadres e importancia de las fuentes institucionales como principales portadoras de información frente a las fuentes sanitarias o científicas, con escasa relevancia para la prensa española.AbstractThe following analysis is focused on the approach made by newspapers such as El País, El Mundo and ABC about the sanitary crisis of A Flu and E.coli bacteria. The methodology used is the analysis of content of a wide range of news samples generated during both crisis. As a result of this analysis it is made clear that both crises have been approached by Spanish press in different ways, giving more importance to government and official sources in opposition to the lack of relevance given to scientific or sanitary ones.

  17. Evaluation of Oral Bait Vaccine Efficacy Against Classical Swine Fever in Village Backyard Pig Farms in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, V R; Stegeman, J A; Dukpa, K; Gurung, R B; Loeffen, W L A

    2016-12-01

    Control and eradication of classical swine fever (CSF) in countries with a high proportion of backyard holdings is a challenge. Conventional attenuated Chinese C-strain vaccines, though safe and effective, are difficult to use in backyard farms due to various practical reasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the CSF oral bait vaccine in village backyard pig farms and to assess the farmers' knowledge on CSF and motivation on using oral vaccines. The pigs were fed the bait by the farmers themselves; one bait was given on day 0, followed by second bait on the next day. Seventy-three per cent (140 of 193 pigs) of vaccinated pigs had either a slight (2-fold-3-fold; 60 pigs) or significant (at least 4-fold; 80 pigs) increase of the antibody titre against CSFV. A significant increase of the antibody titres was mainly observed in pigs with no pre-vaccination titre (OR = 12, 95% CI = 4-40). The number of pigs with protective antibody titres (≥40) rose from 47 (24%) to 115 (60%) following vaccination. Only 30% of the farmers claimed to be familiar with CSF, although clinical signs they mentioned were rather unspecific and could relate to many other pig diseases. Most of the farmers claimed to be motivated to use oral vaccines if made available. The oral vaccine could be a substitute for the conventional attenuated CSF vaccines in areas where it is logistically difficult for veterinarians to visit. It may therefore be a useful tool to combat endemic CSF disease in regions where the disease continues to have a serious impact on the backyard farmers who depend on pig farming for their sustenance and livelihoods. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccine confers early and full protection against FMDV O1 Manisa in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Sainz, Ignacio; Medina, Gisselle N; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Koster, Marla J; Grubman, Marvin J; de Los Santos, Teresa

    2017-02-01

    A human adenovirus (Ad5) vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O1-Manisa subunit vaccine (Ad5-O1Man) was engineered to deliver FMDV O1-Manisa capsid and capsid-processing proteins. Swine inoculated with Ad5-O1Man developed an FMDV-specific humoral response as compared to animals inoculated with an empty Ad5-vector. Vaccinated animals were completely protected against homologous challenge at 7 or 21 days post-vaccination. Potency studies exhibited a PD50 of about 107 pfu/animal while a dose of 4×107pfu/animal fully protected swine against FMDV intradermal challenge. In-vitro cross-neutralization analysis distinctly predicted that swine vaccinated with Ad5-O1Man would be protected against challenge with homologous FMDV O1Man Middle East-South Asia (ME-SA) topotype and also against recent outbreak strains of Mya-98 South East Asia (SEA) lineage including O1-UK-2001 and O1-South Korea-2010. These results indicate that recombinant Ad5-O1Man is an effective, safe and cross-reacting vaccine that could potentially be used preventively and in outbreak situations, to control FMDV O Mya-98 lineage in swine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Ceftiofur hydrochloride affects the humoral and cellular immune response in pigs after vaccination against swine influenza and pseudorabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Czyżewska-Dors, Ewelina; Kwit, Krzysztof; Wierzchosławski, Karol; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2015-10-22

    Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are active against many Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. Beyond their antibacterial activity, they are reported to have various immunomodulatory properties. It has been shown that they reduce the secretion of cytokines as well as influence the humoral and cellular immune response. In the field conditions antibiotics are frequently administered at the same time as vaccines in pigs and, in the view of their potential immunomodulatory properties, it is important to examine their effect on the development and persistence of the post-vaccinal immune response. Ceftiofur is a very popular veterinary medicine third-generation cephalosporin with a broad spectrum of activity. It has been shown that it can inhibit cytokines secretion and in this way can potentially affect host immune response. The influence of ceftiofur on the immune response has not yet been investigated in pigs. In the present study we evaluated the influence of therapeutic doses of ceftiofur hydrochloride on the post-vaccinal immune response after vaccination with two model vaccines (live and inactivated). Seventy pigs were divided into five groups: control, unvaccinated (C), control vaccinated against swine influenza (SI-V), control vaccinated against pseudorabies (PR-V), vaccinated against SI during ceftiofur administration (SI-CEF) and vaccinated against PR during ceftiofur administration (PR-CEF). Pigs from SICEF and PR-CEF groups received therapeutic dose of ceftiofur for five days. Pigs from SI-CEF, PR-CEF, SIV and PR-V groups were vaccinated against SI and PR. Antibodies to PRV were determined with the use of blocking ELISA tests (IDEXX Laboratories, USA). Humoral responses to SIV were assessed based on haemagglutination inhibition assay. T-cell response was analyzed with the use of proliferation test. The concentrations of IFN- γ and IL-4 in culture supernatant were determined with the use of ELISA kits Invitrogen Corporation, USA). The

  20. How Does Seasonal Flu Differ From Pandemic Flu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues How Does Seasonal Flu Differ From Pandemic Flu? Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Seasonal Flu Pandemic Flu Outbreaks follow predictable seasonal patterns; occurs ...

  1. Multiple linear B-cell epitopes of classical swine fever virus glycoprotein E2 expressed in E.coli as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Yan; Wei, Jian-Chao; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2011-07-30

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. Epitope-based vaccines is one of the current focuses in the development of new vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Two B-cell linear epitopes rE2-ba from the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV, rE2-a (CFRREKPFPHRMDCVTTTVENED, aa844-865) and rE2-b (CKEDYRYAISSTNEIGLLGAGGLT, aa693-716), were constructed and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as multiple epitope vaccine. Fifteen 6-week-old specified-pathogen-free (SPF) piglets were intramuscularly immunized with epitopes twice at 2-week intervals. All epitope-vaccinated pigs could mount an anamnestic response after booster vaccination with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256. At this time, the pigs were subjected to challenge infection with a dose of 1 × 106 TCID50 virulent CSFV strain. After challenge infection, all of the rE2-ba-immunized pigs were alive and without symptoms or signs of CSF. In contrast, the control pigs continuously exhibited signs of CSF and had to be euthanized because of severe clinical symptoms at 5 days post challenge infection. The data from in vivo experiments shown that the multiple epitope rE2-ba shown a greater protection (similar to that of HCLV vaccine) than that of mono-epitope peptide(rE2-a or rE2-b). Therefore, The results demonstrated that this multiple epitope peptide expressed in a prokaryotic system can be used as a potential DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) vaccine. The E.coli-expressed E2 multiple B-cell linear epitopes retains correct immunogenicity and is able to induce a protective immune response against CSFV infection.

  2. Multiple linear B-cell epitopes of classical swine fever virus glycoprotein E2 expressed in E.coli as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jian-Chao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. Epitope-based vaccines is one of the current focuses in the development of new vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV. Two B-cell linear epitopes rE2-ba from the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV, rE2-a (CFRREKPFPHRMDCVTTTVENED, aa844-865 and rE2-b (CKEDYRYAISSTNEIGLLGAGGLT, aa693-716, were constructed and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as multiple epitope vaccine. Fifteen 6-week-old specified-pathogen-free (SPF piglets were intramuscularly immunized with epitopes twice at 2-week intervals. All epitope-vaccinated pigs could mount an anamnestic response after booster vaccination with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256. At this time, the pigs were subjected to challenge infection with a dose of 1 × 106 TCID50 virulent CSFV strain. After challenge infection, all of the rE2-ba-immunized pigs were alive and without symptoms or signs of CSF. In contrast, the control pigs continuously exhibited signs of CSF and had to be euthanized because of severe clinical symptoms at 5 days post challenge infection. The data from in vivo experiments shown that the multiple epitope rE2-ba shown a greater protection (similar to that of HCLV vaccine than that of mono-epitope peptide(rE2-a or rE2-b. Therefore, The results demonstrated that this multiple epitope peptide expressed in a prokaryotic system can be used as a potential DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals vaccine. The E.coli-expressed E2 multiple B-cell linear epitopes retains correct immunogenicity and is able to induce a protective immune response against CSFV infection.

  3. Health and social care workers: don't risk flu infection

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    This leaflet explains why health and social care workers should receive the new flu vaccine. It provides a range of information, including how to get vaccinated, how the vaccine works, how effective it is and possible side effects.

  4. Influenza A virus in swine breeding herds: Combination of vaccination and biosecurity practices can reduce likelihood of endemic piglet reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L A; Torremorell, M; Craft, M E

    2017-03-01

    Recent modelling and empirical work on influenza A virus (IAV) suggests that piglets play an important role as an endemic reservoir. The objective of this study is to test intervention strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of IAV in piglets and ideally, preventing piglets from becoming exposed in the first place. These interventions include biosecurity measures, vaccination, and management options that swine producers may employ individually or jointly to control IAV in their herds. We have developed a stochastic Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Vaccinated (SEIRV) model that reflects the spatial organization of a standard breeding herd and accounts for the different production classes of pigs therein. Notably, this model allows for loss of immunity for vaccinated and recovered animals, and for vaccinated animals to have different latency and infectious periods from unvaccinated animals as suggested by the literature. The interventions tested include: (1) varied timing of gilt introductions to the breeding herd, (2) gilt separation (no indirect transmission to or from the gilt development unit), (3) gilt vaccination upon arrival to the farm, (4) early weaning, and (5) vaccination strategies of sows with different timing (mass and pre-farrow) and efficacy (homologous vs. heterologous). We conducted a Latin Hypercube Sampling and Partial Rank Correlation Coefficient (LHS-PRCC) analysis combined with a random forest analysis to assess the relative importance of each epidemiological parameter in determining epidemic outcomes. In concert, mass vaccination, early weaning of piglets (removal 0-7days after birth), gilt separation, gilt vaccination, and longer periods between introductions of gilts (6 months) were the most effective at reducing prevalence. Endemic prevalence overall was reduced by 51% relative to the null case; endemic prevalence in piglets was reduced by 74%; and IAV was eliminated completely from the herd in 23% of all simulations. Importantly

  5. Evaluation of a modified live-virus vaccine for the prevention of porcine parvovirus-induced reproductive disease in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P S; Mengeling, W L

    1980-12-01

    Each of 5 gilts was vaccinated IM with modified live-virus (MLV) vaccine for porcine parvovirus (PPV), and 5 gilts were used as nonvaccinated controls. Vaccinated gilts developed hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibodies to PPV (titer of 320 to 1,280) by 2 weeks after vaccination. All gilts wee bred, and at about 40 days of gestation their immunity was challenged by intranasal and oral administration of a virulent strain of PPV. Gilts were killed at about 84 days of gestation and their litters were examined. Litters from vaccinated gilts comprised 59 live and 2 dead fetuses. Neither the virus nor antibodies to the virus were detected in any of the fetuses. In contrast, litters from nonvaccinated gilts comprised 25 live and 29 dead fetuses, and PPV was isolated from all dead and 9 live fetuses. Viral antigen was detected by direct immunofluorescence in the lungs of all PPV-infected fetuses, and 7 of the live infected fetuses had HI antibodies. Modified live virus did not cause transplacental fetal infection in 3 seronegative gilts inoculated at about 40 days of gestation. All 3 gilts had antibodies to PPV (80 to 640) when killed at about 84 days of gestation, and neither HI antibodies nor PPV were detected in any of the 20 live and 1 dead fetuses from these gilts. Modified live virus replicated in the tissues of fetuses of 2 gilts inoculated in utero. Seven of 8 fetuses inoculated with MLV died and were infected. These results demonstrated the efficacy of MLV vaccine for the prevention of PPV-induced reproductive disease in swine. Although MLV did not cross the placental barrier in pregnant animals, its pathogenicity for porcine fetuses after direct in utero inoculation indicates that its use should be limited to nonpregnant animals.

  6. Preventing Flu During Pregnancy (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-26

    During the influenza season, pregnant women and infants under 6 months old are especially susceptible to severe complications from the flu. This podcast discusses the importance of pregnant women receiving the flu vaccine.  Created: 9/26/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/26/2013.

  7. OHS Helps Protect Employees During Flu Season | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flu season is in full swing, bringing a host of symptoms like congestion, coughs, fever, chills, muscle aches, and fatigue. To help NCI at Frederick employees stay healthy this year, Occupational Health Services (OHS) is offering two types of flu vaccines for free.

  8. H1N1 Flu & U.S. Schools: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A severe form of influenza known as H1N1, commonly being called swine flu, has health officials around the world concerned. In the United States, the outbreak of H1N1 has prompted school closures and cancellation of school-related events. As the flu spreads, the Department of Education encourages school leaders, parents and students to know how to…

  9. Overcoming maternal antibody interference by vaccination with human adenovirus 5 recombinant viruses expressing the hemagglutinin and the nucleoprotein of swine influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Ronald D; Lager, Kelly M

    2006-11-26

    Sows and gilts lack immunity to human adenovirus 5 (Ad-5) vectored vaccines so immunogens of swine pathogens can be expressed with these vaccines in order to immunize suckling piglets that have interfering, maternally derived antibodies. In this study 7-day-old piglets, that had suckled H3N2 infected gilts, were sham-inoculated with a non-expressing Ad-5 vector or given a primary vaccination with replication-defective Ad-5 viruses expressed the H3 hemagglutinin and the nucleoprotein of swine influenza virus (SIV) subtype H3N2. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer of the sham-inoculated group (n = 12) showed continued antibody decay whereas piglets vaccinated with Ad-5 SIV (n = 23) developed an active immune response by the second week post-vaccination. At 4 weeks-of-age when the HI titer of the sham-inoculated group had decayed to 45, the sham-inoculated group and half of the Ad-5 SIV vaccinated pigs were boosted with a commercial inactivated SIV vaccine. The boosted pigs that had been primed in the presence of maternal interfering antibodies had a strong anamnestic response while sham-inoculated pigs did not respond to the commercial vaccine. Two weeks after the booster vaccination the pigs were challenged with a non-homologous H3N2 virulent SIV. The efficacy of the vaccination protocol was demonstrated by abrogation of clinical signs, by clearance of challenge virus from pulmonary lavage fluids, by markedly reduced virus shedding in nasal secretions, and by the absence of moderate or severe SIV-induced lung lesions. These recombinant Ad-5 SIV vaccines are useful for priming the immune system to override the effects of maternally derived antibodies which interfere with conventional SIV vaccines.

  10. Fighting flu: military pathology, vaccines, and the conflicted identity of the 1918-19 pandemic in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresalier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the decisive role of British military medicine in shaping official approaches to the 1918 influenza pandemic. It contends that British approaches were defined through a system of military pathology, which had been established by the War Office as part of the mobilization of medicine for the First World War. Relying on the bacteriological laboratory for the identification and control of pathogenic agents, military pathology delivered therapeutic and preventive measures against a range of battlefield diseases, and military and civilian authorities trusted that it could do the same with influenza. This article traces how it shaped efforts to establish the etiology of the pandemic and to produce a general influenza vaccine. It highlights the challenges involved in both strategies. Understanding the central role of military pathology helps make sense of the nature, direction, scale, and limitations of medical mobilization against the pandemic in Britain and the authority accorded to specific medical bodies for elaborating and coordinating strategies. Crucially, it demands that we rethink the relationship between the war and pandemic as one about the social organization of medical knowledge and institutions.

  11. Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). Increasing Flu Vaccination Rates among Healthcare Workers Position statements from professional organizations, mandatory influenza vaccination policies, and many helpful ...

  12. Guidance for Schools on the Recent Flu Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The document provides a transcript of a conference call moderated by Bill Modzeleski, Director of the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools. The focus of the call was the recent outbreak of swine flu in Mexico and the United States. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) actions and recommendations to the education community were discussed. A comparison…

  13. Storms and Water Usage; Swine Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C. C.; Muttiah, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a contemporary, authentic application of quantitative reasoning based on media clips. Students analyze items from the media to answer mathematical questions related to the article. Volumes, economics, and growth rates of a pandemic are featured in the two clips presented. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)

  14. The failure of the 1976 swine influenza immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, S L

    1977-01-01

    The program to immunize 210 million Americans against swine flu failed. It set back the Federal government's relations with state health agencies, private physicians, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the insurance industry. It increased mistrust of immunization programs and of government health programs in general.The well-intentioned plan had far-reaching consequences because its scope and the speed with which it was implemented were overreactions to the threat. Its size magnified every one of its faults, legal, medical and political. Organizational and scientific capacity were less than expected. Local health agencies could not administer the program with the inadequate funds from HEW and pharmaceutical companies could not produce a safe, effective children's vaccine.Because of the urgency given the program, Congress neglected the opposition of consumer advocates and state health officials, and did not spend time trying to include immunization against childhood disease in the swine flu program.The failure illustrates the dangers of hasty decisions, of considering only direct medical costs and benefits and not social and political effects on health policy, of launching a public health program whose scientific basis is weak and whose administrative requirements are untested.

  15. Efficacy of a subunit vaccine against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in an endemcally infected swine herd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jirawattanapong, P.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Wisselink, H.J.; Raymakers, R.; Cruijsen, T.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Nes, van A.; Nielen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate lung lesions at slaughter after three-dose vaccination with a subunit Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vaccine containing ApxI, ApxII, ApxIII, and an outer membrane protein. Materials and methods: A total of 430 newborn piglets in a herd endemically infected with A

  16. Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virus Testing Clinical Signs & Symptoms of Influenza Symptoms & Laboratory Diagnosis Information for Clinicians on Rapid Diagnostic Testing for ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  17. Challenge of Pigs with Classical Swine Fever Viruses after C-Strain Vaccination Reveals Remarkably Rapid Protection and Insights into Early Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Felicity J.; Johns, Helen L.; Sosan, Olubukola A.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Clifford, Derek J.; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-emptive culling is becoming increasingly questioned as a means of controlling animal diseases, including classical swine fever (CSF). This has prompted discussions on the use of emergency vaccination to control future CSF outbreaks in domestic pigs. Despite a long history of safe use in endemic areas, there is a paucity of data on aspects important to emergency strategies, such as how rapidly CSFV vaccines would protect against transmission, and if this protection is equivalent for all viral genotypes, including highly divergent genotype 3 strains. To evaluate these questions, pigs were vaccinated with the Riemser® C-strain vaccine at 1, 3 and 5 days prior to challenge with genotype 2.1 and 3.3 challenge strains. The vaccine provided equivalent protection against clinical disease caused by for the two challenge strains and, as expected, protection was complete at 5 days post-vaccination. Substantial protection was achieved after 3 days, which was sufficient to prevent transmission of the 3.3 strain to animals in direct contact. Even by one day post-vaccination approximately half the animals were partially protected, and were able to control the infection, indicating that a reduction of the infectious potential is achieved very rapidly after vaccination. There was a close temporal correlation between T cell IFN-γ responses and protection. Interestingly, compared to responses of animals challenged 5 days after vaccination, challenge of animals 3 or 1 days post-vaccination resulted in impaired vaccine-induced T cell responses. This, together with the failure to detect a T cell IFN-γ response in unprotected and unvaccinated animals, indicates that virulent CSFV can inhibit the potent antiviral host defences primed by C-strain in the early period post vaccination. PMID:22235283

  18. Evaluation of the efficacy and cross-protectivity of recent human and swine vaccines against the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk; Lee, Jun Han; Park, Kuk Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Baek, Yun Hee; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Rho, Jong-Bok; Kim, Chul-Joong; Poo, Haryoung; Ryoo, Thomas S; Sung, Moon-Hee; Choi, Young Ki

    2009-12-23

    The current pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus remains transmissible among humans worldwide with cases of reverse zoonosis, providing opportunities to produce more pathogenic variants which could pose greater human health concerns. To investigate whether recent seasonal human or swine H1N1 vaccines could induce cross-reactive immune responses against infection with the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, mice, ferrets or mini-pigs were administered with various regimens (once or twice) and antigen content (1.77, 3.5 or 7.5 microg HA) of a-Brsibane/59/07, a-CAN01/04 or RgCA/04/09xPR8 vaccine. Receipt of a-CAN01/04 (2-doses) but not a-Brisbane/59/07 induced detectable but modest (20-40 units) cross-reactive serum antibody against CA/04/09 by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assays in mice. Only double administration (7.5 microg HA) of both vaccine in ferrets could elicit cross-reactivity (30-60 HI titers). Similar antigen content of a-CAN01/04 in mini-pigs also caused a modest approximately 30 HI titers (twice vaccinated). However, vaccine-induced antibody titers could not suppress active virus replication in the lungs (mice) or virus shedding (ferrets and pigs) of immunized hosts intranasally challenged with CA/04/09. Furthermore, neither ferrets nor swine could abrogate aerosol transmission of the virus into naïve contact animals. Altogether, these results suggest that neither recent human nor animal H1N1 vaccine could provide complete protectivity in all animal models. Thus, this study warrants the need for strain-specific vaccines that could yield the optimal protection desired for humans and/or animals.

  19. Efficacy of a high-growth reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccine against the classical swine H1N1 subtype influenza virus in mice and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease caused by swine influenza A viruses (SwIVs), and it poses a potential global threat to human health. Classical H1N1 (cH1N1) SwIVs are still circulating and remain the predominant subtype in the swine population in China. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) harboring the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel cH1N1 isolate in China, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (GD/11) and six internal genes from the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/34(PR8) virus was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate seed virus for the preparation of an inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice and pigs challenged with GD/11 virus. Prime and boost inoculation of GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and IgG antibodies for GD/11 in both mice and pigs. Complete protection of mice and pigs against cH1N1 SIV challenge was observed, with significantly fewer lung lesions and reduced viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with unvaccinated control animals. Our data demonstrated that the GD/PR8 may serve as the seed virus for a promising SwIVs vaccine to protect the swine population.

  20. The 1997/1998 epizootic of swine fever in the Netherlands: control strategies under a non-vaccination regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpstra, C; de Smit, A J

    2000-11-15

    The 1997/1998 epizootic of classical swine fever (CSF) in an area with high pig density in the Netherlands is described. The epizootic, which numbered 429 outbreaks, was controlled and finally eradicated after 14 months without resorting to vaccination. A further almost 1300 herds (1.1 million pigs) at close proximity of confirmed outbreaks were preventively culled because of the risk of having been infected. The pros and cons of this so-called "pre-emptive slaughter" are discussed. The long-lasting movement restrictions caused severe overcrowding especially in breeding farms. For reasons of animal welfare 6.5 million weaners and adult pigs had to be killed and destroyed, whereas another 2.6 million 3-17 days old piglets were euthanised to save long-term destruction capacity. The presumed routes of infection and factors influencing the epizootic are explained, as well as the various methods to bring the epizootic to a halt. The strategy for detecting outbreaks in an early stage, and the type of samples to be collected for laboratory diagnosis are emphasised from the general point of application. The direct costs of the epizootic, losses of exports not included, are estimated at US$ 2 billion.

  1. 76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product license for this vaccine, provided the field test data support... biological product must be shown to be pure, safe, potent, and efficacious before a veterinary biological...

  2. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  3. Fighting the Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-08

    Wes Studi, Hollywood actor, urges Native peoples to know the facts about the flu.  Created: 3/8/2011 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 3/8/2011.

  4. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing

  5. Protection of mice against lethal challenge with 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus by 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Manicassamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus infection in humans has resulted in nearly 5,000 deaths worldwide. Early epidemiological findings indicated a low level of infection in the older population (>65 years with the pandemic virus, and a greater susceptibility in people younger than 35 years of age, a phenomenon correlated with the presence of cross-reactive immunity in the older population. It is unclear what virus(es might be responsible for this apparent cross-protection against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. We describe a mouse lethal challenge model for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain, used together with a panel of inactivated H1N1 virus vaccines and hemagglutinin (HA monoclonal antibodies to dissect the possible humoral antigenic determinants of pre-existing immunity against this virus in the human population. By hemagglutinination inhibition (HI assays and vaccination/challenge studies, we demonstrate that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is antigenically similar to human H1N1 viruses that circulated from 1918-1943 and to classical swine H1N1 viruses. Antibodies elicited against 1918-like or classical swine H1N1 vaccines completely protect C57B/6 mice from lethal challenge with the influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 virus isolate. In contrast, contemporary H1N1 vaccines afforded only partial protection. Passive immunization with cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs raised against either 1918 or A/California/04/2009 HA proteins offered full protection from death. Analysis of mAb antibody escape mutants, generated by selection of 2009 H1N1 virus with these mAbs, indicate that antigenic site Sa is one of the conserved cross-protective epitopes. Our findings in mice agree with serological data showing high prevalence of 2009 H1N1 cross-reactive antibodies only in the older population, indicating that prior infection with 1918-like viruses or vaccination against the 1976 swine H1N1 virus in the USA are likely to provide protection against the 2009

  6. Swine influenza and vaccines: an alternative approach for decision making about pandemic prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Marcello; Ferrini, Silvia; Montomoli, Emanuele

    2013-08-01

    During the global pandemic of A/H1N1/California/07/2009 (A/H1N1/Cal) influenza, many governments signed contracts with vaccine producers for a universal influenza immunization program and bought hundreds of millions of vaccines doses. We argue that, as Health Ministers assumed the occurrence of the worst possible scenario (generalized pandemic influenza) and followed the strong version of the Precautionary Principle, they undervalued the possibility of mild or weak pandemic wave. An alternative decision rule, based on the non-extensive entropy principle, is introduced, and a different Precautionary Principle characterization is applied. This approach values extreme negative results (catastrophic events) in a different way and predicts more plausible and mild events. It introduces less pessimistic forecasts in the case of uncertain influenza pandemic outbreaks. A simplified application is presented using seasonal data of morbidity and severity among Italian children influenza-like illness for the period 2003-10. Established literature results predict an average attack rate of not less than 15% for the next pandemic influenza [Meltzer M, Cox N, Fukuda K. The economic impact of pandemic influenza in the United States: implications for setting priorities for interventions. Emerg Infect Dis 1999;5:659-71; Meltzer M, Cox N, Fukuda K. Modeling the Economic Impact of Pandemic Influenza in the United States: Implications for Setting Priorities for Intervention. Background paper. Atlanta, GA: CDC, 1999. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol5no5/melt_back.htm (7 January 2011, date last accessed))]. The strong version of the Precautionary Principle would suggest using this prediction for vaccination campaigns. On the contrary, the non-extensive maximum entropy principle predicts a lower attack rate, which induces a 20% saving in public funding for vaccines doses. The need for an effective influenza pandemic prevention program, coupled with an efficient use of public

  7. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 35) Fighting Flu (:60) Fighting Flu (:30) H1N1 (Swine Flu) I Never Get The Flu Influenza Round ... Antivirals (:60) Wes Studi: Antivirals (:30) Why Flu Vaccination Matters Lifestyle Healthy Swimming Is No Accident No ...

  8. An approach to a FMD vaccine based on genetic engineered attenuated pseudorabies virus: one experiment using VP1 gene alone generates an antibody responds on FMD and pseudorabies in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ping; Li, Xiang-Min; Jin, Mei-Lin; Peng, Gui-Qing; Chen, Huan-Chun

    2004-06-02

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and pseudorabies (PR) are two important infectious diseases in swine. An attenuated pseudorabies virus (PRV) has been successfully used as a gene delivery vector for the development of live-viral vaccines. In this study, a recombinant PRV-VP1 virus was constructed by fusioning the VP1 gene of FMD virus in frame to the N-terminal sequence of the gG gene of PRV. To test the protective immunity, 15 FMDV sero-negative white swine were divided into three groups and immunized with the recombinant PRV-VP1 virus, commercial FMD vaccine and vector virus (TK(-)/gG(-)/LacZ(+)), respectively, and challenged intramuscularly with 20 minimal infecting doses (MID) of virulent type O FMDV 4 weeks after booster immunization. Swine vaccinated with PRV-VP1 acquired antibodies against both FMDV and PRV, however, anti-FMDV antibodies were much lower than those vaccinated with the commercial FMD vaccine. Our results suggested that the recombinant PRV-VP1 virus, which only expressed FMDV VP1 gene controlled by PRV gG promoter, could not protect swine from the challenge of 20 MID type O FMDV, but could delay and reduce the clinical symptoms of FMD.

  9. Induction of a protective immune response against swine Chlamydophila abortus infection in mice following co-vaccination of omp-1 DNA with recombinant MOMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Li, S; Yang, J; Yang, L; He, C

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydophila abortus is the causative agent of abortion in pigs and pregnant women. Seroconversion rates were arranged from 11% to 80% in piglets and sows in China. These very high rates illustrate the scale of the problem in China and highlight the urgent need for the development of a C. abortus vaccine. An efficacious anti-chlamydial vaccine should induce not only strong mucosal and systemic T-helper type 1 (Th1) immune response but also give a humoral response that enhances Th1 activation following infection. In order to evaluate an active immune response of a combination of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) DNA- and protein-based vaccines, 54 BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to six groups and inoculated intramuscularly with: (i) 100 microg pcDNA::MOMP, (ii) 10 microg r-MOMP, (iii) primed with 100 microg pcDNA::MOMP and boosted with 10 microg r-MOMP, (iv) primed-boosted with a combination of pcDNA::MOMP and r-MOMP simultaneously, (v) live-attenuated 1B vaccine, (vi) 100 microg pcDNA3.1 vector. All animals were vaccinated two times at 14 days intervals. Results showed that mice given DNA and r-MOMP induced higher antibody levels, higher T cells proliferation and an elevated level of chlamydial clearance in spleen, which was equivalent to the clearance of 1B vaccine. Mice administrated the DNA-primed/MOMP-boosted approach elicited moderate antibody levels, less T-lymphocyte proliferation and lower chlamydial clearance as compared with 1B vaccine. Co-immunization with DNA- and r-MOMP vaccine may provide novel ways for active immunization strategy against swine C. abortus.

  10. Evaluation of the immunogenicity and safety of different doses and formulations of a broad spectrum influenza vaccine (FLU-v) developed by SEEK: study protocol for a single-center, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical phase IIb trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Eva; Pleguezuelos, Olga; Liu, Heng; Fernandez, Ana; Bannister, Robin; Stoloff, Gregory; Oftung, Fredrik; Norley, Stephen; Huckriede, Anke; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hak, Eelko

    2017-04-04

    Current influenza vaccines, based on antibodies against surface antigens, are unable to provide protection against newly emerging virus strains which differ from the vaccine strains. Therefore the population has to be re-vaccinated annually. It is thus important to develop vaccines which induce protective immunity to a broad spectrum of influenza viruses. This trial is designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of FLU-v, a vaccine composed of four synthetic peptides with conserved epitopes from influenza A and B strains expected to elicit both cell mediated immunity (CMI) and humoral immunity providing protection against a broad spectrum of influenza viruses. In a single-center, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled phase IIb trial, 222 healthy volunteers aged 18-60 years will be randomized (2:2:1:1) to receive two injections of a suspension of 500 μg FLU-v in saline (arm 1), one dose of emulsified 500 μg FLU-v in Montanide ISA-51 and water for injection (WFI) followed by one saline dose (arm 2), two saline doses (arm 3), or one dose of Montanide ISA-51 and WFI emulsion followed by one saline dose (arm 4). All injections will be given subcutaneously. Primary endpoints are safety and FLU-v induced CMI, evaluated by cytokine production by antigen specific T cell populations (flow-cytometry and ELISA). Secondary outcomes are measurements of antibody responses (ELISA and multiplex), whereas exploratory outcomes include clinical efficacy and additional CMI assays (ELISpot) to show cross-reactivity. Broadly protective influenza vaccines able to provide protection against multiple strains of influenza are urgently needed. FLU-v is a promising vaccine which has shown to trigger the cell-mediated immune response. The dosages and formulations tested in this current trial are also estimated to induce antibody response. Therefore, both cellular and humoral immune responses will be evaluated. EudraCT number 2015-001932-38 ; retrospectively registered

  11. College students and the flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/007446.htm College students and the flu To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Every year, the flu spreads across college campuses nationwide. Close living quarters, ...

  12. Reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccines protect pigs against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and H1N2 swine influenza virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Shi, Jianzhong; Guo, Jing; Xin, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Qiao, Chuanling; Chen, Hualan

    2011-09-28

    Influenza A (H1N1) virus has caused human influenza outbreaks in a worldwide pandemic since April 2009. Pigs have been found to be susceptible to this influenza virus under experimental and natural conditions, raising concern about their potential role in the pandemic spread of the virus. In this study, we generated a high-growth reassortant virus (SC/PR8) that contains the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel H1N1 isolate, A/Sichuan/1/2009 (SC/09), and six internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus, by genetic reassortment. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this reassortant virus were evaluated at different doses in a challenge model using a homologous SC/09 or heterologous A/Swine/Guangdong/1/06(H1N2) virus (GD/06). Two doses of SC/PR8 virus vaccine elicited high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies specific for the 2009 H1N1 virus and conferred complete protection against challenge with either SC/09 or GD/06 virus, with reduced lung lesions and viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with non-vaccinated control animals. These results indicated for the first time that a high-growth SC/PR8 reassortant H1N1 virus exhibits properties that are desirable to be a promising vaccine candidate for use in swine in the event of a pandemic H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy evaluation of the C-strain-based vaccines against the subgenotype 2.1d classical swine fever virus emerging in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuzi; Ji, Shengwei; Lei, Jian-Lin; Xiang, Guang-Tao; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yao; Meng, Xing-Yu; Zheng, Guanglai; Zhang, En-Yu; Wang, Yimin; Du, Ming-Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; He, Xi-Jun; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a devastating infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The disease has been controlled following extensive vaccination with the lapinized attenuated vaccine C-strain for decades in China. However, frequent CSF outbreaks occurred recently in a large number of C-strain-vaccinated pig farms in China and a new subgenotype 2.1d of CSFV has been reported to be responsible for the outbreaks. Here we analyzed the molecular variations and antigenic differences among the C-strain-based commercial vaccines of different origins from different manufacturers in China, and reevaluated the vaccines against the emerging subgenotype 2.1d strain of CSFV. The results showed that the C-strain adapted to the continuous ST cell line (CST) contain a unique M290K variation on the E2 protein, compared to those of primary BT cells (CBT) or rabbit origin (CRT) and the traditional C-strain sequences available in the GenBank database. Serum neutralization test revealed the antigenic differences between CST and CBT or CRT. Notably, the neutralizing titers of porcine anti-C-strain sera against the CSFV isolate of subgenotype 2.1d were significantly lower than those against C-strain or Shimen strain. The C-strain-vaccinated, subgenotype 2.1d HLJZZ2014 strain-challenged pigs did not show any clinical signs and all survived. However, these pigs displayed mild pathological and histological lesions, and the CSFV viral RNA was detected in the various tissue and blood samples. Taken together, the C-strain-based vaccines of different origins showed molecular variations and antigenic differences, and could provide clinical but not pathological and virological protection against the subgenotype 2.1d CSFV emerging in China. Further investigation is needed to comprehensively assess the efficacy of C-strain of different doses against the subgenotype 2.1d CSFV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Romio; Daniel Weibel; Dieleman, Jeanne P; Olberg, Henning K; de Vries, Corinne S.; Cormac Sammon; Nick Andrews; Henrik Svanström; Ditte Mølgaard-Nielsen; Anders Hviid; Maryse Lapeyre-Mestre; Agnès Sommet; Christel Saussier; Anne Castot; Harald Heijbel

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods: A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Informati...

  15. International collaboration to assess the risk of Guillain Barré Syndrome following Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Caitlin; Romio, Silvana; Black, Steve; Vellozzi, Claudia; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Zuber, Patrick; Hua, Wei; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Buttery, Jim; Crawford, Nigel; Deceuninck, Genevieve; de Vries, Corinne; Wals, Philippe; Gimeno, David; Heijbel, Harald

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The global spread of the 2009 novel pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus led to the accelerated production and distribution of monovalent 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccines (pH1N1). This pandemic provided the opportunity to evaluate the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which has been an influenza vaccine safety concern since the swine flu pandemic of 1976, using a common protocol among high and middle-income countries. The primary objective of this project was to demo...

  16. [Relation between the level of knowledge and the rate of vaccination against the flu virus among the staff of the Clermont-Ferrand University hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, F; Kelly, C; Biat, I; Provost, D; Baud, O; Laurichesse, H; Chamoux, A

    2008-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine how much staff at the Clermont-Ferrand university hospital, France, knew about influenza and its relation with the vaccinal rate. The other aim was to develop better-targeted information campaigns and prevention policy in the work place. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the 7601 salaried staff of the hospital in May 2005. The staff was asked to give details on socioprofessional characteristics, vaccinal status, and knowledge about the influenza virus (mode of transmission, contagiousness, measures of prevention, populations affected, mortality, vaccination schedule, and vaccination target populations). Multiple-choice questions on knowledge of influenza were scored according to the answer given. The response rate was 26.5%. The 2011 completed questionnaires were representative of the working staff. They showed a positive correlation between the rate of vaccination and knowledge of influenza, with a 0.98 coefficient. They also showed that the staff was very largely unaware of population groups most at risk for influenza (1% of correct answers). Primary prevention campaigns will only be effective if the target population has a better awareness of the issues involved. This study highlights the areas in which knowledge was heterogeneous or inadequate, and the information that could be decisive in increasing vaccinal coverage among staff. This information should focus on modes of transmission, contagiousness, mortality, and above all on populations at risk.

  17. Development of a swine specific 9-plex Luminex cytokine assay and assessment of immunity after porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccination: Elevated serum IL-12 levels are not predictive of protect

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Luminex multiplex swine cytokine assay was developed to measure 9 cytokines simultaneously in pig serum and tested in a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine/challenge study. This assay detects innate (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IFNa, TNFa); regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, I...

  18. Oseltamivir-Resistant Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-13

    Dr. Aaron Storms, an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer at CDC, discusses his paper about oseltamivir-resistant H1N1flu.  Created: 4/13/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/17/2012.

  19. Warning Signs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes the main symptoms of seasonal flu and when it is serious enough to seek medical help.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  20. Take Three: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting seasonal flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  1. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  2. Colds and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be contagious?I’m pregnant. Is there any danger to my baby from the flu?Will steam ... affect you or your baby through your breast milk.December 2017December 2017familydoctor.org editorial staff AboutSupport UsCopyright & ...

  3. Flu and Holiday Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-13

    This podcast explains the ways people can stay healthy and avoid the flu when traveling this winter.  Created: 12/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/13/2010.

  4. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-10-01

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Respons Antibodi terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam yang Divaksin Tetelo dan Tetelo-Flu Burung (NEWCASTLE DISEASE/ND ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF CHICKENS VACCINATED WITH ND SINGLE AND COMBINED ND AND AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate antibody response of specific pathogen-free (SPF chickens vaccinatedwith single inactivated Newcastle disease (ND vaccine and combined inactive ND and avian influenza(AI vaccines and to known the efficacy of both vaccines. The vaccines used were killed ND vaccine andkilled ND-AI vaccine produced by PT. Sanbio Laboratories Bogor, West Java. SPF chickens were vaccinatedwith 3 different doses. Antibody titer of SPF chickens against ND virus were determined byhaemagglutination inhibition (HI test. As many as 130 two week old SPF chickens were used and theywere divided into 2 groups (A and B consisting of 60 chickens and 10 chickens were used as control withoutvaccine. Group A chickens were vaccinated with ND-K vaccine and group B were vaccinated with combinedkilled ND-AI vaccines. Each group was further divided into 3 subsgroups (1, 2 and 3 consisting 20 chickens.Subgroups 1, 2 and 3 were vaccinated intramuscularly respectively with intramuskular 1, 1/10 and 1/100doses of each vaccines. Antibody response of chickens against ND virus was examined before vaccinationand every three week after vaccination and was expresses as geometric mean titre (GMT HI units. Theresult showed that the titre antibody against ND increased at the second week following the vaccination.The antibody titer against ND virus of chickens vaccinated single killed ND at the second week in eachdose were 6.05 GMT HI unit, 4.05 GMT HI unit, and 0.9 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre at the third week were 7.90 GMT HI unit ,5.40 GMT HI unit and 2.20 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre against ND virus ofchickens vaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine at the second week were 6.30 GMT HI unit , 4.15 GMTHI unit , and 2.05 GMT HI unit. At the third week, the antibody titre against ND virus of chickensvaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine in each subgroup were 7.45 GMT HI unit, 5.60 GMT HI unit , and2.40 GMT HI unit . It showed that the antibody titers

  6. Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Variant Pandemic Other Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... flu season. What is Fluzone High-Dose influenza vaccine? Fluzone High-Dose is an influenza vaccine, manufactured ...

  7. Emergency vaccination for classical swine fever will not be cost-effective for countries with a large export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Toft, Nils; Alban, Lis

    2009-01-01

    the epidemiological and economic consequences of such control strategies under Danish conditions with respect to herd demographics and geography as well as to investigate the effect of extra biosecurity on farms. We used InterSpread Plus to model the effect of nine different control strategies: the minimum measures......,H.M., Smak,J.A., Pluimers,F.H., 1999. The classical swine fever epidemic 1997-1998 in The Netherlands: descriptive epidemiology, Prev.Vet.Med., 42, 157-184. Fritzemeier,J., Teuffert,J., Greiser,Wilke,I, Staubach,Ch, Schlüter,H., Moennig,V., 2000. Epidemiology of classical swine fever in Germany in the 1990s......, Vet.Microbiol. 77, 29-41. MacKinnon, J.D., 2001. Some clinical and epidemiological aspects of the outbreak of Classical Swine Fe-ver in East Anglia in 2000, State Vet.J,, 11, 2-7....

  8. Key Facts about Influenza (Flu) and Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virus Testing Clinical Signs & Symptoms of Influenza Symptoms & Laboratory Diagnosis Information for Clinicians on Rapid Diagnostic Testing for ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  9. Grid attacks avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April, a collaboration of Asian and European laboratories analysed 300,000 possible drug components against the avian flu virus H5N1 using the EGEE Grid infrastructure. Schematic presentation of the avian flu virus.The distribution of the EGEE sites in the world on which the avian flu scan was performed. The goal was to find potential compounds that can inhibit the activities of an enzyme on the surface of the influenza virus, the so-called neuraminidase, subtype N1. Using the Grid to identify the most promising leads for biological tests could speed up the development process for drugs against the influenza virus. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for science. The challenge of the in silico drug discovery application is to identify those molecules which can dock on the active sites of the virus in order to inhibit its action. To study the impact of small scale mutations on drug r...

  10. Flu season and trehalose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of us who are practicing medicine know that we are in a very active flu season. This was brought home to me when last week trying to admit a patient to the hospital from the office. She was a bone marrow transplant patient who had severe diarrhea and dehydration probably secondary to C. difficile. Hospital admissions said the patient had to be sent to the Emergency Room because the hospital was full due to the flu epidemic. Nationwide there has been a dramatic increase in the number of hospitalizations due to influenza over the past week from 13.7 to 22.7 per 100,000 (1. Influenza A(H3N2 has been the most common form of influenza reported this season. These viruses are often linked to more severe illness, especially in children and people age 65 years and older. Fortunately, the CDC also says that the flu cases may be peaking. However, at ...

  11. The Impact of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccination Policy in Importing Countries on U.S. Swine Meat Exports

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shang-Ho; Saghaian, Sayed H.; Reed, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous research found that FMD Outbreaks in foreign countries have a significant positive influence on U.S. swine meat exports. However, not all of these FMD-affected countries adopted the same treatment policy to ease domestic FMD issues. This study proposes a gravity model with fixed-effect regressions to analyze the effects of FMD in countries that import U.S. swine meat. Annual trade data for seventeen countries are used in this study. This study confirms that different policies cha...

  12. Mitigation approaches to combat the flu pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Chawla

    2009-01-01

    The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA, Government of India, with the active cooperation of UN agencies and other stakeholders/experts has formulated a concept paper on role of nonhealth service providers during pandemics in April 2008 and released national guidelines - management of biological disasters in July 2008. These guidelines enumerate that the success of medical management endeavors like pharmaceutical (anti-viral Oseltamivir and Zanamivir therapies, nonpharmaceutical interventions and vaccination development etc., largely depends on level of resistance offered by mutagenic viral strain and rationale use of pharmaco therapeutic interventions. This article describes the mitigation approach to combat flu pandemic with its effective implementation at national, state and local levels.

  13. Financial evaluation of vaccination and testing alternatives for control of parvovirus-induced reproductive failure in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, I A; Carpenter, T E; Leontides, L; Parsons, T D

    1996-03-15

    To identify the preferable testing and vaccination strategy for control of porcine parvovirus (PPV) during a 6-month period. Decision-tree analysis and computer simulations. Computer modeling of 300-sow farrow-to-finish herd. Serologic testing of 30 females to estimate herd PPV prevalence versus not testing any females was the initial decision alternative. On the basis of serologic test results, herds were classified into 1 of 3 PPV-risk categories: low (> or = 80% seropositive females), moderate (40 to gilts, or not vaccinating was the second decision alternative. For initial model assumptions (test sensitivity and specificity = 0.95; test cost = $5/female; vaccination cost = $0.30/dose; vaccination efficacy = 0.95; and foregone gross margin = $10.85/pig), vaccination of all females (with or without serologic testing) was preferable, but the financially preferable option was to omit serologic testing. Most profitable vaccination option varied with foregone gross margin, vaccination cost, and efficacy. For herds in which all sows were known to be immune, vaccinating only gilts was financially preferable, and serologic testing was not warranted. Variation is expected monetary losses was less in vaccination options than with nonvaccination. For most herds in the United States, serologic screening for PPV prior to selection of a vaccination program is unlikely to be cost-effective, because vaccination is inexpensive ($0.30/dose) and effective (95%). At current profit margins ($10.85/pig), vaccination of all females has the least-risk and is the preferred option.

  14. Safety and efficacy of a novel live attenuated influenza vaccine against pandemic H1N1 in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is the predominant influenza strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers a...

  15. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Aaron TL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases known to man. Reassorted strains of the virus pose the greatest risk to both human and animal health and have been associated with all pandemics of the past century, with the possible exception of the 1918 pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible. These algorithms enable reassorted influenza, and other, viruses to be rapidly identified to allow prevention strategies and treatments to be more efficiently implemented. Results The FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms were tested with both experimental and simulated mass spectra of whole virus digests. FluShuffle considers different combinations of viral protein identities that match the mass spectral data using a Gibbs sampling algorithm employing a mixed protein Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. FluResort utilizes those identities to calculate the weighted distance of each across two or more different phylogenetic trees constructed through viral protein sequence alignments. Each weighted mean distance value is normalized by conversion to a Z-score to establish a reassorted strain. Conclusions The new FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms can correctly identify the origins of influenza viral proteins and the number of reassortment events required to produce the strains from the high resolution mass spectral data of whole virus proteolytic digestions. This has been demonstrated in the case of constructed vaccine strains as well as common human seasonal strains of the virus. The algorithms significantly improve the capability of the proteotyping approach to identify reassorted viruses that pose the greatest pandemic risk.

  16. Pregnant Women Need a Flu Shot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnant? You Need a Flu Shot! Information for pregnant women Because you are pregnant, CDC and your ob- ... more likely to get severely ill from flu. Pregnant women who get flu are at high risk of ...

  17. Cloned cDNA of A/swine/Iowa/15/1930 internal genes as a candidate backbone for reverse genetics vaccine against influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Petcharat, Nantawan; Lekcharoensuk, Chalermpol; Auewarakul, Prasert; Richt, Juergen A

    2012-02-14

    Reverse genetics viruses for influenza vaccine production usually utilize the internal genes of the egg-adapted A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) strain. This egg-adapted strain provides high production yield in embryonated eggs but does not necessarily give the best yield in mammalian cell culture. In order to generate a reverse genetics viral backbone that is well-adapted to high growth in mammalian cell culture, a swine influenza isolate A/swine/Iowa/15/30 (H1N1) (rg1930) that was shown to give high yield in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was used as the internal gene donor for reverse genetics plasmids. In this report, the internal genes from rg1930 were used for construction of reverse genetics viruses carrying a cleavage site-modified hemagglutinin (HA) gene and neuraminidase (NA) gene from a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. The resulting virus (rg1930H5N1) was low pathogenic in vivo. Inactivated rg1930H5N1 vaccine completely protected chickens from morbidity and mortality after challenge with highly pathogenic H5N1. Protective immunity was obtained when chickens were immunized with an inactivated vaccine consisting of at least 2(9) HA units of the rg1930H5N1 virus. In comparison to the PR8-based reverse genetics viruses carrying the same HA and NA genes from an H5N1 virus, rg1930 based viruses yielded higher viral titers in MDCK and Vero cells. In addition, the reverse genetics derived H3N2 and H5N2 viruses with the rg1930 backbone replicated in MDCK cells better than the cognate viruses with the rgPR8 backbone. It is concluded that this newly established reverse genetics backbone system could serve as a candidate for a master donor strain for development of inactivated influenza vaccines in cell-based systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Design and immunogenicity evaluation for the bacteria-like particle vaccine against swine type O foot-and-mouth disease virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liting; Chen, Jin; Qiao, Xuwen; Yu, Xiaoming; Hou, Jibo; Zheng, Qisheng; Li, Jinnian

    2017-02-25

    Based on gram positive enhancer matrix displaying technology, we designed and evaluated a bacteria-like particle vaccine against swine type O Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Three optimized genes of type O Foot-and-mouth disease virus strain Mya98 were cloned into recombinant prokaryotic expression vector pQZ-PA and renamed as pQZ-BT1B-PA, pQZ-BT2B-PA and pQZ-B (T1BT2) 4B-PA, fused with an anchor protein (PA) binding to Gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles specifically. The protein expression was identified with SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, and then purified with GEM particles. Five-week old female mice were randomly divided into six groups and all the immunization was developed according to subcutaneous injection. Mice in the first three groups were injected with 50 μg/dose GEM-BT1B, GEM-BT2B and GEM-B (T1BT2) 4B, respectively. Mice in the fourth group were immunized with commercial peptide vaccine as positive control. The fifth group vaccinated with host E. coli transformed with pQZ-PA fulfilled as negative control. Mice in the last group injected with sterile PBS served as blank control. The humoral immunity of recombinant protein vaccine was evaluated with peptide-specific antibody and LPB antibody. The cellular immunity was evaluated with lymphocyte proliferation test and cytokine expression detection. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting showed that the most part of soluble target fusion protein have been purified and displayed on GEM particles. Vaccine GEM-B (T1BT2) 4B stimulated mice produce not only higher level of specific antibody against peptide and Foot-and-mouth disease virus specific liquid phase blocking antibody, but also more vigorous spleen lymph proliferation and higher levels of Th1 type cytokines. To summarize, vaccine of GEM-B (T1BT2) 4B possessed good immunogenicity and opened a new way for further Foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine design.

  19. Immunogenicity and tolerability of inactivated flu vaccine In high risk and healthy children Inmunogenicidad y tolerancia de la vacuna inactivada anti-influenza en niños en alto riesgo y en controles sanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Avila Aguero

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We conducted this open study to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of the inactivated influenza vaccine, Imovax Gripe® in 154 children between 6 and 36 months of age at high risk of influenza- related complications, and in a reference group of 64 healthy children. The study was conducted over two flu seasons, in which the vaccine contained the same A strains but different B strains. The results for the A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 strains from the two flu seasons were pooled, but those for the B strains were not. Anti-hemagglutinin (HA antibody titers were determined before, and one month after each vaccination, and safety was evaluated based on diary card reporting any adverse event observed, either included or not in the list of "solicited events". Within each group of vaccines, the seroconversion rates, seroprotection rates, and ratio of post- to prevaccination geometric mean titers (GMTR for the A/H3N2 and the A/H1N1 strains fulfilled all requirements of the criteria of the European Union Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP. The immune responses in high-risk and in healthy children were similar, and consistent with those observed in previous studies conducted in healthy children. The vaccine was equally well tolerated by all study groups. Reactogenicity was low and similar in both high-risk and healthy children. Overall from 9.5% to 15.4% of at-risk children and 12% of healthy children reported a solicited local reaction; 23.0 to 28.8% of high-risk and 25.3% of healthy children reported a solicited systemic reaction. The study results provide support for vaccination of children at high-risk of influenza related complications.Se realizó un estudio clínico abierto para evaluar la inmunogenícidad y la seguridad de la vacuna inactivada anti-influenza, Imovax Gripe®, en 154 niños entre 6 y 36 meses de edad con alto riesgo de complicaciones ligadas a la influenza, y en un grupo de referencia de 64 niños sanos. El estudio fue

  20. The Spanish flu in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Ida Viktoria; Skinhøj, Peter; Keiding, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The spread of H5N1 influenza and the similarity between this avian virus and the Spanish flu virus causes fear of a new influenza pandemic, but data from the Spanish flu may also be of guidance in planning for preventive measures. Using data on influenza cases, influenza deaths and total deaths...

  1. Characterization of a novel oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant for swine influenza virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines consisting of subunit or inactivated bacteria/virus and potent adjuvants are widely used to control and prevent infectious diseases. Because inactivated and subunit antigens are often less antigenic than live microbes, a growing need exists for the development of new and improved vaccine ad...

  2. Molecular Characterisation of the Haemagglutinin Glycan-Binding Specificity of Egg-Adapted Vaccine Strains of the Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Swine Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carbone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The haemagglutinin (HA glycan binding selectivity of H1N1 influenza viruses is an important determinant for the host range of the virus and egg-adaption during vaccine production. This study integrates glycan binding data with structure-recognition models to examine the impact of the K123N, D225G and Q226R mutations (as seen in the HA of vaccine strains of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 swine influenza A virus. The glycan-binding selectivity of three A/California/07/09 vaccine production strains, and purified recombinant A/California/07/09 HAs harboring these mutations was examined via a solid-phase ELISA assay. Wild-type A/California/07/09 recombinant HA bound specifically to α2,6-linked sialyl-glycans, with no affinity for the α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans in the array. In contrast, the vaccine virus strains and recombinant HA harboring the Q226R HA mutation displayed a comparable pattern of highly specific binding to α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans, with a negligible affinity for α2,6-linked sialyl-glycans. The D225G A/California/07/09 recombinant HA displayed an enhanced binding affinity for both α2,6- and α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans in the array. Notably its α2,6-glycan affinity was generally higher compared to its α2,3-glycan affinity, which may explain why the double mutant was not naturally selected during egg-adaption of the virus. The K123N mutation which introduces a glycosylation site proximal to the receptor binding site, did not impact the α2,3/α2,6 glycan selectivity, however, it lowered the overall glycan binding affinity of the HA; suggesting glycosylation may interfere with receptor binding. Docking models and ‘per residues’ scoring were employed to provide a structure-recognition rational for the experimental glycan binding data. Collectively, the glycan binding data inform future vaccine design strategies to introduce the D225G or Q226R amino acid substitutions into recombinant H1N1 viruses.

  3. Impact of information on intentions to vaccinate in a potential epidemic: swine-origin Influenza A (H1N1)

    OpenAIRE

    Chanel, Olivier; Luchini, Stephane; Massoni, Sébastien; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    URL des Documents de travail : http://centredeconomiesorbonne.univ-paris1.fr/bandeau-haut/documents-de-travail/; Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 2010.87 - ISSN : 1955-611X; Vaccination campaigns to prevent the spread of epidemics are successful only if the targeted populations subscribe to the recommendations of health authorities. However, because compulsory vaccination is hardly conceivable in modern democracies, governments need to convince their populations throug...

  4. Pregnant Women and Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Populations Antiviral Guidance Reference Material Guidance: Antiviral and Obstetric Health Care Antiviral Drug Supply Infection Control Guidelines ... associated with neural tube defects and other adverse outcomes for a developing baby. The Flu Shot is ...

  5. Strategies for Fighting Pandemic Flu in Developing Countries

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-04

    Countries throughout the world are preparing for the next influenza pandemic. Developing countries face special challenges because they don't have antiviral drugs or vaccines that more developed countries have. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Dan Jernigan discusses new and innovative approaches that may help developing countries fight pandemic flu when it emerges.  Created: 3/4/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/4/2009.

  6. Quality of life and trust among young people with narcolepsy and their families, after the Pandemrix® vaccination: protocol for a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Karin; Carlsson, Agneta Anderzén; Hagberg, Lars; Jonsson, Östen; Leissner, Lena; Eriksson, Mats H

    2017-08-23

    The extensive vaccination programme against swine flu resulted in an increased incidence of narcolepsy among children and adolescents. There is a need to explore if these young persons' experiences have affected their trust in healthcare, their willingness to participate in future prevention programmes, and their contacts with the healthcare system. The overall aim is to identify factors important for the life-situation of children and adolescents with narcolepsy and their families, and factors that correlate with trust in healthcare. Data will be collected via questionnaires from all available children with narcolepsy following the vaccination and their families, as well as a control group of children with diabetes and their families. Longitudinal descriptive interviews will also be conducted with a selection of 20-25 children and their families. Techniques from media research will be used for Internet-based data collection and analysis of information relating to narcolepsy from social media. This project will use the situation of young persons with narcolepsy after the swine flu vaccination as a case to build a model that can be used in situations where trust in healthcare is essential. This model will be based on findings from the included studies on how trust is influenced by support, quality of life, burden of disease, impact on family, and use of social media. The model developed in this project will be beneficial in future situations where trust in healthcare is essential, such as new pandemic outbreaks but also for "everyday" adherence to health advice.

  7. FluBreaks: early epidemic detection from Google flu trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Fahad; Pervaiz, Mansoor; Abdur Rehman, Nabeel; Saif, Umar

    2012-10-04

    The Google Flu Trends service was launched in 2008 to track changes in the volume of online search queries related to flu-like symptoms. Over the last few years, the trend data produced by this service has shown a consistent relationship with the actual number of flu reports collected by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), often identifying increases in flu cases weeks in advance of CDC records. However, contrary to popular belief, Google Flu Trends is not an early epidemic detection system. Instead, it is designed as a baseline indicator of the trend, or changes, in the number of disease cases. To evaluate whether these trends can be used as a basis for an early warning system for epidemics. We present the first detailed algorithmic analysis of how Google Flu Trends can be used as a basis for building a fully automated system for early warning of epidemics in advance of methods used by the CDC. Based on our work, we present a novel early epidemic detection system, called FluBreaks (dritte.org/flubreaks), based on Google Flu Trends data. We compared the accuracy and practicality of three types of algorithms: normal distribution algorithms, Poisson distribution algorithms, and negative binomial distribution algorithms. We explored the relative merits of these methods, and related our findings to changes in Internet penetration and population size for the regions in Google Flu Trends providing data. Across our performance metrics of percentage true-positives (RTP), percentage false-positives (RFP), percentage overlap (OT), and percentage early alarms (EA), Poisson- and negative binomial-based algorithms performed better in all except RFP. Poisson-based algorithms had average values of 99%, 28%, 71%, and 76% for RTP, RFP, OT, and EA, respectively, whereas negative binomial-based algorithms had average values of 97.8%, 17.8%, 60%, and 55% for RTP, RFP, OT, and EA, respectively. Moreover, the EA was also affected by the region's population size

  8. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhihong [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Quan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Wang, Zaishi [China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Zhongqiu [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100125 (China); Guo, Pengju [Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong 510640 (China); Zhao, Deming, E-mail: zhaodm@cau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the immunoadjuvant effects of HVJ-E on killed PRRSV vaccine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HVJ-E enhanced the humoral and cellular responses of the piglets to PRRSV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is suggested that HVJ-E could be developed as a new-type adjuvant for mammals. -- Abstract: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-{gamma} production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV.

  9. A clinical trial to assess the immunogenicity and safety of Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (Whole Virion IP (Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009 Monovalent Vaccine; VaxiFlu-S ™ in healthy Indian adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A H Kubavat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The pandemic of H1N1 2009 influenza has spread world over and low degree of virus transmission has continued in several regions of India. Aims : To assess the immunogenicity and safety of Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009 Monovalent Vaccine in healthy adult Indian population. Settings and Design : Prospective, open label, multicentric, phase 2/3 clinical trial. Materials and Methods : Healthy adult Indian subjects belonging to either 18-59 years or ≥60 years age groups were enrolled and administered a single 0.5 ml (≥15 mcg of hemagglutinin antigen dose of vaccine in the deltoid muscle. Anti-hemagglutinin antibody titer was assessed at baseline and 21 (±2 days after vaccination by Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI test. Safety assessments were done for a period of 42 days. Statistical Analysis Used : Percentages of appropriate population with 95% confidence intervals calculated, log transformation of the data to calculate Geometric Mean Titers (GMTs and chi-square test and student′s t-test applied for significance testing. Results : 182/198 and 53/63 volunteers in age groups of 18-59 years and ≥60 years, respectively, achieved an HI titer ≥1 : 40 at Day 21 (91.9% [95% confidence interval: 88.1-95.7%] and 84.1% [75.1-93.2%]; P=0.072. Further, 171/198 and 50/63 volunteers in the respective age groups achieved seroconversion/four-fold increase in titer at Day 21 (86.4% [81.6-91.1%] and 79.4% [69.4-89.4%]; P=0.179. A significant rise of 22.6-fold [18.0-28.4] and 10.5-fold [7.4-15.0] was noted in GMT in the respective age groups (P<0.001 for both groups as compared to baseline. Nine vaccine-related adverse events were reported (3.4% incidence [1.2-5.6%], which were of low severity only. Conclusions : Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009 Monovalent Vaccine produces excellent immunogenic response with a good tolerability profile in adult Indian population.

  10. Knowledge and Perceptions of Influenza Vaccinations Among College Students in Vietnam and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Kamimura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Influenza is a significant worldwide public health issue. Knowledge and perceptions regarding the flu vaccination are associated with whether individuals obtain the vaccination. The purpose of this study was to examine how such perceptions were related to knowledge and self-efficacy regarding influenza and the flu vaccination in Vietnam and the US. Methods College students (n=932 in Vietnam (n=495 and the US (n=437 completed a self-administered survey regarding knowledge and perceptions of influenza vaccinations in September and October 2016. Results Vietnamese participants reported significantly lower levels of awareness about flu risk, higher levels of negative attitudes toward flu vaccination, lower levels of knowledge about the flu and vaccination, and lower levels of self-efficacy than US participants. Higher levels of flu and flu vaccination knowledge and self-efficacy regarding general responsible health practices were associated with lower levels of negative perceptions of flu risk and attitudes toward vaccination. At the same time, self-efficacy regarding responsible health practices was associated with higher levels of awareness of flu risk and lower levels of negative attitudes toward vaccination. Self-efficacy regarding exercise was associated with lower levels of perceptions of flu risk and higher levels of negative attitudes toward vaccination. Conclusions Vietnam could benefit from influenza education based on this comparison with the US. In both countries, knowledge and self-efficacy were found to be important factors influencing perceptions of influenza risk and vaccination.

  11. Vaccinology of classical swine fever: from lab to field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.

    2003-01-01

    There are two types of classical swine fever vaccines available: the classical live and the recently developed E2 subunit vaccines. The live Chinese strain vaccine is the most widely used. After a single vaccination, it confers solid immunity within a few days that appears to persist lifelong. The

  12. Determinants of healthcare provider recommendations for influenza vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Villacorta

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: ACIP priority groups experienced higher rates of recommendations compared to non-ACIP groups. Racial differences in HCP recommendations cannot explain racial disparities in flu vaccination rates.

  13. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Weesendorp, E.; Zoelen-Bos, van D.J.; Heutink, R.; Quak, J.; Goovaerts, D.; Heldens, J.; Maas, H.A.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Koch, G.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named “pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009¿ (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to

  14. Flu Vaccine and People with Egg Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virus Testing Clinical Signs & Symptoms of Influenza Symptoms & Laboratory Diagnosis Information for Clinicians on Rapid Diagnostic Testing for ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  15. A clinical trial to assess the immunogenicity and safety of Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (Whole Virion) IP (Pandemic Influenza (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine; VaxiFlu-S™) in healthy Indian adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubavat, A H; Mittal, R; Patel, P M; Jarsaniya, D H; Pawar, P R

    2011-01-01

    The pandemic of H1N1 2009 influenza has spread world over and low degree of virus transmission has continued in several regions of India. To assess the immunogenicity and safety of Pandemic Influenza (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine in healthy adult Indian population. Prospective, open label, multicentric, phase 2/3 clinical trial. Healthy adult Indian subjects belonging to either 18-59 years or ≥ 60 years age groups were enrolled and administered a single 0.5 ml (≥ 15 mcg of hemagglutinin antigen) dose of vaccine in the deltoid muscle. Anti-hemagglutinin antibody titer was assessed at baseline and 21 (± 2) days after vaccination by Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI) test. Safety assessments were done for a period of 42 days. Percentages of appropriate population with 95% confidence intervals calculated, log transformation of the data to calculate Geometric Mean Titers (GMTs) and chi-square test and student's t-test applied for significance testing. 182/198 and 53/63 volunteers in age groups of 18-59 years and ≥ 60 years, respectively, achieved an HI titer ≥ 1 : 40 at Day 21 (91.9% [95% confidence interval: 88.1-95.7%] and 84.1% [75.1-93.2%]; P=0.072). Further, 171/198 and 50/63 volunteers in the respective age groups achieved seroconversion/four-fold increase in titer at Day 21 (86.4% [81.6-91.1%] and 79.4% [69.4-89.4%]; P=0.179). A significant rise of 22.6-fold [18.0-28.4] and 10.5-fold [7.4-15.0] was noted in GMT in the respective age groups (Ppopulation.

  16. flu, a metastable gene controlling surface properties of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Diderichsen, B

    1980-01-01

    flu, a gene of Escherichia coli K-12, was discovered and mapped between his and shiA. It is shown that flu is a metastable gene that changes frequently between the flu+ and flu states. flu+ variants give stable homogeneous suspensions, are piliated, and form glossy colonies. flu variants aggregate, fluff and sediment from suspensions, are nonpiliated, and form frizzy colonies. flu+ and flu variants can be isolated from most strains. Implications of these observations are discussed, and it is ...

  17. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhihong; Zhang, Quan; Wang, Zaishi; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Guo, Pengju; Zhao, Deming

    2011-11-11

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Should we fear "flu fear" itself? Effects of H1N1 influenza fear on ED use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, William M; Nelson, Douglas S; Schunk, Jeff E

    2012-02-01

    Surges in patient volumes compromise emergency departments' (EDs') ability to deliver care, as shown by the recent H1N1 influenza (flu) epidemic. Media reports are important in informing the public about health threats, but the effects of media-induced anxiety on ED volumes are unclear. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of widespread public concern about flu on ED use. We reviewed ED data from an integrated health system operating 18 hospital EDs. We compared ED visits during three 1-week periods: (a) a period of heightened public concern regarding flu before the disease was present ("Fear Week"), (b) a subsequent period of active disease ("Flu Week"), and (c) a week before widespread concern ("Control Week"). Fear Week was identified from an analysis of statewide Google electronic searches for "swine flu" and from media announcements about flu. Flu Week was identified from statewide epidemiological data. Data were reviewed from 22 608 visits during the study periods. Fear Week (n = 7712) and Flu Week (n = 7687) were compared to Control Week (n = 7209). Fear Week showed a 7.0% increase in visits (95% confidence interval, 6-8). Pediatric visits increased by 19.7%, whereas adult visits increased by 1%. Flu Week showed an increase over Control Week of 6.6% (95% confidence interval, 6-7). Pediatric visits increased by 10.6%, whereas adult visits increased by 4.8%. At a time of heightened public concern regarding flu but little disease prevalence, EDs experienced substantial increases in patient volumes. These increases were significant and comparable to the increases experienced during the subsequent epidemic of actual disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stomach Flu: How Long Am I Contagious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... long am I contagious if I have the stomach flu? Answers from James M. Steckelberg, M.D. You can ... more, depending on which virus is causing your stomach flu (gastroenteritis). A number of viruses can cause ...

  20. Progressive adaptation of a Georgian isolate of African swine fever virus to vero cells leads to a gradual attenuation of virulence in swine corresponding to major changes of the viral genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a contagious and often lethal disease of feral and domestic swine. Experimental vaccines derived from naturally occurring, genetically modified or cell culture-adapted ASFV have been evaluated but no commercial vaccine is available to control African Swine Fev...

  1. Adjuvanted influenza-H1N1 vaccination reveals lymphoid signatures of age-dependent early responses and of clinical adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Olga; Binda, Elisa; O'Farrell, Sean; Lorenc, Anna; Pradines, Joel; Huang, Yongqing; Duffner, Jay; Schulz, Reiner; Cason, John; Zambon, Maria; Malim, Michael H; Peakman, Mark; Cope, Andrew; Capila, Ishan; Kaundinya, Ganesh V; Hayday, Adrian C

    2016-02-01

    Adjuvanted vaccines afford invaluable protection against disease, and the molecular and cellular changes they induce offer direct insight into human immunobiology. Here we show that within 24 h of receiving adjuvanted swine flu vaccine, healthy individuals made expansive, complex molecular and cellular responses that included overt lymphoid as well as myeloid contributions. Unexpectedly, this early response was subtly but significantly different in people older than ∼35 years. Wide-ranging adverse clinical events can seriously confound vaccine adoption, but whether there are immunological correlates of these is unknown. Here we identify a molecular signature of adverse events that was commonly associated with an existing B cell phenotype. Thus immunophenotypic variation among healthy humans may be manifest in complex pathophysiological responses.

  2. Can mothers who have swine flu continue to breastfeed? Yes!

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siegal_D

    mother and baby), and other people by: ▫ Washing hands with soap frequently and thoroughly, especially after sneezing. ▫ Not sharing handkerchiefs with anyone. ▫ If possible, using paper handkerchiefs to cover the nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing, and then burning or burying them. ▫ Not putting their hands into ...

  3. Making Vaccine Messaging Stick: Perceived Causal Instability as a Barrier to Effective Vaccine Messaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Graham N

    2017-08-01

    Health officials often face challenges in communicating the risks associated with not vaccinating, where persuasive messages can fail to elicit desired responses. However, the mechanisms behind these failures have not been fully ascertained. To address this gap, an experiment (N = 163) tested the differences between loss-framed messages-one emphasizing the consequence of not receiving a flu vaccine; the other emphasizing the consequence of receiving the flu vaccine. Despite an identical consequence (i.e., Guillain-Barre syndrome), the message highlighting the consequence of not receiving the flu vaccine produced lower negative affect scores as compared to the message highlighting the consequence of receiving the flu vaccine. Mediation analyses suggest that one reason for this difference is due to non-vaccination being perceived as temporary and reversible, whereas vaccination is perceived as being permanent. Implications on health communication and future research are discussed.

  4. Protection of guinea pigs by vaccination with a recombinant swinepox virus co-expressing HA1 genes of swine H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiarong; Yang, Deji; Huang, Dongyan; Xu, Jiaping; Liu, Shichao; Lin, Huixing; Zhu, Haodan; Liu, Bao; Lu, Chengping

    2013-03-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory infectious disease of swine caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). SIV is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a potent threat to human health. Here, we report the construction of a recombinant swinepox virus (rSPV/H3-2A-H1) co-expressing hemagglutinin (HA1) of SIV subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. Immune responses and protection efficacy of the rSPV/H3-2A-H1 were evaluated in guinea pigs. Inoculation of rSPV/H3-2A-H1 yielded neutralizing antibodies against SIV H1N1 and H3N2. The IFN-γ and IL-4 concentrations in the supernatant of lymphocytes stimulated with purified SIV HA1 antigen were significantly higher (P guinea pigs against SIV H1N1 or H3N2 challenge was observed. No SIV shedding was detected from guinea pigs vaccinated with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 after challenge. Most importantly, the guinea pigs immunized with rSPV/H3-2A-H1 did not show gross and micrographic lung lesions. However, the control guinea pigs experienced distinct gross and micrographic lung lesions at 7 days post-challenge. Our data suggest that the recombinant swinepox virus encoding HA1 of SIV H1N1 and H3N2 might serve as a promising candidate vaccine for protection against SIV H1N1 and H3N2 infections.

  5. [How do we catch flu? Beliefs in France in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti-Watel, P; Gautier, A; Verger, P; Raude, J; Constant, A; Beck, F

    2015-02-01

    Our goals were to describe beliefs held by French people concerning the contagiosity of influenza and analyze the relationship of these beliefs with vaccination against seasonal flu. A subsample (4749 people aged 15-79) of the Health Barometer 2010 responded to questions dealing with influenza. Responses were analyzed using clustering analysis and logistic regression. Overall, observed beliefs were quite good, but also socially differentiated. 'False' beliefs were more frequent among people with a lower socioeconomic status. Those who overestimated the contagiosity of influenza were less likely to have been vaccinated against seasonal influenza in 2008. The beliefs analyzed here were associated with vaccination behaviors. 'False' beliefs may be difficult to change as they are nevertheless coherent. These beliefs also exhibit social inequalities that should be taken into account when determining preventive measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction (early recognition) of emerging flu strain clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Phillips, J. C.

    2017-08-01

    Early detection of incipient dominant influenza strains is one of the key steps in the design and manufacture of an effective annual influenza vaccine. Here we report the most current results for pandemic H3N2 flu vaccine design. A 2006 model of dimensional reduction (compaction) of viral mutational complexity derives two-dimensional Cartesian mutational maps (2DMM) that exhibit an emergent dominant strain as a small and distinct cluster of as few as 10 strains. We show that recent extensions of this model can detect incipient strains one year or more in advance of their dominance in the human population. Our structural interpretation of our unexpectedly rich 2DMM involves sialic acid, and is based on nearly 6000 strains in a series of recent 3-year time windows. Vaccine effectiveness is predicted best by analyzing dominant mutational epitopes.

  7. Development of a fluorescent ASFV strain that retains the ability to cause disease in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    African swine fever is a contagious and often lethal disease for domestic pigs with a significant economic impact for the swine industry. The etiological agent, African swine fever virus (ASFV), is a highly structurally complex double strain DNA virus. No effective vaccines or antiviral treatment ar...

  8. Secreted Expression of the Cap Gene of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 in Classical Swine Fever Virus C-Strain: Potential of C-Strain Used as a Vaccine Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingkai Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bivalent vaccines based on live attenuated viruses expressing a heterologous protein are an attractive strategy to address co-infections with various pathogens in the field. Considering the excellent efficacy and safety of the lapinized live attenuated vaccine C-strain (HCLV strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV, we proposed that C-strain has the potential as a viral vector for developing bivalent vaccines. To this end, we generated three recombinant viruses based on C-strain, one expressing the capsid (Cap gene of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 with the nuclear localization signal (NLS (rHCLV-2ACap, and the other two expressing the PCV2 Cap gene without the NLS yet containing the signal peptide of the prolactin gene (rHCLV-pspCap or that of the ubiquitin-specific peptidase gene (rHCLV-uspCap. All the recombinant viruses exhibited phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus and produced high-level anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies (NAbs in rabbits. Interestingly, rHCLV-uspCap and rHCLV-pspCap, but not rHCLV-2ACap, elicited detectable anti-Cap and -PCV2 NAbs in rabbits. Taken together, our data demonstrate that C-strain can be used as a viral vector to develop bivalent vaccines.

  9. Using EGEE against avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April 2006 avian flu was spreading across the world with the potential of turning into a pandemic, a drug to treat the deadly H5N1 strain was needed. Such a task required the huge processing power provided by EGEE, which analysed 300 000 possible drug components for their suitability. This map shows the network of computer centres and their activity during this time.

  10. Molecular characterization of African swine fever virus in apparently ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal and economically significant disease of domestic pigs in Uganda where outbreaks regularly occur. There is neither a vaccine nor treatment available for ASF control. Twenty two African swine fever virus (ASFV) genotypes (I - XXII) have been identified based on partial sequencing ...

  11. Transmission rate of African swine fever virus under experimental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho Ferreira, de H.C.; Backer, J.A.; Weesendorp, E.; Klinkenberg, D.; Stegeman, J.A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal, viral disease of swine. No vaccine is available, so controlling an ASF outbreak is highly dependent on zoosanitary measures, such as stamping out infected herds and quarantining of affected areas. Information on ASF transmission parameters could allow

  12. Evaluation of an Erns-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to distinguish Classical swine fever virus-infected pigs from pigs vaccinated with CP7_E2alf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannhorst, Katrin; Fröhlich, Andreas; Staubach, Christoph; Meyer, Denise; Blome, Sandra; Becher, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Infections with Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are a major economic threat to pig production. To combat CSF outbreaks and to maintain trade, new marker vaccines were developed that allow differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA principle). The chimeric pestivirus CP7_E2alf was shown to be safe and efficacious. Its DIVA strategy is based on the detection of CSFV E(rns)-specific antibodies that are only developed on infection. However, for the new marker vaccine to be considered a valuable control tool, a validated discriminatory assay is needed. One promising candidate is the already commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, PrioCHECK CSFV E(rns) ELISA (Prionics BV, Lelystad, The Netherlands). Four laboratories of different European Union member states tested 530 serum samples and country-specific field sera from domestic pigs and wild boar. The ELISA displayed a good robustness. However, based on its reproducibility and repeatability, ranges rather than single values for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were defined. The ELISA displayed a sensitivity of 90-98% with sera from CSFV-infected domestic pigs. A specificity of 89-96% was calculated with sera from domestic pigs vaccinated once with CP7_E2alf. The ELISA detected CSFV infections in vaccinated domestic pigs with a sensitivity of 82-94%. The sensitivity was lower with sera taken ≤21 days post-challenge indicating that the stage of CSFV infection had a considerable influence on testing. Taken together, the PrioCHECK CSFV E(rns) ELISA can be used for detection of CSFV infections in CP7_E2alf-vaccinated and nonvaccinated domestic pig populations, but should only be applied on a herd basis by testing a defined number of animals. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. FLUed: A Novel Four-Layer Model for Simulating Epidemic Dynamics and Assessing Intervention Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic, to the 2009 swine-origin influenza A (H1N1 pandemic, to the projected highly pathogenic avian influenza A event, emerging infectious diseases highlight the importance of computational epidemiology to assess potential intervention policies. Hence, an important and timely research goal is a general-purpose and extendable simulation model that integrates two major epidemiological factors—age group and population movement—and substantial amounts of demographic, geographic, and epidemiologic data. In this paper, we describe a model that we have named FLUed for Four-layer Universal Epidemic Dynamics that integrates complex daily commuting network data into multiple age-structured compartmental models. FLUed has four contact structures for simulating the epidemic dynamics of emerging infectious diseases, assessing the potential efficacies of various intervention policies, and identifying the potential impacts of spatial-temporal epidemic trends on specific populations. We used data from the seasonal influenza A and 2009 swine-origin influenza A (H1N1 epidemics to validate model reliability and suitability and to assess the potential impacts of intervention policies and variation in initial outbreak areas for novel/seasonal influenza A in Taiwan. We believe that the FLUed model represents an effective tool for public health agencies responsible for initiating early responses to potential pandemics.

  14. Standard regulation of obligatory immunoprevention of flu in a control system of incidence of health workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Zobov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In article the interconnected provisions of the federal legislation and regulations of federal executive authorities regulating a question of obligatory immunization of health workers against flu in aspect of legal consequences of refusal of her are considered. The analysis of the existing regulations and materials of jurisprudence concerning carrying out obligatory vaccination of health workers against flu is carried out. By results of the analysis it is shown that today a problematic issue is absence of the accurate standardly consolidated criteria of reference of these or those categories of medical personnel to group of the subjects of obligatory immunization performing works with sick infectious diseases and, respectively, against flu. It doesn’t allow the management of the medical organizations to differentiate specifically mentioned professions and positions owing to what the requirement about obligatory carrying out preventive inoculations against flu of those health workers whose obligatory vaccination isn’t provided actually is compulsion to vaccination. Therefore, the subsequent discharge from work in case of refusal it работни from carrying out an inoculation strikes at his rights (as in this case, for example, time of discharge isn’t subject to payment and inclusion in the length of service granting the right for the annual paid vacation and is illegal.It is offered to accept as such criterion the labor function fixed by the statutory act of authorized federal executive authority for concrete positions of employees of the medical organizations providing performance of work with sick infectious diseases. The recommendations to heads of the medical organizations concerning the publication of local acts on the organization of vaccinal prevention of flu and adoption of administrative decisions after written refusals of vaccination are provided.

  15. Panblok-H1+advax H1N1/2009pdm vaccine: Insights into rapid development of a delta inulin adjuvanted recombinant pandemic influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Sajkov, Dimitar; Gordon, David; Cox, Manon M J; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2017-06-03

    Timely vaccine supply is critical during influenza pandemics but is impeded by current virus-based manufacturing methods. The 2009 H1N1/2009pdm 'swine flu' pandemic reinforced the need for innovation in pandemic vaccine design. We report on insights gained during rapid development of a pandemic vaccine based on recombinant haemagglutinin (rHA) formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (Panblok-H1/Advax). Panblok-H1/Advax was designed and manufactured within 1 month of the pandemic declaration by WHO and successfully entered human clinical testing in under 3 months from first isolation and sequencing of the novel pandemic virus, requiring several major challenges to be overcome. Panblok-H1/Advax successfully induced neutralising antibodies against the pandemic strain, but also induced cross-neutralising antibodies in a subset of subjects against an H1N1 strain (A/Puerto Rico/8/34) derived from the 1918 Spanish flu, highlighting the possibility to use Advax to induce more broadly cross-protective antibody responses. Interestingly, the rHA from H1N1/2009pdm exhibited variants in the receptor binding domain that had a major impact on receptor binding and hemagglutination ability. We used an in silico structural modeling approach to better understand the unusual behavior of the novel hemagglutinin, thereby demonstrating the power of computational modeling approaches for rapid characterization of new pandemic viruses. While challenges remain in ensuring ultrafast vaccine access for the entire population in response to future pandemics, the adjuvanted recombinant Panblok-H1/Advax vaccine proved its utility during a real-life pandemic situation.

  16. Antigenic analysis of classical swine fever virus E2 glycoprotein using pig antibodies identifies residues contributing to antigenic variation of the vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jinrong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein E2, the immunodominant protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV, can induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protective immunity in pigs. Our previous phylogenetic analysis showed that subgroup 2.1 viruses branched away from subgroup 1.1, the vaccine C-strain lineage, and became dominant in China. The E2 glycoproteins of CSFV C-strain and recent subgroup 2.1 field isolates are genetically different. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated how this diversity affects antigenicity of the protein. Results Antigenic variation of glycoprotein E2 was observed not only between CSFV vaccine C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains, but also among strains of the same subgroup 2.1 as determined by ELISA-based binding assay using pig antisera to the C-strain and a representative subgroup 2.1 strain QZ-07 currently circulating in China. Antigenic incompatibility of E2 proteins markedly reduced neutralization efficiency against heterologous strains. Single amino acid substitutions of D705N, L709P, G713E, N723S, and S779A on C-strain recombinant E2 (rE2 proteins significantly increased heterologous binding to anti-QZ-07 serum, suggesting that these residues may be responsible for the antigenic variation between the C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains. Notably, a G713E substitution caused the most dramatic enhancement of binding of the variant C-strain rE2 protein to anti-QZ-07 serum. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the glutamic acid residue at this position is conserved within group 2 strains, while the glycine residue is invariant among the vaccine strains, highlighting the role of the residue at this position as a major determinant of antigenic variation of E2. A variant Simpson's index analysis showed that both codons and amino acids of the residues contributing to antigenic variation have undergone similar diversification. Conclusions These results demonstrate that CSFV vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains

  17. Swine-Origin Influenza A Outbreak 2009 at Shinshu University, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washizuka Shinsuke

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A worldwide outbreak of swine flu H1N1 pandemic influenza occurred in April 2009. To determine the mechanism underlying the spread of infection, we prospectively evaluated a survey implemented at a local university. Methods Between August 2009 and March 2010, we surveyed 3 groups of subjects: 2318 children in six schools attached to the Faculty of Education, 11424 university students, and 3344 staff members. Subjects with influenza-like symptoms who were diagnosed with swine flu at hospitals or clinics were defined as swine flu patients and asked to make a report using a standardized form. Results After the start of the pandemic, a total of 2002 patients (11.7% were registered in the survey. These patients included 928 schoolchildren (40.0%, 1016 university students (8.9%, and 58 staff members (1.7%. The incidence in schoolchildren was significantly higher than in the other 2 groups (P Conclusion Schoolchildren and university students are vulnerable to swine flu, suggesting that avoidance of close contact, especially among these young people, may be effective way in controlling future severe influenza pandemics, especially at educational institutions.

  18. Vaccine Effectiveness - How Well Does the Seasonal Flu Vaccine Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virus Testing Clinical Signs & Symptoms of Influenza Symptoms & Laboratory Diagnosis Information for Clinicians on Rapid Diagnostic Testing for ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  19. The 2014 French health campaign reminds us that “flu must be taken seriously”

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2014-01-01

    The fact is that 5-10% of the global adult population and 20-30% of children worldwide catch the flu every year. The illness can lead to hospitalisation and death, mainly in people who are considered high-risk (infants, the elderly, and those with chronic illnesses). According to the WHO, every year, flu epidemics are responsible for approximately three to five million cases of serious illness and for 250,000 to 500,000 deaths worldwide.   Vaccination is the most effective way of avoiding the illness and any serious consequences and protecting those around you. Safe and effective vaccines are available and have been used for more than 60 years. Remember, anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor) with their dose of vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement through UNIQA. NB: The Medical Service cannot provide this vaccinat...

  20. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs immunized with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine and subsequently infected with an antigenically divergent virus of the same HA subtype. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines administered intranasally h...

  1. MODEL SEIR UNTUK EPIDEMI FLU BABI PADA POPULASI BABI DENGAN LAJU KONTAK JENUH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kharis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Babi merupakan inang alami dari virus influensa yang secara anatomis, fisiologis, dan imunitas mirip (similar dengan yang ada pada manusia. Virus influenza subtipe A yang ada pada manusia yaitu H1N1, H3N2 dan H1N2 merupakan enzootic pada populasi babi di dunia. babi dapat terinfeksi oleh turunan-turunan virus influenza tipe A dari manusia maupun dari burung dan dalam hal ini dianggap sebagai inang sementara (Intermediate hosts dari turunan-turunan virus flu babi yang berpotensi menyebabkan epidemi bahkan pandemi. Evolusi antigenik dari virus influenza pada babi terjadi dengan laju sekitar 6 kali lebih lambat dibandingkan dengan virus influenza pada manusia. Dalam tulisan ini akan dikaji model matematika untuk epidemi flu babi pada populasi babi. Model yang diberikan merupakan model deterministik dengan laju kontak jenuh yang merupakan perumuman dari laju kontak standar. Perumuman ini dinyatakan dengan adanya probabilitas suatu individu melakukan kontak yang dinyatakan sebagai suatu fungsi dari populasi. Pengkajian yang dilakukan meliputi penentuan titik ekuilibrium model matematika dan analisa kestabilannya. Diharapkan hasil kajian ini dapat bermanfaat dalam penanggulangan wabah flu babi pada sumber utama yaitu populasi babi sehingga dapat dilakukan pencegahan sebelum mewabah di populasi manusia. Pigs are a natural host of influenza virus that are similar anatomically, physiologically, and immunity which in humans. Influenza viruses of A subtype in humans are H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2. They are enzootic in the swine population in the world. Pigs can be infected by strains of type A influenza viruses from humans or from birds. Pigs are considered as a temporary host (intermediate hosts of the derivatives of the swine flu virus that has the potential to cause epidemics and even pandemics. Antigenic evolution of influenza viruses in pigs occurred at rate about 6 times slower than the influenza viruses in humans. In this paper the mathematical model

  2. Narcolepsy and H1N1 vaccination: a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebault, Simon; Vincent, Angela; Gringras, Paul

    2013-11-01

    A number of European countries have reported a dramatic increase in the rates of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy in children immunized with a split-virion adjuvanted swine flu vaccine. Here, we review the strengths and weaknesses of these epidemiological studies and possible neuroimmunological mechanisms. Initial concerns of a 13-fold increased relative risk of narcolepsy were raised by the Scandinavian health protection agencies in 2010. Subsequent retrospective studies support these findings in Canada, France, Ireland, England and Denmark. The cases are predominantly young children who present with severe and rapid onset of cataplexy as well as narcolepsy often within a few weeks of vaccination. The proposed mechanism for postvaccination narcolepsy is one in which an environmental trigger causes or enhances an antibody-mediated autoimmune response in patients with a preexisting genetic susceptibility. However, there have not yet been any reports of specific autoimmunity, either antibody or T-cell-mediated. There is a strong association between narcolepsy and H1N1 vaccination. However, whether this reflects a true increase in affected individuals or a hastening of disease onset in individuals who would otherwise have developed narcolepsy later will become clear in the coming years. The pathological explanation of this association and narcolepsy is likely to be autoimmune, although supportive evidence is lacking.Video abstract available: See the Video Supplementary Digital Content 1 (http://links.lww.com/COPM/A9).

  3. CRISPR-Cas9, a tool to efficiently increase the development of recombinant African swine fever viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    African swine fever is a contagious and often lethal disease for domestic pigs with a significant economic impact on the swine industry. The etiological agent, African swine fever virus (ASFV), is a highly structurally complex double stranded DNA virus. No effective vaccines or antiviral treatment ...

  4. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MedImmune Vaccines (formerly Aviron) has developed a cold-adapted live influenza virus vaccine [FluMist] that can be administered by nasal spray. FluMist is the first live virus influenza vaccine and also the first nasally administered vaccine to be marketed in the US. The vaccine will be formulated to contain live attenuated (att) influenza virus reassortants of the strains recommended by the US Public Health Service for each 'flu season. The vaccine is termed cold-adapted (ca) because the virus has been adapted to replicate efficiently at 25 degrees C in the nasal passages, which are below normal body temperature. The strains used in the seasonal vaccine will also be made temperature sensitive (ts) so that their replication is restricted at 37 degrees C (Type B strains) and 39 degrees C (Type A strains). The combined effect of the antigenic properties and the att, ca and ts phenotypes of the influenza strains contained in the vaccine enables the viruses to replicate in the nasopharynx to produce protective immunity. The original formulation of FluMist requires freezer storage throughout distribution. Because many international markets do not have distribution channels well suited to the sale of frozen vaccines, Wyeth and MedImmune are collaborating to develop a second generation, refrigerator-stable, liquid trivalent cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T), which is in phase III trials. Initially, the frozen formulation will only be available in the US. For the 2003-2004 season, FluMist will contain A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) (A/Moscow/10/99-like) and B/Hong Kong/330/2001. Aviron was acquired by MedImmune on 15 January 2002. Aviron is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of MedImmune and is called MedImmune Vaccines. Aviron acquired FluMist in March 1995 through a Co-operative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US NIAID, and a licensing agreement with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. In June 2000, the CRADA was

  5. Swine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plain, Ronald L; Lawrence, John D

    2003-07-01

    The US swine industry is large and growing. The quantity of pork desired by consumers of US pork is growing at the rate of 1.5%/y. New production systems and new technology have enabled production per sow to grow at a rate of 4% annually in recent years. Consequently, the number of sows in the United States is declining. Because productivity growth is outpacing demand growth, the deflated price of hogs and pork is declining. Hog production and prices continue to exhibit strong seasonal and cyclic patterns. Pork production is usually lowest in the summer and highest in the fall. Production and prices tend to follow 4-year patterns. The US swine industry continues to evolve toward fewer and larger producers who rely on contracts for both hog production and marketing. In 2000, over half of the hogs marketed were from approximately 156 firms marketing more than 50,000 head annually. These producers finished 60% of their production in contract facilities. Over 90% of their marketings were under contract or were owned by a packer. These producers expressed a high level of satisfaction with hog production. Both they and their contract growers were satisfied with production contracts. These large producers were satisfied with their marketing contracts and planned to continue them in the future. The hog industry has changed a great deal in the last decade. There is little reason to believe this rapid rate of change will not continue. This swine industry is highly competitive and profit driven. Profit margins are too small to allow producers the luxury of ignoring new technology and innovative production systems. Consequently, hog production will continue its rapid evolution from traditional agriculture to typical industry.

  6. What You Can Do to Stop the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu What You Can Do to Stop the Flu Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents To ... Health and Human Services: http://flu.gov NIH Flu Research to Results Scientists at the National Institute ...

  7. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  8. 75 FR 2049 - National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Influenza Vaccination Week. I encourage all Americans to observe this week by getting the H1N1 flu vaccine... Proclamation 8472--National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0...;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8472 of January 8, 2010 National Influenza Vaccination Week...

  9. Vaccines for Your Children: Protect Your Child at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about the 6 month shots, side effects, flu vaccine, and child care requirements. 7 to 11 Months Learn about ... vaccines before college. Adoption and Vaccines Learn about vaccines for international adoption, domestic adoption, ... Protect Your Child Home Pregnancy Birth 1 to 2 months 4 ...

  10. Healthcare workers under a mandated H1N1 vaccination policy with employment termination penalty: a survey to assess employee perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Lori; Wagner, Stephanie; Chan, Shu

    2014-08-20

    The ethical debate over mandatory healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccination is a heated one. Our study hospital instituted a mandatory employee influenza vaccination policy for the 2009-2010 influenza season during the highly publicized pandemic of the H1N1 "Swine Flu." Under this mandate there was no informed declination option, and termination of employment was the consequence for noncompliance. Our objective was to examine HCW perceptions of the H1N1 influenza virus, the vaccine, and the strict mandated vaccination policy. A survey was designed, distributed, and anonymously collected. In total, 202 completed questionnaires were obtained via accidental sampling by the investigators achieving a 100% response rate. Data analysis showed that 31.7% of surveyed HCWs felt the mandate was an infringement on their rights and 3.5% of HCWs would electively seek employment elsewhere. Significantly more nurses and clerks/technicians were opposed to the mandate compared to other types of employees. 96% felt that the mandating hospital should be liable should a significant adverse effect occur from receiving the vaccine. While the mandate helped to increase HCW influenza vaccination rates dramatically, the strict consequence of employment termination created negative feelings of coercion. Adopting a policy that includes a declination option with mandatory masking during influenza season might be a more widely acceptable and still adequate approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The influence of induced parturition and the moment of vaccination against Swine erysipelas during lactation on the weaning-to-oestrus interval in sows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, M.C.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Vesseur, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of vaccination during lactation with PorciW Ery+Parvo on the weaning-to-oestrus interval and the reproduction in sows. An exploratory study had indicated that vaccination during particularly the first few days of lactation might lead to a

  12. Diva vaccines that reduce virus transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.

    1999-01-01

    This brief review deals with the effect of diva (Differentiating Infected from VAccinated individuals) vaccines (also termed marker vaccines) on transmission of herpesviruses and pestiviruses in swine and cattle. Pseudorabies and bovine herpesvirus 1 diva vaccines have been demonstrated to reduce

  13. Combined administration of synthetic RNA and a conventional vaccine improves immune responses and protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Belén; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez Pulido, Miguel; Mateos, Francisco; Lorenzo, Gema; Cardillo, Sabrina; Smitsaart, Eliana; Sobrino, Francisco; Sáiz, Margarita

    2017-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease and a major concern in animal health worldwide. We have previously reported the use of RNA transcripts mimicking structural domains in the non-coding regions of the FMDV RNA as potent type-I interferon (IFN) inducers showing antiviral effect in vivo, as well as their immunomodulatory properties in combination with an FMD vaccine in mice. Here, we describe the enhancing effect of RNA delivery on the immunogenicity and protection induced by a suboptimal dose of a conventional FMD vaccine in pigs. Animals receiving the RNA developed earlier and higher levels of neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous isolates, compared to those immunized with the vaccine alone, and had higher anti-FMDV titers at late times post-vaccination. RNA delivery also induced higher specific T-cell response and protection levels against FMDV challenge. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pigs inoculated with RNA and the vaccine had a higher IFN-γ specific response than those from pigs receiving the vaccine alone. When challenged with FMDV, all three animals immunized with the conventional vaccine developed antibodies to the non-structural viral proteins 3ABC and two of them developed severe signs of disease. In the group receiving the vaccine together with the RNA, two pigs were fully protected while one showed delayed and mild signs of disease. Our results support the immunomodulatory effect of these RNA molecules in natural hosts and suggest their potential use for improvement of FMD vaccines strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cross-protective efficacy of engineering serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine against the two pandemic strains in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haixue; Lian, Kaiqi; Yang, Fan; Jin, Ye; Zhu, Zixiang; Guo, Jianhong; Cao, Weijun; Liu, Huanan; He, Jijun; Zhang, Keshan; Li, Dan; Liu, Xiangtao

    2015-10-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious vesicular disease that affects domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals worldwide. Recently, a series of outbreaks of type A FMDV occurred in Southeast Asian countries, China, the Russia Federation, Mongolia, Kazakhstan and South Korea. The FMD virus (A/GDMM/CHA/2013) from China's Guangdong province (2013) is representative of those responsible for the latest epidemic, and has low amino acid identity (93.9%) in VP1 protein with the epidemic strain A/WH/CHA/09 from Wuhan, China in 2009. Both of isolates belong to the Sea-97 genotype of ASIA topotype. Therefore, the application of a new vaccine strain with cross-protective efficacy is of fundamental importance to control the spread of the two described pandemic strains. A chimeric strain rA/P1-FMDV constructed by our lab previously through replacing the P1 gene in the vaccine strain O/CHA/99 with that from the epidemic stain A/WH/CHA/09, has been demonstrated to exhibit good growth characteristics in culture, and the rA/P1-FMDV inactivated vaccine can provide protection against epidemic strain A/WH/CHA/09 in cattle. However, it is still unclear whether the vaccine produces efficient protection against the new pandemic strain (A/GDMM/CHA/2013). Here, vaccine matching and pig 50% protective dose (PD50) tests were performed to assess the vaccine potency. The vaccine matching test showed cross-reactivity of sera from full dose vaccine vaccinated pigs with A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 isolates, with average r1 values of 0.94±0.12 and 0.68±0.06 (r1≥0.3), which indicates that the rA/P1-FMDV vaccine is likely to confer good cross-protection against the two isolates. When challenged with two pandemic isolates A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 strain, the vaccine achieved 12.51 PD50 and 10.05 PD50 per dose (2.8μg), respectively. The results indicated that the rA/P1-FMDV inactivated vaccine could protect pigs against both A/WH/CHA/09 and A/GDMM/CHA/2013 pandemic isolates

  15. Surfing the web during pandemic flu: availability of World Health Organization recommendations on prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravà Lucilla

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People often search for information on influenza A(H1N1v prevention on the web. The extent to which information found on the Internet is consistent with recommendations issued by the World Health Organization is unknown. Methods We conducted a search for "swine flu" accessing 3 of the most popular search engines through different proxy servers located in 4 English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, UK, USA. We explored each site resulting from the searches, up to 4 clicks starting from the search engine page, analyzing availability of World Health Organization recommendations for swine flu prevention. Results Information on hand cleaning was reported on 79% of the 147 websites analyzed; staying home when sick was reported on 77.5% of the websites; disposing tissues after sneezing on 75.5% of the websites. Availability of other recommendations was lower. The probability of finding preventative recommendations consistent with World Health Organization varied by country, type of website, and search engine. Conclusions Despite media coverage on H1N1 influenza, relevant information for prevention is not easily found on the web. Strategies to improve information delivery to the general public through this channel should be improved.

  16. Non-hydrolyzed in digestive tract and blood natural L-carnosine peptide ("bioactivated Jewish penicillin") as a panacea of tomorrow for various flu ailments: signaling activity attenuating nitric oxide (NO) production, cytostasis, and NO-dependent inhibition of influenza virus replication in macrophages in the human body infected with the virulent swine influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2013-01-01

    Influenza (flu) is caused by a highly contagious virus that is spread by coughs and sneezes. Flu symptoms include high fever, chills and sweating, sore throat, weakness, headache, muscle and joint pains, and cough. Older people and those with an underlying medical condition are more likely to develop serious complications, including secondary bacterial pneumonia, primary influenza pneumonia, and inflammation of the brain or heart. There are three types of flu virus: A, B, and C. The flu virus has a unique ability to change its surface structure. This allows it to escape recognition by the body's immune system and cause widespread illness (epidemics and pandemics). Most cases of influenza occur within a 6- to 8-week period during winter and spring. Epidemics occur when there are minor changes in the nature of the virus so that more people within a community are susceptible. Influenza A is more likely to cause epidemics. Pandemics (worldwide epidemics) occur when there are major changes in the virus so that the disease affects a large proportion of people in a geographic region or on more than one continent. The findings presented in this article have many important implications for understanding the influenza A (H1N1) viral pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment. Direct viral cytotoxicity (referred cytopathic effect) is only a fraction of several types of events induced by virus infection. Nitric oxide and oxygen free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-·) are generated markedly in influenza A (including H1N1) virus-infected host boosts, and these molecular species are identified as the potent pathogenic agents. The mutual interaction of nitric oxide (NO) with O2-· resulting in the formation of peroxynitrite is operative in the pathogenic mechanism of influenza virus pneumonia. Influenza virus infection involves pathological events in which oxygen free radicals play an important role in the pathogenesis. The toxicity and reactivity of oxygen radicals generated

  17. Likely correlation between sources of information and acceptability of A/H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus vaccine in Marseille, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougairède, Antoine; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Ninove, Laetitia; Sartor, Catherine; Badiaga, Sékéné; Botelho, Elizabeth; Brouqui, Philippe; Zandotti, Christine; De Lamballerie, Xavier; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel; Gould, Ernest A; Charrel, Rémi N; Raoult, Didier

    2010-06-25

    In France, there was a reluctance to accept vaccination against the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus despite government recommendation and investment in the vaccine programme. We examined the willingness of different populations to accept A/H1N1 vaccination (i) in a French hospital among 3315 employees immunized either by in-house medical personnel or mobile teams of MDs and (ii) in a shelter housing 250 homeless persons. Google was used to assess the volume of enquiries concerning incidence of influenza. We analyzed the information on vaccination provided by Google, the website of the major French newspapers, and PubMed. Two trust Surveys were used to assess public opinion on the trustworthiness of people in different professions. Paramedics were significantly more reluctant to accept immunisation than qualified medical staff. Acceptance was significantly increased when recommended directly by MDs. Anecdotal cases of directly observed severe infections were followed by enhanced acceptance of paramedical staff. Scientific literature was significantly more in favour of vaccination than Google and French newspaper websites. In the case of the newspaper websites, information correlated with their recognised political reputations, although they would presumably claim independence from political bias. The Trust Surveys showed that politicians were highly dis-trusted in contrast with doctors and pharmacists who were considered much more trustworthy. The low uptake of the vaccine could reflect failure to convey high quality medical information and advice relating to the benefits of being vaccinated. We believe that the media and internet contributed to this problem by raising concerns within the general population and that failure to involve GPs in the control programme may have been a mistake. GPs are highly regarded by the public and can provide face-to-face professional advice and information. The top-down strategy of vaccine programme management and information

  18. Why do I need it? I am not at risk! Public perceptions towards the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Kirsten F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the 30th September 2009, the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine was made available to adults and children aged 10 years and over, in Australia. Acceptance of a novel vaccine is influenced by perceptions of risk including risk of infection, risk of death or severe illness and risk of serious vaccine side-effects. We surveyed a sample of residents from Sydney, Australia to ascertain their risk perception, attitudes towards the pandemic and willingness to accept the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine. Methods We sampled residents using a cross-sectional intercept design during the WHO Phase 6. Members of the public were approached in shopping and pedestrian malls to undertake the survey during September and October 2009. The survey measured perceived risk, seriousness of disease, recent behavioural changes, likely acceptance of the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine and issues relating to uptake and perceived safety. Results Of the 627 respondents, the majority felt that they had a "very low to low" (332/627, 52.9% risk of acquiring H1N1. 24.5% (154/627 of respondents believed that the disease would "very seriously or extremely" affect their health. Nearly half (305/627, 48.6% reported that in response to the "swine flu" outbreak they had undertaken one or more of the investigated behavioural changes. Overall, the self-reported likelihood of accepting vaccination against novel H1N1 was 54.7% (343/627. Conclusions While, most participants did not believe they were at high risk of acquiring pandemic H1N1 2009, over half of the sample indicated that they would accept the vaccine. Participants who were vaccinated against the seasonal influenza were more likely to receive the H1N1 vaccine. Concerns about safety, the possibility of side effects and the vaccine development process need to be addressed.

  19. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Sheena Aislinn; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-01-01

    Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.

  20. Vaccination Confidence and Parental Refusal/Delay of Early Childhood Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa B Gilkey

    Full Text Available To support efforts to address parental hesitancy towards early childhood vaccination, we sought to validate the Vaccination Confidence Scale using data from a large, population-based sample of U.S. parents.We used weighted data from 9,354 parents who completed the 2011 National Immunization Survey. Parents reported on the immunization history of a 19- to 35-month-old child in their households. Healthcare providers then verified children's vaccination status for vaccines including measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR, varicella, and seasonal flu. We used separate multivariable logistic regression models to assess associations between parents' mean scores on the 8-item Vaccination Confidence Scale and vaccine refusal, vaccine delay, and vaccination status.A substantial minority of parents reported a history of vaccine refusal (15% or delay (27%. Vaccination confidence was negatively associated with refusal of any vaccine (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.63 as well as refusal of MMR, varicella, and flu vaccines specifically. Negative associations between vaccination confidence and measures of vaccine delay were more moderate, including delay of any vaccine (OR = 0.81, 95% CI, 0.76-0.86. Vaccination confidence was positively associated with having received vaccines, including MMR (OR = 1.53, 95% CI, 1.40-1.68, varicella (OR = 1.54, 95% CI, 1.42-1.66, and flu vaccines (OR = 1.32, 95% CI, 1.23-1.42.Vaccination confidence was consistently associated with early childhood vaccination behavior across multiple vaccine types. Our findings support expanding the application of the Vaccination Confidence Scale to measure vaccination beliefs among parents of young children.

  1. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    This year, as usual, the Medical Service is helping to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal flu is especially recommended for anyone who suffers from chronic pulmonary, cardio-vascular or kidney disease or diabetes, is recovering from a serious illness or major surgery, or is over 65 years of age. The flu virus is transmitted through the air and through contact with contaminated surfaces, so frequent hand-washing with soap and/or an antiseptic hand wash is of great importance. As soon as the first symptoms appear (fever above 38°, shivering, coughing, muscle and/or joint pains, generalised weakness), you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. Anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor), with their dose of vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement through UNIQA...

  2. Flu Shot Falls Short More Often for Obese People: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166544.html Flu Shot Falls Short More Often for Obese People: ... 2017 TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A flu shot is the best way to avoid getting ...

  3. Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Know the Difference for Best Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe October 2014 Print this issue Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Know the Difference for Best Treatment ... Allergy Therapy Seeking Allergy Relief Wise Choices Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Treatment depends on which you have. ...

  4. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000250.htm Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... Nasal congestion Sneezing Sore throat Cough Headache The flu is an infection of the nose, throat, and ...

  5. Seasonal influenza vaccination of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The elderly are at increased risk of the complications of seasonal influenza. Annual vaccination is therefore recommended. However, two systematic reviews published by the Cochrane collaboration have highlighted a number of outstanding issues. This article examines whether annual influenza vaccination of the elderly and their regular contacts is still supported by the available scientific evidence. The randomised trials included in one of the Cochrane reviews suggest that influenza vaccination reduces the incidence of flu-like syndromes and laboratory-confirmed influenza in the elderly. There are no robust randomised trials specifically designed to assess whether vaccination of the elderly prevents influenza complications. Two case-control studies showed a statistical correlation between vaccination and a lower risk of death from influenza complications. Cohort studies have also shown that complications are less frequent when the vaccine strains correspond to circulating strains. Because of a patient selection bias, non-randomised studies seem to overestimate the efficacy of vaccination. Three randomised trials showed that vaccination of care home staff reduced mortality among elderly residents during seasonal flu epidemics. No such effect was observed in another trial, possibly because a large proportion (32%) of staff in the control institutions had also been vaccinated. In practice, influenza vaccination of the elderly with risk factors for complications is justified, especially for care home residents, their regular contacts and healthcare workers. Seasonal flu vaccination of healthy people over 65 provides limited benefit but its harm-benefit balance remains favourable. More studies of routine influenza vaccination of the elderly are needed.

  6. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lun, Aaron Tl; Wong, Jason Wh; Downard, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    ... pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible...

  7. Is It a Cold or the Flu (For Parents)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Confident Kids Is It a Cold or the Flu? KidsHealth > For Parents > Is It a Cold or the Flu? Print A A A en español ¿Es un ... cough, and high fever — could it be the flu that's been going around? Or just a common ...

  8. Avian Flu Epidemic 2003: Public health consequences. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman A; Mulder YM; Leeuw JRJ de; Meijer A; Du Ry van Beest Holle M; Kamst RA; Velden PG van der; Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Koopmans MPG; Ruijten MWMM; Instituut voor Psychotrauma; CIE; MGO; LIS

    2004-01-01

    Executive summary Avian flu epidemic 2003: public health consequences.Risk factors, health, well-being, health care needs and preventive measures during the H7N7 avian flu outbreak control in the Netherlands.An estimated thousand people, possibly more have been infected with avian flu during the

  9. Updates on Influenza Vaccination in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Angela J P; Grohskopf, Lisa A

    2018-03-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for all children 6 months of age and older who do not have contraindications. This article provides an overview of information concerning burden of influenza among children in the United States; US-licensed influenza vaccines; vaccine immunogenicity, effectiveness, and safety; and recent updates relevant to use of these vaccines in pediatric populations. Influenza antiviral medications are discussed. Details concerning vaccine-related topics may be found in the current US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations for use of influenza vaccines (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/vacc-specific/flu.html). Additional information on influenza antivirals is located at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/index.htm. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Influenza Vaccination Beliefs and Practices in Elderly Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikin, Sharon; Scott, Vanessa; Shea, Steven; LaRussa, Philip; Stockwell, Melissa S

    2017-07-10

    The majority of influenza related deaths and hospitalizations occur among individuals ≥65 years, yet the national influenza vaccination rate for this group is 63% and is lower in the Hispanic population. Previous studies have described negative predictors of vaccination; however, there is a knowledge gap of how influenza vaccine-specific beliefs affect vaccination rates. We examined the relationship between influenza vaccine health beliefs and vaccination behaviors in a cross sectional sample of 200 primarily Hispanic patients aged ≥65 years in an academic general internal medicine clinic. Participants were asked about perceptions of influenza vaccine effectiveness and safety. Interview responses regarding influenza vaccine concerns were evaluated qualitatively with conventional content analysis. Logistic regression evaluated associations between beliefs and self-reported vaccination the previous year, adjusted for age, gender, and language. Of those approached to complete the questionnaire, 88% participated. Self-reported influenza vaccination rate during the study year was 75%. Only 46.5% endorsed the belief that influenza vaccine is very effective and 47% that it is very safe. Many stated specific concerns about flu vaccine including that it causes side effects/adverse outcomes, is not effective, vaccine components are harmful, and vaccination is not necessary. Belief that the flu shot causes the flu and concern for variability of the flu shot were associated with reduced odds of vaccination (aOR 0.19, 95% CI [0.05, 0.83] and 0.06 [0.006, 0.63] respectively). The patient-perceived distinction between cold, flu, and other symptoms warrants further exploration. This information can be used to develop targeted communication to promote vaccination.

  11. [Differentiation of influenza (Flu) type A, type B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohiyama, Risa; Miyazawa, Takashi; Shibano, Nobuko; Inano, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Because it is not easy to differentiate Influenza virus (Flu) from RS virus (RSV) just by clinical symptoms, to accurately diagnose those viruses in conjunction with patient's clinical symptoms, rapid diagnostic kits has been used separately for each of those viruses. In our new study, we have developed a new rapid diagnostic kit, QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV. The kit can detect Flu A, Flu B, and RSV antigens with a single sample collection and an assay. Total of 2,873 cases (including nasopharyngeal swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates specimens) in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 seasons were evaluated with QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV and a commercially available kit. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Flu type A, type B, and RSV were above 95% when compared to commercially available kits (QuickNavi™-Flu and QuickNavi™-RSV) and considered to be equivalent to the commercially available kits. In 2011/2012 season, RSV infections increased prior to Flu season and continued during the peak of the Flu season. The kit can contribute to accurate diagnosis of Flu and RSV infections since co-infection cases have also been reported during the 2011/2012 season. QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV is useful for differential diagnosis of respiratory infectious diseases since it can detect Flu type A, type B, and RSV virus antigens with a single sample collection.

  12. [The control of Aujeszky's disease using surface vaccination. 2. Serologic studies of the occurrence of latent infection by Aujeszky's disease virus in fattening swine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse Beilage, E; Friedel, K; Hirchert, R; Wagner, C; Bollwahn, W

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prove in a region in the North-West of Germany that there is the possibility to decrease the prevalence of latent Aujeszky's Disease infections by means of a systematic vaccination. For this, the most important precondition of the success in a high population immunity that is maintained also in the finishing pig until slaughter. Since it is known that maternal antibodies interfere with the active immunization in the prefattening period, procedures were to be found that guarantee a high immunity in spite of the colostral antibodies. The results of the study show that the existing recommendation for vaccinating fattening pigs are sufficient for the prevalence of latent infections. They also confirm the necessity to carry out a check- and slaughter policy at the end of the eradication program.

  13. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Are we ready for the avian flu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    It may be tempting to dismiss headlines about a potential avian flu pandemic as "the sky is falling" sensationalism, but experts continue to warn that the disease is likely to show up here in the not-too-distant future. What must hospitals do to prepare for a sudden influx of patients and other huge demands such a crisis would create?

  15. Deck Yourself with Flu Protection Song

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-22

    This song (sung to the tune of Deck the Halls) describes actions you can take to protect yourself and others from the flu. Sing along!  Created: 12/22/2009 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID), Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ).   Date Released: 12/22/2009.

  16. Alternative way to test the efficacy of swine FMD vaccines: measurement of pigs median infected dose (PID50) and regulation of live virus challenge dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Lu, Zeng-Jun; Xie, Bao-Xia; Sun, Pu; Chen, Ying-Li; Fu, Yuan-Fang; Liu, Zai-Xin

    2010-09-08

    Foot-and -mouth disease to pigs is serious recently around the world. "Vaccination prevention" is still an important policy. OIE specifies 10,000 TCID50(0.2 ml) of virulent virus for challenge test in pigs to test the potency of FMD vaccine by intradermal route inoculating the virus in the heel bulbs of one foot or by intramuscular route administering into one site of the neck behind the ear. Convenience and speediness are available in the process of potency test of commercial FMD vaccine. We selected the route of "administering into one site of the muscular part of the neck behind the ear" because of convenience and speediness. However, it was difficult to infect control pigs even up to 100,000TCID50, so we changed the challenged virus from cell-passaged strain to suckling mice-passaged one, measured its PID50 (pigs median infected dose) and defined the virus challenge dose as 1000PID50. Meanwhile, we arranged the number of control pigs from two to three for easy evaluation.

  17. New pandemics: HIV and AIDS, HCV and chronic hepatitis, Influenza virus and flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Éric A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New pandemics are a serious threat to the health of the entire world. They are essentially of viral origin and spread at large speed. A meeting on this topic was held in Lyon, France, within the XIXth Jacques Cartier Symposia, a series of France-Québec meetings held every year. New findings on HIV and AIDS, on HCV and chronic hepatitis, and an update on influenza virus and flu were covered during this meeting on December 4 and 5, 2006. Aspects of viral structure, virus-host interactions, antiviral defenses, drugs and vaccinations, and epidemiological aspects were discussed for HIV and HCV. Old and recent data on the flu epidemics ended this meeting.

  18. Influenza forecasting with Google Flu Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Andrea Freyer; Jalalpour, Mehdi; Gel, Yulia; Levin, Scott; Torcaso, Fred; Igusa, Takeru; Rothman, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    We developed a practical influenza forecast model based on real-time, geographically focused, and easy to access data, designed to provide individual medical centers with advanced warning of the expected number of influenza cases, thus allowing for sufficient time to implement interventions. Secondly, we evaluated the effects of incorporating a real-time influenza surveillance system, Google Flu Trends, and meteorological and temporal information on forecast accuracy. Forecast models designed to predict one week in advance were developed from weekly counts of confirmed influenza cases over seven seasons (2004-2011) divided into seven training and out-of-sample verification sets. Forecasting procedures using classical Box-Jenkins, generalized linear models (GLM), and generalized linear autoregressive moving average (GARMA) methods were employed to develop the final model and assess the relative contribution of external variables such as, Google Flu Trends, meteorological data, and temporal information. A GARMA(3,0) forecast model with Negative Binomial distribution integrating Google Flu Trends information provided the most accurate influenza case predictions. The model, on the average, predicts weekly influenza cases during 7 out-of-sample outbreaks within 7 cases for 83% of estimates. Google Flu Trend data was the only source of external information to provide statistically significant forecast improvements over the base model in four of the seven out-of-sample verification sets. Overall, the p-value of adding this external information to the model is 0.0005. The other exogenous variables did not yield a statistically significant improvement in any of the verification sets. Integer-valued autoregression of influenza cases provides a strong base forecast model, which is enhanced by the addition of Google Flu Trends confirming the predictive capabilities of search query based syndromic surveillance. This accessible and flexible forecast model can be used by

  19. Swine Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A Virus on a Canadian Research Farm Supports Human-to-Swine Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenliside, Julia; Wilkinson, Craig; Webby, Richard; Lu, Patricia; Sorensen, Ole; Fonseca, Kevin; Barman, Subrata; Rubrum, Adam; Stigger, Evelyn; Marrie, Thomas J.; Marshall, Frank; Spady, Donald W.; Hu, Jia; Loeb, Mark; Russell, Margaret L.; Babiuk, Lorne A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Swine outbreaks of pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) suggest human introduction of the virus into herds. This study investigates a pH1N1 outbreak occurring on a swine research farm with 37 humans and 1300 swine in Alberta, Canada, from 12 June through 4 July 2009. Methods. The staff was surveyed about symptoms, vaccinations, and livestock exposures. Clinical findings were recorded, and viral testing and molecular characterization of isolates from humans and swine were performed. Human serological testing and performance of the human influenza-like illness (ILI) case definition were also studied. Results. Humans were infected before swine. Seven of 37 humans developed ILI, and 2 (including the index case) were positive for pH1N1 by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Swine were positive for pH1N1 by RT-PCR 6 days after contact with the human index case and developed symptoms within 24 h of their positive viral test results. Molecular characterization of the entire viral genomes from both species showed minor nucleotide heterogeneity, with 1 amino acid change each in the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes. Sixty-seven percent of humans with positive serological test results and 94% of swine with positive swab specimens had few or no symptoms. Compared with serological testing, the human ILI case definition had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 33.3%. The only factor associated with seropositivity was working in the swine nursery. Conclusions. Epidemiologic data support human-to-swine transmission, and molecular characterization confirms that virtually identical viruses infected humans and swine in this outbreak. Both species had mild illness and recovered without sequelae. PMID:21148514

  20. Influenza A virus infections in swine: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, B H

    2014-03-01

    Influenza has been recognized as a respiratory disease in swine since its first appearance concurrent with the 1918 "Spanish flu" human pandemic. All influenza viruses of significance in swine are type A, subtype H1N1, H1N2, or H3N2 viruses. Influenza viruses infect epithelial cells lining the surface of the respiratory tract, inducing prominent necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis and variable interstitial pneumonia. Cell death is due to direct virus infection and to insult directed by leukocytes and cytokines of the innate immune system. The most virulent viruses consistently express the following characteristics of infection: (1) higher or more prolonged virus replication, (2) excessive cytokine induction, and (3) replication in the lower respiratory tract. Nearly all the viral proteins contribute to virulence. Pigs are susceptible to infection with both human and avian viruses, which often results in gene reassortment between these viruses and endemic swine viruses. The receptors on the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tract are major determinants of infection by influenza viruses from other hosts. The polymerases, especially PB2, also influence cross-species infection. Methods of diagnosis and characterization of influenza viruses that infect swine have improved over the years, driven both by the availability of new technologies and by the necessity of keeping up with changes in the virus. Testing of oral fluids from pigs for virus and antibody is a recent development that allows efficient sampling of large numbers of animals.

  1. Dietary Probiotic Compound Improves Reproductive Performance of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus-Infected Sows Reared in a Japanese Commercial Swine Farm under Vaccine Control Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takio Inatomi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactogenic immunity transferred to piglets after inoculation of a live vaccine to pregnant sows was proved limited to control porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED. Hence, here we evaluated the efficacy of administration of a probiotic compound containing Bacillus mesentericus, Clostridium butyricum, and Enterococcus faecalis together with a commercial live-attenuated PED vaccine (Nisseiken PED Live Vaccine, Nisseiken, Tokyo, Japan to improve the health and reproductive performance of PED-infected sows. Twenty pregnant sows in a PED-positive farm were equally divided into probiotics-administered (VP and control (VC sow groups. A commercial live-attenuated vaccine was injected as per the manufacturer’s instruction. The probiotic compound (15 g/day was orally administered to VP from 6 weeks pre-parturition to 7 days post-parturition (ppd7. VP had a significantly higher body weight at ppd7 than VC (191 vs 186 kg; P < 0.05. At day 3 post-parturition (ppd3 (4.18 vs 3.63 kg/day and ppd7 (5.14 vs 4.34 kg/day, milk produced by VP was significantly (P < 0.05 greater than that by VC. Total immunoglobulin (IgA and IgG concentrations at day 0 were significantly (P < 0.05 higher in whey of VP (1.9 and 6.6 g/dL, respectively than in that of VC (1.7 and 6.1 g/dL, respectively. However, total IgG concentration in whey of VP and VC at ppd3 and ppd7 did not differ. Antibody titer was significantly higher at day 0 in serum of VP than it was that of VC (60 vs 37 in geometric mean; P < 0.05. Likewise, the antibody titer in whey of VP and VC was found to be similar at day 0 (416 vs 208 in geometric mean; P = 0.13. Consequently, VP had fewer days between weaning and return to estrus than did VC (7 vs 10 days; P < 0.05. Moreover, piglets of VP had a significantly (P < 0.05 higher litter weight at birth (9,252 g/litter and a lower mortality (12% during suckling than those of VC (8,686 g/litter and 28%, respectively. In

  2. Hypersensitivity reaction to human papillomavirus vaccine due to polysorbate 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiu, Iuliana; Geuna, Massimo; Heffler, Enrico; Rolla, Giovanni

    2012-05-08

    A 17-year-old girl reported generalised urticaria, eyelid angioedema, rhino-conjunctivitis, dyspnoea and wheezing 1 h after third intramuscular administration of quadrivalent human papilloma virus vaccine (Gardasil). She was treated with antihistamine, and corticosteroids with prompt relief of rhinitis and dyspnoea, while urticaria and angioedema lasted 24 h. Intradermal test with Gardasil, which contains polysorbate 80 (PS80), resulted positive, while skin tests with the bivalent vaccine were negative. Prick test performed with PS80 resulted positive in the patient and negative in ten healthy controls. The CD203 basophil activation test result was negative for PS80 at all the tested dilutions and specific IgE was not found. As flu vaccine was recommended, the authors skin tested two flu vaccine, one containing PS80 (Fluarix, GSK), which resulted positive and another flu vaccine with no adjuvant or preservative (Vaxigrip, Sanofi Pasteur MSD), which gave negative results. The patient then received Vaxigrip without adverse reactions.

  3. Comparative evaluation of live marker vaccine candidates "CP7_E2alf" and "flc11" along with C-strain "Riems" after oral vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blome, S.; Aebischer, A.; Lange, E.; Hofmann, M.; Leifer, I.; Loeffen, W.L.A.; Koenen, F.; Beer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the tremendous socio-economic impact of classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks, emergency vaccination scenarios are continuously under discussion. Unfortunately, all currently available vaccines show restrictions either in terms of marker capacities or immunogenicity. Recent research efforts

  4. L-carnosine modulates respiratory burst and reactive oxygen species production in neutrophil biochemistry and function: may oral dosage form of non-hydrolized dipeptide L-carnosine complement anti-infective anti-influenza flu treatment, prevention and self-care as an alternative to the conventional vaccination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2014-05-01

    compounds, and suggest important interactions between neutrophills and carnosine related compounds in the host response to viruses and bacteria. Carnosine and anserine were also found to reduce apoptosis of human neutrophils. In this way these histidine-containing compounds can modulate the Influenza virus release from neutrophills and reduce virus dissemination through the body of the organism. This review points the ability of therapeutic control of Influenza viral infections associated with modulation by oral nonhydrolized forms of carnosine and related histidine-containg compounds of PMN apoptosis which may be involved at least in part in the pathophysiology of the disease in animals and humans. The data presented in this article, overall, may have implications for global influenza surveillance and planning for pandemic influenza therapeutic prevention with oral forms of non-hydrolized natural L-carnosine as a suitable alternative to the conventional vaccination for various flu ailments.

  5. "Beauty contest" indicator of cognitive ability and free riding strategies. Results from a scenario experiment about pandemic flu immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnerstrand, Björn

    2017-03-01

    High immunization coverage rates are desirable in order to reduce total morbidity and mortality rates, but it may also provide an incentive for herd immunity free riding strategies. The aim of this paper was to investigate the link between cognitive ability and vaccination intention in a hypothetical scenario experiment about Avian Flu immunization. A between-subject scenario experiment was utilized to examine the willingness to undergo vaccination when the vaccination coverage was proclaimed to be 36, 62 and 88%. Respondents were later assigned to a "Beauty contest" experiment, an experimental game commonly used to investigate individual's cognitive ability. Results show that there was a significant negative effect of the proclaimed vaccination uptake among others on the vaccination intention. However, there were no significant association between the "Beauty contest" indicator of cognitive ability and the use of herd immunity free riding strategies.

  6. A DIVA vaccine for cross-protection against Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D; Kich, Jalusa D

    2016-03-04

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., a leading cause of human bacterial foodborne disease. Vaccination against Salmonella is effective for protecting animal health and enhancing food safety. However, with >2500 Salmonella serovars, current vaccines for swine offer limited cross-protection against heterologous serovars. Also, existing vaccines can interfere with surveillance programs that monitor the Salmonella status of swine herds. To overcome Salmonella vaccine limitations, we rationally designed and constructed an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (BBS 866) by deleting multiple small regulatory RNA (sRNA) genes (omrA, omrB, rybB, micA, and invR) in combination with an rfaH mutation. We vaccinated swine intranasally at 3-weeks of age with PBS (mock-vaccinated), BBS 866 or BBS 202 (S. Typhimurium rfaH, Bearson et al., Front Vet Sci 2014;1:9.) and challenged at 7-weeks of age with virulent S. Choleraesuis, a swine pathogen. Vaccination with BBS 866 enhanced protection against S. Choleraesuis by significantly limiting the duration of fever, weight loss, the levels of circulating INFγ, and the total number of swine with S. Choleraesuis septicemia. Vaccination with either BBS 866 or BBS 202 significantly reduced S. Choleraesuis colonization of both systemic (spleen and liver) and gastrointestinal (Peyer's Patch, Ileocecal lymph nodes, and cecum) tissues. Similar to our earlier report for BBS 202, the BBS 866 vaccine strain can be used in swine without compromising the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Therefore, the attenuated S. Typhimurium BBS 866 strain, containing mutations in rfaH and multiple sRNAs, addresses the limitations of current Salmonella vaccines by providing cross-protection against Salmonella serovars in swine without interfering with established monitoring programs for Salmonella surveillance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Piezoresistive measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding with microcantilever arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bajwa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1. Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  8. A Fast Test to Diagnose Flu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-12

    People with flu-like symptoms who seek treatment at a medical clinic or hospital often must wait several hours before being examined, possibly exposing many people to an infectious virus. If a patient appears to need more than the routine fluids-and-rest prescription, effective diagnosis requires tests that must be sent to a laboratory. Hours or days may pass before results are available to the doctor, who in the meantime must make an educated guess about the patient's illness. The lengthy diagnostic process places a heavy burden on medical laboratories and can result in improper use of antibiotics or a costly hospital stay. A faster testing method may soon be available. An assay developed by a team of Livermore scientists can diagnose influenza and other respiratory viruses in about two hours once a sample has been taken. Unlike other systems that operate this quickly, the new device, called FluIDx (and pronounced ''fluidics''), can differentiate five types of respiratory viruses, including influenza. FluIDx can analyze samples at the point of patient care--in hospital emergency departments and clinics--allowing medical providers to quickly determine how best to treat a patient, saving time and potentially thousands of dollars per patient. The FluIDx project, which is led by Livermore chemist Mary McBride of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. To test the system and make it as useful as possible, the team worked closely with the Emergency Department staff at the University of California (UC) at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. Flu kills more than 35,000 people every year in the US. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome and the ongoing concern about a possible bird flu pandemic show the need for a fast, reliable test that can differentiate seasonal flu from a

  9. Entrapment of H1N1 Influenza Virus Derived Conserved Peptides in PLGA Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Response and Vaccine Efficacy in Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Hiremath

    Full Text Available Pigs are believed to be one of the important sources of emerging human and swine influenza viruses (SwIV. Influenza virus conserved peptides have the potential to elicit cross-protective immune response, but without the help of potent adjuvant and delivery system they are poorly immunogenic. Biodegradable polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle (PLGA-NP based vaccine delivery system enhances cross-presentation of antigens by the professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, Norovirus P particle containing SwIV M2e (extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2 chimera and highly conserved two each of H1N1 peptides of pandemic 2009 and classical human influenza viruses were entrapped in PLGA-NPs. Influenza antibody-free pigs were vaccinated with PLGA-NPs peptides cocktail vaccine twice with or without an adjuvant, Mycobacterium vaccae whole cell lysate, intranasally as mist. Vaccinated pigs were challenged with a virulent heterologous zoonotic SwIV H1N1, and one week later euthanized and the lung samples were analyzed for the specific immune response and viral load. Clinically, pigs vaccinated with PLGA-NP peptides vaccine had no fever and flu symptoms, and the replicating challenged SwIV was undetectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Immunologically, PLGA-NP peptides vaccination (without adjuvant significantly increased the frequency of antigen-specific IFNγ secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells response in the lung lymphocytes, despite not boosting the antibody response both at pre- and post-challenge. In summary, our data indicated that nanoparticle-mediated delivery of conserved H1N1 influenza peptides induced the virus specific T cell response in the lungs and reduced the challenged heterologous virus load in the airways of pigs.

  10. Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) and Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virus Testing Clinical Signs & Symptoms of Influenza Symptoms & Laboratory Diagnosis Information for Clinicians on Rapid Diagnostic Testing for ... Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  11. Flu vaccine may arrive too late / Ella Karapetyan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karapetyan, Ella

    2009-01-01

    Eesti arstid süüdistavad riiki liigses passiivsuses seagripivaktsiini hankimisel. Tartu ülikooli kliinikumi infektsiooniteenistuse juht doktor Matti Maimets arvab, et seagripi epideemia jõuab Eestisse jaanuaris

  12. Time to Get Your Seasonal Flu Shot | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Flu Season Time to Get Your Seasonal Flu Shot Past Issues / ... able to infect others for an even longer time. How serious is the flu? Certain people are ...

  13. Third-Person Effect and Pandemic Flu: The Role of Severity, Self-Efficacy Method Mentions, and Message Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunmin; Park, Sun-A

    2016-12-01

    Within the context of a pandemic flu, this experiment investigated whether source (government officials or physicians), severity condition (high or low), and mention of self-efficacy method (mention present or absent) in H1N1 health news affected participants' (a) perception of media influence on self and others and (b) intentions to get vaccinated. Results found support for third-person effects, and the magnitude of the effects grew with social distance. Main effect of source, as well as interaction effects among the independent variables on third-person effect and vaccination intentions, were also found.

  14. Vaccination: Who Should Do It, Who Should Not and Who Should Take Precautions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you get sick Caring for Someone Sick Schools, Businesses & Travelers Schools & Childcare Providers Information for Schools Guidance ... flu vaccine is best for you and your family. All persons aged 6 months and older are ...

  15. Is it a policy crisis or it is a health crisis? The Egyptian context--analysis of the Egyptian health policy for the H1N1 flu pandemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seef, Sameh; Jeppsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A new influenza virus that was first detected in people in April 2009, was initially referred to colloquially as "swine flu", since it contained genes from swine, avian and human influenza viruses. It can, however, not be transmitted by eating pork or dealing with pigs. In Egypt, several hundred thousand pigs were killed in May, in spite of advice from global health authorities that such an action was unnecessary. Pigs are raised and consumed mainly by the Christian minority, which constitute some 10% of the population. Health Ministry estimated there were between 300,000-350,000 pigs in Egypt. This paper will analyze the Egyptian health policy for controlling the pandemic H1N1 flu, exploring its context, content, process, and actors. The analysis is based on the Leichter Context, which refers to systemic factors-political, economic and social, both national and international-that may have an effect on health policy, and is based on data collected from literature review and policy documents. The International health officials said the swine flu virus that has caused worldwide fear is not transmitted by pigs, and that pig slaughters do nothing to stop its spread. The WHO stopped using the term "swine flu" to avoid confusion. In Egypt, even the editor of a pro-government newspaper criticized the order to slaughter: "Killing (pigs) is not a solution, otherwise, we should kill the people, because the virus spreads through them," wrote Abdullah Kamal of the daily Rose El-Youssef. The World Health organization also criticized the decision. The extinction of the Egyptian pigs is an example of how a health issue can be used to persecute a minority within a country. Although the current influenza has nothing whatsoever to do with pigs, the previous name of the epidemic was used as an argument to violate the rights of the Christian minority in Egypt.

  16. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  17. Classical Swine Fever-An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph; Henke, Julia; Carlson, Jolene; Beer, Martin

    2017-04-21

    Classical swine fever (CSF) remains one of the most important transboundary viral diseases of swine worldwide. The causative agent is CSF virus, a small, enveloped RNA virus of the genus Pestivirus. Based on partial sequences, three genotypes can be distinguished that do not, however, directly correlate with virulence. Depending on both virus and host factors, a wide range of clinical syndromes can be observed and thus, laboratory confirmation is mandatory. To this means, both direct and indirect methods are utilized with an increasing degree of commercialization. Both infections in domestic pigs and wild boar are of great relevance; and wild boars are a reservoir host transmitting the virus sporadically also to pig farms. Control strategies for epidemic outbreaks in free countries are mainly based on classical intervention measures; i.e., quarantine and strict culling of affected herds. In these countries, vaccination is only an emergency option. However, live vaccines are used for controlling the disease in endemically infected regions in Asia, Eastern Europe, the Americas, and some African countries. Here, we will provide a concise, updated review on virus properties, clinical signs and pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immune responses, diagnosis and vaccination possibilities.

  18. Gamma-irradiated influenza A virus provides adjuvant activity to a co-administered poorly immunogenic SFV vaccine in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle eBabb

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many currently available inactivated vaccines require 'adjuvants' to maximise the protective immune responses generated against the antigens of interest. Recent studies in mice with gamma-irradiated influenza A virus (γ-FLU have shown its superior efficacy compared to other forms of inactivated FLU vaccines and its ability to induce both potent type-I interferon (IFN-I responses and the IFN-I associated partial lymphocyte activation. Commonly, IFN-I responses induced by adjuvants, combined in vaccine preparations, have been shown to effectively enhance the immunogenicity of the antigens of interest. Therefore, we investigated the potential adjuvant activity of γ-FLU and the possible effect on antibody responses against co-administrated antigens, using gamma-irradiated Semliki Forest Virus (γ-SFV as the experimental vaccine in mice. Our data show that co-vaccination with γ-FLU and γ-SFV resulted in enhanced SFV-specific antibody responses in terms of increased titres by 6 fold and greater neutralisation efficacy, when compared to vaccination with γ-SFV alone. This study provides promising evidence related to the possible use of γ-FLU as an adjuvant to poorly immunogenic vaccines without compromising the vaccine efficacy of γ-FLU.

  19. EDITORIAL Avian Flu Pandemic Threat: Why is Ethiopia considered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Many zoonotic diseases have affected human beings with serious impact. Among those pandemic flu originated from birds have caused millions of human deaths at different times. The so called Spanish flu that caused about 50 million people worldwide in 1918-19 is the most devastating. That pandemic was refereed as.

  20. PRODUCTION OF HYBRID RECOMBINANT PROTEIN Flu-Chim, CONTAINING INFLUENZA VIRUSES A AND B MAJOR EPITOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dukhovlinov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influenza virus is highly contagious diseases of people, birds and mammals. Approximately 250 000– 500 000 deaths are caused by influenza epidemics worldwide yearly, and the death number may be up to millions in a possible influenza pandemic. Vaccination is the most cost-effective way to reduce the considerable disease burden of seasonal influenza. Although seasonal influenza vaccines are effective, their performance in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals would benefit from improvement. Major problems related to the development and production of pandemic influenza vaccines are response time and production capacity as well as vaccine efficacy and safety. Reverse genetics techniques can speed up the generation of seed viruses and new mathematical modelling methods improve vaccine strain selection. Using vaccines based on recombinant proteins, we avoid the risks associated with the introduction of the virus into the body, even inactivated. In this paper, we have got a highly purified recombinant fusion protein composed of fragments of the hemagglutinin of influenza viruses A and B. As adjuvant we used components of flagellin. We used the most immunogenic and conserved areas of hemagglutinin H1, H3, H5 and B, which cause the formation of specific antibodies which can cross-react with homologous epitopes among the various strains of influenza A and B. Vaccine efficacy is increased by using multiple epitopes of various proteins. The aim of this study was to clone and express the hybrid recombinant protein Flu-Chim, containing immunogenic epitopes of influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2, A/H5N1 and B fused with fragments of flagellin in Escherichia coli expression system and its subsequent purification. During the study was created high-yield E. coli strain, which produces the recombinant protein Flu-Chim, selected the optimal protocol of induction of the gene encoding the protein. The protein was purified using metal affinity chromatography. The

  1. Spreading Of Avian Flu On Duck And Its Impact On Social Economy: Lesson Learnt From Avian Flu Cases On Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyak Ilham

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bird flu disease that attacks duck dismissed the notion of duck immune to bird flu disease. Learning from the experience of bird flu disease that attacks poultry in the year of 2004-2005, necessary to measure the spread of disease prevention bird flu in ducks. This paper aims to describe the business and trade patterns of duck associated with the spread of avian influenza and predict the socio-economic impact of bird flu on duck farms in Indonesia. Duck rearing patterns mostly are in the extensive and semi-intensive system, that have large potential disease transmission occured between duck and wild. Illegal trade in the crossborder region and imports from countries that re-export it, ias alo become potential as well as the entry point to the bird flu virus in Indonesia. Ducks trade between regions by land transportation is difficult to control as well becomes the potential media to spread of the virus to a wider area. The economic impact of bird flu on duck business occured due to the death of ducks, decline in production and loss of job opportunities, while that on demand reduction was not significant. Small scale farmers that were bankrupt as a result of bird flu outbreaks may require technical assistance and access to capital for recovery. In the future, development of ducks business should be directed at duck farms into a semi-intensive and intensive system to facilitate the control of epidemic diseases

  2. Time to Get Your Annual Flu Shot | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Shot Time to Get Your Annual Flu Shot Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents ... the Northern Hemisphere. What is influenza (also called flu)? The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused ...

  3. Microneedle and mucosal delivery of influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2017-01-01

    In recent years with the threat of pandemic influenza and other public health needs, alternative vaccination methods other than intramuscular immunization have received great attention. The skin and mucosal surfaces are attractive sites probably because of both non-invasive access to the vaccine delivery and unique immunological responses. Intradermal vaccines using a microinjection system (BD Soluvia) and intranasal vaccines (FluMist) are licensed. As a new vaccination method, solid microneedles have been developed using a simple device that may be suitable for self-administration. Because coated micorneedle influenza vaccines are administered in the solid state, developing formulations maintaining the stability of influenza vaccines is an important issue to be considered. Marketable microneedle devices and clinical trials remain to be developed. Other alternative mucosal routes such as oral and intranasal delivery systems are also attractive for inducing cross protective mucosal immunity but effective non-live mucosal vaccines remain to be developed. PMID:22697052

  4. Strategi Pesan Promosi Kesehatan Cegah Flu Burung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Widiastuti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza health disaster has attacked many countries in the world, includes Indonesia. An effort have been done by government through Health Department RI publish health promotion communication on public services advertising (PSA version “Cegah Flu Burung dengan B3K”. In a way to criticize this PSA is used theoretical framework social construction of reality and health promotion. This research use descriptive qualitative method, whereas data is collected with literature review from television PSA, and data analysis technique is used framing analysis from Zhondang Pan and Gerald M. Kosicki. Based on research finding has been found that avian influenza prevention health promotion message not yet “enabling” (ability people to act healthy life, but it only “desiring” (willingness. From this we can say that health promotion still prioritize in giving information, whereas message toward new attitude and behavior changes through learning process still not visible.

  5. BFluenza: A Proteomic Database on Bird Flu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Khan, Asad U

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus subtype H5N1, also known as "bird flu" has been documented to cause an outbreak of respiratory diseases in humans. The unprecedented spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza type A is a threat to veterinary and human health. The BFluenza is a relational database which is solely devoted to proteomic information of H5N1 subtype. Bfluenza has novel features including computed physico-chemical properties data of H5N1 viral proteins, modeled structures of viral proteins, data of protein coordinates, experimental details, molecular description and bibliographic reference. The database also contains nucleotide and their decoded protein sequences data. The database can be searched in various modes by setting search options. The structure of viral protein could be visualized by JMol viewer or by Discovery Studio. The database is available for free at http://www.bfluenza.info.

  6. Universal influenza vaccines: a realistic option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R D; Altenburg, A F; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2016-12-01

    The extensive antigenic drift displayed by seasonal influenza viruses and the risk of pandemics caused by newly emerging antigenically distinct influenza A viruses of novel subtypes has raised considerable interest in the development of so-called universal influenza vaccines. We review options for the development of universal flu vaccines and discuss progress that has been made recently. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Adjuvanted Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Vaccines: A Multinational Self-Controlled Case Series in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Jeanne P.; Olberg, Henning K.; de Vries, Corinne S.; Sammon, Cormac; Andrews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Par; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; van der Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart C.; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1–4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI). Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. Results Three hundred and three (303) GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99) were exposed to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.2–5.5), based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2–3.1) after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–3.2) when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom) we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month) to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8), which is the main finding. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8). Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule

  8. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccines: a multinational self-controlled case series in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Romio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1pdm09 immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination. METHODS: A self-controlled case series (SCCS analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1-4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI. Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. RESULTS: Three hundred and three (303 GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99 were exposed to A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria. The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 2.2-5.5, based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2-3.1 after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.2 when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8, which is the main finding. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8. Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule out with

  9. A pandemic influenza H1N1 live vaccine based on modified vaccinia Ankara is highly immunogenic and protects mice in active and passive immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Hessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of novel influenza vaccines inducing a broad immune response is an important objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate live vaccines which induce both strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against the novel human pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, and to show protection in a lethal animal challenge model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For this purpose, the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of the influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1 strain (CA/07 were inserted into the replication-deficient modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus--a safe poxviral live vector--resulting in MVA-H1-Ca and MVA-N1-Ca vectors. These live vaccines, together with an inactivated whole virus vaccine, were assessed in a lung infection model using immune competent Balb/c mice, and in a lethal challenge model using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice after passive serum transfer from immunized mice. Balb/c mice vaccinated with the MVA-H1-Ca virus or the inactivated vaccine were fully protected from lung infection after challenge with the influenza H1N1 wild-type strain, while the neuraminidase virus MVA-N1-Ca induced only partial protection. The live vaccines were already protective after a single dose and induced substantial amounts of neutralizing antibodies and of interferon-gamma-secreting (IFN-gamma CD4- and CD8 T-cells in lungs and spleens. In the lungs, a rapid increase of HA-specific CD4- and CD8 T cells was observed in vaccinated mice shortly after challenge with influenza swine flu virus, which probably contributes to the strong inhibition of pulmonary viral replication observed. In addition, passive transfer of antisera raised in MVA-H1-Ca vaccinated immune-competent mice protected SCID mice from lethal challenge with the CA/07 wild-type virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The non-replicating MVA-based H1N1 live vaccines induce a broad protective immune response and are promising vaccine candidates for

  10. Parvoviral Infections in Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Došen Radoslav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections hold an important place among factors which can cause disorders in swine reproduction. Infections with the porcine parvovirus (PPV are present in all herds. In the past four years, 70-77% seropositive animals have been registered in herds of the industrial type. There are increasing reports about disorders in swine reproduction, both from individual breeders and mini farmers, caused by parvoviral infections. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the latest knowledge on epizootiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and prophylaxis of this diseases.

  11. Controlling pandemic flu: the value of international air travel restrictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Epstein

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Planning for a possible influenza pandemic is an extremely high priority, as social and economic effects of an unmitigated pandemic would be devastating. Mathematical models can be used to explore different scenarios and provide insight into potential costs, benefits, and effectiveness of prevention and control strategies under consideration.A stochastic, equation-based epidemic model is used to study global transmission of pandemic flu, including the effects of travel restrictions and vaccination. Economic costs of intervention are also considered. The distribution of First Passage Times (FPT to the United States and the numbers of infected persons in metropolitan areas worldwide are studied assuming various times and locations of the initial outbreak. International air travel restrictions alone provide a small delay in FPT to the U.S. When other containment measures are applied at the source in conjunction with travel restrictions, delays could be much longer. If in addition, control measures are instituted worldwide, there is a significant reduction in cases worldwide and specifically in the U.S. However, if travel restrictions are not combined with other measures, local epidemic severity may increase, because restriction-induced delays can push local outbreaks into high epidemic season. The per annum cost to the U.S. economy of international and major domestic air passenger travel restrictions is minimal: on the order of 0.8% of Gross National Product.International air travel restrictions may provide a small but important delay in the spread of a pandemic, especially if other disease control measures are implemented during the afforded time. However, if other measures are not instituted, delays may worsen regional epidemics by pushing the outbreak into high epidemic season. This important interaction between policy and seasonality is only evident with a global-scale model. Since the benefit of travel restrictions can be substantial while

  12. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil’s swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009–2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance. PMID:26196759

  13. Sharp claims new technology can combat bird flu virus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

      Tests byjapanese electronics maker Sharp Corp. have found an air-purifier using plasmacluster ion technology was 99 percent effective in killing off the bird flu virus in a controlled environment, a company spokeswoman said...

  14. [Role of vaccination in animal health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoret, Paul-Pierre

    2012-03-01

    According to the IFAH, veterinary vaccines currently account for 26% of the global market in veterinary medicines, reflecting the importance of vaccines in animal health, as well as the number of wild and domesticated target species, and the monospecific nature of most vaccines. Multispecies vaccines include tetanus and rabies. In 2010, the number of food-producing animals was estimated to be roughly 20 billion and is rising gradually. Fowl currently represent the main food species. Veterinary vaccination has allowed the eradication of rinderpest, as officially declared last year (2011), jointly by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO). Rinderpest was a real scourge, and was only the second viral disease to be totally eradicated (after human smallpox). One characteristic of veterinary vaccination is the DIVA approach, "differentiating infected from vaccinated animals". The DIVA strategy is especially interesting for regulated control of diseases like foot-and-mouth disease, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, pseudorabies, and classical swine fever. DIVA vaccination requires prior serological testing. Vaccination is also used for wild animals such as foxes (rabies) and wild boars (classical swine fever). "In ovo" vaccination of fowl on day 18 of the incubation period is used to prevent Marek's disease for instance, and double vaccination (vector and insert) to prevent both Marek's disease and Gumboro's disease in fowl. Animal vaccination can also help to protect human health, as illustrated by fowl vaccination against salmonellosis.

  15. Good vaccination practice: it all starts with a good vaccine storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangroenweghe, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Recent introduction of strategies to reduce antibiotic use in food animal production implies an increased use of vaccines in order to prevent the economic impact of several important diseases in swine. Good Vaccination Practice (GVP) is an overall approach on the swine farm aiming to obtain maximal efficacy of vaccination through good storage, preparation and finally correct application to the target animals. In order to have a better insight into GVP on swine farms and the vaccine storage conditions, a survey on vaccination practices was performed on a farmers' fair and temperatures in the vaccine storage refrigerators were measured during farm visits over a period of 1 year. The survey revealed that knowledge on GVP, such as vaccine storage and handling, needle management and injection location could be improved. Less than 10% had a thermometer in their vaccine storage refrigerator on the moment of the visit. Temperature measurement revealed that only 71% of the measured refrigerators were in line with the recommended temperature range of +2 °C to +8 °C. Both below +2 °C and above +8 °C temperatures were registered during all seasons of the year. Compliance was lower during summer with an average temperature of 9.2 °C while only 43% of the measured temperatures were within the recommended range. The present study clearly showed the need for continuous education on GVP for swine veterinarians, swine farmers and their farm personnel in general and vaccine storage management in particular. In veterinary medicine, the correct storage of vaccines is crucial since both too low and too high temperatures can provoke damage to specific vaccine types. Adjuvanted killed or subunit vaccines can be damaged (e.g. structure of aluminiumhydroxide in adjuvans) by too low temperatures (below 0 °C), whereas lyophilized live vaccines are susceptible (e.g. loss of vaccine potency) to heat damage by temperatures above +8 °C. In conclusion, knowledge and awareness of GVP

  16. Swine Brucellosis: Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucella suis is a significant zoonosis that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human to human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic liv...

  17. Supersize my identity: when thoughts of contracting swine flu boost one's patriotic identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bélanger, J.J.; Faber, T.; Gelfand, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pandemics are socially threatening situations that rapidly spread across large regions. Thinking of contracting dangerous diseases can potentially evoke fear and death-related thoughts. The aim of the present work was to investigate how individuals respond to fear associated with contracting a

  18. Focus on pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza (swine flu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, M; Capretti, M G; Decembrino, L; Natale, F; Pedicino, R; Pugni, L; Serra, L

    2010-06-01

    At the moment of the onset of the pandemic there were few data about the transmission of the 2009 H1N1 virus infection from the mother to the newborn. Nevertheless neonates born to an ill mother from 2 days before through 7 days after illness onset in the mother were thought to be exposed and potentially infected. In October 2009 the Infectious Disease Group of the Italian Society of Neonatology provided a guide regarded the management of suspected or confirmed maternal infection with 2009 H1N1 influenza virus within labor and delivery, postpartum, and newborn care settings in hospitals. It was based on the available scientific information, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Italian Ministry of Labour, Health and Social Policy recommendations in order to protect the infant from exposure to respiratory secretion during or immediately after delivery. Moreover, we published 300,000 copies of a more popular pamphlet for parents. Rigorous attention to Standard Precautions and Droplet Precautions is required to reduce the opportunities for the transmission of the infection in the health-care setting.

  19. Swine flu outbreak 2015-Paediatric Experience in a Tertiary Care Centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Anuya Chauhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: To study and analyse the clinical profile and outcome of children admitted with Influenza A positive cases at our Tertiary Care Centre in 2015. Materials & Methods: Prospective study conducted in a tertiary care centre (Civil Hospital B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad from Jan 2015 to March 2015. 340 Children presenting with clinical features compatible with category C were admitted and 199 patients having laboratory confirmed influenza A (H1N1 were included in our study. Details regarding clinical features, examination findings, investigations, complications and treatment were recorded and analysed in a systemic manner. Results: Study showed that highest incidence of influenza A was seen in 1-3 years age group (41.7% Male-female ratio was 1.18:1 indicating similar affection of both sexes. Maximum patients presented within first 3 days of illness (53.2% with fever (82.9% followed by dry cough (74.6% and sore throat (52.7% as presenting symptoms. Leucopenia (79.4% was the most common laboratory finding and lobar pneumonia (81.1% was the most common radiological finding followed by bronchopneumonia (18.9%. Conjunctivitis (20.1% and otitis media (6.03% were the common complications. Mortality rate in our set up was 6.5% (13 out of 199; with maximum from 1-3 year age group (46.1%, most common cause being ARDS (46.1%. Conclusion: The outbreak of influenza A (H1N1 2015 predominantly affected young population with significant morbidity and mortality. With the efforts of healthcare authorities worldwide, we have still not lost the race against fighting this virus.

  20. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and identification of commonly occurring haplotypes using sequence specific low and high resolution primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Maria Rathmann

    2014-01-01

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region (SLA) is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many encoding a distinct MHC class I molecule, which binds and presents endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system. Upon recognition...... of such peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) naïve T cells can become activated and respond to a given pathogen leading to its elimination and the generation of memory cells. Hence SLA plays a crucial role in maintaining overall adaptive immunologic resistance to pathogens. Knowing which SLA alleles that are commonly...... occurring can be of great importance in regard to future vaccine development and the establishment of immune protection in swine through broad coverage, highly specific, subunit based vaccination against viruses such as swine influenza, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, vesicular...

  1. “Beauty contest” indicator of cognitive ability and free riding strategies. Results from a scenario experiment about pandemic flu immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Rönnerstrand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available High immunization coverage rates are desirable in order to reduce total morbidity and mortality rates, but it may also provide an incentive for herd immunity free riding strategies. The aim of this paper was to investigate the link between cognitive ability and vaccination intention in a hypothetical scenario experiment about Avian Flu immunization. A between-subject scenario experiment was utilized to examine the willingness to undergo vaccination when the vaccination coverage was proclaimed to be 36, 62 and 88%. Respondents were later assigned to a “Beauty contest” experiment, an experimental game commonly used to investigate individual's cognitive ability. Results show that there was a significant negative effect of the proclaimed vaccination uptake among others on the vaccination intention. However, there were no significant association between the “Beauty contest” indicator of cognitive ability and the use of herd immunity free riding strategies.

  2. Determinants of adherence to seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers from an Italian region: results from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, P; Alicino, C; Dini, G; Barberis, I; Bagnasco, A M; Iudici, R; Zanini, M; Martini, M; Toletone, A; Paganino, C; Massa, E; Orsi, A; Sasso, L

    2016-05-17

    Notwithstanding decades of efforts to increase the uptake of seasonal influenza (flu) vaccination among European healthcare workers (HCWs), the immunisation rates are still unsatisfactory. In order to understand the reasons for the low adherence to flu vaccination, a study was carried out among HCWs of two healthcare organisations in Liguria, a region in northwest Italy. A cross-sectional study based on anonymous self-administered web questionnaires was carried out between October 2013 and February 2014. Through univariate and multivariate regression analysis, the study investigated the association between demographic and professional characteristics, knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of the study participants and (i) the seasonal flu vaccination uptake in the 2013/2014 season and (ii) the self-reported number of flu vaccination uptakes in the six consecutive seasons from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. A total of 830 HCWs completed the survey. Factors statistically associated with flu vaccination uptake in the 2013/2014 season were: being a medical doctor and agreeing with the statements 'flu vaccine is safe', 'HCWs have a higher risk of getting flu' and 'HCWs should receive flu vaccination every year'. A barrier to vaccination was the belief that pharmaceutical companies influence decisions about vaccination strategies. All the above-mentioned factors, except the last one, were (significantly) associated with the number of flu vaccination uptakes self-reported by the respondents between season 2008/2009 and season 2013/2014. Other significantly associated factors appeared to be level of education, being affected by at least one chronic disease, and agreeing with mandatory flu vaccination in healthcare settings. This survey allows us to better understand the determinants of adherence to vaccination as a fundamental preventive strategy against flu among Italian HCWs. These findings should be used to improve and customise any future promotion campaigns to overcome identified

  3. Cross reactivity of serum antibody responses elicited by DNA vaccines expressing HA antigens from H1N1 subtype influenza vaccines in the past 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Iman; Chen, Huaiqing; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    In the past three decades, ten H1 subtype influenza vaccines have been recommended for global seasonal flu vaccination. Some of them were used only for one year before being replaced by another H1 flu vaccine while others may be used for up to seven years. While the selection of a new seasonal flu vaccine was based on the escape of a new emerging virus that was not effectively protected by the existing flu formulation, there is limited information on the magnitude and breadth of cross reactivity among H1 subtype virus circulation over a long period. In the current study, HA-expressing DNA vaccines were constructed to express individual HA antigens from H1 subtype vaccines used in the past 30 y. Rabbits naïve to HA antibody responses were immunized with these HA DNA vaccines and the cross reactivity of these sera against HA antigen and related H1 viruses in the same period was studied. Our data indicate that the level of cross reactivity was different for different viral isolates and the key mutations responsible for the cross reactivity may involve only a limited number of residues. Our results provide useful information for the development of improved seasonal vaccines than can achieve broad protection against viruses within the same H1 subtype.

  4. The 1918 "Spanish flu" in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilla, Antoni; Trilla, Guillem; Daer, Carolyn

    2008-09-01

    The 1918-1919 influenza pandemic was the most devastating epidemic in modern history. Here, we review epidemiological and historical data about the 1918-1919 influenza epidemic in Spain. On 22 May 1918, the epidemic was a headline in Madrid's ABC newspaper. The infectious disease most likely reached Spain from France, perhaps as the result of the heavy railroad traffic of Spanish and Portuguese migrant workers to and from France. The total numbers of persons who died of influenza in Spain were officially estimated to be 147,114 in 1918, 21,235 in 1919, and 17,825 in 1920. However, it is likely that >260,000 Spaniards died of influenza; 75% of these persons died during the second period of the epidemic, and 45% died during October 1918 alone. The Spanish population growth index was negative for 1918 (net loss, 83,121 persons). Although a great deal of evidence indicates that the 1918 A(H1N1) influenza virus unlikely originated in and spread from Spain, the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic will always be known as the Spanish flu.

  5. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  6. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Bilcke

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies to (1 describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2 assess influential background characteristics, and (3 formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever, a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  7. Novel Human-like Influenza A Viruses Circulate in Swine in Mexico and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Martha; Culhane, Marie R.; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat; Guerrero, Pedro; Norambuena, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Further understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of influenza A viruses circulating in swine (IAV-S) is important for the development of effective vaccines and our knowledge of pandemic threats. Until recently, very little was known of IAV-S diversity in Latin America, owing to a lack of surveillance. Methods: To address this gap, we sequenced and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 69 hemagglutinin (HA) sequences from IAV-S isolates collected in swine in Mexico and Chile during 2010-2014, including the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes. Results: Our analysis identified multiple IAV-S lineages that appear to have been circulating undetected in swine for decades, including four novel IAV-S lineages of human seasonal virus origin that have not been previously identified in any swine populations globally. We also found evidence of repeated introductions of pandemic H1N1 viruses from humans into swine in Mexico and Chile since 2009, and incursions of H1 and H3 viruses from North American swine into Mexico. Discussion: Overall, our findings indicate that at least 12 genetically distinct HA lineages circulate in Latin American swine herds, only two of which have been found in North American swine herds. Human-to-swine transmission, spatial migration via swine movements, and genomic reassortment are the key evolutionary mechanisms that generate this viral diversity. Additional antigenic characterization and whole-genome sequencing is greatly needed to understand the diversity and independent evolution of IAV-S in Latin America.  PMID:26345598

  8. EVALUATION OF OIL BASED AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINE (H5NI PREPARED WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF ADJUVANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. IQBAL, M. NISAR, ANWARUL-HAQ, S. NOOR AND Z. J. GILL

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bird flu vaccine from H5N1 strain of avian influenza virus was prepared with two concentrations of adjuvant (Montanide ISA 70MVG. Two vaccines (I and II were prepared containing 50 and 60% Montanide, respectively. Immune response of both the vaccines as single, as well as booster, dose was evaluated in layer birds through haemagglutination inhibition test. Single dose of both vaccines showed poor immune response, while booster dose gave better response with both the vaccines. However, the vaccine prepared with 60% Montanide provided better immune response compared with the vaccine containing 50% montanide.

  9. It's a Tough Flu Season for Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, but new canine virus can make your pet 'sick as a dog' To use the sharing features on this page, ... so the main reason for not vaccinating your pet is the cost, Parrish said. Dubovi advises dog owners to assess for themselves what risk their ...

  10. Development of a rapid automated influenza A, influenza B, and respiratory syncytial virus A/B multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay and its use during the 2009 H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus epidemic in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Eric T; Jurgens, Lisa A; Kehl, Sue C; Bose, Michael E; Patitucci, Teresa; LaGue, Elizabeth; Darga, Patrick; Wilkinson, Kimberly; Witt, Lorraine M; Fan, Jiang; He, Jie; Kumar, Swati; Henrickson, Kelly J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid, semiautomated, and fully automated multiplex real-time RT-PCR assays were developed and validated for the detection of influenza (Flu) A, Flu B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) from nasopharyngeal specimens. The assays can detect human H1N1, H3N2, and swine-origin (S-OIV) H1N1 Flu A viruses and were effectively used to distinguish Flu A infections (of all subtypes) from Flu B and RSV infections during the current S-OIV outbreak in Milwaukee, WI. The analytical limits of detection were 10(-2) to 10(1) TCID(50)/ml depending on the platform and analyte and showed only one minor cross-reaction among 23 common respiratory pathogens (intermittent cross-reaction to adenovirus at >10(7) TCID(50)/ml). A total of 100 clinical samples were tested by tissue culture, both automated assays, and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved ProFlu+ assay. Both the semiautomated and fully automated assays exhibited greater overall (Flu A, Flu B, and RSV combined) clinical sensitivities (93 and 96%, respectively) and individual Flu A sensitivities (100%) than the Food and Drug Administration-approved test (89% overall sensitivity and 93% Flu A sensitivity). All assays were 99% specific. During the S-OIV outbreak in Milwaukee, WI, the fully automated assay was used to test 1232 samples in 2 weeks. Flu A was detected in 134 clinical samples (126 H1N1 S-OIV, 5 H1N1 [human], and 1 untyped) with 100% positive agreement compared with other "in-house" validated molecular assays, with only 2 false-positive results. Such accurate testing using automated high-throughput molecule systems should allow clinicians and public health officials to react quickly and effectively during viral outbreaks.

  11. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  12. Serological study of influenza viruses in veterinarians working with swine in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Castillo-Juárez, Héctor; Sánchez-Betancourt, Iván; Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2017-06-01

    Humans and swine are both affected by influenza viruses, and swine are considered a potential source of new influenza viruses. Transmission of influenza viruses across species is well documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of different influenza virus subtypes in veterinarians working for the Mexican swine industry, using a hemagglutination inhibition test. All sera tested were collected in July 2011. The data were analysed using a generalized linear model and a linear model to study the possible association of seroprevalence with the age of the veterinarian, vaccination status, and biosecurity level of the farm where they work. The observed seroprevalence was 12.3%, 76.5%, 46.9%, and 11.1% for the human subtypes of pandemic influenza virus (pH1N1), seasonal human influenza virus (hH1N1), the swine subtypes of classical swine influenza virus (swH1N1), and triple-reassortant swine influenza virus (swH3N2), respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that age was associated with hH1N1 seroprevalence (P virus; hence, they would have been at risk for infection with this virus if this subtype had been circulating in swine in Mexico prior to 2011.

  13. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice: influence of the route of vaccine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal virus infection in mice. Whole inactivated virus-induced cross-protection was found to be mediated primarily by flu-specific CD8+ T cells. As it has been demonstrated that the route of vaccine administration strongly influences both the quantity and quality of vaccine-induced immunity, in this study, we determined which route of WIV administration induces optimal heterosubtypic cross-protection. We compared the magnitude of the immune response and heterosubtypic protection against lethal A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) infection after subcutaneous (SC), intramuscular (IM), and intranasal (IN) vaccination with A/NIBRG-14 (H5N1) WIV. Subcutaneous and IM administration was superior to IN administration of influenza WIV in terms of flu-specific CD8+ T-cell induction and protection of mice against lethal heterosubtypic challenge. Surprisingly, despite the very low flu-specific CD8+ T-cell responses detected in IN-vaccinated mice, these animals were partially protected, most likely due to cross-reactive IgA antibodies. The results of this study show that the magnitude of WIV-induced flu-specific CD8+ T-cell activity depends on the applied vaccination route. We conclude that parenteral administration of WIV vaccine, in particular IM injection, is superior to IN vaccine delivery for the induction of heterosubtypic cross-protection and generally appears to elicit stronger immune responses than mucosal vaccination with WIV. © 2013 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determinants of adherence to seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers from an Italian region: results from a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Durando, P; Alicino, C; Dini, G; Barberis, I; Bagnasco, A M; Iudici, R; Zanini, M; Martini, M; Toletone, A; Paganino, C; Massa, E; Orsi, A; Sasso, L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Notwithstanding decades of efforts to increase the uptake of seasonal influenza (flu) vaccination among European healthcare workers (HCWs), the immunisation rates are still unsatisfactory. In order to understand the reasons for the low adherence to flu vaccination, a study was carried out among HCWs of two healthcare organisations in Liguria, a region in northwest Italy. Methods A cross-sectional study based on anonymous self-administered web questionnaires was carried out between ...

  15. Optimal Allocation of Pandemic Influenza Vaccine Depends on Age, Risk and Timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mylius, S.D.; Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Lugner, A.K.; Wallinga, J.

    2008-01-01

    The limited production capacity for vaccines raises the question what the best strategy is for allocating the vaccine to mitigate an influenza pandemic. We developed an age-structured model for spread of an influenza pandemic and validated it against observations from the Asian flu pandemic. Two

  16. Titer on chip: new analytical tool for influenza vaccine potency determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R Kuck

    Full Text Available Titer on Chip (Flu-ToC is a new technique for quantification of influenza hemagglutinin (HA concentration. In order to evaluate the potential of this new technique, a comparison of Flu-ToC to more conventional methods was conducted using recombinant HA produced in a baculovirus expression system as a test case. Samples from current vaccine strains were collected from four different steps in the manufacturing process. A total of 19 samples were analysed by Flu-ToC (blinded, single radial immunodiffusion (SRID, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and the purity adjusted bicinchoninic acid assay (paBCA. The results indicated reasonable linear correlation between Flu-ToC and SRID, ELISA, and paBCA, with regression slopes of log-log plots being 0.91, 1.03, and 0.91, respectively. The average ratio for HA content measured by Flu-ToC relative to SRID, ELISA, and paBCA was 83%, 147%, and 81%, respectively; indicating nearly equivalent potency determination for Flu-ToC relative to SRID and paBCA. These results, combined with demonstrated multiplexed analysis of all components within a quadrivalent formulation and robust response to HA strains over a wide time period, support the conclusion that Flu-ToC can be used as a reliable and time-saving alternative potency assay for influenza vaccines.

  17. High-Dose Flu Shot May Help Nursing Home Residents Avoid Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167348.html High-Dose Flu Shot May Help Nursing Home Residents Avoid Hospital ... July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nobody wants the flu, but it can prove deadly for frail residents ...

  18. CTL epitopes for influenza A including the H5N1 bird flu; genome-, pathogen-, and HLA-wide screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M.J.; Lamberth, K.; Harndahl, M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to perform a global screening for new immunogenic HLA class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes of potential utility as candidates of influenza A-virus diagnostics and vaccines. We used predictions of antigen processing and presentation...... in a biochemical assay and for influenza-specific, HLA-1-restricted CTL responses in an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Eighty-nine peptides could be confirmed as HLA-1 binders, and 13 could be confirmed as CTL targets. The 13 epitopes, are highly conserved among human influenza A pathogens, and all of these epitopes...... are present in the emerging bird flu isolates. Our study demonstrates that present technology enables a fast global screening for T cell immune epitopes of potential diagnostics and vaccine interest. This technology includes immuno-bioinformatics predictors with the capacity to perform fast genome-, pathogen...

  19. FluTE, a publicly available stochastic influenza epidemic simulation model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chao, Dennis L; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Obenchain, Valerie J; Longini, Jr, Ira M

    2010-01-01

    ..., FluTE. FluTE is an individual-based model capable of simulating the spread of influenza across major metropolitan areas or the continental United States. The model's structure is based on previously published work [3,6], but FluTE incorporates a more sophisticated natural history of influenza, more realistic intervention strategies, and ...

  20. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  1. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by hemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigen...

  2. Mass Media Campaign Impacts Influenza Vaccine Obtainment of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Ali M.; Brent-Hotchkiss, Renee; Andrews, Urkovia K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effectiveness of a mass media campaign in increasing the rate of college student influenza vaccine obtainment. Participants/Methods: Students ("N" = 721) at a large southern university completed a survey between September 2011 and January 2012 assessing what flu clinic media sources were visualized and if they…

  3. Progress in Brucella vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANG, Xinghong; SKYBERG, Jerod A.; CAO, Ling; CLAPP, Beata; THORNBURG, Theresa; PASCUAL, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. are zoonotic, facultative intracellular pathogens, which cause animal and human disease. Animal disease results in abortion of fetuses; in humans, it manifests flu-like symptoms with an undulant fever, with osteoarthritis as a common complication of infection. Antibiotic regimens for human brucellosis patients may last several months and are not always completely effective. While there are no vaccines for humans, several licensed live Brucella vaccines are available for use in livestock. The performance of these animal vaccines is dependent upon the host species, dose, and route of immunization. Newly engineered live vaccines, lacking well-defined virulence factors, retain low residual virulence, are highly protective, and may someday replace currently used animal vaccines. These also have possible human applications. Moreover, due to their enhanced safety and efficacy in animal models, subunit vaccines for brucellosis show great promise for their application in livestock and humans. This review summarizes the progress of brucellosis vaccine development and presents an overview of candidate vaccines. PMID:23730309

  4. Post Flu Shot Confusion – think ADEM!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjunda Murthy Jyoti Prabha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old Caucasian man with hypertension and diabetes presented with left arm weakness and headache for one day. He had an influenza vaccination 10 days prior to presentation. Computed tomography (CT of the head showed a possible right MCA stroke. The next day he developed left hemiplegia. A repeat CT of the head exhibited a “mass like” effect in the right hemisphere. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the head showed a diffuse area of abnormal signals, involving both hemispheres, and diffuse white matter changes. His CSF showed WBC 4/mm3, RBC 1/mm3, glucose 97 mg/dl, and protein 96 mg/dl. He continued to deteriorate, developed encephalopathy, and had to be intubated. A repeat MRI of the head demonstrated extensive bilateral, poorly marginated white matter, and some grey matter involvement characteristic of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM. He failed to respond to methylprednisolone 1 gram daily and was started on plasma exchange daily for 10 days. He started to improve after the second session. After five months he was essentially normal and had returned to work. This case demonstrates that routine vaccination can have important complications.

  5. Too Late for a Flu Shot (For Parents)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regularly and are at risk for developing Reye syndrome if they get the flu caregivers or household contacts of anyone in a high- ... currently recommended. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that ... Guillain-Barré syndrome (a rare condition that affects the immune system ...

  6. Mathematical model for bird flu disease transmission | Yusuf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bird flu (Avian influenza) is a contagious disease of animals caused by viruses that normally infect only birds and, less commonly, pigs. These viruses are highly species-specific, but have, on rare occasions, crossed the species barrier to infect humans. The world at large never considered it a serious threat to mankind until ...

  7. Colds and flu – an overview of the management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: colds, flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus, adenovirus, influenza, upper respiratory tract infections, herbal medicine, antivirals, .... the nose, removing bacterial products, and improving sinonasal function. Nasal irrigations can be used prior to the administration of topical therapies to ensure true sinus distribution1, 10.

  8. mathematical model for bird flu disease transmission with no bird ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    In this paper a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of bird flu among birds and humans is presented. The model assumes that there is no migration of birds in the susceptible bird population immediately the disease starts. The model formulated is analyzed using dynamical systems theory. The analysis of the ...

  9. Mathematical model for bird flu disease transmission with no bird ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of bird flu among birds and humans is presented. The model assumes that there is no migration of birds in the susceptible bird population immediately the disease starts. The model formulated is analyzed using dynamical systems theory . The analysis of the ...

  10. Editorial Avian flu pandemic threat: why is Ethiopia considered at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial Avian flu pandemic threat: why is Ethiopia considered at risk. Yemane Berhane, Admas Tefera. Abstract. No Abstract. Ethiopian Journal of Health Development Vol. 19(3) 2005: 165-166. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics.

  11. Pandemics and networks : The case of the Mexican flu

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omic, J.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2010-01-01

    The recent widespread of the new Mexican flu and SARS show the high dependency on contemporary traveling patterns. The air transport network is recognized as an important channel of epidemic propagation for different diseases. In order to predict epidemic spreading and the influence of protection

  12. Science and Security Clash on Bird-Flu Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, Josh

    2012-01-01

    Censored papers on bird flu, which could help terrorists, have critics wondering if academic scientists can police their own work. The near-publication has brought out general critics of the federal panel, the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, and the voluntary self-policing approach that it embraces instead of regulation. Members…

  13. Flu Shots, Mammogram, and the Perception of Probabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carman, K.G.; Kooreman, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study individuals’ decisions to decline or accept preventive health care interventions such as flu shots and mammograms. In particular, we analyze the role of perceptions of the effectiveness of the intervention, by eliciting individuals' subjective probabilities of sickness and survival, with

  14. Don't Get, Don't Spread: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting the seasonal flu and spreading it to others.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  15. Outbreak of a New Strain of Flu at a Fair

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-28

    Dr. Karen Wong, an EIS officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses her study about flu outbreaks at agricultural fairs.  Created: 2/28/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/4/2013.

  16. Expanding specificity of class I restricted CD8+ T cells for viral epitopes following multiple inoculations of swine with a human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse E.; Patch, Jared R; Kenney, Mary

    2016-01-01

    class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer staining. We also showed that a modified replication defective human adenovirus 5 vector expressing the FMDV structural proteins (Ad5-FMDV-T vaccine) targets the induction of a CD8(+) CTL response with a minimal humoral response. In this report, we...... show that the specificity of the CD8(+) T cell response to Ad5-FMDV-T varies between cohorts of genetically identical animals. Further, we demonstrate epitope specificity of CD8(+) T cells expands following multiple immunizations with this vaccine....

  17. Influenza Vaccination for the Pediatric Patient: A Focus on the New Intranasal, Cold-Adapted, Live Attenuated Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Jennifer M.; Reilly, Joan C.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2004-01-01

    FluMist is the first live attenuated, cold-adapted intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV) approved for the prevention of influenza A and B. Clinical trials have shown that annual vaccination with LAIV is effective for the prevention of influenza. LAIV appears well tolerated in healthy patients 5–49 years of age. The most common adverse events are abdominal pain, chills, cough, diarrhea, headache, irritability, lethargy, muscle aches, otitis media, rhinitis, sinusitis, sore throat, and vomiting. ...

  18. Bacterium-like Particles for efficient immune stimulation of existing vaccines and new subunit vaccines in mucosal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija eVan Braeckel-Budimir

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The successful development of a mucosal vaccine critically depends on the use of a safe and effective immunostimulant and/or carrier system. This review describes the effectiveness and mode of action of an immunostimulating particle derived from bacteria in mucosal subunit vaccines. The non-living particles, designated Bacterium-like Particles (BLPs are based on the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis. The focus of the overview is on the development of intranasal BLP-based vaccines to prevent diseases caused by influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, and includes a selection of Phase I clinical data for the intranasal FluGEM vaccine.

  19. FluG affects secretion in colonies of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengfeng; Krijgsheld, Pauline; Hulsman, Marc; de Bekker, Charissa; Müller, Wally H; Reinders, Marcel; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Aspergillus niger are characterized by zonal heterogeneity in growth, sporulation, gene expression and secretion. For instance, the glucoamylase gene glaA is more highly expressed at the periphery of colonies when compared to the center. As a consequence, its encoded protein GlaA is mainly secreted at the outer part of the colony. Here, multiple copies of amyR were introduced in A. niger. Most transformants over-expressing this regulatory gene of amylolytic genes still displayed heterogeneous glaA expression and GlaA secretion. However, heterogeneity was abolished in transformant UU-A001.13 by expressing glaA and secreting GlaA throughout the mycelium. Sequencing the genome of UU-A001.13 revealed that transformation had been accompanied by deletion of part of the fluG gene and disrupting its 3' end by integration of a transformation vector. Inactivation of fluG in the wild-type background of A. niger also resulted in breakdown of starch under the whole colony. Asexual development of the ∆fluG strain was not affected, unlike what was previously shown in Aspergillus nidulans. Genes encoding proteins with a signal sequence for secretion, including part of the amylolytic genes, were more often downregulated in the central zone of maltose-grown ∆fluG colonies and upregulated in the intermediate part and periphery when compared to the wild-type. Together, these data indicate that FluG of A. niger is a repressor of secretion.

  20. Analysing Twitter and web queries for flu trend prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José Carlos; Matos, Sérgio

    2014-05-07

    Social media platforms encourage people to share diverse aspects of their daily life. Among these, shared health related information might be used to infer health status and incidence rates for specific conditions or symptoms. In this work, we present an infodemiology study that evaluates the use of Twitter messages and search engine query logs to estimate and predict the incidence rate of influenza like illness in Portugal. Based on a manually classified dataset of 2704 tweets from Portugal, we selected a set of 650 textual features to train a Naïve Bayes classifier to identify tweets mentioning flu or flu-like illness or symptoms. We obtained a precision of 0.78 and an F-measure of 0.83, based on cross validation over the complete annotated set. Furthermore, we trained a multiple linear regression model to estimate the health-monitoring data from the Influenzanet project, using as predictors the relative frequencies obtained from the tweet classification results and from query logs, and achieved a correlation ratio of 0.89 (p<0.001). These classification and regression models were also applied to estimate the flu incidence in the following flu season, achieving a correlation of 0.72. Previous studies addressing the estimation of disease incidence based on user-generated content have mostly focused on the english language. Our results further validate those studies and show that by changing the initial steps of data preprocessing and feature extraction and selection, the proposed approaches can be adapted to other languages. Additionally, we investigated whether the predictive model created can be applied to data from the subsequent flu season. In this case, although the prediction result was good, an initial phase to adapt the regression model could be necessary to achieve more robust results.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of novel swine origin influenza virus (S-OIV from Gwalior, India, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Jyoti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The H1N1pandemic virus is a newly emergent human influenza A virus that is closely related to a number of currently circulating pig viruses in the 'classic North American' and 'Eurasian' swine influenza virus lineages and thus referred as S-OIV. Since the first reports of the virus in humans in April 2009, H1N1 virus has spread to 168 countries and overseas territories. India also witnessed severe H1N1 pandemic virus epidemic with considerable morbidity and mortality in different parts starting from May 2009. Findings The suspected swine flu outbreak from Gwalior India during October- December 2009 was confirmed through S-OIV HA gene specific RT-LAMP and real time RT-PCR. Positive samples through CDC real time and Lamp assay were further processed for isolation of the virus. Full HA gene sequencing of the H1N1 isolates of Gwalior, India revealed 99% homology with California and other circulating novel swine flu viruses. Three major changes were observed at nucleotide level, while two major amino acid shifts were observed at the position C9W and I30M corresponding to the ORF with prototype strain. The HA gene sequence phylogeny revealed the circulation of two genetically distinct lineages belonging to Clade VII and Clade I of S-OIV. Conclusions Our findings also supported the earlier report about circulation of mixed genogroups of S-OIV in India. Therefore continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of this newly emergent virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country.

  2. Development of an influenza virus vaccine using the baculovirus-insect cell expression system : implications for pandemic preparedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Key word Influenza, rHA, vaccine, baculovirus, insect cells, production, pandemic preparedness Influenza (or flu) is a highly contagious, acute viral respiratory disease that occurs seasonally in most parts of the world and is caused by influenza viruses. Influenza vaccination is an effective

  3. Preparing for the Flu (Including 2009 H1N1 Flu): A Communication Toolkit for Schools (Grades K-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of "Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Schools" is to provide basic information and communication resources to help school administrators implement recommendations from CDC's (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators for School (K-12)…

  4. Microbiome overview in swine lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; P?rez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; de Carvalho, Fab?ola Marques; Trelles, Oswaldo; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro de; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiologic agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. However other mycoplasma species and secondary bacteria are found as inhabitants of the swine respiratory tract, which can be also related to disease. In the present study we have performed a total DNA metagenomic analysis from the lungs of pigs kept in a field condition, with suggestive signals of enzootic pneumonia and without any infection signals to evaluate the bacteria variability of the lungs microbiota. Libra...

  5. Regional Differences in Pathogen Prevalence and Defensive Reactions to the “Swine Flu” Outbreak among East Asians and Westerners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hamamura

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Research has found that contagion-minimizing behavioral tendencies are amplified in pathogen-prevalent regions. We investigated whether reactions to the “swine flu” outbreak of 2009 were stronger among East Asians than Westerners, populations residing in regions that now enjoy comparable advances in healthcare but that are characterized by relatively high and low historical pathogen prevalence, respectively. In a survey, East Asians reported greater concerns about infection, especially from foreigners. Analyses of international air travel data around the time of the outbreak provided corroborating evidence: Immediately following the outbreak, airports in the Asia-Pacific region lost more international traffic relative to their Western counterparts, and East Asian airlines reported greater declines in international traffic compared to Western airlines. These differences are unlikely to reflect objective threat posed by swine flu (whose casualties were concentrated in the Americas; rather, they appear to reflect culturally adapted behavioral patterns forged and sustained by regionally variable levels of pathogen prevalence.

  6. The effect of gamma-irradiation conditions on the immunogenicity of whole-inactivated Influenza A virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Shannon C; Lau, Josyane; Singleton, Eve V; Babb, Rachelle; Davies, Justin; Hirst, Timothy R; McColl, Shaun R; Paton, James C; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2017-02-15

    Gamma-irradiation, particularly an irradiation dose of 50kGy, has been utilised widely to sterilise highly pathogenic agents such as Ebola, Marburg Virus, and Avian Influenza H5N1. We have reported previously that intranasal vaccination with a gamma-irradiated Influenza A virus vaccine (γ-Flu) results in cross-protective immunity. Considering the possible inclusion of highly pathogenic Influenza strains in future clinical development of γ-Flu, an irradiation dose of 50kGy may be used to enhance vaccine safety beyond the internationally accepted Sterility Assurance Level (SAL). Thus, we investigated the effect of irradiation conditions, including high irradiation doses, on the immunogenicity of γ-Flu. Our data confirm that irradiation at low temperatures (using dry-ice) is associated with reduced damage to viral structure compared with irradiation at room temperature. In addition, a single intranasal vaccination with γ-Flu irradiated on dry-ice with either 25 or 50kGy induced seroconversion and provided complete protection against lethal Influenza A challenge. Considering that low temperature is expected to reduce the protein damage associated with exposure to high irradiation doses, we titrated the vaccine dose to verify the efficacy of 50kGy γ-Flu. Our data demonstrate that exposure to 50kGy on dry-ice is associated with limited effect on vaccine immunogenicity, apparent only when using very low vaccine doses. Overall, our data highlight the immunogenicity of influenza virus irradiated at 50kGy for induction of high titre antibody and cytotoxic T-cell responses. This suggests these conditions are suitable for development of γ-Flu vaccines based on highly pathogenic Influenza A viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Universal paid leave increases influenza vaccinations among employees in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Fernando A; Wang, Yang; Stimpson, Jim P

    2014-05-01

    We predict the impact of paid leave in increasing influenza vaccinations for employees, thus decreasing workdays lost and healthcare visits resulting from infection. Nationally representative data from the 2006-2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were used. We examined working adults aged 18 and above (N=51,471). Logistic regression measured the association of paid leave with flu vaccination. We predicted the impact on labor and healthcare markets if universal paid leave were provided. The proportion of workers receiving vaccination annually was higher for those with paid leave versus without paid leave (34.0% vs. 21.0%, Pvaccination increased with paid leave vs. without paid leave (OR=1.42, CI: 1.31-1.53). Universal paid leave is predicted to increase vaccinations by 1.6 million, resulting in 63.8 thousand fewer absences from work and 18.2 thousand fewer healthcare visits for the flu annually. Our study suggests that employees without paid leave are significantly less likely to have had a flu vaccination. Expanding paid leave could substantially increase flu vaccination, resulting in fewer workdays lost to influenza and savings in healthcare costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The progressive adaptation of a georgian isolate of African swine fever virus to vero cells leads to a gradual attenuation of virulence in swine corresponding to major modifications of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Peter W; Holinka, Lauren G; O'Donnell, Vivian; Reese, Bo; Sanford, Brenton; Fernandez-Sainz, Ignacio; Gladue, Douglas P; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis; Risatti, Guillermo R; Borca, Manuel V

    2015-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a contagious and often lethal disease of feral and domestic swine. Experimental vaccines derived from naturally occurring, genetically modified, or cell culture-adapted ASFV have been evaluated, but no commercial vaccine is available to control African swine fever (ASF). We report here the genotypic and phenotypic analysis of viruses obtained at different passages during the process of adaptation of a virulent ASFV field isolate from the Republic of Georgia (ASFV-G) to grow in cultured cell lines. ASFV-G was successively passaged 110 times in Vero cells. Viruses obtained at passages 30, 60, 80, and 110 were evaluated in vitro for the ability to replicate in Vero cells and primary swine macrophages cultures and in vivo for assessing virulence in swine. Replication of ASFV-G in Vero cells increased with successive passages, corresponding to a decreased replication in primary swine macrophages cultures. In vivo, progressive loss of virus virulence was observed with increased passages in Vero cells, and complete attenuation of ASFV-G was observed at passage 110. Infection of swine with the fully attenuated virus did not confer protection against challenge with virulent parental ASFV-G. Full-length sequence analysis of each of these viruses revealed significant deletions that gradually accumulated in specific areas at the right and left variable ends of the genome. Mutations that result in amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations were also observed, though in a rather limited number of genes. The potential importance of these genetic changes in virus adaptation/attenuation is discussed. The main problem in controlling ASF is the lack of vaccines. Attempts to produce vaccines by adaptation of ASFV to cultured cell lines have been made. These attempts led to the production of attenuated viruses that conferred only homologous protection. Specifics regarding adaptation of these isolates to cell cultures have been

  9. THE MATERNAL TRANSMISSION OF VACCINIAL IMMUNITY IN SWINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, John B.

    1932-01-01

    The introduction of vaccinia virus into the skin of swine calls forth a typical vesicular reaction which may be followed by a solid immunity. This acquired state of resistance was utilized in determining the route of immunity transmission from sow to young. The suckling young of immune sows, vaccinated on the 7th day or earlier, showed no reaction to the virus. Their hand-fed litter mates, however, were susceptible and reacted with the formation of vesicles. These observations indicate that the porcine placenta is largely impermeable to protective substances and establish the fact that colostrum functions as the vehicle for their transmission as it does for antibodies. PMID:19870106

  10. Explanations for Not Receiving the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: An Ontario Canada Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Samantha B; Lum, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Despite evidence of the importance of the seasonal influenza vaccine for both individual and population health, only a third of the Ontario population received the vaccine in 2013/2014. The objective of this study was to identify why Ontarians are not getting the seasonal influenza vaccine. Written responses to the question "Why didn't you get the seasonal flu vaccine in the last flu season?" were deductively analyzed using the Conceptual Model of Vaccine Hesitancy. Inductive coding was also conducted to identify explanations that fall outside of the present model and may be unique to the seasonal influenza vaccine. Data were collected between August and early September, 2014 through a survey in the Region of Waterloo, Ontario. Overall, 91.4% of responses could be explained using the conceptual model and specifically relate to perceived importance of vaccination (46.8%), moral convictions (19.4%), and past experiences with vaccinations services (14.5%). Notably, explanations related to healthcare professional attitudes, risk perceptions and trust, and subjective norms were identified to a much lesser extent than those discussed above. The remaining 8.6% of responses cannot be explained by the model because they do not relate to hesitancy. Our data contribute to the minimal body of Canadian research investigating low uptake of the seasonal flu vaccine, adding to an evidence-base upon which to inform promotional campaigns. Our data also highlight the utility of the Conceptual Model of Vaccine Hesitancy for the design and analysis of research investigating seasonal flu vaccine refusal or delay.

  11. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend ...

  12. Efficacy of marker vaccine candidate CP7 E2alf in piglets with maternally derived C-strain antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    2012-01-01

    Marker vaccines offer the possibility to differentiate classical swine fever (CSF) infected from CSF vaccinated animals based on serology and their implementation will ensure free trade with pigs. Therefore, new generations of promising marker vaccines have been developed, among them the chimeric...

  13. Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS) for clinical detection of influenza in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jason B; Prasad, Priya A; Coffin, Susan E; Alpern, Elizabeth R; Mistry, Rakesh D

    2014-10-01

    Validated clinical scales, such as the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS), have not been used to differentiate influenza (FLU) from other respiratory viruses. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort presenting to the emergency department (ED) with an influenza-like infection from 2008 to 2010. Subjects were children aged 0 to 19 years who had a venipuncture and respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction. Demographics and CARIFS items were assessed during the ED visit; comparisons were made between FLU and non-FLU subjects. The 203 subjects had median age 30.5 months; 61.6% were male. Comorbid conditions (51.2%) were common. FLU was identified in 26.6%, and were older than non-FLU patients (69.7 vs 47.9 months, P = .02). Demographic, household factors, and mean CARIFS score did not differ between FLU (33.7), and non-FLU (32.0) (mean difference 1.6, 95% CI: -2.0 to 5.2) groups. CARIFS cannot discriminate between FLU and non-FLU infection in ED children with influenza-like infection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Spanish flu, Asian flu, Hong Kong flu, and seasonal influenza in Japan under social and demographic influence: review and analysis using the two-population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    When cumulative numbers of patients (X) and deaths (Y) associated with an influenza epidemic are plotted using the log-log scale, the plots fall on an ascending straight line generally expressed as logY = k(logX - logN0). For the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the slope k was ~0.6 for Mexico and ~2 for other countries. The two-population model was proposed to explain this phenomenon (Yoshikura H. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2012;65:279-88; Yoshikura H. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009;62:411-2; and Yoshikura H. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009;62:482-4). The current article reviews and analyzes previous influenza epidemics in Japan to examine whether the two-population model is applicable to them. The slope k was found to be ~2 for the Spanish flu during 1918-1920 and the Asian flu during 1957-1958, and ~1 for the Hong Kong flu and seasonal influenza prior to 1960-1961; however, k was ~0.6 for seasonal influenza after 1960-1961. This transition of the slope k of seasonal influenza plots from ~1 to ~0.6 corresponded to the shift in influenza mortality toward the older age groups and a drastic reduction in infant mortality rates due to improvements in the standard of living during the 1950s and 1960s. All the above observations could be well explained by reconstitution of the influenza epidemic based on the two-population model.

  15. Current recommendations for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Lan; Chang, Jia-Kan; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2015-05-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus infection and an important cause of encephalitis in most of Asia and parts of the western Pacific. Most people infected with the JE virus (JEV) are asymptomatic or seemingly suffer from a nonspecific, flu-like illness; in others, JE can cause illness ranging from fever and headache to severe encephalitis. Although it can cause significant morbidity and mortality, JE is a vaccine-preventable disease, and vaccination programs have proven most effective in preventing and diminishing the burden of disease. Such JE vaccines have been available for decades with four types of JE vaccines-live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine, inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccine (JE-MB), inactivated Vero cell culture vaccine (JE-VC), and live attenuated chimeric vaccine (IMOJEV)-and are currently used in most countries. In some Asian countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, and Thailand, immunization programs have been conducted for children and so the ongoing incidence of JE has declined considerably in recent decades. Until quite recently, the primary JE vaccine in use internationally has been the JE-MB, which is now commonly replaced by cell culture-based vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  16. Novel Isoprene Sensor for a Flu Virus Breath Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelagia-Irene Gouma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A common feature of the inflammatory response in patients who have actually contracted influenza is the generation of a number of volatile products of the alveolar and airway epithelium. These products include a number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and nitric oxide (NO. These may be used as biomarkers to detect the disease. A portable 3-sensor array microsystem-based tool that can potentially detect flu infection biomarkers is described here. Whether used in connection with in-vitro cell culture studies or as a single exhale breathalyzer, this device may be used to provide a rapid and non-invasive screening method for flu and other virus-based epidemics.

  17. Amantadine: the journey from fighting flu to treating Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubsher, G; Haider, M; Okun, M S

    2012-04-03

    To explore how amantadine transitioned from an anti-flu drug to antiparkinsonian agent. A review of the historical literature on the use of amantadine from 1966 to the present was performed. Amantadine was originally introduced and utilized as an antiviral medication. A single patient noticed relief in her Parkinson disease (PD) symptoms after taking amantadine for a flu infection, and this observation sparked an interest, and several important studies that eventually led to a new drug indication. Amantadine has over the years fallen out of favor as a drug to address influenza infection; however, it has become part of the arsenal utilized for early symptomatic treatment of PD, as well an option for treating dyskinesia.

  18. Targeting a metabolic pathway to fight the flu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boergeling, Yvonne; Ludwig, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Our antiviral arsenal to fight influenza viruses is limited and we need novel anti-flu drugs. Recently, cellular drug targets came into focus and omics analysis were instrumental to suggest candidate factors. In this issue of The FEBS Journal, Kainov and colleagues used transcriptome data to investigate virus-induced changes in tryptophan metabolism that may serve as immunomodulatory approach against viruses. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Pregnant Women: Know the Signs and Symptoms of Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-17

    This podcast is targeted to pregnant women and explains 1) the signs and symptoms of the flu, and 2) what to do if you experience and signs and symptoms. This podcast is NOT a substitute for the advice of your doctor or health care provider. It is intended for educational purposes only.  Created: 11/17/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Office of the Director (OD).   Date Released: 11/17/2010.

  20. Use of Protective Gear in Bird Flu Outbreak Response

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-29

    CDC's Dr. Oliver Morgan discusses how the use of masks and other protective gear impacted whether workers dealing with an outbreak of bird flu in England became sick. The paper is published in the January 2009 issue of CDC’s journal, Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 12/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 12/29/2008.

  1. Sequence-Based Genotyping of Expressed Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Alleles by Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal Novel Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class I Haplotypes and Alleles in Belgian, Danish, and Kenyan Fattening Pigs and Göttingen Minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Ilsøe, Mette; Strube, Mikael Lenz

    2017-01-01

    The need for typing of the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) is increasing with the expanded use of pigs as models for human diseases and organ-transplantation experiments, their use in infection studies, and for design of veterinary vaccines. Knowledge of SLA sequences is furthermore a prerequisite...

  2. Feed quality in swine diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Branislav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper will demonstrate the quality of some feed used in swine diet. The emphasis will be on feed whose incorporation into mixes could result in unfavorable effects on production, health and economic production of swine. Data will be presented on maize and its possible negative effects, having in mind toxins. Soybean meal, or genetically modified soybean meal, will also be observed. The next feed which will be discussed will be soybean whey obtained by different procedures and the potential dangers of its use in swine diet rations. Sunflower meal, feed of animal origin, with emphasis on fish flour and meat-bone flour will also be covered in the work. A feed which has been attracting particular attention lately is yeast imported from Italy. Its quality characteristics will be discussed, the so-called non-protein nitrogen. Analyses of mineral feed will include sources of phosphorus, phosphates (monocalciumphosphate, dicalcium phosphate phytases and resolving the problem of phosphorus in swine rations. Finally, an inevitable segment are synthetic amino acids, especially lysine and its role in swine diet.

  3. Movement patterns of exhibition swine and associations of influenza A virus infection with swine management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Nola; Stull, Jason W; Moeller, Steven J; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J; Bowman, Andrew S

    2017-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To identify the geographic distribution of exhibition swine in the Midwestern United States, characterize management practices used for exhibition swine, and identify associations between those practices and influenza A virus (IAV) detection in exhibition swine arriving at county or state agricultural fairs. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE 480 swine exhibitors and 641 exhibition swine. PROCEDURES Inventories of swine exhibited at fairs in 6 selected Midwestern states during 2013 and of the total swine population (including commercial swine) in these regions in 2012 were obtained and mapped. In 2014, snout wipe samples were collected from swine on arrival at 9 selected fairs in Indiana (n = 5) and Ohio (4) and tested for the presence of IAV. Also at fair arrival, swine exhibitors completed a survey regarding swine management practices. RESULTS Contrary to the total swine population, the exhibition swine population was heavily concentrated in Indiana and Ohio. Many swine exhibitors reported attending multiple exhibitions within a season (median number, 2; range, 0 to 50), with exhibited swine often returned to their farm of origin. Rearing of commercial and exhibition swine on the same premises was reported by 13.3% (56/422) of exhibitors. Hosting an on-farm open house or sale was associated with an increased odds of IAV detection in snout wipe samples. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The exhibition swine population was highly variable and differed from the commercial swine population in terms of pig density across geographic locations, population integrity, and on-farm management practices. Exhibition swine may be important in IAV transmission, and identified biosecurity deficiencies may have important public and animal health consequences.

  4. Insights from investigating the interactions of adamantane-based drugs with the M2 proton channel from the H1N1 swine virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing-Fang [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wei, Dong-Qing, E-mail: dqwei@gordonlifescience.org [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gordon Life Science Institute, 13784 Torrey Del Mar Drive, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States); Chou, Kuo-Chen [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gordon Life Science Institute, 13784 Torrey Del Mar Drive, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States)

    2009-10-16

    The M2 proton channel is one of indispensable components for the influenza A virus that plays a vital role in its life cycle and hence is an important target for drug design against the virus. In view of this, the three-dimensional structure of the H1N1-M2 channel was developed based on the primary sequence taken from a patient recently infected by the H1N1 (swine flu) virus. With an explicit water-membrane environment, molecular docking studies were performed for amantadine and rimantadine, the two commercial drugs generally used to treat influenza A infection. It was found that their binding affinity to the H1N1-M2 channel is significantly lower than that to the H5N1-M2 channel, fully consistent with the recent report that the H1N1 swine virus was resistant to the two drugs. The findings and the relevant analysis reported here might provide useful structural insights for developing effective drugs against the new swine flu virus.

  5. Control of African swine fever epidemics in industrialized swine populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten

    2016-01-01

    and national strategy (Basic), the basic strategy plus pre-emptive depopulation of neighboring swine herds, and intensive surveillance of herds in the control zones, including testing live or dead animals. Virus spread via wild boar was not modelled. Under the basic control strategy, the median epidemic...... resulted in marginal improvements to the control of the epidemics. However, adding testing of dead animals in the protection and surveillance zones was predicted to be the optimal control scenario for an ASF epidemic in industrialized swine populations without contact to wild boar. This optimal scenario...

  6. Efficacy of antibiotic treatment and test-based culling strategies for eradicating brucellosis in commercial swine herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieste-Pérez, L.; Frankena, K.; Blasco, J.M.; Muñoz, P.M.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in continental Europe. Without effective vaccines being available, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recommends the full depopulation of infected herds as the only strategy to eradicate B. suis outbreaks. Using data

  7. Efficacy of antibiotic treatment and test-based culling strategies for eradicating brucellosis in commercial swine herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieste-Pérez, L.; Frankena, K.; Blasco, J. M.; Muñoz, P. M.; De Jong, M. C M

    2016-01-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in continental Europe. Without effective vaccines being available, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recommends the full depopulation of infected herds as the only strategy to eradicate B. suis outbreaks. Using data

  8. Comparison: Flu prescription sales data from a retail pharmacy in the US with Google Flu trends and US ILINet (CDC) data as flu activity indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Avinash; Bilkovski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The potential threat of bioterrorism along with the emergence of new or existing drug resistant strains of influenza virus, added to expanded global travel, have increased vulnerability to epidemics or pandemics and their aftermath. The same factors have also precipitated urgency for having better, faster, sensitive, and reliable syndromic surveillance systems. Prescription sales data can provide surrogate information about the development of infectious diseases and therefore serve as a useful tool in syndromic surveillance. This study compared prescription sales data from a large drug retailing pharmacy chain in the United States with Google Flu trends surveillance system data as a flu activity indicator. It was found that the two were highly correlated. The correlation coefficient (Pearson 'r') for five years' aggregate data (2007-2011) was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.90-0.94). The correlation coefficients for each of the five years between 2007 and 2011 were 0.85, 0.92, 0.91, 0.88, and 0.87 respectively. Additionally, prescription sales data from the same large drug retailing pharmacy chain in the United States were also compared with US Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet) data for 2007 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The correlation coefficient (Pearson 'r') was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.98).

  9. Comparison: Flu prescription sales data from a retail pharmacy in the US with Google Flu trends and US ILINet (CDC data as flu activity indicator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Patwardhan

    Full Text Available The potential threat of bioterrorism along with the emergence of new or existing drug resistant strains of influenza virus, added to expanded global travel, have increased vulnerability to epidemics or pandemics and their aftermath. The same factors have also precipitated urgency for having better, faster, sensitive, and reliable syndromic surveillance systems. Prescription sales data can provide surrogate information about the development of infectious diseases and therefore serve as a useful tool in syndromic surveillance. This study compared prescription sales data from a large drug retailing pharmacy chain in the United States with Google Flu trends surveillance system data as a flu activity indicator. It was found that the two were highly correlated. The correlation coefficient (Pearson 'r' for five years' aggregate data (2007-2011 was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.90-0.94. The correlation coefficients for each of the five years between 2007 and 2011 were 0.85, 0.92, 0.91, 0.88, and 0.87 respectively. Additionally, prescription sales data from the same large drug retailing pharmacy chain in the United States were also compared with US Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet data for 2007 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. The correlation coefficient (Pearson 'r' was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.98.

  10. Pandemic Influenza Vaccines – The Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cox

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years’ enzootic spread of highly pathogenic H5N1 virus among poultry and the many lethal zoonoses in its wake has stimulated basic and applied pandemic vaccine research. The quest for an efficacious, affordable and timely accessible pandemic vaccine has been high on the agenda. When a variant H1N1 strain of swine origin emerged as a pandemic virus, it surprised many, as this subtype is well-known to man as a seasonal virus. This review will cover some difficult vaccine questions, such as the immunological challenges, the new production platforms, and the limited supply and global equity issues.

  11. [Mexican flu: public reaction to news coverage measured using an internet panel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bults, Marloes; Beaujean, Desirée J M A

    2009-01-01

    To determine the reaction of the general public on the information regarding the Mexican flu. Online panel interview. From April 30 to May 4 2009, 572 people filled out an online questionnaire. 88% of the respondents had sufficient general knowledge about the Mexican flu. This information was mostly acquired by watching television (69%). More information was desired regarding the symptoms of the flu and those personal measures that could be taken to avoid infection.

  12. Live attenuated influenza vaccine provides superior protection from heterologous infection in pigs with maternal antibodies without inducing vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the US is hindered since inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants co-circulating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be further limited when administered to young pigs that possess maternally deriv...

  13. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); R. Bodewes (Rogier); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); G. van Amerongen (Geert); T. Kuiken (Thijs); J.H. Simon (James); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G. del Giudice (Giuseppe); R. Rappuoli (Rino); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSerum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine

  14. [Adherence to the H1N1 vaccination recommendation in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    In September 2009, the German "Standing Committee for Vaccination" (STIKO) recommended the H1N1 influenza vaccination to all patients with chronic diseases. We investigated the adherence to this recommendation in patients with the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Special attention was paid to arguments for vaccination refusal. In an explorative multicenter study we asked adult patients to answer a questionnaire about their participation in the H1N1 vaccination campaign, their arguments for and against this vaccination and disease specific parameters. Out of 1389 participating patients, 226 (16 %) received the H1N1 vaccination. Among patients who were vaccinated against the seasonal flu as well as patients who were treated with anti-TNF-treatment and members of the German Crohn's and Colitis Association, the participation rates were significantly higher (32 %, 26 %, 25 %, respectively). The main argument against the H1N1 vaccination was fear of side effects (59 %). However, 77 % of all vaccinated patients judged the vaccine as very well tolerated. The non-adherence to general vaccination recommendations against tetanus and seasonal flu was also high (25 % and 66 %, respectively). Only a minority of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis had adhered to the official recommendation concerning vaccination against H1N1. In order to reach higher acceptance, further vaccination campaigns must focus on the safety of the recommended vaccine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Determinants of refusal of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination in a high risk population: a qualitative approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenie d'Alessandro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our study analyses the main determinants of refusal or acceptance of the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine in patients with cystic fibrosis, a high-risk population for severe flu infection, usually very compliant for seasonal flu vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews in 3 cystic fibrosis referral centres in Paris, France. The study included 42 patients with cystic fibrosis: 24 who refused the vaccine and 18 who were vaccinated. The two groups differed quite substantially in their perceptions of vaccine- and disease-related risks. Those who refused the vaccine were motivated mainly by the fears it aroused and did not explicitly consider the 2009 A/H1N1 flu a potentially severe disease. People who were vaccinated explained their choice, first and foremost, as intended to prevent the flu's potential consequences on respiratory cystic fibrosis disease. Moreover, they considered vaccination to be an indirect collective prevention tool. Patients who refused the vaccine mentioned multiple, contradictory information sources and did not appear to consider the recommendation of their local health care provider as predominant. On the contrary, those who were vaccinated stated that they had based their decision solely on the clear and unequivocal advice of their health care provider. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results of our survey led us to formulate three main recommendations for improving adhesion to new pandemic vaccines. (1 it appears necessary to reinforce patient education about the disease and its specific risks, but also general population information about community immunity. (2 it is essential to disseminate a clear and effective message about the safety of novel vaccines. (3 this message should be conveyed by local health care providers, who should be involved in implementing immunization.

  16. Determinants of Non-Vaccination against Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza in Pregnant Women: A Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Romain; Le Ray, Camille; Charlier, Caroline; Avenell, Carolyn; Truster, Van; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Skalli, Dounia; Ville, Yves; Goffinet, François; Launay, Odile

    2011-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 8...

  17. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  18. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajão, Daniela S; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Shanks, G Dennis; Vincent, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigenic drift, but have been shown to induce vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) when challenged with an antigenic variant of the same haemagglutinin (HA) subtype. This study investigated the role the immune response against HA, neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) may play in VAERD by reverse engineering vaccine and challenge viruses on a common backbone and using them in a series of vaccination/challenge trials. Mismatched HA between vaccine and challenge virus was necessary to induce VAERD. However, vaccines containing a matched NA abrogated the VAERD phenomenon induced by the HA mismatch and this was correlated with NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies. Divergence between the two circulating swine N2 lineages (92 % identity) resulted in a loss of NI cross-reactivity and also resulted in VAERD with the mismatched HA. The NP lineage selected for use in the WIV vaccine strains did not affect protection or pathology. Thus the combination of HA and NA in the vaccine virus strains played a substantial role in vaccine protection versus immunopathology, suggesting that vaccines that target the HA protein alone could be more prone to VAERD due to the absence of cross-protective NI antibodies.

  19. Early assessment of anxiety and behavioral response to novel swine-origin influenza A(H1N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Holland Jones

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Since late April, 2009, a novel influenza virus A (H1N1, generally referred to as the "swine flu," has spread around the globe and infected hundreds of thousands of people. During the first few days after the initial outbreak in Mexico, extensive media coverage together with a high degree of uncertainty about the transmissibility and mortality rate associated with the virus caused widespread concern in the population. The spread of an infectious disease can be strongly influenced by behavioral changes (e.g., social distancing during the early phase of an epidemic, but data on risk perception and behavioral response to a novel virus is usually collected with a substantial delay or after an epidemic has run its course.Here, we report the results from an online survey that gathered data (n = 6,249 about risk perception of the Influenza A(H1N1 outbreak during the first few days of widespread media coverage (April 28-May 5, 2009. We find that after an initially high level of concern, levels of anxiety waned along with the perception of the virus as an immediate threat. Overall, our data provide evidence that emotional status mediates behavioral response. Intriguingly, principal component analysis revealed strong clustering of anxiety about swine flu, bird flu and terrorism. All three of these threats receive a great deal of media attention and their fundamental uncertainty is likely to generate an inordinate amount of fear vis-a-vis their actual threat.Our results suggest that respondents' behavior varies in predictable ways. Of particular interest, we find that affective variables, such as self-reported anxiety over the epidemic, mediate the likelihood that respondents will engage in protective behavior. Understanding how protective behavior such as social distancing varies and the specific factors that mediate it may help with the design of epidemic control strategies.

  20. Early assessment of anxiety and behavioral response to novel swine-origin influenza A(H1N1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James Holland; Salathé, Marcel

    2009-12-03

    Since late April, 2009, a novel influenza virus A (H1N1), generally referred to as the "swine flu," has spread around the globe and infected hundreds of thousands of people. During the first few days after the initial outbreak in Mexico, extensive media coverage together with a high degree of uncertainty about the transmissibility and mortality rate associated with the virus caused widespread concern in the population. The spread of an infectious disease can be strongly influenced by behavioral changes (e.g., social distancing) during the early phase of an epidemic, but data on risk perception and behavioral response to a novel virus is usually collected with a substantial delay or after an epidemic has run its course. Here, we report the results from an online survey that gathered data (n = 6,249) about risk perception of the Influenza A(H1N1) outbreak during the first few days of widespread media coverage (April 28-May 5, 2009). We find that after an initially high level of concern, levels of anxiety waned along with the perception of the virus as an immediate threat. Overall, our data provide evidence that emotional status mediates behavioral response. Intriguingly, principal component analysis revealed strong clustering of anxiety about swine flu, bird flu and terrorism. All three of these threats receive a great deal of media attention and their fundamental uncertainty is likely to generate an inordinate amount of fear vis-a-vis their actual threat. Our results suggest that respondents' behavior varies in predictable ways. Of particular interest, we find that affective variables, such as self-reported anxiety over the epidemic, mediate the likelihood that respondents will engage in protective behavior. Understanding how protective behavior such as social distancing varies and the specific factors that mediate it may help with the design of epidemic control strategies.

  1. PANDEMIC SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS: PREPAREDNESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    pandemic planning. Keywords: Pandemic, swine, influenza, virus, preparedness. INTRODUCTION. Effective pandemic preparedness and response should involve .... disaster. Academy of Emerging Medicine 2006;. 13: 1118-1129. 11. Coker R.J, Mounier-Jack S. Pandemic influenza preparedness in the Asia- pacific region.

  2. Microbiome overview in swine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Pérez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Trelles, Oswaldo; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiologic agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. However other mycoplasma species and secondary bacteria are found as inhabitants of the swine respiratory tract, which can be also related to disease. In the present study we have performed a total DNA metagenomic analysis from the lungs of pigs kept in a field condition, with suggestive signals of enzootic pneumonia and without any infection signals to evaluate the bacteria variability of the lungs microbiota. Libraries from metagenomic DNA were prepared and sequenced using total DNA shotgun metagenomic pyrosequencing. The metagenomic distribution showed a great abundance of bacteria. The most common microbial families identified from pneumonic swine's lungs were Mycoplasmataceae, Flavobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae, whereas in the carrier swine's lungs the most common families were Mycoplasmataceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Flavobacteriaceae. Analysis of community composition in both samples confirmed the high prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae. Moreover, the carrier lungs had more diverse family population, which should be related to the lungs normal flora. In summary, we provide a wide view of the bacterial population from lungs with signals of enzootic pneumonia and lungs without signals of enzootic pneumonia in a field situation. These bacteria patterns provide information that may be important for the establishment of disease control measures and to give insights for further studies.

  3. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  4. Evaluation of In Vitro Cross-Reactivity to Avian H5N1 and Pandemic H1N1 2009 Influenza Following Prime Boost Regimens of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Healthy Human Subjects: A Randomised Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    of influenza. Live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is an intranasally administered vaccine, designed to induce an immune response resembling...or the Department of Immunology and Medicine, AFRIMS, Bangkok. Clinical Methods Vaccine administration. The vaccines used were FluMistH intranasal ... Pediatr Infect Dis 17: 206-212. 5. Verrier F, Burda S, Belshe R, Duliege AM, Excler JL, et al. (2000) A human immunodeficiency virus prime-boost

  5. Economic benefits of sharing and redistributing influenza vaccines when shortages occurred.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-I Chen

    Full Text Available Recurrent influenza outbreak has been a concern for government health institutions in Taiwan. Over 10% of the population is infected by influenza viruses every year, and the infection has caused losses to both health and the economy. Approximately three million free vaccine doses are ordered and administered to high-risk populations at the beginning of flu season to control the disease. The government recommends sharing and redistributing vaccine inventories when shortages occur. While this policy intends to increase inventory flexibility, and has been proven as widely valuable, its impact on vaccine availability has not been previously reported.This study developed an inventory model adapted to vaccination protocols to evaluate government recommended polices under different levels of vaccine production. Demands were uncertain and stratified by ages and locations according to the demographic data in Taiwan.When vaccine supply is sufficient, sharing pediatric vaccine reduced vaccine unavailability by 43% and overstock by 54%, and sharing adult vaccine reduced vaccine unavailability by 9% and overstock by 15%. Redistributing vaccines obtained greater gains for both pediatrics and adults (by 75%. When the vaccine supply is in short, only sharing pediatric vaccine yielded a 48% reduction of unused inventory, while other polices do not improve performances.When implementing vaccination activities for seasonal influenza intervention, it is important to consider mismatches of demand and vaccine inventory. Our model confirmed that sharing and redistributing vaccines can substantially increase availability and reduce unused vaccines.

  6. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jolene; O'Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G; Krug, Peter W; Gladue, Douglas P; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V

    2016-10-22

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms.

  7. [Towards a new vaccine economy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, P; Martin, J F

    1994-01-01

    When Jonas Salk announced in the mid-50s the availability of a new vaccine against poliomyelitis, the world had the impression that it was now controlling infectious diseases. In fact, the success of this vaccine has been considerable and although some innovations lead to the launch of vaccines against flu, measles, rubella or mumps, the world vaccine market remained remarkably stable till the mid-80s. However, since 1984 (launch of the hepatitis B vaccine) there have been very substantial changes and further change is expected in the next ten years in the world market. Today, big companies are making a concentrated supply: Pasteur Mérieux with its subsidiary Connaught, SmithKline Beecham who acquired the Belgian company RIT, and Merck & Co. who is joining its forces with Pasteur Mérieux. Medium sized and small companies remain and reflect the situation of the past, but must work hard to secure their long term existence eventhough the world demand is going to double before the year 2000. Very substantial technological innovations explain to a large extent the development of the supply: progress in molecular biology, and particularly genetic engineering, lead to recombinant vaccines of which hepatitis B is the best example with worldwide sales in the range of $600 million a year. Similarly, conjugation technologies have allowed the development of new vaccines against meningitis, particularly Haemophilus influenzae type b. More recently, an efficacious vaccine against hepatitis A has been launched and many new products will be marketed in the next years against herpes, Lyme disease, and agents of other meningitis, etc.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. An econometric analysis of SARS and Avian flu on international tourist arrivals to Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. McAleer (Michael); B-W. Huang (Bing-Wen); H-I. Kuo (Hsiao-I); C-C. Chen (Chi-Chung); C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis paper compares the impacts of SARS and human deaths arising from Avian Flu on international tourist arrivals to Asia. The effects of SARS and human deaths from Avian Flu will be compared directly according to human deaths. The nature of the short run and long run relationship is

  9. Ethnic differences in susceptibilities to A(H1N1) flu: An epidemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current A(H1N1) flu has showed sub-population dependent susceptibility and fatality as early as April and May of 2009 in its first wave of spreading. After the pandemic outbreak spreads globally for more than seven months, the subpopulation dependence of this flu, including ethnicity, age and gender selectivity, has ...

  10. Who Takes Advantage of Free Flu Shots? Examining the Effects of an Expansion in Coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carman, K.G.; Mosca, I.

    2011-01-01

    Because of the high risk of costly complications (including death) and the externalities of contagious diseases, many countries provide free flu shots to certain populations free of charge. This paper examines the expansion of the free flu shot program in the Netherlands. This program expanded in

  11. Conceptual Representations of Flu and Microbial Illness Held by Students, Teachers, and Medical Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail; Rua, Melissa J.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes 5th, 8th, and 11th-grade students', teachers', and medical professionals' conceptions of flu and microbial illness. Participants constructed a concept map on "flu" and participated in a semi-structured interview. The results showed that these groups of students, teachers and medical professionals held and structured their…

  12. Flu Plan: Colleges Struggle with How They Would React to a Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Lila

    2005-01-01

    Administrators of various education schools have vowed to ready their institutions for the next major disaster of flu pandemic. While a few colleges with expertise or interest in the area are trying to determine how their campuses should react to a flu pandemic, most seem to be struggling with how to fit all the unknowns of such a crisis into…

  13. Colds and flu – an overview of the management | Ismail | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common cold and flu are two very different viruses that share very similar symptoms. The common cold is a self-limiting upper respiratory tract infection and it is caused by the rhinovirus, coronavirus or the adenovirus. It usually resolves within 7-10 days. The flu is caused by the influenza virus and usually presents with ...

  14. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  15. Vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  16. Estimation of the transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus within a swine house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J. P.; Larsen, T. S.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    The spread of African swine fever virus (ASFV) threatens to reach further parts of Europe. In countries with a large swine production, an outbreak of ASF may result in devastating economic consequences for the swine industry. Simulation models can assist decision makers setting up contingency plans...

  17. Protective effect of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe

    2018-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus in swine herds represents a major problem for the swine industry and poses a constant threat for the emergence of novel pandemic viruses and the development of more effective influenza vaccines for pigs is desired. By optimizing the vector backbone and using a needle......-free delivery method, we have recently demonstrated a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine that induces a broad immune response, including both humoral and cellular immunity. Objectives To investigate the protection of our polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in a pig challenge study. Methods By intradermal...... needle-free delivery to the skin, we immunized pigs with two different doses (500 μg and 800 μg) of an influenza DNA vaccine based on six genes of pandemic origin, including internally expressed matrix and nucleoprotein and externally expressed hemagglutinin and neuraminidase as previously demonstrated...

  18. THE AVIAN FLU IMPACT ON THE ROMANIAN POULTRY MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius Stanciu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Poultry meat represents one of the most dynamic branches of the local meat production. The poultry sector represents a good quality protein source, at an acceptable price as compared to other animal production domains. There has been an ascending evolution of the sector after the year 2000, although there appeared a series of discontinuities that affected agricultural production, mainly on a short-term basis. The Avian Flu led to 190 million euros’ worth losses at the level of Romanian national economy. Low consumption due to the impact was a short-term consequence, being rapidly amortized by the Romanian producers. The lack of some business continuity insurance measures can further affect the poultry meat sector, which does not have the necessary robustness needed in case of larger shocks. The following article proposes an analysis of the Avian Flu crisis economic effects on the Romanian meat sector, and it is part of a general framework of research regarding the Romanian food chain resilience to critical situations.

  19. Postmarketing safety surveillance of trivalent recombinant influenza vaccine: Reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Emily Jane; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Jankosky, Christopher

    2017-10-09

    On January 16, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration approved recombinant hemagglutinin influenza vaccine (RIV3) (Spodoptera frugiperda cell line; Flublok), which is the first completely egg-free flu vaccine licensed in the United States. To improve our understanding of the safety profile of this vaccine, we reviewed and summarized reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) following RIV3. Through June 30, 2016, VAERS received 88 reports. Allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, were the most common type of adverse event. Based on medical review, 10 cases met the Brighton Collaboration case definition of anaphylaxis, 21 reports described allergic reactions other than anaphylaxis, and 11 reports described signs and symptoms that suggested hypersensitivity. Other adverse events included injection site reactions, fatigue, myalgia, headache, and fever. The occurrence of anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions in some individuals may reflect an underlying predisposition to atopy that may manifest itself after an exposure to any drug or vaccine, and it does not necessarily suggest a causal relationship with the unique constituents that are specific to the vaccine product administered. Further research may elucidate the mechanism of allergic reactions following influenza vaccination: it is possible that egg proteins and influenza hemagglutinin play little or no role. Vaccination remains the single best defense against influenza and its complications. The information summarized here may enable policy makers, health officials, clinicians, and patients to make a more informed decision regarding vaccination strategies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Journey to vaccination: a protocol for a multinational qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Ana; Miraldo, Marisa; Parand, Anam; Vincent, Charles; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-01-31

    In the past two decades, childhood vaccination coverage has increased dramatically, averting an estimated 2-3 million deaths per year. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains inconsistently recorded and substandard. Although structural barriers are known to limit coverage, social and psychological factors can also affect vaccine uptake. Previous qualitative studies have explored beliefs, attitudes and preferences associated with seasonal influenza (flu) vaccination uptake, yet little research has investigated how participants' context and experiences influence their vaccination decision-making process over time. This paper aims to provide a detailed account of a mixed methods approach designed to understand the wider constellation of social and psychological factors likely to influence adult vaccination decisions, as well as the context in which these decisions take place, in the USA, the UK, France, India, China and Brazil. We employ a combination of qualitative interviewing approaches to reach a comprehensive understanding of the factors influencing vaccination decisions, specifically seasonal flu and tetanus. To elicit these factors, we developed the journey to vaccination, a new qualitative approach anchored on the heuristics and biases tradition and the customer journey mapping approach. A purposive sampling strategy is used to select participants who represent a range of key sociodemographic characteristics. Thematic analysis will be used to analyse the data. Typical journeys to vaccination will be proposed. Vaccination uptake is significantly influenced by social and psychological factors, some of which are under-reported and poorly understood. This research will provide a deeper understanding of the barriers and drivers to adult vaccination. Our findings will be published in relevant peer-reviewed journals and presented at academic conferences. They will also be presented as practical recommendations at policy and industry meetings and healthcare

  1. Antibody repertoire development in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John E; Sun, Jishan; Wertz, Nancy; Sinkora, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Swine belong to the Order Artiodactyla and like mice and humans, express IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies but a larger number of IgG subclasses. Like rabbits and chickens, expressed V(H) genes belong to the ancestral V(H)3 family and only 5 comprise >80% of the pre-immune repertoire. Since they use primarily two D(H) segments and have a single J(H) like chickens, junctional diversity plays a relatively greater role in repertoire formation than in humans and mice. Proportional light chain usage surprisingly resembles that in humans and is therefore distinctly different from the predominant kappa chain usage (>90%) of lab rodents and predominant lambda chain usage in other ungulates (>90%). The pre-immune V(kappa) repertoire also appears restricted since >95% of V(kappa)J(kappa) rearrangements use only a few members of the IGKV2 family and only J(kappa)2. Two V(lambda) families (IGLV3 and IGLV8) are used in forming the pre-immune repertoire. Antibodies that do not utilize light chains as in camelids, or the lengthy CDR3 regions seen in cattle that use V(H)4 family genes, have not been reported in swine. B cell lymphogenesis first occurs in the yolk sac but early VDJ rearrangements differ from mice and humans in that nearly 100% are in-frame and N-region additions are already present. Swine possess ileal Peyers patches like sheep which may be important for antigen-independent B cell repertoire diversification. The presence of pro B-like cells in interlobular areas of thymus and mature B cells in the thymic medulla that have switched to especially IgA in early gestation, is so far unique among mammals. The offspring of swine are believed to receive no passive immunity in utero and are precosial. Thus, they are a useful model for studies on fetal-neonatal immunological development. The model has already shown that: (a) colonization of the gut is required for responsiveness to TD and TI-2 antigens, (b) responsiveness due to colonization depends on bacterial PAMPs

  2. Simultaneous Deletion of the 9GL and UK Genes from the African Swine Fever Virus Georgia 2007 Isolate Offers Increased Safety and Protection against Homologous Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Vivian; Risatti, Guillermo R; Holinka, Lauren G; Krug, Peter W; Carlson, Jolene; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Azzinaro, Paul A; Gladue, Douglas P; Borca, Manuel V

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The control of African swine fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Successful experimental vaccines have been derived from naturally occurring, cell culture-adapted, or genetically modified live attenuated ASFV. Recombinant viruses harboring engineered deletions of specific virulence-associated genes induce solid protection against challenge with parental viruses. Deletion of the 9GL (B119L) gene in the highly virulent ASFV isolates Malawi Lil-20/1 (Mal) and Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Δ9GL viruses) resulted in complete protection when challenged with parental isolates. When similar deletions were created within the ASFV Georgia 2007 (ASFV-G) genome, attenuation was achieved but the protective and lethal doses were too similar. To enhance attenuation of ASFV-G, we deleted another gene, UK (DP96R), which was previously shown to be involved in attenuation of the ASFV E70 isolate. Here, we report the construction of a double-gene-deletion recombinant virus, ASFV-G-Δ9GL/ΔUK. When administered intramuscularly (i.m.) to swine, there was no induction of disease, even at high doses (10 6 HAD 50 ). Importantly, animals infected with 10 4 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD 50 ) of ASFV-G-Δ9GL/ΔUK were protected as early as 14 days postinoculation when challenged with ASFV-G. The presence of protection correlates with the appearance of serum anti-ASFV antibodies, but not with virus-specific circulating ASFV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells. ASFV-G-Δ9GL/ΔUK is the first rationally designed experimental ASFV vaccine that protects against the highly virulent ASFV Georgia 2007 isolate as early as 2 weeks postvaccination. Currently, there is no commercially available vaccine against African swine fever. Outbreaks of the disease are devastating to the swine

  3. Protection of guinea pigs and swine by a recombinant adenovirus expressing O serotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus whole capsid and 3C protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Cao, Yimei; Sun, Pu; Guo, Jianhun; Li, Pinghua; Bai, Xingwen; Chen, Yingli; Xie, Baoxia; Li, Dong; Liu, Zaixin; Xie, Qingge

    2008-12-19

    Two recombinant adenoviruses were constructed expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and 3C/3CD proteins in replicative deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. Guinea pigs vaccinated with 1-3 x 10(8)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C recombinant adenovirus were completely protected against 10,000GID(50) homologous virulent FMDV challenge 25 days post vaccination (dpv). Ad-P12x3CD vaccinated guinea pigs were only partially protected. Swine were vaccinated once with 1x10(9)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C hybrid virus and challenged 28 days later. Three of four vaccinated swine were completely protected against 200 pig 50% infectious doses (ID(50)) of homologous FMDV challenge, and vaccinated pigs developed specific cellular and humoral immune responses. The immune effect of Ad-P12x3C in swine further indicated that the recombinant adenovirus was highly efficient in transferring the foreign gene. This approach may thus be a very hopeful tool for developing FMD live virus vector vaccine.

  4. Swine in biomedical research. V. 1

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    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the history of pigs; conceptual and operational history of the development of miniature swine; breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen miniature swine; moral, social and scientific aspects of the use of swine in research; fertility in gilts inseminated with frozen boar semen stored at -196 C for eight years; ultrastructure of piglet liver; porcine models in surgical research; anesthesia in swine; pulse monitoring, intravascular and instramuscular injection sites in pigs; collagen biosynthesis and collagen content as a measure of dermal healing in experimental wounds in domestic swine; methods for hair removal; swine as a cardiac surgical model; bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine; technical aspects of small intestinal transplantation in young pigs; models; the pig in studies of diarrhea pathophysiology; use of swine to validate airflow perturbation device for airways resistance measurements in humans; swine as a model for human diabetes; and the weanling Yorkshire pig as an animal model for measuring percutaneous penetration.

  5. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does...... not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum...... after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals...

  6. Strategies for design and application of enteric viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Roth, James A; Saif, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Enteric viral infections in domestic animals cause significant economic losses. The recent emergence of virulent enteric coronaviruses [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV)] in North America and Asia, for which no vaccines are available, remains a challenge for the global swine industry. Vaccination strategies against rotavirus and coronavirus (transmissible gastroenteritis virus) infections are reviewed. These vaccination principles are applicable against emerging enteric infections such as PEDV. Maternal vaccines to induce lactogenic immunity, and their transmission to suckling neonates via colostrum and milk, are critical for early passive protection. Subsequently, in weaned animals, oral vaccines incorporating novel mucosal adjuvants (e.g., vitamin A, probiotics) may provide active protection when maternal immunity wanes. Understanding intestinal and systemic immune responses to experimental rotavirus and transmissible gastroenteritis virus vaccines and infection in pigs provides a basis and model for the development of safe and effective vaccines for young animals and children against established and emerging enteric infections.

  7. Binge Drinking

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  8. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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  9. Swine flu and hype: a systematic review of media dramatization of the H1N1 influenza pandemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemm, C.; Das, E.; Hartmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Highly disconcerting at the time, in retrospective, the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic looks like much ado about nothing. As a consequence, many accused the media of having created an artificial hype or hysteria around the new virus, thus contributing to unwarranted public fear. The current paper set

  10. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  11. Determinants of non-vaccination against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in pregnant women: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Freund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 882 pregnant women were randomly included between October 12, 2009 and February 3, 2010, with the aim to study characteristics of pandemic influenza during pregnancy. At inclusion, socio-demographic, medical, obstetrical factors and those associated with a higher risk of flu exposition and disease-spreading were systematically collected. Pandemic flu vaccine uptake was checked until delivery. 555 (62.9% women did not get vaccinated. Determinants associated with non-vaccination in a multivariate logistic regression were: geographic origin (Sub-Saharan African origin, adjusted Odd Ratio aOR = 5.4[2.3-12.7], North African origin, aOR = 2.5[1.3-4.7] and Asian origin, aOR = 2.1[1.7-2.6] compared to French and European origin and socio-professional categories (farmers, craftsmen and tradesmen, aOR = 2.3[2.0-2.6], intermediate professionals, aOR = 1.3[1.0-1.6], employees and manual workers, aOR = 2.5[1.4-4.4] compared to managers and intellectual professionals. The probability of not receiving pandemic flu vaccine was lower among women vaccinated against seasonal flu in the previous 5 years (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8] and among those who stopped smoking before or early during pregnancy (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]. Number of children less than 18 years old living at home, work in contact with children or in healthcare area, or professional contact with the public, were not associated with a higher vaccine uptake. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this cohort of pregnant women, vaccine coverage against pandemic

  12. Determinants of non-vaccination against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in pregnant women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Romain; Le Ray, Camille; Charlier, Caroline; Avenell, Carolyn; Truster, Van; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Skalli, Dounia; Ville, Yves; Goffinet, François; Launay, Odile

    2011-01-01

    In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 882 pregnant women were randomly included between October 12, 2009 and February 3, 2010, with the aim to study characteristics of pandemic influenza during pregnancy. At inclusion, socio-demographic, medical, obstetrical factors and those associated with a higher risk of flu exposition and disease-spreading were systematically collected. Pandemic flu vaccine uptake was checked until delivery. 555 (62.9%) women did not get vaccinated. Determinants associated with non-vaccination in a multivariate logistic regression were: geographic origin (Sub-Saharan African origin, adjusted Odd Ratio aOR = 5.4[2.3-12.7], North African origin, aOR = 2.5[1.3-4.7] and Asian origin, aOR = 2.1[1.7-2.6] compared to French and European origin) and socio-professional categories (farmers, craftsmen and tradesmen, aOR = 2.3[2.0-2.6], intermediate professionals, aOR = 1.3[1.0-1.6], employees and manual workers, aOR = 2.5[1.4-4.4] compared to managers and intellectual professionals). The probability of not receiving pandemic flu vaccine was lower among women vaccinated against seasonal flu in the previous 5 years (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]) and among those who stopped smoking before or early during pregnancy (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]). Number of children less than 18 years old living at home, work in contact with children or in healthcare area, or professional contact with the public, were not associated with a higher vaccine uptake. In this cohort of pregnant women, vaccine coverage against pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 flu was low, particularly in immigrant women and those having a low socio

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

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  14. Burn Pits

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  15. Diseases and Conditions

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  16. Agent Orange

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  17. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

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  18. Mefloquine (Lariam)

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  19. Soft Tissue Sarcomas and Agent Orange

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  20. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans

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