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Sample records for swimming pool tank reactor austria

  1. Lip and tooth injuries at public swimming pools in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Katharina; Connert, Thomas; Kühl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    There is an increased risk of orofacial injuries in swimming pool facilities. Nevertheless, only a few studies have addressed this issue. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of lip and tooth injuries at public swimming pools in Austria. A further aim was to examine which gender and age groups were affected, where and why these injuries occurred, and whether pool attendants had sufficient knowledge of dental first-aid measures. A total of 764 pool attendants in Austria were contacted by telephone and 689 participated in the study (90.2%). The attendants were interviewed retrospectively about accident occurrences in 2014 by a standardized questionnaire. Responses to the provision of first aid and choice of storage medium for avulsed teeth were subsequently evaluated. The frequency of lip injuries was 19.0%, and tooth injuries were 11.3%. Male bathers (P < .05) and children under 12 years (P < .001) most frequently suffered injuries. The waterslide was the most common accident site. The most common cause of lip injuries was slipping on wet surfaces (39.0%), and for tooth injuries it was collisions with other persons or objects (each 28.1%). The pool attendants' responses were predominantly good or sufficient on first aid, with the exception of what storage medium to choose. Tooth rescue boxes were available in only 8.6% of all pool facilities. Orofacial injuries are a frequently occurring problem in swimming pool facilities. The pool attendants' knowledge on first-aid care of tooth injuries could still be improved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, M.; Arragon, Ph.; Dupont, G.; Gentil, J.; Tanis, G.

    1964-01-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [fr

  3. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  4. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  5. Siloe, Osiris, and the future perspective of swimming-pool reactors; Siloe et Osiris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatoux, J.; Denielou, G.; Lerouge, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Kervenoael, O. de [Societe INDATOM (France)

    1964-07-01

    Siloe and Osiris are two new general purpose research reactors of the 'Commissariat a l'energie Atomique'. Siloe, located within the 'Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires' of Grenoble is a swimming pool reactor of the same type as Melusine and Triton. It operates, at a nominal power of 15 MW thermal and has reached the peak power of 20 MW thermal with two thirds of its cooling system working. The fast flux above 1 MeV, which is maximum at the center of the core at 15 MW thermal is 1,2. 10{sup 14}. The core, quite open, is downward cooled. Average specific power is 159 kW/l. Osiris is under construction at Saclay. Designed for 50 MW thermal, this reactor is upward cooled. The fast flux at the center of the core above 1 MeV is calculated to be 2, 5.10{sup 14}. The average designed specific power is 280 kW/l. A fixed zircaloy gamma shield makes a box round the core. Future perspectives open to non-pressurised swimming-pool reactors are examined. Ways are suggested for neutronic; thermal and shielding modifications which make possible further improvements in the performances and economy of these devices. (authors) [French] SILOE et OSIRIS sont deux nouvelles piles de recherche non specialisees du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. Installee au Centre de GRENOBLE, SILOE est une pile piscine derivee de MELUSINE et TRITON. Elle fonctionne a 15 MWt en regime nominal et a ete poussee a 20 MWt avec les 2/3 de sa refrigeration en route. Le flux rapide au dessus de 1 MeV maximum au centre du coeur a 15 MWt est de 1,2 10{sup 14}. Le coeur, entierement ouvert, est refroidi en sens descendant et la puissance specifique moyenne est 150 KW/l. OSIRIS est en construction a SACLAY. Prevue pour 50 MWt thermique, cette pile est au contraire refrigeree en sens ascendant. Le flux rapide au centre du coeur au dessus de 1 MeV est de 2,5 10{sup 14} calcules. La puissance specifique moyenne prevue est de 280 KW/l de coeur. Une protection gamma fixe en zircalloy forme

  6. Dominant seismic sloshing mode in a pool-type reactor tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Large-diameter LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) tanks contain a large volume of sodium coolant and many in-tank components. A reactor tank of 70 ft. in diameter contains 5,000,000 of sodium coolant. Under seismic events, the sloshing wave may easily reach several feet. If sufficient free board is not provided to accommodate the wave height, several safety problems may occur such as damage to tank cover due to sloshing impact and thermal shocks due to hot sodium, etc. Therefore, the sloshing response should be properly considered in the reactor design. This paper presents the results of the sloshing analysis of a pool-type reactor tank with a diameter of 39 ft. The results of the fluid-structure interaction analysis are presented in a companion paper. Five sections are contained in this paper. The reactor system and mathematical model are described. The dominant sloshing mode and the calculated maximum wave heights are presented. The sloshing pressures and sloshing forces acting on the submerged components are described. The conclusions are given

  7. Performance of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste energy rejected from an ice rink with an energy storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuyumcu, Muhammed Enes; Tutumlu, Hakan; Yumrutaş, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An analytical model of the system, and a computational program were developed. • Transient behavior of the water in the buried energy storage tank was simulated. • Effects of various system parameters on the system performance were investigated. • Long period performance of the system was analyzed and obtained periodic condition. • Optimum ice rink size is determined for a semi-Olympic size swimming pool heating. - Abstract: This study deals with determining the long period performance of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste heat energy that is rejected from a chiller unit of ice rink and subsequently stored in an underground thermal energy storage (TES) tank. The system consists of an ice rink, a swimming pool, a spherical underground TES tank, a chiller and a heat pump. The ice rink and the swimming pool are both enclosed and located in Gaziantep, Turkey. An analytical model was developed to obtain the performance of the system using Duhamel’s superposition and similarity transformation techniques. A computational model written in MATLAB program based on the transient heat transfer is used to obtain the annual variation of the ice rink and the swimming pool energy requirements, the water temperature in the TES tank, COP, and optimum ice rink size depending on the different ground, TES tank, chiller, and heat pump characteristics. The results obtained from the analysis indicate that 6–7 years’ operational time span is necessary to obtain the annual periodic operation condition. In addition, an ice rink with a size of 475 m 2 gives the optimum performance of the system with a semi-Olympic size swimming pool (625 m 2 ).

  8. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  9. Optical inspections of research reactor tanks and tank components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Hammer, J.

    1988-01-01

    By the end of 1987 worldwide there were 326 research reactors in operation, 276 of them operating more than 10 years, and 195 of them operating more than 20 years. The majority of these reactors are swimming-pool type or tank type reactors using aluminium as structural material. Although aluminium has prooven its excellent properties for reactor application in primary system, it is however subjected to various types of corrosion if it gets into contact with other materials such as mild steel in the presence of destilled water. This paper describes various methods of research reactor tank inspections, maintenance and repair possibilities. 9 figs. (Author)

  10. Presentation of a calorigenic swimming-pool reactor and study of its use for urban heating, desalination of water, and other industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    The design characteristics of the heat-producing swimming pool reactor are discussed together with economic and technical considerations related to its utilization in the areas of district heating, process heat production, and desalination

  11. On-site releases of noble gases and iodine in the event of core meltdown in a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaignac, E. de.

    1976-10-01

    Research aimed at defining a standard model accident for swimming pool type reactors, has led to the adoption to the so-called BORAX accident which involves complete meltdown of the reactor core. This type of accident-an accident related to dimensional problems- is useful for calculations concerning reactor components which have to withstand the mechanical forces resulting from the accident. A study of the radiobiological consequences of this type of accident, involving the entire reactor core, required research to determine as accurately as possible how the iodine, noble gases and solid fission products are distributed between the melted core and the site. The joint document in the annexure served as the basis for discussion at the meeting (BEVS/SESR) on 9th March 1973, at which the SESR set the standard parameter values to be used for estimating fission product distributions on the site. (author)

  12. Evaluation of LOCA in a swimming-pool type reactor using the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagler, A.; Gilat, J.; Hirshfeld, H.

    1991-01-01

    The 3D-AIRLOCA code was used to calculate core temperature evolution curves in the wake of a full LOCA in a swimming pool type reactor, resulting in complete core exposure and dryout within about 1000 sec of the initiating event. The results show that fuel integrity loss thresholds (450 C for softening and 650 C for melting) are reached and exceeded over large fractions of the core at power levels as low as 2 MW. At 4.5 MW, the softening threshold is reached even when the accident occurs up to 12 hours after reactor shutdown for continuous operation, and up to 2 hrs after shutdown for intermittent (6 hrs/day, 4 days a week) operation. The situation is even more severe in blockage cases, when the air flow through the core is blocked by residual water at the grid plate level. It is concluded that substantial fission product releases are quite likely in this class of accidents. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of LOCA in a swimming-pool type reactor using the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagler, A.; Gilat, J.; Hirshfeld, H.

    1991-01-01

    The 3D-AIRLOCA code was used to calculate core temperature evolution curves in the wake of a full LOCA in a swimming pool type reactor, resulting in complete core exposure and dryout within about 1000 sec of the initiating event. The results show that fuel integrity loss thresholds (450 C for softening and 650 C for melting) are reached and exceeded over large fractions of the core at powr levels as low as 2 MW. At 4.5 MW, the softening threshold is reached even when the accident occurs up to 12 hours after reactor shutdown for continuous operation, and up to 2 hrs after shutdown for intermittent (6 hrs/day, 4 days a week) operation. The situation is even more severe in blockage cases, when the air flow through the core is blocked by residual water at the grid plate level. It is concluded that substantial fission product releases are quite likely in this class of accidents. (orig.)

  14. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at a pneumatic rabbit station of a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkawi, S.R.; Ahmad, N.

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiple foil activation was used to measure the neutron energy spectrum, experimentally, at a rabbit station of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor. The computer codes MSITER and SANDBP were used to adjust the spectrum. The pre-information required by the adjustment codes was obtained by modelling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions by using the one dimensional transport theory code WIMS-D/4 and the multidimensional finite difference diffusion theory code CITATION. The input spectrum covariance information required by MSITER code was also calculated from the CITATION output. A comparison between calculated and adjusted spectra shows a good agreement

  15. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  16. Maintenance operation by divers on a swimming-pool type reactor (Osiris, CEN Saclay). Technical and medical prevention: an example of multidisciplinary ergonomic step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, C.; Martin, L.

    1979-01-01

    Maintenance works in a swimming-pool reactor was performed by a team of divers. A multidisciplinary ergonomic study had previously defined the working procedure. The ergonomic approach is analysed. The divers' working techniques are described. After work, medical tests showed that previsions were verified and proved the methods as safe. This technique by divers' interventions should open new possibilities in nuclear industry [fr

  17. Experimental study on the impulsive load of follow fuel assembly of swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changlong; Bo Hanliang; Jiang Shengyao; Zhang Hongchao; Ma Cang; Wang Jinhua; Qin Benke

    2005-01-01

    Through the data of impulsive load experiment on this fuel assembly, this paper obtained how the impact force and impact acceleration changed with time and other parameters, and analyzed the causation of the different impact force and impact acceleration, further more, found the disciplinarian of impulsive load. Investigation showed: the fuel assembly of electromagnetic movable coil control rod drive mechanism is firm enough to suffer from the impulsive load, so it suits using in the reactor. (authors)

  18. Study on the Modeling Method for Computational Fluid Dynamics to Predict Coolant Flow Behavior in a Tank-in-pool Type Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Cheol; Kim, Heon Il; Lee, Doo Jeong; Seo, Kyoung Woo; Oh, Jae Min; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2009-08-15

    This is a study on the modeling method for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to analyze and to predict primary coolant flow behavior in a tank-in-pool type research reactor at the conceptual design stage. It is very hard to conduct a CFD analysis on an enormous complex equipment integrated system like a nuclear reactor with no simplification and alternative model treatment, so it is required a new methodological approach to be adopted to such an enormous CFD model. In this study it is proposed a new modeling method to solve a nuclear reactor employing plate type nuclear fuel assemblies. The idea attributes fuel assembly modeling to simplification, but the effect and the influence to a flow by fuel assembly can be reproduced as close as possible to physical phenomena. The idea is applied to CFD analysis model for a tank-in-pool type research reactor. A careful evaluation of the CFD analysis result is carried out whether the CFD model can provide a reasonable prediction or not. According to the evaluation it can be said that the proposed modeling method is so useful idea for the CFD analysis model to solve the whole nuclear reactor. The CFD result provides valuable predictions to the flow phenomena in the tank-in-pool type research reactor, which contributes to the more understanding of flow characteristics of primary coolant flow in the reactor. It is shown by the CFD analysis that the reactor core would have even flow distribution within {+-}3% deviation to the design flow rate, and that the primary coolant of PCHT(Primary Coolant Hold-up Tank) would flow out to reactor pool via the NC flow gates. The outstanding grasping of the flow in the PCHT leads to a remedy to reduce the flowing out from the NC flow gates.

  19. Feynman-α technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaho, E.H.K.; Intsiful, J.D.K.; Maakuu, B.T.; Anim-Sampong, S.; Nyarko, B.J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-α technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the α-conventional method

  20. Feynman-alpha technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Akaho, E H K; Intsiful, J D K; Maakuu, B T; Nyarko, B J B

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-alpha technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the alpha-conventional method.

  1. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  2. [Chlorine concentrations in the air of indoor swimming pools and their effects on swimming pool workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; Gallardo, Leonor; Tamaral, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To describe chlorine levels in the air of indoor swimming pools in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) and relate them to other chemical parameters in the installation and to the health problems perceived by swimming pool workers. We analyzed 21 pools with chlorine as chemical treatment in Castilla-La Mancha. The iodometry method was applied to measure chlorine concentrations in the air. The concentrations of free and combined chlorine in water, pH and temperature were also evaluated. Health problems were surveyed in 230 swimming pool workers in these facilities. The mean chlorine level in the air of swimming pools was 4.3 ± 2.3mg/m(3). The pH values were within the legal limits. The temperature parameters did not comply with regulations in 17 of the 21 pools analyzed. In the pools where chlorine values in the air were above the legal regulations, a significantly higher percentage of swimming pool workers perceived eye irritation, dryness and irritation of skin, and ear problems. Chlorine values in the air of indoor swimming pools were higher than those reported in similar studies. Most of the facilities (85%) exceeded the concentration of 1.5mg/m(3) established as the limit for the risk of irritating effects. The concentration of chlorine in indoor swimming pool air has a direct effect on the self-perceived health problems of swimming pool workers. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Virulent Naegleria fowleri in indoor swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, V; Skvárová, J; Cerva, L; Nebáznivá, D

    1980-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri was isolated from water during a hygienic inspection of a swimming pool in December 1977. This swimming pool was identified as a source of the infectious agent in the years 1962-1965, when a large outbreak of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAME) occurred. First two strains of N. fowleri, pathogenic for white mice after intracerebral and intranasal inoculation, were isolated from water of outlet troughs, additional strains were then isolated from various places; particularly from a cavity in the damaged wall of the pool. The incubation temperature did not inhibit a simultaneous growth of amoebae of the genera Acanthamoeba, Flabellula, Hartmannella and Vahlkampfia in the primocultures. Epidemiological investigations did not reveal any new case of PAME in relation with the occurrence of pathogenic N. fowleri in the swimming pool.

  4. Swimming pool use and birth defect risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, A J; Lupo, Philip J; Canfield, Mark A; Mitchell, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    Swimming during pregnancy is recommended. However, the use of swimming pools is also associated with infection by water-borne pathogens and exposure to water disinfection byproducts, which are 2 mechanisms that are suspected to increase risk for birth defects. Thus, we evaluated the relationship between maternal swimming pool use during early pregnancy and risk for select birth defects in offspring. Data were evaluated for nonsyndromic cases with 1 of 16 types of birth defects (n = 191-1829) and controls (n = 6826) from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study delivered during 2000-2006. Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each birth defect type. Separate analyses were conducted to assess any pool use (yes vs no) and frequent use (5 or more occasions in 1 month) during the month before pregnancy through the third month of pregnancy. There was no significant positive association between any or frequent pool use and any of the types of birth defects, even after adjustment for several potential confounders (maternal race/ethnicity, age at delivery, education, body mass index, folic acid use, nulliparity, smoking, annual household income, surveillance center, and season of conception). Frequent pool use was significantly negatively associated with spina bifida (adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.99). Among offspring of women 20 years old or older, pool use was associated with gastroschisis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8), although not significantly so. We observed little evidence suggesting teratogenic effects of swimming pool use. Because swimming is a common and suggested form of exercise during pregnancy, these results are reassuring. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    Swimming pools are used around the world for recreational, rehabilitation and physical activity and therefore it is imperative that the water and air quality are safe for the health of the bathers. Chlorination is by far the most widely applied method to control pool water quality and to prevent...... spreading of pathogens between swimmers because of its residual disinfection effect. In addition to potential contamination of pathogenic microorganisms, swimming pool water is polluted by organic matter deposited from the bathers such as saliva, urine, sweat, hair and personal care products. Since chlorine...... is a strong oxidant it oxidizes the organic matter in the pool water and forms disinfection byproducts (DBPs). More than 100 different DBPs have been identified. Some of these have been found to be genotoxic and may pose an increased cancer risk for the bathers. The aim of this thesis was to give an overview...

  6. Reactor pressure tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor pressure tank for a nuclear reactor, self-locking hooks engage a steel ring disposed over the removable cover of the steel vessel. The hooks exert force upon the cover to maintain the cover in a closed position during operation of the reactor pressure tank. The force upon the removal cover is partly the result of the increasing temperature and thermal expansion of the steel vessel during operation. The steel vessel is surrounded by a reinforced-concrete tank. (U.S.)

  7. Swimming level of pupils from elementary schools with own swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zálupská, Klára

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming level of pupils from primary school with private swimming pool. Work objectives: The aim is to identify assess level of swimming of pupils from first to ninth grade of primary school with a private pool in Chomutov district using continuous swimming test with regular swimming lessons, which is started in the first grade and persists until the ninth grade. The condition was organizing a school swimming lessons once a week for 45 minutes in all grades. Methodology: Swimming leve...

  8. [Infections transmitted in swimming pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Suzani, C; Hazeghi, P

    1976-01-01

    Public swimmingpools can be the source of infections due to micro-organism such as mycobacterium balnei, adeno and enteroviruses, the virus of plantar warts and molluscum contagiosum, the TRIC-Agent of swimmingpool-conjonctivitis and pathogenic fungi. The transmission of trichomonas vaginalis is considered unlikely-Water of pools, supposed to present satisfactory qualities by standard controls, was found to contain pathogenic staphylococci and pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective preventive measures include the continuous recording of the redox-potential of the water, limiting the number of visitors to pool design specifications, better desinfection of sanitary installations, regular maintenance of technical equipment including frequent backwashing of filters and exclusion of visitors with communicable disease.

  9. Isolation of Fungi in Swimming pools in Enugu, Nigeria | Mbata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been established that swimming pools contribute to the spread of fungal infections in susceptible hosts. Objectives: To isolate and identify fungi associated with swimming pools. Methods: A total of 147 samples from water and related areas of each swimming pool were tested for the presence of fungi.

  10. Spent fuel storage pool and reactor well pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchisawa, Hiroshi.

    1996-01-01

    An overflow device is disposed to a water draining channel communicating a spent fuel storage pool, a well pool and a cask cleaning pit, and a cleaning treatment system is connected to the cask cleaning pit. In addition, a tank chamber having an overflow device communicating with the well pool is disposed to the inside of the spent fuel storage pool, and a cleaning system is connected to the tank chamber. Namely, water overflow from the spent fuel storage pool and the well pool flows down to the cask cleaning pit directly, the water level can be kept to a predetermined value without disposing a skimmer serge tank, and the overflow water is transported to and cleaned in the cleaning treatment system. In addition, the overflow water flow to the tank chamber directly is transferred to and cleaned in the cleaning treatment system. The cost for the reactor building can be reduced, and interference with the building and adjustment for the steps upon installation of the skimmer serge tank are no more necessary to shorten the terms for the building construction. (N.H.)

  11. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit the Information for Aquatics Professionals page. Pinworm & Swimming Pinworm infections are rarely spread through the use of swimming pools. Pinworm infections occur when a person swallows pinworm eggs ...

  12. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demand. The study shows the need to reduce the impact of swimming pools. This could include: pool covers to reduce evaporation, the recycling of backwash water, the use of rainwater to top up swimming pools, water use surcharges and, finally, appropriate regulation and enforcement to prevent the use of municipal water ...

  13. Thermal analyses of solar swimming pool heating in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2011-01-01

    Hotels and swimming clubs in Pakistan pay huge gas bills for heating Swimming pools in winter. Winter days in most parts of Pakistan remain sunny and unglazed low cost solar collectors may be used to extend the swimming season. Installing the pool in a wind-protected area, which receives unobstructed solar radiation, may further reduce the size of the solar collectors required to heat the swimming pools. The pools should be covered with plastic sheet to eliminate evaporative heat losses and to prevent dust and tree leaves falling in the pool. The results of the thermal analysis show that in some parts of the country, a solar exposed pool can maintain comfortable temperature simply by using a plastic sheet on the pool surface. On the other hand, there are cities where solar collector array equal to twice the surface area of the pool is required to keep desired temperature in winter. (author)

  14. Assessing Water Quality: Staphylococci as Microbial Indicators in Swimming Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jo. Bechaida T.; Adera, Tilahun

    1991-01-01

    This study suggests that staphylococci may be the preferred microbial indicators of swimming pool water quality because these organisms met all criteria for best microbial indicators in terms of amount of recovery, resistance to disinfectants, and risk to bathers using water samples from nine swimming pools in Linn and Benton Counties, Oregon. (30…

  15. Non-electric applications of pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper recommends the use of pool-type light water reactors for thermal energy production. Safety and reliability of these reactors were already demonstrated to the public by the long-term operation of swimming pool research reactors. The paper presents the design experience of two projects: Apatity Underground Nuclear Heating Plant and Nuclear Sea-Water Desalination Plant. The simplicity of pool-type reactors, the ease of their manufacturing and maintenance make this type of a heat source attractive to the countries without a developed nuclear industry. (author). 6 figs, 1 tab

  16. The Ineffectiveness of Manual Treatment of Swimming Pools | Nnaji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Nigeria, Nsukka swimming pool was monitored for a period spanning about three months. The pool was constructed in 1961 and has been in operation since then except that many facilities including the treatment system are no longer functional forcing management to resort to treatment of the pool water ...

  17. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is a water-scarce country where the sustainable provision of water to its citizens is one of the most significant challenges faced. A recent study in Cape Town, South Africa, investigated the impact of residential swimming pools on household water demand and found that, on average, the presence of a swimming ...

  18. How to improve hygienic behaviour in holiday park swimming pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, I.; Keuten, M.G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on contamination of swimming pool water showed that the hygienic behaviour of swimmers is the most important factor. The suggested hygienic behaviour is; having a pre-swim shower and using the toilet when nature calls. Knowing the importance of hygienic behaviour is one thing,

  19. Allegheny County Public Swimming Pool, Hot Tub, and Spa Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Public swimming pool, hot tub, and spa facilities are licensed and inspected once each year to assure proper water quality, sanitation, lifeguard coverage and...

  20. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Villanueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks.

  1. Study of Fungal Contamination of Indoor Public Swimming Pools

    OpenAIRE

    H Nanbakhsh; K Diba; K Hazarti

    2004-01-01

    Fungi are found in different environments with variable distribution patterns depending on various factors. The aim of this study was determination of fungal contaminants in public swimming pools in Uromia, Iran. The fungal contaminations of four indoor swimming pools were studied by using membrane filtration and swab sampling method. Samples were collected by a manual plastic pump, in a 200 ml sterilized bottle. All samples were collected within 2 hours and then transferred to the laboratory...

  2. The Ineffectiveness of Manual Treatment of Swimming Pools NNAJI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    period, the COD was above 80mg/l, the pH was between 6.2 and 7.1 as against 7.2 to 7.8 recommended by standards. The total plate count was within limits but ... strains of normal human flora have been found in chlorinated swimming pools ... mucus, saliva or skin in the swimming pool water or similar recreational water ...

  3. Study on water evaporation rate from indoor swimming pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeźnik, Ilona

    2017-11-01

    The air relative humidity in closed spaces of indoor swimming pools influences significantly on users thermal comfort and the stability of the building structure, so its preservation on suitable level is very important. For this purpose, buildings are equipped with HVAC systems which provide adequate level of humidity. The selection of devices and their technical parameters is made using the mathematical models of water evaporation rate in the unoccupied and occupied indoor swimming pool. In the literature, there are many papers describing this phenomena but the results differ from each other. The aim of the study was the experimental verification of published models of evaporation rate in the pool. The tests carried out on a laboratory scale, using model of indoor swimming pool, measuring 99cm/68cm/22cm. The model was equipped with water spray installation with six nozzles to simulate conditions during the use of the swimming pool. The measurements were made for conditions of sports pools (water temperature 24°C) and recreational swimming pool (water temperature 34°C). According to the recommendations the air temperature was about 2°C higher than water temperature, and the relative humidity ranged from 40% to 55%. Models Shah and Biasin & Krumm were characterized by the best fit to the results of measurements on a laboratory scale.

  4. Study on water evaporation rate from indoor swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzeźnik Ilona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air relative humidity in closed spaces of indoor swimming pools influences significantly on users thermal comfort and the stability of the building structure, so its preservation on suitable level is very important. For this purpose, buildings are equipped with HVAC systems which provide adequate level of humidity. The selection of devices and their technical parameters is made using the mathematical models of water evaporation rate in the unoccupied and occupied indoor swimming pool. In the literature, there are many papers describing this phenomena but the results differ from each other. The aim of the study was the experimental verification of published models of evaporation rate in the pool. The tests carried out on a laboratory scale, using model of indoor swimming pool, measuring 99cm/68cm/22cm. The model was equipped with water spray installation with six nozzles to simulate conditions during the use of the swimming pool. The measurements were made for conditions of sports pools (water temperature 24°C and recreational swimming pool (water temperature 34°C. According to the recommendations the air temperature was about 2°C higher than water temperature, and the relative humidity ranged from 40% to 55%. Models Shah and Biasin & Krumm were characterized by the best fit to the results of measurements on a laboratory scale.

  5. An Innovative Passive Residual Heat Removal System of an Open-Pool Type Research Reactor with Pump Flywheel and Gravity Core Cooling Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon-Yeong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an open-pool type research reactor, the primary cooling system can be designed to have a downward flow inside the core during normal operation because of the plate type fuel geometry. There is a flow inversion inside the core from the downward flow by the inertia force of the primary coolant to the upward flow by the natural circulation when the pump is turned off. To delay the flow inversion time, an innovative passive system with pump flywheel and GCCT is developed to remove the residual heat. Before the primary cooling pump starts up, the water level of the GCCT is the same as that of the reactor pool. During the primary cooling pump operation, the water in the GCCT is moved into the reactor pool because of the pump suction head. After the pump stops, the potential head generates a downward flow inside the core by moving the water from the reactor pool to the GCCT and removes the residual heat. When the water levels of the two pools are the same again, the core flow has an inversion of the flow direction, and natural circulation is developed through the flap valves.

  6. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the water shall be provided to maintain the residual chlorine in the pool water at not less than 0.4 part per...

  7. Sanitary Conditions of Public Swimming Pools in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abu Aqoulah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the summer of 2005 and investigated all of active public swimming pools (85 out of 93 in Amman, the capital of Jordan. The aim of this study was to find out if these swimming pools are in compliance with Jordanian Standards for Swimming Pools Water (JS 1562/2004. The pools were surveyed against the water microbial quality and other physicochemical parameters indicated in the standards. Two samples from each pool were collected for microbial analysis and pools monitoring were carried out during the afternoon of the weekends when the pools are most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pools water to the microbial parameters was 56.5%, for residual chlorine 49.4%, for pH 87.7%, water temperature 48.8%, and bathing load 70.6%. The results also indicated that water microbial quality deteriorated with time. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of water contamination with time of sample collection, residual chlorine, water temperature and load of swimmers. The poor compliance was attributed to lack of proper disinfection, staff training, proper maintenance, and timely inspection.

  8. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-29

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.  Created: 5/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  9. Swimming pools and intra-city climates: Influences on residential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While determinants such as household income, regional climate, water price, property size and household occupancy have been comprehensively studied and modelled, other determinants such as swimming pools and intra-city climates have not. This study examines residential water consumption in the City of Cape Town ...

  10. Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Herrawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

  11. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. Methods: Respiratory health and pool

  12. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. METHODS Respiratory health and pool

  13. Indoor swimming pool attendance and respiratory and dermal health in schoolchildren: HITEA Catalonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, L.; Villanueva, C.M.; Gracia-Lavedan, E.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Kogevinas, M.; Zock, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health benefits of swimming in pools may outweigh adverse health outcomes in children, but evidence from epidemiological studies is scarce or inconclusive for different health outcomes. We evaluated the association between indoor swimming pool attendance during childhood and respiratory

  14. ENERGY SAVING AT OPERATION OF OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Ivin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Energy saving is a major problem in modern power engineering and various energy-consuming devices. They include outdoor swimming pools. In order to maintain them in working condition, especially in winter period, it takes significant amount of thermal energy. Task of heat loss substantial decrease in open swimming pools is considered in the article (on DNURT example. Methodology. The method of determining the mass and heat loss on the basis of criteria equations of heat and mass transfer theory is used. Findings. Calculations of the actual DNURT pool heat loss for different seasons, as for natural convection both for air forced motion above the free water surface are performed. It is shown that for the adiabatic evaporation conditions of water from the pool in winter during blow-off with wind the heat loss can be up to 2 kW/m2 on surface. To reduce these losses it is offered to cover water surface in a pool with a special material with low thermal conductivity on the basis of porous polyethylene during the time when the pool is not used for other purposes. It is shown that the implementation of these standards will reduce the actual heat loss, at least 5-6 times. Originality. The solution of important environmental and energy problem thanks to reducing heat losses by the pool in different times of a year and correspondingly lower emissions of power generating enterprises. Practical value. It is shown that the coating surface of the pool with poorly heat-conducting and easy to install coating will let, at a minimum, to reduce the actual heat loss on 5-6 times and reduce the emissions of power plants generating energy for pool heating.

  15. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  16. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs

  17. Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary

  18. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  19. Presence and select determinants of organophosphate flame retardants in public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Tiffany L.L., E-mail: tiffany.teo@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Kensington NSW 2052 (Australia); Coleman, Heather M., E-mail: h.coleman@ulster.ac.uk [Nanotechnology and Integrated BioEngineering Centre, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, County Antrim BT37 0QB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Khan, Stuart J., E-mail: s.khan@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Kensington NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of five organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) consisting of tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1.3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in swimming pools were investigated. Fifteen chlorinated public swimming pools were sampled, including indoor pools, outdoor pools and spa pools. The analyses were carried out using isotope dilution gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All five PFRs were detected in swimming pool waters with concentrations ranging from 5–27 ng/L (TNBP), 7–293 ng/L (TCEP), 62–1180 ng/L (TCIPP), 10–670 ng/L (TDCIPP) and 8–132 ng/L (TPHP). The concentrations of PFRs were generally higher in indoor swimming pools compared to outdoor swimming pools. In municipal water supplies, used to fill the swimming pools in three of the sampling locations, the five PFRs were all below the limit of quantifications, eliminating this as the source. Potential leaching of PFRs from commonly used swimming equipment, including newly purchased kickboards and swimsuits was investigated. These experiments revealed that PFRs leached from swimsuits, and may be a source of PFRs in swimming pools. A quantitative risk assessment revealed that the health risk to PFRs via swimming pools was generally low and below commonly applied health risk benchmarks. - Highlights: • TNBP, TCEP, TCIPP, TDCIPP and TPHP were detected in chlorinated swimming pools. • PFRs were below the LOQ in fill water samples collected from 3 locations. • TCIPP was observed to have the highest concentrations in swimming pools. • PFRs are leaching from swimsuits and may be a source in swimming pools. • Health risks through oral and dermal exposure to PFRs in swimming pools were low.

  20. Blanket and vacuum vessel design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, H.; Minato, A.; Kitamura, K.

    1983-01-01

    The structural design study of a reactor module for a swimming pool type reactor (SPTR) was conducted. Since pool water plays the role of radiation shielding in the SPTR, the module does not have a solid shield. It consists of tritium breeding blankets, divertor collector plates and a vacuum vessel. The object of this study is to show the reactor module design which has a simple structure and a sufficient tritium breeding ratio. A large coverage of the plasma chamber surface with tritium breeding blanket is essential in order to obtain a high tritium breeding ratio. A breeding blanket is also placed behind the divertor collector plate, i.e. in the upper and lower region, as well as in the outboard and inboard regions of the module. A concept in which the first wall is an integral part of the blanket is employed to minimize the thickness of structural and cooling material brazed in front of the breeding material (Li 2 O) and to enhance the tritium breeding capability. In order to simplify the module structure the vacuum vessel and breeding blanket is also integrated in the inboard region. One of the features inherent in the swimming pool type reactor is an additional external force on the vacuum vessel, namely hydraulic pressure. A detailed structural analysis of the vacuum vessel is performed. Divertor collector plates are assemblies of co-axial tubes. They minimize the electromagnetic force on the plate induced by the plasma disruption. A thermal and structural analysis and life time estimation of the first wall and divertor collector plates are performed. (author)

  1. Swimming Lessons: Learning, New Materialisms, Posthumanism, and Post Qualitative Research Emerge through a Pool Poem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    This article shifts from the formal learning spaces of school and university to an Australian public swimming pool to playfully engage some of the dilemmas that recent theory poses for curriculum studies. The article enacts multiple diffractions (Barad, 2007) as theory becomes swimming and swimming becomes theory, and ideas and movements are…

  2. Abandoning nature: swimming pools and clean, healthy recreation in Hamilton, Ontario, c. 1930s-1950s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchier, Nancy B; Cruikshank, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Municipal swimming pools arose as a technological fix for an urban public health and recreation crisis in Hamilton when its bay became a polluted sink for residential and industrial wastes. Until World War II, city leaders and medical authorities believed that they could identify, delineate, and construct safe natural swimming areas along the bay's shore, supplemented by a few public artificial swimming pools. After the war, the pollution situation worsened. For those who couldn't travel to cleaner lakeshores elsewhere, local authorities created swimming pools, thus abandoning the natural waters of the bay to the "constructive power of the profit motive".

  3. Survey of bacterial contamination of environment of swimming pools in Yazd city, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari Mansoorian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections are readily transmitted as a result of bacterial contamination of swimming pools. Therefore, hygiene and preventing the contamination of swimming pools is of particular importance. The objective of this study was to determine the amount of bacterial contamination in indoor pools of Yazd in 2013. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, all indoor swimming pools of Yazd (12 pools were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2013, in terms of bacterial contamination. In order to determine contamination, a sterile cotton swab was used for sampling. On average, 45 samples were taken from different surfaces in each pool (shower, dressing room, sitting places in sauna, platforms and around the pool. In total, about 540 samples from all pools were tested for bacterial contamination. Results: The results show that from 540 samples, bacterial contamination was observed in about 93 samples (17.22%; and was seen more in showers, edges of the pool and jacuzzis, and the slippers used in swimming pools. The most important isolated bacteria types were E. coli, Actinobacteria, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusion: The results indicate the presence of bacterial contamination on the surface of these places. It is recommended that health authorities should pay more attention to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces around the pool, showers, dressing rooms etc, to prevent infectious disease transfer as a result of contact with contaminated swimming pool surfaces.

  4. Semi-Automatic Detection of Swimming Pools from Aerial High-Resolution Images and LIDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Rodríguez-Cuenca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bodies of water, particularly swimming pools, are land covers of high interest. Their maintenance involves energy costs that authorities must take into consideration. In addition, swimming pools are important water sources for firefighting. However, they also provide a habitat for mosquitoes to breed, potentially posing a serious health threat of mosquito-borne disease. This paper presents a novel semi-automatic method of detecting swimming pools in urban environments from aerial images and LIDAR data. A new index for detecting swimming pools is presented (Normalized Difference Swimming Pools Index that is combined with three other decision indices using the Dempster–Shafer theory to determine the locations of swimming pools. The proposed method was tested in an urban area of the city of Alcalá de Henares in Madrid, Spain. The method detected all existing swimming pools in the studied area with an overall accuracy of 99.86%, similar to the results obtained by support vector machines (SVM supervised classification.

  5. Inspection of the TRIGA Reactor Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerman, Jernej; Lesnjak, Andrej; Snoj, Luka; Smodiš, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear components are under strict supervision of operators and safety authorities. The Reactor Centre of the Jožef Stefan Institute decided to make an inspection of its TRIGA Mark II research reactor to verify the conditions for long-term future operation within the on-going periodic safety review. Two main inspection methods were used: ultrasonic and visual inspection. Ultrasonic inspection was selected to prove that there is no significant reduction of wall thickness anywhere in the tank. The inspection confirmed that the reactor tank has not been degraded or corroded. In the future such inspection will take place every 10 years within the periodic safety review in order to monitor every 10 years the reactor tanks condition. (author)

  6. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  7. Occurrence and human exposure of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhui; Shi, Yali; Gao, Lihong; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2015-11-01

    As an emerging group of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, parabens have attracted growing attention due to their potential effects on human health. In the present study, the occurrence and distribution of eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens, and their common hydrolysis product, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were investigated in 39 swimming pools in Beijing, China. Methyl paraben and propyl paraben were the predominant compounds in swimming pools, accounting for 91.2 % of the total parabens. It is noteworthy that octyl paraben, a paraben with longer chain, was firstly detected in this study. There were several factors affecting the levels of parabens among the 39 swimming pools. The concentrations of parabens and chlorinated derivatives detected in indoor pools (144 ng L(-1)) were roughly 20-fold higher than those in outdoor pools (6.78 ng L(-1)). Hotel pools appear to present higher level of target compounds (361 ng L(-1)) than that in health club (228 ng L(-1)), municipal (130 ng L(-1)), school (75.6 ng L(-1)), and community pools (63.0 ng L(-1)). Moreover, the level of these compounds in pools during weekends (174 ng L(-1)) was much higher than that during weekdays (52.3 ng L(-1)). The dynamics of target compounds were also investigated to provide a general trend of the level of parabens in a school indoor swimming pool during a 14-week period. Human exposure assessment was conducted to estimate the potential risk of exposure to parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in swimming pools. Considering the total exposure dose of multiple parabens, human exposure to parabens from the water of swimming pools is negligible. However, the threat of these parabens to children in swimming pool should be concerned.

  8. Effect of pool length on blood lactate, heart rate, and velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, O P; Keskinen, K L; Mero, A A

    2007-05-01

    Exercise testing in water has been used to follow the progression of conditioning during regular training in swimmers. The present study examined the effects of pool length in eleven male swimmers on a set of 5 x 200-m freestyle swims with increasing speed from submaximal to maximal. Mean velocity of swimming, blood lactate and heart rate were examined in both 25-m and 50-m pools. Turning benefit as a marker for turning skill was measured separately by a underwater video system (speed difference between pre- and post-turning) during short all-out swims. Maximum force during swimming was measured in tethered swimming and explosive strength of leg extensor muscles was evaluated by a counter movement jump. The significantly higher (p=0.033 - 0.000) blood lactate values for the 50-m pool as compared to the 25-m pool were found at each point of swimming velocity versus blood lactate curve. The highest post-test lactate level was 7.36 +/- 1.47 mmol x l (-1) in the short course and 8.24 +/- 1.55 mmol x l (-1) (p=0.033) in the long course. The maximum swimming velocity was significantly greater (4.5 %) in the 25-m pool swimming (1.38 +/- 0.11 m x s (-1) vs. 1.32 +/- 0.12 m x s (-1); p=0.000). The heart rate values were significantly (p=0.020 - 0.000) lower in the short course than in the long course at all points of submaximal velocity with a mean difference of 7.3 +/- 0.7 bpm. Heart rate was equal (172 +/- 14 vs. 172 +/- 14 bpm) after the maximum swims in both short and long course. The turning benefit in the short maximum swim was 0.12 +/- 0.05 m x s (-1) (8.1 +/- 3.2 %), correlating positively with the difference in maximal swimming velocity between the short and long-pool swims (r = 0.59; p = 0.029), with the maximum force during tethered swimming (r=0.75; p=0.004) and with the vertical jumping height in the counter movement jump (r=0.55; p=0.039). We conclude that the pool length has a strong effect on blood lactate concentration and heart rate with greater swimming

  9. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Holbrook, R.; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (<1 kDa), with only a minor fraction of total [Ti] being considered either particulate or microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. -- Highlights: •Total titanium concentrations in unfiltered swimming pool water ranged between 21 and 60 μg/L. •Evaporation of the swimming pool water is suspected of causing a temporal increase in [Ti]. •The vast majority of Ti is found in the dissolved phase (<1 kD). •Swimming pools are not a significant Ti source for human exposure via ingestion. -- In children's swimming pool water, the majority of titanium is found in the dissolved phase

  10. THE USE OF MEMBRANE TECHNIQUES IN SWIMMING POOL WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper has determined the suitability of membrane processes (UF ultrafiltration, UF, and nanofiltration, NF for the purification of waste streams, so-called backwash water, obtained from washing filtration beds in a swimming pool water system. The backwash water samples were taken from the circuits located in two indoor facilities with a different purpose of the basins. Moreover, the samples were characterized by varying quality, as described by selected physicochemical parameters (such as turbidity and ultraviolet absorbance UV254. Commercial membranes were used for the tests. The transport-separation properties of the membranes were determined based on the volumetric flux of the permeate. In addition, backwash water samples before and after the membrane process were subjected to toxicological assessment using the Microtox® screening test. The performed processes contributed to a significant reduction in turbidity and the value of UV254 ultraviolet absorbance, both in the ultrafiltration and nanofiltration processes. Whereas, significant differences in transport properties were noted within individual processes. A great influence of backwash water quality, including physicochemical parameters, on the course and results of the membrane filtration processes was demonstrated. In all of the nanofiltration cycles carried out, the removal of the toxic properties of the backwash water with respect to bacteria in the Microtox® test was found. Nevertheless, samples with high values of resultant physicochemical parameters after the ultrafiltration process were still characterized by high toxicity. Pressure membrane processes show high effectiveness in the removal of contaminants from backwash water. However, it is necessary to introduce supporting processes aimed at reducing membrane pore blocking by deposits and organic compounds, and in the case of ultrafiltration, assuring the safety of the purified stream in terms of the toxicological effect.

  11. An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs--loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphenix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL's Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed

  12. Reinforced confinement in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nuclear reactor containing a reactor core, a swimming pool space that is filled and pressurized with a neutron-absorbing solution, a reactor tank, at least one heat exchanger, at least one inlet line, at least one return line and at least one circulation pump, where the said reactor tank is confined in the said swimming pool space and designed to be cooled with the aid of relatively pure water, which is fed by means of the said at least one circulating pump to the said reactor tank from the said heat exchanger via the said at least one inlet line and is returned to the heat exchanger via the said at least one return line. The problem that is to be solved by the invention is to design a reactor of the above type in such a way that a complete confinement of the primary circuit of the reactor is achieved at relatively low extra cost. This problem is solved by providing the reactor with a special confinement space that confines the heat exchanger, but not the reactor tank, with the confinement space and the swimming pool space being fashioned in the same concrete body

  13. Trihalomethane exposures in indoor swimming pools: a level III fugacity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Roberta; Sadiq, Rehan; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Simard, Sabrina; Tardif, Robert

    2011-10-15

    The potential for generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in swimming pools is high due to the concentrations of chlorine required to maintain adequate disinfection, and the presence of organics introduced by the swimmers. Health Canada set guidelines for trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water; however, no such guideline exists for swimming pool waters. Exposure occurs through ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact in swimming pools. In this research, a multimedia model is developed to evaluate exposure concentrations of THMs in the air and water of an indoor swimming pool. THM water concentration data were obtained from 15 indoor swimming pool facilities in Quebec (Canada). A level III fugacity model is used to estimate inhalation, dermal contact and ingestion exposure doses. The results of the proposed model will be useful to perform a human health risk assessment and develop risk management strategies including developing health-based guidelines for disinfection practices and the design of ventilation system for indoor swimming pools. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of some radioprotection apparatuses used in the case of pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robien, E. de; Choudens, H. de; Delpuech, J.

    1965-01-01

    Various problems of radioprotection concerning swimming-pool reactors in Grenoble have led us to study adequate solutions: a) The automatic verification of the staff-radioactivity when coming out of Melusine or Siloe has been realized thanks to a βγ gate which is insensitive to the ambient background in the reactor-hall; b) The automatic verification of the contamination of the shoes of the agents working in these reactors has been realized with a dedicated device; c) The necessity to measure precisely γ doses with the help of an autonomous apparatus has led to the making of a plastic-scintillator γ dosimeter; d) The obligation to forbid the opening of doors in some places where there might be a great intensity of radiation, has led us to make doors open according to the intensity of radiation inside the rooms; e) The releases of radioactive iodine have been measured with activated charcoal cartridges that surround a scintillator connected with a unique channel selector; f) Finally the control of reactor safety rod fall in case of a radioactive accident has been secured by a chain whose detector is a chamber immersed in the swimming-pool, which offers, in the particular case of the hot thickness swimming-pool reactor a double advantage: first it enables us to regulate the upper hot water layer, second to get free of transitory radiations which appear in the reactor hall as the experimental apparatuses are taken out from the core. (authors) [fr

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa on vinyl-canvas inflatables and foam teaching aids in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schets, F M; van den Berg, H H J L; Baan, R; Lynch, G; de Roda Husman, A M

    2014-12-01

    Swimming pool-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections mainly result in folliculitis and otitis externa. P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on surfaces in the swimming pool environment. The presence of P. aeruginosa on inflatables and foam teaching aids in 24 public swimming pools in the Netherlands was studied. Samples (n = 230) were taken from 175 objects and analysed for P. aeruginosa by culture. Isolated P. aeruginosa were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa was detected in 63 samples (27%), from 47 objects (27%) in 19 (79%) swimming pools. More vinyl-canvas objects (44%) than foam objects (20%) were contaminated, as were wet objects (43%) compared to dry objects (13%). Concentrations were variable, and on average higher on vinyl-canvas than on foam objects. Forty of 193 (21%) P. aeruginosa isolates from 11 different objects were (intermediate) resistant to one or more of 12 clinically relevant antibiotics, mostly to imipenem and aztreonam. The immediate risk of a P. aeruginosa infection from exposure to swimming pool objects seems limited, but the presence of P. aeruginosa on pool objects is unwanted and requires attention of pool managers and responsible authorities. Strict drying and cleaning policies are needed for infrequently used vinyl-canvas objects.

  16. Health effects from swimming training in chlorinated pools and the corresponding metabolic stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Deng, Zhao-Hui; Cai, Can-Xin; Qiu, Li-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Lin, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chlorination is the most popular method for disinfecting swimming pool water; however, although pathogens are being killed, many toxic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs), are formed. Numerous epidemiological publications have associated the chlorination of pools with dysfunctions of the respiratory system and with some other diseases. However, the findings concerning these associations are not always consistent and have not been confirmed by toxicological studies. Therefore, the health effects from swimming in chlorinated pools and the corresponding stress reactions in organisms are unclear. In this study, we show that although the growth and behaviors of experimental rats were not affected, their health, training effects and metabolic profiles were significantly affected by a 12-week swimming training program in chlorinated water identical to that of public pools. Interestingly, the eyes and skin are the organs that are more directly affected than the lungs by the irritants in chlorinated water; instead of chlorination, training intensity, training frequency and choking on water may be the primary factors for lung damage induced by swimming. Among the five major organs (the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys), the liver is the most likely target of DBPs. Through metabolomics analysis, the corresponding metabolic stress pathways and a defensive system focusing on taurine were presented, based on which the corresponding countermeasures can be developed for swimming athletes and for others who spend a lot of time in chlorinated swimming pools.

  17. Swimming pool attendance and risk of asthma and allergic symptoms in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, L.; Kogevinas, M.; Zock, J.P.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.J.; Heederik, D.; Villanueva, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Increased asthma risk has been associated with pool attendance in children but evidence is inconsistent and inconclusive. A survey was conducted of 3,223 9-12-yr-old children in Sabadell (Spain) to evaluate association between swimming pool attendance and prevalence of asthma and allergic conditions

  18. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone...... was not affected by pH in the range relevant to swimming pools (pH 6.8 – 7.8) and a half-life time at 10-12 min was obtained. Repeating the ozonation, the decomposition of ozone increased at the second dose of ozone added (t½,2=8 min) and then decreased again at the third and fourth dose of ozone (t½,3=17 min; t...... chlorine for drinking water as lower TTHM formation occurred than in non-ozonated samples. For pool water, a higher TTHM formation was observed in ozonated than non-ozonated pool water. Thus, it was observed that ozone reacts markedly different in swimming pool water from the known pattern in drinking...

  19. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  20. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...... revealed that the organic matter fluorescence was characterised by five different components, one of which was unique to swimming pool organic matter and one which was specific to organic contamination. The latter component had emission peaks at 420nm and was found to be a sensitive indicator of organic...... loading in swimming pool water. The fluorescence at 420nm gradually increased during opening hours and represented material accumulating through the day....

  1. Health Risk Assessment from Haloacetic Acids Exposure in Indoor and Outdoor Swimming Pool Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawat Ounsanaeha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of haloacetic acids (HAAs in both indoor and outdoor swimming pools were assessed for cancer and non-cancer health risks with water samples collected during the summer and rainy seasons from two sources. Results showed that average concentrations of HAA5 (MCAA, DCAA, TCAA, MBAA, and DBAA in both indoor and outdoor pools ranged from 74.28 to 163.05 µg/L which was higher than USEPA and WHO water quality standards. Cancer and non-cancer risk values of HAA5 exposure from both swimming pool types were acceptable risks based on USEPA recommendation (10 -6-10-4 and <1, respectively. The highest cancer and non-cancer risk values of HAAs exposure were females for indoor pool and children for outdoor pool, respectively. Cancer and non-cancer risk values of HAA5 exposure from outdoor pool were higher than indoor pool and during the rainy season, respectively. Results indicated that monitoring and control of water quality and accumulated organic substance in swimming pools should be followed to maximize health risk reduction from HAA exposure.

  2. Automation of water supply and recirculation-filtration of water at a swimming pool using Zelio PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Zelio PLC for the automation of the water supply and recirculation-filtration system of a swimming pool. To do this, the Zelio SR3B261BD - 24V DC with 10 digital inputs (24V DC) and 10 digital outputs (relay contacts) was used. The proposed application makes the control of the water supply pumps and the water recirculation-filtration from a swimming pool. The recirculation-filtration systems for pools and swimming pools are designed to ensure water cleaning and recirculation to achieve optimum quality and lasting service life. The water filtration process is one of the important steps in water treatment in polls and swimming pools. It consists in recirculation of the entire volume of water and begins by absorbing the water in the pool by means of a pump followed by the passing of water through the filter, disinfectant and pH dosing, and reintroducing the water back into the pool or swimming pool through the discharge holes. Filters must to work 24 hours a day to remove pollutants from pools or swimming pools users. Filtration removes suspension particles with different origins. All newly built pools and swimming pools must be fitted with water recirculation systems, and existing ones will be equipped with water recirculation and water treatment systems.

  3. Mathematical model development of heat and mass exchange processes in the outdoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Shaptala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Currently exploitation of outdoor swimming pools is often not cost-effective and, despite of their relevance, such pools are closed in large quantities. At this time there is no the whole mathematical model which would allow assessing qualitatively the effect of energy-saving measures. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of heat and mass exchange processes for calculating basic heat and mass losses that occur during its exploitation. Methodology. The method for determination of heat and mass loses based on the theory of similarity criteria equations is used. Findings. The main types of heat and mass losses of outdoor pool were analyzed. The most significant types were allocated and mathematically described. Namely: by evaporation of water from the surface of the pool, by natural and forced convection, by radiation to the environment, heat consumption for water heating. Originality. The mathematical model of heat and mass exchange process of the outdoor swimming pool was developed, which allows calculating the basic heat and mass loses that occur during its exploitation. Practical value. The method of determining heat and mass loses of outdoor swimming pool as a software system was developed and implemented. It is based on the mathematical model proposed by the authors. This method can be used for the conceptual design of energy-efficient structures of outdoor pools, to assess their use of energy-intensive and selecting the optimum energy-saving measures. A further step in research in this area is the experimental validation of the method of calculation of heat losses in outdoor swimming pools with its use as an example the pool of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan. The outdoor pool, with water heating- up from the boiler room of the university, is operated year-round.

  4. Indoor heated swimming pools: the vulnerability of some infants to develop spinal asymmetries years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Marianne E; Lee, A J; Burwell, R G

    2006-01-01

    Evidence reported in an earlier paper suggests that infants introduced to indoor heated swimming pools in the first year of life show an association with spinal asymmetries including progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and in normal subjects vertical spinous process asymmetry. Indoor heated swimming pools may contain a risk factor that predisposes some infants to develop such spinal asymmetries years later. What the risk factor(s) may be and its possible portal of entry into the infant's body are unknown and possibilities are examined. New teenage controls were obtained after mothers of AIS patients mentioned that they had taken their child to an infant swim class. In a further group of 18 normal teenagers introduced to an indoor heated swimming pool in the first year of life, 15 had vertical spinous process asymmetry. This prevalence of 83% of those at risk confirms our previous observation of vertical spinous process asymmetry in 61% of teenagers who were introduced to indoor heated swimming pools in the first year of life. Subject to confirmation of our observations consideration should be given to chemical risk factors, possible portals of entry, toxicology, environmental epigenomics and disease susceptibility to altered spinal development. If the risk factor is confirmed there may ultimately be a place for the prevention of AIS in some subjects.

  5. Effect of nano silica on water quality, health and safety in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmohammad Kashef

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study has been to review of using nano-silica on the efficiency of water treatment of the swimming pool. The current research was an experimental study and was performed in-vitro and experimentally. At first, a nano-particle, called "Nano-Silica", was prepared in the laboratory and herbal additives such as turmeric, curries, saffron and cinnamon were used to increase its antibacterial property. Then, for performing microbiological tests, the water samples of Urmia University's swimming pool were studied in a multi-stage process, in two parts including water samples before adding the nano-particle and after the addition of the nano-particle. Finally, to study the safety and safety, among the relevant factors, the PH and turbidity were studied in the laboratory again in two parts, including before and after the addition of the nano-particle. The survey results showed that there are averages of 2.0633 and 1.0325 before and after adding the nano-particle, respectively, which is higher (P <0.05. Among the mentioned additives, the curries with 92% and the turmeric with 85% had the most antibacterial properties. But the nano-particle did not adjust the swimming pool water PH up to the optimal level of 7.2. However, it reduced the swimming pool water turbidity significantly. This study showed that by using the nano-silica and adding the herbal additives such as cinnamon and saffron, the swimming pool water treatment has reached to a better quality. Keywords: quality, health, safety, nano silica, swimming pool.

  6. [Hygienic profile of the water in Milan swimming pools: a three-year comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, M; Bianchi, A; Consonni, M; Bollani, M; Cesaria, M; Trolli, F Radice; Galli, M G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether swimming pool water quality in Milan from 2006 to 2008 was within the standards established by national and local Italian laws (Circolare Min. Sanità 128/71 and DGR 2552/2006). In 2006, 580 samples of water from public swimming pools were analyzed to determine the presence of heterotrophic counts at 37 degrees and total coliforms; pH, free chlorine and chloride of each sample were also measured. In the following years, water from both public and private swimming pools were examined to measure heterotrophic count at 22 degrees and 36 degrees, Escherichia coli, enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, pH, free chlorine, and nitrates. The total number of analyses carried out in 2007 and 2008 was 2074 and 1532, respectively. In 2006, the extent of noncompliance of all swimming pools that was observed for both physical/chemical and microbiological parameters was 72.3%, which then decreased to 53.2% and 36.2% in 2007 and 2008, respectively. In particular with regard to the microbiological analysis, an increase of noncompliance based on at least one parameter was determined (7.1% in 2006 vs. 21.5% in 2007 and 22% in 2008). In contrast, a decrease of the extent of noncompliance based on at least one physical/chemical parameter was observed (from 68.1% in 2006 to 40.4% and 22.3% in 2007 and 2008, respectively). Interestingly, public swimming pools exceeded the legal limits of microbiological concentration more often than the private ones, whereas both types of swimming pools showed a decrease in noncompliance with regard to the physical/chemical parameters.

  7. Particles in swimming pool filters – Does pH determine the DBP formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The formation was investigated for different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination of filter particles from swimming pools at different pH-values and the toxicity was estimated. Specifically, the formation of the DBP group trihalomethanes (THMs), which is regulated in many...... or initial free chlorine concentrations the particles were chlorinated at different pH-values in the relevant range for swimming pools. THM and HAA formations were reduced by decreasing pH while HAN formation increased with decreasing pH. Based on the organic content the relative DBP formation from...

  8. Perceived health problems in swimmers according to the chemical treatment of water in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; del Corral, Julio; García-Unanue, Jorge; Gallardo, Leonor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which chemical treatment used for disinfecting water in indoor swimming pools had the least impact on users' perceptions of health problems, and which generated the greatest satisfaction with the quality of the water. A survey on satisfaction and perceived health problems was given to 1001 users at 20 indoor swimming pools which used different water treatment methods [chlorine, bromine, ozone, ultraviolet lamps (UV) and salt electrolysis]. The findings suggest that there is a greater probability of perceived health problems, such as eye and skin irritation, respiratory problems and skin dryness, in swimming pools treated with chlorine than in swimming pools using other chemical treatment methods. Pools treated with bromine have similar, although slightly better, results. Other factors, such as age, gender, time of day of use (morning and afternoon) and type of user (competitive and recreational), can also affect the probability of suffering health problems. For all of the above, using combined treatment methods as ozone and UV, or salt electrolysis produces a lower probability of perceived health problems and greater satisfaction.

  9. Microbial quality of swimming pool water with treatment without disinfection, with ultrafiltration, with UV-based treatment and with chlorination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuten, M.G.A.; Peters, M.C.F.M.; van Dijk, J.C.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2017-01-01

    Swimming pools are traditionally disinfected with a residual disinfectant such as sodium hypochlorite. Nowadays, swimming water without a residual disinfectant is increasingly popular, as can be seen by the growing number of (natural) swimming ponds (Weilandt 2015), but health risks for bathers do

  10. Concentrations of disinfection by-products in swimming pool following modifications of the water treatment process: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Robert; Rodriguez, Manuel; Catto, Cyril; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Simard, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The formation and concentration of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in pool water and the ambient air vary according to the type of water treatment process used. This exploratory study was aimed at investigating the short-term impact of modifications of the water treatment process on traditional DBP levels (e.g., trihalomethanes (THMs), chloramines) and emerging DBPs (e.g., Halonitromethanes, Haloketones, NDMA) in swimming pool water and/or air. A sampling program was carried to understand the impact of the following changes made successively to the standard water treatment process: activation of ultraviolet (UV) photoreactor, halt of air stripping with continuation of air extraction from the buffer tank, halt of air stripping and suppression of air extraction from the buffer tank, suppression of the polyaluminium silicate sulfate (PASS) coagulant. UV caused a high increase of Halonitromethanes (8.4 fold), Haloketones (2.1 fold), and THMs in the water (1.7 fold) and, of THMs in the air (1.6 fold) and contributed to reducing the level of chloramines in the air (1.6 fold) and NDMA in the water (2.1 fold). The results highlight the positive impact of air stripping in reducing volatile contaminants. The PASS did not change the presence of DBPs, except for the THMs, which decrease slightly with the use of this coagulant. This study shows that modifications affecting the water treatment process can rapidly produce important and variable impacts on DBP levels in water and air and suggests that implementation of any water treatment process to reduce DBP levels should take into account the specific context of each swimming pool. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Occurrence and simulation of trihalomethanes in swimming pool water: A simple prediction method based on DOC and mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Saravia, Florencia; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Trihalomethanes (THM) are the most typical disinfection by-products (DBPs) found in public swimming pool water. DBPs are produced when organic and inorganic matter in water reacts with chemical disinfectants. The irregular contribution of substances from pool visitors and long contact time with disinfectant make the forecast of THM in pool water a challenge. In this work occurrence of THM in a public indoor swimming pool was investigated and correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Daily sampling of pool water for 26 days showed a positive correlation between DOC and THM with a time delay of about two days, while THM and DOC didn't directly correlate with the number of visitors. Based on the results and mass-balance in the pool water, a simple simulation model for estimating THM concentration in indoor swimming pool water was proposed. Formation of THM from DOC, volatilization into air and elimination by pool water treatment were included in the simulation. Formation ratio of THM gained from laboratory analysis using native pool water and information from field study in an indoor swimming pool reduced the uncertainty of the simulation. The simulation was validated by measurements in the swimming pool for 50 days. The simulated results were in good compliance with measured results. This work provides a useful and simple method for predicting THM concentration and its accumulation trend for long term in indoor swimming pool water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    McMaster Marianne E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hy...

  13. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  14. Swimming Pool Water Treatment Chemicals and/or Processes. Standard No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Chemicals or processes used or intended for use, in the treatment of swimming pool water are covered. Minimum public health limits or acceptability in regard to toxicity, biocidal effectiveness, and chemical behavior and analysis are presented. The appendices give guidelines to the scientific and statistically sound evaluations to determine the…

  15. Centrifugal Pumps for Swimming Pools. National Sanitation Foundation Standard Number 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Committee for Swimming Pool Equipment Standards.

    The pumps discussed herein are intended to be used for recirculating water in swimming pools, both public and private. Included are the basic components which may be a part of a pump such as the housing, strainer, impeller, valves, and such other parts as are attached or a part of the pump as supplied by the manufacturer. This standard is intended…

  16. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Zortea, R.; Piketty, A.

    2013-01-01

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported...

  17. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    “It should be light blue, transparent” (Mario Andrada, speakerman, Olympic Games, Rio, 2016) was the comment for the “green lake”. Swimming pools are sensitive recirculating systems. A malfunction in water treatment units or a poor operating decision could possibly lead to health-endangering or a...

  18. Determining a pool - type reactor fuel policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Refuelling the 10 to 15 MW pool type reactor considered here will occur frequently (some 10 elements every 3 to 4 weeks). It is therefore necessary to determine the most economic fuel policy. This study proposes to define a strategy that will make it possible to decide on the number and characteristics of the shipment containers, as well as on the means of storage, so as to reduce the risks as much as possible should the basic parameters of the study vary. Among these parameters, the respective influence of which is investigated, chemical reprocessing costs play a vital part. Two examples of optimum fuel management are given according to whether the reprocessing charges applied are those of the old or of the 1961 U.S. AEC base charges for reprocessing highly enriched irradiated fuel. (authors) [fr

  19. [Surveillance of the sanitary conditions of a public swimming pool in the city of Palermo (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Di Benedetto, Maria Antonella; Firenze, Alberto; Calamusa, Giuseppe; Di Piazza, Florinda; Milici, Maria Eleonora; Romano, Nino

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study we evaluated the microbiological quality of water of seven pools in the city of Palermo through evaluation of bacterial indicators of faecal contamination and of protozoa (Giardia and Cryptosporidium). In this study we also searched for the presence of fungi in two swimming pools of a public swimming facility in the same city. Samples were collected from both pools, their filtration systems and floor surfaces of the facility. Chemical-physical and microbiological examination of water of the two pools have shown that quality of water depends on the concentration of residual free chlorine and on the number of bathers in the pool. The values of four microbiological parameters (bacterial load at 22 degrees C and 36 degrees C, presence of coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Pseudomonas spp.) increased with diminishing chlorine concentrations and with increasing number of pool users. Faecal bacteria, Giardia and Cryptosporidium were not found. On the other hand, various fungi were isolated from floor surfaces and pool water even in the presence of optimal chlorine concentrations. This study confirms the importance of regular maintenance of pool disinfection systems and suggests the need to search for other micro-organisms not included in the current legislation (Giardia, Cryptosporidium and fungi).

  20. An Investigation on Physicochemical and Microbial Water Quality of Swimming Pools in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dehvari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disrespect of health regulations and proper disinfection of water and swimming pools is effective in incidence of health problems and transfer of infectious diseases to swimmers. The aim of this research was to investigate water of swimming pools in Yazd city and compare the results with national standards. Methods: In this study, 11 active covered swimming pools of Yazd city were sampled as census. Parameters of temperature, pH, amount of free and Combined chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, the population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, fecal streptococci, and fecal coliforms were studied. Sampling has been conducted every two weaks for 3 months and samples were analyzed under standard procedures. Results: In this research, amount of pH in 84.73%, free residual chlorine in 44.18%, Combined residual chlorine in 72.45%, alkalinity in19.82%, turbidity in 86.36%, hardness in 57.18% and temperature in 13.73% Samples were desirable. The fecal streptococci bacteria was not shown in all the swimming pools and population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fecal coliforms in 56.73%, 93.27%, 79.36% and 91.45% cases were desirable, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a direct relationship between Water turbidity and population of heterotraphic bacteria. Conclusion: According to the results, the parameters of heterotrophic bacteria population, also the alkalinity and temperature had the least compliant with the standards that shows the necessity for continuous monitoring of physical, chemical and microbial parameters and also control of filtration and disinfection of water condition of swimming pools.

  1. Occupational exposures of airborne trichloramine at indoor swimming pools in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tsai-Shu; Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Tsai, Shih-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Ten indoor swimming pools in Taipei, Taiwan were included in the study to assess the exposure of people to airborne trichloramine (NCl3) and also to discover the factors that might affect the associated concentrations. An active air sampling method was performed to determine the levels of NCl3, while questionnaires were administered to swimming pool workers, including lifeguards, swimming instructors, and management employees. The results show that the concentrations of trichloramine ranged from 0.017 to 0.15 mg m(-3), which were generally lower than what have been reported from other studies. Symptoms of sore throat and phlegm were more frequent among lifeguards and swimming instructors (exposure group) than management employees (reference group) (odds ratios were 11.28 and 4.22 for sore throat and phlegm, respectively). It seems that the current exposure limit for airborne NCl3, which was recommended by WHO, was not lower enough to protect the health of pool attendants. Regulated level of free available chlorine in Taipei (i.e., 0.3-0.7 ppm) is lower than what is required in other countries (e.g., 1-3 ppm in the UK). This might be the main reason why the concentrations of NCl3 reported elsewhere were higher than what were found in this research. Further international comparisons will help to elucidate if low free chlorine concentration should be adopted as an operating standard. For the indoor swimming pools in Taipei, the air quality is suggested to be improved, since even with the low concentrations of NCl3, higher respiratory ailments among pool workers were observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of dental erosion in adolescent competitive swimmers exposed to gas-chlorinated swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowska-Radlińska, J; Łagocka, R; Kaczmarek, W; Górski, M; Nowicka, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers of the local swimming club in Szczecin, Poland, who train in closely monitored gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. The population for this survey consisted of a group of junior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 7 years, a group of senior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 10 years, and a group of recreational swimmers. All subjects underwent a clinical dental examination and responded to a questionnaire regarding aspects of dental erosion. In pool water samples, the concentration of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, sodium, and potassium ions and pH were determined. The degree of hydroxyapatite saturation was also calculated. Dental erosion was found in more than 26 % of the competitive swimmers and 10 % of the recreational swimmers. The lesions in competitive swimmers were on both the labial and palatal surfaces of the anterior teeth, whereas erosions in recreational swimmers developed exclusively on the palatal surfaces. Although the pH of the pool water was neutral, it was undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. The factors that increase the risk of dental erosion include the duration of swimming and the amount of training. An increased risk of erosion may be related to undersaturation of pool water with hydroxyapatite components. To decrease the risk of erosion in competitive swimmers, the degree of dental hydroxyapatite saturation should be a controlled parameter in pool water.

  3. Determination of Bacterial Quality of Water in Randomly Selected Swimming Pools in Kampala City, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Margaret Ekopai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming pools have become major recreation facilities for leisure and sports in cities across the world, but the standard guidelines, particularly in developing countries, are not adhered to because little is known about the contaminants in the pools and the possible health risks involved. This study provides a survey of bacterial quality of water from swimming pools in Kampala. A total of 26 water samples were collected from 13 outdoor swimming pools in Kampala between January and June 2016 and analysed for total aerobic plate count (TPC, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Salmonella. The heterotrophic bacterial load ranged between 0 and 6.35 × 105 cfu/ml, where 6.35 × 105 cfu/ml was the highest load and 3 × 101 cfu/ml the least. The highest average TPC was 6.19 × 105 cfu/ml and the lowest 5.07 × 103 cfu/ml. 30.8% of the pools had TPC within acceptable limits (≤5 × 102 cfu/ml, whereas 69.2% were highly contaminated and did not conform to the Uganda National Water and Sewerage Corporation standards of recreational water quality for both treated (0 cfu/100 mls water and untreated (10 cfu/100 mls water. Although no positive results were yielded for E. coli, coliforms, and Salmonella, TPC represented the presence of heterotrophic bacteria which are often indicated in opportunistic infections.

  4. Gene expression changes in blood RNA after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Lucas A; Font-Ribera, Laia; Bustamante, Mariona; Sumoy, Lauro; Grimalt, Joan O; Bonnin, Sarah; Aguilar, Maria; Mattlin, Heidi; Hummel, Manuela; Ferrer, Anna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP) such as trihalomethanes (THM) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects in humans, but their biological mechanisms are unclear. We evaluated short-term changes in blood gene expression of adult recreational swimmers after swimming in a chlorinated pool. Volunteers swam 40min in an indoor chlorinated pool. Blood samples were drawn and four THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform) were measured in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Intensity of physical activity was measured as metabolic equivalents (METs). Gene expression in whole blood mRNA was evaluated using IlluminaHumanHT-12v3 Expression-BeadChip. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the relationship between gene expression changes and THM exposure. Thirty-seven before-after pairs were analyzed. The median increase from baseline to after swimming were: 0.7 to 2.3 for MET, and 1.4 to 7.1μg/m 3 for exhaled total THM (sum of the four THM). Exhaled THM increased on average 0.94μg/m 3 per 1 MET. While 1643 probes were differentially expressed post-exposure. Of them, 189 were also associated with exhaled levels of individual/total THM or MET after False Discovery Rate. The observed associations with the exhaled THM were low to moderate (Log-fold change range: -0.17 to 0.15). In conclusion, we identified short-term gene expression changes associated with swimming in a pool that were minor in magnitude and their biological meaning was unspecific. The high collinearity between exhaled THM levels and intensity of physical activity precluded mutually adjusted models with both covariates. These exploratory results should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Potential risks of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung; Kim, Eun-ju; Lee, Jaesang; Lee, Seunghak

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO 2 , ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H 2 O 2 concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H 2 O 2 possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  6. Potential risks of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-ju [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaesang [Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seunghak, E-mail: seunglee@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO{sub 2}, ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  7. An outbreak of adenovirus type 3 disease at a private recreation center swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, W J; Hierholzer, J C; Keenlyside, R A; Fraser, D W; D'Angelo, L J; Winkler, W G

    1980-02-01

    In the period June 6--July 24, 1977, and outbreak of illness due to adenovirus type 3 (AV3) occurred in residents of a suburban community (Community A), Dekalb County, Georgia. Based on surveys, at least 105 cases occurred. The illness was primarily characterized by sore throat, fever, headache, and anorexia. Conjunctivitis affected only 34 of 105 (32%) of the individuals in two surveys. Frequent use of a private swimming pool was associated with illness in Community A residents. The outbreak coincided with a temporary defect in the pool filtration system which probably prevented maintenance of proper chlorine levels in the pool water, and suggested that the infection was spread by pool water. However, the predominant mode of transmission could not be shown conclusively to be waterborn rather than person-to-person.

  8. Optimal pH in chlorinated swimming pools - balancing formation of by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    -products. The chlorine-to-precursor ratio used in the batch experiments influenced the amounts of by-products formed, but regardless of the ratio the same trends in the effect of pH were observed. Trihalomethane formation was reduced by decreasing pH but haloacetonitrile and trichloramine formation increased......In order to identify the optimal pH range for chlorinated swimming pools the formation of trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and trichloramine was investigated in the pH-range 6.5–7.5 in batch experiments. An artificial body fluid analogue was used to simulate bather load as the precursor for by.......7 or lower. An optimal pH range for by-products formation in swimming pools was identified at pH 7.0–7.2. In the wider pH range (pH 6.8–7.5) the effect on by-product formation was negligible. Swimming pools should never be maintained at lower pH than 6.8 since formation of both haloacetonitriles...

  9. Ultrafiltration for Purification and Treatment of Water Streams in Swimming Pool Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possible applications of pressure-driven membrane processes for treatment of swimming pool water and purification of waste streams – washings. Newly identified swimming pool water quality issues are presented that require a modernization of existing technologies. The studies used polymer membranes with the same particle distribution range (50000 Da, but made of different membrane-forming materials: polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF and polyether sulfone (PES for purification of washings. The ultrafiltration process allowed obtaining a high turbidity reduction rate in washings (over 95%, and also a significant reduction of total organic carbon. The effectiveness of the PES membrane was reduced after the process commencement, whereas the separation capacity of the PVDF membrane increased during the studied filtration process. While setting the operational process parameters consideration should be given also to the resistance of used membranes to chlorine present in the swimming pool water. A prolonged exposure of the polyether sulfone membrane to chloride may have caused its gradual damage and degradation of its separation properties.

  10. Occurrence ofCryptosporidiumandGiardiaand the Relationship between Protozoa and Water Quality Indicators in Swimming Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shumin; Yin, Pengna; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Sike

    2017-04-01

    A total of 60 samples were collected from 35 swimming pools in Beijing, China, and the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia were investigated. The results showed that 16.7% and 15.0% of samples were positive for Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cysts, respectively, with a mean concentration of 0.30 oocysts/10 L and 0.27 cysts/10 L. The oocysts and cysts were found to have higher rates of occurrence in August than in May. Genotyping confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium hominis, C. parvum , and Giardia assemblages A and B, all of which were associated with human infections. The predominant species/assemblages were C. hominis and Giardia assemblage A. Analyses of the relationships between parasite oocysts/cysts, indicator bacteria, and physical-chemical parameters revealed that there was no correlation between 2 parasites and fecal bacterial indicators, whilst there was a significant correlation between protozoa and urea concentration, which indicates that urea concentration rather than fecal bacterial indicators might be an appropriate index for chlorine-resistant protozoa in swimming pools. This study provides useful information to improve the safety of swimming pool water and deduce the risk of protozoan infections.

  11. The application of computational fluid dynamics and small-scale physical models to assess the effects of operational practices on the risk to public health within large indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lowell; Chew, John; Woodley, Iain; Colbourne, Jeni; Pond, Katherine

    2015-12-01

    Swimming pools provide an excellent facility for exercise and leisure but are also prone to contamination from microbial pathogens. The study modelled a 50-m × 20-m swimming pool using both a small-scale physical model and computational fluid dynamics to investigate how water and pathogens move around a pool in order to identify potential risk spots. Our study revealed a number of lessons for pool operators, designers and policy-makers: disinfection reaches the majority of a full-scale pool in approximately 16 minutes operating at the maximum permissible inlet velocity of 0.5 m/s. This suggests that where a pool is designed to have 15 paired inlets it is capable of distributing disinfectant throughout the water body within an acceptable time frame. However, the study also showed that the exchange rate of water is not uniform across the pool tank and that there is potential for areas of the pool tank to retain contaminated water for significant periods of time. 'Dead spots' exist at either end of the pool where pathogens could remain. This is particularly significant if there is a faecal release into the pool by bathers infected with Cryptosporidium parvum, increasing the potential for waterborne disease transmission.

  12. QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF INDOOR SWIMMING POOL AND SEASONAL BATHING RESORTS WATER USING MICROTOX® TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The tests were to specify the toxic effect on the basis of Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition caused by chemical compounds present in pool water samples. The testing tool was Microtox®; This biotest produces quick results thus making it a comfortable tool for testing water for various toxicants. Furthermore, UV254 absorbance measure was carried out and its value was a proxy parameter for defining participation of precursors to disinfection by-products in the samples. Some of the samples had high UV254 values, one of them was 144 m 1. The Microtox® quality tests of indoor and outdoor swimming pool water presented in the paper proved impact of such factors like air exchange or supply of pool water circulation on water quality. Seasonal bathing waters had lower toxicity values. In the context of the work specifies that the impurities in the water cause its toxicity. However, there was no relationship between high UV254 absorbance values and higher toxicity of the samples. The toxicological analysis may serve as a screening test of swimming pool water quality. It is of key importance to check the free chlorine value for a water sample. High chlorine concentration can cause higher bioluminescence inhibition values.

  13. Acute changes in serum immune markers due to swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; van Veldhoven, Karin; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Portengen, Lützen; Grimalt, Joan O; Zwiener, Christian; Heederik, Dick; Zhang, Xiangru; Vineis, Paolo; Kogevinas, Manolis; Vermeulen, Roel

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfectants and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) due to swimming in chlorinated water has been associated with allergic and respiratory health effects, including asthma. Biological mechanisms contributing to these associations are largely unknown. We hypothesized a potential pathway involving modulation of the immune system. We assessed levels of immune markers (CCL11, CCL22, CXCL10, CRP, EGF, GCSF, IL-8, IL-17, IL-1RA, MPO, VEGF, Periostin) in serum collected from 30 women and 29 men before and after 40min of swimming in a chlorinated pool. Exposure to DBPs was assessed by measuring bromodichloromethane, bromoform, chloroform, and dibromochloromethane in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Covariate data including information on physical activity was available through questionnaires and measurements. We assessed the association between indicators of swimming in a chlorinated pool and changes in serum immune marker concentrations using linear regression with bivariate normal distributions and adjusted for multiple comparisons by applying the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure. We observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IL-8 (-12.53%; q=2.00e-03), CCL22 (-7.28%; q=4.00e-04), CCL11 (-7.15%; q=9.48e-02), CRP (-7.06%; q=4.68e-05), and CXCL10 (-13.03%; q=6.34e-14) and a significant increase in IL-1RA (20.16%; q=4.18e-06) from before to after swimming. Associations with quantitative measurements of DBPs or physical activity were similar in direction and strength. Most of the observed associations became non-significant when we adjusted the effects of exposure to DBPs for physical activity or vice-versa. Our study indicates that swimming in a chlorinated pool induces perturbations of the immune response through acute alterations of patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion. The observed effects could not be uniquely attributed to either exposure to DBPs or physical activity. Evidence in the literature suggests that observed decreases in

  14. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence...... trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates......Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile...

  15. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Water samples from 2 indoor public swimming pool facilities with significantly different organic matter concentrations in the recirculation were tested to evaluate UV-induced effects on water chemistry. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of poor water quality due to increased...... organic carbon (TOC) and the potential effect of increased nitrate concentration on disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in pool water. Concentration change on total trihalomethanes (TTHM) was investigated utilising medium pressure UV treatment in conjunction with chlorine. Post-UV chlorine consumption...... increased, UV dose-dependently. The post-UV chlorination clearly induced TTHM formation in both polluted and normal operated pools. However, elevated TOC concentration did not increase significantly the DBP formation. Regarding the brominated fraction of the halogens in the formed TTHMs, it appeared...

  16. Effect of selection of pH in swimming pool on formation of chlorination by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine is used as disinfection agent in public swimming pools, but also reacts with organic matter in the water forming chlorinat ed disinfection by-products. In order to evaluate the effect of choice of pHsetpoint in the pool we investigated the effect of chlorination of artificial body fluid...

  17. Kick, Stroke and Swim: Complement Your Swimming Program by Engaging the Whole Body on Dry Land and in the Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Susan; Duell, Kelly; Dehaven, Carole; Heidorn, Brent

    2017-01-01

    The Kick, Stroke and Swim (KSS) program can be used to engage students in swimming-skill acquisition and fitness training using a variety of modalities, strategies and techniques on dry land. Practicing swim strokes and techniques on land gives all levels of swimmers--from beginner to competitive--a kinesthetic awareness of the individual…

  18. Disinfection by-product formation of UV treated swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation of DBPs....... The trihalomethane induction might result from a kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of the halogens in the formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose, which......-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed. The post-UV chlorination clearly induced formation of DBPs; however, for the total trihalomethanes (TTHM), the inductions were not more than what...

  19. A survey of fungi and some indicator bacteria in chlorinated water of indoor public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, R.; Hirn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four water samples, of volume 500 ml, originating from six public indoor fresh water swimming pools were examined for the presence of fungi and some indicator bacteria by a membrane-filter method. Sabouraud-dextrose agar and selective Candida albicans-medium were used for isolation and identification of fungi. In all but one of the samples the free chlorine content was above 0.40 mg/l. No Candida albicans were detected. Molds and unidentified yeasts were isolated from 29 of the samples. The following species were recorded: Acremonium spp., ALternaria sp., Aspergillus spp., Candida guilliermondii, Chaetomium sp., Cladosporium spp., Clasterosporium sp., Fusarium spp., Geotrichium sp., Penicillium spp., Petriellidium boydii and Phoma spp. Their occurrence was sporadic, each species mostly appearing as single colonies only, with a maximum of 5 colonies. Bacterial growth was noticed in 15 samples, but only in the sample of low free chlorine content did this reach significant proportions. The study indicates that the standard of chlorination is, at least in general, an adequate measure against fungal contamination of swimming pool water. However, the spectrum of mold species encountered encourages a further search for possible indicator species among these organisms.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Guida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aeruginosa was not correlated with free or total chlorine amount (R2 < 0.1. All the isolates were moderate- to strong-forming biofilm (Optical Density O.D.570 range 0.7–1.2. To control biofilm formation and P. aeruginosa colonization, Quantum FreeBioEnergy© (QFBE, FreeBioEnergy, Brisighella, Italy, has been applied with encouraging preliminary results. It is a new, promising control strategy based on the change of an electromagnetic field which is responsible for the proliferation of some microorganisms involved in biofilm formation, such as P. aeruginosa.

  1. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba spp. from thermal swimming pools and spas in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabres, Laura Fuhrich; Rosa Dos Santos, Sayonara Peixoto; Benitez, Lisianne Brittes; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2016-03-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed in soil and water. A few number of them are implicated in human disease: Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris and Sappinia diploidea. Species of Acanthamoeba can cause keratitis and brain infections. In this study, 72 water samples were taken from both hot tubs and thermal swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, to determine the presence of Acanthamoeba in the water as well as perform the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the isolates. The identification of the isolates was based on the cysts morphology and PCR amplification using genus-specific oligonucleotides. When the isolates were submitted to PCR reaction only 8 were confirmed as belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba. The sequences analysis when compared to the sequences in the GenBank, showed genotype distribution in group T3 (12,5%), T5 (12,5%), T4 (25%) and T15 (50%). The results of this study confirmed the presence of potentially pathogenic isolates of free living amoebae in hot swimming pool and spas which can present risks to human health.

  2. [Investigation and comparison of behaviours of adults and children in swimming pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, M; Bodina, A; Bonali, D; Bascucci, B; Pellino, P; Castaldi, S

    2011-01-01

    The swimmers health's protection must be achieved through the implementation of structures that respect safety standards, the best management of the structures and the users'compliance with rules that minimize the potential risks to health, now clearly identified by the World Health Organization in specific guidelines and by the national and regional legislation. An anonymous questionnaire has been used in order to detect the level of knowledge of hygienic risks and the behaviour of costumers (adults and children) of swimming pool. Comparing the answers, statistically significant differences in the behaviours of adults and children were found in order to protect their own and others' health. In particular children do shower and go through footbath before entering the swimming pool more than adults (respectively 89.2% versus 77.4% and 89.2% versus 79.4%). No differences in the behaviours of the two groups were found in the use of dedicated footwear and caps. Children are predisposed to follow the rules because they are more loyal to duty, while adults comply with the rules only when it is clear the advantage to protect their health. This paper underline the importance of health education programs that can help people to understand the importance of adopting certain behaviours in order to prevent risks and promote health for the benefit of all.

  3. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and UV filters in swimming pools and spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekowati, Yuli; Buttiglieri, Gianluigi; Ferrero, Giuliana; Valle-Sistac, Jennifer; Diaz-Cruz, M Silvía; Barceló, Damià; Petrovic, Mira; Villagrasa, Marta; Kennedy, Maria D; Rodríguez-Roda, Ignasi

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence of 32 pharmaceuticals and 14 UV filters in swimming pools and spas was studied. Fifty-one water samples were collected from 17 pools located in sport centres and hotels in Catalonia, Spain. The samples were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmaceuticals atenolol, carbamazepine, hydrochlorothiazide, metronidazole, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and phenazone were measured in water samples at concentrations higher than their limit of quantification (LOQ). The highest concentration of any individual pharmaceutical was measured for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (904 ng/L). The most frequently detected pharmaceutical was carbamazepine, as it was observed in more than half of all the water samples measured (53 %, 27/51). The UV filters at concentrations higher than LOQ in water samples were BP1, BP2, BP3, BP8, THB, 4DHB, 4MBC, OD-PABA, 1HBT, MeBT and DMeBT. The highest concentration of UV filter observed was 4MBC (69.3 ng/L) while the most frequent UV filters in the samples were 1HBT (59 %, 30/51). The results also showed that pharmaceuticals and UV filters were most frequently found in spas. Finally, from a water treatment technology perspective, the lowest occurrence of pharmaceuticals was in the pools applying sand filters followed by disinfection by sodium hypochlorite, while the lowest occurrence of UV filters was in the pools applying coagulation, sand filtration, UV and salt electrolysis.

  4. Chloroform in indoor swimming-pool air: monitoring and modeling coupled with the effects of environmental conditions and occupant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H T; Chen, M J; Lin, C H; Chou, W S; Chen, J H

    2009-08-01

    Human exposure to chloroform in indoor swimming pools has been recognized as a potential health concern. Although environmental monitoring is a useful technique to investigate chloroform concentrations in indoor swimming-pool air, in practice, the interpretations of measured data would inevitably run into difficulties due to the complex interactions among the numerous variables, including environmental conditions and occupant activities. Considering of the relevant variables of environmental conditions and occupant activities, a mathematical model was first proposed to predict the chloroform concentration in indoor swimming-pool air. The developed model provides a straightforward, conceptually simple way to predict the indoor air chloroform concentration by calculating the mass flux, J, and the Péclet number, Pe, and by using a heuristic value of the indoor airflow recycle ratio, R. The good agreement between model simulation and measured data demonstrates the feasibility of using the presented model for indoor air quality management, operational guidelines and health-related risk assessment.

  5. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Lobner, P.R.; Powell, R.W.; Straker, E.A.

    1978-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems

  6. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  7. Trihalomethanes in Lisbon indoor swimming pools: occurrence, determining factors, and health risk classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Zelinda Isabel; Rebelo, Maria Helena; Silva, Manuela Manso; Alves, Ana Martins; Cabral, Maria da Conceição; Almeida, Ana Cristina; Aguiar, Fátima Rôxo; de Oliveira, Anabela Lopes; Nogueira, Ana Cruz; Pinhal, Hermínia Rodrigues; Aguiar, Pedro Manuel; Cardoso, Ana Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of water quality from indoor swimming pools, using chorine-based disinfection techniques, was performed during a 6-mo period to study the occurrence, distribution, and concentration factors of trihalomethanes (THM). Several parameters such as levels of water THM, water and air chloroform, water bromodichloromethane (BDCM), water dibromochloromethane (DBCM), water bromoform (BF), free residual chlorine (FrCl), pH, water and air temperature, and permanganate water oxidizability (PWO) were determined in each pool during that period. Chloroform (CF(W)) was the THM detected at higher concentrations in all pools, followed by BDCM, DBCM, and BF detected at 99, 34, and 6% of the samples, respectively. Water THM concentrations ranged from 10.1 to 155 μg/L, with 6.5% of the samples presenting values above 100 μg/L (parametric value established in Portuguese law DL 306/2007). In this study, air chloroform (CF(Air)) concentrations ranged from 45 to 373 μg/m³ with 24% of the samples presenting values above 136 μg/m³ (considered high exposure value). Several significant correlations were observed between total THM and other parameters, namely, CF(W), CF(Air), FrCl, water temperature (T(W)), and PWO. These correlations indicate that FrCl, T(W) and PWO are parameters that influence THM formation. The exposure criterion established for water THM enabled the inclusion of 67% of Lisbon pools in the high exposure group, which reinforces the need for an improvement in pool water quality.

  8. Comparison of swimming pools alternative passive and active heating systems based on renewable energy sources in Southern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsaprakakis, Dimitris Al.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines different passive and active heating systems for swimming pools. The passive systems introduced in this article are: * The swimming pools' enclosure. * The placement of floating insulating covers on the pools' surfaces whenever they are not used. The examined active systems in this article are: * A biomass heater. * A biomass heater and solar collectors combi-system. * Vertical geothermal heat exchangers (GHE) co-operating with geothermal heat pumps (GHP). The methodology employed for the introduced systems' evaluation is the arithmetic computational simulation of the swimming pools' annual heating, using annual time series of averaged hourly values for the available solar radiation and the calculated pools' thermal power demand (heating loads). The dimensioning of the active systems aims at the maximisation of the heating production from R.E.S. (renewable energy sources). and the optimisation of the corresponding investments' economic indexes. The examined systems are evaluated technically and economically versus fundamental criteria. It is proved that significant reduction of the heating loads is achieved with the introduced passive systems. The reduced swimming pools' heating loads can be successfully covered by the proposed R.E.S. active systems. The fossil fuels consumption is eliminated. The corresponding investments' payback periods can be lower than 5 years. - Highlights: • The passive solar systems reduce the swimming pools heating loads more than 90%. • The examined active heating system exhibit payback periods lower than 3.5 years. • The energy saving is maximised with a biomass heater – solar collectors system. • Single biomass heaters exhibits the shortest payback period. • GHE–GHP can be used in cases of low solar radiation and lack of biomass fuels

  9. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMaster Marianne E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hypothesis Through vulnerability of the developing central nervous system to circulating toxins, and because of delayed epigenetic effects, the trunk deformity of AIS does not become evident until adolescence. In mature healthy swimmers using such pools, the circulating neurotoxins detected are chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform. Cyanogen chloride and dichloroacetonitrile have also been detected. Testing the hypothesis In infants, the putative portals of entry to the blood could be dermal, oral, or respiratory; and entry of such circulating small molecules to the brain are via the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and circumventricular organs. Barrier mechanisms of the developing brain differ from those of adult brain and have been linked to brain development. During the first 6 months of life cerebrospinal fluid contains higher concentrations of specific proteins relative to plasma, attributed to mechanisms continued from fetal brain development rather than immaturity. Implications of the hypothesis The hypothesis can be tested. If confirmed, there is potential to prevent some children from developing AIS.

  10. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Marianne E

    2011-10-05

    In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Through vulnerability of the developing central nervous system to circulating toxins, and because of delayed epigenetic effects, the trunk deformity of AIS does not become evident until adolescence. In mature healthy swimmers using such pools, the circulating neurotoxins detected are chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform. Cyanogen chloride and dichloroacetonitrile have also been detected. In infants, the putative portals of entry to the blood could be dermal, oral, or respiratory; and entry of such circulating small molecules to the brain are via the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and circumventricular organs. Barrier mechanisms of the developing brain differ from those of adult brain and have been linked to brain development. During the first 6 months of life cerebrospinal fluid contains higher concentrations of specific proteins relative to plasma, attributed to mechanisms continued from fetal brain development rather than immaturity. The hypothesis can be tested. If confirmed, there is potential to prevent some children from developing AIS.

  11. Radon measurements in air in waterworks and indoor swimming pools - a primary mapping project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinko, J.; Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 the Swedish Work Environment Authority asked five regional offices around the country; Falun, Malmoe, Vaexjoe, Umeaa and Oerebro, to measure radon in air in workplaces where water was likely to enhance radon levels indoors. Track etch detectors were used and placed in workplaces according to the SSI measurement protocol for determining the annual average radon concentration in homes. Rooms that are frequently used by employees were measured. The detectors were exposed between 1 to 3 months. 225 detectors were used in the project and analysed at the same laboratory. The results showed that the radon concentration in waterworks often is high. Measurements were made in 60 waterworks. Levels exceeding 1000 Bq/m 3 were found in 49 of them and levels exceeding 4000 Bq/m 3 were found in 21 waterworks. The variation between waterworks may be a result of the radon concentration in the raw water, the amount of radon gas escaping to the air when water is treated, the air exchange rate in the building and where the detectors were deployed. Measurements were made in 28 indoor swimming baths. The maximum level was 290 Bq/m 3 , but most concentrations were between 30 to 70 Bq/m 3 . The conclusion is that high radon levels do not seem to be a problem in indoor swimming baths. Maybe this is due to good ventilation or the fact that water often has been treated for radon before it is used in swimming pools. The results from measurement in food industries such as breweries showed no extreme radon levels except for a fish farm where levels over 1000 Bq/m 3 were measured in the farming room and 790 Bq/m 3 in the office. The radon concentrations in laundries were relatively low, between 30 and 170 Bq/m 3

  12. Structural analysis of the reactor pool for the RRRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberro, J.G.; Abbate, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present document is to describe the structural design of the Reactor Pool relevant to the RRRP (Replacement Research Reactor Project) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The structural analysis required coordinated design, engineering, analysis, and fabrication efforts. The pool has been designed, manufactured, and inspected following as guideline the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which defines the requirements for the pool to withstand hydrostatic and mechanical forces, ensuring its integrity throughout its lifetime. Standard off-the-shelf finite element programs (Nastran and Ansys codes) were used to evaluate the pool and further qualify the design and its construction. Both global and local effect analyses were carried out. The global analysis covers the structural integrity of the pool wall (6 mm thick) considering the different load states acting on it, namely hydrostatic pressure, thermal expansion, and seismic event. The local analysis evaluates the structural behaviour of the pool at specific points resulting from the interaction among components. It is confirmed that maximum stresses and displacements fall below the allowable values required by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The water pressure analysis was validated by means of a hydrostatic test. (authors)

  13. Characterization of a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain isolated from an abandoned swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Karine M; Hartwig, Daiane D; Seixas, Fabiana K; McBride, Alan J A; Monte, Leonardo G; Recuero, Ana Lúcia C; Brod, Claudiomar S; Hartleben, Cláudia P; Amaral, Marta; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are the etiological agents of leptospirosis, an important disease of both humans and animals. In urban settings, L. interrogans serovars are the predominant cause of disease in humans. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel Leptospira isolate recovered from an abandoned swimming pool. Molecular characterization through sequencing of the rpoB gene revealed 100% identity with L. interrogans and variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis resulted in a banding pattern identical to L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae, serovar Copenhageni or Icterohaemorrhagiae. The virulence of the strain was determined in a hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. The lethal dose 50% (LD50) was calculated to be two leptospires in female hamsters and a histopathological examination of infected animals found typical lesions associated with severe leptospirosis, including renal epithelium degeneration, hepatic karyomegaly, liver-plate disarray and lymphocyte infiltration. This highly virulent strain is now available for use in further studies, especially evaluation of vaccine candidates.

  14. Should children be SCUBA diving?: Cerebral arterial gas embolism in a swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Valerie; Adkinson, Cheryl; Bowen, Mariya; Ortega, Henry

    2012-04-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a well-known serious complication of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving. Most serious complications of SCUBA diving occur in adults because most of SCUBA divers are adults. However, young age is an independent risk factor for injury in SCUBA diving and shallow-water SCUBA diving is the riskiest environment for CAGE. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who developed CAGE while taking SCUBA diving lessons in a university swimming pool. This case illustrates the potential danger of SCUBA diving for children who lack understanding of the physics of diving as well as the often unappreciated risk of shallow-water SCUBA diving. Our intent is to educate providers of primary care to children, so that they may appropriately advise parents about SCUBA diving, and to educate providers of emergency care to children, so that they will recognize this uncommon but serious emergency condition.

  15. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. UV treatment is the most common approach, as it is particularly efficient at removing combined chlorine. However, the UV treatment of pool water increases chlorine reactivity...... and the formation of chloro-organic DBPs such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine, we hypothesised that the created reactivity to chlorine, as a result of the UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in swimming pool water, might also be expressed as increased...... reactivity to ozone. Moreover, ozonation might saturate the chlorine reactivity created by UV treatment and mitigate increased formation of a range of volatile DBPs. We found that UV treatment makes pool water highly reactive to ozone. The subsequent reactivity to chlorine decreases with increasing ozone...

  16. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M.S.; Andersen, Henrik R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  17. Destruction of disinfection byproducts and their precursors in swimming pool water by combined UV treatment and ozonation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in swimming pools. UV treatment is most common as it is particularly efficient in removing the repulsive chlorine like smelling chloramines (combined chlorine). UV treatment of a pool water increased chlorine reactivity and formation of chlor-organic DBP such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine we hypothesized that the created reactivity towards c...

  18. Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re just learning to swim, stay in the shallow end. Don't push or jump on others. ... and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours ...

  19. Surveillance and Molecular Identification of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria Species in Two Swimming Pools in Alexandria University, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-HERRAWY, Ahmad Z.; KHALIL, Mahmoud I.; EL-SHERIF, Soheir S.; OMAR, Fatima A. E.; LOTFY, Wael M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Swimming in contaminated water was reported to be associated with Acanthamoeba and N. fowleri human infections. The present study was carried out with the aim of isolation and identification of the different species of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria from two swimming pools in Alexandria University. Methods: Samples were collected from the swimming pools of Alexandria University Stadium and Faculty of Agriculture-Alexandria University during the period from May 2012 to April 2013. Results: Free-living amoebae were prevalent in the collected samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the identity of ten Acanthamoeba isolates and seven Naegleria isolates. Acanthamoeba T3, T4, T5, T11 and T15 genotypes were identified. Acanthamoeba T4 was the most prevalent genotype. Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of Acanthamoeba, especially genotype T4, indicates the presence of a health hazard to swimmers particularly those wearing contact lenses. Naegleria fowleri was not found during the present study. PMID:28761479

  20. Surveillance and Molecular Identification of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria Species in Two Swimming Pools in Alexandria University, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Z. AL-HERRAWY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Swimming in contaminated water was reported to be associated with Acanthamoeba and N. fowleri human infections. The present study was carried out with the aim of isolation and identification of the different species of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria from two swimming pools in Alexandria University. Methods: Samples were collected from the swimming pools of Alexandria University Stadium and Faculty of Agriculture-Alexandria University during the period from May 2012 to April 2013.Results: Free-living amoebae were prevalent in the collected samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the identity of ten Acanthamoeba isolates and seven Naegleria isolates. Acanthamoeba T3, T4, T5, T11 and T15 genotypes were identified. Acanthamoeba T4 was the most prevalent genotype.Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of Acanthamoeba, especially genotype T4, indicates the presence of a health hazard to swimmers particularly those wearing contact lenses. Naegleria fowleri was not found during the present study. 

  1. Kinetics of propionate conversion in anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of anaerobic propionate degradation by biomass from 7 continuously stirred tank reactors differing in temperature, hydraulic retention time and substrate composition were investigated. In substrate-depletion experiments (batch) the maximum propionate degradation rate, A......-m, was estimated. The results demonstrate that the rate of endogenous substrate (propionate) production should be taken into account when estimating kinetic parameters in biomass from manure-based anaerobic reactors....

  2. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2016-01-01

    dosage, however this decreased with subsequent treatments. For tap and polluted pool water, ozone reacted directly with the pollutants resulting in a short ozone half-life, removing reactivity towards chlorine oxidation and preventing TTHM production. Conversely for pool water samples, due to the long......) was observed to increase in pool water with ozone treatment. Thus, ozonation dosage regimes should be designed such that ozone mostly oxidizes fresh pollutants before chlorine is able to react with it.......Ozonation experiments were performed using unchlorinated tap water used for filling municipal swimming pools, actual pool water and pool water polluted by addition of fresh tap water and artificial body fluid to evaluate ozone kinetics and water quality effects on formation of volatile disinfection...

  3. Destruction of disinfection byproducts and their precursors in swimming pool water by combined UV treatment and ozonation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in swimming pools. UV treatment is most common as it is particularly efficient in removing the repulsive chlorine like smelling chloramines (combined chlorine). UV treatment of a pool water increased...... chlorine reactivity and formation of chlor-organic DBP such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine we hypothesized that the created reactivity towards chlorine by UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in pool water might also be expressed as an increased...... reactivity towards ozone and that ozonation might saturate the chlorine reactivity created by UV treatment and mitigate the increased DBP formation. By experimentally treating pool water samples, we found that UV treatment makes pool water highly reactive to ozone. The created reactivity towards chlorine...

  4. Characterization of a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain isolated from an abandoned swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine M. Forster

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are the etiological agents of leptospirosis, an important disease of both humans and animals. In urban settings, L. interrogans serovars are the predominant cause of disease in humans. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel Leptospira isolate recovered from an abandoned swimming pool. Molecular characterization through sequencing of the rpoB gene revealed 100% identity with L. interrogans and variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR analysis resulted in a banding pattern identical to L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae, serovar Copenhageni or Icterohaemorrhagiae. The virulence of the strain was determined in a hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. The lethal dose 50% (LD50 was calculated to be two leptospires in female hamsters and a histopathological examination of infected animals found typical lesions associated with severe leptospirosis, including renal epithelium degeneration, hepatic karyomegaly, liver-plate disarray and lymphocyte infiltration. This highly virulent strain is now available for use in further studies, especially evaluation of vaccine candidates.

  5. Detection and quantification of human adenovirus genomes in Acanthamoeba isolated from swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO STAGGEMEIER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acanthamoeba is the most common free-living environmental amoeba, it may serve as an important vehicle for various microorganisms living in the same environment, such as viruses, being pathogenic to humans. This study aimed to detect and quantify human adenoviruses (HAdV in Acanthamoebas isolated from water samples collected from swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba were isolated from water samples, and isolates (n=16 were used to investigate the occurrence of HAdVs. HAdV detection was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. HAdVs were detected in 62.5% (10/16 of Acanthamoeba isolates, ranging from 3.24x103 to 5.14x105 DNA copies per milliliter of isolate. HAdV viral loads found in this study are not negligible, especially because HAdV infections are associated with several human diseases, including gastroenteritis, respiratory distress, and ocular diseases. These findings reinforce the concept that Acanthamoeba may act as a reservoir and promote HAdV transmission through water.

  6. Electromagnetic Interference from Swimming Pool Generator Current Causing Inappropriate ICD Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Samuel Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI includes any electromagnetic field signal that can be detected by device circuitry, with potentially serious consequences: incorrect sensing, pacing, device mode switching, and defibrillation. This is a unique case of extracardiac EMI by alternating current leakage from a submerged motor used to recycle chlorinated water, resulting in false rhythm detection and inappropriate ICD discharge. A 31-year-old female with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and Medtronic dual-chamber ICD placement presented after several inappropriate ICD shocks at the public swimming pool. Patient had never received prior shocks and device was appropriate at all regular follow-ups. Intracardiac electrograms revealed unique, high-frequency signals at exactly 120 msec suggestive of EMI from a strong external source of alternating current. Electrical artifact was incorrectly sensed as a ventricular arrhythmia which resulted in discharge. ICD parameters including sensing, pacing thresholds, and impedance were all normal suggesting against device malfunction. With device failure and intracardiac sources excluded, EMI was therefore strongly suspected. Avoidance of EMI source brought complete resolution with no further inappropriate shocks. After exclusion of intracardiac interference, device malfunction, and abnormal settings, extracardiac etiologies such as EMI must be thoughtfully considered and excluded. Elimination of inappropriate shocks is to “first, do no harm.”

  7. Prevalence of Ocular, Respiratory and Cutaneous Symptoms in Indoor Swimming Pool Workers and Exposure to Disinfection By-Products (DBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmina Fantuzzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs. Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%, sneezing (52.6%, red eyes (48.9% and itchy eyes (44.4%. Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.. Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010. Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs, the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 ± 20.2 µg/m3, while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 ± 12.1 µg/m3, offices (14.4 ± 12.0 µg/m3 and engine rooms (13.6 ± 4.4 µg/m3 showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 µg/m3 (median value experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6–14.9, itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5–8.0, dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0–27.2 and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0–4.7 than subjects with less exposure. This study confirms

  8. Reliability assessment of emergency exhaust system in a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The reliability of an extract system in a swimming-pool-type research reactor has been assessed. A global fault-tree analysis technique has been utilized. The basic event reliability data is based on both generic and reactor specific informations. The unavailability of the extract system is quantified in terms of the unavailability of the various functional requirements of the system. The unavailability is expressed as the probability of failure on demand. The computer system unavailability is determined from the minimal cutsets of the system. It is found that only three events have a major contribution to the top event, i.e., failures of compressed air supply, electric power supply and solenoid valve. A sensitivity analysis is performed to show the effects of variations in the data values of the dominant cutsets. An uncertainty analysis was also performend on the fault tree. The evaluations show that the reactor extract system lacks diversity and redundance in most of its components. It is tolerant of most minor degradations, as these are taken care of by the operating policies and procedures. However, it can not tolerate common cause failures, e.g. simultaneous compressed air and electric power supply failure. Based upon the results obtained, some recommendations are made. (orig.)

  9. A cubic autocatalytic reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakubu, Aisha Aliyu; Yatim, Yazariah Mohd [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-10-22

    In the present study, the dynamics of the cubic autocatalytic reaction model in a continuous stirred tank reactor with linear autocatalyst decay is studied. This model describes the behavior of two chemicals (reactant and autocatalyst) flowing into the tank reactor. The behavior of the model is studied analytically and numerically. The steady state solutions are obtained for two cases, i.e. with the presence of an autocatalyst and its absence in the inflow. In the case with an autocatalyst, the model has a stable steady state. While in the case without an autocatalyst, the model exhibits three steady states, where one of the steady state is stable, the second is a saddle point while the last is spiral node. The last steady state losses stability through Hopf bifurcation and the location is determined. The physical interpretations of the results are also presented.

  10. The Confluence of Naturalism and Postmodernism in Rose Tremain’s The Swimming Pool Season: a Post-War Feminist

    OpenAIRE

    Walezak, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    Cet article entend démontrer la vitalité de l’écriture réaliste dans le monde contemporain en prenant pour exemple le roman de Rose Tremain, The Swimming Pool Season, publié en 1985. Bien que condamné par la critique structuraliste et post-structuraliste des années 70 et 80 comme véhicule de valeurs bourgeoises conservatrices, le réalisme a su se renouveler en intégrant la problématique postmoderniste de la fragmentation de l’identité. Dans The Swimming Pool Season, les références intertextue...

  11. [Environmental surveillance of a sample of indoor swimming pools from Emilia Romagna region: microclimate characteristics and chemical parameters, particularly disinfection by products, in pool waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzi, G; Righi, E; Predieri, G; Giacobazzi, P; Mastroianni, K; Aggazzotti, G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the environmental and healthy aspects from a representative sample of indoor swimming pools located in the Emilia Romagna region. During the sampling sessions, the occupational environment was evaluated in terms of microclimate parameters and thermal comfort/discomfort conditions. Moreover the chemical risk was assessed by analyzing from the pool water the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs), such as: trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), chlorite, chlorate and bromate. The analytical results are in agreement with the Italian legislation (Accordo Stato-Regioni; 2003) even if in some of the sampled indoor swimming pools, the dosed combined chlorine levels, were greater than the Italian limit. With the regard to the microclimate conditions evaluation, the considered thermal indices, Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD%), described a satisfactory occupational environment. Among DBPs, the THMs mean levels (41.4 +/- 30.0 microg/l) resulted close to the values of the current Italian drinking water legislation, and seem to not represent an health issue. The pool waters chlorate levels (range: 5 - 19537 microg/l) need further investigations as recent epidemiological studies on drinking water hypothesized a potential genotoxicity effect of these compounds which are involved in cellular oxidative processes.

  12. Adaptive Controller Design for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    K. Prabhu; V. Murali Bhaskaran

    2014-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important issue in chemical process and a wide range of research in the area of chemical engineering. Temperature Control of CSTR has been an issue in the chemical control engineering since it has highly non-linear complex equations. This study presents problem of temperature control of CSTR with the adaptive Controller. The Simulation is done in MATLAB and result shows that adaptive controller is an efficient controller for temperature control of C...

  13. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Modified Mathematical Model For Neutralization System In Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed Saadi Ibrehem

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A modified model for the neutralization process of Stirred Tank Reactors (CSTR reactor is presented in this study. The model accounts for the effect of strong acid [HCL] flowrate and strong base [NaOH] flowrate with the ionic concentrations of [Cl-] and [Na+] on the Ph of the system. In this work, the effect of important reactor parameters such as ionic concentrations and acid and base flowrates on the dynamic behavior of the CSTR is investigated and the behavior of mathematical model is compared with the reported models for the McAvoy model and Jutila model. Moreover, the results of the model are compared with the experimental data in terms of pH dynamic study. A good agreement is observed between our model prediction and the actual plant data. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 1st March 2011, Revised: 28th March 2011; Accepted: 7th April 2011[How to Cite: A.S. Ibrehem. (2011. Modified Mathematical Model For Neutralization System In Stirred Tank Reactor. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(1: 47-52. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.825.47-52][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.825.47-52 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/825 ] | View in 

  15. Influence of physical activity in the intake of trihalomethanes in indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Esther; Lourencetti, Carolina; Grimalt, Joan O; Gari, Mercè; Fernández, Pilar; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the relationship between physical activity and intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br), dibromochloromethane (CHClBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3), in individuals exposed in two indoor swimming pools which used different disinfection agents, chlorine (Cl-SP) and bromine (Br-SP). CHCl3 and CHBr3 were the dominant compounds in air and water of the Cl-SP and Br-SP, respectively. Physical exercise was assessed from distance swum and energy expenditure. The changes in exhaled breath concentrations of these compounds were measured from the differences after and before physical activity. A clear dependence between distance swum or energy expenditure and exhaled breath THM concentrations was observed. The statistically significant relationships involved higher THM concentrations at higher distances swum. However, air concentration was the major factor determining the CHCl3 and CHCl2Br intake in swimmers whereas distance swum was the main factor for CHBr3 intake. These two causes of THM incorporation into swimmers concurrently intensify the concentrations of these compounds into exhaled breath and pointed to inhalation as primary mechanism for THM uptake. Furthermore, the rates of THM incorporation were proportionally higher as higher was the degree of bromination of the THM species. This trend suggested that air-water partition mechanisms in the pulmonary system determined higher retention of the THM compounds with lower Henry's Law volatility constants than those of higher constant values. Inhalation is therefore the primary mechanisms for THM exposure of swimmers in indoor buildings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Removal of haloacetic acids from swimming pool water by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; She, Qianhong; Wan, Man Pun; Wang, Rong; Chang, Victor W-C; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies report high concentrations of haloacetic acids (HAAs), a prevalent class of toxic disinfection by-products, in swimming pool water (SPW). We investigated the removal of 9 HAAs by four commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes. Under typical SPW conditions (pH 7.5 and 50 mM ionic strength), HAA rejections were >60% for NF270 with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) equal to 266 Da and equal or higher than 90% for XLE, NF90 and SB50 with MWCOs of 96, 118 and 152 Da, respectively, as a result of the combined effects of size exclusion and charge repulsion. We further included 7 neutral hydrophilic surrogates as molecular probes to resolve the rejection mechanisms. In the absence of strong electrostatic interaction (e.g., pH 3.5), the rejection data of HAAs and surrogates by various membranes fall onto an identical size-exclusion (SE) curve when plotted against the relative-size parameter, i.e., the ratio of molecular radius over membrane pore radius. The independence of this SE curve on molecular structures and membrane properties reveals that the relative-size parameter is a more fundamental SE descriptor compared to molecular weight. An effective molecular size with the Stokes radius accounting for size exclusion and the Debye length accounting for electrostatic interaction was further used to evaluate the rejection. The current study provides valuable insights on the rejection of trace contaminants by RO/NF membranes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Activity release from damaged fuel during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident in the spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Zoltan; Szabo, Emese; Pinter, Tamas; Varju, Ilona Baracska; Bujtas, Tibor; Farkas, Gabor; Vajda, Nora

    2009-01-01

    During crud removal operations the integrity of 30 fuel assemblies was lost at high temperature at the unit No. 2 of the Paks NPP. Part of the fission products was released from the damaged fuel into the coolant of the spent fuel storage pool. The gaseous fission products escaped through the chimney from the reactor hall. The volatile and non-volatile materials remained mainly in the coolant and were collected on the filters of water purification system. The activity release from damaged fuel rods during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident was estimated on the basis of coolant activity concentration measurements and chimney activity data. The typical release rate of noble gases, iodine and caesium was 1-3%. The release of non-volatile fission products and actinides was also detected.

  18. Activity release from damaged fuel during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident in the spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Zoltan, E-mail: hozer@aeki.kfki.h [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Szabo, Emese [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Pinter, Tamas; Varju, Ilona Baracska; Bujtas, Tibor; Farkas, Gabor [Nuclear Power Plant Paks, H-7031 Paks, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Vajda, Nora [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-1521 Budapest, Muegyetem rakpart 9 (Hungary)

    2009-07-01

    During crud removal operations the integrity of 30 fuel assemblies was lost at high temperature at the unit No. 2 of the Paks NPP. Part of the fission products was released from the damaged fuel into the coolant of the spent fuel storage pool. The gaseous fission products escaped through the chimney from the reactor hall. The volatile and non-volatile materials remained mainly in the coolant and were collected on the filters of water purification system. The activity release from damaged fuel rods during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident was estimated on the basis of coolant activity concentration measurements and chimney activity data. The typical release rate of noble gases, iodine and caesium was 1-3%. The release of non-volatile fission products and actinides was also detected.

  19. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pool What to Do if You Have Diarrhea Diarrhea and Swimming Diarrhea and swimming don’t mix! ... small amount of pool water to become infected. Diarrhea and Spreading Illness at the Pool Infectious diarrhea ...

  20. Structural analysis of a seismic resistant pool reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, S.; Sakurai, A.; Kurihara, C.; Tarutani, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to identify any seismic areas of the new concept where design improvement are indicated and more detailed analysis might be necessary for pool-type LMFBR. All analyses were performed in compliance with Japanese practices and pertinent regulatory standards. Only the S1 grade earthquake was analyzed. Results of the S2 grade earthquake were estimated with 1.5 times the results of the S1 grade earthquake. Based on the seismic loading defined from the seismic design response spectra for the horizontal and vertical directions at the reactor vessel support, seismic responses of the reference concept are computed from the 'NASTRAN' finite element seismic model. As an aid to understanding its dynamic behavior, selected dynamic properties (natural frequencies, mode shapes and participation factors) are presented for both horizontal and vertical seismic loadings. Maximum seismic displacement, acceleration and stress responses were examined and those reactor components which needed apparent improvement in seismic design are identified. Following evaluations were performed; 1) Evaluation of primary stress and primary plus secondary stress on the reactor vessel and the core support cylinder. 2) Horizontal relative displacement between UCS and core. 3) Vertical relative displacement between control rod and core. (orig./HP)

  1. SURGTANK, Steam Pressure, Saturation Temperature or Reactor Surge Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Gupta, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SURGTANK generates the steam pressure, saturation temperature, and ambient temperature history for a nuclear reactor steam surge tank (pressurizer) in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium subjected to a liquid insurge described by a specified time history of liquid levels. It is capable also of providing the pressure and saturation temperature history, starting from thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, for the same tank subjected to an out-surge described by a time history of liquid levels. Both operations are available for light- or heavy- water nuclear reactor systems. The tank is assumed to have perfect thermal insulation on its outer wall surfaces. 2 - Method of solution: Surge tank geometry and initial liquid level and saturation pressure are provided as input for the out-surge problem, along with the prescribed time-sequence level history. SURGTANK assumes a reduced pressure for the end of the first change in liquid level and determines the associated change of entropy for the closed system. The assumed pressure is adjusted and the associated change in entropy recalculated until a pressure is attained for which no change occurs. This pressure is recorded and used as the beginning pressure for the next level increment. The system is then re-defined to exclude the small amount of liquid which has left the tank, and a solution for the pressure at the end of the second level increment is obtained. The procedure is terminated when the pressure at the end of the final increment has been determined. Surge tank geometry, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density of tank walls, initial liquid level, and saturation pressure are provided as input for the insurge problem, along with the prescribed time-sequence level history. SURGTANK assumes a slightly in- creased pressure for the end of the first level, the inner tank sur- face is assumed to follow saturation temperature, linearly with time, throughout the interval, and

  2. Concept Design of a Gravity Core Cooling Tank as a Passive Residual Heat Removal System for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwonyeong; Chi, Daeyoung; Kim, Seong Hoon; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Yoon, Juhyeon

    2014-01-01

    A core downward flow is considered to use a plate type fuel because it is benefit to install the fuel in the core. If a flow inversion from a downward to upward flow in the core by a natural circulation is introduced within a high heat flux region of residual heat, the fuel fails instantly due to zero flow. Therefore, the core downward flow should be sufficiently maintained until the residual heat is in a low heat flux region. In a small power research reactor, inertia generated by a flywheel of the PCP can maintain a downward flow shortly and resolve the problem of a flow inversion. However, a high power research reactor more than 10 MW should have an additional method to have a longer downward flow until a low heat flux. Usually, other research reactors have selected an active residual heat removal system as a safety class. But, an active safety system is difficult to design and expensive to construct. A Gravity Core Cooling Tank (GCCT) beside the reactor pool with a Residual Heat Removal Pipe connecting two pools was developed and designed preliminarily as a passive residual heat removal system for an open-pool type research reactor. It is very simple to design and cheap to construct. Additionally, a non-safety, but active residual heat removal system is applied with the GCCT. It is a Pool Water Cooling and Purification System. It can improve the usability of the research reactor by removing the thermal waves, and purify the reactor pool, the Primary Cooling System, and the GCCT. Moreover, it can reduce the pool top radiation level

  3. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathaire, F. de; Vernier, Ph.; Pascouet, A.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors) [fr

  4. An Architectural Self - Criticism: The Accessibility Analysis of Berlika Park Swimming Pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Demirkan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban designers and architects have to clearly understand the physical features and needs of the people they are designing for. In the designing process fields such as   anthropometry, biomechanics, ergonomics, biology and physics require scientific verification to architects. But it can easily be forgotten that there are physically-challenged persons. All users experience any place by using their ability to move and perceive. If designers don’t take into account the special circumstances in the design process for physically-challenged persons, the accessibility of the place becomes impossible. At the same time a sustainable and an accessible place is truly a sign of urban rights being recognized. In this context, human rights are not only important for disciplines such as law, sociology, psychology and political sciences but also they must be important for design disciplines such as architecture, urban and interior design. This research based on the rights to exercise for physically-challenged persons aims to analyze the accessibility of the place. I was a member of the design team and today an active user of the facility-Berlika Park Swimming Pool-chosen for this study. Photographs were taken of different areas of the facility not compliant with TSE standards -TS9111 - TS 12576. Within this context, the structure was examined in terms of mobility constraints under the titles of accessible route, the arrangement of immediate surroundings of the building, arrangement of the entrance of the building, arrangement of the accessibility inside the building, signs, elevators, and fire emergency alert systems. The problematic areas of the building were identified and analyzed. This research aims to make the building more accessible place and a new modification project is being planned. But it is necessary to examine the building or the environment during its design process and solve the problems without the need of renovation project. The design

  5. Nuclear reactor equipped with a flooding tank and a residual heat removal and emergency cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Winkler, F.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor such as a pressurized-water reactor or the like which is equipped with a flooding tank and a residual heat removal and emergency cooling system. The flooding tank is arranged within the containment shell at an elevation above the upper edge of the reactor core and contains a liquid for flooding the reactor core in the event of a loss of coolant

  6. Design of the Demineralized Water Make-up Line to Maintain the Normal Pool Water Level of the Reactor Pool in the Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Gi; Choi, Jung Woon; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Chi, Dae Young

    2012-01-01

    In many research reactors, hot water layer system (HWLS) is used to minimize the pool top radiation level. Reactor pool divided into the hot water layer at the upper part of pool and the cold part below the hot water layer with lower temperature during normal operation. Water mixing between these layers is minimized because the hot water layer is formed above cold water. Therefore the hot water layer suppresses floatation of cold water and reduces the pool top radiation level. Pool water is evaporated form the surface to the building hall because of high temperature of the hot water layer; consequently the pool level is continuously fallen. Therefore, make-up water is necessary to maintain the normal pool level. There are two way to supply demineralized water to the pool, continuous and intermittent methods. In this system design, the continuous water make-up method is adopted to minimize the disturbance of the reactor pool flow. Also, demineralized water make-up is connected to the suction line of the hot water layer system to raise the temperature of make-up water. In conclusion, make-up demineralized water with high temperature is continuously supplied to the hot water layer in the pool

  7. Dynamic simulation and thermo-economic analysis of a PhotoVoltaic/Thermal collector heating system for an indoor–outdoor swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; De Luca, Giuseppina; Figaj, Rafal Damian; Vanoli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A PV/T heating system for indoor–outdoor swimming pools is proposed. • A comparison among some thermal pool models available in literature is carried out. • Dynamic simulations of the thermal behavior of the swimming-pools are performed. • PV/T thermal energy is used to heat the swimming pool and for DHW production. • Energy and economic parametric analyses of the proposed system are presented. - Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of an innovative renewable energy plant serving an existing indoor/outdoor swimming pool located in Naples. The proposed solar hybrid system is designed in order to balance the remarkable energy demand of the swimming pool facility and to ensure suitable comfort conditions for swimmers. With the aim to accomplish such goals, the dynamic thermal behavior of the swimming pool was analyzed as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the indoor space and on the meteorological conditions of the pool site. In order to properly design and size the proposed renewable energy system, different thermal pool loss formulations for the calculation of the swimming pool thermal balance, in indoor and outdoor regimes, are adopted. The solar hybrid system consists of a water cooled photovoltaic/thermal collectors plant (PV/T), designed to meet a part of the facility demands of electricity and heat. Electricity is completely utilized by the facility, while the produced thermal energy is primarily used to meet the pool thermal demand and secondarily for sanitary hot water scopes. In order to carry out dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses, the system performance is designed and dynamically simulated in TRNSYS environment. The developed simulation model enables the calculation of both the indoor and outdoor swimming pool thermal losses and the overall energy and economic system performance. Such results are obtained as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the environment, of the occupants and the

  8. Chemical Safety Alert: Safe Storage and Handling of Swimming Pool Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazards of pool water treatment and maintenance chemicals (e.g., chlorine), and the protective measures pool owners should take to prevent fires, toxic vapor releases, and injuries. Triggered by improper wetting, mixing, or self-reactivity over time.

  9. Evaluation of biological and physico-chemical quality of public swimming pools, Hamadan (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Hoseinzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: As results showed the residual chlorine in pools water was lower than standard level and as regard to microbial contamination in pool water, it can be concluded that the disinfection system has been impaired.

  10. Consequences of a radioactive surface pool resulting from waste transfer operations between tanks 214-C-106 and 241-AY-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Vleet, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document contains supporting calculations for quantifying the dose consequences from a pool formed from an underground leak or a-leak from an above grade structure for the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (Project W-320), i.e., sluicing the contents of Tank 241-C-106 (high heat, SST) into Tank 241-AY-102 (aging waste, DST)

  11. Consequences of a radioactive surface pool resulting from waste transfer operations between tanks 214-C-106 and 241-AY-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vleet, R.J.

    1997-08-05

    This document contains supporting calculations for quantifying the dose consequences from a pool formed from an underground leak or a-leak from an above grade structure for the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (Project W-320), i.e., sluicing the contents of Tank 241-C-106 (high heat, SST) into Tank 241-AY-102 (aging waste, DST).

  12. UV filters interaction in the chlorinated swimming pool, a new challenge for urbanization, a need for community scale investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifan, Hamidreza; Klein, David; Morse, Audra N

    2016-07-01

    Sunscreen products and some personal care products contain the Ultraviolet (UV) chemical filters, which are entering the surface water. Public concerns about secondary effects of these compounds are growing because of the contamination of the aquatic environment that may reach to potentially toxic concentration levels. This article highlights the reaction of certain UV filters with hypochlorite disinfectant in the presence of sunlight. Due to urbanization and industrialization, use of outdoor plastic swimming pools is increasing. The relatively smaller volume of these pools compared to larger pools may increase the concentration of the UV filters in the pool and their potential interactions with materials of human origin (urine, sweat, cosmetics, skin cells, and hair) to the levels of toxicity concerns for children through the creation of disinfection by products (DBP). Based on our analysis, the minimum concentration levels of 2.85, 1.9, 1.78 and 0.95g/L, respectively, for EHMC, OC, 4-MBC and BP3 UV filters in children pools are predicted. Therefore, this article calls for an urgent investigation of potential toxic effects of the UV filters, the creation of DBPs and their subsequent impacts on human health. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The analysis of the RA reactor irradiated fuel cooling in the spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, M.; Afgan, N.; Spasojevic, D.; Jovic, V.

    1985-01-01

    According to the RA reactor exploitation plan the great quantity of the irradiated spent fuel will be disposed in the reactor spent fuel pool after each reactor campaign which will including the present spent fuel inventory increase the residual power level in the pool and will soon cause the pool capacity shortage. To enable the analysis of the irradiated fuel cooling the pool and characteristic spent fuel canister temperature distribution at the residual power maximum was done. The results obtained under the various spent fuel cooling conditions in the pit indicate the normal spent fuel thermal load even in the most inconvenient cooling conditions. (author)

  14. Estimation of reactor pool water temperature after shutdown in JRR-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Sato, Mitsugu; Kakefuda, Kazuhiro

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pool water temperature increasing by the decay heat was estimated by calculation. The reactor pool water temperature was calculated by increased enthalpy that was estimated by the reactor decay heat, the heat released from the reactor biological shielding concrete, reactor pool water surface, the heat conduction from the canal and the core inlet piping. These results of calculation were compared with the past measured data. As the results of estimation, after the JRR-3M shutdown, the calculated reactor pool temperature first increased sharply. This is because the decay heat was the major contribution. And then, rate of increased reactor pool temperature decreased. This is because the ratio of heat released from reactor biological shielding concrete and core inlet piping to the decay heat increased. Besides, the calculated reactor pool water temperature agreed with the past measured data in consequence of correcting the decay heat and the released heat. The corrected coefficient k 1 of decay heat was 0.74 - 0.80. And the corrected coefficient k 2 of heat released from the reactor biological shielding concrete was 3.5 - 4.5. (author)

  15. ‘Right now, Sophie *swims in the pool?!’: Brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique eFlecken

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing resemble semantic or morpho-syntactic processing, or whether they instead are characterized by an entirely distinct pattern in the same individuals. We studied aspect from the perspective of agreement between the temporal information in the context (temporal adverbials, e.g., Right now and a morpho-syntactic marker of grammatical aspect (e.g., progressive is swimming. Participants read questions providing a temporal context that was progressive (What is Sophie doing in the pool right now? or habitual (What does Sophie do in the pool every Monday?. Following a lead-in sentence context such as Right now, Sophie…, we measured ERPs time-locked to verb phrases in four different conditions, e.g., (a is swimming (control; (b *is cooking (semantic violation; (c *are swimming (morpho-syntactic violation; or (d?swims (aspect mismatch; …in the pool. The collected ERPs show typical N400 and P600 effects for semantics and morpho-syntax, while aspect processing elicited an Early Negativity (250-350 ms. The aspect-related Negativity was short-lived and had a central scalp distribution with an anterior onset. This differentiates it not only from the semantic N400 effect, but also from the typical (LAN (Left Anterior Negativity, that is frequently reported for various types of agreement processing. Moreover, aspect processing was not accompanied by a clear P600 modulation.We argue that the specific context for each item in this experiment provided a trigger for agreement checking with temporal information encoded on the verb, i.e., morphological aspect marking. The aspect-related Negativity obtained for aspect agreement mismatches reflects a violated expectation concerning verbal inflection (in the example above, the expected verb phrase was Sophie is X-ing rather than Sophie X-s in condition d. The absence of an additional P600 for aspect processing suggests that the mismatch did not

  16. Primary system thermal-hydraulic simulation of a experimental pool type research fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, E.M.; Braz Filho, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    The first step of the Fast Reactor Program (REARA) is the design of an experimental reactor. To this end a 5 MW t pool type reactor was adapted. The objective of this work is to evaluate the reactor behaviour at the on set protected accidents. The program NALAP was used in this study and the results showed the outstanding safety margins that this reactor type presents inherently. (author)

  17. Effect of Primary Cooling Water on the Hot Water Layer of a Reactor Pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek; Jo, Dea Sung; Lee, Byung Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Many research reactors, including HANARO, have a hot water layer to reduce the radioactivity level in a pool top area. The hot water layer can keep down the ascending of radio-active matters generated nearby the reactor by the neutron irradiation. The hot water layer is a stratified water layer about 5 {approx} 10 .deg. C hotter than the lower pool water. The flow in the reactor pool become fierce, the hot water layer may be broken or become thinner due to vigorous mixing between the hot water layer and the pool water. Large amount of cooling water directly dumped into the reactor pool makes the stable water pool move violently that can have a serious effect on the hot water layer. Thus, the preliminary investigation is required to figure out the mass flow dump effect on the hot water layer. The reactor pool is so gigantic that it is hard to conduct this study by an experimental method, whereas CFD method is relatively easy to simulate even such a very large structure. In this paper when a mass flow of cooling water is dumped into the reactor pool, flow behaviors of pool water are studied by CFD method

  18. Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs

  19. Microbiological quality of swimming-pool waters in the province of Badajoz (Spain); Calidad microbiologica de las aguas de piscina en la provinca de Badajoz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba Doblas, A. M.; Ambel Carracedo, M. P.; Cobos Rodriguez, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    The object of the actual work is to evaluate the microbiological quality of swimming pool waters in the province of Badajoz, 79 samples in 33 cities, according to criteria required by the Decreto 54/2002 of the Comunidad Autonoma of Extremadura. the work describes the possible origins of the pollution in the swimming-pool waters and the risks. The parameters analyzed were Termotolerant Coliforms, Faecal streptococci, S. aureus, P. aerogenes, Sulphate reducing bacteria and Salmonella spp. Results show that 62% of these fulfil microbiological quality criteria. the presence of Sulphate reducing bacteria was found in 24% of the samples, and P. aerogenes was detected in 16% of them. (Author) 20 refs.

  20. Kartini reactor tank inspection using NDT method for safety improvement of the reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Sutondo, Tegas; Saleh, Chaerul; Nitiswati; Puradwi; Andryansah; Mudiharjo

    2002-01-01

    The inspection of Kartini reactor tank liner (TRK) by using Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods to improve the reactor operation safety, have been done. The type of NDT used were: visual examination using an underwater camera and magnifier, replication survey using dental putty, hardness test using an Equotip D indentor, thickness test using ultrasonic probe, and dye penetrant test. The visual examination showed that the surface of TRK was in good condition. The hardness readings were considered to be consistent with the original condition of the tank and the slight hardness increase at the reactor core area consistent with the neutron fluence experienced -10 1 4 n/cm 2 . Results of ultrasonic thickness survey showed that in average the TRK thickness is between 5,0 mm - 6,5 mm, a low 2,1 mm thickness exists at the top of the TRK in the belt area (double layer aluminum plat, therefore do not influencing the safety ). The replica and dye penetrant test at the low thickness area and several suspected areas showed that it could be some defect from original manufacture. Therefore, it can be concluded that the TRK is still feasible for continued operation safely

  1. The risk of contracting infectious diseases in public swimming pools: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia Barna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of pathogenic microorganisms presenting risk of infection in pool based artificial recreational water venues is extracted from the available scientific literature. The microorganisms are grouped both according to their way of spread and their survival and growth strategies and their characteristics relevant for the pool and spa based recreation are discussed. In order to put the proposed risks on a solid basis, among others a ten year excerpt of the waterborne disease statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC is used throughout the article.

  2. Study of Microbial Contamination of the Public Swimming Pools with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Their Physical Parameters in Kermanshah, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Haghmorad Korasti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Public swimming pools' waters are contaminated with a wide variety of pathogenic microorganisms and are a suitable environment for transmission of different diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial contamination of the public swimming pools' waters with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to determine certain parameters such as residual chlorine, pH, temperature and turbidity in these pools' waters in Kermanshah. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, 129 water samples were taken from all active pools in Kermanshah and their bacteriologic and physicochemical properties were investigated. Phosphatase alkaline (PHO-A gene was used for molecular confirmation of E. coli isolates, and exotoxin A (ETA gene in PCR was employed to confirm pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa isolates. Data were analyzed by chi-square and t-test. p0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that appropriate amount of residual chlorine caused reduction in microbial contamination in the public swimming pools' waters in Kermanshah.

  3. Conditions of appearance of steam explosions during accidents in tank reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalozubov, V.I.; Kozlov, I.L.; Klevtsov, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper develops studies of authors concerning modelling of conditions of appearance of steam explosions in reactors during accidents with various initial conditions of a reactor loop. The work shows that steam explosions are possible at certain ratios of rates of steam generation and ''venting'' of the reactor even when safety valves of the reactor are opened and large leaks of a reactor loop are available. Therefore, possibility of steam explosions generally needs to be considered during the modelling of accidents and the safety analysis of tank reactors

  4. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  5. Technical outline of a high temperature pool reactor with inherent passive safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Many reactor designers world wide have successfully established technologies for very small reactors (less than 10 MW TH ), and technologies for large power reactors (greater than 1000 MW TH ), but have not developed small reactors (between 10 MW TH and 1000 MW th ) which are safe, economic, and capable of meeting user technical, economic, and safety requirements. This is largely because the very small reactor technologies and the power reactor technologies are not amiable to safe and economic upsizing/downsizing. This paper postulates that new technologies, or novel combinations of existing technologies are necessary to the design of safe and economic small reactors. The paper then suggest a set of requirements that must be satisfied by a small reactor design, and defines a pool reactor that utilizes lead coolant and TRISO fuel which has the potential for meeting these requirements. This reactor, named LEADIR-PS, (an acronym for LEAD-cooled Integral Reactor, Passively Safe) incorporates the inherent safety features of the Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MWGR), while avoiding the cost of reactor and steam generator pressure vessels, and the safety concerns regarding pressure vessel rupture. This paper includes the description of a standard 200MW thermal reactor module based on this concept, called LEADIR-PS 200. (author)

  6. Degradation pathway of malachite green in a novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Zenghui; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Fanyin; Song, Lin; Qiu, Rongliang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed. • Malachite green degraded in bipolar double-effect mode. • Salt bridge replaced by a cation exchange membrane in the reactor. • Degradation pathways of malachite green in the cathode and anode tanks were similar. -- Abstract: A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed to investigate the degradation pathway of malachite green. A thermally formed TiO 2 /Ti thin film electrode was used as photoanode, graphite was used as cathode, and a saturated calomel electrode was employed as the reference electrode in the reactor. In the reactor, the anode and cathode tanks were connected by a cation exchange membrane. Results showed that the decolorization ratio of malachite green in the anode and cathode was 98.5 and 96.5% after 120 min, respectively. Malachite green in the two anode and cathode tanks was oxidized, achieving the bipolar double effect. Malachite green in both the anode and cathode tanks exhibited similar catalytic degradation pathways. The double bond of the malachite green molecule was attacked by strong oxidative hydroxyl radicals, after which the organic compound was degraded by the two pathways into 4,4-bis(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) phenol, and other intermediate products. Eventually, malachite green was degraded into oxalic acid as a small molecular organic acid, which was degraded by processes such as demethylation, deamination, nitration, substitution, addition, and other reactions

  7. Degradation pathway of malachite green in a novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diao, Zenghui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Mingyu, E-mail: tlimy@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Zeng, Fanyin; Song, Lin [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Qiu, Rongliang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed. • Malachite green degraded in bipolar double-effect mode. • Salt bridge replaced by a cation exchange membrane in the reactor. • Degradation pathways of malachite green in the cathode and anode tanks were similar. -- Abstract: A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed to investigate the degradation pathway of malachite green. A thermally formed TiO{sub 2}/Ti thin film electrode was used as photoanode, graphite was used as cathode, and a saturated calomel electrode was employed as the reference electrode in the reactor. In the reactor, the anode and cathode tanks were connected by a cation exchange membrane. Results showed that the decolorization ratio of malachite green in the anode and cathode was 98.5 and 96.5% after 120 min, respectively. Malachite green in the two anode and cathode tanks was oxidized, achieving the bipolar double effect. Malachite green in both the anode and cathode tanks exhibited similar catalytic degradation pathways. The double bond of the malachite green molecule was attacked by strong oxidative hydroxyl radicals, after which the organic compound was degraded by the two pathways into 4,4-bis(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) phenol, and other intermediate products. Eventually, malachite green was degraded into oxalic acid as a small molecular organic acid, which was degraded by processes such as demethylation, deamination, nitration, substitution, addition, and other reactions.

  8. Prediction of Outside Surface Aluminium Tank Corrosion on TRIGA Mark - IIResearch Reactor Bandung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedardjo

    2000-01-01

    The prediction of outside surface aluminium tank corrosion on researchreactor design which coated by epoxy paint, has been assessed. The new TRIGAMark - II Bandung research reactor tank design separated by 3 section arebottom, middle and upper section then inserted into the existing old reactor.The separation carried out caused by the space constraint on top of old tank,so that the novel tank impossible inserted into old tank all at once. Thespace between novel and old tank is 10 mm. After bottom and middle section oftank welded then followed by epoxy painting and inserted partially into oldtank. From then on the middle and upper section welded and followed by epoxypainting then inserted into old tank. Based on prediction result, that theroot cause of corrosion would be took place on welding and on imperfectlyepoxy painting area. The outside surface novel tank would be generated by thereaction between imperfectly epoxy painting area and the highly basecondition on cement grout that available on novel and old tank gap. (author)

  9. Detection of fission products release in the research reactor 'RA' spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Vukadin, Z.; Pavlovic, S.; Maksin, T.; Idakovic, Z.; Marinkovic, N.

    1997-05-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating the 6.5/10 MW thermal heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor RA at the VINCA Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool in the basement of the reactor building. In 1984, the reactor was shut down for refurbishment, which for a number of reasons has not yet been completed. Recent investigations show that independent of the future status of the research reactor, safe disposal of the so far irradiated fuel must be the subject of primary concern. The present status of the research reactor RA spent fuel storage pool at the VINCA Institute presents a serious safety problem. Action is therefore initiated in two directions. First, safety of the existing spent fuel storage should be improved. Second, transferring spent fuel into another, presumably dry storage space should be considered. By storing the previously irradiated fuel of the research reactor RA in a newly built storage space, sufficient free space will be provided in the existing spent fuel storage pool for the newly irradiated fuel when the reactor starts operation again. In the case that it would be decided to decommission the research reactor RA, the newly built storage space would provide safe disposal for the fuel irradiated so far

  10. System for reducing heat losses from indoor swimming pools by use of automatic covers. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This final report is an account of the principal activities of Lof Energy Systems, Inc. in a two-year project funded by the Energy Related Inventions Program (ERIP) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary objective has been the development of a fully practical and economical system for saving energy in indoor swimming pools by use of motorized covers. The goal is wide-spread use of a fully developed product, in institutional swimming pools. Four major tasks, depicted in the accompanying Performance Schedule, have been completed, and one other has been initiated and its completion committed. Principal accomplishments have been the selection and improvement of cover materials and designs, lengthening and strengthening of reels and improvements in motorized components and their control, design and installation of pool covers in full scale demonstration and evaluation of fully developed commercial system, preparation and dissemination of manuals and reports, finalization of arrangements for Underwriters Laboratory certification of products, and final report preparation and submission. Of greatest significance has been the successful demonstration of the fully developed system and the verification and reporting by an energy consultant of the large savings resulting from pool cover use. Probably the best evidence of success of the DOE-ERIP project in advancing this invention to a commercial stage is its acceptance for sale by the Lincoln Equipment Company, a national distributor of swimming pool supplies and equipment. A copy of the relevant page in the Lincoln catalog is included in this report as Annex A. Representatives of that company now offer Tof motorized pool cover systems to their pool owner customers. In addition to the plans for securing UL certification the company expects to continue making design improvements that can increase system reliability, durability, and cost-effectiveness.

  11. Comparison of decay heat exchangers placing in the primary circuit of pool type fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbraer, P.N.; Gorbunov, V.S.; Zotov, V.G.; Kuzavkov, N.G.; Pykhonin, V.A.; Sobolev, V.A.; Ryzhov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Description of two alternative arrangements of decay beat exchangers (DHXs) in the fast reactor tank is presented: in 'hot' cavity and in 'cold' cavity. The results of calculation for the two alternative arrangements as regards static and dynamic parameters in the primary circuit on 1-D program are given. (author)

  12. Flow rate analysis of wastewater inside reactor tanks on tofu wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamat; Sintawardani, N.; Astuti, J. T.; Nilawati, D.; Wulan, D. R.; Muchlis; Sriwuryandari, L.; Sembiring, T.; Jern, N. W.

    2017-03-01

    The research aimed to analyse the flow rate of the wastewater inside reactor tanks which were placed a number of bamboo cutting. The resistance of wastewater flow inside reactor tanks might not be occurred and produce biogas fuel optimally. Wastewater from eleven tofu factories was treated by multi-stages anaerobic process to reduce its organic pollutant and produce biogas. Biogas plant has six reactor tanks of which its capacity for waste water and gas dome was 18 m3 and 4.5 m3, respectively. Wastewater was pumped from collecting ponds to reactors by either serial or parallel way. Maximum pump capacity, head, and electrical motor power was 5m3/h, 50m, and 0.75HP, consecutively. Maximum pressure of biogas inside the reactor tanks was 55 mbar higher than atmosphere pressure. A number of 1,400 pieces of cutting bamboo at 50-60 mm diameter and 100 mm length were used as bacteria growth media inside each reactor tank, covering around 14,287 m2 bamboo area, and cross section area of inner reactor was 4,9 m2. In each reactor, a 6 inches PVC pipe was installed vertically as channel. When channels inside reactor were opened, flow rate of wastewater was 6x10-1 L.sec-1. Contrary, when channels were closed on the upper part, wastewater flow inside the first reactor affected and increased gas dome. Initially, wastewater flowed into each reactor by a gravity mode with head difference between the second and third reactor was 15x10-2m. However, head loss at the second reactor was equal to the third reactor by 8,422 x 10-4m. As result, wastewater flow at the second and third reactors were stagnant. To overcome the problem pump in each reactor should be installed in serial mode. In order to reach the output from the first reactor and the others would be equal, and biogas space was not filled by wastewater, therefore biogas production will be optimum.

  13. Development, Implementation and Experimental Validations of Activation Products Models for Water Pool Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petriw, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Some parameters were obtained both calculations and experiments in order to determined the source of the meaning activation products in water pool reactors. In this case, the study was done in RA-6 reactor (Centro Atomico Bariloche - Argentina).In normal operation, neutron flux on core activates aluminium plates.The activity on coolant water came from its impurities activation and meanly from some quantity of aluminium that, once activated, leave the cladding and is transported by water cooling system.This quantity depends of the 'recoil range' of each activation reaction.The 'staying time' on pool (the time that nuclides are circulating on the reactor pool) is another characteristic parameter of the system.Stationary state activity of some nuclides depends of this time.Also, several theoretical models of activation on coolant water system are showed, and their experimental validations

  14. Pump/heat exchanger assembly for pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathenson, R.D.; Slepian, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a heat exchanger and pump assembly for transferring thermal energy from a heated, first electrically conductive fluid to a pumped, second electrically conductive fluid and for transferring internal energy from the pumped, second electrically conductive fluid to the first electrically conductive fluid, the assembly adapted to be disposed within a pool of the first electrically conductive fluid and comprising: a heat exchanger comprising means for defining a first annularly shaped cavity for receiving a flow of the second electrically conductive fluid and a plurality of tubes disposed within the cavity, whereby the second electrically conductive fluid in the cavity is heated, each of the tubes having an input and an output end. The input ends being disposed at the top of the heat exchanger for receiving from the pool a flow of the first electrically conductive fluid therein. The output ends being disposed at the bottom of and free of the cavity defining means for discharging the first electrically conductive fluid directly into the pool; a pump disposed beneath the heat exchanger and comprised of a plurality of flow couplers disposed in a circular array, each flow coupler comprised of a pump duct for receiving the first electrically conductive fluid and a generator duct for receiving the second electrically conductive fluid

  15. Evaluation of Packed-Bed Reactor and Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor for the Production of Colchicine Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Dubey, Kashyap Kumar; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Punit; Haque, Shafiul; Jawed, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    Bioconversion of colchicine into its pharmacologically active derivative 3-demethylated colchicine (3-DMC) mediated by P450BM3 enzyme is an economic and promising strategy for the production of this inexpensive and potent anticancer drug. Continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and packed-bed reactor (PBR) of 3 L and 2 L total volumes were compared for the production of 3-demethylated colchicine (3-DMC) a colchicine derivative using Bacillus megaterium MTCC*420 under aerobic conditions. Statis...

  16. Corrosion problems in the aluminum tank of the reactor of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazon, R.

    1995-01-01

    The contention developed a leak that was found on March 15th 1985 in a routine inspection to the exposure room. The maximum water leak reached almost 5 liters per hour, it started to diminish until it disappeared completely two months later. It is believed that the holes were blocked by particles in suspension that were introduced to the primary system during the leaking tests. Immediately after the finding of the leak an inspection, testing and repair program was established. Hydrostatic tests to the primary cooling system and cooling system of the exposure room piping showed that the problem was the aluminum liner and not the piping. In order to have the possibility of inspecting the walls of the tank, the pool was drained from its 7.49 m of water down to 3.6 m of depth. At this point the reactor operation stopped and the inspection work started. Previously gamma radiation doses were evaluated using TLD crystals and was determined that 3.6 m of water column gave 0.1 mR/hr of gamma radiation doses at the surface. (orig./HP)

  17. Sloshing and fluid-structure interaction in a 400-MWe pool-type advanced fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic analysis of a 400-MWe advanced fast reactor under 0.3 g SSE ground excitation. Two types of analyses are performed - the sloshing analysis and the fluid-structure interaction analysis. In the sloshing analysis, the sloshing frequency and wave patterns are calculated. The maximum wave height and the sloshing forces exerted on the submerged components and the primary tank are evaluated. In the fluid-structure interaction analysis, the maximum horizontal acceleration for the reactor core and the relative displacement between the reactor core and UIS are examined. The fluid-coupling phenomena between various components are investigated. Seismic stresses at critical areas are examined. The results obtained from this study are very useful to the design of the advanced reactors. Meanwhile, the computer code FLUSTR-ANL has proved to be a useful analytical tool for assessing the complicated seismic fluid-structure interactions and sloshing in the fast reactor systems. 10 refs., 25 figs

  18. Three-dimension thermal hydraulic studies for the pool-type fast reactor of CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yijun; Liu Yizhe; Xue Xiuli; Feng Yuheng; Qiao Xuedong; Hou Zhifeng; Yu Hong; Yang Hongyi; Yang Fuchang

    2009-01-01

    With the development of the computer software and hardware, 3-dimension numerical analysis technology has become an important part of the reactor core and plenums design and research of the fast reactor, sometimes even plays an un-replacable role in the design. In this paper, the typical thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the pool-type fast reactor are analysed by using 3-dimension numerical analysis codes and programs. It can be said that it will play an important role in the thermal hydraulic design and research by using these tools. And at the same time, it will also set good examples and speed up the application of these technologies by summing up these experiences and methods in order that it can be used in the future design and analyses for the large-scaled pool-type fast reactor. (authors)

  19. Radiological performance of hot water layer system in open pool type reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Abdelhady

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculated dose rate carried out by using MicroShield code to show the importance of hot water layer system (HWL in 22 MW open pool type reactor from the radiation protection safety point of view. The paper presents the dose rate profiles over the pool surface in normal and abnormal operations of HWL system. The results show that, in case of losing the hot water layer effect, the radiation dose rate profiles over the pool surface will increase from values lower than the worker permissible dose limits to values very higher than the permissible dose limits.

  20. Radiological performance of hot water layer system in open pool type reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Amr Abdelhady

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the calculated dose rate carried out by using MicroShield code to show the importance of hot water layer system (HWL) in 22 MW open pool type reactor from the radiation protection safety point of view. The paper presents the dose rate profiles over the pool surface in normal and abnormal operations of HWL system. The results show that, in case of losing the hot water layer effect, the radiation dose rate profiles over the pool surface will increase from values lower than th...

  1. Cost estimates of operating onsite spent fuel pools after final reactor shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rod, S.R.

    1991-08-01

    This report presents estimates of the annual costs of operating spent fuel pools at nuclear power stations after the final shutdown of one or more onsite reactors. Its purpose is to provide basic spent fuel storage cost information for use in evaluating DOE's reference nuclear waste management system, as well as alternate systems. The basic model of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) used in this study was based on General Electric Corporation's Morris Operation and was modified to reflect mean storage capabilities at an unspecified, or ''generic,'' US reactor site. Cost data for the model came from several sources, including both operating and shutdown nuclear power stations and existing ISFSIs. Duke Power Company has estimated ISFSI costs based on existing spent fuel storage costs at its nuclear power stations. Similarly, nuclear material handling facilities such as the Morris Operation, the West Valley Demonstration Project, and the retired Humbolt Bay nuclear power station have compiled spent fuel storage cost data based on years of operating experience. Consideration was given to the following factors that would cause operating costs to vary among pools: (1) The number of spent fuel pools at a given reactor site; (2) the number of operating and shutdown reactors onsite; (3) geographic location; and (4) pool storage capacity. 10 ref., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  2. CFD aided analysis of a scaled down model of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, Fernando L.A.; Lima, Claubia P.B.; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Research reactors are commonly built inside deep pools that provide radiological and thermal protection and easy access to its core. Reactors with thermal power in the order of MW usually use an auxiliary thermal-hydraulic circuit at the top of its pool to create a purified hot water layer (HWL). Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the flow configuration in the pool and HWL is paramount to insure radiological protection. A useful tool for these analyses is the application of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). To obtain satisfactory results using CFD it is necessary the verification and validation of the CFD numerical model. Verification is divided in code and solution verifications. In the first one establishes the correctness of the CFD code implementation and in the former estimates the numerical accuracy of a particular calculation. Validation is performed through comparison of numerical and experimental results. This paper presents a dimensional analysis of the RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) pool to determine a scaled down experimental installation able to aid in the HWL numerical investigation. Two CFD models were created one with the same dimensions and boundary conditions of the reactor prototype and the other with 1/10 proportion size and boundary conditions set to achieve the same inertial and buoyant forces proportions represented by Froude Number between the two models. Results comparing the HWL thickness show consistence between the prototype and the scaled down model behavior. (author)

  3. Effect of tryptone and ammonia on the biogas process in continuously stirred tank reactors treating cattle manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hanne Bjerg; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    Two themophilic continuously stirred tank reactors, R1 and Two thermophilic continuously stirred tank reactors, R1 and R2, were subject to pulses of tryptone and ammonia. R1 was operated at an ammonia-N concentration of 3.0 g l(-1) and R2 was operated at an ammonia-N concentration of 1.7 g l(-1)....

  4. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  5. Occurrence and Spatial and Temporal Variations of Disinfection By-Products in the Water and Air of Two Indoor Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catto, Cyril; Sabrina, Simard; Ginette, Charest-Tardif; Manuel, Rodriguez; Robert, Tardif

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve disinfection by-product (DBP) exposure assessment, this study was designed to document both water and air levels of these chemical contaminants in two indoor swimming pools and to analyze their within-day and day-to-day variations in both of them. Intensive sampling was carried out during two one-week campaigns to measure trihalomethanes (THMs) and chloramines (CAMs) in water and air, and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in water several times daily. Water samples were systematically collected at three locations in each pool and air samples were collected at various heights around the pool and in other rooms (e.g., changing room) in the buildings. In addition, the ability of various models to predict air concentrations from water was tested using this database. No clear trends, but actual variations of contamination levels, appeared for both water and air according to the sampling locations and times. Likewise, the available models resulted in realistic but imprecise estimates of air contamination levels from water. This study supports the recommendation that suitable minimal air and water sampling should be carried out in swimming pools to assess exposure to DBPs. PMID:23066383

  6. Radioactivity Monitoring System for TRIGA 2000 Reactor Water Tank with On-Line Gamma Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasetyo Basuki; Sudjatmi KA

    2009-01-01

    One of the requirements in radiological safety in the operating condition of research reactor are the absence of radionuclide from fission product released to reactor cooling water and environment. Early detection of fission product that released from fuel element can be done by monitoring radioactivity level on primary cooling water.Reactor cooling water can be used as an important indicator in detecting radioactivity level of material fission product, when the leakage occurs. Therefore, it needs to build a monitoring system for measuring radioactivity level of cooling water directly and simple. The idea of this system is counting radioactivity water flow from reactor tank to the marinelli cube that attached to the HPGe detector on gamma spectrometer. Cooling water from tank aimed on plastic pipe to the marinelli cube. Water flows in gravitational driven to the marinelli cube, with volume flow rate 5.1 liters/minute in the inlet and 2.2 liters/minute in output. (author)

  7. Evaporation rate calculation of the RSG-GAS reactor cooling pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibyo, Sukmanto

    2002-01-01

    Evaporation rate is necessary to be known because it is closely related to humidity control and make-up of pool water. This paper calculates the evaporation rate from the reactor pool to the operation hall of the RSG-GAS. The evaporation rate was calculated based on temperature, pressure, mass-transfer coefficient and other complement data. Calculation result indicates that the reactor pool temperature has a great influence to the evaporation rate. Whereas air temperature given very small effect to the evaporation. Based on the collecting data and warm water layer temperature of 46 oC , the evaporation rate was found to be 8 kg/hr. This evaporation causes gradually humidity increase at the operation hall if temperature of ventilation cooling system is mostly higher than its dew point. As the consequence of evaporation, the decrease of pool water level is relatively small even without the pool make-up system operation. The minimum level of pool water will be reached after 46 days

  8. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outcome will depend on the extent of this damage. Opening a large bucket of chlorine tablets can expose you to a powerful chlorine gas that can be very poisonous. Always open the container outdoors. Keep your face as far away from ...

  9. Gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient in stirred tank reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yawalkar, Archis A.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric gas—liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) data available in the literature for larger tanks (T = 0.39 m to 2.7 m) have been analyzed on the basis of relative dispersion parameter, N/Ncd. It was observed that at a given superficial gas velocity (VG), kLa values were approximately the same

  10. Bio-hydrogen production from molasses by anaerobic fermentation in continuous stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Li, Yong-feng; Chen, Hong; Deng, Jie-xuan; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    A study of bio-hydrogen production was performed in a continuous flow anaerobic fermentation reactor (with an available volume of 5.4 L). The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for bio-hydrogen production was operated under the organic loading rates (OLR) of 8-32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d (COD: chemical oxygen demand) with molasses as the substrate. The maximum hydrogen production yield of 8.19 L/d was obtained in the reactor with the OLR increased from 8 kg COD/m3 reactor/d to 24 kg COD/m3 d. However, the hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) drastically decreased at an OLR of 32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d. Ethanoi, acetic, butyric and propionic were the main liquid fermentation products with the percentages of 31%, 24%, 20% and 18%, which formed the mixed-type fermentation.

  11. Safe design and operation of tank reactors for multiple-reaction networks: uniqueness and multiplicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Westerink, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    A method is developed to design a tank reactor in which a network of reactions is carried out. The network is a combination of parallel and consecutive reactions. The method ensures unique operation. Dimensionless groups are used which are either representative of properties of the reaction system

  12. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  13. Control method for pool water of pressure suppression chamber in reactor container vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Konomaru, Toshimi; Saito, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber in adjacent with the outer circumference of a pedestal of a reactor pressure vessel, at least a portion of pool water is provisionally transported from the pressure suppression chamber to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel, and stored therein. In addition, an opening of the side wall of the pedestal is closed to raise the water level of the provisionally stored water thereby increasing the amount of provisionally stored pool water. Predetermined operations are performed in the pressure suppression chamber after transporting the pool water to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel. Namely, a portion of the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber is transported to the inner space surrounded by the pedestal to provisionally store it thereby forming a circumstance for enabling predetermined operations such as inspection and re-coating in the pressure suppression chamber. Then, radiation contamination prevailing to the outer side of the reactor container can be reduced thereby enabling to obtain various effects, namely, reduction in the amount of equipments for provisional installment, shortening for construction term and decrease in the amount of waste materials. (I.S.)

  14. Technical note on last-ditch cooling of the small Hanford reactors: Part 1, High tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.S.

    1964-07-01

    A number of tests have been performed and reports issued concerning the adequacy of the last-ditch cooling systems at the Hanford small production reactors. At the present time, re-evaluations are being made, both theoretical and experimental, by process engineers and others at th particular reactor sites. In the interest of uniformity and consistency, this report presents a means of determining the last-ditch cooling adequacy for all the small production reactors. This method includes both the night tanks and the export system.

  15. Applying rotary jet heads for mixing and mass transfer in a forced recirculation tank reactor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Grotkjær, Thomas; Hummer, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    An approximation to an ideally mixed tank reactor can be obtained by vigorous stirring with mechanical mixers. For an aerated reactor the gas dispersion contributes to the mixing process. Mixing can also be achieved by recirculation of a portion of the liquid through either an internal or an exte......An approximation to an ideally mixed tank reactor can be obtained by vigorous stirring with mechanical mixers. For an aerated reactor the gas dispersion contributes to the mixing process. Mixing can also be achieved by recirculation of a portion of the liquid through either an internal...... or an external loop.In this study, we determine mixing times in water and CMC solutions and oxygen mass transfer coefficients in water for a tank reactor system where a small fraction of the total liquid volume is rapidly circulated through an external loop and injected through the nozzles of rotary jet heads....... The system has a very simple design with no internal baffles or heat exchange area, and between batches the rotary jet heads are used for cleaning in place.Mixing time decreases and mass transfer increases with increasing circulation flow rate. For nozzle diameters between 5.5 and 10 mm and with one or two...

  16. Fast neutron spectrum in the reflector of swimming pool reactor behind metallics slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brousse, J.C.

    1970-01-01

    The large perturbations of fast neutron spectrum were measured behind lead, aluminium and iron slabs in the Siloette reflector at the CENG. The neutron slowing down is chiefly depending of the inelastic reaction. The reaction cross section increases with energy; a spectrum softening is deduced. This is verified. We tried to determine the spectrum shape by calculation to fit the measurements. Calculations were firstly made in unidimensional geometry by the NIOBE transport equation resolution code and by the SANE Monte-Carlo code. The results does not agree with the experimental determined values. Finally a semi-empirical method for studying a tridimensional geometry was chosen. We have obtained calculation results in a perfect agreement with measurements. The method is described. (author) [fr

  17. Removals of cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and cryptosporidium-sized polystyrene microspheres from swimming pool water by diatomaceous earth filtration and perlite-sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E; Hill, Vincent R; Murphy, Jennifer L; Schneeberger, Chandra L; Arrowood, Michael J; Yuan, Tao

    2017-06-01

    Removal of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from swimming pools was investigated using diatomaceous earth (DE) precoat filtration and perlite-sand filtration. In pilot-scale experiments, microsphere removals of up to 2 log were obtained with 0.7 kg·DE/m 2 at a filtration rate of 5 m/h. A slightly higher microsphere removal (2.3 log) was obtained for these DE-precoated filters when the filtration rate was 3.6 m/h. Additionally, pilot-scale perlite-sand filters achieved greater than 2 log removal when at least 0.37 kg/m 2 of perlite was used compared to 0.1-0.4 log removal without perlite both at a surface loading rate of 37 m/h. Full-scale testing achieved 2.7 log of microspheres and oocysts removal when 0.7 kg·DE/m 2 was used at 3.6 m/h. Removals were significantly decreased by a 15-minute interruption of the flow (without any mechanical agitation) to the DE filter in pilot-scale studies, which was not observed in full-scale filters. Microsphere removals were 2.7 log by perlite-sand filtration in a full-scale swimming pool filter operated at 34 m/h with 0.5 kg/m 2 of perlite. The results demonstrate that either a DE precoat filter or a perlite-sand filter can improve the efficiency of removal of microspheres and oocysts from swimming pools over a standard sand filter under the conditions studied.

  18. The heavy water accountancy for research reactors in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshijima, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Sumitoshi; Nemoto, Denjirou

    1998-11-01

    The three research reactors have been operated by the Department of Research Reactor and used about 41 tons heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector of research reactors. The JRR-2 is a tank type research reactor of 10MW in thermal power and its is used as moderator, coolant and reflector about 16 tons heavy water. The JRR-3M is a light water cooled and moderated pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 20MW and its is used as reflector about 7.3 tons heavy water. In the JRR-4, which is a light water cooled swimming pool type research reactor with the maximum thermal power of 3.5MW, about 1 ton heavy water is used to supply fully thermalized neutrons with a neutron beam experiment of facility. The heavy water was imported from U.S.A., CANADA and Norway. Parts of heavy water is internationally controlled materials, therefore management of heavy water is necessary for materials accountancy. This report described the change of heavy water inventories in each research reactors, law and regulations for accounting of heavy water in JAERI. (author)

  19. Analysis of the radiation level variation at the reactor pool top

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Guk Hoon; Park, Cheol; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    During HANARO commissioning test on ascending power, pool surface radiation level was found to be highly larger than the design target. Hence, the reasons were investigated in various aspects through experiment and analysis, and the several suggestions to minimize possible the radiation level at the pool top were proposed and tested step by step, including the installation of hot water layer system. As the results of these effort, the pool surface radiation level is about 6,000 nGy/hr at 20 MW, which is 1/30 less than that of the early commissioning test. It is expected from this result that the pool surface radiation level will be around 9,000 nGy/hr at 30 MW of normal operation, which is larger than the design target but less than the value corresponding to the acceptance criteria of 25,000 nGy/hr on the allowable dose for worker at site. Meanwhile, as the pool surface radiation monitors were installed 55 cm below inside the pool from the pool top and the stay of operation staffs at the pool top would be limited and very short, no radiation safety problems are expected even if the alarm setting is adjusted slightly higher. Consequently, the adjustment of alarm setting value for the radiation level of the reactor pool top is necessary from 12,500 nGy/hr to 20,000 nGy/hr, considering the measuring error and the operation range of related systems. 18 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  20. Engineering, safety, and economic evaluations of ASPIRE [Advanced Safe Pool Immersed REactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Gordon, J.; Piet, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Klein, A.

    1988-02-01

    A preconceptual design of a tokamak fusion reactor concept called ASPIRE (Advanced Safe Pool Immersed REactor) has been developed. This concept provides many of the attractive features that are needed to enhance the capability of fusion to become the power generation technology for the 21st century. Specifically, these features are: inherent safety, low pressure, environmental compatibility, moderate unit size, high availability, high thermal efficiency, simplicity, low radioactive inventory, Class C radioactive waste disposal, and low cost of electricity. We have based ASPIRE on a second stability tokamak. However, the concept is equally applicable to a first stability tokamak or to most other magnetic fusion systems

  1. Parametric study of postulated reactivity transients due to ingress of heavy water from the reflector tank into the converted core of APSARA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Research reactors in the power range 5-10 MW with useable neutron flux values >1.OE+14 n/sqcm/sec can be constructed using LEU fuel with light water for neutron moderation and fuel cooling. In order to obtain a large irradiation volume, a heavy water reflector is used where fairly high neutron flux levels can be obtained. A prototype LEU fuelled 5/10 MW reactor design has been developed in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in Trombay. Work is on hand to carry out technology simulation of this reactor design by converting the pool type reactor APSARA in BARC. Presently the Apsara reactor uses MTh type high enriched U-Al alloy plate type fuel loaded in a 7x7 grid with a square lattice pitch of 76.8 mm. The reactor has three control-scram-shut off rods and one regulating control rod. In the first phase of the simulation studies, it is proposed to use the existing high enriched uranium fuel in a modified core with 37 positions arranged with a square lattice pitch of 84.8 mm, surrounded by a 50 cm thick heavy water reflector. Subsequently the converted core will use plate-type low enriched uranium suicide fuel. One of the accident scenarios postulated for the safety evaluation of the modified APSARA reactor is the reactivity transient due to the ingress of heavy water into the core through a small sized rupture in the aluminium wall of the reflector tank. Parametric analyses were done for the safety evaluation of modified Apsara reactor, for postulated leak of heavy water into the core from the reflector tank. A simplified computer code REDYN, based on point model reactor kinetics with one effective group of delayed neutrons is used for the analyses. Results of several parametric cases used in the study show that it is possible to contain the consequences of this type of reactivity transient within acceptable fuel and coolant thermal safety limits

  2. Detailed evaluation of melt pool configuration in the lower plenum of the APR1400 reactor vessel during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Hwan-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Melt pool condition in the lower plenum was determined using SCDAP/RELAP5. • GEMINI analyses were performed to examine the final melt pool composition. • A density evaluation graph was developed for the melt pool layer inversion. • The final melt pool configurations were determined for five accident scenarios. • The thermodynamic results address the possibility of the layer inversion. - Abstract: For a detailed evaluation of the IVR (In-Vessel corium Retention) through the ERVC (External Reactor Vessel Cooling) during a severe accident, the melt pool configuration should be accurately determined in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. It affects the thermal load to the vessel wall and plays a key role in determining the integrity of the reactor vessel under the IVR-ERVC. SCDAP/RELAP5 and GEMINI analyses have been performed to determine the final corium condition and examine the final melt pool composition at a reactor vessel failure during a severe accident in an APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400, respectively. As the representative accident scenarios, five dominant sequences of the TLFW (Total Loss of Feed Water), the SBO (Station BlackOut), the SBLOCA (Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident) without SI (Safety Injection), the MBLOCA without SI, and the LBLOCA without SI were selected from the level I PSA (Probabilistic Safe Assessment) results. A density evaluation graph was developed for the precise examination of the melt pool layer inversion. The final melt pool configurations at the reactor vessel failure have been determined for five dominant accident scenarios of the APR1400 using the GEMINI results and the density evaluation graph. The thermodynamic analysis results in three sequences of the APR1400 accident address the possibility of a melt pool layer inversion in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. The layer inversion led to corium pool stratification with a heavy metallic layer below the oxidic pool, which leads to a three

  3. Eddy current testing of PWR fuel pencils in the pool of the Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1983-12-01

    A nondestructive testing bench is described. It is devoted to examination of high residual power fuel pencils without stress on the cladding nor interference with cooling. Guiding by fluid bearings decrease the background noise. Scanning speed is limited only by safety criteria and data acquisition configuration. Simultaneous control of various parameters is possible. Associated to an irradiation loop, loaded and unloaded in a reactor swinning pool, this bench can follow fuel pencil degradation after each irradiation cycle [fr

  4. Trace element analysis at the Livermore pool-type reactor using neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragaini, R.C.; Ralston, R.; Garvis, D.

    1975-01-01

    The capabilities of trace element analysis at the Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) are discussed. A description is given of the technology and the methods employed, including sample preparation, irradiation, and analysis. Applications of the INAA technique in past and current projects are described. A computer program, GAMANAL, has been used for nuclide identification and quantification. (U.S.)

  5. Abiotic Dissolution of a Tetrachloroethene (PCE) Pool in an Anaerobic Sand Tank Aquifer System with Heterogeneous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Sara; Seagren, Eric; Becker, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Intrinsic and engineered in situ bioremediation are made technologically challenging by the physically and chemically heterogeneous nature of the subsurface environment. Subsurface heterogeneities are important because they influence interfacial mass-transfer processes that impact the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. The laboratory experiments reported here examined the dissolution of a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool, and transport of the dissolved PCE plume in a aquifer simulated system with heterogeneous flow. These abiotic experiments were performed in a saturated intermediate-scale flow cell (1.2 m), with flow parallel to the PCE pool. A steady-state mass balance approach was used to estimate the PCE dissolution rate at two different flow rates. As expected, increasing the flow rate decreased the effluent dissolved PCE concentration and increased the dissolution flux. However, the effluent PCE concentration was higher than expected based on modeling predictions assuming a uniform distribution of flow across the depth of the tank. Nonreactive tracer studies confirmed that there was a velocity profile with depth, with the slowest velocity at the top of the tank, and the highest velocity at the bottom of the tank, possible due to consolidation of the sand that occurred during a wetting/drainage cycle. Revised modeling using the vertical flow variation provided an improved prediction of the effluent PCE concentration. These results have important implications for predicting DNAPL pool dissolution in the field. Whereas experimental systems in the laboratory typically employ porous media with uniform flow distribution, flow heterogeneities are the rule rather than the exception in the field, and it is well known that velocity impacts pool dissolution. In the case of this experimental system, the pore water velocity near the pool was greater than the average pore water velocity across the system, resulting in a

  6. Measurement and analysis of the neutron noise of the pool research reactor at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, Graciete Pedro

    1979-01-01

    Variations in the neutron density or power of a nuclear reactor (the neutron noise) operating at nominally constant power are generally random and can only be described in terms of statistical parameters. Random variations in the power of a power reactor are produced by one or more driving functions. In this work the neutron noise of the pool reactor IEAR-1 (2 MW nominal power) has been studied using two compensated ionization chambers ( Westinghouse VJL6377) and related to three possible-driving functions, namely vibration of the control bar and reactor support bridge and the temperature of the water entering the core. The CIC detectors were located in rigid tubes in turn positively located in the reactor lattice plate. Conventional accelerometers were used. Temperature measurements were made with a NiCr/Ni thermocouple (wire diam ∼ 0.2mm) located 10 mm above the top of a fuel element. Although the correlation between the measured neutron signals was high ( > 0,4) for frequencies in the range 0 to 10 Hz no resonances were identified in the neutron noise. A significant correlation (> 0,4) between the control bar acceleration and the neutron flux was obtained in the frequency range 0 to 10 Hz. The measured correlation between the neutron noise and both the bridge vibration and the reactor water inlet temperature was insignificant. (author)

  7. Fluid dynamic analysis of a continuous stirred tank reactor for technical optimization of wastewater digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, F J; Kaiser, A S; Zamora, B

    2015-03-15

    Continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) are widely used in wastewater treatment plants to reduce the organic matter and microorganism present in sludge by anaerobic digestion. The present study carries out a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic behaviour of a CSTR in order to optimize the process energetically. The characterization of the sludge flow inside the digester tank, the residence time distribution and the active volume of the reactor under different criteria are determined. The effects of design and power of the mixing system on the active volume of the CSTR are analyzed. The numerical model is solved under non-steady conditions by examining the evolution of the flow during the stop and restart of the mixing system. An intermittent regime of the mixing system, which kept the active volume between 94% and 99%, is achieved. The results obtained can lead to the eventual energy optimization of the mixing system of the CSTR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Applying rotary jet heads for mixing and mass transfer in a forced recirculation tank reactor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Grotkjær, Thomas; Hummer, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    An approximation to an ideally mixed tank reactor can be obtained by vigorous stirring with mechanical mixers. For an aerated reactor the gas dispersion contributes to the mixing process. Mixing can also be achieved by recirculation of a portion of the liquid through either an internal...... at 1-9 bar gauge pressure into the bulk liquid. Liquid feed can be added to the bulk volume or it may be injected into the pressurized recirculation loop. Gas is always fed to the recirculation loop, and the heat of reaction is removed in a plate-type heat exchanger inserted in the recirculation loop...

  9. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  10. Computer programme for calculating LOCA in a pool type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, L.

    1982-01-01

    A computer programme has been developed to calculate the loss of coolant accident at the top part of the fuel rod, for a pool type reactor. The following heat transfer modes are considered in the computer code: 1) forced convection in the transition regimes, 2) forced turbulent convection, 3) forced laminar convection, 4) natural convection in water, 5) natural convection in rectangular cells, 6) natural convection in air in partially closed channels, 7) laminar convection in steam, 8) thermal radiation between two parallel plates within the steam, 9) nucleate boiling in standing liquid

  11. Influence of reactor design on the establishment of natural circulation in pool-type LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The general principles involved in establishing natural circulation in a pool-type liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor following loss of a.c. supplies are elucidated and the effects of design features by use of the computer code MELANI are quantified. It is shown that natural circulation can provide a feasible means of emergency core cooling in addition to that provided by pony motors. The choice of primary pump rundown time has a significant effect in controlling peak core outlet temperatures in the hypothetical case of natural circulation alone being the core heat removal process. (author)

  12. Detectability prediction for a thermoacoustic sensor in the breazeale nuclear reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hrisko, Joshua [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garrett, Steven [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory experiments have suggested that thermoacoustic engines can be in- corporated within nuclear fuel rods. Such engines would radiate sounds that could be used to measure and acoustically-telemeter information about the op- eration of the nuclear reactor (e.g., coolant temperature or uxes of neutrons or other energetic particles) or the physical condition of the nuclear fuel itself (e.g., changes in temperature, evolved gases) that are encoded as the frequency and/or amplitude of the radiated sound [IEEE Measurement and Instrumen- tation 16(3), 18-25 (2013)]. For such acoustic information to be detectable, it is important to characterize the vibroacoustical environments within reactors. Measurements will be presented of the background noise spectra (with and with- out coolant pumps) and reverberation times within the 70,000 gallon pool that cools and shields the fuel in the 1 MW research reactor on Penn State's campus using two hydrophones, a piezoelectric projector, and an accelerometer. Sev- eral signal-processing techniques will be demonstrated to enhance the measured results. Background vibrational measurement were also taken at the 250 MW Advanced Test Reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory, using ac- celerometers mounted outside the reactor's pressure vessel and on plumbing will also be presented. The detectability predictions made in the thesis were validated in September 2015 using a nuclear ssion-heated thermoacoustic sensor that was placed in the core of the Breazeale Nuclear Reactor on Penn State's campus. Some features of the thermoacoustic device used in that experiment will also be revealed. [Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. In-tank examination and experience with MTR fuel integrity at the Imperial College reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, S.; Chapman, N.; Robertson, B.; Shields, A.; Velez-Moss, S.; Boeck, H.; Schachner, H.; Klapfer, E.

    2000-01-01

    Many changes have occurred in the UK nuclear industry over the past 10 years: nuclear power/radiation research groups have closed, the fast reactor program ceased, and the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) changed emphasis to decommissioning. Many UK research reactors and associated facilities have closed. In 1997, the 100 kW CONSORT pool-type reactor became the last civil nuclear research reactor surviving in the UK. Although VIPER, NEPTUNE and VULCAN remain in the defense field, they have lower steady state neutron fluxes. With so many reactors closing, CONSORT has a strong future. In fact, it underpins many research projects, monitoring schemes and power plants - but each provides a relatively small amount of business. The future strategy of the reactor is being reviewed this year. First criticality took place April 1965, and so in parallel, it is important to understand what the residual technical life of the reactor might be. This paper presents the results of an in-service inspection, which took place in August 1999. (author)

  14. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Waqas A; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-01

    Several brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed in chlorinated seawater pools, due to the high concentration of bromide in seawater. UV irradiation is increasingly employed in freshwater pools, because UV treatment photodegrades harmful chloramines. However, in freshwater pools it has been reported that post-UV chlorination promotes the formation of other DBPs. To date, UV-based processes have not been investigated for DBPs in seawater pools. In this study, the effects of UV, followed by chlorination, on the concentration of three groups of DBPs were investigated in laboratory batch experiments using a medium-pressure UV lamp. Chlorine consumption increased following post-UV chlorination, most likely because UV irradiation degraded organic matter in the pool samples to more chlorine-reactive organic matter. Haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations decreased significantly, due to photo-degradation, but the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) increased with post-UV chlorination. Bromine incorporation in HAAs was significantly higher in the control samples chlorinated without UV irradiation but decreased significantly with UV treatment. Bromine incorporation was promoted in THM and HAN after UV and chlorine treatment. Overall, the accumulated bromine incorporation level in DBPs remained essentially unchanged in comparison with the control samples. Toxicity estimates increased with single-dose UV and chlorination, mainly due to increased HAN concentrations. However, brominated HANs are known in the literature to degrade following further UV treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht

    2017-01-01

    experiments using a medium-pressure UV lamp. Chlorine consumption increased following post-UV chlorination, most likely because UV irradiation degraded organic matter in the pool samples to more chlorine-reactive organic matter. Haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations decreased significantly, due to photo...

  16. Spectacular energy technology: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW funds indoor swimming pools as 'process heat'; Energetisch spektakulaer: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW foerdert Schwimmbaeder als 'Prozesswaerme'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Rolf

    2008-11-15

    The ''Panorama-Sauna'' at Grafschaft is a big indoor swimming pool and Sauna centre in a rural region not far from Cologne and Koblenz. The charm of this spectacular solar project is in its minimalism. Conventional solar thermal power systems, in contrast, tend to be complex and prone to failure. (orig.)

  17. Biological treatment of phenolic wastewater in an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firozjaee Taghizade Tahere

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (ACSTR with consortium of mixed culture was operated continuously for a period of 110 days. The experiments were performed with three different hydraulic retention times and by varying initial phenol concentrations between 100 to 1000 mg/L. A maximum phenol removal was observed at a hydraulic retention time (HRT of 4 days, with an organic loading rate (OLR of 170.86 mg/L.d. At this condition, phenol removal rate of 89% was achieved. In addition, the chemical oxygen demand (COD removal corresponds to phenol removal. Additional operating parameters such as pH, MLSS and biogas production rate of the effluents were also measured. The present study provides valuable information to design an anaerobic ACSTR reactor for the biodegradation of phenolic wastewater.

  18. Trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas en cuatro zonas de España participantes en el proyecto INMA Trihalomethanes in swimming pool water in four areas of Spain participating in the INMA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Font-Ribera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: La natación es uno de los deportes más practicados en España, por personas de todas las edades y condiciones físicas. También es una vía de exposición a subproductos de la desinfección, compuestos potencialmente tóxicos. Su concentración en el agua de las piscinas no está legislada y es poco conocida. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir la concentración de trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas de los municipios de cuatro cohortes del estudio INMA. Métodos: En julio de 2009 se analizaron los trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas (n=27 de Asturias, Granada, Valencia y Sabadell. Resultados: La concentración media de trihalometanos totales fue de 42,7µg/l (desviación estándar [DE]=19,1 en las piscinas interiores y de 151,2µg/l (DE=80,7 en las exteriores, predominando siempre el cloroformo. Granada tuvo los valores más bajos. Conclusión: La concentración de trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas presenta una gran variabilidad. Las piscinas exteriores tienen valores más altos, superando mayoritariamente los límites legales establecidos para el agua de consumo.Objective: Swimming is one of the most widely practiced sports in Spain among people of all ages and physical conditions. This activity is also a source of exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP, which are potentially toxic. The DBP concentration in swimming pool water is not regulated and is poorly known. The aim of this study was to describe trihalomethane concentrations in swimming pool water in the municipalities of four cohorts of the INMA project. Methods: In July 2009, trihalomethanes were analyzed in water from 27 swimming pools in Asturias, Granada, Valencia and Sabadell. Results: The mean total trihalomethane concentration was 42.7µg/L (standard deviation [SD]=19.1 in indoor pools and 151.2µg/L (SD=80.7 in outdoor pools. In all pools, the most abundant trihalomethane was always chloroform. The lowest levels were found in Granada. Conclusion

  19. The ISABELLE-4 loop: a PWR testing loop loaded and unloaded in the pool of the Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucot, Michel.

    1982-09-01

    The installation for loading and unloading of fuel pencils in the pool of the Osiris reactor is presented. This installation includes an irradiation loop and an associated loading-unloading device immersed in the pool. The evolution of the characteristics and the conditions of the tested fuel pencils can be followed. Examinations can be made at any time during irradiation. Irradiation conditions can be changed for each irradiation period as a function of results obtained after analysis [fr

  20. Assessment of irradiation effects on beryllium reflector and heavy water tank of JRR-3M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Yoji; Kakehuda, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The JRR-3M, a swimming pool type research reactor with beryllium and heavy water reflectors, has been operated since 1990. Since the beryllium reflectors are close to fuel and receive high fast neutron fluence in a relatively short time, they may be subject to change their dimensions by swelling due mostly to entrapped helium gaseous. This may bend the reflectors to the outside and narrow gaps between the reflectors and the fuel elements. The gaps have been measured with an ultrasonic thickness gage in an annual inspection. The results in 1996 show that the maximum of expansion in the diametral directions was 0.6 mm against 1.6 mm of a managed value for replacement of the reflector. A heavy water tank of the JRR-3M is made of aluminum alloy A5052. Surveillance tests of the alloy have been conducted to evaluate irradiation effects of the heavy water tank. Five sets of specimens of the alloy have been irradiated in the beryllium reflectors where fast neutron flux is higher than that in the heavy water tank. In 1994, one set of specimens had been unloaded and carried out the post-irradiation tests. The results show that the heavy water tank preserved satisfactory mechanical properties. (author)

  1. Frequency and Genotyping of Acanthamoeba Species in the Swimming Pools and Ponds of Khoramabad, Iran, in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faraji

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Acanthamoeba is a free-living and opportunistic amoeba found in the water, soil, and air. This amoeba causes granulomatous amoebic encephalitis in the immunocompromised patients and amoebic keratitis in the people using contact lenses. The genotypes of Acanthamoeba are pathogenic and non-pathogenic. Regarding this, the present study aimed to determine the frequency and genotypes of Acanthamoeba in the water pools and ponds of Khorramabad, Iran, using culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and sequencing methods in 2016. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on a total of 84 water samples collected from the water pools and ponds of Khorramabad. The samples were filtered using nitrocellulose syringe (0.45 μm; subsequently, they were cultured on 1.5% non-nutrient agar, covered by killed Escherichia coli and incubated at 27ºC. After the extraction of DNA from positive samples, PCR was performed using specific primers to detect and confirm Acanthamoeba. Then, for genotyping, the PCR products of positive samples were sequenced. Results: Out of the 84 water samples, 50 (59.5% cases were positive for amoeba in the culture method. However, the results of the PCR revealed 35 (41.7% positive samples for Acanthamoeba. The sequencing of the PCR products demonstrated that 17 samples were T4 genotype (pathogen, and the rest were other Acanthamoeba genotypes. Conclusion: This study indicated the high prevalence of Acanthamoeba species, especially the pathogenic type, in the water pools of Khoramabad that could be a source of infection risk for humans. Regarding the fact that almost half of the found genotypes were pathogenic (genotype T4 that are the main cause of amoebic keratitis, these water bodies could be a potential risk factor for the public health. Therefore, the health professionals should prevent contamination.

  2. Declassification of radioactive water from a pool type reactor after nuclear facility dismantling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, J. M.; Sancho, M.; García-Fayos, B.; Verdú, G.; Serrano, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work is aimed to the treatment of the radioactive water from a dismantled nuclear facility with an experimental pool type reactor. The main objective of the treatment is to declassify the maximum volume of water and thus decrease the volume of radioactive liquid waste to be managed. In a preliminary stage, simulation of treatment by the combination of reverse osmosis (RO) and evaporation have been performed. Predicted results showed that the combination of membrane and evaporation technologies would result in a volume reduction factor higher than 600. The estimated time to complete the treatment was around 650 h (25-30 days). For different economical and organizational reasons which are explained in this paper, the final treatment of the real waste had to be reduced and only evaporation was applied. The volume reduction factor achieved in the real treatment was around 170, and the time spent for treatment was 194 days.

  3. Degradation mechanisms in pool-storage and handling of spent power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterlund, G.; Olsson, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report deals with potential mechanisms for the degradation of light water reactor fuel in water pool storage. The assessment is made that neither general corrosion, local corrosion, stress corrosion nor hydrogen embrittlement will cause any significant degradation of the fuel and the fuel cladding within 50 years of storage. It is also concluded that no hazard is involved in storing defective fuel in the same manner as non-defective fuel as the degradation will not continue at low temperatures and the water leaching of fission products in the fuel is slow. It is also shown in the report how other activated materials in the fuel assemblies safely can be taken care of. (author)

  4. SPARC fast reactor design : Design of two passively safe metal-fuelled sodium-cooled pool-type small modular fast reactors with Autonomous Reactivity Control

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this master thesis a small modular sodium-cooled metal-fuelled pool-type fast reactor design, called SPARC - Safe and Passive with Autonomous Reactivity control, has been designed. The long term reactivity changes in the SPARC are managed by implementation of the the Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system, which is the novelty of the design. The overall design is mainly based on the Integral Fast Reactor project (IFR), which experimentally demonstrated the passive safety characteristic...

  5. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  6. Radiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank from the Shippingport reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of neutron shield tank (NST) material (A212 Grade B steel) from the Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Irradiation increases the Charpy transition temperature (CTT) by 23--28{degrees}C (41--50{degrees}F) and decreases the upper-shelf energy. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) surveillance specimens. However, the actual value of the CTT is higher than that for the HFIR data. The increase in yield stress is 51 MPa (7.4 ksi), which is comparable to HFIR data. The NST material is weaker in the transverse orientation than in the longitudinal orientation. Some effects of position across the thickness of the wall are also observed; the CTT shift is slightly greater for specimens from the inner region of the wall. Annealing studies indicate complete recovery from embrittlement after 1 h at 400{degrees}C (752{degrees}F). Although the weld metal is significantly tougher than the base metal, the shifts in CTT are comparable. The shifts in CTT for the Shippingport NST are consistent with the test and Army reactor data for irradiations at <232{degrees}C (<450{degrees}F) and show very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence rate, and neutron flux spectrum are discussed. The results indicate that fluence rate has no effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s and at the low operating temperatures of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C (130{degrees}F). This suggests that the accelerated embrittlement of HFIR surveillance samples is most likely due to the relatively higher proportion of thermal neutrons in the HFIR spectrum compared to that for the test reactors. 28 refs., 25 figs.

  7. Feasibility analysis of the Primary Loop of Pool-Type Natural Circulating Nuclear Reactor Dedicated to Seawater Desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woonho; Jeong, Yong Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the feasibility of natural circulation was evaluated for the reference plant AHR400 (Advanced Heating Reactor 400MWth). AHR400 is a pool-type desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor. As a consequence, AHR400 has low operating pressure and temperature which provides large safety margin. Removal of the reactor coolant pump from the AHR400 will enforce integrity of the reactor vessel and passive safety feature. Therefore, the study also tried to find out optimized primary loop design to achieve total natural circulation of the coolant. Natural circulation capacity of the primary loop of the desalination dedicated nuclear reactor AHR400 was evaluated. It was concluded that to remove RCP from the AHR400 and operates the reactor only by natural circulation of the coolant is impossible. Decreased core power as half make removal of RCP possible with 15m central height difference between the core and IHXs. Furthermore, validation and modification of pressure loss coefficients by small-scaled natural circulation experiment at a pool-type reactor would provide more accurate results.

  8. The radionuclides of primary coolant in HANARO and the recent activities performed to reduce the radioactivity or reactor pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjin [HANARO Research Reactor Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    In HANARO reactor, there have been activities to identify the principal radionuclides and to quantify them under the normal operation. The purposes of such activities were to establish the measure by which we can reduce the radioactivity of the reactor pool water and detect, in early stage, the abnormal symptoms due to the leakage of radioactive materials from the irradiation sample or the damage of the nuclear fuel, etc. The typical radionuclides produced by the activation of reactor coolant are N{sup 16} and Ar{sup 41}. The radionuclides produced by the activation of the core structural material consist of Na{sup 24}, Mn{sup 56}, and W{sup 187}. Of the various radionuclides, governing the radiation level at the pool surface are Na{sup 24}, Ar{sup 41}, Mn{sup 58}, and W{sup 187}. By establishing the hot water layer system on the pool surface, we expected that the radionuclides such as Ar{sup 41} and Mn{sup 56} whose half-life are relatively short could be removed to a certain extent. Since the content of radioactivity of Na{sup 24} occupies about 60% of the total radioactivity, we assumed that the total radiation level would be greatly reduced if we could decrease the radiation level of Na{sup 24}. However the actual radiation level has not been reduced as much as we expected. Therefore, some experiments have been carried out to find the actual causes afterwards. What we learned through the experiments are that any disturbance in reactor pool water layer causes increase of the pool surface radiation level and even if we maintain the hot water layer well, reactor shutdown will be very much likely to happen once the hot water layer is disturbed. (author)

  9. Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification for the production of margarine fats in a 1 kg scale stirred tank reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hong; Xu, Xuebing; Mu, Huiling

    2000-01-01

    Lipozyme IM-catalyzed interesterification of the oil blend between palm stearin and coconut oil (75/25 w/w) was studied for the production of margarine fats in a 1 kg scale batch stirred tank reactor. Parameters such as lipase load, water content, temperature, and reaction time were investigated...

  10. Nonlinear versus Ordinary Adaptive Control of Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtesek, Jiri; Dostal, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Unfortunately, the major group of the systems in industry has nonlinear behavior and control of such processes with conventional control approaches with fixed parameters causes problems and suboptimal or unstable control results. An adaptive control is one way to how we can cope with nonlinearity of the system. This contribution compares classic adaptive control and its modification with Wiener system. This configuration divides nonlinear controller into the dynamic linear part and the static nonlinear part. The dynamic linear part is constructed with the use of polynomial synthesis together with the pole-placement method and the spectral factorization. The static nonlinear part uses static analysis of the controlled plant for introducing the mathematical nonlinear description of the relation between the controlled output and the change of the control input. Proposed controller is tested by the simulations on the mathematical model of the continuous stirred-tank reactor with cooling in the jacket as a typical nonlinear system.

  11. Comparison of Two Identification Models Used in Adaptive Control of Continuous-Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtesek Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to compare two identification methods – continuous-time and discrete-time. The continuous-time identification model is more accurate but not very suitable for on-line identification. This disadvantage was overcome with the use of differential filters. On the other hand, discrete-time identification model has is more suitable for identification but less accurate. Compromise can be found in the delta model as a special type of the discrete-time model parameters of which are related to the sampling period. The adaptive approach is based on the choice of the External Linear Model, parameters of which are identified recursively which satisfies the adaptivity of this system. Proposed control strategy was applied on the mathematical model of the Continuous Stirred-Tank reactor as a typical nonlinear lumped-parameters system used in the industry.

  12. Genetic Algorithm Based PID Controller Tuning Approach for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jayachitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithm (GA based PID (proportional integral derivative controller has been proposed for tuning optimized PID parameters in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR process using a weighted combination of objective functions, namely, integral square error (ISE, integral absolute error (IAE, and integrated time absolute error (ITAE. Optimization of PID controller parameters is the key goal in chemical and biochemical industries. PID controllers have narrowed down the operating range of processes with dynamic nonlinearity. In our proposed work, globally optimized PID parameters tend to operate the CSTR process in its entire operating range to overcome the limitations of the linear PID controller. The simulation study reveals that the GA based PID controller tuned with fixed PID parameters provides satisfactory performance in terms of set point tracking and disturbance rejection.

  13. Performance of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) on fermentative biohydrogen production from melon waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyari, K.; Sarto; Syamsiah, S.; Prasetya, A.

    2016-11-01

    This research was meant to investigate performance of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) as bioreactor for producing biohydrogen from melon waste through dark fermentation method. Melon waste are commonly generated from agricultural processing stages i.e. cultivation, post-harvesting, industrial processing, and transportation. It accounted for more than 50% of total harvested fruit. Feedstock of melon waste was fed regularly to CSTR according to organic loading rate at value 1.2 - 3.6 g VS/ (l.d). Optimum condition was achieved at OLR 2.4 g VS/ (l.d) with the highest total gas volume 196 ml STP. Implication of higher OLR value is reduction of total gas volume due to accumulation of acids (pH 4.0), and lower substrate volatile solid removal. In summary, application of this method might valorize melon waste and generates renewable energy sources.

  14. Study on the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR including fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, K.; Ito, T.; Fujita, K.; Kurihara, C.; Sawada, Y.; Sakurai, A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR with fluid-structure interaction. The reactor vessel has bottom support arrangement, the same core support system as Super-Phenix in France. Due to the bottom support arrangement, the level of core support is lower than that of the side support arrangement. So, in this reactor vessel, the displacement of the core top tends to increase because of the core's rocking. In this study, we investigated the vibration and seismic response characteristics of the reactor vessel. Therefore, the seismic experiments were carried out using one-eighth scale model and the seismic response including FSI and sloshing were investigated. From this study, the effect of liquid on the vibration characteristics and the seismic response characteristics of reactor vessel were clarified and sloshing characteristics were also clarified. It was confirmed that FEM analysis with FSI can reproduce the seismic behavior of the reactor vessel and is applicable to seismic design of the pool type LMFBR with bottom support arrangement. (author). 5 refs, 14 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Evaluation of Total Coliform, Fecal Coliform and Residual Chlorine in Swimming Pools in Kermanshah on the Season, the type of Pool, Disinfection System and Source of Water Supply in the during of three years (2010-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K SHarafi

    2014-11-01

    From the results , although the pools of water quality parameters has been studied in almost ideal But in summer, especially on a female pools and pools with wells water supply source than other pools , to be more oversight .

  16. Potential market and characteristics of low-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    1975-01-01

    The low-temperature (100 to 200 deg C) heat market for industrial applications and district heating is very important. Two main studies have been developed: a swimming pool reactor delivering water at 110 deg C and a prestressed concrete vessel reactor delivering water at 200 deg C [fr

  17. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Eighteenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 16-19 April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Meeting on the Status of National Programmes in Member States of the IAEA on Fast Breeder Reactors had been held in April 1985. The representatives of the Member States and international organizations reported status and activities in the field of fast breeder reactors development and operation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 12 presentations of the meeting

  18. [Management of infectious risk associated with therapeutic pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, C; Gardes, S; Tasseau, F

    2004-06-01

    There is no specific legislation concerning pools and others medical hydrotherapy equipments relating hygiene and security rules. For this reason, the hydrotherapy pools use the public swimming pools legislation. This article is based on literature review (database Medline and Embase--manual research). This article offers a review of pool associated infections along with the description of the measures designed to minimise the possible transmission of infection during hydrotherapy activities such as: Technical measures: pool and premises conception, water treatments, feed tanks, air quality. Hygiene rules for patients and hospital staff and pathologies which are contra-indications to hydrotherapy activities. Microbiological and physico-chemical monitoring. The infectious risk remains low with therapeutic pools. However, the development of specific legislation and surveillance should be enhanced. All these measures are part of the quality assurance program that must be implemented to control the safety of these installations.

  19. Migration of activation products in discharges pool in T.H.O.R. nuclear research reactor site boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.; Chan, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Due to material degradation in tubing, the heat exchanger for the primary coolant of the 1 MW Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor(THOR) has minor leakage to the secondary cooling system since 1970. In the past twenty years, trace amount of Co-58, 60, Cr-51, Cs-137, Mn-54, Sc-46, and Zn-65 have been leaked through the cooling system, accumulated and trapped eventually in the discharge pool right in front of the THOR facility. The distribution of these activation products in mud at different depths and various locations in the pool was measured with standard procedures of radioactive soil sampling and counting techniques. Concentration of activation products, with no more than 40 kBq/kg. dry at the hottest spot, was contour-mapped to reveal the migration of these trace level radioactive products in a period of 20 years

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a heavy-water reactor moderator tank using the CUPID Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Su Ryong; Jeong, Jae Jun [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Han Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a preliminary analysis is performed for the CANDU moderator tank. The calculation results using the basic case input showed a unrealistic, thermal stratification in the upper region, which was caused by the lack of the momentum of the cooling water from the inlet nozzle. To increase the flow momentum from the inlet nozzle, the cross-section area of each inlet nozzle was reduced by half and, then, the calculation showed very realistic results. It is clear that the modeling of the inlet nozzle affects the calculation result significantly. Further studies are needed for a realistic and efficient simulation of the flow in the Calandria tank. When the core cooling system fails to remove the decay heat from the fuel channels during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the pressure tube (PT) could strain to contact its surrounding Calandria tube (CT), which leads to sustained CTs dry out, finally resulting in damages to nuclear fuel. This situation can occur when the degree of the subcooling of the moderator inside the Calandria vessel is insufficient. In this regard, to estimate the local subcooling of the moderator inside the Calandria vessel is very important. However, the local temperature is measured at the inlet and outlet of the vessel only. Therefore, we need to accurately predict the local temperature inside the Calandria vessel.In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the real-scale heavy-water reactor moderator is carried out using the CUPID code. The applicability of the CUPID code to the analysis of the flow in the Calandria vessel has been assessed in the previous studies.

  1. Bioleaching of uranium in batch stirred tank reactor: Process optimization using Box–Behnken design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisapour, M.; Keshtkar, A.; Moosavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► High amount of uranium recovery achieved using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. ► ANOVA shows individual variables and their squares are statistically significant. ► The model can accurately predict the behavior of uranium recovery. ► The model shows that pulp density has the greatest effect on uranium recovery. - Abstract: To design industrial reactors, it is important to identify and optimize the effective parameters of the process. Therefore, in this study, a three-level Box–Behnken factorial design was employed combining with a response surface methodology to optimize pulp density, agitation speed and aeration rate in uranium bioleaching in a stirred tank reactor using a pure native culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. A mathematical model was then developed by applying the least squares method using the software Minitab Version 16.1.0. The second order model represents the uranium recovery as a function of pulp density, agitation speed and aeration rate. An analysis of variance was carried out to investigate the effects of individual variables and their combined interactive effects on uranium recovery. The results showed that the linear and quadratic terms of variables were statistically significant whilst the interaction terms were statistically insignificant. The model estimated that a maximum uranium extraction (99.99%) could be obtained when the pulp density, agitation speed and aeration rate were set at optimized values of 5.8% w/v, 510 rpm and 250 l/h, respectively. A confirmatory test at the optimum conditions resulted in a uranium recovery of 95%, indicating a marginal error of 4.99%. Furthermore, control tests were performed to demonstrate the effect of A. ferrooxidans in uranium bioleaching process and showed that the addition of this microorganism greatly increases the uranium recovery

  2. AFRRI TRIGA Reactor water quality monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Mark; George, Robert; Spence, Harry; Nguyen, John

    1992-01-01

    AFRRI has started a water quality monitoring program to provide base line data for early detection of tank leaks. This program revealed problems with growth of algae and bacteria in the pool as a result of contamination with nitrogenous matter. Steps have been taken to reduce the nitrogen levels and to kill and remove algae and bacteria from the reactor pool. (author)

  3. Bakteri Legionella pneumophila Terdeteksi pada Air Kolam Renang di Kota Surabaya dengan Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA BACTERIADETECTED IN SWIMMING POOL WATER OF SURABAYA BY USING NESTED POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardus Bimo Aksono

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacillus that causes nosocomial and community-acquired pneumonia. The aim of this research was to detect the presence of bacteria of L. pneumophila species in the swimming pools water of Surabaya city by using nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assay of a specific gene for L. pneumophila (mip gene. This study used purposive sampling method. A total of 10 water samples were collected from five swimming pools consisting of 200 mL water for each swimming pool. The results showed that of 10 samples tested by nested PCR, one sample was positive for L. pneumophila, and nine samples were negative. L. pneumophila were found in pool water samples with a higher temperature (>30ºC.Serogrouping analysis of positive sample that L. pneumophila bacteria detected in the water sample of swimming pool in Surabaya was L. pneumophila serogroup 9 (98% and serogroup 10 (98%. L. pneumophila detection of bacteria is expected to raise the awareness of physician and microbiologists about the transmission of L. pneumophila and will also be useful for controlling the agents. ABSTRAK Legionella pneumophila adalah bakteri Gram-negatif berbentuk batang yang dapat menyebabkan penyakit nosokomial dan pneumonia. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mendeteksi keberadaan bakteri L. pneumophila pada air kolam renang di Kota Surabaya dengan menggunakan nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR berbasis gen spesifik L. pneumophila (mip gene. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode purposive sampling. Sebanyak sepuluh sampel diambil dari lima kolam renang. Sampel diambil sebanyak 200 mL dari air kolam renang di setiap lokasi. Hasil dari 10 sampel yang diuji menggunakan nested PCR, satu sampel menunjukkan hasil positif untuk L.pneumophila, dan sembilan sampel menunjukkan hasil negatif. Bakteri L. pneumophila ditemukan pada sampel air kolam dengan suhu yang lebih tinggi (>30ºC. Satu sampel positip tersebut ketika dilanjutkan terhadap analisis serogrup

  4. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MW t h, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co 60 ) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200 Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N 16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  5. Two-component HLMC-gas flow instability and inhomogeneity phenomena in open-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergey I Shcherbakov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Consideration is being given to two-component gas-liquid flows with inhomogeneous gas content. The inhomogeneity of gas content over flow space can be caused by local mixing of gas and liquid, gas injection, gas-containing liquid jet penetration into the bulk of liquid without gas. The paper presents the computational results obtained using the direct non-stationary calculation with the TURBO-FLOW computer code. The results refer to flows near the liquid level, flows in downcomer gaps, collectors, elements with varying geometry (jet outlet into space, flow turn) for the pool-type reactors and experimental models. The following processes have been shown and discussed: formation of new liquid levels, entrainment of gas from the level, change in density composition of gas, flow stratification, effect of gas emergence rate and density convection on flow pattern. At gas phase transfer by liquid, two phenomena governing this transfer proceed: gas slip in liquid and density convection of non-uniformly aerated liquid. In horizontal flows, a vertical stratification of gas content always occurs. If the flow changes its direction to an upward one (collector at core inlet), the gas content maximum would be observed in channels nearest to the inlet. At the liquid level, the processes of gas separation from liquid and gas entrainment take place. The separation is a self-sustained process due to circulations arising near the level. The rate of gas entrainment is proportional to the rate of overflow and inversely proportional to the height of liquid level. At the downcomer region in case of its expansion, there occurs the instability of flow resulting in formation of liquid level and falling jet. The level is lower the more the gas content at inlet. The accumulation of gas occurs at sharp turns, encumbered regions (tube bundle), at all regions with upper (ceiling) constraints of flow. The flow instability being often observed in gas-liquid flows

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors During Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Jensen, Mette; Ingildsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Aeration Tank Settling is a control method alowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration Tank Settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plant's using present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have...... shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. The paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...

  7. A model for the analysis of loss of decay heat removal accident in MTR pool type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousbia-Salah, A.

    2005-01-01

    During a loss of coolant accident leading to total emptying of the reactor pool, the decay heat could be removed through air natural convection. However, under partial pool emptying the core is partially submerged and the coolant circulation inside the fuel element could no more be possible. In such conditions, a core overheat take place, and the heat is essentially diffused from the core to its periphery by combined thermal radiation and conduction. In order to predict fuel element temperature evolution under such conditions a mathematical model is performed. The model is based on a three dimensional geometry and takes into account a variety of core configurations including fuel elements (standard and control), reflector elements and grid plates. The homogeneous flow model is used and the time and space dependent non-linear partial differential fluid conservation equations are solved using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Preliminary tests of the developed model were made by considering a series of hypothetical accidents. In the current framework a loss of decay heat removal accidents in the IAEA benchmark open pool MTR-type research reactor is considered. It is shown that in the case of a low core immersion height no water boiling is observed and the fuel surface temperature rise remains below the melting point of the aluminium cladding. (author)

  8. An Assessment of Fission Product Scrubbing in Sodium Pools Following a Core Damage Event in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, M.; Farmer, M.; Grabaskas, D.

    2017-06-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that mechanistic source term (MST) calculations are expected to be required as part of the advanced reactor licensing process. A recent study by Argonne National Laboratory has concluded that fission product scrubbing in sodium pools is an important aspect of an MST calculation for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To model the phenomena associated with sodium pool scrubbing, a computational tool, developed as part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, was utilized in an MST trial calculation. This tool was developed by applying classical theories of aerosol scrubbing to the decontamination of gases produced as a result of postulated fuel pin failures during an SFR accident scenario. The model currently considers aerosol capture by Brownian diffusion, inertial deposition, and gravitational sedimentation. The effects of sodium vapour condensation on aerosol scrubbing are also treated. This paper provides details of the individual scrubbing mechanisms utilized in the IFR code as well as results from a trial mechanistic source term assessment led by Argonne National Laboratory in 2016.

  9. Swimming performance in surf: the influence of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M; Reilly, T; Rees, A; Spray, G; Golden, F

    2008-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis (H1) that surf swimming involves a quantifiable experience component. Sixty-five beach lifeguards with (n = 35) and without surf experience (n = 30) completed: a best effort 200-m swim in a 25-m pool, a calm and a surf sea; an anthropometric survey; maximum effort 30-s swim bench test; 50-m pool swim (25 m underwater). In both groups, time to swim 200 m was slower in calm seas than in the pool and slower in surf than in either calm seas or the pool (p surf conditions (p surf experience as a predictor of surf swim time (R(2) = 0.32, p surf swimming. This limits the usefulness of pool swim times and other land-based tests as predictors of surf swimming performance. The hypothesis (H1) is accepted.

  10. Defluoridation of drinking water by electrocoagulation/electroflotation in a stirred tank reactor with a comparative performance to an external-loop airlift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essadki, A H; Gourich, B; Vial, Ch; Delmas, H; Bennajah, M

    2009-09-15

    Defluoridation using batch electrocoagulation/electroflotation (EC/EF) was carried out in two reactors for comparison purpose: a stirred tank reactor (STR) close to a conventional EC cell and an external-loop airlift reactor (ELAR) that was recently described as an innovative reactor for EC. The respective influences of current density, initial concentration and initial pH on the efficiency of defluoridation were investigated. The same trends were observed in both reactors, but the efficiency was higher in the STR at the beginning of the electrolysis, whereas similar values were usually achieved after 15min operation. The influence of the initial pH was explained using the analyses of sludge composition and residual soluble aluminum species in the effluents, and it was related to the prevailing mechanisms of defluoridation. Fluoride removal and sludge reduction were both favored by an initial pH around 4, but this value required an additional pre-treatment for pH adjustment. Finally, electric energy consumption was similar in both reactors when current density was lower than 12mA/cm(2), but mixing and complete flotation of the pollutants were achieved without additional mechanical power in the ELAR, using only the overall liquid recirculation induced by H(2) microbubbles generated by water electrolysis, which makes subsequent treatments easier to carry out.

  11. Study of Maximum Swimming Speed Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus) for Fisheries Management

    OpenAIRE

    Primeswari, Ridha; ', Nofrizal; Sari, T. Ersti Yulika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the swimming speed of the free swimming intank and flume tank, an outdoor durability of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and maximumswimming speed tilapia in flume tank. Therefore, to use experimental methods. Free swimmingspeed was 0,25 BL/sec, maximum swimming speed of fish occurs when the fish are given ashock to swim. Negative correlation between speed and endurance swimming R2 = 0,7295 showsa fish swimming endurance decreases at higher speeds. S...

  12. The life-extension and upgrade program of the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) and its research prospectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, J.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor (THOR) has been operated for thirty years. It is the regulations of the ROCAEC that any reactor shall be decommissioned after forty-year operation since the first fuel loading. Therefore, for extending the lifetime of THOR, it is necessary to have a life-extension program to be approved by the ROCAEC and also completed by the year of 1997. At the same time, for proceeding new research purposes, it is planed to upgrade the thermal power of THOR from 1 Wth up to 3 Wth and hopefully to reach the maximum thermal neutron flux of 5x10 13 n/cm 2 .s and the fast flux close to that order. New research directions involve (a) boron-captured neutron cancer therapy (BNCT) (b) small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). (author)

  13. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Esteban Naudin, A.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-01-01

    The analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 Mwt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E. is included. A short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental cheking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-1 and JEN-2 of Junta de Energia Nuclear, is given in each of these chapters. (author) [es

  14. Analysis of Transient Performance of KALIMER-600 Reactor Pool by Changing the Elevation of Intermediate Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Woong; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Seong O

    2010-01-01

    The effect of increasing the elevation of an IHX (intermediate heat exchanger) on the transient performance of the KALIMER-600 reactor pool during the early phase of a loss of normal heat sink accident was investigated. Three reactors equipped with IHXs that were elevated to different heights were designed, and the thermal-hydraulic analyses were carried out for the steady and transient state by using the COMMIX-1AR/P code. In order to analyze the effects of the elevation of an IHX between reactors, various thermal-hydraulic properties such as mass flow rate, core peak temperature, RmfQ (ratio of mass flow over Q) and initiation time of decay heat removal via DHX (decay heat exchanger) were evaluated. It was found that with an increase in the IHX elevation, the circulation flow rate increases and a steep rise in the core peak temperature under the same coastdown flow condition is prevented without a delay in the initiation of the second stage of cooling. The available coastdown flow range in the reactor could be increased by increasing the elevation of the IHX

  15. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  16. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  17. Description of the RA-3 research reactor as a model facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, Hugo E.; Quintana, Jorge A.

    2001-01-01

    The Argentine RA-3 reactor is described as a model facility for the information to be provided to the IAEA in accordance with the requirements of the Model Additional Protocol. RA-3 reactor was designed as a 5 MW swimming pool reactor, moderated and cooled with light water. Its fuel was 90% enriched uranium. The reactor started its operation in 1967, has been modified and improved in many components, including the core, that now is fueled with moderately enriched uranium

  18. The solar heating system of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland; Installation solaire thermique. Complexe sportif de la piscine de Guillamo - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy describes the refurbishment and the extension of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland. The original building built in 1978 included three swimming pools (two indoor and one small outdoor). In 2005 a three-room fitness centre, a wellness centre and a bar were added to the compound and the old building and technical installations refurbished. At the same time a 591 m{sup 2} solar collector array was added. Unglazed selective solar absorbers were mounted on the 5{sup o} tilted flat roof. They insure at the same time the water tightness of the roof, a feature that lead to a significant cost reduction of the project. Before 2005 the natural gas consumption of the centre was 1.3 to 1.7 GWh/year. After the construction work the consumption was about 1.6 GWh, including a contribution of 0.06 GWh from the solar collectors. This last figure is disappointing. The reasons for this are mainly attributed by the authors to a very poor integration of the solar collectors into the conventional heat generation and distribution system, which do not enable the solar collectors to deliver the heat quantity they should. Changes should be made on the hydraulics of the whole system and on the control algorithms and settings.

  19. The use and evolution of the CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossillon, F.; Chauvez, C.

    1964-01-01

    organic liquids under irradiation. The equipments of Melusine are now being modernized. Siloe, another swimming-pool reactor, has been operating at 15 MW since the end of 1963. The performances achieved constitute a considerable progress in the field of swimming-pool reactors, since the fluxes obtained with Siloe are in the same order of magnitude than those which needed till now a tank type structure, whose numerous disadvantages in the fitting of experiments are well known. Siloe will be used mostly in the study of structural materials, graphites, refractory fissile materials, and for solid state physics. The reactor Pegase, in service in the Cadarache Nuclear Centre since 1963, is intended solely for testing full-scale fuel elements of EDF and EL 4 types. The current programme, for the eight loops of the reactor, covers the elements for the reactors EDF 2, EDF 3 and EL 4. New loops are in the course of being studied for the fuel elements of the EDF 4 and EDF 5 reactors. The general line of the CEA programmes has shown up the considerable need for fast neutron irradiations. The reactor Osiris which is in the course of being constructed will serve to complement the CEA's equipment in this field and at the same time fill the gap which will be left in the near future in the Centre de Saclay by the closing down of EL 2. Osiris is a light water reactor whose special structure will allow it to function at 50 MW without the disadvantages usually associated with the presence of a heavy waterproof tank. This reactor, which should be put into service in 1966, is mainly intended for the investigation of structural materials, graphite and refractory fuels; it will also serve to increase the production of high specific activity isotopes, and to develop activation analysis techniques. (authors) [fr

  20. Criteria for recladding of spent light water reactor fuel before long term pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Jansson, L.

    1979-01-01

    The question of the need for any special treatment of failed fuel elements prior to long term pool storage has been studied. It is concluded that the main problem appears to be hydride embrittlement of failed fuel rods, which may lead to increased damage during handling and transport of the failed fuel. Some mechanisms for the degradation of failed fuel rods have been identified. They can all be considered as relatively improbable, but further experimental evidence is needed before it can be concluded that these degradation mechanisms are insignificant during pool storage. The report also contains a review of methods for identification of leaking fuel bundles and fuel rods. (Auth.)

  1. Criteria for recladding of spent light water reactor fuel before long term pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Jansson, L.

    1979-06-01

    The question of the need for any special treatment of failed fuel elements prior to long term pool storage has been studied. It is concluded that the main problem appears to be hydride embrittlement of failed fuel rods, which may lead to increased damage during handling and transport of the failed fuel. Some mechanisms for the degradation of failed fuel rods have been identified. They can all be considered as relatively improbable, but further experimental evidence is needed before it can be concluded that thede degradation mechanisms are insignificant during pool storage. The report also contains a review of methods for identification of leaking fuel bundles and fuel rods.(author)

  2. Corrosion in the aluminum containment tank at the Nuclear Center of Mexico TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Juan Ramon

    1986-01-01

    The reactor developed a leak inside the exposure room discovered when it was opened for a routine inspection. This leak started to diminish immediately after it was found and disappeared completely in 2.5 months. The hydrostatic tests of the exposure room cooling water pipes and of the primary cooling system suction pipe proved that piping do not have leaks. A portion of the total volume of water was drained from the pool to conduct an inspection on the aluminum liner. Penetrant dye tests were initiated over welded Joints and walls. Welded Joints were all found to be in good condition but a total of 35 indications were reported on walls and concentrated on two main areas. A vacuum system was used to test for leakage. Seven indications were found to be perforations that crossed through the wall, fifteen indications did not cross through the wall but required repair and the rest were superficial irregularities. For the inspection of surfaces that remained covered by water, two methods were used. One was a television camera that was adapted to be used under water and hooked to a monitor and a videorecorder for close up inspection of the walls. The other consisted of submarine still color photography performed by divers. The evaluation of these inspections concluded that out of the 10 areas previously identified, only one presented the kind of problem that required repair. The last inspection performed was that using ultrasound techniques. Irregularities found did not require complete replacement of the aluminum liner. The repair procedures included the welding of aluminum plates over damaged areas and the injection of an effective insulating material (resin) to stop the corrosion mechanism

  3. Evaluation of decentralized treatment of sewage employing Upflow Septic Tank/Baffled Reactor (USBR) in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabry, Tarek, E-mail: tsabry@consultant.com [Ain Shams University, Department of Public Works Engineering, Abbasia, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-02-15

    A new concept for a low-cost modified septic tank, named Upflow Septic Tank/Baffled Reactor (USBR), was constructed and tested in a small village in Egypt. During almost one year of continuous operation and monitoring, this system was found to have very satisfactory removal results, where the average results of COD, BOD, and TSS removal efficiencies were 84%, 81%, and 89%, respectively, and the results of the experiment proved that the second compartment (Anaerobic Baffled Reactor) was the main treatment unit in removing the pollutants during the start-up period and at the very early steady-state stage. However, after this period and during the steady-state operation conditions, the second compartment served as a polishing step. Also, it was observed that the USBR system was not affected by the imposed shock loads at the peak flow and organic periods. The results showed that the system is slightly influenced by the drop in the temperature. Decreasing in BOD and COD removal by factor of 9% was observed, when temperature decreases from the average of 35 deg. C in summer time (for the first 127 days) to the average of 22 deg. C in winter time (between day 252 and day 280). Whereas, the TSS removals were not affected by the drop in temperature. The results of the sewage flow variations during one year of operation were compared with Goodrich Formula to see the applicability of this equation in rural developing countries. Main finding of the work: The Upflow Septic Tank/Baffled Reactor system could become a promising alternative to the conventional treatment plants in rural developing countries.

  4. Seismic analysis of a large pool-type LMR [liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic study of a 450-MWe liquid metal reactor (LMR) under 0.3-g SSE ground excitation. Two calculations were performed using the new design configuration. They deal with the seismic response of the reactor vessel, the guard vessel and support skirt, respectively. In both calculations, the stress and displacement fields at important locations of those components are investigated. Assessments are also made on the elastic and inelastic structural capabilities for other beyond-design basis seismic loads. Results of the reactor vessel analysis reveal that the maximum equivalent stress is only about half of the material yield stress. For the guard vessel and support skirt, the stress level is very small. Regarding the analysis if inelastic structural capability, solutions of the Newmark-Hall ductility modification method show that the reactor vessel can withstand seismics with ground ZPAs ranging from 1.015 to 1.31 g, which corresponds to 3.37 to 4.37 times the basic 0.3-g SSE. Thus, the reactor vessel and guard vessel are strong enough to resist seismic loads. 4 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Validation of the tanks-in series with recycle model for mixing characterization in anchor-agitated batch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Catasus, Judith; Abreu Diaz, Aida Mary; Mc Calla, Rogelio; Ortueta Milan, Marvic; Perez Machado, Esperanza; Borroto Portela, Jorge

    1998-01-01

    Presently work settles down the fitness of the tanks-in-series with recycle model for describing the blending in a 100 liters anchor-agitated batch reactor. This model is used to establish the relationship between the mixing-rate number and the Reynolds number The basic information needed was obtained from the curves that record the counting rate variations of the 99mT c with time, during the mixing process. The mixing-rate number shows a tendency to a constant value of 7,8 within the Reynolds range between 4,78x10 4 and 2,68x10 5

  6. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaruoka, Hiromitsu.

    1994-01-01

    A high pressure water injection recycling system comprising injection pipelines of a high pressure water injection system and a flow rate control means in communication with a pool of a pressure control chamber is disposed to a feedwater system of a BWR type reactor. In addition, the flow rate control means is controlled by a power control device comprising a scram impossible transient event judging section, a required injection flow rate calculation section for high pressure water injection system and a control signal calculation section. Feed water flow rate to be supplied to the reactor is controlled upon occurrence of a scram impossible transient event of the reactor. The scram impossible transient event is judged based on reactor output signals and scram operation demand signals and injection flow rate is calculated based on a predetermined reactor water level, and condensate storage tank water or pressure control chamber pool water is injected to the reactor. With such procedures, water level can be ensured and power can be suppressed. Further, condensate storage tank water of low enthalpy is introduced to the pressure suppression chamber pool to directly control elevation of water temperature and ensure integrity of the pressure vessel and the reactor container. (N.H.)

  7. Safety aspects of the cleaning and conditioning of radioactive sludge from spent fuel storage pool on 'RA' Research reactor in the Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R; Pavlovic, S.; Plecas, I.

    1999-01-01

    Spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors in the Vinca Institute have been temporary stored in water filled storage pool. Due to the fact that the water in the spent fuel elements storage pool have not been purified for a long time, all metallic components submerged in the water have been hardly corroded and significant amount of the sludge has been settled on the bottom of the pool. As a first step in improving spent fuel elements storage conditions and slowing down corrosion in the storage spent fuel elements pool we have decided to remove the sludge from the bottom of the pool. Although not high, but slightly radioactive, this sludge had to be treated as radioactive waste material. Some safety aspects and radiation protection measures in the process of the spent fuel storage pool cleaning are presented in this paper

  8. Linear and Non-linear Multi-Input Multi-Output Model Predictive Control of Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muayad Al-Qaisy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, multi-input multi-output (MIMO linear model predictive controller (LMPC based on state space model and nonlinear model predictive controller based on neural network (NNMPC are applied on a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR. The idea is to have a good control system that will be able to give optimal performance, reject high load disturbance, and track set point change. In order to study the performance of the two model predictive controllers, MIMO Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller (PID strategy is used as benchmark. The LMPC, NNMPC, and PID strategies are used for controlling the residual concentration (CA and reactor temperature (T. NNMPC control shows a superior performance over the LMPC and PID controllers by presenting a smaller overshoot and shorter settling time.

  9. Designing an enzymatic oscillator: Bistability and feedback controlled oscillations with glucose oxidase in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanag, Vladimir K.; Míguez, David G.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2006-11-01

    The reaction of glucose with ferricyanide catalyzed by glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger gives rise to a wide range of bistability as the flow rate is varied in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor. Oscillations in pH can be obtained by introducing a negative feedback on the autocatalytic production of H+ that drives the bistability. In our experiments, this feedback consists of an inflow of hydroxide ion at a rate that depends on [H+] in the reactor as k0[OH-]0[H+]/(K+[H+]). pH oscillations are found over a broad range of enzyme and ferricyanide concentrations, residence times (k0-1), and feedback parameters. A simple mathematical model quantitatively accounts for the experimentally found oscillations.

  10. Production of L(+)-lactic acid using acid-adapted precultures of Rhizopus arrhizus in a stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhan Ying; Jin, Bo; Kelly, Joan M

    2008-06-01

    Cultivations of filamentous fungi in stirred tank reactors (STRs) to produce metabolites are often limited by insufficient mixing and mass transfer because of the formation of mycelial clumps inside the reactors. This study developed an acid-adapted preculture approach to control the morphology of filamentous Rhizopus arrhizus in a STR, consequently to enhance the production yield and productivity of L(+)-lactic acid efficiently using waste potato starch as substrate. Using the acid-adapted precultures as inoculum, the morphology of R. arrhizus was maintained as large clumps, coalesced loose small pellets, and freely dispersed small pellets. The highest lactic acid concentration of 85.7 g/L with a yield of 86% was obtained in association with the formation of coalesced loose small pellets. The results indicate that the use of the acid-adapted precultures as inoculum is a promising approach for lactic acid production in STRs.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

    2014-05-12

    A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD

  12. Water Penetration into Middle Ear Through Ventilation Tubes in Children While Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Water penetration into the middle ear through ventilation tubes and middle ear infection are not likely when surface swimming. Children with ventilation tubes can enjoy swimming without protection in clean chlorinated swimming pools.

  13. Research on Liquid Management Technology in Water Tank and Reactor for Propulsion System with Hydrogen Production System Utilizing Aluminum and Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryoji; Imamura, Takuya; Sugioka, Masatoshi; Higashino, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    High pressure hydrogen produced by aluminum and water reaction is considered to be applied to space propulsion system. Water tank and hydrogen production reactor in this propulsion system require gas and liquid separation function under microgravity condition. We consider to install vane type liquid acquisition device (LAD) utilizing surface tension in the water tank, and install gas-liquid separation mechanism by centrifugal force which swirling flow creates in the hydrogen reactor. In water tank, hydrophilic coating was covered on both tank wall and vane surface to improve wettability. Function of LAD in water tank and gas-liquid separation in reaction vessel were evaluated by short duration microgravity experiments using drop tower facility. In the water tank, it was confirmed that liquid was driven and acquired on the outlet due to capillary force created by vanes. In addition of this, it was found that gas-liquid separation worked well by swirling flow in hydrogen production reactor. However, collection of hydrogen gas bubble was sometimes suppressed by aluminum alloy particles, which is open problem to be solved.

  14. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chun-Ping, E-mail: chunping@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Chen, Hong-Bin [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m{sup 3} of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, U, and {alpha}-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 {mu}m filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb {beta}-emitters, {alpha}-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously

  15. Introduction to Safety Analysis Approach for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Suki

    2016-01-01

    The research reactors have a wide variety in terms of thermal powers, coolants, moderators, reflectors, fuels, reactor tanks and pools, flow direction in the core, and the operating pressure and temperature of the cooling system. Around 110 research reactors have a thermal power greater than 1 MW. This paper introduces a general approach to safety analysis for research reactors and deals with the experience of safety analysis on a 10 MW research reactor with an open-pool and open-tank reactor and a downward flow in the reactor core during normal operation. The general approach to safety analysis for research reactors is described and the design features of a typical open-pool and open-tank type reactor are discussed. The representative events expected in research reactors are investigated. The reactor responses and the thermal hydraulic behavior to the events are presented and discussed. From the minimum CHFR and the maximum fuel temperature calculated, it is ensured that the fuel is not damaged in the step insertion of reactivity by 1.8 mk and the failure of all primary pumps for the reactor with a 10 MW thermal power and downward core flow

  16. Contaminación del aire interior y del agua de baño en piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa Indoor air and bathing water pollution in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Santa Marina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los niveles de contaminantes presentes en las piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa, tanto en el agua de baño como en el aire, y estudiar la relación entre estos contaminantes y otras variables relacionadas con los sistemas de ventilación y el uso de las instalaciones. Métodos: De las 35 piscinas cubiertas registradas en Guipúzcoa se estudiaron las 20 más utilizadas por nadadores. Cada instalación se muestreó 2 días no consecutivos y se midieron los niveles de cloro libre y combinado y trihalometanos en el agua, así como los de cloro total y cloroformo en el aire. Como indicador de la renovación del aire se midió el dióxido de carbono (CO2. Resultados: El nivel medio de cloro en el aire fue de 0,4mg/m³ y el de cloroformo de 22µg/m³. Los valores de cloro libre y combinado de todas las piscinas se mantuvieron dentro de los valores reglamentarios. El nivel medio de cloroformo del agua de baño fue de 13,7µg/l. El valor del cloroformo del aire puede predecirse razonablemente (R²=0,85, y las variables predictoras son el cloroformo del agua, el CO2 y el número de bañistas del día. Conclusiones: Los niveles de contaminantes en el agua y en el aire de las piscinas de Guipúzcoa son inferiores a los descritos en otros estudios. Sin embargo, utilizando la concentración de 0,5mg/m³ de cloro total en aire, propuesta como valor de referencia para la protección de los nadadores con actividad intensa, un 20% de las instalaciones superarían dicho valor.Objective: To describe levels of pollutants found in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Basque Country, Spain, both in the bathing water and in the air, and to study the association between these pollutants and other variables related to ventilation systems and the use of installations. Methods: Of the 35 indoor swimming pools registered in Guipúzcoa, the 20 most frequently used by swimmers were studied. Each installation was sampled on two nonconsecutive days. Free and

  17. Fungi solubilisation of low rank coal: performances of stirred tank, fluidised bed and packed bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available bioreactor represent slurry reactor systems enabling a comparative study. Direct comparison between these and the fixed bed bioreactor could not be carried as the corresponding particle sizes will result to a pressure drop in the fixed bed reactor. Coal...

  18. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors; Conception de la surete en france et influence des imperatifs de surete sur la conception des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vathaire, F. de; Vernier, Ph.; Pascouet, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors) [French] La presente communication propose une synthese de l'experience acquise en France en matiere de surete des reacteurs. Les reacteurs de la filiere graphite-gaz faisant l'objet d'une communication particuliere, on examine ici la surete des autres types de reacteurs etudies en France: - reacteurs eau lourde-gaz, - reacteurs a neutrons rapides, - reacteurs de recherche a eau des types piscines et tank. Les imperatifs de surete propres aux differentes filieres sont developpes, en mettant l'accent sur leur influence sur la conception des reacteurs et sur les limitations de puissance qu'ils entrainent. Les etudes de surete correspondantes sont presentees, en insistant plus particulierement sur les travaux originaux developpes dans ces domaines. On indique notamment les moyens d'essais qui ont ete construits pour ces etudes: le reacteur CABRI, boucle en pile pour essais de depressurisation, boucles hors pile, maquettes, etc. (auteurs)

  19. Leu based Mo-99 production facility using the Open Pool Australian Light-Water (OPAL) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, M.; Turner, I.; Kenny, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: ARI currently manufactures Mo-99 in the HIFAR reactor by irradiating uranium dioxide pellets. Whilst this process is old and inefficient, it has enabled ARI to successfully supply Tc 99 m generators to meet the needs of the Australian nuclear medicine community. Along with the new OPAL reactor, ARI is introducing a new Mo-99 production process. Due to global threat reduction and non-proliferation concerns, this new process will be a low enriched uranium (LEU) process. The facility will provide improved efficiencies for Mo-99 production and greatly increase production capacity. A small-scale production plant will be established and the objective of the plant is twofold: to increase production capacity for both the Australian and Asian-Pacific markets and, to serve as a test platform for a much larger scale commercial Mo-99 production which could take advantage of the total OPAL irradiation capacity. Initially, the plant will have a capacity 4 times greater than the current HIFAR based production. Currently the USA and European radiopharmaceutical manufacturers rely on a supply of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce targets for the production of Mo-99 and other radionuclides. The new Australian LEU-based Mo-99 production process will be unique in the global marketplace

  20. Significance of coast down time on safety and availability of a pool type fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Plant dynamics studies for quantifying the benefits of flow coast down time. • Establishment of minimum flow coast down time required for safety. • Assessment of influence of flow coast down on enhancing plant availability. • Synthesis of thermo mechanical benefits of flow coast down time on component design. - Abstract: Plant dynamic investigation towards establishing the influence of flow coast down time of primary and secondary sodium systems on safety and availability of plant has been carried out based on one dimensional analysis. From safety considerations, a minimum flow coast down time for primary sodium circuit is essential to be provided to limit the consequences of loss of flow event within allowable limits. Apart from safety benefits, large primary coast down time also improves plant availability by the elimination of reactor SCRAM during short term power failure events. Threshold values of SCRAM parameters also need optimization. By suitably selecting the threshold values for SCRAM parameters, significant reduction in the inertia of pumping systems can be derived to obtain desirable results on plant availability. With the optimization of threshold values and primary flow coast down behaviour equivalent to a halving time of 8 s, there is a possibility to eliminate reactor SCRAM during short term power failure events extending up to 0.75 s duration. Benefits of secondary flow halving on reducing transient thermal loading on components have also been investigated and mixed effects have been observed

  1. Computational study of the mixed cooling effects on the in-vessel retention of a molten pool in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Seok; Sohn, Chang Hyun; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2004-01-01

    The retention of a molten pool vessel cooled by internal vessel reflooding and/or external vessel reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies. The present numerical study investigates the effect of both internal and external vessel mixed cooling on an internally heated molten pool. The molten pool is confined in a hemispherical vessel with reference to the thermal behavior of the vessel wall. In this study, our numerical model used a scaled-down reactor vessel of a KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power) reactor design of 1000 MWe (a pressurized water reactor with a large and dry containment). Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the internal and external vessel cooling boundaries. Radiative heat transfer has been considered in the case of dry internal vessel boundary condition. Computational results show that the external cooling vessel boundary conditions have better effectiveness than internal vessel cooling in the retention of the melt pool vessel failure

  2. Progressive Increase in Disinfection By-products and Mutagenicity from Source to Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Impact of Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples from ...

  3. Backfitting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delrue, R.; Noesen, T.

    1985-01-01

    The backfitting of research reactors covers a variety of activities. 1. Instrumentation and control: Control systems have developed rapidly and many reactor operators wish to replace obsolete equipment by new systems. 2. Pool liners: Some pools are lined internally with ceramic tiles. These may become pervious with time necessitating replacement, e.g. by a new stainless steel liner. 3. Heat removal system: Deficiencies can occur in one or more of the cooling system components. Upgrading may require modifications of the system such as addition of primary loops, introduction of deactivation tanks, pump replacement. Recent experience in such work has shown that renewal, backfitting and upgrading of an existing reactor is economically attractive since the related costs and delivery times are substantially lower than those required to install a new research reactor

  4. Co-digestion and model simulations of source separated municipal organic waste with cattle manure under batch and continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Kuthiala, Sidhant

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the co-digestion of source separated municipal organic waste (SSMOW), pretreated using a biopulper, and cattle manure both in batch and continuous stirred tank reactors. The optimum co-digestion feeding mixture was consisted of 90% SSMOW and 10% cattle manure on organic...

  5. Molecular weight​/branching distribution modeling of low-​density-​polyethylene accounting for topological scission and combination termination in continuous stirred tank reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaghini, N.; Iedema, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model to predict the molecular weight distribution (MWD),(1) and branching distribution of low-density polyethylene (IdPE),(2) for free radical polymerization system in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR).(3) The model accounts for branching, by branching moment or

  6. Dissolution of a Tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool in an Anaerobic Sand Tank Aquifer System: Bioenhancement, Ecology, and Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Sara; Becker, Jennifer; Seagren, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Dehalorespiring bacteria that reductively dechlorinate and grow on chlorinated ethenes in the aqueous phase can also achieve treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants in the subsurface via bioenhanced dissolution, i.e., enhanced mass transfer from the DNAPL to the aqueous phase. Theoretical and experimental analyses predict that a number of interrelated physicochemical processes (e.g., advection and dispersion) and biological factors (e.g., biokinetics and competition) may influence the degree of bioenhancement. This research focused on understanding the interrelated roles that hydrodynamics and ecological interactions among dehalorespiring populations play in determining the distribution of dehalorespiring populations and the impact on bioenhanced dissolution and detoxification. The hypotheses driving this research are that: (1) ecological interactions between different dehalorespiring strains can significantly impact the dissolution rate bioenhancement and extent of dechlorination; and (2) hydrodynamics near the DNAPL pool will affect the outcome of ecological interactions and the potential for bioenhancement and detoxification. These hypotheses were evaluated via a multi-objective modeling and experimental framework focused on quantifying the impact of microbial interactions and hydrodynamics on the dissolution rate bioenhancement and plume detoxification using a model co-culture of Desulfuromonas michiganensis BB1 and Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195. The experiments were performed in a saturated intermediate-scale flow cell (1.2 m), with flow parallel to a tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool. Bioenhancement of PCE dissolution by the two dehalorespirers was evaluated using a steady-state mass balance, and initially resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in the dissolution rate, with cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) as the primary dechlorination product. Quantitative analysis of microbial population distribution and abundance using a 16S rRNA gene-based q

  7. Optimal conditions and operational parameters for conversion of Robusta coffee residues in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Msambichaka, B.L.; Kivaisi, A.K.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This experiment studied the possibility of optimizing anaerobic degradation, developing microbial adaptation and establishing long term process stability in a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) running on Robusta coffee hulls as feed substrate. Decrease in lag phase and increase in methane production rate in batch culture experiment conducted before and after process stabilization of each operational phase in the CSTR clearly suggested that microbial adaptation to increasing coffee percentage composition was attained. Through gradual increase of coffee percentage composition, from 10% coffee, 2% VS, 20 days HRT and a 1 g VS/1/day loading rate to 80% coffee, 4.5% VS, 12 days HRT and a loading rate of 3 g VS/1/day the CSTR system was optimized at a maximum methane yield of 535 ml/g VS. Again it was possible to attain long term process stability at the above mentioned optimal operational parameters for a further 3 month period. (au)

  8. Structural evaluation of the Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Lo, T.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    A structural evaluation of Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads under the normal and hypothetical accident conditions of 10 CFR 71 was performed. Component performance criteria for the Shippingport package and the corresponding structural acceptance criteria for these components were developed based on a review of the package geometry, the planned transport environment, and the external radiation standards and dispersal limits of 10 CFR 71. The evaluation was performed using structural analysis methods. A demonstration combining simplified model tests and nonlinear finite element analyses was made to substantiate the structural analysis methods used to evaluate the Shippingport package. The package was analyzed and the results indicate that the package meets external radiation standards and release limits of 10 CFR 71. 13 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs

  9. Process design and dynamics of a series of continuously fed aerated tank reactors treating dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alitalo, Anni; Alakukku, Laura; Aura, Erkki

    2013-09-01

    A 6-month trial was carried out to study operational conditions and process dynamics in a system of six continuously fed aerated tank bioreactors grouped by serial connection. Feedback was with NH3-stripped solution after biological treatment, with the purpose of lowering the NH3 content of the feedback solution in order to improve the process. The fate of carbon and nutrients during treatment were determined, as well as the ammonia stripping performance of the biological treatment. The results of the study confirmed the dynamic nature of the serial system and indicated its resistance to process disturbances. The feedback of slurry resulted in a dilution effect and significantly reduced the carbon and nutrients concentrations in the first tank, increasing the treatment efficiency. Overall, after mechanical separation, low intensity aeration treatment and ammonia stripping, up to 61%, 67%, 79% and 83% average reductions of TS, Ntot, NH4(+)-N and Ptot, respectively, were reached. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation impact caused by the rupture of a radioactive tank within the Reactor Auxiliary Building of Angra 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, Erivaldo Mario dos; Alves, Antonio Sergio de Martin

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to show the methodology, the parameters and some results of the radionuclide migration simulation in order to determine the radiation impact to the biosphere due to an accidental radionuclide release associated with the rupture of a radioactive tank within the Reactor Auxiliary Building of Angra 2. After tank rupture, the radionuclides are supposed to reach the sea via the aquifer of the Angra 2 site. This radiological impact is evaluated with the aid of the activity concentration at the sea and dose received by members of the public. Activity concentration for each radionuclide is calculated according to the ANSI/ANS - 2.17 - 1980, which shows the methodology for calculation of activity concentration in the aquifer in case of accidental radionuclide releases of nuclear power plants, whereas the dose calculation follows recognized international procedures. The migration analysis for the mentioned radionuclides is performed through the aquifer and allows to estimate the maximum activity concentration near the sea boundary and the annual dose to the member of the public. Based on the safety analysis performed for the investigated case one can conclude the annual dose impact is lower than that corresponding to one year of normal operation of the Angra 2 plant. (author)

  11. Study of oxygen mass transfer coefficient and oxygen uptake rate in a stirred tank reactor for uranium ore bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zokaei-Kadijani, S.; Safdari, J.; Mousavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer coefficient does not depend on biomass concentration. ► The pulp density has a negative effect on mass transfer coefficient. ► The pulp density is the unique factor that affects maximum OUR. ► In this work, Neale’s correlation is corrected for prediction of mass transfer coefficient. ► Biochemical reaction is a limiting factor in the uranium bioleaching process. - Abstract: In this work, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were studied for uranium ore bioleaching process by Acidthiobacillus ferrooxidans in a stirred tank reactor. The Box-Bohnken design method was used to study the effect of operating parameters on the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The investigated factors were agitation speed (rpm), aeration rate (vvm) and pulp density (% weight/volume) of the stirred tank reactor. Analysis of experimental results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient had low dependence on biomass concentration but had higher dependence on the agitation speed, aeration rate and pulp density. The obtained biological enhancement factors were equal to ones in experiments. On the other hand, the obtained values for Damkohler number (Da < 0.468) indicated that the process was limited by the biochemical reaction rate. Experimental results obtained for oxygen mass transfer coefficient were correlated with the empirical relations proposed by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez (2009) and Neale and Pinches (1994). Due to the high relative error in the correlation of Neale and Pinches, that correlation was corrected and the coefficient of determination was calculated to be 89%. The modified correlation has been obtained based on a wide range of operating conditions, which can be used to determine the mass transfer coefficient in a bioreactor

  12. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  13. Effect of organic loading rate on dark fermentative hydrogen production in the continuous stirred tank reactor and continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Nie, Qiulin; Zhao, Hongting; Tang, Junhong

    2016-12-01

    Waste pastry (6%, w/v) was hydrolyzed by the produced glucoamylase and protease to obtain the glucose (19.8g/L) and free amino nitrogen (179mg/L) solution. Then, the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) (8-40kgCOD/(m 3 d)) on dark fermentative hydrogen production in the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor (CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate was investigated and compared. The maximum hydrogen production rate of CSTR (277.76mL/(hL)) and CMISR (320.2mL/(hL)) were achieved at OLR of 24kgCOD/(m 3 d) and 32kgCOD/(m 3 d), respectively. Carbon recovery ranged from 75.2-84.1% in the CSTR and CMISR with the balance assumed to be converted to biomass. One gram waste pastry could produce 0.33g (1.83mmol) glucose which could be further converted to 79.24mL (3.54mmol) hydrogen in the CMISR or 91.66mL (4.09mmol) hydrogen in the CSTR. This is the first study which reports dark fermentative hydrogen production from waste pastry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Seismic and layout design for a tank-type fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, L.; Yamaki, Hideo; Davies, S.M.

    1984-06-01

    Hitachi Ltd. of Japan, with the assistance of the Bechtel Group, Inc. and the General Electric Company of the US, initiated a conceptual design study of a compact tank-type LMFBR. The Bechtel work concentrated on layout of the nuclear island (NI), and its orientation with respect to the Control (CB) and Turbine (TGB) Buildings. This joint effort was carried out during 1982 and 1983 in four steps. Each step produced improvements in the design and reduced the plant size and cost. This paper described the design evolution and the final result with respect to Bechtel's development of the NI layout

  15. Raising the four downcomers in the reactor aluminium tank of the FRJ-2 research reactor as an example of the execution of complicated work in the region of high radiation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, M.; Schmitz, J.; Wolters, J.

    1975-02-01

    As a result of the planned power increase from 15 MW to 25 MW, a new emergency cooling system had to be installed in the research reactor FRJ-2 of the KFA Juelich, which called for an extension of the four standpipes in the reactor tank by 57 mm. Due to the high radiation level in the reactor tank, new techniques had to be found allowing aluminium rings of corresponding height to be welded onto the top part of the standpipes by remotecontrolled welding; moreover, the welded parts were then to be protected by a bandage made of high-quality steel. The development work was carried out in the KFA and this report gives an account of the technique applied and the results obtained. (author)

  16. Microfungal Activity Test Of The Triga Mark II Reactor Tank Isolation to Aluminium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, Rosmiarty A.; Umar, Lukman; Yestiani, Yani

    2000-01-01

    In our pres ious study some pure species of micro fungal have been isolated from cooling water and samples taken from surrounding tank wall of TRIGA Mark II Reaktor. This study was conducted to determine their activities to aluminium 6061-T using modified method of Hortative (1962) in the speed of corrosion transmission process. Each isolate was inoculated into mineral nutrient solution. Changes of ph and reduced weight of Aluminium specimen weight between the experimental and the control groups, and the amounts were proportional to to the length of investigation times. The highest degree of the corrosion speed is given by Penicillium simplicissimum inoculant 2,95.10 - 6, followed by Paecilomyceus carneus 2,61.10 6 , Penicillium canescens 2,59.10 - 6 and the control 2,11.10 6 respectively

  17. Contributions of research Reactors in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, N.M.; Bashir, J.

    1992-12-01

    In the present paper, after defining a research reactor, its basic constituents, types of reactors, their distribution in the world, some typical examples of their uses are given. Particular emphasis in placed on the contribution of PARR-I (Pakistan Research Reactor-I), the 5 MW Swimming Pool Research reactor which first became critical at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) in Dec. 1965 and attained its full power in June 1966. This is still the major research facility at PINSTECH for research and development. (author)

  18. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Effect of agitation and aeration rates on chitinase production using Trichoderma virens UKM1 in 2-l stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Aziz, Suraini; Fernandez, Christine Cheryl; Salleh, Madihah Md; Illias, Rosli Md; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2008-08-01

    Shrimps have been a popular raw material for the burgeoning marine and food industry contributing to increasing marine waste. Shrimp waste, which is rich in organic compounds is an abundant source of chitin, a natural polymer of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GluNac), a reducing sugar. For this respect, chitinase-producing fungi have been extensively studied as biocontrol agents. Locally isolated Trichoderma virens UKM1 was used in this study. The effect of agitation and aeration rates using colloidal chitin as control substrate in a 2-l stirred tank reactor gave the best agitation and aeration rates at 200 rpm and 0.33 vvm with 4.1 U/l per hour and 5.97 U/l per hour of maximum volumetric chitinase activity obtained, respectively. Microscopic observations showed shear sensitivity at higher agitation rate of the above system. The oxygen uptake rate during the highest chitinase productivity obtained using sun-dried ground shrimp waste of 1.74 mg of dissolved oxygen per gram of fungal biomass per hour at the kappaL a of 8.34 per hour.

  20. Investigations of the Gas-Liquid Multiphase System Involving Macro-Instability in a Baffled Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD in gas-liquid multiphase system is of particular interest and the quantification of gas characteristics is still a challenge today. In this contribution, multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations are combined with Population Balance Model (PBM to investigate the bubble SMD in baffled stirred tank reactor (STR. Hereby, special attention is given to the phenomenon known as the fluid macro-instability (MI, which is a large-scale low-frequency fluid velocity variation in baffled STRs, since the fluid MIs have a dominating influence on the bubble breakage and coalescence processes. The simulations, regarding the fluid velocity, are validated with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA experiments, in which the instant radial velocity is analyzed through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT spectrum. The frequency peaks of the fluid MIs are found both in the simulation and in the experiment with a high degree of accuracy. After the validation, quantitative predictions of overall bubble SMD with and without MIs are carried out. Due to the accurate prediction of the fluid field, the influence of the fluid MI to bubble SMD is presented. This result provides more adequate information for engineers working in the field of estimating bubble SMDs in baffled STRs.

  1. Fermentation characteristics in stirred-tank reactor of exopolysaccharides with hypolipidemic activity produced by Pleurotus geesteranus 5#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAO DUOBIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the hypolipidemic effect of exopolysaccharides (EPS from Pleurotus geesteranus 5# fermenting liquor by the optimal culture conditions in a 5-L stirred-tank reactor was investigated. The hypolipidemic effect of the polysaccharide, investigated in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice, decreased plasma glucose, total cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations by 17.1 %, 18.8 % and 12.0 %, respectively. The results of the present investigation strongly demonstrate the potential of this polysaccharide to prevent hyperglycemia in the experimental animals. Under optimal culture conditions, the maximum concentrations of mycelial and EPS were 22.63 g/L after 7 d cultivation and 11.09 g/L after 10 d, respectively. Furthermore, the morphological parameters (i.e. mean diameter, circularity, roughness and compactness of the pellets and the broth viscosity were characterized. It was proved that compactness of the pellet morphology (R2=0.963, p<0.01 was significantly and positively determined with mycelial biomass. Moreover, mean diameter (R2=93.3, p<0.01 and broth viscosity (R2=0.950, p<0.01 were significantly and positively determined with EPS content.

  2. Recycling of metals from pretreated waste printed circuit boards effectively in stirred tank reactor by a moderately thermophilic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming-Chen; Wang, Ya-Ping; Peng, Tang-Jian; Shen, Li; Yu, Run-Lan; Liu, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Miao; Li, Jiao-Kun; Wu, Xue-Ling; Zeng, Wei-Min

    2017-06-01

    To seek a feasible technique for processing waste printed circuit boards (PCBs), pretreatment of PCBs by table separation and further bioleached by moderate thermophiles in a stirred tank reactor were investigated. The shaking table separation, conducted after grinding and sieving of PCBs, produced two fractions: metal-rich parts (RPCBs), which is more suitable for pyrometallurgy process than untreated PCBs, and metal-poor parts (PPCBs) with only 8.83% metals was then bioleached by a mixed culture of moderate thermophiles effectively. After adaptation, the mixed culture could tolerate 80 g/L PPCBs. The bioleaching results showed that metals recovery was 85.23% Zn, 76.59% Cu and 70.16% Al in only 7 days. Trace Pb and Sn were detected in the leachate because of precipitating. The microorganism community structure was analyzed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Two moderately thermophilic bacteria species were identified as Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus caldus. Furthermore, uncultured Thermoplasmatales archaeon was also detected in the leaching system. It was also shown that moderate thermophiles revealed best bioleaching ability when compared with mesophiles and the mixture of mesophiles and moderate thermophiles. Finally, we designed a two-stage process model according to the present study to achieve semi-industrial waste PCBs recycling and economic feasibility analysis indicated that the process was profitable. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  4. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Naudin, A. E.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  5. PACING DEVICE FOR SWIMMING. MECHANICAL CONSTRUCTION OF CONSTANT SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MESSINIS S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pace in swimming is very important because it allows swimmers to allocate their forces accordingly, and therefore a distance to travel as quickly as possible. The training pace at different swimmingspeeds and combinations thereof, is an important part of training before the competitions.The definition and maintenance of the stable and swimmer specific speed is difficult to achieve and requires considerable effort and experience. To determine the desired rate of accuracy by the researchers and their coaches used till now, various audio and visual media.However, some of these institutions did not very accurately measure the rate and not all styles of swimming, while other aspects affect the proper swimming. In this construction, a key objective is to solve the problems occurring in the previous constructions, the modern technological development of them and the adaption of the specificities of different swimming styles.This device consists of an electro 3 / 8 of the horse, a flange, a single inverter from 3 / 8 to ½ of the horse, pulleys with taper Bush, flange axle, pulleys, platforms and a 52 meters cable. The assembly and operation is as follows: At the edge of the pool next to the platform is placed the base of pulleys, the electro setis connected to the inverter and the axle flange.Precisely opposite is positioned the other base. Along the pool «moves» the cable that connects the two bases, located 150 cm above the water. A fixed point on the cable is marked with paint in order to be visible to the swimmer during backstroke swimming while for other styles we adapt a lamination at the cable vertically inthe pool, above the surface a sheet of 15 cm which is painted with strong color that is visible from the athlete and will precede him. Setting the speed with inverter it starts from one end of the tank leading to the other, doing a circular motion.The swimmer is required to follow the marked point of the cable in the backstroke or

  6. Training optimization of swimming of school-age children

    OpenAIRE

    Hudcová, Stanislava

    2011-01-01

    Subject matter: Training optimization of swimming of school-age children Objectives: The main goal of this research work is to suggest a model of advanced swimming training lessons with school-age children. Swimming training is practised in deep swimming pool. Next goal is to create an inventory of games and game disciplines which are suitable for training in deep water. Through the analysis of specialized literature and realization of experimental education we will be able to formulate new p...

  7. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  8. Chernobyl and its consequences for Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofer, F.; Ecker, W.; Hojesky, H.; Junger, W.; Kienzl, K.; Nowak, H.; Riss, A.; Vychytil, P.; Zechner, J.

    1986-11-01

    First there is a short version of 16 pages. Then a detailed account is given mainly on the activities of the Federal Environment Office and the radiation burden to the population. The chapter headings are 1) The Chernobyl reactor accident 2) The meteorological situation 3) Monitoring of the radioactive contamination in Austria 4) Aims of the radiation measurement activities 5) Initial situation in Austria and first measurements 6) Environmental control 7) Food control 8) Fodder 9) Measures taken to minimise the radiation burden - a chronology 10) Comparison with nuclear tests fallout 11) Dose estimation 12) Radioactive contamination in other European countries. (G.Q.)

  9. Continuous ethanol fermentation from non-sulfuric acid-washed molasses using traditional stirred tank reactors and the flocculating yeast strain KF-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue-Qin; An, Ming-Zhe; Zhong, Ya-Ling; Shigeru, Morimura; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Kida, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Waste molasses is one of the most important feedstock for ethanol production in Brazil as well as in many Southeast Asian countries, including China. Sulfuric acid pretreatment is employed in most ethanol distilleries in China to control bacterial contamination, which results in difficulties in the treatment of wastewater containing high levels of sulfate ions. In this study, a high efficiency, non-sterilized, continuous ethanol fermentation process without sulfuric acid pretreatment was developed using the flocculating yeast strain KF-7 and the widely utilized, traditional, stirred tank reactors. An alternative molasses medium feeding method, which differs from traditional methods, is proposed that effectively controls bacterial contamination. Separate feeding of 1.2-fold diluted molasses and tap water into the reactor proved to be effective against bacterial contamination during long-term continuous fermentation. By feeding yeast cells with high metabolic activity to the second reactor, a two-stage continuous fermentation process that yielded a high ethanol concentration of 80 g/l as well as high ethanol productivity of 6.6 g/l/h was successfully operated for more than one month. This fermentation process can be applied to ethanol distilleries in which traditional tank reactors are used. 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulation and transient analyses of a complete passive heat removal system in a downward cooling pool-type material testing reactor against a complete station blackout and long-term natural convection mode using the RELAP5/3.2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Afshin [Reactor and Nuclear Safety School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, a complete station blackout (SBO) or complete loss of electrical power supplies is simulated and analyzed in a downward cooling 5-MW pool-type Material Testing Reactor (MTR). The scenario is traced in the absence of active cooling systems and operators. The code nodalization is successfully benchmarked against experimental data of the reactor's operating parameters. The passive heat removal system includes downward water cooling after pump breakdown by the force of gravity (where the coolant streams down to the unfilled portion of the holdup tank), safety flapper opening, flow reversal from a downward to an upward cooling direction, and then the upward free convection heat removal throughout the flapper safety valve, lower plenum, and fuel assemblies. Both short-term and long-term natural core cooling conditions are simulated and investigated using the RELAP5 code. Short-term analyses focus on the safety flapper valve operation and flow reversal mode. Long-term analyses include simulation of both complete SBO and long-term operation of the free convection mode. Results are promising for pool-type MTRs because this allows operators to investigate RELAP code abilities for MTR thermal–hydraulic simulations without any oscillation; moreover, the Tehran Research Reactor is conservatively safe against the complete SBO and long-term free convection operation.

  11. Simulation and transient analyses of a complete passive heat removal system in a downward cooling pool-type material testing reactor against a complete station blackout and long-term natural convection mode using the RELAP5/3.2 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Hedayat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a complete station blackout (SBO or complete loss of electrical power supplies is simulated and analyzed in a downward cooling 5-MW pool-type Material Testing Reactor (MTR. The scenario is traced in the absence of active cooling systems and operators. The code nodalization is successfully benchmarked against experimental data of the reactor's operating parameters. The passive heat removal system includes downward water cooling after pump breakdown by the force of gravity (where the coolant streams down to the unfilled portion of the holdup tank, safety flapper opening, flow reversal from a downward to an upward cooling direction, and then the upward free convection heat removal throughout the flapper safety valve, lower plenum, and fuel assemblies. Both short-term and long-term natural core cooling conditions are simulated and investigated using the RELAP5 code. Short-term analyses focus on the safety flapper valve operation and flow reversal mode. Long-term analyses include simulation of both complete SBO and long-term operation of the free convection mode. Results are promising for pool-type MTRs because this allows operators to investigate RELAP code abilities for MTR thermal–hydraulic simulations without any oscillation; moreover, the Tehran Research Reactor is conservatively safe against the complete SBO and long-term free convection operation.

  12. Diagnosis of electric equipment at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Truong Sinh

    1999-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type of its kind in the world: Soviet-designed core and control system harmoniously integrated into the left-over infrastructure of the former American-made TRIGA MARK II reactor, which includes the reactor tank and shielding, graphite reflector, beam tubes and thermal column. The reactor is mainly used for radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production, elemental analysis using neutron activation techniques, neutron beam exploitation, silicon doping, and reactor physics experimentation. For safe operation of the reactor maintenance work has been carried out for the reactor control and instrumentation, reactor cooling, ventilation, radiomonitoring, mechanical, normal electric supply systems as well as emergency electric diesel generators and the water treatment station. Technical management of the reactor includes periodical maintenance as required by technical specifications, training, re-training and control of knowledge for reactor staff. During recent years, periodic preventive maintenance (PPM) has been carried out for the electric machines of the technological systems. (author)

  13. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Naudin, A. E.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-01-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  14. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.

    1976-01-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  15. Gifted Education in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyringer, Sieglinde

    2013-01-01

    In Austria, gifted education and the education of highly gifted and talented children have been receiving an increasing public awareness and social acceptance over the past decade. The article highlights the existing ideas of giftedness in Austria, and it presents several initiatives having triggered and influenced this positive development. The…

  16. Experimental investigation of heat transfer during severe accident of a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor with simulated decay heat generation in molten pool inside calandria vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Sumit Vishnu, E-mail: svprasad@barc.gov.in; Nayak, Arun Kumar, E-mail: arunths@barc.gov.in

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Scaled test facility simulating the calandria vessel and calandria vault water of PHWR with simulated decay heat was built. • Experiments conducted with simulant material at about 1200 °C. • Experimental result shows that melt coolability and growth rate of crust thickness are affected by presence of decay heat. • No gap was observed between the crust and vessel on opening. • Result shows that vessel integrity is intact with presence of water inside water tank in both cases. - Abstract: The present study focuses on experimental investigation in a scaled facility of an Indian PHWR to investigate the coolability of molten corium with simulated decay heat in the simulated calandria vessel. Molten borosilicate glass was used as the simulant due to its comparable heat transfer characteristics similar to prototypic material. About 60 kg of the molten material was poured into the test section at about 1200 °C. Decay heat in the melt pool was simulated using four high watt heaters cartridges, each having 9.2 kW. The temperature distributions inside the molten pool, across the vessel wall thickness and vault water were measured. Experimental results obtained are compared with the results obtained previously for no decay heat case. The results indicated that presence of decay heat seriously affects the coolability behaviour and formation of crust in the melt pool. The location and magnitude of maximum heat flux and surface temperature of the vessel also are affected in the presence of decay heat.

  17. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1985-02-01

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation [fr

  18. Evaluation of final vapor pressures in the loss of flow accident in an irradiation device of a pool reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The reliability feature, are described for a device containing samples, at a temperatures of 300 grade centigrades, in a reactor core for a long time. After an examination of the maximum accident event, the maximum vapour pressure originated by the inlet of reactor cooling water into the experimental device, is evaluated

  19. Reracking of fuel pools, experience with improved codes and design for reactor sites with high seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banck, J.; Wirtz, K.

    1998-01-01

    Reracking of existing pools to the maximum extent is desirable from the economical point of view. Although the load onto the storage rack structure and the fuel pool bottom will be increased, new improved codes, optimized structural qualification procedures and advanced design enable to demonstrate the structural integrity for all normal and accident conditions so that the design provides a safe compact storage of spent fuel under any condition.(author)

  20. Trench reactor: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.; Rohach, A.F.; Razzaque, M.M.; Sankoorikal, J.T.; Schmidt, R.S.; Lofshult, J.; Ramin, T.; Sokmen, N.; Lin, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent fast, sodium-cooled reactor designs reflect new conditions. In nuclear energy these conditions are (a) emphasis on maintainability and operability, (b) design for more transparent safety, and (c) a surplus of uranium and enrichment availability that eases concerns about light water reactor fueling costs. In utility practice the demand is for less capital exposure, short construction time, smaller new unit sizes, and low capital cost. The PRISM, SAFR, and integral fast reactor (IFR) concepts are responses to these conditions. Fast reactors will not soon be deployed commercially, so more radical designs can be considered. The trench reactor is the product of such thinking. Its concepts are intended as contributions to the literature, which may be picked up by one of the existing programs or used in a new experimental project. The trench reactor is a thin-slab, pool-type reactor operated at very low power density and- for sodium-modest temperature. The thin slab is repeated in the sodium tank and the reactor core. The low power density permits a longer than conventional core height and a large-diameter fuel pin. Control is by borated steel slabs that can be lowered between the core and lateral sodium reflector. Shutdown is by semaphore slabs that can be swung into place just outside the control slabs. The paper presents major characteristics of the trench reactor that have been changed since the last report

  1. Role of analytical chemistry in the operation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikku, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Research reactors have played a pivotal role not only in the non-power sector utilization of nuclear energy but also in the evolution of nuclear power programme, as has been amply demonstrated by the Indian research reactor APSARA (1 MW9th), swimming pool type with enriched uranium fuel), CIRUS (40 MW(th), natural uranium fuelled, heavy water moderated and light water cooled) and DHRUVA (100 MW(th), natural uranium fuelled, heavy water moderated and cooled), at Trombay. The present discussion is confined to the role of analytical chemistry in the operation of water cooled and moderated reactors

  2. Activities for extending the lifetime of MINT research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Adnan; Kassim, Mohammad Suhaimi [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    MINT TRIGA Reactor is a 1-MW swimming pool nuclear reactor commissioned in June 1982. Since then, it has been used for research, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography and manpower training. The total operating time till the end on September 1997 is 16968 hours with cumulative total energy release of 11188 MW-hours. After more than fifteen years of successful operation, some deterioration in components and associated systems has been observed. This paper describes some of the activities carried out to increase the lifetime and to reduce the shutdown time of the reactor. (author)

  3. The reactor Cabri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailloud, J.; Millot, J.P.

    1964-01-01

    It has become necessary to construct in France a reactor which would permit the investigation of the conditions of functioning of future installations, the choice, the testing and the development of safety devices to be adopted. A water reactor of a type corresponding to the latest CEA constructions in the field of laboratory or university reactors was decided upon: it appeared important to be able to evaluate the risks entailed and to study the possibilities of increasing the power, always demanded by the users; on the other hand, it is particularly interesting to clarify the phenomena of power oscillation and the risks of burn out. The work programme for CABRI will be associated with the work carried out on the American Sperts of the same type, during its construction, very useful contacts were made with the American specialists who designed the se reactors. A brief description of the reactor is given in the communication as well as the work programme for the first years with respect to the objectives up to now envisaged. Rough description of the reactor. CABRI is an open core swimming-pool reactor without any lateral protection, housed in a reinforced building with controlled leakage, in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache. It lies alone in the middle of an area whose radius is 300 meters long. Control and measurements equipment stand out on the edge of that zone. It consumes MTR fuel elements. The control-safety rods are propelled by compressed air. The maximum flow rate of cooling circuit is 1500 m 3 /h. Transient measurements are recorded in a RW330 unit. Aims and work programme. CABRI is meant for: - studies on the safety of water reactors - for the definition of the safety margins under working conditions: research of maximum power at which a swimming-pool reactor may operate with respect to a cooling accident, of local boiling effect on the nuclear behaviour of the reactor, performances of the control and safety instruments under exceptional

  4. Production of fumaric acid by immobilized Rhizopus arrhizus RH 7-13-9# on loofah fiber in a stirred-tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Zhao, Shijie; Jin, Yuhan; Yue, Xuemin; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-11-01

    Fumaric acid is an important building-block chemical. The production of fumaric acid by fermentation is possible. Loofah fiber is a natural, biodegradable, renewable polymer material with highly sophisticated and pore structure. This work investigated a new immobilization method using loofah fiber as carrier to produce fumaric acid in a stirred-tank reactor. Compared with other carriers, loofah fiber was proven to be efficiently and successfully used in the reactor. After the optimization process, 20g addition of loofah fiber and 400rpm agitation speed were chosen as the most suitable process conditions. 30.3g/L fumaric acid in the broth as well as 19.16g fumaric acid in the precipitation of solid was achieved, while the yield from glucose reached 0.211g/g. Three batches of fermentation using the same loofah fiber carrier were conducted successfully, which meant it provided a new method to produce fumaric acid in a stirred-tank reactor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Conceptual design of multipurpose compact research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost multipurpose compact research reactor which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  6. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Tatsuo; Yanai, Ryoichi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a reactor container which is free from water shock action or condensing vibrations and cannot be readily broken by a missile from a pump impeller, pipe whipping, steam jet reaction, etc., and which also quickly condenses issuing steam and possesses a large vibration-proof strength. Structure: A high pressure containment vessel accommodating a pressure container includes a plurality of pressurized water tanks arranged along its inner periphery, and a pneumatic valve is provided in a lower portion of each of these pressurized water tanks. If an accident occurs, vapor is caused to issue from the pressure container into the vessel. When a certain value is reached, the pneumatic valves are opened, whereby the gas within the pressurized water tanks causes pressurized water to flow through the pipe and be ejected from spray nozzles to cause condensation of water within the vessel. Further, water of a pool within the container is circulated to allow heat release to the outside. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Mosbæk, Hans

    2013-01-01

    I Danmark er offentlige svømmebade en vigtig mulighed for rekreative aktiviteter og fysisk træning samt et redskab for genoptræning. Tilsætning af klor anvendes altid til at kontrollere vand¬kvaliteten og hindre spredning af infektioner mellem badende. Klor oxiderer vandforureningen fra de badende, hvilket holder bassinvandet rent, men der dannes klorerede desinfektions¬biprodukter. Der er identificeret mere end 100 klorbiprodukter i svømme¬bads¬vand, hvor nogle har vist sig at være genotoksi...

  8. Continuous abatement of methane coupled with ectoine production by Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z in stirred tank reactors: A step further towards greenhouse gas biorefineries

    OpenAIRE

    Cantera, Sara; Lebrero Fernández, Raquel; Rodríguez, Elisa; García Encina, Pedro A.; Muñoz Torre, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    Producción Científica This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of producing ectoine (a high added value osmoprotectant intensively used in the cosmetic industry) during the continuous abatement of diluted emissions of methane by Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z in stirred tank reactors under non-sterile conditions. An increase in NaCl concentration in the cultivation broth from 3 to 6% increased the intra-cellular ectoine yield by a factor of 2 (from 16.5 to 37.4 mg ecto...

  9. Investigation of the thermal performance of a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon as a passive cooling system for a nuclear reactor spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuma, Mukhsinun Hadi; Putra, Nandy; Imawan, Ficky Augusta [Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Universitas Indonesia, Kampus (Indonesia); Antariksawan, Anhar Riza [Centre for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong (Indonesia)

    2017-04-15

    The decay heat that is produced by nuclear reactor spent fuel must be cooled in a spent fuel storage pool. A wickless heat pipe or a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) is used to remove this decay heat. The objective of this research is to investigate the thermal performance of a prototype model for a large-scale vertical TPCT as a passive cooling system for a nuclear research reactor spent fuel storage pool. An experimental investigation and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD 3.2 were used to investigate the TPCT thermal performance. The effects of the initial pressure, filling ratio, and heat load were analyzed. Demineralized water was used as the TPCT working fluid. The cooled water was circulated in the water jacket as a cooling system. The experimental results show that the best thermal performance was obtained at a thermal resistance of 0.22°C/W, the lowest initial pressure, a filling ratio of 60%, and a high evaporator heat load. The simulation model that was experimentally validated showed a pattern and trend line similar to those of the experiment and can be used to predict the heat transfer phenomena of TPCT with varying inputs.

  10. Einstein and Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This text was written by Engelbert Broda in 1979 and is about Albert Einstein and his relation to Austria. This text is split in different sections which are amongst others: Einstein und Mach; Einstein und Boltzmann; Positivism, Atoms and Relativity; Einstein as an Austrian professor; Einstein’s visits to Austria; Einstein and Viennese friends; Einstein and Friedrich Adler; Einstein and the Austrian mentality; (nowak)

  11. The FM01-LC reactor modeling using axial dispersion model with a reaction term coupled with a continuous stirred tank (CST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Díaz, Martín; Rivera, Fernando F.; Rivero, Eligio P.; González, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at modeling the operation of the FM01-LC reactor coupled with a continuous stirred tank (CST) in recirculation mode. The parametric flow dispersion model with an electrochemical reaction limited by mass transfer coupled with Poisson (tertiary potential distribution) and CST equations are used to describe the performance of a FM01-LC reactor with 3D electrodes. Theoretical predictions for dispersion reaction coupled with CST showed a good agreement with the experimental data on depletion of electroactive species as a function of time and potential distribution, whereas these data have not been adequately described by the plug-flow model. Fluid dispersion obtained in the reaction zone (depending on the fluid flow velocities and geometric configuration), plays an important role in tertiary potential distribution.

  12. Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Mette; Kogevinas, Manolis; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined...... the association between swimming in pregnancy and preterm and postterm birth, fetal growth measures, small-for-gestational-age, and congenital malformations. METHODS: We used self-reported exercise data (swimming, bicycling, or no exercise) that were prospectively collected twice during pregnancy for 74......,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise...

  13. Improving Pool Fencing Legislation in Queensland, Australia: Attitudes and Impact on Child Drowning Fatalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Richard C; Peden, Amy E

    2017-11-24

    Four-sided, non-climbable pool fencing is an effective strategy for preventing children from drowning in home swimming pools. In 2009, the Queensland Government introduced legislation to improve the effectiveness of pool fencing. This study explores community attitudes towards the effectiveness of these legislative changes and examines child (houses with swimming pools) are protected.

  14. EBR-II in-vessel natural circulation experiments on hot and cold pool stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragland, W.A.; Feldman, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II is located in a cylindrical pool of liquid sodium which is part of the cold-leg of the primary flow circuit. A vertical string of 32 thermocouples spans the 8 m tank height, at each of two diametrically opposed locations in the primary tank. Local temperatures were measured with these 64 thermocouples during dynamic tests. The instantaneous spacial temperature distribution obtained from a string of thermocouples can be viewed on a personal computer. The animation which results from displaying successive spacial distributions provide a very effective way to quickly obtain physical insights. The design of the two strings of thermocouples, the software used to create the animation, measured data from three different types of tests--two unprotected reactor transients, and one with the reactor at decay power levels and the reactor cover lifted, are discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs

  15. Piscina cubierta, en Viena, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünberger, Friedrich

    1969-03-01

    Full Text Available This project includes the following: The main building contains the basement, a laundry, the heating and air conditioning installations. The ground floor has men's dressing rooms and showers. The first floor has ladies dressing rooms and individual bathrooms. On the 2nd and 3rd floors there are sauna facilities for men and women and also ladies and gentlemen's hairdressing saloons. The top level is utilized for sunbathing. The intermediate building has two swimming pools, one for learners, and the other for children. Finally the covered swimming pool itself has a full sized pool and a diving structure, 5 m in height. The most outstanding features of this sporting facility are the structures of the buildings, which are made with prestressed concrete.El conjunto construido comprende: El edificio principal, que alberga en el sótano: una lavandería, los cuartos para la calefacción y aire acondicionado; en la planta baja: los vestuarios para hombres, con sus duchas correspondientes; en la 1.ª planta: los vestuarios y duchas para mujeres y los servicios de «baños» individuales; en las plantas 2.ª y 3.ª: «saunas» para mujeres y para hombres, y una peluquería masculina y otra femenina. El nivel superior es utilizado para tomar «baños de sol». El pabellón intermedio contiene las piscinas: para los que aprenden a nadar, y de niños. Finalmente, el edificio de la «Piscina cubierta» propiamente dicha aloja: una piscina reglamentaria y su correspondiente torre de saltos de 5 m de altura. Lo más destacable de este complejo son las estructuras de los edificios y de la piscina, realizadas con hormigón pretensado.

  16. Effects of Nanofluid for In-Vessel Retention External Reactor Vessel Cooling on Critical Heat Flux using Pool Boiling Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Dae; Kang, Sarah; Lee, Seung Won; Bang, In Cheol

    2011-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is one of the severe accident management (SAM) strategies that are used in some nuclear power plants: AP600, AP1000, Loviisa and APR1400. One way of IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC). When core melts and deposits on the bottom of reactor vessel, ERVC is starting to flood the reactor cavity to remove the decay heat through the wall of the reactor vessel. This process can improve the plant economics by reducing regulatory requirements. And increased safety margin leads to gain public acceptance. In this system, the heat removal is restricted by thermal limit called by critical heat flux (CHF). Besides, as advanced light water reactors such as South Korea's APR-1400, thermal safety margin is deceased. So, it is essential to get more safety margin. There are some approaches to enhance the ERVC: using the coating on the vessel outer surface, increasing the reactor cavity flood level, streamlining the gap between the vessel and the vessel insulation. Many investigations have been performed to evaluate the coolability of IVR In this paper, we firstly investigated the coating effects in the critical heat flux among the above mentioned approach methods. During the boiling phenomenon, a thin layer was formed on the heater surface in the nanofluid. This coating mechanism is well known theoretically. Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in traditional heat transfer fluids. One of the most interesting characteristics of nanofluids is their capability to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) significantly. Nanofluid is made by typical particle materials. Materials of nanoparticles include metals (e.g., silver, copper, gold), metal oxides (e.g., titania, alumina, silica, zirconia), carbon allotrope (e.g., carbon nanotube, graphite). We selected the grapheneoxide nanofluid which is a kind of carbon allotrope. Graphene-oxide is attractive material with the high thermal conductivity and stable dispersion ability in

  17. Experiment of IEA-R1 reactor core cooling by air convection after pool water loss accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a Emergency Core Cooling to be applied to the IEA-R1 reactor. This system must have the characteristics of passive action, with water spraying over the core, and feeding by gravity from elevated reservoirs. In the evaluation, this system must demonstrate that when the reservoirs are emptied, the core cooling must assure to be fulfilled by air natural convection. This work presents the results of temperature distribution in a test section with plates electrically heated simulation the heat generation conditions on the most heated reactor element

  18. 1st IAEA research coordination meeting on tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components. October 5-6, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the 1st IAEA research Coordination Meeting on ''Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Components'' held on October 5 and 6, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the retention, release and removal of tritium from plasma facing components, a summary of data evaluation, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 4 tabs

  19. Intercomparison of the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux transport methods for a LWR pool-reactor benchmark problem in X-Y geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Stepanek, J.; Wagner, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to compare and discuss the three of the most advanced two dimensional transport methods, the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux method, incorporated into the transport codes TWODANT, TWOTRAN-NODAL, MULTIMEDIUM and SURCU. For intercomparison the eigenvalue and the neutron flux distribution are calculated using these codes in the LWR pool reactor benchmark problem. Additionally the results are compared with some results obtained by French collision probability transport codes MARSYAS and TRIDENT. Because the transport solution of this benchmark problem is close to its diffusion solution some results obtained by the finite element diffusion code FINELM and the finite difference diffusion code DIFF-2D are included

  20. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun KIR

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000: 103-104

  1. Protocol of actuation before occurrence of 'molluscum contagiosum' for use in public swimming pools Protocolo de actuación ante la aparición de casos de molusco contagioso en piscinas de uso público

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Bautista Cotorruelo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to develop a protocol for the disinfection of episodes of Molluscum contagiosum and establish an objective indicator. Molluscum contagiosum is a virus of Poxviridae Family. This virus produces a common infection in children that occurs when they come into direct contact with a lesion or with contaminated objects. In November 2008 is received at the Servicio de Sanidad Ambiental (Dirección General de Salud Pública, Consejería de Sanidad y Consumo, Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia a telephone call from the Epidemiology Service, which reported the existence of about 12-15 cases of children affected by Molluscum contagiosum. In addition, they indicated us that the suspicions fell on the Municipal Pool Cover Alhama de Murcia. Immediately we contacted the responsible staff and we send them a protocol developed with information from several sources. The analysis of articles used for water activities showed absence of Molluscum contagiosum. We selected "absence of molds and yeasts” as indicator. All this coincided with the disappearance of the cases. Months later, in March 2009 we detected new cases of children affected in another pool in the town of Alcantarilla. Due to the success of the methodology used in the earlier incident we performed the same actions and we obtained the same results. The protocol developed by this Service is effective to avoid the occurrence of more cases. We propose the “absence of molds and yeasts” as an indicator to evaluate the presence of Molluscum contagiosum. Coinciding with the update of the rules of public swimming pools in our Region we have introduced an article that indicates that the objects used for water activities must be disinfected after each use.El objetivo principal fue elaborar un protocolo de actuación para el caso de episodios de infección de molusco contagioso y un indicador objetivo, que nos permita hacer un seguimiento. El virus del molusco contagioso

  2. Organic Farming in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Vogl, C. R.; Heß, J.

    1999-01-01

    During the present decade, Austria has experienced a dramatic increase in organic farming among those countries that comprise the European Union (EU). For example, in 1992, approximately 2,000 farms were practicing organic, ecological, or biodynamic farming methodes. By 1997 the number of certified organic farms plus those in transition from conventional farming had increased 10-fold to some 20,000 farms. This represents almost 9% of the total farms in Austria and an area of 345,375 ha, or 10...

  3. Efeitos de oito semanas de treinamento de natação no limiar anaeróbio determinado na piscina e no ergômetro de braço Effect of eight weeks of swimming training on the anaerobic threshold determined in the swimming pool and by arm ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Caputo

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os efeitos do treinamento de natação na intensidade do limiar anaeróbio (LAn, determinado na piscina e no ergômetro de braço, verificando se este pode ser utilizado para avaliar os efeitos do treinamento em nadadores. Participaram do estudo sete nadadores de ambos os sexos, com nível de performance regional, que foram submetidos aos seguintes testes, antes e após oito semanas de treinamento: 1 dois tiros de 400m, um a 85% e outro a 95% do máximo, com coleta de 25mil de sangue do lóbulo da orelha no 1º, 3º e 5º minuto após cada tiro, para posterior análise do lactato sanguíneo (YSI 1500; 2 teste contínuo progressivo realizado no ergômetro de braço (UBE 2462 Cybex, com carga inicial de 33,3W e incrementos de 16,6W a cada três minutos até a exaustão voluntária, com coleta de sangue ao final de cada estágio. Um grupo controle de indivíduos não ativos (n = 9, que se manteve sedentário, realizou somente o procedimento 2 no mesmo intervalo de tempo. O LAn na natação (NLAn e no ergômetro de braço (BLAn foi encontrado através de interpolação linear, considerando uma concentração fixa de lactato de 4mM e 3,5mM, respectivamente. Os resultados demonstram diferença significante para o grupo treinado, entre o pré (130,4 ± 20,4W e o pós-teste (137,7 ± 17,9W para o BLAn. Porém, não foi encontrada diferença significante para o NLAn (1,09 ± 0,1m.s-1 e 1,13 ± 0,1m.s-1, p = 0,06. No grupo controle não foi encontrada diferença para o BLAn entre o pré (93,2 ± 11,5W e o pós-teste (87,7 ± 7,2W. Pode-se concluir através desses dados que a determinação do LAn no ergômetro de braço é útil para detectar adaptações na capacidade aeróbia de nadadores com nível de performance regional.The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of swimming training on the intensity corresponding to the anaerobic threshold (AnT determined in the swimming pool and by arm ergometer, and

  4. Repairing liner of the reactor; Reparacion del liner del reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-07-15

    Due to the corrosion problems of the aluminum coating of the reactor pool, a periodic inspections program by ultrasound to evaluate the advance grade and the corrosion speed was settled down. This inspections have shown the necessity to repair some areas, in those that the slimming is significant, of not making it can arrive to the water escape of the reactor pool. The objective of the repair is to place patches of plates of 1/4 inch aluminum thickness in the areas of the reactor 'liner', in those that it has been detected by ultrasound a smaller thickness or similar to 3 mm. To carry out this the fuels are move (of the core and those that are decaying) to a temporary storage, the structure of the core is confined in a tank that this placed inside the pool of the reactor, a shield is placed in the thermal column and it is completely extracted the water for to leave uncover the 'liner' of the reactor. (Author)

  5. Repairing liner of the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.

    2001-07-01

    Due to the corrosion problems of the aluminum coating of the reactor pool, a periodic inspections program by ultrasound to evaluate the advance grade and the corrosion speed was settled down. This inspections have shown the necessity to repair some areas, in those that the slimming is significant, of not making it can arrive to the water escape of the reactor pool. The objective of the repair is to place patches of plates of 1/4 inch aluminum thickness in the areas of the reactor 'liner', in those that it has been detected by ultrasound a smaller thickness or similar to 3 mm. To carry out this the fuels are move (of the core and those that are decaying) to a temporary storage, the structure of the core is confined in a tank that this placed inside the pool of the reactor, a shield is placed in the thermal column and it is completely extracted the water for to leave uncover the 'liner' of the reactor. (Author)

  6. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  7. Education Policy Outlook: Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Diana Toledo; Golden, Gillian; Giovinazzo, Manon; Peterka, Judith; Ullmann, Marie

    2017-01-01

    This policy profile on education in Austria is part of the "Education Policy Outlook" series, which presents comparative analysis of education policies and reforms across OECD countries. Building on the OECD's substantial comparative and sectoral knowledge base, the series offers a comparative outlook on education policy by providing…

  8. Phosphated in aluminium 6061-T651 used in the pool of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.; Espinosa L, J.; Pena B, A.; Perez F, C.; Sanchez C, M.; Vite T, M.; Vite T, J.

    2001-01-01

    We characterized a phosphated coating used a substrate in aluminium 6061-T651, which is used in the container of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor. Characterization was made using MEB and X-ray diffraction techniques. Coating application has the function to prevent the corrosion. Coating was probed to test adhesion in accordance with the Standard ASTM D-4541, and the corrosion process using a salt spray (fog) camera, in accordance with the Standard ASTM B-117, so as we could phosphate the welding cord. These experiences were obtained using a Deep cell. Results obtained are going to phosphate 'in situ' using a mobile device which was patented for the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) in the Mexican Institute of Intellectual Property (INPI). (Author)

  9. Important matter by confirmation of administrative office regarding repair of enriched uranium dissolution tanks in reprocessing plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission acknowledged the policy of handling this matter by Science and Technology Agency after having received a report from the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety on April 11, 1985, and carried out the deliberation. The investigation and deliberation of this matter were instructed by the NSC to the Committee on January 24, 1985. It was confirmed that the repair welding applied to the place of leak of the dissolution tanks would not hinder the expected test dissolution, and if the leak occurs, the measures to detect it properly have been taken. In order to confirm the soundness of the repair welding, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. is to carry out the test dissolution for about 400 hours per one tank dividing into three runs, and the observation of appearance is to be made after every run. The time of test dissolution, the items and contents of inspection were confirmed to be adequate. Moreover, the immersion corrosion test of test pieces and the long term corrosion test in a laboratory are to be carried out. (Kako, I.)

  10. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  11. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Velocity Fields Measurement of Natural Circulation Flow inside a Pool Using PIV Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seok; Kim, Dong Eok; Youn, Young Jung; Euh, Dong Jin; Song, Chul Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal stratification is encountered in large pool of water increasingly being used as heat sink in new generation of advanced reactors. These large pools at near atmospheric pressure provide a heat sink for heat removal from the reactor or steam generator, and the containment by natural circulation as well as a source of water for core cooling. For examples, the PAFS (passive auxiliary feedwater system) is one of the advanced safety features adopted in the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus), which is intended to completely replace the conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. The PAFS cools down the steam generator secondary side and eventually removes the decay heat from the reactor core by adopting a natural convection mechanism. In a pool, the heat transfer from the PCHX (passive condensation heat exchanger) contributed to increase the pool temperature up to the saturation condition and induce the natural circulation flow of the PCCT (passive condensate cooling tank) pool water. When a heat rod is placed horizontally in a pool of water, the fluid adjacent to the heat rod gets heated up. In the process, its density reduces and by virtue of the buoyancy force, the fluid in this region moves up. After reaching the top free surface, the heated water moves towards the other side wall of the pool along the free surface. Since this heated water is cooling, it goes downward along the wall at the other side wall. Above heater rod, a natural circulation flow is formed. However, there is no flow below heater rod until pool water temperature increases to saturation temperature. In this study, velocity measurement was conducted to reveal a natural circulation flow structure in a small pool using PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurement technique

  13. Biogas upgrading by injection of hydrogen in a two-stage Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis; Treu, Laura

    methanogens. In this study, a novel serial biogas reactor system is presented, in which the produced biogas from the first stage reactor was introduced in the second stage, where also H2 was injected. The effects of the H2 addition on the process performance and on the microbial community were investigated....... The profiles of the microbial communities prior and after the H2 addition showed distinct differences. Changes in the archaeal community and more specifically increase in the relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter sp. and Methanoculleus sp. indicated that the methanogenic pathway was clearly shifted from...

  14. EFFECTS OF THREE FEEDBACK CONDITIONS ON AEROBIC SWIM SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pérez Soriano

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (a to develop an underwater chronometer capable to provide feedback while the athlete is swimming, as well as being a control tool for the coach, and (b to analyse its feedback effect on swim pace control compared with feedback provided by the coach and with no feedback, in 25 m and 50 m swimming pools. 30 male swimmers of national level volunteer to participate. Each swimmer swam 3 x 200 m at aerobic speed (AS and 3 x 200 m just under the anaerobic threshold speed (AnS, each swam repetition with a different feedback condition: chronometer, coach and without feedback. Results (a validate the chronometer system developed and (b show that swimmers pace control is affected by the type of feedback provided, the swim speed elected and the size of the swimming pool

  15. Remote maintenance in the building of the reactor of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, R.

    1984-01-01

    Examples describing the different operations requiring remote control for reactor maintenance are given. These operations include: refueling machines (for closure stud, vessel flange cleaning, screwing plug for channel head, swimming pool decontamination) in-service inspection machines (MIS, spider for eddy current testing of steam generator, television) and routine or accidental maintenance (leak detection in water boxes, maintenance spider, opening or closing primary manways, decontamination manipulators and various automatic control devices) [fr

  16. Future uses of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The use of research reactors in the next decade will be driven by two key forces: the retirement of obsolete facilities and the development of new capabilities, both in the United States and worldwide. Most research reactors in use in the United States began operation in the period from the late 1950s to the middle of the 1960s, both at universities and at the national laboratories. New design concepts include the 10-MW MAPLE by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited intended to provide an order-of-magnitude upgrade for the 2-MW university swimming-pool facilities and the advanced neutron source by the U.S. Department of Energy intended as the ultimate steady-state neutron facility. A rational program for U.S. research reactors might include the following components: (1) an inexpensive and very reliable reactor to replace the underutilized or underfunded university facilities of 2 MW or less; (2) a simple design in the 10- to 20-MW range to provide full research capability for some universities and other laboratories (the MAPLE design is a step in this direction); and (3) one or more of a high-end reactor with a power level up to 250 MW. Recent experience has shown that an important design criterion for any such facilities must be reliability of operation. All of these reactors would provide high-quality neutron beams as well as a variety of irradiation facilities

  17. Radon in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, H.

    2000-01-01

    Several projects in Austria deal with the problem of enhanced radon exposure to the public. The Austrian Radon Project is the largest project within this task, with the aim of investigating the radon concentrations in Austrian homes. Another project concerns mitigation methods. According to the EU directive EURATOM 96/29 it is also necessary to check working places for possibly enhanced radon concentrations. These projects are and will be funded by the government. The federal government of Upper Austria sponsored a project to test the indoor air quality in kindergartens including radon measurements. Within an EU research project, the radon concentrations in Austrian springs and groundwater were systematically listed and analyzed. Additional investigations will focus on methods to improve the radon potential maps from the Austrian Radon Project by including geological and other information. (author)

  18. Upgrading and modernization of the high flux reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, The Netherlands, owned by the European Communities and operated by the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, is a water-cooled and moderated, multipurpose research reactor of the closed-tank in-pool type, operated at 45 MW. Performance upgrading comprised two power increases from 20 MW via 30 MW to 45 MW, providing more and higher rated irradiation positions in the tank. With the replacement of the original reactor vessel the experimental capabilities of the reactor were improved. Better pool side facilities and the introduction of a large cross-section, double, beam tube were implemented. Additional major installation upgrading activities consisted of the replacement of the primary and the pool heat exchangers, replacement of the beryllium reflector elements, extension of the overpower protection systems and upgrading of the nuclear instrumentation as well as the guaranteed power supply. Control room upgrading is in progress. A full new safety analysis, as well as the introduction of a comprehensive Quality Assurance system, are summarized under software upgrading. Continuous modernization and upgrading also takes place of equipment for fuel and structural materials irradiations for fission reactors and future fusion machines. In parallel, all supporting services, as well as the management structure for large irradiation programmes, have been developed. Presently the reactor is operating at about 275 full power days per year with an average utilization of the irradiation positions of 70 to 80%. (orig.)

  19. Physics in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1985-07-01

    This catalogue gives the results of an investigation on research institutes in Austria in the field of physics, including nuclear physics, which was performed by the Austrian Physical Society. The main part is on university institutes, but also other research institutes are listed. For each institute the name of the head, number of researchers, a short description of the scientific work and an overview of national and international cooperation is given. Various registers and indexes are attached. (A.N.)

  20. ARC Code TI: Swim

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Swim is a software information service for the grid built on top of Pour, which is an information service framework developed at NASA. Swim provides true software...

  1. Laryngoscopy during swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken

    2017-01-01

    that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  2. Determination of the exposition rapidity in the level 49.90 of the reactor building for the decrease in the water level of the spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijangos D, Z. E.; Herrera H, S. F.; Cruz G, M. A.; Amador C, C.

    2014-10-01

    The fuel assemblies storage in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) represents a crucial aspect, due to the generated dose by the decay heat of the present radio-nuclides in the assemblies retired of the reactor core, after their useful life. These spent assemblies are located inside the spent fuel pool (SFP), in the level 49.90 m in the Reload Floor of the Reactor building of NPP-L V. This leads to the protection at personnel applying the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) criteria, fulfilling the established dose criteria by the Regulator Body the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). Considering the loss scenario of the cooling system of the SFP, in which the SFP water vaporizes, is important to know the water level in which the limit of effective dose equivalent is fulfilled for the personnel. Also, is important for the instrumentation of the SFP, for the useful life of the same instruments. In this work is obtained the exposition rapidity corresponding to different water levels of SFP in the Reload Floor of NPP-L V, to identify the minimum level of water where the limit of effective dose equivalent is fulfilled of 25 rem s to the personnel, established in the Article 48 of the General Regulation of Radiological Safety of CNSNS and the Chapter 50 Section 67 of the 10-Cfr of Nuclear Regulatory Commission in USA. The water level is also identified where the exposition rapidity is of 15 m R/hr, being the value of the set point of the area radiation monitor D21-Re-N003-1, located to 125 cm over the level 49.90 meters of the Reload Floor of NPP-L V. (Author)

  3. Operational strategies for thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Cui, J.; Chen, X.

    2006-01-01

    Three operational strategies to reduce inhibition due to ammonia during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SS-OFMSW) rich in proteins were investigated. Feed was prepared by diluting SS-OFMSW (ratio of 1:4) with tap water or reactor process...

  4. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  5. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  6. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka

    1996-11-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  7. Swimming Safely (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    Almost 4,000 people die from drowning each year in the U.S. You can also get sick at the pool. This podcast discusses swimming pool safety tips.  Created: 5/22/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  8. Chernobyl - 30 years thereafter. Experiences and lessons learned in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, Franz Josef; Hajek, Michael; Steger, Ferdinand; Hefner, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    During the severe reactor accident in Chernobyl in 1986 large amounts of radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Unfavorable atmospheric circulation conditions have transported about 2%of the released radioactive matter to Austria. The contribution describes the measures and actions for dose reduction performed in Austria. The measured cs-137 distribution is illustrated (in some areas more the 100 Bq/m2 were deposited). Experiences considering the measurements in consequence of the contamination are discussed and improvements of the emergency planning are summarized.

  9. Saksa skandaal ja Austria / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2000-01-01

    Saksamaa korruptsiooniskandaal. J. Haideri Vabaduspartei valitsuse koosseisus. Kumb on suurem ohu allikas? Vt. samas art. Habsburg: Austria ei ole banaanivabariik. Austria mitteametliku troonipärija arvamus

  10. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking: A rationalization of apparent differences among stress corrosion cracking tendencies for sensitized regions in the process water piping and in the tanks of SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of stress corrosion cracking in the near weld regions of the SRS reactor tank walls is apparently lower than the cracking frequency near the pipe-to-pipe welds in the primary cooling water system. The difference in cracking tendency can be attributed to differences in the welding processes, fabrication schedules, near weld residual stresses, exposure conditions and other system variables. This memorandum discusses the technical issues that may account the differences in cracking tendencies based on a review of the fabrication and operating histories of the reactor systems and the accepted understanding of factors that control stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

  11. Pool water cleaning facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Asano, Takashi

    1998-05-29

    Only one system comprising a suppression poor water cleaning system (SPCU) and a filtration desalting tower (F/D) is connected for a plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting the one system of the SPCU pump, the F/D and the plurality of nuclear power plants are disposed, and the system is used in common with the plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting a pipeline for passing SP water to the commonly used SPCU pump and a skimmer surge tank are disposed, and fuel pool water is cooled and cleaned by the commonly used SPCU pump and the commonly used F/D. The number of SPCU pumps and the F/D facilities can be reduced, and a fuel pool water cooling operation mode and a fuel pool water cleaning operation mode which were conducted by an FPC pump so far are conducted by the SPCU pump. (N.H.)

  12. Changes in product formation and bacterial community by dilution rate on carbohydrate fermentation by methanogenic microflora in continuous flow stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Y; Haruta, S; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y

    2001-10-01

    Changes in product formation during carbohydrate fermentation by anaerobic microflora in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor were investigated with respect to the dilution rate in the reactor. In the fermentation by methanogenic microflora, stable methane fermentation, producing methane and carbon dioxide, was observed at relatively low dilution rates (less than 0.33 d(-1) on glucose and 0.20 d(-1) on cellulose). Decomposition of cellulose in the medium was a rate-limiting step in the reaction, because glucose was easily consumed at all applied dilution rates (0.07-4.81 d(-1)). Intermediate metabolites of methane fermentation, such as lactate, ethanol, acetate, butyrate, formate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide, were accumulated as dilution rate increased. Maximum yield of hydrogen was obtained at 4.81 d(-1) of dilution rate (0.1 mol/mol glucose on glucose or 0.7 mol/mol hexose on cellulose). Lactate was the major product on glucose (1.2 mol/mol glucose), whereas ethanol was predominant on cellulose (0.7 mol/mol hexose). An analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified bacterial 16S rDNA of the microflora indicated that changes in the microbial community took place at various dilution rates, and these changes appeared to correspond to the changes in product distributions. Sequence analyses of the DGGE fragments revealed the probable major population of the microflora. A band closely related to the microorganisms of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria was detected with strong intensity on both glucose and cellulose. Differences in the production yield of hydrogen could have been caused by different populations of microorganisms in each microflora. In the case of cellulose, increasing the dilution rate brought about an accumulation of microorganisms related to Clostridia species that have cellulolytic activity, this being in accordance with the notion of cellulose decomposition being the rate-limiting reaction.

  13. Puente en Melk, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt, W.

    1974-05-01

    Full Text Available This interesting bridge across the Danube links the central forest zone with the highway Ceste and contributes greatly to facilitate the intense traffic of this region. It has a total length of 818 m, distributed in nine spans: the two central ones over the river are 190 m each with box girders. A great many problems have bean solved successfully regarding the various foundations, slender beams, processes of concreting, the temperature of concrete, and the most adequate design and realisation all of which makes this work one of the most important ones that have been constructed in Austria during recent years.Este interesante puente sobre el Danubio enlaza la zona boscosa central con la autopista Oeste y contribuye grandemente a aligerar el denso tráfico de esta zona. Tiene una longitud total de 818 m, distribuidos en nueve tramos; los dos centrales, sobre el río, alcanzan los 190 m cada uno, con vigas de cajón. Se han resuelto acertadamente numerosos problemas, relacionados con las variadas cimentaciones adoptadas, esbeltez de canto en las vigas, procesos de hormigonado, temperatura del hormigón y el cálculo y ejecución más adecuados; todo lo cual hace de esta obra una de las más importantes que se han realizado en Austria durante los últimos años.

  14. Hydrolysis-acidogenesis of food waste in solid-liquid-separating continuous stirred tank reactor (SLS-CSTR) for volatile organic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-01-01

    The use of conventional continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) can affect the methane (CH4) recovery in a two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW) due to carbon short circuiting in the hydrolysis-acidogenesis (Hy-Aci) stage. In this research, we have designed and tested a solid-liquid-separating CSTR (SLS-CSTR) for effective Hy-Aci of FW. The working conditions were pH 6 and 9 (SLS-CSTR-1 and -2, respectively); temperature-37°C; agitation-300rpm; and organic loading rate (OLR)-2gVSL(-1)day(-1). The volatile fatty acids (VFA), enzyme activities and bacterial population (by qPCR) were determined as test parameters. Results showed that the Hy-Aci of FW at pH 9 produced ∼35% excess VFA as compared to that at pH 6, with acetic and butyric acids as major precursors, which correlated with the high enzyme activities and low lactic acid bacteria. The design provided efficient solid-liquid separation there by improved the organic acid yields from FW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Co-digestion of food and garden waste with mixed sludge from wastewater treatment in continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Boldrin, Alessio; Boe, Kanokwan

    2016-01-01

    Co-digestions of urban organic waste were conducted to investigate the effect of the mixing ratio between sludge, food waste, grass clippings and green waste at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Compared to the digestion of 100% sludge, the methane yield increased by 48% and 35%, when co......-digesting sludge with food waste, grass clippings and garden waste with a corresponding % VS of 10:67.5:15.75:6.75 (R1) and 10:45:31.5:13.5 (R2), respectively. The methane yield remained constant at around 425 and 385 NmL CH4/g VS in R1 and R2, respectively, when the reactors were operated at HRTs of 15, 20 and 30...

  16. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico; Evaluacion de la aptitud para el servicio de la piscina del reactor TRIGA Mark III del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, J.; Gachuz M, M.; Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Gonzalez R, C.; Nava G, T.; Medina R, M.J. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales del ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  17. Quantitative wake analysis of a freely swimming fish using 3D synthetic aperture PIV

    OpenAIRE

    Mendelson, Leah Rose; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture PIV (SAPIV) is used to quantitatively analyze the wake behind a giant danio (Danio aequipinnatus) swimming freely in a seeded quiescent tank. The experiment is designed with minimal constraints on animal behavior to ensure that natural swimming occurs. The fish exhibits forward swimming and turning behaviors at speeds between 0.9 and 1.5 body lengths/second. Results show clearly isolated and linked vortex rings in the wake structure, as well as the thrust jet coming off of ...

  18. Neutron detection in an atomic reactor core using semi-conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divoux, F.

    1968-01-01

    In this paper, the first part describes the principle of nuclear particle detection by means of semiconductor diodes and the general application of these. The second part describes fabrication of the device used to estimate thermic neutron fluxes in core of a swimming pool type reactor. The useful volume (2.9 mm thickness) is in the light water moderator, between combustible elements plates. The results, principally obtained in the core of Siloette reactor at the 'Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble' at low power, are mentioned in the third part. Flux maps have been set and comparison between converter's products: Bore 10, Lithium 6, Uranium 235 is made. (author) [fr

  19. HTR research and development in Austria. 1982-1984 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, E.; Neumann, W.; Fritz, K.

    1984-01-01

    Due to Austria's participation in the OECD Dragon project, a considerable amount of R and D work has been performed and is still going on in several selected areas related to high-temperature gas cooled reactors. These areas are: High temperature reactor fuels; High temperature structural materials; High temperature helium test rig prestressed concrete pressure vessels

  20. Transient analysis of a typical MTR fuel type research reactor by RELAP5/MOD 3.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazeri, A.; Bousbia Salah, A.; D'Auria, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this work the Transient Analysis for two different scenarios in a typical research reactor are considered. The first case is T he Spurious opening of the safety flapper valve, following reactor trip . The second case is the same as the first one, but the corresponding trip signal is not initiated, i.e. an anticipated transient without scram. The safety flapper valve is employed for natural convection in a typical swimming pool type research reactor. In both cases it is considered that the core is in steady state operation at full power. The reactor under consideration is a pool-type MTR core with maximum thermal capacity of 1 MW. Light water moderates the neutrons and a downward forced circulation of light water cools off the core as well. The analysis is performed using advanced computational tools, i.e. RELAP5/MOD 3.3

  1. Co-digestion of food and garden waste with mixed sludge from wastewater treatment in continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Boldrin, Alessio; Boe, Kanokwan

    2016-01-01

    Co-digestions of urban organic waste were conducted to investigate the effect of the mixing ratio between sludge, food waste, grass clippings and green waste at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Compared to the digestion of 100% sludge, the methane yield increased by 48% and 35%, when co......-digesting sludge with food waste, grass clippings and garden waste with a corresponding % VS of 10:67.5:15.75:6.75 (R1) and 10:45:31.5:13.5 (R2), respectively. The methane yield remained constant at around 425 and 385 NmL CH4/g VS in R1 and R2, respectively, when the reactors were operated at HRTs of 15, 20 and 30...... days. However, the methane yield dropped significantly to 356 (R1) and 315 (R2) NmL CH4/g VS when reducing the HRT to 10 days, indicating that the process was stressed. Since the methane production rate improved significantly with decreasing HRT, the trade-off between yield and productivity...

  2. Swimming type inspection device and system thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Arata; Kimura, Motohiko; Ito, Tomoyuki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a swimming type inspection device which can be reduced in the size, easily accessible to each portion of a reactor, and increase the degree of freedom of swimming and visual range, and facilitate visual inspection. The swimming type inspection device comprises two photographing devices, a device which can obtain propelling force by rotation of impellers, two second propelling devices having impellers disposed in perpendicular to the rotating axis of the impellers of the first propelling device, a control device for controlling control signals of first and second propelling devices and driving devices therefor and control image signals of the photographing devices, and transmission section for wireless transmitting of the control signals and the image signals. (N.H.)

  3. Effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters of elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2017-03-01

    In the present research, we examined the effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters by (1) comparing the starting and turning velocities with the swimming parameters on the emersion and mid-pool segments and (2) by relating the individual behaviour of swimmers during the start and turns with subsequent behaviour on each swimming lap. One hundred and twelve 100 m performances on the FINA 2013 World Swimming Championships were analysed by an image-processing system (InThePool 2.0®). At the point of the start emersion, the swimming parameters of the 100-m elite swimmers were substantially greater than the mid-pool parameters, except on the breaststroke races. On the other hand, no diminution in the swimming parameters was observed between the turn emersion and the mid-pool swimming, except on the butterfly and backstroke male races. Changes on the surface swimming kinematics were not generally related to the starting or turning parameters, although male swimmers who develop faster starts seem to achieve faster velocities at emersion. Race analysts should be aware of a transfer of momentum when swimmers emerge from underwater with implications on the subsequent swimming kinematics, especially for male swimmers who employ underwater undulatory techniques.

  4. 76 FR 62605 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Interpretation of Unblockable Drain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... 19, 2008. The VGB Act's purpose is to prevent suction entrapment by swimming pool and spa drains and child drowning in swimming pools and spas. Section 1404(c)(1)(A)(i) of the VGB Act requires that each... area (beyond the shadowed portion) cannot create a suction force in excess of the removal force values...

  5. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  6. The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS reg-sign): Completely-Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) formulations for the wetland pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.P.; van der Aa, N.G.F.M.; Whelan, G.

    1997-06-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a physics-based environmental analysis code integrating source-term, fate, and exposure models for concentration, dose, or risk endpoints. Developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, MEPAS is designed for site-specific assessments using readily available information. Endpoints are computed for chemical and radioactive pollutants. For human health impacts, risks are computed for radioactive and hazardous carcinogens, and hazard quotients for noncarcinogens. This system has wide applicability to environmental problems using air, groundwater, surface-water, overland, wetland, and exposure models. MEPAS enables users to simulate release of contaminants from a source; transport of contaminants through the air, groundwater, surface-water, overland, or wetland pathways; and transfer of contaminants through food chains and exposure pathways to the exposed individual or population. Whenever available and appropriate, guidance and/or models from the US Environmental Protection Agency, International Commission on Radiological Protection, and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements were used to facilitate compatibility and acceptance. Although based on relatively standard transport and exposure computation approaches, MEPAS uniquely integrated these approaches into a single system, providing a consistent basis for evaluating health impacts for a large number of problems and sites. Implemented on a desktop computer, a user-friendly platform allows the user to define the problem, input the required data, and execute the appropriate models. This document describes the mathematical formulations for the Completely-Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) component of MEPAS as applied to the wetland pathway

  7. Recovery of resources for advanced life support space applications: effect of retention time on biodegradation of two crop residues in a fed-batch, continuous stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.; Cook, K.; Garland, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Bioreactor retention time is a key process variable that will influence costs that are relevant to long distance space travel or long duration space habitation. However. little is known about the effects of this parameter on the microbiological treatment options that are being proposed for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. Two bioreactor studies were designed to examine this variable. In the first one, six retention times ranging from 1.3 to 21.3 days--were run in duplicate, 81 working-volume continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) that were fed ALS wheat residues. Ash-free dry weight loss, carbon mineralization, soluble TOC reduction, changes in fiber content (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin), bacterial numbers, and mineral recoveries were monitored. At short retention times--1.33 days--biodegradation was poor (total: 16-20%, cellulose - 12%, hemicellulose - 28%) but soluble TOC was decreased by 75-80% and recovery of major crop inorganic nutrients was adequate, except for phosphorus. A high proportion of the total bacteria (ca. 83%) was actively respiring. At the longest retention time tested, 21.3 days, biodegradation was good (total: 55-60%, cellulose ca. 70%, hemicellulose - ca. 55%) and soluble TOC was decreased by 80%. Recovery of major nutrients, except phosphorus, remained adequate. A very low proportion of total bacteria was actively respiring (ca. 16%). The second bioreactor study used potato residue to determine if even shorter retention times could be used (range 0.25-2.0 days). Although overall biodegradation deteriorated, the degradation of soluble TOC continued to be ca. 75%. We conclude that if the goal of ALS bioprocessing is maximal degradation of crop residues, including cellulose, then retention times of 10 days or longer will be needed. If the goal is to provide inorganic nutrients with the smallest volume/weight bioreactor possible, then a retention time of 1 day (or less) is sufficient.

  8. An experimental investigation of the thermal mixing in a water pool using a simplified I-sparger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Jun, H. G.; Youn, Y. J.; Park, C. K.; Song, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    The SDVS (Safety Depressurization and Vent System) in the APR1400 is designed to cope with some DBEs (Design Bases Events) and beyond-DBEs related to overpressurization of the RCS (Reactor Coolant System). When the POSRV (Power Operated Safety Relief Valve) is actuated, steam from the pressurizer is discharged to the IRWST(In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank) through I-spargers. When injected steam is condensed in the pool, it induces water motions and temperature variations in the pool, which effects on the steam jet condensation, vice versa. The B and C(Blowdown and Condensation) loop is a test facility for the thermal mixing through a steam sparger in a water pool. Thermal mixing tests provide basic understanding of the physics and some insights related to efficient pool mixing, dynamic load, and the IRWST design improvement etc

  9. Country profile: Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Situated at the East-West crossroads, Austria's energy sector is wide open to import, transit and export of supplies. This has become increasingly important as energy resources have dwindled, to the point where primary production accounts for around one-third of consumption, which is still heavily dependent on oil. Oil exploration and production has dropped significantly, as OMV - state-controlled but mid-privatisation - has sought to diversify its crude sources to maintain supply security. OMV's interests in the trans-Alpine crude pipeline network help to offset product transport costs from the Schwechat refinery. Domestic gas production, meanwhile, meets a quarter of demand. OMV again dominates as producer and importer, having recently moved to tie up supply from Norway and Algeria as questionmarks remain over the future of gas from the former Soviet Union. Coal continues to play a significant role in the energy matrix, but indigenous production has slipped with only the lignite reserves remaining. Responsible for the coordination of production and imports, the VbG electricity authority has struggled to find ways to increase capacity to meet growing demand. Massive hydro projects have run into the kind of opposition from the public that put paid to the country's never started up and now mothballed nuclear facility. The trend towards reliance on imports is likely to persist: at least the country is ideally situated, with connections to the grids of both East and West Europe. (author)

  10. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Disclosed is a neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch. 1 claim, 16 figures

  12. SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.J.R.; Downs, W.E.

    1974-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE reactor is described, which is a small pool type with thermal neutron fluxes ranging from 10 11 -10 12 n cm -2 sec -1 . It differs in many ways from conventional pool type, namely small critical mass, beryllium reflector and a closed reactor container. The reactor is designed as small and simply as possible, and consistently with safety and good operating practice. Access to the present model is via pneumatic irradiation tubes only, which limits the use of the facility to activation analysis, tracer production and training. (Mori, K.)

  13. Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a polygon layer representing existing vernal pool complexes in California's Central Valley, as identified and mapped by Dr. Robert F. Holland. The purpose of...

  14. Simulated front crawl swimming performance related to critical speed and critical power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, H.M.; Wakayoshi, K.; Hollander, A.P.; Ogita, F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Competitive pool swimming events range in distance from 50 to 1500 m. Given the difference in performance times (±23-1000 s), the contribution of the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems changes considerably with race distance. In training practice the regression line between swimming

  15. A Guide to Swimming Instruction for Developmentally Disabled Children. Report Number 8168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Susan

    The swimming instruction guide presents teaching techniques and skill progressions for developmentally disabled individuals and includes program development and administrative guidelines. Part 1 discusses swimming and developmentally disabled children, program planning and preparation elements (including pool, scheduling, staff, parents,…

  16. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report

  17. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

  18. Historical earthquake research in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, Christa

    2017-12-01

    Austria has a moderate seismicity, and on average the population feels 40 earthquakes per year or approximately three earthquakes per month. A severe earthquake with light building damage is expected roughly every 2 to 3 years in Austria. Severe damage to buildings ( I 0 > 8° EMS) occurs significantly less frequently, the average period of recurrence is about 75 years. For this reason the historical earthquake research has been of special importance in Austria. The interest in historical earthquakes in the past in the Austro-Hungarian Empire is outlined, beginning with an initiative of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the development of historical earthquake research as an independent research field after the 1978 "Zwentendorf plebiscite" on whether the nuclear power plant will start up. The applied methods are introduced briefly along with the most important studies and last but not least as an example of a recently carried out case study, one of the strongest past earthquakes in Austria, the earthquake of 17 July 1670, is presented. The research into historical earthquakes in Austria concentrates on seismic events of the pre-instrumental period. The investigations are not only of historical interest, but also contribute to the completeness and correctness of the Austrian earthquake catalogue, which is the basis for seismic hazard analysis and as such benefits the public, communities, civil engineers, architects, civil protection, and many others.

  19. Microbial community analysis of a biogas-producing completely stirred tank reactor fed continuously with fodder beet silage as mono-substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Michael; Mähnert, Pia; Mundt, Kerstin; Souidi, Khadidja; Linke, Bernd

    2007-03-01

    The bioconversion of renewable raw material to biogas by anaerobic microbial fermentation processes in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTR) is a valuable alternative resource of energy especially for rural areas. However, knowledge about the microorganisms involved in the degradation of plant biomass is still poor. In this study, a first analysis of the biogas-forming process within a CSTR fed continuously with fodder beet silage as mono-substrate is presented in the context of molecular data on the microbial community composition. As indicated by the conventional process parameters like pH value, content of volatile fatty acids, N:P ratio and the biogas yield, the biogas-forming process within the CSTR occurred with a stable and efficient performance. The average biogas yield based on volatile solids was 0.87m(3)kg(-1) at an organic loading rate of 1.2-2.3kgm(-3)d(-1). This amounts to 94% of the theoretical maximum. In order to identify microorganisms within the CSTR, a 16S rDNA clone library was constructed by PCR amplification applying a prokaryote-specific primer set. One hundred and forty seven clones were obtained and subsequently characterized by amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The sequences of 60 unique ARDRA patterns were estimated in a length of approximately 800-900bp each. Four of them were assigned to the domain Archaea and 56 to the domain Bacteria. Within the domain Archaea, all clones showed a close relationship to methanogenic species. Major bacterial groups represented in the clone library were the class Clostridia of the phylum Firmicutes (22% of all 16S rDNA clones), the class Deltaproteobacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria (24%), the class Bacilli of the phylum Firmicutes (22%) and members of the phylum Bacteroidetes (21%). Within these major groups, the highest biodiversity was found within the class Clostridia (35% of all operational taxonomic units). Members of the phyla Actinobacteria and Spirochaetes were represented only

  20. Related activities on management of ageing of Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Van Lam [Reactor Dept., Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    1998-10-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed in 1982 from the previous 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed. The renovated reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. Since then DNRR has been operated safely. Retained structures of the former reactor such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, the horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding are 35 years old. During the recent years, in-service inspection has been carried out, the reactor control and instrumentation system were renovated due to ageing and obsolescence of its components, reactor general inspection and refurbishment were performed. Efforts are being made to cope with ageing of old reactor components to maintain safe operation of the DNRR. (author)

  1. Stress corrosion (Astm G30-90 standard) in 08x18H10T stainless steel of nuclear fuel storage pool in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, V.; Zamora R, L.

    1997-01-01

    At the water storage of the irradiated nuclear fuel has been an important factor in its management. The actual pools have its walls covered with inoxidable steel and heat exchangers to dissipate the residual heat from fuel. It is essential to control the water purity to eliminate those conditions which aid to the corrosion process in fuel and at related components. The steel used in this research was obtained from an austenitic inoxidizable steel standardized with titanium 08x18H10T (Type 321) similar to one of the two steel coatings used to cover walls and the pools floor. the test consisted in the specimen deformation through an U ply according to the Astm G30-90 standard. The exposition of the deformed specimen it was realized in simulated conditions to the chemical regime used in pools. (Author)

  2. Adiabatic continuous stirred tank reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll-Fleischer, Eskild; Wu, Hao; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    the experiment for use in course 28845 Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratory. Initially the experimental setup is described in terms of programmable logic controller (PLC) hardware, laboratory apparatus and software. This is followed by a description of how to connect to the PLC via OPC-UA. The appendix...... contains an experimental guide for use in course 28845, step-by-step instructions on how to control the setup with a computer, sample code and datasheets....

  3. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  4. Jules Horowitz reactor (RJH): its design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the design of the new irradiation facility (Jules Horowitz reactor) that is planned to be built on the Cadarache site of Cea. 2 principles have been followed. The first one is based on a physical separation between the systems and activities related to the reactor and the experiments from one hand and the other systems and means dedicated to the treatment of the experimental devices before and after irradiation on the other hand. This first principle implies to build 2 buildings: the reactor building and the nuclear auxiliaries building. Inside the reactor building activities from the reactor itself are separated from those dedicated to experimentation. In order to maximize the efficiency of such a reactor, an important number of simultaneous experiments is expected, which will generate an endless flux of incoming and out-going experiments and as a consequence an important handling work between the different work posts. The second principle aims at easing any handling work without breaking the rules of confinement. The different storing pools, the water pits that lead to the 5 hot cells and the reactor tank will communicate through a water-filled canal that will link the 2 buildings. (A.C.)

  5. Evaluating the efficiency of two phase partitioning stirred tank bio-reactor for treating xylene vapors from the airstreamthrough a bed of Pseudomonas Putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Golbabaei

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Overall, the results of the present research revealed that the application of two phase stirred tank bioreactors (TPPBs containing pure strains of Pseudomonas putida was successful for treatment of air streams with xylene.

  6. Safe Swimming (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-01

    Most outbreaks linked to pools and water playgrounds are caused by Cryptosporidium. This podcast discusses ways to keep you healthy and safe while swimming.  Created: 6/1/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 6/1/2017.

  7. Independent Swimming for Children with Severe Physical Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Susan J.; McGill, Christine D.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques are described for teaching severely physically disabled persons to swim. Approaches begin with a discussion of water adjustment progression and proceed through achieving breath control, mobility, developing movement in a supine position, and developing recovery. The conclusion addresses such final steps toward independence as pool entry…

  8. Predictors of Swimming Ability among Children and Adolescents in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pharr

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Swimming is an important source of physical activity and a life skill to prevent drowning. However, little research has been conducted to understand predictors of swimming ability. The purpose of this study was to understand factors that predict swimming ability among children and adolescents in the United States (US. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted between February and April of 2017 across five geographically diverse cities. Participants were accessed through the Young Christian Men’s Association (YMCA and included parents of children aged 4–11 years old and adolescents aged 12–17 years old. Independent t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Several factors were significant (p ≤ 0.05 predictors of swimming ability and explained 53% of the variance in swimming ability. Variables that were positively associated with swimming ability included: ability of parent(s to swim, child/adolescent age, a best friend who enjoys swimming, water-safety knowledge, pool open all year, and encouragement to swim from parent(s. Variables that were negatively associated with swimming ability included: fear of drowning, being African American, and being female. Interventions and programs to improve the swimming ability of children and adolescents could be developed with these predictors in mind.

  9. Experimental study of void behavior in a suppression pool of a boiling water reactor during the blowdown period of a loss of coolant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassame, Somboon

    The possible failure of an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) train due to a large amount of entrained gas in the ECCS pump suction piping in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is one of the potential engineering problems faced in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) power plant. To analyze potential gas intrusion into the ECCS pump suction piping, the study of void behavior in the Suppression Pool (SP) during the LOCA is necessary. The void fraction distribution and void penetration are considered as the key parameters in the problem analysis. Two sets of experiments, namely, steady-state tests and transient tests were conducted using the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly for ESBWR application (PUMA-E) to study void behavior in the SP during the blowdown. The design of the test apparatus used is based on the scaling analysis from a prototypical BWR containment (MARK-I) with consideration of the downcomer size, the SP water level, and the downcomer water submergence depth. Several instruments were installed to obtain the required experimental data, such as inlet gas volumetric flow, void fraction, pressure, and temperature. For the steady-state tests, the air was injected through a downcomer pipe in the SP in order to simulate the physical phenomena in the SP during the initial blowdown of LOCA. Thirty tests were performed with two different downcomer sizes (0.076 and 0.102 m), various air volumetric flow rates or flux (0.003 to 0.153 m3/s or 0.5 to 24.7 m/s), initial downcomer void conditions (fully filled with water, partially void, and completely void) and air velocity ramp rates (one to two seconds). Two phases of the experiment were observed, namely, the initial phase and the quasi-steady phase. The initial phase produced the maximum void penetration depth; and the quasi-steady phase showed less void penetration with oscillation in the void penetration. The air volumetric flow rate was found to have a minor effect on the void fraction

  10. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  11. [The effect of swimming on the nasal passages and on tube function in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desterbeck, R A; Stoop, A; Franckx, H; Clement, P A; Kaufman, L; Rousseeuw, P

    1984-01-01

    In two studies the authors want to confirm experimentally what is assumed in every day ENT-practice: otitis and sinusitis are not infrequent complications of swimming. The first study, involving 60 children with chronic non-specific lung diseases shows that swimming in a sea water pool increases the nasal airway resistance during two days. In the second study, performed in 32 normal children swimming in a chlorous pool, a negative relationship is found between the number of days after the swimming and the increased nasal airway resistance. Probably other factors also play a part in this phenomenon. Due to the too small number of children showing an otitis media with effusion, the influence of swimming on the function of the Eustachian tube could not be determined.

  12. The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2012-01-31

    Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71\\/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.

  13. Volumetric flow around a swimming lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Colin, Sean P.; Costello, John H.; Leftwich, Megan C.; Tytell, Eric D.

    2015-11-01

    A primary experimental technique for studying fluid-structure interactions around swimming fish has been planar dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). Typically, two components of the velocity vector are measured in a plane, in the case of swimming studies, directly behind the animal. While useful, this approach provides little to no insight about fluid structure interactions above and below the fish. For fish with a small height relative to body length, such as the long and approximately cylindrical lamprey, 3D information is essential to characterize how these fish interact with their fluid environment. This study presents 3D flow structures along the body and in the wake of larval lamprey, P etromyzon m arinus , which are 10-15 cm long. Lamprey swim through a 1000 cm3 field of view in a standard 10 gallon tank illuminated by a green laser. Data are collected using the three component velocimeter V3V system by TSI, Inc. and processed using Insight 4G software. This study expands on previous works that show two pairs of vortices each tail beat in the mid-plane of the lamprey wake. NSF DMS 1062052.

  14. Utilization of plastic detector for pool water radioactivity control of IEA-R1 reactor. Examination of fuel element irradiation behaviour fabricated at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berretta, J.R.; Mesquita, C.H. de; Madi Filho, T.

    1989-01-01

    For the examination of fuel element irradiation behavior that were fabricated at IPEN/CNEN/SP Metalurgical Departament, it was provided a detection system for pool water radioactivity measurements. This system uses a plastic scintillator detector produced at IPEN/CNEN-SP Health Physics Department, with dimensions and shape apropriated for such work. The detection system shows a sensibility of 4.125x10 -2 dps/cm 3 and 20% of efficiency for 131 I radiations. (author) [pt

  15. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  16. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  17. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  18. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  19. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  20. 2012 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  1. Front crawl swimming analysis using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa, Hugo G; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Thiel, David V

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical characteristics such as stroke rate and stroke length can be used to determine the velocity of a swimmer and can be analysed in both a swimming pool and a flume. The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the differences between the acceleration data collected from ...... movements (0.64 ≤ r ≤ 0.75). The correlation coefficients are (0.75 ≤ r ≤ 0.83) and (0.82 ≤ r ≤ 0.89) for the other two axes....

  2. Presa Malta – Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt, W.

    1975-11-01

    Full Text Available The Malta Dam consists of three consecutive units, united by means of pressure galleries. The upper and the lower steps are balancing tanks with a capacity of 1,800,000 and 500,000 m2, respectively. The middle step is a great vaulted dam of 200 m height, of 200 million m2 capacity, with a crest length of 600 m, and is therefore one of the largest dams in the world of its kind. This hydroelectric group will be able to provide annually approximately 900 million kW/h, by using exclusively the natural flow of the river Malta and its tributaries. For the construction of this power plant, various additional installations were necessary, such as for instance: the preparation of the quarry for the extraction of the aggregates; transport systems for the aggregates and the concrete; living quarters for approximately 700 workers, kitchen, dining-rooms, lounges, work-shops and storage rooms; purification plants and water supply installation; and finally, the numerous access roads to all the working areas.Se halla constituida por tres escalones sucesivos unidos entre sí por medio de galerías de presión. Los escalones superior e inferior son depósitos de compensación de 1.800.000 y 500.000 m2 de capacidad, respectivamente. El escalón intermedio es un gran embalse de 200 millones de m2 de volumen, cerrado con una presa-bóveda, cuyo muro tiene 200 m de altura y una corona de 600 m de longitud, siendo una de las mayores presas, de este tipo, en el mundo. El grupo formado por estas centrales eléctricas podrá producir en un año normal cerca de 900 millones de kW/h, aprovechando solamente la afluencia natural del río Malta y sus afluentes. Para la ejecución de esta obra se han necesitado numerosas instalaciones, entre las que cabe destacar: la preparación de la cantera en la que se obtienen los áridos; la central de hormigonado; los sistemas de transporte para los áridos y el hormigón; un campamento de vivienda para 700 personas, con

  3. Pool scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Jimenez, J.; Herranz, J.; Escudero, M.J.; Espigares, M.M.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Kortz, Ch.; Koch, M.K.; Brockmeier, U.; Unger, H.; Dutton, L.M.C.; Smedley, Ch.; Trow, W.; Jones, A.V.; Bonanni, E.; Calvo, M.; Alonso, A.

    1996-12-01

    The Source Term Project in the Third Frame Work Programme of the European Union Was conducted under and important joined effort on pool scrubbing research. CIEMAT was the Task Manager of the project and several other organizations participated in it: JRC-Ispra, NNC Limited, RUB-NES and UPM. The project was divided into several tasks. A peer review of the models in the pool scrubbing codes SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 was made, considering the different aspects in the hydrodynamic phenomenology, particle retention and fission product vapor abortions. Several dominant risk accident sequences were analyzed with MAAP, SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and the predictions were compared. A churn-turbulent model was developed for the hydrodynamic behaviour of the pool. Finally, an experimental programme in the PECA facility of CIEMAT was conducted in order to study the decontamination factor under jet injection regime, and the experimental observations were compared with the SPARC and BUSCA codes. (Author)

  4. Chairman’s Summary [International Experts’ Meeting on Reactor and Spent Fuel Safety in the Light of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Vienna (Austria), 19-22 March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meserve, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    General remarks In furtherance of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (the Action Plan) unanimously endorsed by the Member States as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the IAEA held an International Experts’ Meeting (“IEM”) from 19-22 March 2012. The primary objectives of this IEM were to analyze relevant technical aspects of reactor and spent nuclear fuel management safety and performance; to review what is known to date about the accident in order to understand more fully its root causes; and to share the lessons learned from the accident. These objectives served to pursue several purposes of the Action Plan: · to discuss the results of Member States national assessments of the safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants in light of lessons learned to date (Action Plan, Safety Assessments in the Light of the Accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power station bullet no. 11); · to analyze all relevant technical aspects and learn the lessons from the Fukushima accident. (Action Plan, Communication and Information Dissemination bullet no. 41); and · to help facilitate and to continue to share with member states a fully transparent assessment of the accident in cooperation with Japan (Action Plan, Communication and Information Dissemination bullet no. 5). The IEM was attended by approximately 230 experts from 44 Member States and 4 international organizations. There were wide-ranging and open discussions and a full exchange of information. This summary is intended to reflect observations that were made at the IEM, but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of the participants. The IEM revealed that the Member States (including regulators, industry, and technical support organizations), the IAEA Secretariat, and other relevant organizations had undertaken very significant efforts to analyze the Fukushima accident and to take appropriate actions to respond to it. The overall efforts have been comprehensive

  5. In the making: SA-PIV applied to swimming practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Josje; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2017-11-01

    To understand and optimize the propulsion in human swimming, a deep understanding of the hydrodynamics of swimming is required. This is usually based on experiments and numerical simulations under laboratory conditions.. In this study, we bring basic fluid mechanics knowledge and experimental measurement techniques to analyze the flow towards the swimming practice itself. A flow visualization setup is build and placed in a regular swimming pool. The measurement volume contains five homogeneous air bubble curtains illuminated by ambient light. The bubbles in these curtains act as tracer particles. The bubble motion is captured by six cameras placed in the side wall of the pool. It is intended to apply SA-PIV (synthetic aperture PIV) for analyzing the flow structures on multiple planes in the measurement volume. The system has been calibrated and the calibration data are used to refocus on the planes of interest. Multiple preprocessing steps need to be executed to obtain the proper quality of images before applying PIV. With a specially programmed video card to process and analyze the images in real-time feedback about swimming performance will become possible. We report on the first experimental data obtained by this system.

  6. Power control of water reactors using nitrogen 16 activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariod, R.; Merchie, F.; O'byrne, G.

    1964-01-01

    At the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, the open-core swimming pool reactors Melusine (2 MW) and Siloe (15 MW) are controlled at a constant overall power using nitrogen-16 channels. The conventional linear control channels react instantaneously to the rapid power fluctuations, this being necessary for the safety of the reactors, but their power indications are erroneous since they are affected by local deformations of the thermal flux caused by the compensation movements of the control rods. The nitrogen-16 channels on the other hand give an indication of the overall power proportional to the mean fission flux and independent of the rod movements, but their response time is 15 seconds, A constant overall power control is thus possible by a slow correction of the reference signal given by the automatic control governed by thu linear channels by means of a correction term given by the 'N-16' channels: This is done automatically in Melusine and manually in Siloe. (authors) [fr

  7. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a sodium cooled reactor of the type having a reactor hot pool, a slightly lower pressure reactor cold pool and a reactor vessel liner defining a reactor vessel liner flow gap separating the hot pool and the cold pool along the reactor vessel sidewalls and wherein the normal sodium circuit in the reactor includes main sodium reactor coolant pumps having a suction on the lower pressure sodium cold pool and an outlet to a reactor core; the reactor core for heating the sodium and discharging the sodium to the reactor hot pool; a heat exchanger for receiving sodium from the hot pool, and removing heat from the sodium and discharging the sodium to the lower pressure cold pool; the improvement across the reactor vessel liner comprising: a jet pump having a venturi installed across the reactor vessel liner, the jet pump having a lower inlet from the reactor vessel cold pool across the reactor vessel liner and an upper outlet to the reactor vessel hot pool

  8. [Epidemiology of obesity in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to compile all existing data regarding the prevalence of obesity in Austria in all age groups, and to perform additional analyses. Prevalence of obesity in the adult Austrian population varies between 8.3 and 19.9% in men, and 9.0 and 19.8% in women with increasing trends over time. Prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents in Austria varies between 3.1 and 9.0% in boys and between 2.2 and 7.3% in girls. Factors associated with obesity include higher age, lower educational level, profession, migration background, living in eastern parts of Austria, lack of social support, and psycho-social pressure. In women, socio-economic parameters are stronger associated with obesity compared to men. Obesity is associated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, and low back pain, and deteriorated quality of live, in both sexes, and in men additionally with a history of heart attack, and in women additionally with anxiety/depression.

  9. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Fast flux measurements by means of threshold detectors on the reactor 'Melusine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, P.; Sautiez, B.

    1959-01-01

    Using existing data on the (n,p) and (n,α) threshold reactions we have carried out fast flux measurements on the swimming pool type reactor 'Melusine'. Four common elements: P, S, Mg, Al were chosen because from the point of view of fast spectrum analysis they represent a fairly good energy range from 2.4 MeV to 8 MeV. The fission flux value found in the central element at a power of 1 MW is 1.4 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s ± 0.14. (author) [fr

  11. Nuclear reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Murase, Michio.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor containing facility, a condensation means is disposed above the water level of a cooling water pool to condensate steams of the cooling water pool, and return the condensated water to the cooling water pool. Upon occurrence of a pipeline rupture accident, steams generated by after-heat of a reactor core are caused to flow into a bent tube, blown from the exit of the bent tube into a suppression pool and condensated in a suppression pool water, thereby suppressing the pressure in the reactor container. Cooling water in the cooling water pool is boiled by heat conduction due to the condensation of steams, then the steams are exhausted to the outside of the reactor container to remove the heat of the reactor container to the outside of the reactor. In addition, since cooling water is supplied to the cooling water pool quasi-permanently by gravity as a natural force, the reactor container can be cooled by the cooling water pool for a long period of time. Since the condensation means is constituted with a closed loop and interrupted from the outside, radioactive materials are never released to the outside. (N.H.)

  12. Swimming performance assessment in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Keith B

    2011-05-20

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming abilities of different physiological and ecological relevance. Most frequently step size is set to determine critical swimming velocity (U(crit;)), which is intended to capture maximum sustained swimming ability. Traditionally this test has consisted of approximately ten steps each of 20 min duration. However, steps of shorter duration (e.g. 1 min) are increasingly being utilized to capture acceleration ability or burst swimming performance. Regardless of step size, swimming tests can be repeated over time to gauge individual variation and recovery ability. Endpoints related to swimming such as measures of metabolic rate, fin use, ventilation rate, and of behavior, such as the distance between schooling fish, are often included before, during and after swimming tests. Given the diversity of fish species, the number of unexplored research questions, and the importance of many species to global ecology and economic health, studies of fish swimming performance will remain popular and invaluable for the foreseeable future.

  13. Keila Tervisekeskus. Ujula = Keila Health Club. Swimming Pool / Ain Padrik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Padrik, Ain, 1947-

    2001-01-01

    Projekteerija: Arhitektuuribüroo Künnapu & Padrik. Arhitektid Ain Padrik ja Kristi Alamaa, sisearhitekt Sirje Männik. Konstruktsioonid: Jaan Laks, A-Grupp. Ujulas on võistlus- ja lastebassein, suvel on avatud välibassein. 5 ill.: I korruse plaan, ristlõige, vaated

  14. Ilves urges closer ties while in Austria / Ella Karapetyan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karapetyan, Ella

    2010-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese ametlik visiit Austria Vabariiki 22.11.2010 - 24.11.2010. Eesti riigipea pidas kõne Austria Majanduskojas Eesti-Austria majandusfoorumil, kohtus Alam-Austria Liidumaa parlamendi presidendi Hanz Penz'i ning Austria presidendi Heinz Fischeriga. Presidentide kohtumisel räägiti EL-i laienemispoliitikast, energiajulgeoleku probleemidest, Euroopa naabruspoliitikast ja idapartnerlusest

  15. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  16. Republic of Austria. Country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, L C

    1985-07-01

    A summary description of Austria's demographic situation, economic conditions, labor force characteristics, housing conditions, household characteristics, and marriage patterns is provided. Austria, the former center of the Hapsburg Empire, covers 32,375 square miles and is divided into 9 provinces, including Vienna, the federal capital. Austria's population increased from 6.9 million in 1950 to 7.6 million in 1980. Since 1980 it declined slightly and in 1985 it was estimated to be 7,487,000. Between 1961-81, the industrial, western region of the country grew more rapidly than the predominantly rural eastern section of the country. Vienna, the largest city in the country, experienced a decline in population size from 1.9 million to 1.5 million since 1923. Part of the decline was due to the annihilation of the city's Jewish population in 1938. Austria has a lower urban population (56%) than most other industrialized countries. This low rate reflects the availability of tourist related jobs in the rural areas. 98% of the population is Austrian, the official language is German, and most of the inhabitants are Roman Catholic. Due to the homogeneity of the population, the country has few religious and racial problems; however, a recent study indicated that about 1/2 of the population has anti-Semetic attitudes. Life expectancy is 69 years for men and 76 years for women. Austria's population is aging. Currently, 18% of the population is under 15 years of age, and 14% is 65 years of age or older. Births are expected to increase slightly until the end of the 1900s and then decline slightly. Austrians place a high value on children and family life. Between 1978-82 the marriage rate increased from 4.5/1000 to 4.8/1000, and the median age at marriage increased from 22.4-23.0 years for women and from 25.6-25.8 years for men. The number of divorces/year increased from 11,168-14.298 between 1976-82. Currently, there are 2,767,000 households, and the average household size is 2

  17. London 2012 Paralympic swimming: passive drag and the classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yim-Taek; Burkett, Brendan; Osborough, Conor; Formosa, Danielle; Payton, Carl

    2013-09-01

    The key difference between the Olympic and Paralympic Games is the use of classification systems within Paralympic sports to provide a fair competition for athletes with a range of physical disabilities. In 2009, the International Paralympic Committee mandated the development of new, evidence-based classification systems. This study aims to assess objectively the swimming classification system by determining the relationship between passive drag and level of swimming-specific impairment, as defined by the current swimming class. Data were collected on participants at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. The passive drag force of 113 swimmers (classes 3-14) was measured using an electro-mechanical towing device and load cell. Swimmers were towed on the surface of a swimming pool at 1.5 m/s while holding their most streamlined position. Passive drag ranged from 24.9 to 82.8 N; the normalised drag (drag/mass) ranged from 0.45 to 1.86 N/kg. Significant negative associations were found between drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.41, p < 0.01) and normalised drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.60, p < 0.01). The mean difference in drag between adjacent classes was inconsistent, ranging from 0 N (6 vs 7) to 11.9 N (5 vs 6). Reciprocal Ponderal Index (a measure of slenderness) correlated moderately with normalised drag (r(P) = -0.40, p < 0.01). Although swimmers with the lowest swimming class experienced the highest passive drag and vice versa, the inconsistent difference in mean passive drag between adjacent classes indicates that the current classification system does not always differentiate clearly between swimming groups.

  18. Extensive utilization of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, Karel; Sklenka, Lubomir

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The training reactor VR-1 Vrabec ('Sparrow'), operated at the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, was started up on December 3, 1990. Particularly, it is designed and operated for training of students from Czech universities, preparing of experts for the Czech nuclear programme, as well as for certain research and development work, and for information programmes in the sphere of non-military nuclear energy use (public relation). The VR-1 training reactor is a pool-type light-water reactor based on enriched uranium with maximum thermal power 1kWth and short time period up to 5kW th . The moderator of neutrons is light demineralized water (H 2 O) that is also used as a reflector, a biological shielding, and a coolant. Heat is removed from the core with natural convection. The reactor core contains 14 to 18 fuel assemblies IRT-3M, depending on the geometric arrangement and kind of experiments to be performed in the reactor. The core is accommodated in a cylindrical stainless steel vessel - pool, which is filled with water. UR-70 control rods serve the reactor control and safe shutdown. Training of the VR-1 reactor provides students with experience in reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and nuclear installation operation. Students from technical universities and from natural sciences universities come to the reactor for training. Approximately 200 university students are introduced to the reactor (lectures, experiments, experimental and diploma works, etc.) every year. About 12 different faculties from Czech universities use the reactor. International co-operation with European universities in Germany, Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, Holland and UK is frequent. Practical Course on Reactor Physics in Framework of European Nuclear Engineering Network has been newly introduced. Currently, students can try out more than 20 experimental exercises. Further training courses have been included

  19. Improving Pool Fencing Legislation in Queensland, Australia: Attitudes and Impact on Child Drowning Fatalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Franklin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Four-sided, non-climbable pool fencing is an effective strategy for preventing children from drowning in home swimming pools. In 2009, the Queensland Government introduced legislation to improve the effectiveness of pool fencing. This study explores community attitudes towards the effectiveness of these legislative changes and examines child (<5 years drowning deaths in pools. Data from the 2011 Queensland Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI Social Survey include results from questions related to pool ownership and pool fencing legislation. Fatal child drowning cases between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015 were sourced from coronial data. Of the 1263 respondents, 26/100 households had a pool. A total of 58% believed tightening legislation would be effective in reducing child drowning deaths. Pool owners were more likely to doubt the effectiveness of legislation (p < 0.001 when compared to non-pool owners. Perceptions of effectiveness did not differ by presence of children under the age of five. There were 46 children who drowned in Queensland home pools (7.8/100,000 pools with children residing in the residence/annum between 2005 and 2015. While pool owners were less likely to think that tightening the legislation would be effective, the number of children drowning in home swimming pools declined over the study period. Drowning prevention agencies have more work to do to ensure that the most vulnerable (young children in houses with swimming pools are protected.

  20. Improving the production yield and productivity of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone from glycerol fermentation using Gluconobacter oxydans NL71 in a compressed oxygen supply-sealed and stirred tank reactor (COS-SSTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Xuelian; Xu, Yong; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a compressed oxygen gas supply was connected to a sealed aerated stirred tank reactor (COS-SSTR) bio-system, leading to a high-oxygen pressure bioreactor used to improve the bio-transformative performance in the production of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from glycerol using Gluconobacter oxydans NL71. A concentration of 301.2 ± 8.2 g L(-1) DHA was obtained from glycerol after 32 h of fed-batch fermentation in the COS-SSTR system. The volumetric productivity for this process was 9.41 ± 0.23 g L(-1) h(-1), which is presently the highest obtained level of glycerol bioconversion into DHA. These results show that the application of this bioreactor would enable microbial production of DHA from glycerol at the industrial scale.

  1. Stirring by swimming bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jeanluc@math.wisc.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 480 Lincoln Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute for Mathematics and Applications, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, 207 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Childress, Stephen [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-07-26

    We consider the stirring of an inviscid fluid caused by the locomotion of bodies through it. The swimmers are approximated by non-interacting cylinders or spheres moving steadily along straight lines. We find the displacement of fluid particles caused by the nearby passage of a swimmer as a function of an impact parameter. We use this to compute the effective diffusion coefficient from the random walk of a fluid particle under the influence of a distribution of swimming bodies. We compare with the results of simulations. For typical sizes, densities and swimming velocities of schools of krill, the effective diffusivity in this model is five times the thermal diffusivity. However, we estimate that viscosity increases this value by two orders of magnitude.

  2. 1984 Operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The programme resources in 1984 were largely devoted to the replacement of the old reactor vessel and its peripheral equipment. The original vessel had been in operation for more than 20 years and doubts had arisen about the condition of the aluminium tank after so long an exposure to neutrons. The operation, which had never been attempted before on a reactor of that size and complexity was planned and prepared over a number of years to take advantage of the occasion to provide a much improved vessel, incorporating the latest design features. The plant was shut down at the end of November 1983 and the 14 months operation began with a short cooling-off period for decay of short lived radioactivity followed by removal of the old tank and its dissection into pieces convenient for consolidation and storage as radioactive waste. After decontamination of the shielding pool, the new vessel and neutron beam tubes were installed and the reactor was recommissioned. Routine 45 MW operation was resumed on 14 February 1985 and has been uneventful since then

  3. Investigación de un brote respiratorio agudo por exposición a cloro gas en una piscina pública Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory illness due to exposure to chlorine gas in a public swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles para investigar el accidente químico ocurrido en una piscina pública en el verano de 2005 y describir los factores ambientales responsables, analizar el efecto del cloro gas y valorar la evolución clínica y funcional del aparato respiratorio. Las intervenciones fueron las siguientes: inspecciones ambientales, encuesta epidemiológica (variables sociodemográficas, ubicación en el momento del accidente, olor percibido y seguimiento clínico y espirométrico de la función respiratoria. Se encuestaron 65 casos y 48 controles. El suceso se produjo al mezclar accidentalmente ácido clorhídrico e hipoclorito sódico, lo que generó cloro gas. Los síntomas predominantes fueron tos y disnea. El riesgo de enfermar en niños era 10 veces mayor si tenían una enfermedad respiratoria previa y 4 veces superior si estaban a una distancia inferior a 40 m del lugar del accidente. Todos los casos evolucionaron hacia la curación, excepto uno que tenía antecedentes asmáticos.A case-control study was designed to investigate a chemical accident that occurred in a swimming-pool in the summer of 2005. The aim was to describe the environmental factors involved in the accident, to assess the effect of chlorine gas on the respiratory system, and to perform a clinical and spirometric follow-up. The following interventions were carried out: environmental inspection, epidemiologic survey (including sociodemographic variables, location at the time of the accident, perception of an abnormal smell, and clinical and spirometric outcomes to assess respiratory function. Sixty-five cases and 48 controls were identified and interviewed. The accident was produced by accidental admixture of hydrochloric acid with sodium hypochlorite resulting in chlorine gas release. The main clinical symptoms were dyspnea and cough. The risk of becoming ill was 10-fold higher in children with a previous lung disease and was 4-fold higher when

  4. Structural integrity assessment of HANARO pool cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo

    2001-11-01

    This report is for the seismic analysis and the structural integrity evaluation of HANARO Pool Cover in accordances with the requirement of the Technical Specification for Seismic Analysis of HANARO Pool Cover. For performing the seismic analysis and evaluating the structural integrity for HANARO Pool Cover, the finite element analysis model using ANSYS 5.7 was developed and the dynamic characteristics were analyzed. The seismic response spectrum analyses of HANARO Pool Cover under the design floor response spectrum loads of OBE and SSE were performed. The analysis results show that the stress values in HANARO Pool Cover for the seismic loads are within the ASME Code limits. It is also confirmed that the fatigue usage factor is less than 1.0. Therefore any damage on structural integrity is not expected when an HANARO Pool Cover is installed in the upper part of the reactor pool

  5. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    generator, and eight reactor coolant pumps (RCP). The containment vessel is 27.1 m (89 ft) long and 9.8 m (32 ft) in diameter, and is designed to withstand pressures up to 1.7 MPa (250 psi). It is completely submerged in a pool of water serving as a heat sink and radiation shield. Housed within the containment are four combined core makeup tanks (CMT)/passive residual heat removal (PRHR) heat exchangers, two in-containment pools (ICP), two ICP tanks and four valves which function as the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The PRHR heat exchangers are thermally connected to two different ultimate heat sink (UHS) tanks which provide transient cooling capabilities. (authors)

  6. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J.

    2012-01-01

    , and eight reactor coolant pumps (RCP). The containment vessel is 27.1 m (89 ft) long and 9.8 m (32 ft) in diameter, and is designed to withstand pressures up to 1.7 MPa (250 psi). It is completely submerged in a pool of water serving as a heat sink and radiation shield. Housed within the containment are four combined core makeup tanks (CMT)/passive residual heat removal (PRHR) heat exchangers, two in-containment pools (ICP), two ICP tanks and four valves which function as the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The PRHR heat exchangers are thermally connected to two different ultimate heat sink (UHS) tanks which provide transient cooling capabilities. (authors)

  7. The evolution of doses in the IEA-R1 reactor environment and tendencies based on the current results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Eduardo Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The IPEN / CNEN-SP have a Nuclear Research Reactor-NRR named IEA-R1, in operation from 1957. It is an open swimming pool reactor using light water as shielding, moderator and as cooling, the volume of this pool is 273m 3 .Until 1995 the reactor operated daily at a power of 2,0 MW. From June of that year, after a few safety modifications the reactor began operating in continuous way from Monday to Wednesday without shutdown totalizing 64 hours per week and the power was increased to 4,5MW also. Because of these changes, continuous operation and increased power, workers' doses would tend to increase. In the past several studies were conducted seeking ways to reduce the workers' doses. A study was made on the possibility to introduce a shielding at the top of the reactor core with a hot water layer. Studies have shown that a major limitation for operating a reactor at high power comes from the gamma radiation emitted by the sodium-24. Other elements such as magnesium-27, aluminum-28, Argon-51, contribute considerably to the water activity of the pool. The introduction of a hot water layer on the swimming pool would form a layer of surface, stable and free of radioactive elements with a 1.5m to 2m thickness creates a shielding to radiation from radioactive elements dissolved in water. Optimization studies proved that the installation of the hot layer was not necessary for the regime and the current power reactor operation, because other procedures adopted were more effective. From this decision the Radiological Protection Reactor Team, set up a dose assessment program to ensure them remained in low values based on principles established in national and international standards. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the individual doses of OEI (Occupationally Exposed Individual), which will be checked increasing doses resulting from recent changes in reactor operation regime and suggested viable safety and protection options, in the first instance to reducing

  8. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Douglas [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-10-29

    The purpose of the United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program is to provide fresh nuclear reactor fuel to United States universities at no, or low, cost to the university. The title of the fuel remains with the United States government and when universities are finished with the fuel, the fuel is returned to the United States government. The program is funded by the United States Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy division, managed by Department of Energy - Idaho Field Office, and contracted to the Idaho National Laboratory's Management and Operations Contractor - Battelle Energy Alliance. Program has been at Idaho since 1977 and INL subcontracts with 26 United States domestic reactor facilities (13 TRIGA facilities, 9 plate fuel facilities, 2 AGN facilities, 1 Pulstar fuel facility, 1 Critical facility). University has not shipped fuel since 1968 and as such, we have no present procedures for shipping spent fuel. In addition: floor loading rate is unknown, many interferences must be removed to allow direct access to the reactor tank, floor space in the reactor cell is very limited, pavement ends inside our fence; some of the surface is not finished. The whole approach is narrow, curving and downhill. A truck large enough to transport the cask cannot pull into the lot and then back out (nearly impossible / refused by drivers); a large capacity (100 ton), long boom crane would have to be used due to loading dock obstructions. Access to the entrance door is on a sidewalk. The campus uses it as a road for construction equipment, deliveries and security response. Large trees are on both sides of sidewalk. Spent fuel shipments have never been done, no procedures approved or in place, no approved casks, no accident or safety analysis for spent fuel loading. Any cask assembly used in this facility will have to be removed from one crane, moved on the floor and then attached to another crane to get from the staging area to the reactor room

  9. Austria: The INIS Austria Centre 1970-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rössner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This article spotlights Austrian people and institutions that have influenced the fortunes of INIS and the INIS Centre in Austria. The work of two Austrians had a lasting influence on INIS. The first person, Ms Elisabeth Ruckenbauer, was Head of the INIS Bibliographic Control Unit at the start of INIS. She was responsible for the development and implementation of the INIS bibliographic description rules (INIS Reference Series IAEA-INIS-01 and -02). The second person having a lasting influence on INIS was Mr Alexander Nevyjel. He was Austrian INIS Liaison Officer from 1983 –2002, and Head of the INIS Subject Control Unit until 2011. During his second term of office, he developed, together with the Swiss company Convera, the Computer Assisted Indexing Software (CAI). The aim of the project was to optimize indexing. The implementation of CAI in 2004 resulted in an increase of input to the INIS database; from around 60 000 records per year to over 100 000 records per year. We are proud that Mr Nevyjel is still an active member of the INIS Austria Center and that he continues to offer his experience and expertise. The Austrian INIS Centre has resided at two scientific institutions: Seibersdorf and the Austrian Central Library for Physics and Chemistry Library, each having a specific relationship with the IAEA and INIS

  10. Reactor container facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi; Nagasaka, Hideo.

    1990-01-01

    A dry-well pool for spontaneously circulating stored pool water and a suppression pool for flooding a pressure vessel by feeding water, when required, to a flooding gap by means of spontaneous falling upto the flooding position, thereby flooding the pressure vessel are contained at the inside of a reactor container. Thus, when loss of coolant accidents such as caused by main pipe rupture accidents should happen, pool water in the suppression pool is supplied to the flooding gap by spontaneously falling. Further, if the flooding water uprises exceeding a predetermined level, the flooding gap is in communication with the dry-well pool at the upper and the lower portions respectively. Accordingly, flooding water at high temperature heated by the after-heat of the reactor core is returned again into the flooding gap to cool the reactor core repeatedly. (T.M.)

  11. Reactor core control device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Norihiko

    1991-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a control line having a control pump and a control tank for injecting liquids for neutron reflectors to an annular tank disposed in a reactor container, a supply line having a supply pump and a supply tank for supplying the liquids for the reflectors to the control tank, a drain line having a control valve, a drain valve and a drain tank disposed to the annular tank and a make-up line for supplying the liquids for the reflectors from the drain tank to the control tank. Liquids such as water or oil for the neutron reflectors are injected in the annular tank disposed at the periphery of the reactor core to raise the level of the liquids in the tank and conduct burning in the reactor core. The liquid level may be controlled by an appropriate ON/OFF operation of a pump with no requirement for a motor or a driving device at a high accuracy and rotational portions. Periodical maintenances are not necessary. Reactor scram can be conducted only by opening the drain valve and the reflectors may be made of inexpensive materials. (N.H.)

  12. Sewage sludge disposal in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, F.

    1997-01-01

    Sewage systems serve about 70% of the Austrian population, producing 6 million m 3 of sewage sludge per year with a dry matter content of 4-5%. At present about 52% of this sludge is disposed of in land fills, 33% is incinerated, and only about 15 % is used in agriculture. Although agricultural utilization is becoming increasingly important, several problems, especially those related to public opinion, need to be resolved before increased use will be possible. In this paper, wastewater treatment and sewage-sludge production in Austria, and problems associated with sludge disposal are discussed. (author)

  13. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    type of reactors: low power reactors, graphite and natural uranium reactors, heavy water and natural uranium reactors (with water, gas or heavy water as coolant), heavy water and enriched uranium reactors, 'kettle' type reactors, pool type reactors and high power reactors. Finally, additional factors are considered as the correlation of the reactor type with the research program, safety considerations, size of the construction and economical considerations. (M.P.)

  14. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsorn, S. [Reactor Operation Division, Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Chatuchak, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1999-10-01

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U{sub 3}O{sub 8}- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)

  15. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ce-Zr-La/Al2O3 prepared in a continuous stirred-tank reactor: a highly thermostable support for an efficient Rh-based three-way catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Ning; Lan, Li; Hua, Wei-Bo; Shi, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Yao-Qiang; Gong, Mao-Chu; Zhong, Lin

    2015-12-21

    Two Ce-Zr-La/Al2O3 composite oxides, CZLA-C and CZLA-B, were synthesized using a co-precipitation method in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) and a batch reactor (BR), respectively. Two Rh-based three-way catalysts (TWCs), Rh/CZLA-C and Rh/CZLA-B were obtained by a wet-impregnation method using the two composites as the supports. The physicochemical properties of the samples before and after thermal treatment at 1000 °C were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and CO chemisorption. The results indicated that CZLA-C shows higher thermal stability than CZLA-B due to a sparsely-agglomerated morphology. Compared with Rh/CZLA-B, Rh/CZLA-C displayed better reducibility and higher thermal stability and exhibited significantly higher activity in the catalytic removal of the simulated gasoline vehicle exhaust emission (NO, CO and C3H8). Our work can provide a facile and economical synthesis route to advanced support materials and catalysts for exhaust emission control.

  17. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.E.; Bonnet, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor and its containment, instead of being supported on a solid concrete pad, are supported on a truss formed of upper and lower reinforced horizontal plates and vertical walls integrated into a rigid structure. The plates and walls from chambers within which the auxiliary components of the reactor, such as valves, pumping equipment and various tanks, are disposed. Certain of the chambers are also access passages for personnel, pipe chases, valve chambers and the like. In particular the truss includes an annular chamber. This chamber is lined and sealed by a corrosion-resistant liner and contains coolant and serves as a refueling cooling storage tank. This tank is directly below the primary-coolant conductor loops which extend from the reactor above the upper plate. The upper plate includes a sump connected to the tank through which coolant flows into the tank in the event of the occurrence of a loss-of-coolant accident. The truss extends beyond the containment and has chambers in the extending annulus. Pumps for circulating the coolant between the refueling coolant storage tank and the reactor are provided in certain of these chambers. The pumps are connected to the reactor by relatively short coolant conductors. Access to these pumps is readily afforded through hatches in the extending annulus

  18. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  19. Corporate Financial Reporting in Austria : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report on corporate financial reporting in Austria is to describe the key features of Austria’s corporate financial reporting environment as well as its practical application in regard to small and medium enterprises (SMEs’) financial reporting practices in Austria. This report builds on the World Bank accounting and auditing reports on standards and codes (ROSC) method...

  20. Renewable sources of energy in Austria 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faninger, G.

    1993-07-01

    Present contribution of renewable sources of energy to the overall energy requirements in Austria. Estimated potential of renewable sources of energy in Austria: firewood and biogeneous fuels, environmental energy, combustible wastes. Ecological aspects of utilising renewable sources of energy. Market barriers and strategies for overcoming them

  1. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  2. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  3. Determination of the solids retainment effectiveness of disposable swim diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Richard P; Patch, Steven C; Berkowitz, Jacob F; Johnson, Holly D

    2004-06-01

    In light of recent and increasing incidences of pathogenic E. coli outbreaks at public bathing facilities attributable to non-toilet-trained infants and toddlers, many such facilities are restricting water contact for this age group. A number of manufacturers are now offering disposable "swim diapers," which claim to effectively retain fecal material under typical pool play conditions. The study reported here examined the solids retention effectiveness of three major brands of swim diapers as well as of conventional disposable diapers, under simulated water play conditions. Swim diapers of all three brands exhibited an approximately equal fine-solids retention capability of about 98 to 99 percent over 30 minutes of water immersion activity. Conventional disposable diapers invariably fell down or came apart during the experiments, resulting in very limited solids retention. This study indicates that commercially available swim diapers represent a vast improvement in reducing the potential for fecal material release in public pool facilities, but that some release will still generally occur with these products.

  4. La autopista de Viena Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1979-10-01

    Full Text Available The elevated stretch of the motorway crossing the city of Vienna in a North-South direction is the largest bridge in Austria. The bridge consists of a central span, the corresponding access ramps at the ends and a junction with a district highway having six separate roadways. The design and construction of the bridge was based on the principle of using the maximum amount of prefabricated parts in order to, on the one hand, achieve a higher constructive rationalization, and on the other, minimize erection time. Owing to its being inside the city, the bridge has been fitted with adequate lighting and runoff water disposal systems.

    El tramo volado de la autopista, que cruza Viena de norte a sur, constituye el puente más grande de toda Austria. Dicho puente consta de un tramo central, las correspondientes rampas de acceso en los extremos, y un nudo de enlace con la carretera comarcal compuesto por seis calzadas distintas. En su diseño y realización se procuró utilizar el mayor número posible de elementos prefabricados para, por una parte, permitir una construcción más racionalizada y, por otra, minimizar los tiempos de ejecución. Se ha dotado a toda la obra, por estar dentro de la ciudad, de unos adecuados sistemas de iluminación y evacuación de las aguas superficiales.

  5. Hospital hydrotherapy pools treated with ultra violet light: bad bacteriological quality and presence of thermophilic Naegleria.

    OpenAIRE

    De Jonckheere, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological quality of eight halogenated and two u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools in hospitals was investigated. The microbiological quality of halogenated hydrotherapy pools was comparable to halogenated public swimming pools, although in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and faecal pollution indicators were more frequent due to bad management. On the other hand u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools had very bad microbiological quality. Apart from faecal pollution indicators, P. aeruginosa was pr...

  6. Task 3.3 Use of circular tanks for on growing of Dover sole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mheen, van der H.W.; Schram, E.; Kloet, C.J.; Heul, van der J.W.; Kamstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    Circular tanks are widely used in aquaculture. They have the advantage of being self-cleaning, which is important for all forms of aquaculture. They also have a constant and non-ending flow throughout the tank, which is a particular advantage for active swimming fish species. The use of circular

  7. Mechanical krill models for studying coordinated swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Alice; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    The global biomass of Homo sapiens is about a third of the biomass of Euphausia superba, commonly known as the Antarctic krill. Krill participate in organized social behavior. Propulsive jets generated by individual krill in a school have been suggested to be important in providing hydrodynamic sensory cues. The importance of body positions and body angles on the wakes generated is challenging to study in free swimming krill. Our solution to study the flow fields of multiple krill was to develop mechanical krill robots. We designed krillbots using mostly 3D printed parts that are actuated by stepper motors. The krillbot limb lengths, angles, inter-limb spacing and pleopod stroke frequency were dynamically scaled using published data on free-swimming krill kinematics. The vertical and horizontal spacing between krillbots, as well as the body angle, are adjustable. In this study, we conducted particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements with two tethered krillbots in a flow tank with no background flow. One krillbot was placed above and behind the other. Both krillbots were at a zero-degree body angle. Wake-body interactions visualized from PIV data will be presented.

  8. Component failure data base of TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuricic, M.

    2004-10-01

    This compilation provides failure data such as first criticality, component type description (reactor component, population, cumulative calendar time, cumulative operating time, demands, failure mode, failures, failure rate, failure probability) and specific information on each type of component of TRIGA Mark-II reactors in Austria, Bangladesh, Germany, Finland, Indonesia, Italy, Indonesia, Slovenia and Romania. (nevyjel)

  9. Radio-transmitted electromyogram signals as indicators of swimming speed in lake trout and brown trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstad, E.B.; Økland, F.; Koed, Anders

    2000-01-01

    Swimming speed and average electromyogram (EMG) pulse intervals were highly correlated in individual lake trout Salvelinus namaycush (r(2)=0.52-0.89) and brown trout Salmo trutta (r(2)=0.45-0.96). High correlations were found also for pooled data in both lake trout (r(2)=0.90) and brown trout...... of the Ema stock (r(2)=0.96) and Laerdal stock (r(2)=0.96). The linear relationship between swimming speed and average EMG pulse intervals differed significantly among lake trout and the brown trout stocks. This successful calibration of EMGs to swimming speed opens the possibility of recording swimming...... speed of free swimming lake trout and brown trout in situ. EMGs can also be calibrated to oxygen consumption to record energy expenditure. (C) 2000 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles...

  10. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    OpenAIRE

    Maladen, Ryan D.; Ding, Yang; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numeric...

  11. Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leixnering, Stephan; Schikowitz, Andrea; Meyer, Renate E.

    2016-01-01

    The Austrian COCOPS findings confirm the ongoing relevance of the traditional legalistic public sector norms and values. However, this traditional administrative culture is today supplemented with managerialistic and network-oriented ideas and orientations. Combining a focus on results with process......, such as a lack of actual performance management, underscored by the perception of low management autonomy. Thus, while managerial values and principles appear as incorporated in Austrian public executives’ role identities, in order to deal with shortcomings and contradictions with the existing system, they fall...

  12. Fuel handling pool and safety water reserve for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1990-01-01

    This pool is characterized by a shutter generally in cylindrical form, fixed around the reactor vessel head and control rod drive mechanisms and removable sealed to the floor of the pool. This disposition allows the water to be held outside the shutter during reactor operation and gives an emergency water reserve in case of primary coolant circuit break. This pool always empty can be used for storing spent fuel [fr

  13. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  14. High flux testing reactor Petten. Replacement of the reactor vessel and connected components. Overall report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysochoides, N.G.; Cundy, M.R.; Von der Hardt, P.; Husmann, K.; Swanenburg de Veye, R.J.; Tas, A.

    1985-01-01

    The project of replacing the HFR originated in 1974 when results of several research programmes confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report contains the detailed chronology of events concerning preparation and execution of the replacement. After a 14 months' outage the reactor resumed routine operation on 14th February, 1985. At the end of several years of planning and preparation the reconstruction proceded in the following steps: unloading of the old core, decay of short-lived radioactivity in December 1983, removal of the old tank and of its peripheral equipment in January-February 1984, segmentation and waste disposal of the removed components in March-April, decontamination of the pools, bottom penetration overhauling in May-June, installation of the new tank and other new components in July-September, testing and commissioning, including minor modifications in October-December, and, trials runs and start-up preparation in January-February 1985. The new HFR Petten features increased and improved experimental facilities. Among others the obsolete thermal columns was replaced by two high flux beam tubes. Moreover the new plant has been designed for future increases of reactor power and neutron fluxes. For the next three to four years the reactor has to cope with a large irradiation programme, claiming its capacity to nearly 100%

  15. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Michihira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To equalize heavy water flow distribution by providing a nozzle for externally injecting heavy water from a vibration preventive plate to the upper portion to feed the heavy water in a pressure tube reactor and swallowing up heavy water in a calandria tank to supply the heavy water to the reactor core above the vibration preventive plate. Constitution: A moderator injection nozzle is mounted on the inner wall of a calandria tank. Heavy water is externally injected above the vibration preventive plate, and heavy water in the calandria tank is swallowed up to supply the heavy water to the core reactor above the vibration preventive plate. Therefore, the heavy water flow distribution can be equalized over the entire reactor core, and the distribution of neutron absorber dissolved in the heavy water is equalized. (Yoshihara, H.)

  16. Influence of mobile games on the process of teaching of students that can not swim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strelnykov G.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Considered direction in teaching of students to swimming in terms 25 meter pool. 30 students took part in an experiment. The place of mobile games in the process of teaching of novices is certain. Information of results of testing of level of physical preparedness of students is presented. Positive influence of mobile games on the process of mastering of skills of swimming and co-operations on water is marked. Forms and methods of mastering of skills and conduct in water are offered. The motive mode and forms of organization of educational process of not able to swim students is recommended.

  17. Tank Farms

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Afterirradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford, they were exposed to a series of chemical processes designed...

  18. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  19. The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    THESIS ANNOTATION Title: The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training Aim: To assess the impact of 'baby swimming' on the successfulness in introductory and partly in elementary swimming training, and to find out whether also other circumstances (for example the length of attendance at 'baby swimming') have some influence on introductory swimming training. Methods: We used a questionnaire method for the parents of children who had attended 'baby swimming' and f...

  20. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.