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Sample records for swimming crabs crustacea

  1. Swimming of the pea crab (Pinnotheres pisum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, C.P.C.; Muller, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic organisms have to deal with different hydrodynamic regimes, depending on their size and speed during locomotion. The pea crab swims by beating the third and fourth pereiopod on opposite sides as pairs. Using particle tracking velocimetry and high-speed video recording, we quantify the

  2. Porcelain crabs from Brazil (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Porcellanidae).

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    Ferreira, Luciane Augusto De Azevedo; De Melo, Gustavo Augusto Schmidt

    2016-03-15

    Twenty species of porcelain crabs are reported on the basis of material collected from Brazilian coasts. Considering the lack of systematic studies comprehending the Brazilian porcellanids, the present work presents a review of the regional species based on the current taxonomic information. New records, information about variation between specimens and a taxonomic discussion are given for porcellanid crabs from Brazil.

  3. A new species of portunid crab of the genus Charybdis (De Haan, 1833) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) from Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Padate, V.P.; Rivonker, C.U.; Anil, A.C.; Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.

    within the sub-family Thalamitinae Paulson, 1875, with 63 species (Thalamita Latreille, 1829 comprises 89 species) (Ng et al., 2008) distributed among four sub-genera (Charybdis De Haan, 1833; Goniohellenus Alcock, 1899; Gonioneptunus Ortmann, 1893.... Biol. Res., vol.6(6); 2010; 579-590 A new species of portunid crab of the genus Charybdis (De Haan, 1833) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) from Goa, India. VINAY P. PADATE Department of Marine Sciences, Goa University, Goa 403 206, India...

  4. First discovery of porcellanid crab, Porcellanella picta (Crustacea: Decapoda: Porcellanidae, from south-east coast of India

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    Kanagasabapathy Sivasubramanian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the distribution of any marine organism are very important in determining the range of its expansion in the oceans and to determine the factors influencing this expansion. This study reports for the first time the occurrence of the crab Porcellanella picta (Crustacea, Anomura, Porcellanidae in the Point Calimere coastal region of southeastern India. All the specimens found were sexually mature. This crab occurs only rarely on the Indian coast and this observation expands its known range, recording a second distributional area for the species and significantly extending its range on the southeast coast of India.

  5. The Effects of Season and Sex on the Nutritional Quality of Muscle Types of Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus and Swimming Crab Portunus segnis

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    Deniz Ayas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of season and sex on the nutritional quality of muscle types (lump crab meatLCM, claw crab meat-CCM of swimming crab (Portunus segnis and blue crab (Callinectes sapidus were investigated. Carapace width, carapace length and total weight of both crab species were measured. High protein content in spring and low protein content in autumn were observed for both crab species. The levels of lipid content of both crab species were found to be similar. Higher lipid contents in spring and winter, lower lipid contents in summer and autumn for both sexes were found. Although both crab species contain small amounts of fat, they are good sources of n-3 PUFA content (especially EPA and DHA for all seasons regardless of sex and muscle types.

  6. Sex Ratio And Size At First Maturity Of Blue Swimming Crab (Portunus pelagicus Salemo Island Pangkep Regency

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    Muh. Saleh Nurdin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Blue swimming crab (Portunuspelagicus is aeconomical valuable fisheries importantcommodity  due to the high demand and availability jobs created for the fishermen. Due to their high demand blue swimming crab heavily exploited from Salemo Island. This study aimed at comparing the sex ratio and the size at first maturity of blue swimming crab caught in mangrove ecosystems, coral reefs, and seagrass. Sex ratio was analyzed using chi square test and the size at first maturity was analyzed using the Spearman-Karber formula. The results showed the sex ratio ofmales and femalessmall crab caught in every ecosystem is balanced. The size at first maturity of blue swimming crab caught in mangrove, seagrass and coral reefs, each to the male 81,08 mm, 102,36 mm and 102,87 mm in width and size of female 94,54 mm, 83,35 mm, 98,31 mm width. In a reference to government regulations, the blue male swimming crab caught in the coral reef and seagrass ecosystems have yet to size at first maturity is allowed to be captured. Keywords: blue swimming crab, sex ratio,size at first maturity, Salemo Island

  7. Food Habits of the Blue Swimming Crab Portunus pelagicus along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    43: 225–240. Sumpton, W.D. & Smith, G.S. (1990) Effect of temperature on the emergence, activity and feeding of male and female sand crabs (Portunus pelagicus). Aust. J. Mar. Freshwat. Res. 41: 545–. 550. Underwood, A.J. (1981) Techniques of analysis of variance in experimental marine biology and ecology. Oceanogr.

  8. Gonioinfradens paucidentatus (A. Milne Edwards, 1861 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Portunidae: a new alien crab in the Mediterranean Sea

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    M. CORSINI-FOKA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The first record for the Mediterranean Sea of the Red Sea/Indo-Pacific portunid Gonioinfradens paucidentatus (red swimming crab is documented. A detailed description of the specimens collected at Rodos Island (southeastern Aegean Sea is given, while possible introduction vectors of the species in the area are discussed.

  9. The Utilization of Blue Swimming Crab (Portunus pelagicus) Waste Product, Lemi, as a Food Flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasongko, A. Y.; Dewi, E. N.; Amalia, U.

    2018-01-01

    Lemi is a wasted product that resulted from the meating process of blue swim crab. One of the utilization of blue swim crab lemi is processed it into a food flavor. The aim of this research was to know the value of glutamic acid in blue swim crab lemi flavor with the addition of dextrin using different concentration and know the level of consumer preference of lemi flavor by using hedonic test. The research was using a Completely Randomized research Design (CRD) with a factor of 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3% dextrin concentration. The treatment that was tested was the additions of 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3% dextrin. The nonparametric data (panelist hedonic level) was analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and further analysis using Mann-Whitney. The parametric data (glutamic acid content, protein content, moisture content, and solubility level) were analyzed by analysis of varians and further analysis using Honestly Significant Difference. The results showed that flavor with 1% dextrin addition has the highest hedonic score (7,07 processing waste so that it can optimalized any further.

  10. The Amino Acid Composition of Blue Swimming Crab (Portunus Segnis, Forskal, 1775 from The North Eastern Mediterranean Sea of Turkey

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    Engin Artar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to detect the content of amino acid in female and male specimens of blue swimming crab (Portunus segnis obtained from (including 12 male crab and also 12 female crab North Eastern Mediterranean Sea, Turkey. The protein was identified as 17.63% and 18.13% for female and male crab respevtively. Totally 9 essential amino acids were recorded in the present study. Lysine and leucine constituted the highest essential amino acid (EAA concentrations in P. segnis. This species was found to be in good score in terms of the level of EAA and the EAA/Non-EAA ratios when compared with other economical crab species.

  11. Reproductive performance and larval quality of blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus broodstock, fed with different feeds

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    Vutthichai Oniam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fecundity, hatching rate and crab larvae quality of blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus, broodstock reared inearthen ponds, fed with different feeds, were studied for about 150 days. Results showed that average fecundity ofP. pelagicus broodstock fed with trash fish (569,842±243,173 eggs, shrimp feed (464,098±188,884 eggs, mixed feeds(544,875.3±169,357.3 eggs and hatching rate (50.78±25.19%, 62.33±26.79% and 50.86±20.76% were not significantly different(P>0.05. Zoea produced by female broodstock fed with mixed feeds had a significantly higher survival rate (89.47±5.03%,P<0.05 compared to those produced by female broodstock fed with trash fish (73.40±14.61% and shrimp feeds (67.33±12.80%, but the survival rate of megalopa and first crab stages was not affected. This study recommends that the mixed feedwas suitable feed for rearing of P. pelagicus broodstock in an earthen pond as evidenced by the quality of zoea I or 1 dayafter hatching and growth of female broodstock.

  12. Abundance, Fishing Season and Management Strategy for Blue Swimming Crab (Portunus pelagicus) in Pangkajene Kepulauan, South Sulawesi, Indonesia.

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    Wiyono, Eko Sri; Ihsan

    2018-03-01

    In order to manage blue swimming crabs in Pangkajene Kepulauan, management measures are required. Since the environment which affects the abundance of the blue swimming crab varies seasonally, it is necessary to take into account the seasonal nature with the aim of developing a management strategy. The objectives of this study are to define the abundance of and fishing season of blue swimming crabs in the Pangkajene Kepulauan waters, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The fishing season was analysed using seasonal index analysis, while fish abundance was analysed by means of Equilibrium-Schaefer. The result of this study demonstrated that fishermen allocate their fishing gear all year, although the fish catch is seasonal. Based on analysis of the result, the fishing season for the blue swimming crabs is short. The peak fishing season starts in May and finishes in June. However, in order to enable their families to earn a living, fishermen operated their fishing gear throughout the year. As a result, both catch landing and effort were close to maximum sustainable yield (MSY). In order to reduce fishing pressure, it is necessary to reduce fishing gear and have a seasonal arrangement regarding fishing gear allocation.

  13. Evolutionary morphology of the hemolymph vascular system in hermit and king crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomala).

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    Keiler, Jonas; Richter, Stefan; Wirkner, Christian S

    2013-07-01

    The morphological transformation of hermit crabs into crab-like king crabs in the evolution of decapod crustaceans represents a remarkable case of carcinization or evolutionary shaping into a crab-like form. In this study, we focus on internal organs such as the hemolymph vascular system and adjacent anatomical structures of several Recent hermit crab (Paguridae) and king crab (Lithodidae) species. There are various correspondences in the morphology of the arterial systems in the dorsal cephalothorax of the two taxa, especially with regard to the anterior aorta, anterior lateral arteries, and hepatic arteries. In the pleon, the posterior aorta in both taxa displays a proximal bifurcation and follows an asymmetrical course. The ventral vessel system, on the other hand, which mainly supplies the limbs, differs significantly between the taxa, with pagurids displaying the plesiomorphic condition. The pattern of the ventral vessel system in Lithodidae is influenced by morphological transformations of integumental structures during carcinization. One of these transformations was the broadening of the sternites, which resulted in a widening of the space between the endosternites. In addition, changes in the morphology of the endophragmal skeleton in Lithodidae led to an increase in the potential for intraspecific variability and interspecific variation in the arterial branching pattern. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Chaetotaxy and setal diversity of grooming legs in species of porcelain crabs (Crustacea: Anomura: Porcellanidae

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    Luciane Augusto de Azevedo Ferreira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The morphology of the fifth pereiopods was studied under scanning electron microscopy in ten species of porcelain crabs for chaetotaxy and setal diversity, namelly Megalobrachium pacificum, Megalobrachium roseum, Pachycheles grossimanus, Petrolisthes armatus, Petrolisthes tuberculatus, Pisidia brasiliensis, Pisidia longicornis, Polyonyx gibbesi, Porcellana platycheles and Porcellana sayana. Six setal types were identified: simple, pappose, sickle-shaped serrate, straight serrate, club-shaped and tooth-like cuspidate. Porcelain crabs can differ in the fifth pereiopod setal morphology, chaetotaxy and setal density, even among species within the same genus. The absence of sexual dimorphism of the grooming legs in porcelain crabs suggests that grooming eggs requires no particular grooming apparatus in females and that male and female are equal in grooming efficiency.

  15. The effects of superchilling with modified atmosphere packaging on the physicochemical properties and shelf life of swimming crab.

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    Sun, Bowen; Zhao, Yuanhui; Ling, Jiangang; Yu, Jingfen; Shang, Haitao; Liu, Zunying

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of superchilling with modified atmosphere packaging on the physicochemical properties and shelf life of swimming crab. As the storage time increased, the rates at which the total aerobic plate count, total volatile basic nitrogen, pH, peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances value increase were significantly lower for the superchilling with modified atmosphere packaging (SCS + MAP) treatment compared to superchilling storage (SCS) and chilling storage (CS). With increasing storage time, the carbonyl content of the proteins increased from 1.21 nmol/mg of protein (0 day) to 2.03, 1.87, 1.66 nmol carbonyl/mg protein on the 6th day for CS, SCS and SCS + MAP, respectively. The disulfide bonds increased in a similar manner, and the total sulfhydryl content, salt extractable protein and Ca-ATPase stability decreased. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel elcetrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and microstructure analysis also indicated that SCS + MAP could reduce the degree of protein degradation. These results suggested that superchilling with modified atmosphere packaging offers an effective approach to slowdown protein and lipid oxidation, and extends the shelf life of swimming crab. However, superchilling with high-CO 2 packaging had a negative effect on the surface hydrophobicity and drip loss of swimming crab.

  16. Embriologia do siri Arenaeus cribrarius (Lamarck (Crustacea, Brachyura, Portunidae Embryology of the swimming crab Arenaeus cribrarius (Lamarck (Crustacea, Brachyura, Portunidae

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    Marcelo A.A. Pinheiro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Ovigerous females of Arenaeus cribrarius were collected at Ubatuba, São Paulo, and maintaining in aquaria under controlled temperature (25±1ºC, salinity (35±1‰ and photoperiod (12:12. A small sample of eggs was collected for each 24h, for morphological description, chromatic changes and biometric analysis throughout the embryonic development. Eight egg stages were photographed and had their small and large diameters measured under a microscope provided with camera lucida. The egg's shape was low elliptical during all the embryogenesis and showed size increase (24.4% and volume (91.1 %, when the last stage were compared with the first one. According to mean egg diameter and volume, the eggs should be pooled in three different groups (1-3; 4-6; 7-8 corresponding to initial, intermediate and final stages. The attained results were compared with the literature which emphasizing the species of Portunidae's family.

  17. Inclusive blue swimming crab fishery management initiative in Betahwalang Demak, Indonesia

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    Ghofar, A.; Redjeki, S.; Madduppa, H.; Abbey, M.; Tasunar, N.

    2018-02-01

    There has been a growing interest in the sustainability of the blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus, BSC) fisheries in Indonesia. The fishery is operated on a small-scale basis and yet it significantly contributes to the Indonesia’s fisheries as the third biggest export commodities following tuna and shrimp. The project inclusively (i) brings together coastal and fishing communities, university, the private sector, government at various levels and international agencies, (ii) bottom up approach is integrated with top-down (government policy) approach and (iii) integration o f conservation into fisheries management. This approach resulted in better understanding and participation among the coastal fishing communities on sustainable fisheries and the necessity to perform fisheries management. This led to the establishment of BSC fishery management body (legally support by Village Regulation - No.06/2013 on BSC fishery management in 2013, followed by a District Regulation No.523/0166/2014 on BSC fishery management in 2014. More recently, the Governor of Central Java issued a Governor Regulation No. 33/2017 on Crab and Lobster fisheries management and a Governor Decree No. 523/93/2017 on the establishment of the BSC fisheries management committee in Central Java. Further impacts have been raised awareness in sustainable BSC fishery management in surrounding districts in other provinces, namely East Java and Southeast Sulawesi. There remains, further needs to strengthen fishery governance by means of integrating national and local government effort in sustaining the fisheries, including the Issuance and effective implementation of the provincial decree on BSC fishery management for Central Java, that will enable the use of province’s resource to implement fisheries management and strengthen law enforcement. To help improve the stock, a plan for stock enhancement should also be developed with proper monitoring program and community commitment to avoid “put and

  18. A New Report of Two Species of Pagurid Hermit Crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura from Korea

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    Won Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pagurus undosus and Pagurus parvispina, collected from the East Sea by fishery trap, are newly recorded from Korean waters. Pagurus undosus is distinguished from other hermit crab by its right cheliped slightly elevated medially, and with broad ridge formed by deep depressions mesial and lateral to midline. Pagurus parvispina is distinguished from other hermit crab by its right cheliped covered with large spine and long tufts of setae. These species live in cold water areas and their geographical distribution is extended southwardly by the present study. A specimen of the former species, P. undosus, was found living in a shelter formed by a sponge, similar to that observed in Pagurus pectinatus. Descriptions and figures of these two species are provided in this paper. Currently, 27 species of the genus Pagurus are recorded in Korean fauna.

  19. Spermatophore transfer in the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura, Diogenidae).

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    Hess, Gregory S; Bauer, Raymond T

    2002-08-01

    Although mating has been described in several hermit crab species, the mechanics of spermatophore transfer have not previously been demonstrated. Evidence from pleopod and gonopore morphology, video observations, and inseminated females indicates that in Clibanarius vittatus the male applies a spermatophoric mass directly onto the female via the gonopores rather than with modified pleopods 1-2 (gonopods) and/or genital papillae as in many other decapods. The single second pleopod of males of C. vittatus has a simple endopod with no apparent modifications for sperm transfer. There are no genital papillae extending from the male gonopores. The globular spermatophores are aligned in rows surrounded by a seminal secretion in the male ducts (vasa deferentia that terminate in ejaculatory ducts opening to the exterior via the gonopores). During copulation, described from time-lapse video recordings, the ventral surface of the last thoracic segment of the male, bearing the gonopores, was apposed to the ventral cephalothorax of the female. A massive amount of seminal secretion containing spermatophore ribbons, termed here the spermatophoric mass and described for the first time in a hermit crab species, was observed covering the sternites and coxae of pereopods 1-5 of a recently copulated female. It is suggested that during copulation the male emits the contents of the ejaculatory ducts directly onto the female without the aid of gonopods or genital papillae. Although spermatophore transfer is simple in C. vittatus, the presence of modified anterior pleopods or elongate genital papillae (sexual tubes) in other paguroidean species suggests the possibility of a more complex insemination process in these other hermit crabs. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Resistance test at early larval stage of blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus

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    Mhd Ikhwanuddin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The early larval stage is the crucial phase in the larviculture of blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus. The combination of stress resistance tests have been done to determine the maximum period of starvation and dissolved oxygen, the preferable range of temperature, salinity, pH and ammonia for P. pelagicus larvae survival at early larval stages. Larvae were exposed to various treatments as mentioned above to examine larvae competency against the stressor. In starvation test, at 12 hours, more than 50 percent of larvae were observed dead. While in the dissolved oxygen test, no larvae survived more than 6 hours without aeration treatment. The optimum temperature for larvae was 30C due to high survival rate (43.18% was found in the end of experiment. There were no larvae survival at salinity level 0 ppt, 10 ppt and 50 ppt respectively. The highest larvae survival was found at 30 ppt treatment (60.51%. The suitable pH for larval rearing condition was ranged from 8.0-8.2 (survival rate were 48.60% and 70.47%, respectively owing to larval survival rate in others treatments were very low. In the last experiment, lower concentration of ammonia treatments (0.02, 0.2 ppm showed higher survival rate (58.54% and 23.90% whereas the larvae in 2 ppm and 20 ppm treatments died with 24 hours and 6 hours after spike.

  1. Intersexuality in the porcellanid crab Pisidia longicornis (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Porcellanidae

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    Luciane Augusto de Azevedo Ferreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intersex specimens of Pisidia longicornis (Linnaeus, 1767 are recorded for the first time and their secondary sexual characters are analyzed. Of 145 specimens of P. longicornis examined in this study, six were identified as intersex individuals. Of these, three presented male secondary sexual characters, well-developed male gonopores and rudimentary female gonopores, whereas the other three had female secondary sexual characters, with female gonopores being more pronounced than the male ones. The present study provides the first record of intersex porcelain crabs.

  2. A new species of the hermit crab genus Diogenes (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Diogenidae) from southern India.

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    Komai, Tomoyuki; Reshmi, Rema; Kumar, Appukuttannair Biju

    2013-02-12

    A new species of the hermit crab genus Diogenes Dana, 1851 (Diogenidae), D. canaliculatus, is described and illustrated on the basis of material from off the Kerala State, southern India. It is referred to the D. edwardsii (De Haan, 1849) species group, and compared with D. bicristimanus Alcock, 1905, D. fasciatus Rahayu & Forest, 1995, D. laevicarpus Rahayu, 1996 and D. moosai Rahayu & Forest, 1995. The characteristically sculptured left chela and the unarmed dorsal margins of the propodi of the second and third pereopods distinguish the new species from these congeners.

  3. Dry season distribution of land crabs, Gecarcinus quadratus (Crustacea: Gecarcinidae, in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica

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    Megan E Griffiths

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The land crab Gecarcinus quadratus is an engineering species that controls nutrient cycling in tropical forests. Factors regulating their coastal distribution are not fully understood. We quantified land crab distribution during the dry season at Sirena Field Station in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica, and found that land crab burrow density decreases with increasing distance from the ocean. Leaf litter depth and tree seedling density are negatively correlated with land crab burrow density. Burrows are strongly associated with sand substrate and burrow density is comparatively low in clay substrate. Results suggest that G. quadratus is limited to a narrow coastal zone with sand substrate, and this distribution could have profound effects on plant community structure. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (1: 219-224. Epub 2007 March. 31.El cangrejo terrestre Gecarcinus quadratus es una especie "ingeniera" que controla el ciclo de nutrientes en los bosques tropicales. Los factores que regulan su distribución a lo largo de las costas no se conocen de forma definitiva. Se cuantificó la distribución del cangrejo terrestre durante la estación seca en la Estación de Campo Sirena en el Parque Nacional de Corcovado, Costa Rica, y se encontró que la densidad de galerías del cangrejo terrestre disminuye al aumentar la distancia al océano. La profundidad de la hojarasca y la densidad de plántulas de especies arbóreas están negativamente correlacionadas con la densidad de galerías del cangrejo terrestre. Las galerías aparecen fuertemente asociadas con el sustrato arenoso y la densidad de galerías es comparativamente más baja en sustratos arcillosos. Estos resultados sugieren que G. quadratus se encuentra en una zona costera estrecha con sustrato arenoso, y que esta distribución podría tener efectos importantes en la estructura de la comunidad vegetal.

  4. A new distinctive species of pagurid hermit crab (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) from Japan.

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    Komai, T; Osawa, M

    2001-12-01

    A new species of pagurid hermit crab, Pagurus decimbranchiae, is described and illustrated based on 20 specimens collected from shallow waters of the Pacific coast of Japan ranging from Boso Peninsula to Tanegashima Island. It is quite distinctive in having the rudimentary arthrobranch on the third maxilliped represented by a single bud, however close morphological similarity is found between the new species and P. moluccensis Haig and Ball. Comparisons are also made among other species, including P. boriaustraliensis Morgan, P. sp. cf. boriaustraliensis sensu Rahayu and Komai (2000) and the members of the P. anachoretus group. The present generic assignment of the new species should be considered provisional, as more extensive study is needed to investigate phylogenetic relationships of the new species and the other species of Pagurus.

  5. The complete mitogenome of the porcelain crab Petrolisthes haswelli Miers, 1884 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura).

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    Tan, Mun Hua; Gan, Han Ming; Lee, Yin Peng; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-11-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the porcellanid crab, Petrolisthes haswelli is provided, making it the second for the family Porcellanidae and the third for the superfamily Galatheoidea. Petrolisthes haswelli has a mitogenome of 15,348 bp consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of the P. haswelli mitogenome is 35.66% for T, 18.65% for C, 34.35% for A and 11.34% for G, with an AT bias of 70.01%. The mitogenome gene order is identical to the mitogenome of Neopetrolisthes maculatus, the only other species of the family with a sequenced mitogenome.

  6. An annotated checklist of hermit crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura of Indian waters with three new records

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    Jigneshkumar N. Trivedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The annotated checklist of hermit crabs occurring in the Indian waters has been compiled based on published literature and specimens collected by us along the Indian coastline from 2010 to 2016. The checklist records 112 species belonging to 26 genera and five families. The east coast of India, with 81 species is more diverse than the west coast of India (73 species. Maximum species diversity was recorded from coastal areas of Tamil Nadu state (50 species whereas the least number of species were reported from coastal areas of Maharashtra state (7 species. Distribution of three species belonging to the family Diogenidae namely Areopaguristes perspicax (Nobili, 1906, Clibanarius virescens (Krauss, 1843, and Diogenes lophochir (Morgan, 1989 is for the first time recorded in Indian waters.

  7. Population biology of the crab Armases angustipes (Crustacea, Decapoda, Sesarmidae at Brazilian tropical coast

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    Marina de Sá Leitão C. de Araújo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The semi terrestrial crabs are important elements of the fauna of coastal regions. The aim of this study was to analyze the population structure of Armases angustipes (Dana, 1852 at estuaries of the Ariquindá River, considered a non impacted area, and Mamucabas River, considered a few impacted area, on the south coast of state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The species occurred in all months of the year. The number of individuals per month varied, being higher in the months of transition between the seasons. This is probably due to significant seasonal variations of air and burrow temperature and burrow salinity. There was no sexual dimorphism in size of A. angustipes in the mangrove of Ariquindá River, but males were larger than females in the mangrove of Mamucabas River. In both estuaries, the sex ratio did not differ from Mendelian proportion, but showed a deviation for females. The analysis of temporal variation in sex ratio showed significant differences in some months of the year. These variations are due to cyclical events that act distinctly on each sex. In both estuaries, size classes of carapace width were equally represented by both sexes. The ovigerous females of A. angustipes occurred only in some months of the year, especially in summer, in both estuaries. Probably the high phytoplankton productivity observed in summer favors the reproductive activity, since these algae serve as food for the larvae. Specimens of the population of Rio Ariquindá are largest and wider than those of Mamucabas River. This fact, associated with the low abundance of crabs and the lower frequency of ovigerous females observed in Mamucabas River, is an indication that this population may be influenced by the environmental impacts that this estuary has received.

  8. Survival and metamorphosis rate of swimming crab Portunus pelagicus larvae with the use of phytoecdysteroid in the artificial feed

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    Andi Nikhlani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The survival rate of blue swimming crabs and the larval metamorphosis processes are still low in hatcheries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different phytoecdysteroids doses on both the survival and the rate of Blue swimmer crab larvae metamorphosis. The study consisted of four different phytoecdysteroids treatments, namely: control (0 mg/100 g of feed, 1 mg/100 g of feed, 2 mg/100 g of feed, and 4 mg/100 g of feed. Each treatment was replicated three times. The survival rate of the larvae was analyzed through analysis of variance, while the rate of larval metamorphosis was descriptively analyzed. The results showed that the dose of phytoecdysteroid of 2 mg/100 g of artificial feed resulted in the highest survival and the fastest metamorphosis speed of crab larvae for zoea-2 and zoea-3, and the dose of 4 mg/100 g of artificial feed for stadia megalopa and crablet. Keywords: phytoecdysteroids, survival rate, metamorphosis, blue swimming crab  ABSTRAK Kelangsungan hidup rajungan dalam pembenihan masih rendah, dan proses metamorfosis larva masih lambat. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengevaluasi pengaruh pemberian fitoekdisteroid dosis berbeda terhadap kelangsungan hidup dan kecepatan metamorfosis larva rajungan. Penelitian ini terdiri atas empat perlakuan dosis fitoekdisteroid yang berbeda, yaitu: kontrol (0 mg/100 g pakan, 1 mg/100 g pakan, 2 mg/100 g pakan, dan 4 mg/100 g pakan dengan masing-masing perlakuan dilakukan tiga kali ulangan. Kelangsungan hidup larva dianalisis menggunakan analisis sidik ragam, sedangkan kecepatan metamorfosis larva dianalisis secara deskriptif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa dosis fitoekdisteroid sebanyak 2 mg/100 g pakan buatan menghasilkan kelangsungan hidup tertinggi dan proses metamorfosis larva rajungan tercepat untuk stadia zoea-2 dan zoea-3, serta  dosis 4 mg/100 g pakan buatan untuk stadia megalopa dan crablet. Kata kunci: fitoekdisteroid, kelangsungan

  9. First Report of Two Diogenid Species of Hermit Crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura from Korea

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    Jung, Jibom

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two diogenid hermit crab species, Dardanus lagopodes and Diogenes deflectomanus, are newly reported from Korea. Dardanus lagopodes is distinguished from the other species of genus Dardanus in Korea by having setae with cream-colored tips on the cephalothorax and the following characteristics: ocular peduncles somewhat longer than antennular peduncles, and the pereopod without a longitudinal sulcus and scute-like projections. Diogenes deflectomanus is similar to D. nitidimanus but can be distinguished by having the fixed finger of the left cheliped bent slightly downwardly and the following characteristics: slightly shorter ocular peduncle, elongated left cheliped with small granules on the surface, right cheliped without calcareous teeth on the cutting edge of the dactylus, and the minute spine of post-median margin of the telson is not well developed. The geographical distributions of these two species are extended by the present study. In particular, D. deflectomanus in the current study is the first report outside Chinese waters. Now, 20 species of the family Diogenidae are known in Korean waters.

  10. Brain architecture of the largest living land arthropod, the Giant Robber Crab Birgus latro (Crustacea, Anomura, Coenobitidae: evidence for a prominent central olfactory pathway?

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    Krieger Jakob

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lineages within the Crustacea conquered land independently during evolution, thereby requiring physiological adaptations for a semi-terrestrial or even a fully terrestrial lifestyle. Birgus latro Linnaeus, 1767, the giant robber crab or coconut crab (Anomura, Coenobitidae, is the largest land-living arthropod and inhabits Indo-Pacific islands such as Christmas Island. B. latro has served as a model in numerous studies of physiological aspects related to the conquest of land by crustaceans. From an olfactory point of view, a transition from sea to land means that molecules need to be detected in gas phase instead of in water solution. Previous studies have provided physiological evidence that terrestrial hermit crabs (Coenobitidae such as B. latro have a sensitive and well differentiated sense of smell. Here we analyze the brain, in particular the olfactory processing areas of B. latro, by morphological analysis followed by 3 D reconstruction and immunocytochemical studies of synaptic proteins and a neuropeptide. Results The primary and secondary olfactory centers dominate the brain of B. latro and together account for ca. 40% of the neuropil volume in its brain. The paired olfactory neuropils are tripartite and composed of more than 1,000 columnar olfactory glomeruli, which are radially arranged around the periphery of the olfactory neuropils. The glomeruli are innervated ca. 90,000 local interneurons and ca. 160,000 projection neurons per side. The secondary olfactory centers, the paired hemiellipsoid neuropils, are targeted by the axons of these olfactory projection neurons. The projection neuron axonal branches make contact to ca. 250.000 interneurons (per side associated with the hemiellipsoid neuropils. The hemiellipsoid body neuropil is organized into parallel neuropil lamellae, a design that is quite unusual for decapod crustaceans. The architecture of the optic neuropils and areas associated with antenna two

  11. Brain architecture of the largest living land arthropod, the Giant Robber Crab Birgus latro (Crustacea, Anomura, Coenobitidae): evidence for a prominent central olfactory pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Several lineages within the Crustacea conquered land independently during evolution, thereby requiring physiological adaptations for a semi-terrestrial or even a fully terrestrial lifestyle. Birgus latro Linnaeus, 1767, the giant robber crab or coconut crab (Anomura, Coenobitidae), is the largest land-living arthropod and inhabits Indo-Pacific islands such as Christmas Island. B. latro has served as a model in numerous studies of physiological aspects related to the conquest of land by crustaceans. From an olfactory point of view, a transition from sea to land means that molecules need to be detected in gas phase instead of in water solution. Previous studies have provided physiological evidence that terrestrial hermit crabs (Coenobitidae) such as B. latro have a sensitive and well differentiated sense of smell. Here we analyze the brain, in particular the olfactory processing areas of B. latro, by morphological analysis followed by 3 D reconstruction and immunocytochemical studies of synaptic proteins and a neuropeptide. Results The primary and secondary olfactory centers dominate the brain of B. latro and together account for ca. 40% of the neuropil volume in its brain. The paired olfactory neuropils are tripartite and composed of more than 1,000 columnar olfactory glomeruli, which are radially arranged around the periphery of the olfactory neuropils. The glomeruli are innervated ca. 90,000 local interneurons and ca. 160,000 projection neurons per side. The secondary olfactory centers, the paired hemiellipsoid neuropils, are targeted by the axons of these olfactory projection neurons. The projection neuron axonal branches make contact to ca. 250.000 interneurons (per side) associated with the hemiellipsoid neuropils. The hemiellipsoid body neuropil is organized into parallel neuropil lamellae, a design that is quite unusual for decapod crustaceans. The architecture of the optic neuropils and areas associated with antenna two suggest that B. latro has

  12. Brain architecture of the largest living land arthropod, the Giant Robber Crab Birgus latro (Crustacea, Anomura, Coenobitidae): evidence for a prominent central olfactory pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Jakob; Sandeman, Renate E; Sandeman, David C; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2010-09-10

    Several lineages within the Crustacea conquered land independently during evolution, thereby requiring physiological adaptations for a semi-terrestrial or even a fully terrestrial lifestyle. Birgus latro Linnaeus, 1767, the giant robber crab or coconut crab (Anomura, Coenobitidae), is the largest land-living arthropod and inhabits Indo-Pacific islands such as Christmas Island. B. latro has served as a model in numerous studies of physiological aspects related to the conquest of land by crustaceans. From an olfactory point of view, a transition from sea to land means that molecules need to be detected in gas phase instead of in water solution. Previous studies have provided physiological evidence that terrestrial hermit crabs (Coenobitidae) such as B. latro have a sensitive and well differentiated sense of smell. Here we analyze the brain, in particular the olfactory processing areas of B. latro, by morphological analysis followed by 3 D reconstruction and immunocytochemical studies of synaptic proteins and a neuropeptide. The primary and secondary olfactory centers dominate the brain of B. latro and together account for ca. 40% of the neuropil volume in its brain. The paired olfactory neuropils are tripartite and composed of more than 1,000 columnar olfactory glomeruli, which are radially arranged around the periphery of the olfactory neuropils. The glomeruli are innervated ca. 90,000 local interneurons and ca. 160,000 projection neurons per side. The secondary olfactory centers, the paired hemiellipsoid neuropils, are targeted by the axons of these olfactory projection neurons. The projection neuron axonal branches make contact to ca. 250.000 interneurons (per side) associated with the hemiellipsoid neuropils. The hemiellipsoid body neuropil is organized into parallel neuropil lamellae, a design that is quite unusual for decapod crustaceans. The architecture of the optic neuropils and areas associated with antenna two suggest that B. latro has visual and

  13. Insular species of Afrotropical freshwater crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura: Potamonautidae and Potamidae) with special reference to Madagascar and the Seychelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumberlidge, N.

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships between island and mainland faunas of the 24 species of insular freshwater crabs in the Afrotropical region are reviewed in the light of phylogenetic studies. Twenty insular species of freshwater crabs are endemic, and four are also found on the neighboring mainland of

  14. New Report of Two Species of Crabs, Cycloes granulosa and Pugettia vulgaris (Crustacea: Decapoda Collected from Korea

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    Yang, Kea Cheong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two species of crabs, Cycloes granulosa and Pugettia vulgaris, are described and illustrated for the first time in Korea. The former is the first species of calappoid genus Cycloes and characterized by having a minute lateral spine on the margin of carapace. The latter is a species of majoid crab and similar to P. pellucens. However, it can be distinguished by shorter rostral spines, a smaller hepatic spine, and a carapace entirely covered with short setae. In Korea the calappoid crab now includes seven species of three genera (Calappa, Mursia, and Cycloes and the majoid genus Pugettia consists of six species.

  15. Fecundity, embryonic and ovarian development of blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) in coastal water of Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhwanuddin, M; Azra, M N; Siti-Aimuni, H; Abol-Munafi, A B

    2012-08-01

    Blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus is widely study and research throughout the Indo-West Pacific, but little is known of its reproductive biology in Malaysia. The present study describes the fecundity, embryonic development and ovarian development stages of the P. pelagicus from Johor coastal water, Malaysia. Carapace width range of berried crabs sampled was from 9.64 to 13.32 cm, while the body weight range was from 75 to 235 g. The mean number of egg produced by females in different sizes ranged from 105443.333 +/- 35448.075 per eggs batch. Mean egg size during embryonic development at stage 1 was 0.307 +/- 0.037, while 0.386 +/- 0.039 and 0.396 +/- 0.033 for stage 2 and stage 3, respectively. Study showed that there was significant (p < 0.05) relationship between the number of eggs and carapace width/body weight. Mean diameter oocyte during ovarian development at stage 1 was 97.732 +/- 12.391 while for stage 2 was 149.516 +/- 23.287. Stage 3 showed increasingly of size with mean diameter was 158.506 +/- 27.616 and 181.013 +/- 24.339 for stage 4.

  16. A new species of porcelain crab, Petrolisthes tuerkayi n. sp. (Crustacea: Anomura: Porcellanidae), from the Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderloo, Reza; Apel, Michael

    2014-11-04

    A new species of porcellanid crab, Petrolisthes tuerkayi n. sp., is described from the Persian Gulf. The new species is closely related to P. rufescens Heller, 1861, but is easily distinguishable by having three or four large spines distally on the posterior margin of the carpus of chelipeds, whereas the posterior margin of the cheliped merus in P. rufescens is unarmed.

  17. Reproduction and management of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ucididae at Iguape, São Paulo, Brazil

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    BRUNO S. SANT'ANNA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is one of the most exploited crustaceans in Brazil. The present study investigated the breeding season of this species and the period of the “andada” phenomenon, when the crabs are active outside their burrows and perform agonistic behaviors. Furthermore related them to environmental factors, in a mangrove on the coast of Brazil, with inferences about management of this crab. The crabs reproduced from October through February. The “andada” occurred from November through February, with typical characteristics in the first two months, during the full and new moon periods, and was influenced positively by the air and soil temperature, luminosity, and tidal amplitude, and negatively by salinity. Based on the results of the present study, the period when the “andada” occurs in other parts of Brazil could be defined, which will aid in managing this fishery. For Iguape, state of São Paulo, Brazil, we suggest a legal off-season for both sexes in December or during the full and new moon, including January.

  18. Biological associations of color variation in the Indo-Pacific swimming crab Charybdis hellerii

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    TIMOTEO T. WATANABE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A marine biological invasion is a natural process accelerated by human activities, and the crab Charybdis hellerii is an example of a globally widespread invasive species. This study evaluated color variation in C. hellerii and its relationship to the sex, size and sexual maturity of these crabs, and compared the efficiency of a freeware digital image-editing program with a commercially available program. The color of the individuals was analyzed using standardized digital images. The color pattern varied significantly with size; smaller and immature individuals were darker than larger and mature ones. The female abdomen changed in morphology and color with sexual maturity, becoming wider and orange-colored. There was no statistical difference in the color values between males and females and immature males did not show morphological or color differences in their abdomen. This study highlights the possible relationships of the color and physiological state of the reproductive system, which could help in future studies of behavior, avoiding the need to dissect and/or remove individuals from nature for assessment of sexual maturity. The freeware program showed the same efficiency in digital image analysis as a widely known commercial program.

  19. Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re just learning to swim, stay in the shallow end. Don't push or jump on others. ... and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours ...

  20. Effects of florfenicol on the antioxidant status, detoxification system and biomolecule damage in the swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xianyun; Wang, Zhuqing; Gao, Baoquan; Liu, Ping; Li, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Florfenicol (FLR) is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in aquaculture because of its wide spectrum of activity and few side-effects. We characterized the toxicokinetics of FLR in the swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus) after intravenous (IV) dosing (20, 40 and 80mg/kg). The results showed that FLR significantly suppressed the antioxidant system of the hepatopancreas. FLR induced transcriptional expression of phase I and phase II detoxification genes (CYP3 and GST, respectively) in a dose- and clearance time-dependent manner and altered the expression of their corresponding enzymes (erythromycin N-demethylase and glutathione S-transferase, respectively). Moreover, FLR induced the transcription of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily B (ABCB) and subfamily G (ABCG), although ABCG transcription was not induced by FLR at 20mg/kg. Additionally, higher FLR doses caused significant biomolecule damage during the first 48h after delivery. This study will provide an improved understanding of the exact mechanism underlying toxicity in aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea populations of swimming crab Ovalipes punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Han, Zhiqiang; Chen, Guobao; Yu, Cungen; Gao, Tianxiang

    2015-08-01

    Swimming crab Ovalipes punctatus is a commercially important species in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea, but there is limited knowledge of its genetic population structure. The population genetic structure of O. punctatus in East China Sea and Yellow Sea was examined with a 658-bp segment of the mtDNA COI gene. A total of 60 individuals were collected from five locations and 48 haplotypes were obtained. Mean haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity for the five populations were 0.9876 ± 0.0068 and 0.0074 ± 0.0041, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) detected no significant differences at all hierarchical levels, and all FST values were non-significant, indicating that no significant population genetic structure exists in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea. These results supported the null hypothesis that O. punctatus within the East China Sea and Yellow Sea constitutes a panmictic mtDNA gene pool. Neutrality tests and mismatch distribution supported population expansion in this species, indicating that climate change could play an important role in affecting the demographic history of marine species. Strong dispersal capacity of larvae and adults, and ocean currents in the studied area could be the reasons for genetic homogeneity in this species in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea. Another explanation for the lack of phylogeographic structure in O. punctatus might reflect a recent range expansion after the last glacial maximum and insufficient time to attain migration-drift equilibrium.

  2. A new species of freshwater crab of the genus Kingsleya Ortmann, 1897 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Pseudothelphusidae) from Amazonia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Manuel; Tavares, Marcos

    2015-10-19

    A new species of freshwater crab, Kingsleya celioi, from the Brazilian Amazon (Pará State) is described and illustrated. The new species can be easily separated from their congeners by a suite of morphological characters, including the apical plate of the first gonopod large, widest medially in abdominal view, with single large spine-like outgrowth in midlength of mesial margin; distal, proximal lobes of apical plate unequal in size, distal lobe largest, tapering distally in lateral view.

  3. Terrathelphusa secula, a new species of semiterrestrial freshwater crab (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae) from Sabah, East Malaysia, Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Peter K L; Tan, Leo W H

    2015-08-28

    A new species of semiterrestrial gecarcinucid freshwater crab, Terrathelphusa secula, is described from Danum Valley in Sabah, East Malaysia, eastern Borneo. In the form of its carapace, third maxilliped, and male second gonopod, it most closely resembles T. ovis Ng, 1997, and T. telur Ng, 1997, from eastern Sarawak and Brunei, respectively. It differs markedly from these and other congeners in its proportionately much wider carapace, and a male first gonopod that is strongly curved and sickle-shaped.

  4. The trophic position of the alien crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii (crustacea decapoda panopeidae) in the Taman Bay, Sea of Azov community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalota, A. K.; Kolyuchkina, G. A.; Tiunov, A. V.; Biriukova, S. V.; Spiridonov, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    This work concerns the trophic web positioning of the alien crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii and other common marine invertebrate species and fishes in the benthic ecosystem of the shallows of Taman Bay, Sea of Azov. The base of the trophic web in this system is composed of phytoplankton, macrophytes (algae and marine grasses), and reeds that use atmospheric carbon for photosynthesis. Analysis of the isotopic composition of nitrogen and carbon has shown that although marine grasses are dominating primary producers in the shallows of the bay, primary consumers (such as Cerastoderma glaucum, Porifera gen. sp., Gammarus aequicauda, Deshayesorchestia deshayesii and Idotea balthica) only partially use this organic source; instead, they use a combination of different sources of primary production. It has been shown that the food source of the alien crab is primarily of animal origin. In Taman Bay, R. harrisii is on the same trophic level as other carnivores/scavengers: benthic fishes Syngnathus nigrolineatus, Gobius spp. and native crab Pilumnus hirtellus and shrimp Palaemon adspersus.

  5. [Dana swimming crab growth Callinectes danae (Decapoda: Portunidae) from Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jesylén; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo Walter

    2011-12-01

    Callinectes danae is a common species captured with crab traps in nearby areas of coastal lagoons in Margarita Island. Although its considerable economic importance as a fishery resource, few studies have been done on population dynamics and its fishery potential in local coastal environments to support decision making in fishery administration. We present growth pattern details of Callinectes danae to better estimate its population size and exploitation feasibility. For this, we analyzed a total of 3 623 specimens that were monthly captured in crab pots by artisanal fishermen in Las Marites lagoon, from October 2007 to September 2008. The length-weight ratio was determined, and growth parameters estimated from both length and weight curves of the von Bertalanffy model. The general sex ratio showed no significant difference between males and females (chi2 = 0.04, p > 0.05). However, values of slopes b between males and females were significantly different (t(s) = 2.75, p < 0.05), as well as intercepts a (t(s) = 2.44, p < 0.05). Thus, the length-weight ratio was determined separately: W = 7.48e(-5)*L(2.98) for males and W = 1.21e(-4)*L(2.87) for females, indicating a negative allometric growth in both sexes. Growth parameters were established as: L(infinity) =134.80mm, W(infinity) = 166.04g and k = 0.86/yr for males; L(infinity) = 122.35mm, W(infinity) = 118.45g and k = 0.63/yr for females. Lifespan was estimated at 3.05 years for males and 4.24 years for females. We concluded that Callinectes danae is a species with short lifespan and moderately rapid growth. The coefficient of variation values (CV), of the phi-prime growth performance index (Ø'), showed a different growth pattern compared to those obtained in other regions. We propose that a management strategy will be the periodical review of the minimum capture size for fishing area, after the great variability found in growth parameters.

  6. Morphological changes in the seminal receptacle during ovarian development in the speckled swimming crab Arenaeus cribrarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Fernando Jose; Raggi Pereira, Gerson Rodrigues; Sant'anna, Bruno Sampaio

    2014-08-01

    To understand sperm plug dissolution and spermatophore dehiscence in Portunidae, histological and ultrastructural changes in the seminal receptacle (SR) of Arenaeus cribrarius were investigated during ovarian development. In juvenile females the SR was filled with acid polysaccharides and the dorsal epithelium was stratified. Mated females with rudimentary ovaries showed a large SR filled by a glycoprotein sperm plug. This plug was present until the developing-ovary stage, when spermatophore dehiscence and intense holocrine secretions in the dorsal dense layer occurred. The plug was absent after the intermediate stage, and the SR became flaccid. The secretion produced moved the spermatophores into the ventral region. The modified dorsal epithelium in the transition between the dorsal and ventral regions released acid polysaccharides, which were found among the sperm, by exocytosis. The morphological changes of the SR in A. cribrarius, including the presence of the sperm plug, followed the macroscopic pattern observed in other members of Portunidae, such as blue crabs. However, in this species dissolution of the sperm plug was synchronized with ovarian development and occurred simultaneously with spermatophore dehiscence, showing the evolutionary relationship of the seminal receptacle and the female reproductive system to the storage of spermatophores and spermatozoa. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  7. Cytochemical characterization of gill and hepatopancreatic cells of the crab Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura validated by cell metal transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Ortega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763 is a hypo-hyper-regulating mangrove crab possessing gills for respiratory and osmoregulatory processes, separated in anterior and posterior sections. They also have hepatopancreas, which is responsible for digestion and absorption of nutrients and detoxification of toxic metals. Each of these organs has specific cells that are important for in vitro studies in cell biology, ion and toxic metals transport. In order to study and characterize cells from gills and hepatopancreas, both were separated using a Sucrose Gradient (SG from 10 to 40% and cells in each gradient were characterized using the vital mitochondrial dye DASPEI (2-(4-dimethylaminostyryl-N- ethylpyridinium iodide and Trichrome Mallory's stain. Both in 20 and 40% SG for gill cells and 30% SG for hepatopancreatic cells, a greater number of cells were colored with DASPEI, indicating a larger number of mitochondria in these cells. It is concluded that the gill cells present in 20% and 40% SG are Thin cells, responsible for respiratory processes and Ionocytes responsible for ion transport, respectively. For hepatopancreatic cells, the 30% SG is composed of Fibrillar cells that possess larger number of membrane ion and nutrient transporters. Moreover, the transport of toxic metal cadmium (Cd by isolated hepatopancreatic cells was performed as a way of following cell physiological integrity after cell separation and to study differences in transport among the cells. All hepatopancreatic cells were able to transport Cd. These findings are the first step for further work on isolated cells of these important exchange epithelia of crabs, using a simple separation method and to further develop successful in vitro cell culture in crabs.

  8. First occurrence of a Hymenosomatid crab Elamena mathoei (Desmarest, 1823 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. ZAOUALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean fauna is undergoing drastic modifications as a result of anthropogenic activities and global warming. The most important of these is the colonization of the Mediterranean Sea by alien species, many of them entering through the Suez Canal. While many of them are still confined to the Levant Basin, several have extended their distribution westwards to Tunisian waters. The presence of the Indo-west Pacific hymenosomatid crab Elamena mathoei on a rocky shore at Sidi Daoud, Cape Bon Peninsula, Tunisia, is the first Mediterranean record of this species. It is a testimony to the changes in the patterns of invasion in the Mediterranean Sea.

  9. Distribution notes on the Endangered freshwater crab Ceylonthelphusa armata Ng (1995 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. S.C. Udagedera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are 52 species of freshwater crabs in Sri Lanka and 51 of them are endemic. There are several species that are known only from a single locality.  Ceylonthelphusa armata is such a species, and we have initiated a study to record the distribution of this species as its typical locality is heavily polluted at Kadugannawa.  At present C. armata is known from six localities, and this information will be useful to facilitate the conservation of the species by assessing the Red List.  

  10. Growth and reproduction of the mangrove crab Goniopsis cruentata (Latreille, 1803 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Grapsidae in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla R.G. Reis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Goniopsis cruentata is a common semi-terrestrial crab in Brazilian mangroves and an important fishery resource for traditional communities in the northeastern Brazilian coast. Aiming to contribute to the knowledge about the species, this study evaluated the carapace width and weight growth curves, the relative growth of weight versus carapace width, and the temporal variation of gonadosomatic and hepatosomatic indices for the species. A total of 524 crabs were collected in a mangrove area of Ubatuba municipality, state of São Paulo. The growth-curves parameters and longevity (tmax were estimated for males (CW∞=50.6 mm, WE=56.4 g, k=2.24, t0=0.003631502 year-1, tmax=1.3 years and females (CW∞=50.7 mm, WE∞=58.8 g, k=2.50, t0=0.003247209 year-1, tmax=1.2 years. The age at onset of sexual maturity was 0.23 years for both genders. The weight-growth model was isometric for the immature developmental stages and allometric negative for adults. The species exhibited a continuous reproduction, with breeding peaks in spring and summer months. The weight dynamics of gonads and hepatopancreas were not clearly related. The growth and reproductive patterns indicated that Goniopsis cruentata has a life-history that prioritizes reproduction instead of survival. The species exhibited some of the highest growth rates and lowest longevity estimates reported for brachyuran species in Brazil.

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation on the physical and sensory quality and inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in blue swimming crab meat (Portunas pelagicus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suklim, Kannapha; Flick, George J.; Vichitphan, Kanit

    2014-01-01

    Blue swimming crab lump (backfin) meat were exposed to 2, 4, and 6 kGy doses of Co 60 irradiation and evaluated for changes in physical, sensory properties, and Listeria monocytogenes inactivation. Irradiation up to 6 kGy resulted in no textural changes (p>0.05) in maximum shear forces; however, these exposures resulted in sensory quality changes (p<0.05) as determined by a triangle overall difference test (n=50) at each irradiation level. Irradiation had no effect (p>0.05) on L ⁎ color value. Irradiation at 4 and 6 kGy resulted in listericidal reductions greater than 6.65 (Department of Medical Science, Ministry of Health, Thailand, [DMST] 1783) and 7.56 logs (DMST 4553). Irradiation doses of 1 and 2 kGy resulted in a reduction of 2.10 and 5.35 logs respectively of L. monocytogenes DMST 1783 and 1.56 and 4.19 logs respectively of L. monocytogenes DMST 4553. The D 10 values of L. monocytogenes DMST 1783 and 4553 were 0.35 and 0.45 kGy. The study indicated that low-dose gamma irradiation would increase the safety of blue swimming crab meat without unacceptable changes in texture and L ⁎ color value. - Highlights: • γ-irradiation up to 6 kGy caused no changes in fresh crab meat textural properties. • γ-irradiation increased safety of ready-to-eat product i.e. fresh crab meat. • γ-irradiation had either listericidal or listeristatic effect on L. monocytogenes. • L. monocytogenes were completely inactivated by 4 kGy and 6 kGy γ-irradiation. • 1–2 kGy lethally injured L. monocytogenes but survivors increased during storage

  12. A new species of the hermit crab genus Paguristes Dana, 1851 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Diogenidae) from southwestern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Reshmi, Rema; Kumar, Appukuttannair Biju

    2015-03-26

    A new species of the hermit crab genus Paguristes Dana, 1851 (Diogenidae), P. luculentus, is described and illustrated on the basis of three male specimens collected from off the Kerala State, southwestern India. It belongs to the species group characterized by the posterior lobes of the telson unarmed on the terminal margins, but the characteristic armature of the chelae and carpi of the chelipeds, consisting of a covering of numerous small corneous-tipped spines, and the presence of numerous small corneous-tipped or corneous spines on the mesial faces of the dactyli of the second pereopods immediately distinguish the new species from other congeneric species. The new species represents the ninth of the genus known from Indian waters.

  13. A new species of Pagurus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Paguridae, new records and a redescription of hermit crabs from the Mexican Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ayón-Parente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available New records are provided for three species of little-known pagurids. All the material reported was collected by the R/V “El Puma” in the central Gulf of California during the GUAYTEC II cruise. New material is reported for Iridopagurus haigae García-Gómez, 1983, Enallopagurus spinicarpus (Glassell, 1937, and Solenopagurus diomedeae (Faxon, 1893, and these two latter species are redescribed. A new species of hermit crab of the genus Pagurus Fabricius, 1775, is described and illustrated in detail. Among the eastern Pacific species of Pagurus, this new species resembles Pagurus meloi Lemaitre and Cruz Castaño, 2004, P. imarpe Haig, 1974 and P. delsolari Haig, 1974, but differs from these three species in the armature and setation of the chelipeds and second and third pereopods, the shape and armature of the telson, and the number of rows of scales on pereopodal rasp and the presence of a preungual process.

  14. Anatomy of virgin and mature externae of Loxothylacus texanus, parasitic on the dark blue crab Callinectes rathbunae (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Fernando; Bortolini, José Luis; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2010-01-01

    Rhizocephalan parasites are dioecious organisms, in that one or several dwarf males are implanted into the external part of the female parasite soon after it emerges from the interior of the host animal. The structure of the female externa and its resident males is crucial for understanding both...... the reproductive biology and the taxonomy of these specialized parasites. We use scanning electron microscopy and histological methods to study the anatomy of juvenile and the mature externae of the rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus texanus parasitizing the blue crab Callinectes rathbunae. We put emphasis......, as is characteristic for the genus Loxothylacus. The internal anatomy of the mature externa of L. texanus is in most features similar to that seen in other species of the Sacculinidae, which comprises the majority of rhizocephalan species. However, the single receptacle creates a situation where the two implanted...

  15. Observations on the Carapace Length-Width and Carapace Width-Weight Relationships of the Blue Swimming Crab, Portunus Pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Bahraini Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rumaidh, Mohammed Juma; Yule, A. B.; Walker, G.

    2005-01-01

    Studies on the biometric relationships of the blue swimming crab Portunus pelagicus from Bahraini waters have been undertaken in the present investigation in order to understand the growth pattern of this species in terms of carapace-width (CL-CW) and carapace width-weight (CW-Wt.) relationships, in this part of the world. From the (759) male and (1,233) female crabs that were collected from the offshore study region from October to November 1999, data have indicated that that slopes of (CL-CW) relationships are found to be similar in both genders. The average slopes for crabs in area (A) and (B) had exhibited an isometric growth with (CW) being (1.7) times (CL). The slope recorded or area (C) proved to be significantly less than (1), indicating an allometric growth with (CW) getting relatively longer in bigger crabs. As for the (CW-wt.) relationship, the total of (2,070) male and (3,005) female crabs, which were collected over a period of (14) months (i.e. March 1999-April 2000) showed that males are heavier than females at (2) cms (CW), becoming more so above (6) (CW). Male exponents varied significantly between study areas and from one month to another, unlike those for females which are found to be similar across the study areas and months, except for area (B), June 1999, where the exponent was at its lowest at (2.71). The higher of exponents of males thought most of the study period indicate their better condition over females. Both genders were found to be heavier during the Summer months, i.e. May-September. However, male and female slopes for (CW-CL) and many other exponents for (CW-Wt.) exhibited small differences which prove statistically significant. This is attributed to the large number of observations that make small differences significant, yet biological significance may be less obvious. (author)

  16. Morphology and function of the reproductive tract of the spider crab Libinia spinosa (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majoidea): pattern of sperm storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sal Moyano, M. P.; Gavio, M. A.; Cuartas, E. I.

    2010-09-01

    Morphology and function of the male reproductive tract, female spermatheca and patterns of sperm storage were assessed in the crab Libinia spinosa using histological methods. Testes are characterized by the presence of peripheral spermatogonia and different sequences of sperm maturity. Spermatophores begin to be packed in the last portion. The vas deferens consists of three sections: anterior, with undeveloped spermatophores and free sperm; median, with well-developed spermatophores; and posterior with granular secretions. Female spermathecae are of the ventral type, with a velum separating dorsal and ventral chambers. Live individuals were kept in the laboratory and arranged in pairs. An experiment was conducted toward the end of the reproductive season, in which males with the right gonopod excised were placed with receptive females. After mating, females were killed and the spermathecae dissected for histological study and observation of the pattern of sperm storage. Spermatozoa were found forming discrete sperm packages. New ejaculates can fill the entire spermatheca or be restricted to the ventral chamber; sperm are rounded, with a distinguishable acrosomal core. Old ejaculates are restricted to the dorsal chamber and are of irregular shape and larger size; an acrosomal core was not distinguishable. The secretions produced by the glandular epithelium of the dorsal chamber of the spermathecae are likely to have a role in the removal of dead sperm.

  17. Effects of gamma irradiation on the physical and sensory quality and inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in blue swimming crab meat (Portunas pelagicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suklim, Kannapha; Flick, George J.; Vichitphan, Kanit

    2014-10-01

    Blue swimming crab lump (backfin) meat were exposed to 2, 4, and 6 kGy doses of Co60 irradiation and evaluated for changes in physical, sensory properties, and Listeria monocytogenes inactivation. Irradiation up to 6 kGy resulted in no textural changes (p>0.05) in maximum shear forces; however, these exposures resulted in sensory quality changes (pirradiation level. Irradiation had no effect (p>0.05) on L* color value. Irradiation at 4 and 6 kGy resulted in listericidal reductions greater than 6.65 (Department of Medical Science, Ministry of Health, Thailand, [DMST] 1783) and 7.56 logs (DMST 4553). Irradiation doses of 1 and 2 kGy resulted in a reduction of 2.10 and 5.35 logs respectively of L. monocytogenes DMST 1783 and 1.56 and 4.19 logs respectively of L. monocytogenes DMST 4553. The D10 values of L. monocytogenes DMST 1783 and 4553 were 0.35 and 0.45 kGy. The study indicated that low-dose gamma irradiation would increase the safety of blue swimming crab meat without unacceptable changes in texture and L* color value.

  18. Physiologic sexual maturity of the fiddler crab Uca rapax (Smith, 1870 (Crustacea, Ocypodidae from two mangroves in Ubatuba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela da Silva Castiglioni

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The gonad development of Uca rapax was studied to achieve the size at onset of its sexual maturity. Crabs were sampled from April/2001 to March/2002 in the Itamambuca and Ubatumirim mangroves in Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil. The specimens were grouped in 10 size classes. Juveniles and adult crabs frequencies were assessed for each class. The size of carapace width in which 50% of males and females were considered mature was 14.8 and 12.1 mm (Itamambuca and 13.6 and 11.4 mm (Ubatumirim, respectively for males and females. Males matured at higher sizes than females, probably due to a major investment in their somatic growth, while females spend their energy in the reproductive process, saving energy for eggs' production.A determinação do tamanho em que os caranguejos atingem sua maturidade sexual é um importante instrumento em estudos da dinâmica populacional e na determinação do potencial reprodutivo de uma espécie. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar aspectos fisiológicos como o desenvolvimento gonadal para a determinação do tamanho na primeira maturação de Uca rapax. Os caranguejos foram coletados durante um ano (abril de 2001 a março de 2002 nos manguezais de Itamambuca e Ubatumirim, Ubatuba, SP. Os exemplares capturados foram mensurados quanto à largura da carapaça e o sexo e os estágios de desenvolvimento gonadal registrados. Os caranguejos com gônadas imaturas e rudimentares foram considerados jovens e os caranguejos nos demais estágios gonadais foram classificados como adultos. Os exemplares foram separados em 10 classes de tamanhos, sendo que para cada classe foram obtidas as freqüências de caranguejos jovens e adultos. A determinação da maturidade sexual foi obtida através de equação logística e o ajuste desta equação foi efetuado pelo método dos mínimos quadrados. O tamanho da largura da carapaça no qual 50% da população de Uca rapax foi considerada madura foi de 14,8 mm para machos e 12,1 mm de LC para

  19. Taxonomy of the freshwater crabs of Costa Rica, with a revision of the genus Ptychophallus Smalley, 1964 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Pseudothelphusidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Célio; Wehrtmann, Ingo S; Lara, Luis Rólier; Mantelatto, Fernando L

    2015-01-13

    The taxonomy and geographic distribution of the freshwater crabs of the family Pseudothelphusidae Ortmann, 1893, of Costa Rica, Central America, particularly of the genus Ptychophallus Smalley, 1964, are revised. Historical materials deposited in major collections of several institutions were examined, as well as valuable collections in the Zoological Museum of the University of Costa Rica that include abundant specimens obtained recently (2007-2010) in the southern region of the country. The pseudothelphusids of Costa Rica consists of 15 currently valid species belonging to Achlidon Smalley, 1964 (two species), Allacanthos Smalley, 1964 (two species), Potamocarcinus H. Milne Edwards, 1853 (three species), and Ptychophallus (eight species). Two species seem to be restricted to the Atlantic drainage, while seven are known only from the Pacific drainage; six species occur in both drainages. Ptychophallus comprises 13 valid species; four new synonymies are proposed: P. osaensis Rodríguez, 2001, P. campylus Pretzmann, 1968, P. tumimanus ingae            Pretzmann, 1978, and P. barbillaensis Rodríguez & Hedström, 2001, as junior synonyms of P. paraxantusi (Bott, 1968), P. tristani (Rathbum 1896), P. tumimanus (Rathbun, 1898), and P. uncinatus Campos & Lemaitre, 1999, respectively. Two species, P. colombianus (Rathbun, 1896) and P. exilipes (Rathbun, 1898), are considered species inquerendae. Lectotype designations are made for P. montanus and P. colombianus. Three species of Ptychophallus are known exclusively from Costa Rica, five exclusively from Panama, and five species occur in both countries; one species appears to be exclusive of the Atlantic drainage, whereas five are known only from the Pacific drainage and seven occur in both drainages. The gonopod morphology of all species is redescribed and illustrated, and maps of their geographic distribution are furnished. A key to the species of Pseudothelphusidae from Costa Rica and to all species of

  20. Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit in swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus: molecular cloning, characterization, and expression under low salinity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaolin; Liu, Ping; Gao, Baoquan; Wang, Haofeng; Duan, Yafei; Xu, Wenfei; Chen, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Na+/K+-ATPases are membrane-associated enzymes responsible for the active transport of Na+ and K+ ions across cell membranes, generating chemical and electrical gradients. These enzymes' α-subunit provides catalytic function, binding and hydrolyzing ATP, and itself becoming phosphorylated during the transport cycle. In this study, Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit cDNA was cloned from gill tissue of the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end methods. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that the cDNA had a full-length of 3 833 base pairs (bp), with an open reading frame of 3 120 bp, 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 317 bp, and 3' UTR of 396 bp. The sequence encoded a 1 039 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 115.57 kDa and with estimated pI of 5.21. It was predicted here to possess all expected features of Na+/K+-ATPase members, including eight transmembrane domains, putative ATP-binding site, and phosphorylation site. Comparison of amino acid sequences showed that the P. trituberculatus α-subunit possessed an overall identity of 75%-99% to that of other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this α-subunit was in the same category as those of crustaceans. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that this α-subunit's transcript were most highly expressed in gill and lowest in muscle. RT-PCR analysis also revealed that α-subunit expression in crab gill decreased after 2 and 6 h, but increased after 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. In addition, α-subunit expression in hepatopancreas of crab decreased after 2-72 h. These facts indicated that the crab's Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit was potentially involved in the observed acute response to low salinity stress.

  1. A new species of hermit crab, Diogenes heteropsammicola (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura, Diogenidae), replaces a mutualistic sipunculan in a walking coral symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Momoko; Kato, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Symbiont shift is rare in obligate mutualisms because both the partners are reciprocally dependent on and specialized to each other. In the obligate accommodation-transportation mutualism between walking corals and sipunculans, however, an unusual saltatory symbiont shift was discovered. In shallow waters of southern Japan, an undescribed hermit crab species was found living in corallums of solitary scleractinian corals of the genera Heterocyathus and Heteropsammia, replacing the usual sipunculan symbiont. We described the hermit crab as a new species Diogenes heteropsammicola (Decapoda, Anomura, Diogenidae), and explored its association with the walking corals. This hermit crab species obligately inhabits the coiled cavity of the corals, and was easily distinguished from other congeneric species by the exceedingly slender chelipeds and ambulatory legs, and the symmetrical telson. Observations of behavior in aquaria showed that the new hermit crab, like the sipunculan, carries the host coral and prevents the coral from being buried. This is an interesting case in which an organism phylogenetically distant from Sipuncula takes over the symbiotic role in association with a walking coral. The hermit crab species is unique in that its lodging is a living solitary coral that grows with the hermit crab in an accommodation-transportation mutualism.

  2. A new species of hermit crab, Diogenes heteropsammicola (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura, Diogenidae, replaces a mutualistic sipunculan in a walking coral symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Igawa

    Full Text Available Symbiont shift is rare in obligate mutualisms because both the partners are reciprocally dependent on and specialized to each other. In the obligate accommodation-transportation mutualism between walking corals and sipunculans, however, an unusual saltatory symbiont shift was discovered. In shallow waters of southern Japan, an undescribed hermit crab species was found living in corallums of solitary scleractinian corals of the genera Heterocyathus and Heteropsammia, replacing the usual sipunculan symbiont. We described the hermit crab as a new species Diogenes heteropsammicola (Decapoda, Anomura, Diogenidae, and explored its association with the walking corals. This hermit crab species obligately inhabits the coiled cavity of the corals, and was easily distinguished from other congeneric species by the exceedingly slender chelipeds and ambulatory legs, and the symmetrical telson. Observations of behavior in aquaria showed that the new hermit crab, like the sipunculan, carries the host coral and prevents the coral from being buried. This is an interesting case in which an organism phylogenetically distant from Sipuncula takes over the symbiotic role in association with a walking coral. The hermit crab species is unique in that its lodging is a living solitary coral that grows with the hermit crab in an accommodation-transportation mutualism.

  3. Reproductive traits of the symbiotic pea crab Austinotheres angelicus (Crustacea, Pinnotheridae living in Saccostrea palmula (Bivalvia, Ostreidae, Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Salas-Moya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pea crabs of the family Pinnotheridae exhibit a symbiotic life style and live associated with a variety of different marine organisms, especially bivalves. Despite the fact that pea crabs can cause serious problems in bivalve aquaculture, the available information about the ecology of these crabs from Central America is extremely limited. Therefore, the present study aimed to describe different reproductive features of the pinnotherid crab Austinotheres angelicus associated with the oyster Saccostrea palmula in the Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Monthly sampling was conducted from April to December 2012. Average carapace width (CW of the 47 analyzed ovigerous females was 7.62 mm. The species produced on average 2677 ± 1754 recently -extruded embryos with an average volume of 0.020 ± 0.003 mm3; embryo volume increased during embryogenesis by 21%, but did not vary significantly between developmental stages. Brood mass volume varied greatly (between 11.7 and 236.7 mm3, and increased significantly with female CW. Females invested on average 76.7% (minimum: 21.7%; maximum: 162.8% of their body weight in brood production, which confirms a substantially higher energy allocation for embryo production in pinnotherid crabs compared to free-living decapods.

  4. Molecular cloning of two structure variants of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) from the swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus), and their gene expression during molting and ovarian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xi; Zhu, Dongfa; Yang, Jifen; Qiu, Xier; Cui, Xiaoyu; Tang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    Two full-length cDNA (Pt-CHH1 and Pt-CHH2) sequences encoding crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) were cloned from tissues of the swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus) using RACE. Pt-CHH1 was cloned from eyestalk, whereas Pt-CHH2 was cloned from thoracic ganglia. Sequence and structure analyses of Pt-CHH1 and Pt-CHH2 suggest that they may be generated from alternative splicing. Tissue distribution showed that transcript of Pt-CHH1 was only detected in eyestalk, while transcript of Pt-CHH2 was observed in several extra-eyestalk tissues. The transcript levels of Pt-CHH1 and Pt-CHH2 during molting and ovarian development were determined using qPCR. In molting process, level of Pt-CHH1 in eyestalk increased from stage A (postmolt), and to significant higher at stage C (intermolt), then decreased during premolt (D0-D4). In ovarian development, level of Pt-CHH1 in eyestalk decreased from previtellogenic stage (II), and to significant lower at mature stage (IV). The expression patterns of Pt-CHH2 in thoracic ganglia and Y-organ were distinct from that of Pt-CHH1 in eyestalk. The combined results suggest that Pt-CHH1 may be involved in inhibition of molting and ovarian development, whereas Pt-CHH2 may have other physiological functions.

  5. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ 2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus ( P <0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  6. New records of hermit crabs, Calcinus morgani Rahayu and Forest, 1999 and Diogenes klaasi Rahayu and Forest, 1995 (Crustacea: Anomura: Diogenidae from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Reshmi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Two species of hermit crabs, Calcinus morgani Rahayu and Forest and Diogenes klaasi Rahayu and Forest of the family Diogenidae, are recorded for the first time from the Indian coast. Calcinus morgani inhabits the intertidal rocky area along Thirumullavaram beach, Kollam, while D. klaasi was collected from the mangrove swamps in Ashtamudi Lake, Kerala.

  7. A case of associated occurrence of the crab Lauridromia inter-media (Laurie, 1906) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Dromiidae) and the actinian Nemanthus annamensis Carlgren, 1943 (Anthozoa: Actiniaria: Nemanthidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Hartog, den J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Members of the crab family Dromiidae tend to cover their carapace mostly with sponges or colonial tunicates. More rarely are used other objects or organisms such as solitary Tunicata, Zoantharia (= encrusting anemones), valves of Bivalvia, etc.; a review of these is presented. A new association of a

  8. Ultraestrutura do espermatozóide de Ucides cordatus Linnaeus (Crustacea, Ocypodidae do litoral norte do Brasil Ultrastructure of spermatozoon of the crab Ucides cordatus Linaeus (Crustacea, Decapoda of the northern littoral of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilson Matos

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructure of spermatozoa of the crab Ucides cordatus Linnaeus, 1763 is described and illustrated. Three parts can be distinguished: 1. the elongate-ovoid acrosome located anteriorly; 2. the cytoplasmic region; and 3. the nuclear region. The acrosome is composed of a thick electron-dense wall and a less electron-dense subacrosomal space. The cytoplasm region connects the acrosome with the nucleus, and three arms filled with microtubules arise from this region. The nucleus is polymorphous. The spermatozoon of Ucides cordatus follows the general pattern described for other Decapods.

  9. New records of xanthid crabs Atergatis roseus (Rüppell, 1830 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura from Iraqi coast, south of Basrah city, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Khassaf Al-Khafaji

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the The Brachyuran crab Atergatis roseus (Ruppell, 1830, were collected for first times from Iraqi coast, south Al-Faw, Basrah city, Iraq, in coast of northwest of Arabian Gulf. Morphological features and distribution pattern of this species are highlighted and a figure is provided. The material was mostly collected from the shallow subtidal and intertidal areas using trawl net and hand.

  10. A new large oregoniid spider crab of the genus Pleistacantha Miers, 1879, from the Bay of Bengal, India (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. L. Ng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new species of deep-water oregoniid spider crab of the genus Pleistacantha Miers, 1879, is described from the Indian Ocean. The species is distinct in possessing a prominently inflated carapace in which the median parts of the branchial regions almost meet. It can also be distinguished from its closest congeners, P. moseleyi (Miers, 1885, P. pungens (Wood-Mason, in Wood-Mason and Alcock 1891, and P. ori Ahyong & Ng, 2007, in its more elongate and less spinose chelipeds and ambulatory legs, shorter third maxilliped, trapezoidal male pleon and a male first gonopod which is relatively stout with a short subdistal dorsal papilla.

  11. A new species of the hermit crab genus Alainopaguroides McLaughlin, 1997 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuan-Yuan; Komai, Tomoyuki; Sha, Zhong-Li

    2016-10-10

    A new species of the pagurid hermit crab, Alainopaguroides sinensis sp. nov., is described and illustrated on the basis of a single ovigerous female specimen collected from the South China Sea. It is immediately distinguished from other known congeneric species by the possession of a subdistal spine on the lateral margin of the basal segment of the antennular peduncle, although the most similar congener is A. andamanensis McLauglin, 2002. This is the first record of the genus from the South China Sea. An identification key to the species of the genus Alainopaguroides McLaughlin, 1997 is provided.

  12. Additional records of the pagurid hermit crab genus Trichopagurus de Saint Laurent, 1968 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura), with description of a new species from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    The pagurid hermit crab genus Trichopagurus de Saint Laurent, 1968 is currently represented by three shallow water spe- cies from the tropical Indo-West Pacific region. In this paper, three species of the genus, including one new species, are reported. Trichopagurus tenuidactylus n. sp. is described on the basis of a single ovigerous female from the Bohol Sea, the Philippines, and compared with two close relatives, T. asper Komai & Poupin, 2012 and T. macrochela Komai & Os- awa, 2005. New locality records are provided for T. macrochela (the Philippines) and T. trichophthalinus (Forest, 1954) (Taiwan and Marianas). An identification key to the four species of the genus is presented.

  13. Records of the hermit crab genus Pagurixus Melin, 1939 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from Europa Island, Western Indian Ocean, with descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Poupin, Joseph

    2013-01-18

    Three species of the pagurid hermit crab genus Pagurixus Melin, 1939, are reported from Europa Island in the Mozambique Strait, western Indian Ocean: P. haigae Komai & Osawa, 2007, P. annulus n. sp., and P. europa n. sp. Pagurixus haigae is recorded from the western Indian Ocean for the first time. Pagurixus annulus n. sp. and P. europa n. sp. are referred to the P. boninensis (Melin, 1939) species group and P. anceps (Forest, 1954) group, respectively. Diagnostic characters of these two new species are discussed.

  14. The complete mitogenome of the hermit crab Clibanarius infraspinatus (Hilgendorf, 1869), (Crustacea; Decapoda; Diogenidae) - a new gene order for the Decapoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the hermit crab Clibanarius infraspinatus was recovered by genome skimming using Next-Gen sequencing. The Clibanarius infraspinatus mitogenome has 16,504 base pairs (67.94% A + T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a putative 1500 bp non-coding AT-rich region. The Clibanarius infraspinatus mitogenome sequence is the first for the family Diogenidae and the second for the superfamily Paguroidea and exhibits a translocation of the ND3 gene not previously reported for the Decapoda.

  15. Crustacea; Talitridae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution of the amphipod, Talorchestia capensis (Crustacea; Talitridae) has been studied in a dune-beach system. The majority of amphipods occurred in dune slacks with fewer on the beach. No zonation of size classes existed, both juveniles and adults occurring throughout the slack. Amphipods were concentrated in ...

  16. The freshwater crab, Trichodactylus fluviatilis (Latreille, 1828 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Trichodactylidae, as perceived by the inhabitants of the county of Pedra Branca, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Medeiros Costa Neto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater crabs are key elements of the aquatic biota of streams, rivers, lakes, and dams because of their ecological and economic importance. Considering that Trichodactylus fluviatilis (Latreille, 1828 is an important source of food for the human settlements that inhabit the places of its occurrence, this article records, for the first time, an ethnocarcinological study carried out with the inhabitants of Pedra Branca county, Bahia State. Data were obtained from February to June 2005 by means of open-ended interviews using the usual techniques of ethnographical survey. Sixteen women and eleven men were interviewed. Their ages ranged from 25 to 86 years old. The results showed that the ethnocarcinological knowledge about T. fluviatilis is relatively consistent with academic knowledge. Ethnozoological studies that stress the cultural significance of freshwater crustaceans are very important, since they would represent a great contribution to the debate on biodiversity conservation in the environments these animals inhabit.

  17. A new species of the hermit crab genus Areopaguristes Rahayu & McLaughlin (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea, Diogenidae) from the Mexican Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayón-Parente, Manuel; Hendrickx, Michel E

    2016-10-05

    A new species of hermit crab, Areopaguristes espetacioni, family Diogenidae, is described and illustrated in detail, including the color pattern in live/fresh specimens. This is the fifth species of Areopaguristes reported from the eastern Pacific. Given the morphological similarity between Areopaguristes espetacioni n. sp. and A. tudgei Lemaitre & Felder, 2012, these can be considered sister species. The presence of a long rostrum, the antennal flagella with short setae, chelipeds and ambulatories legs with dense plumose setae, and telson with calcareous teeth on the posterior margin allow to separate Areopaguristes espetacioni n. sp. from all other species in the genus previously described for the region. A key for Areopaguristes species from the eastern tropical Pacific is provided.

  18. Redescription of the pagurid hermit crab Catapaguroides fragilis (Melin, 1939) and descriptions of two new species from deep-sea off the Ryukyu Islands, Japan (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki

    2017-06-02

    Three species of the pagurid hermit crab genus Catapaguroides A. Milne-Edwards & Bouvier, 1892, all from Japanese waters, are reported. Catapaguroides fragilis (Melin, 1939) is redescribed on the basis of the holotype and additional material from southern Japan. Diagnostic characters of this poorly known species are fully assessed. Two new species, C. bythos and C. rubromaculatus, are described and illustrated on the basis of material from upper bathyal depths off the Ryukyu Islands. Catapaguroides rubromaculatus n. sp. resembles C. fragilis and C. hirsutus Komai & Rahayu, 2013, but the characteristic shape of the ocular peduncle and the elongate male right sexual tube with an anteriorly directed distal portion readily separate C. rubromaculatus n. sp. from the latter two congeners. Catapaguroides bythos n. sp. appears close to C. mortenseni de Saint Laurent, 1968 and C. pectinipes (Lewinsohn, 1969), but the different armature of the chelipeds distinguishes C. bythos n. sp. from the latter two allies. Catapaguroides is now represented by 30 species.

  19. Crescimento somático do caranguejo-uçá Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ocypodidae em laboratório Somatic growth of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ocypodidae in laboratory

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    Giovana V. Lima

    In crustaceans, size increase occurs only immediately after molting when the animal is in the soft-shelled condition. The growth of Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763 was observed in laboratory, through its occurrence of molt, percentual increment of size and intermolt period. The study was realized from October/2000 to March/2002 and a total of 91 crabs (15 males, 33 females and 43 juveniles were sampled in Itacuruçá - Coroa Grande mangrove, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The animals were maintained in two types of containers: adult crabs were kept in containers of 1000 l capacity, during eighteen months; while the juveniles were kept in plastic containers of 20 l capacity during eight months. The crabs were maintained in flowing seawater and fed on frozen leaves of Rhizophora mangle (L. (Rhizophoraceae and Laguncularia racemosa (Gaertn. (Combretaceae, twice a week. The carapace width ranged from 50.1 to 70.0 mm in males, 40.2 to 80.0 mm to females and 1.1 to 40.1 mm to juveniles. The survival rate of the specimens studied was of 46.7% for males, 39.4% for females after eighteen months and 67.4% for juveniles after eight months. The males and females molted up to three times during the experiment, while the juveniles molted up twice. Molts occurred between August and April, showing more frequency during spring and summer. The increment of carapace width decreased with size, with mean was 2.21 ± 1.39% for males, 1.28 ± 0.84% for females and 2.89 ± 2.13% for juveniles. The relationship between the percentual increment and the carapace width can be expressed by the equation IM = -0.0707LC + 4.645 (r²= 0.40. The intermolt period was 191 ± 140 days for males, 216 ± 76.2 days for females and 54 ± 1.41 days for juveniles. The percentual increment of size was statistically significant (p<0,05 when compared males and females, and adults and juveniles.

  20. Alometria no crescimento de Uca mordax (Smith (Crustacea, Decapoda, Ocypodidae na Baía de Guaratuba, Paraná, Brasil Allometric growth in the fiddler crab Uca mordax (Smith (Crustacea, Decapoda, Ocypodidae from Guaratuba Bay, Parana, Brazil

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    Setuko Masunari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo do crescimento relativo da maior quela do macho e do abdome da fêmea foi realizado numa população do caranguejo chama-maré Uca mordax (Smith, 1870 ocorrente no extremo oeste da Baía de Guaratuba, Paraná, sul do Brasil. O comprimento da maior quela (CMQ foi medido em 319 machos, e a largura do abdome (LAB em 356 fêmeas. Adicionalmente, seis chama-marés sexualmente indiferenciados foram analisados. A largura da carapaça (LC foi escolhida como dimensão de referência para ambos os sexos, a qual variou de 1,94 a 20,0 mm para machos, de 2,50 a 18,85 mm para fêmeas, e de 1,94 a 3,15 para os indivíduos sexualmente indiferenciados. A relação entre o LC e CMQ mostrou um ponto de inflexão em 11,70 mm LC nos machos, e entre LC e LAB, em 8,77 mm LC dentre as fêmeas. Os machos (média LC = 14,24 mm atingiram tamanhos pouco maiores do que as fêmeas (média LC = 13,97 mm. O crescimento foi alométrico positivo durante toda a ontogênese de ambos os sexos, isto é, antes e depois da muda puberal. As equações das relações entre LC e CMQ nos machos foram: logCMQ = -0,542265 + 1,51.logLC para machos juvenis e logCMQ = -1,446281 + 2,37.logLC para machos adultos. Nas fêmeas, a relação entre LC e LAB foi: logLAB = -0,607282 + 1,22.logLC e logLAB = -0,912074 + 1,60.logLC, respectivamente, para juvenis e adultas. Estas dimensões estão relacionadas com as atividades reprodutivas da espécie. O nível de alometria do CMQ dos machos adultos de U. mordax foi o mais alto dentre as espécies do gênero, cujo crescimento relativo desta dimensão foi estudado. A proporção de machos destros foi estatisticamente a mesma daqueles sinistros (1:1.Relative growth of the male major chela and female abdomen was studied in a population of the fiddler crab Uca mordax (Smith, 1870 from Guaratuba Bay, Parana, Southern Brazil. Major chela length (CMQ was measured from 319 males, and abdomen width (LAB from 356 females. Also six small sexually

  1. Growth of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 (Crustacea, Anomura, Diogenidae at São Vicente, São Paulo, Brazil

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    Bruno Sampaio Sant’Anna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzed the growth of males and females of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802, at São Vicente, São Paulo, Brazil. Monthly collections were made from May/2001 through April/2003, at the Pescadores Beach in São Vicente. The 2,501 crabs caught were identified and sexed and the carapace shield length (CSL was measured. For the seasonal growth study, the population was divided into 5mm size classes (CSL and analyzed by the Bertalanffy method, with the aid of the program Fisat II. The mean sizes of the 703 males and 1,798 females were 8.94±1.80 and 6.61±1.13 mm, respectively. A seasonal growth pattern was observed, with males reaching an asymptotic size (14.92 mm larger than that of females (13.85 mm. Males began the growth process approximately five months before the females. This growth pattern probably helped to reduce intraspecific competition for the shells, because the males reached larger size and made the smaller shells available to the females.O presente estudo teve como objetivo analisar o crescimento de machos e fêmeas do ermitão Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802, da região de São Vicente, São Paulo, Brasil. Foram realizadas coletas mensais de maio/2001 a abril/2003, na Praia dos Pescadores em São Vicente. Os 2.501 animais capturados foram identificados, determinados quanto ao sexo e mensurados quanto ao seu comprimento de escudo cefalotorácico (CEC. Para o estudo sazonal do crescimento, a população foi dividida em classes de tamanho de 5mm de (CEC, e analisada pelo método de Bertalanffy, com o auxílio do software Fisat II. Foram obtidos 703 indivíduos machos e 1.798 fêmeas, com média de tamanho de 8.94±1.80 e 6.61±1.13mm, respectivamente. Constatou-se um padrão de crescimento sazonal, com machos atingindo um tamanho assintótico (14.92mm superior ao das fêmeas (13.85mm, além de iniciarem o processo de crescimento aproximadamente cinco meses antes destas. Desta forma, é provável que

  2. A micro X-ray computed tomography dataset of South African hermit crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguroidea) containing scans of two rare specimens and three recently described species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landschoff, Jannes; Du Plessis, Anton; Griffiths, Charles L

    2018-04-01

    Along with the conventional deposition of physical types at natural history museums, the deposition of 3-dimensional (3D) image data has been proposed for rare and valuable museum specimens, such as irreplaceable type material. Micro computed tomography (μCT) scan data of 5 hermit crab species from South Africa, including rare specimens and type material, depicted main identification characteristics of calcified body parts. However, low-image contrasts, especially in larger (>50 mm total length) specimens, did not allow sufficient 3D reconstructions of weakly calcified and fine characteristics, such as soft tissue of the pleon, mouthparts, gills, and setation. Reconstructions of soft tissue were sometimes possible, depending on individual sample and scanning characteristics. The raw data of seven scans are publicly available for download from the GigaDB repository. Calcified body parts visualized from μCT data can aid taxonomic validation and provide additional, virtual deposition of rare specimens. The use of a nondestructive, nonstaining μCT approach for taxonomy, reconstructions of soft tissue structures, microscopic spines, and setae depend on species characteristics. Constrained to these limitations, the presented dataset can be used for future morphological studies. However, our virtual specimens will be most valuable to taxonomists who can download a digital avatar for 3D examination. Simultaneously, in the event of physical damage to or loss of the original physical specimen, this dataset serves as a vital insurance policy.

  3. Maturidade sexual do caranguejo Armases rubripes (Rathbun (Crustacea, Brachyura, Sesarmidae na Baía de Sepetiba, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Sexual maturity of the crab Armases rubripes (Rathbun (Crustacea, Brachyura, Sesarmidae in Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana V. Lima

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar a maturidade sexual de Armases rubripes (Rathbun, 1897 em três diferentes ambientes (rio, praia arenosa e manguezal no sudeste do Brasil. Os caranguejos foram coletados mensalmente de julho/2002 a fevereiro/2004, utilizando-se peneiras no Rio Sahy durante as marés altas e, manualmente, na praia e no manguezal, durante as marés baixas. Os animais foram capturados por dois coletores num esforço de 15 minutos por estação de coleta. No laboratório, os exemplares foram separados por sexo e mensurados em relação a largura da carapaça, do abdome e comprimento do gonopódio. As gônadas, gonopódios e o abdome foram analisados segundo sua forma e seu aspecto. Um total de 4.051 indivíduos foram amostrados (1.067 machos, 1.563 fêmeas e 1.421 juvenis. Foram determinados cinco morfotipos: juvenis, machos imaturos, fêmeas imaturas, machos maduros e fêmeas maduras. O início da maturidade sexual fisiológica e morfológica ocorreu de forma assíncrona, com machos produzindo gametas mais cedo que as fêmeas. O tamanho da primeira maturidade sexual apresentou diferença significativa entre os ambientes analisados, exceção observada para o manguezal. Os indivíduos obtidos no manguezal apresentaram menores tamanhos para o início da maturidade sexual. Embora, estimados os tamanhos da maturidade sexual morfológica de machos e fêmeas, a análise do crescimento alométrico foi inadequado para a espécie.The present study analyzed the sexual maturity of Armases rubripes (Rathbun, 1897 in three populations from different environmental conditions (river, beach and mangrove in the southeastern Brazilian coast. Crabs were sampled monthly from July 2002 to February 2004; they were captured with sieves at Sahy River, during the high tides, and by hand at beach and mangrove areas, during low tides. Animals were captured by establishing a catch effort of two collectors during 15 minutes for each station. At laboratory, all individuals

  4. Anatomy of virgin and mature externae of Loxothylacus texanus, parasitic on the dark blue crab Callinectes rathbunae (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Fernando; Bortolini, José Luis; Høeg, Jens T

    2010-02-01

    Rhizocephalan parasites are dioecious organisms, in that one or several dwarf males are implanted into the external part of the female parasite soon after it emerges from the interior of the host animal. The structure of the female externa and its resident males is crucial for understanding both the reproductive biology and the taxonomy of these specialized parasites. We use scanning electron microscopy and histological methods to study the anatomy of juvenile and the mature externae of the rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus texanus parasitizing the blue crab Callinectes rathbunae. We put emphasis on the implantation of males and the histology of the female reproductive organs. In the virgin externae, male cyprids attach around a cuticular hood covering the mantle aperture, which is partially blocked by a plug of cuticle so only trichogon larvae, not cyprids, can access the mantle cavity. This resembles the situation known from Sacculina carcini. The mature externa is characterized by a visceral mass that contains the ovary, paired colleteric glands, a single male receptacle, but paired receptacle ducts. The proximal attachment of the visceral mass is located at some distance from the basal stalk, as is characteristic for the genus Loxothylacus. The internal anatomy of the mature externa of L. texanus is in most features similar to that seen in other species of the Sacculinidae, which comprises the majority of rhizocephalan species. However, the single receptacle creates a situation where the two implanted males cannot be kept separate as in most other rhizocephalans, but pass through spermatogenesis in a common chamber. This may have unknown effects on the reproductive biology such as male-male competition.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hydrothermal vent galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: A novel arrangement and incomplete tRNA suite

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    Yang Jin-Shu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metazoan mitochondrial genomes usually consist of the same 37 genes. Such genes contain useful information for phylogenetic analyses and evolution modelling. Although complete mitochondrial genomes have been determined for over 1,000 animals to date, hydrothermal vent species have, thus far, remained excluded due to the scarcity of collected specimens. Results The mitochondrial genome of the hydrothermal vent galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri is 15,182 bp in length, and is composed of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and only 18 transfer RNA genes. The total AT content of the genome, as is typical for decapods, is 72.9%. We identified a non-coding control region of 327 bp according to its location and AT-richness. This is the smallest control region discovered in crustaceans so far. A mechanism of cytoplasmic tRNA import was addressed to compensate for the four missing tRNAs. The S. crosnieri mitogenome exhibits a novel arrangement of mitochondrial genes. We investigated the mitochondrial gene orders and found that at least six rearrangements from the ancestral pancrustacean (crustacean + hexapod pattern have happened successively. The codon usage, nucleotide composition and bias show no substantial difference with other decapods. Phylogenetic analyses using the concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the 13 protein-coding genes prove consistent with the previous classification based upon their morphology. Conclusion The present study will supply considerable data of use for both genomic and evolutionary research on hydrothermal vent ecosystems. The mitochondrial genetic characteristics of decapods are sustained in this case of S. crosnieri despite the absence of several tRNAs and a number of dramatic rearrangements. Our results may provide evidence for the immigrating hypothesis about how vent species originate.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hydrothermal vent galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura): a novel arrangement and incomplete tRNA suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Shu; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchida, Shinji; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2008-05-30

    Metazoan mitochondrial genomes usually consist of the same 37 genes. Such genes contain useful information for phylogenetic analyses and evolution modelling. Although complete mitochondrial genomes have been determined for over 1,000 animals to date, hydrothermal vent species have, thus far, remained excluded due to the scarcity of collected specimens. The mitochondrial genome of the hydrothermal vent galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri is 15,182 bp in length, and is composed of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and only 18 transfer RNA genes. The total AT content of the genome, as is typical for decapods, is 72.9%. We identified a non-coding control region of 327 bp according to its location and AT-richness. This is the smallest control region discovered in crustaceans so far. A mechanism of cytoplasmic tRNA import was addressed to compensate for the four missing tRNAs. The S. crosnieri mitogenome exhibits a novel arrangement of mitochondrial genes. We investigated the mitochondrial gene orders and found that at least six rearrangements from the ancestral pancrustacean (crustacean + hexapod) pattern have happened successively. The codon usage, nucleotide composition and bias show no substantial difference with other decapods. Phylogenetic analyses using the concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the 13 protein-coding genes prove consistent with the previous classification based upon their morphology. The present study will supply considerable data of use for both genomic and evolutionary research on hydrothermal vent ecosystems. The mitochondrial genetic characteristics of decapods are sustained in this case of S. crosnieri despite the absence of several tRNAs and a number of dramatic rearrangements. Our results may provide evidence for the immigrating hypothesis about how vent species originate.

  7. Discovery of a new species of hermit crab of the genus Pylopaguropsis Alcock, 1905 from the Caribbean: "den commensal" or "cleaner"? (Crustacea, Anomura, Paguridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    A new secretive, yet brightly colored hermit crab species of the family Paguridae, Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae sp. n. , is fully described based on specimens from the reefs of Bonaire, Lesser Antilles, southern Caribbean Sea. Populations of this new species were discovered and photographed in the Bonaire National Marine Park under a large coral ledge, at a depth of 13.7 m, living in crevices known by scuba divers to serve as den to a pair of "flaming reef lobsters" Enoplometopus antillensis , or a "broad banded moray" Channomuraena vittata . This new species is only the second species of Pylopaguropsis Alcock, 1905 known from the western Atlantic, the 20 th named worldwide, and belongs in the teevana group of species of the genus. It is remarkably similar, and herein considered geminate, to the tropical eastern Pacific congener, Pylopaguropsis teevana (Boone, 1932), the two being characterized and uniquely different from all other species of the genus, by the striking and deeply excavated, scoop-like ventral surface of the chela of the right cheliped. Minor differences separate this new species from Pylopaguropsis teevana in the relative length of the antennal acicles (exceeding the corneas versus not exceeding the corneas in Pylopaguropsis teevana ); dorsal armature of the right chela (smooth or with scattered minute tubercles versus with numerous small tubercles in Pylopaguropsis teevana ); surface shape of the lateral face of the dactyl of right pereopod 3 (evenly convex versus flattened in Pylopaguropsis teevana ); and coloration (red bright red stripes versus brown stripes in Pylopaguropsis teevana ). The highly visible color pattern of bright red stripes on white background typical of decapods known to have cleaning symbioses with fish, dense setation on the flagella of the antennae, and preference for a crevicular habitat, combined with brief in situ nocturnal observations, suggests the possibility that Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae sp. n. engages in

  8. Discovery of a new species of hermit crab of the genus Pylopaguropsis Alcock, 1905 from the Caribbean: “den commensal” or “cleaner”? (Crustacea, Anomura, Paguridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new secretive, yet brightly colored hermit crab species of the family Paguridae, Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae sp. n., is fully described based on specimens from the reefs of Bonaire, Lesser Antilles, southern Caribbean Sea. Populations of this new species were discovered and photographed in the Bonaire National Marine Park under a large coral ledge, at a depth of 13.7 m, living in crevices known by scuba divers to serve as den to a pair of “flaming reef lobsters” Enoplometopus antillensis, or a “broad banded moray” Channomuraena vittata. This new species is only the second species of Pylopaguropsis Alcock, 1905 known from the western Atlantic, the 20th named worldwide, and belongs in the teevana group of species of the genus. It is remarkably similar, and herein considered geminate, to the tropical eastern Pacific congener, Pylopaguropsis teevana (Boone, 1932), the two being characterized and uniquely different from all other species of the genus, by the striking and deeply excavated, scoop-like ventral surface of the chela of the right cheliped. Minor differences separate this new species from Pylopaguropsis teevana in the relative length of the antennal acicles (exceeding the corneas versus not exceeding the corneas in Pylopaguropsis teevana); dorsal armature of the right chela (smooth or with scattered minute tubercles versus with numerous small tubercles in Pylopaguropsis teevana); surface shape of the lateral face of the dactyl of right pereopod 3 (evenly convex versus flattened in Pylopaguropsis teevana); and coloration (red bright red stripes versus brown stripes in Pylopaguropsis teevana). The highly visible color pattern of bright red stripes on white background typical of decapods known to have cleaning symbioses with fish, dense setation on the flagella of the antennae, and preference for a crevicular habitat, combined with brief in situ nocturnal observations, suggests the possibility that Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae sp. n. engages

  9. Effect of Enriched Artemia sp. by EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid; C20:5n-3 and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid; C22:6n-3 on Survival Rate of Swimming Crab Portunus pelagicus

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    M. Agus Suprayudi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient content of natural food is one of the main factors for determining the successful of marine fish fry production.  EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid are two essential fatty acids for marine fish larvae.   Low levels of EPA and DHA content in natural food is major problem in marine fish larval production.  Rotifers fed by Nannochloropsis contained EPA about 0.94%-1.46% and DHA was limited, while in Artemia was 0.27%-0.39% EPA and DHA was undetected (Suprayudi et al., 2002a.  Feeding on supplemented Artemia with EPA 28G and DHA 70G in ratio of 1:1 could not significantly improved its survival rate and larval development time, while growth by length and carapas width at first crab were higher  than  that of fed with unenriched Artemia. Keywords: EPA, DHA, Artemia, swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus   ABSTRAK Kandungan nutrisi dalam pakan alami merupakan salah satu faktor utama yang menentukan keberhasilan produksi benih spesies akuatik laut.  EPA (asam ekosapentanat dan DHA (asam dokosaheksanat merupakan 2 asam lemak esensil bagi larva ikan laut.  Kandungan EPA dan DHA yang rendah pada pakan alami merupakan masalah utama dalam produksi larva ikan laut.  Rotifer yang diberi pakan Nannochloropsis mengandung EPA 0,94%-1,46% dan DHA dengan jumlah yang sangat kecil, sementara Artemia EPA mengandung 0,27%-0,39% dan DHA tidak terdeteksi (Suprayudi et al., 2002a. Pemberian Artemia yang diperkaya dengan EPA 28G dan DHA 70G dengan perbandingan 1:1 tidak memberikan hasil yang signifikan pada tingkat kelangsungan hidup dan waktu perkembangan larva rajungan, sementara pertumbuhan panjang dan lebar karapas lebih baik pada crab 1 dibandingkan dengan yang diberi Artemia tidak diperkaya. Kata kunci: EPA, DHA, Artemia, rajungan, Portunus pelagicus

  10. Hermit to king, or hermit to all: multiple transitions to crab-like forms from hermit crab ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Chan, Tin-Yam; Ahyong, Shane T; Chu, Ka Hou

    2011-10-01

    The Anomura presents the greatest degree of morphological disparity in the decapod Crustacea, with body forms ranging from the symmetrical and asymmetrical hermit crabs to squat lobsters and king crabs. The phylogeny of the anomurans has been fraught with controversy. Recent debate has focused primarily on the phenomenon of carcinization, the evolution of crab-like form from a non-crab-like ancestor, focused chiefly on derivation of king crabs from asymmetrical hermit crabs--the "hermit to king" hypothesis. We show by phylogenetic analysis of five nuclear protein-coding gene sequences that hermit crabs have a single origin, but surprisingly, that almost all other major clades and body forms within the Anomura, are derived from within the hermit crabs. The crab-like form and squat lobster form have each evolved at least twice from separate symmetrical hermit crab ancestors. In each case, a carcinization trend can be posited via a transition series from the initial symmetrical long-tailed hermit crab form, through the intermediate squat lobster or asymmetrical hermit crab form, to the final crab-like form. Adaptation to dextral shell habitation evolved at least twice, once in an exclusively deep-water clade and once in the common ancestor of all other asymmetrical hermit crabs (from which king crabs are derived). These remarkable cases of parallelism suggest considerable phenotypic flexibility within the hermit crab ground plan, with a general tendency toward carcinization. Rather than having a separate origin from other major clades, hermit crabs have given rise to most other major anomuran body types.

  11. Hermit crabs in the diet of Pigeon Guillemots at Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzow, Michael A.; Piatt, John F.; Figurski, Jared D.

    1998-01-01

    Guillemots (Cepphus spp.) feed their chicks a diet that is almost exclusively fish. We observed Pigeon Guillemots (C. columba) at two colonies in Alaska where hermit crabs (Crustacea: Anomura) were a major part of the diet for some nestlings. Hermit crabs were delivered to three of five observed nests at one colony, comprised between 2% and 22% of the items delivered at those nests, and were the second most common food type at one nest. Hermit crabs may be an attractive prey item when lipid-rich forage fish are scarce, and crabs living in gastropod shells that have been softened by encrustations of Suberites sponges may be vulnerable to guillemot predation.

  12. On the misidentification of a common sandy beach crab belonging to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-07-09

    Jul 9, 1992 ... DU PREEZ, H.H. & MCLACHLAN, A. 1984c. Biology of the three-spot swimming crab, Ovalipes puncta/us (De Haan) D. Growth and moulting. Crustaceana. 47: 113-120. DU PREFZ, H.H. & MCLACHLAN, A. 1984d. Biology of the three-spot swimming crab, Ovalipes puncta/us (De Haan) DI. Reproduction ...

  13. Dinámica temporal en la relación entre el isópodo parásito Aporobopyrus curtatus (Crustacea: Isopoda: Bopyridae y el cangrejo anomuro Petrolisthes armatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Porcellanidae en el sur de Brasil Temporal dynamic of the relationship between the parasitic isopod Aporobopyrus curtatus (Crustacea: Isopoda: Bopyridae and the anomuran crab Petrolisthes armatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Porcellanidae in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of the parasite Aporobopyrus curtatus in Petrolisthes armatus from southern Brazil was determined, and the effect the parasite had on host reproduction was evaluated. Of all 775 crabs sampled in Araçá region from March 2005 to July 2006, 3.2% presented bopyrid parasites. All the parasitized individuals had one branchial chamber occupied by two mature parasites, with no preference for the right or left chamber. Male and female hosts were infested in equal proportions. Parasitized juveniles, large individuals and ovigerous females were not found in our study. The absence of parasitized ovigerous females seems to be insufficient evidence to support the hypothesis of parasitic castration and would require a histological study to confirm their reproductive death. The percentage of infestation observed in our study (3.1% is lower than the one found in other studies and it could indicate the existence of factor(s regulating the density of A. curtatus in the Araçá region. At least in this population, the low but constant presence of the bopyrid A. curtatus population did not appear to have a negative effect on the porcellanid population, and parasitized individuals did not play a significant role in the natural history of P. armatus.Se determinó la prevalencia del parásito Aporobopyrus curtatus en Petrolisthes armatus en el sur de Brasil y se evaluó el efecto de su presencia en la reproducción de su huésped. De marzo de 2005 a julio de 2007 se muestreó en la Región de Araçá un total de 775 cangrejos, de los cuales el 3,2% presentó bopíridos parásitos. Todos los individuos parasitados presentaron una cámara branquial ocupada por dos parásitos maduros, sin preferencia por la cámara derecha o izquierda. Machos y hembras hospedadores fueron infectados en la misma proporción. La ausencia de parásitos en hembras ovígeras no es evidencia suficiente para apoyar la hipótesis de castración parasítica, y se necesita un

  14. (Ortmann) (Decapoda, Crustacea)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-03-13

    Mar 13, 1987 ... duration and current velocity) of the populations to the flow of water entering the estuary during flood tides, ... 2,5 m deep) and has a tidal fetch of about 16 ...... Energy dynamics of two benthic crustacea in relationship to diet. J. Fish. Res. Bd. Can. 33(11): 2544-2550. . TUNNICLIFFE, V. & RISK, M.J. 1977.

  15. "Symmetrical" hermit crabs of the family Pylochelidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) collected by the "BIOPAPUA" and "PAPUA NIUGINI" expeditions in the Papua New Guinea, with descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Chan, Tin-Yam

    2016-03-09

    Collections made during the recent expeditions to Papua New Guinea ("BIOPAPUA", 2010; "PAPUA NIUGINI", 2012) yielded a total of 12 species from the "symmetrical" hermit crab family Pylochelidae, including two new to science: Bathycheles incisus (Forest, 1987), B. integer (Forest, 1987), Cheiroplatea laticauda Boas, 1926, C. pumicicola Forest, 1987, C. rotundioculus n. sp., Pylocheles mortensenii Boas, 1926, and Xylocheles macrops (Forest, 1987) (Pylochelinae); Parapylocheles scorpio (Alcock, 1894), Trizocheles manningi Forest, 1987, T. moosai Forest, 1987, T. sakaii Forest, 1987, and T. spinidigitus n. sp. (Trizochelinae). Affinities of the two new species are discussed. Parapylocheles scorpio, Trizocheles manningi and T. sakaii are recorded from the South Pacific for the first time. Revised identification keys to species of Cheiroplatea and Trizocheles are provided.

  16. A new species of the hermit crab genus Pagurus Fabricius, 1775 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from shallow coastal waters in Japan, with a checklist of the East Asian species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Saito, Yuma; Myorin, Eiji

    2015-02-11

    A new species of hermit crab of the family Paguridae, Pagurus rectidactylus, is described and illustrated on the basis of material from inshore waters in the Seto Inland Sea and the Sea of Japan. It appears closest to P. quinquelineatus Komai, 2003, also known from Japan, but is easily distinguished from the latter by the dactylus of the right cheliped almost unarmed or armed only with a few tiny spines or tubercles, instead of dorsal and dorsomesial rows of conspicuous spines, and the more elongate and slender ambulatory legs with more numerous ventral corneous spines on dactyli and propodi. Housing is also different between the two species: the new species exclusively inhabits carcinoecia formed by a hydrozoan Stylactaria misakiensis (Iwasa, 1934), whereas P. quinquelineatus uses gastropod shells without association with coelenterates. A checklist of East Asian (Japanese Archipelago to Taiwan Island, Far Eastern Russia to northern China) species of Pagurus along with general geographical distributions is presented.

  17. Shell utilization pattern of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura in an estuary at São Vicente, State of São Paulo, Brazil Padrão de utilização de conchas do ermitão Clibanarius vittatus (Crustacea, Anomura, no Estuário de São Vicente, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. Sant'Anna

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the gastropod shell utilization pattern of the hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802 at Pescadores Beach in São Vicente, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Specimens were collected monthly from May 2001 through April 2003, in the intertidal zone at low tide. The crabs were weighed and their carapace shield length measured. All gastropod shells were identified and had their shell biometric parameters (total length and aperture length measured (mm and weighed (g. A total of 2,344 hermit crabs (644 males, 1,594 females, 45 ovigerous females and 61 individuals in intersex, using 13 species of gastropod shells, were collected. Stramonita haemastoma (Linnaeus, 1767, Cymatium parthenopeum (Von Salis, 1793 and Achatina fulica (Bowdich, 1822 comprised over 98% of all the shells. Male and intersex crabs were significantly larger than the females. This size difference strongly influenced the shell utilization pattern, principally in A. fulica, which has the largest shell size, that was only used by males and intersexual individuals of C. vittatus. Cymatium parthenopeum was the only shell species that showed a high determinant coefficient in all the biometric correlations evaluated. The high abundance of S. haemastoma shells and a strong correlation between crab size and shell aperture length established by a significant determination coefficient, indicated that C. vittatus uses this species as the principal resource for shell occupation at Pescadores Beach.O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a utilização de conchas de gastrópodes por Clibanarius vittatus (Bosc, 1802, na Praia dos Pescadores, em São Vicente (SP, Brasil. Foram realizadas amostras mensais no período de maio de 2001 a abril de 2003, na região intertidal durante a maré baixa. Todos os animais foram pesados e tiveram o comprimento de seu escudo cefalotorácico mensurados, suas conchas identificadas e medidas quanto ao comprimento (mm, abertura (mm e peso (g

  18. Differentiation of three common deep-water hermit crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura, Parapaguridae) from the South African demersal abundance surveys, including the description of a new species of Paragiopagurus Lemaitre, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landschoff, Jannes; Lemaitre, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Deep-water hermit crabs of the family Parapaguridae can be abundant (up to 20 kg or 1000 hermit crab individuals per haul) in the trawl bycatch collected during South African demersal abundance research surveys. Until recently, only two parapagurid species had been recognized in the bycatch; Parapagurus bouvieri Stebbing, 1910, and Sympagurus dimorphus (Studer, 1883). Detailed examination of numerous samples of parapagurid specimens from research surveys revealed the existence of a third, undescribed species previously confounded with S. dimorphus , but in fact belonging to a different genus. This new species, Paragiopagurus atkinsonae sp. n. is the 25 th in the genus Paragiopagurus Lemaitre, 1996, and has been found only in a small region on the West Coast shelf of South Africa, at depths of 199-277 m. The species is herein fully described and illustrated, including colour images, µCT scans of selected body parts, and CO1 barcode data. The new species is morphologically most similar to P. ventilatus Lemaitre, 2004, a species associated with hydrothermal vents, but differs in armature of the fourth antennal segment (armed with a spine on the dorsolateral distal angle vs. unarmed in P. ventilatus ); setation of the antennal flagella (nearly naked vs. with dense setae in P. ventilatus ); plumose setation on the third maxillipeds and basal segments of chelipeds (absent vs. present in P. ventilatus ); number of rows of scales on the propodal rasp of pereopod 4 (two or three rows vs. one row in P. ventilatus ); and degree of telson asymmetry (weakly asymmetrical vs. strongly asymmetrical in P. ventilatus ). Paragiopagurus atkinsonae sp. n. is superficially similar to S. dimorphus , with males of the two species showing the same extreme degree of sexual dimorphism on the right cheliped, general light orange colouration, and frequent use of colonial zoanthid carcinoecia for pleonal protection. To aid in future identifications and to facilitate data gathering during

  19. Differentiation of three common deep-water hermit crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura, Parapaguridae from the South African demersal abundance surveys, including the description of a new species of Paragiopagurus Lemaitre, 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannes Landschoff

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep-water hermit crabs of the family Parapaguridae can be abundant (up to 20 kg or 1000 hermit crab individuals per haul in the trawl bycatch collected during South African demersal abundance research surveys. Until recently, only two parapagurid species had been recognized in the bycatch; Parapagurus bouvieri Stebbing, 1910, and Sympagurus dimorphus (Studer, 1883. Detailed examination of numerous samples of parapagurid specimens from research surveys revealed the existence of a third, undescribed species previously confounded with S. dimorphus, but in fact belonging to a different genus. This new species, Paragiopagurus atkinsonae sp. n. is the 25th in the genus Paragiopagurus Lemaitre, 1996, and has been found only in a small region on the West Coast shelf of South Africa, at depths of 199–277 m. The species is herein fully described and illustrated, including colour images, µCT scans of selected body parts, and CO1 barcode data. The new species is morphologically most similar to P. ventilatus Lemaitre, 2004, a species associated with hydrothermal vents, but differs in armature of the fourth antennal segment (armed with a spine on the dorsolateral distal angle vs. unarmed in P. ventilatus; setation of the antennal flagella (nearly naked vs. with dense setae in P. ventilatus; plumose setation on the third maxillipeds and basal segments of chelipeds (absent vs. present in P. ventilatus; number of rows of scales on the propodal rasp of pereopod 4 (two or three rows vs. one row in P. ventilatus; and degree of telson asymmetry (weakly asymmetrical vs. strongly asymmetrical in P. ventilatus. Paragiopagurus atkinsonae sp. n. is superficially similar to S. dimorphus, with males of the two species showing the same extreme degree of sexual dimorphism on the right cheliped, general light orange colouration, and frequent use of colonial zoanthid carcinoecia for pleonal protection. To aid in future identifications and to facilitate data gathering

  20. Comparative histopathology of gladiator swimming crab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pallidus from the two sites. Therefore, efforts should be intensified to avert future deleterious effect of the environmental stressors on the studied species in Agbara water body. Keywords: Susceptibility, hepatopancreas, ovary,stress, alteration ...

  1. Comparative Histopathology of Gladiator Swimming Crab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    covered with a glass cover slip attached with mounting medium.The specimens were examined and photographed by using a digital camera under a compound microscope with haematoxylin and eosin scale bar of 100µm. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. There were no structural differences on the gills for both sexes from ...

  2. Studies of male sexual tubes in hermit crabs (crustacea, decapoda, anomura, paguroidea). I. Morphology of the sexual tube in Micropagurus acantholepis (Stimpson, 1858), with comments on function and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudge, Christopher; Lemaitre, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The external morphology and internal structure of the male sexual tube of the hermit crab Micropagurus acantholepis, a member of the family Paguridae from Australian waters, is described in detail using histological thick sectioning and scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. This is the first in-depth study of a sexual tube in the Paguroidea, a group where a remarkable number of genera (55.9% in the family Paguridae) with species having these intriguing sexual structures are known. In M. acantholepis a sexual tube is present on the left side, whereas only a gonopore is present on the right side. The tube is used for the delivery of spermatophores to the female and consists of a sheath of cuticular origin surrounding an internal, functional extension of the posterior vas deferens. Pedunculate spermatophores were observed within the lumen and partially extruding from the terminal opening of the tube in preserved specimens. The tube protrudes from the left coxa of the fifth pereopod as an elongate 3-mm-long, hollow, coiled structure with a terminal opening. Exteriorly the tube consists of a conspicuous thick chitinous cuticular ridge throughout its length, and a thin chitinous cuticle with sparse, regularly arranged simple setae. Interior to the cuticle, the tube contains loose connective tissue, secretory cells, oblique muscle, circular muscle, and epithelial cells. The latter cells line a central lumen that runs the length of the sexual tube. The morphology, cellular composition, and function of the tube are discussed. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Exoskeletal proteins from the crab, Cancer pagurus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    1999-01-01

    Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry......Crustacea; decapods; cuticle; exoskeleton; structural protein; amino acid sequence; mass spectrometry...

  4. Distribuição e abundância dos caranguejos Uca Leach (Crustacea, Decapoda, Ocypodidae na Baía de Guaratuba, Paraná, Brasil Distribution and abundance of fiddler crabs Uca Leach (Crustacea Decapoda Ocypodidae in Guaratuba Bay, Parana State, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setuko Masunari

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo sobre distribuição espacial e abundância dos chama-marés Uca Leach, 1814 foi realizado na Baía de Guaratuba, Estado do Paraná. Foram coletados chama-marés de dez biótopos ao longo de um gradiente de salinidade de zero a 32 dentro da Baía de Guaratuba. Foram obtidas sete espécies, entre as quais, Uca mordax (Smith, 1870 que foi registrada somente em biótopos inundados por águas de baixas salinidades (de zero a 16. As demais espécies mostraram tolerância a uma ampla variação de salinidade, mas Uca maracoani (Latreille, 1802-1803 e Uca leptodactyla Rathbun, 1898 predominaram em águas mais salinas, de 14 a 32, enquanto U. burgersi Holthuis, 1967, Uca rapax (Smith, 1870, Uca thayeri Rathbun, 1900 e Uca uruguayensis Nobili, 1901 foram coletadas em mais de três biótopos e mostraram uma tendência ao eurihalismo, suportando salinidades de 4 a 32. Entretanto, outras características do substrato tais como porcentagem relativa de cascalho/areia/silte/argila, teor de matéria orgânica e presença de marismas, também, influenciaram a distribuição espacial destes caranguejos. U. leptodactyla foi registrada com densidade máxima de 240 ind.m-2, o mais alto valor conhecido.A study of the spatial distribution and abundance of fiddler crabs was carried out in Guaratuba Bay, Parana State, southern Brazil. Fiddler crabs were collected from 10 biotopes located along a salinity gradient from zero to 32 inside Guaratuba Bay (between 48°30'W-25°50'S and 48°45'W-25°54'S. Seven species were found, among which, Uca mordax (Smith, 1870 occurred only in biotopes inundated by low salinity water, from zero to 16. Remaining species tolerated wide range of salinity oscillation, but Uca maracoani (Latreille, 1802-1803 and Uca leptodactyla Rathbun, 1898 predominated in saltier waters, from 14 to 32, while U. burgersi Holthuis, 1967, Uca rapax (Smith, 1870, Uca thayeri Rathbun, 1900, and Uca uruguayensis Nobili, 1901 were collected in more

  5. Identification of irradiated crab using EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraby, A. [Radiation Dosimetry Department, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Ministry of Scientific Research, Haram, 12211- Giza, P.O. Box: 136 (Egypt)]. E-mail: maghrabism@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    EPR spectroscopy is a fast and powerful technique for the identification of irradiated food. Crab exoskeleton was divided into six parts: dactyl, cheliped, carapace, apron, swimming legs, and walking legs. Samples of the exoskeleton were prepared and irradiated to Cs-137 gamma radiation in the range (1.156-5.365 kGy). EPR spectra of unirradiated as well as irradiated samples were recorded and analyzed. Response to gamma radiation was plotted for each part of the exoskeleton, dactyl was found to be the most sensitive part, followed by the apron (38%), cheliped (37%), walking legs (30%), swimming legs (24%), and carapace (21%) relative to the dactyl response.

  6. Distribuição espacial, sazonal e estrutura populacional do caranguejo Aratus pisonii (H. Milne Edwards (Crustacea, Decapoda, Sesarmidae do manguezal de Itacuruçá, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Spatial and seasonal distribution and population structure of the crab Aratus pisonii (H. Milne Edwards (Crustacea, Decapoda, Sesarmidae in Itacuruçá mangrove, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane F. Nicolau

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo analisar a distribuição espacial e sazonal e a estrutura populacional do caranguejo arborícula Aratuspisonii (H. Milne Edwards, 1837. O trabalho foi realizado através de coletas mensais de junho de 2000 a maio de 2001, para estudo da estrutura populacional e coletas sazonais de janeiro a outubro de 2002 para o estudo da distribuição espacial e sazonal, dividiu-se o manguezal em três áreas. Para a distribuição espacial e sazonal foram capturados 694 indivíduos sendo 45% na área 1, 36% na área 2 e 19% na área 3. O número de indivíduos apresentou diferença significativa na distribuição espacial entre as áreas 2 e 3. Para o estudo da estrutura populacional foi capturado um total de 742 caranguejos, sendo 59% machos, 32,7% fêmeas e 8,3% fêmeas ovígeras. A razãosexual obtida foi de 1: 0,69 (macho:fêmea e a largura da carapaça variou de 9,6 a 25,0 mm em machos e de 5,5 a 24,9 mm em fêmeas. A distribuição da freqüência em classes de tamanho foi unimodal e os machos foram mais freqüentes entre as classes de 19,1 a 21,0 mm LC, enquanto as fêmeas entre 17,1 a 19,0 mm LC. A razão sexual ao longo de cada classe de tamanho demonstrou predominância de machos em quase todas as classes, exceto entre as classes de 5,1 a 7,0 e 7,1 a 9,0 mm de LC.This work was performed by monthly sampling from June 2000 to May 2001 for population structure studies and by seasonal sampling from January to October 2002 for space and seasonal distribution studies, dividing the mangrove in three different areas. On the space-seasonal distribution study, 694 crabs were caught, where 45% was captured in area 1,36% in area 2 and 19% in area 3. There were significant differences between the number of individuals between area 2 and 3. For the population structure study a total of 742 crabs were captured, being 59% male, 32.7% female and 8.3% ovigerous females. The sex ratio was 1:0.69 (male:female, and the carapace width

  7. Desenvolvimento "in vitro" de larvas e juvenis de Emerita brasiliensis Schmitt (Crustacea, Decapoda, Hippidae sob diferentes condições de temperatura, salinidade e regime alimentar "In vitro" development of larvae and juveniles of the sand crab Emerita brasiliensis Schmitt (Crustacea, Decapoda, Hippidae under different conditions of temperature, salinity and food diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara P. Otegui

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Larvas eclodidas em laboratório e juvenis coletados em campo do tatuí Emeritabrasiliensis (Hippidae foram cultivados em diferentes temperaturas e regime alimentar com a finalidade de avaliar as melhores condições para a manutenção da espécie em laboratório. O efeito da freqüência da substituição da água de cultivo sobre o desenvolvimento larvar também foi estudado avaliando-se a sobrevivência, o crescimento e a duração dos estádios larvares. A duração das fases larvares e o crescimento das três últimas fases de zoea correlacionaramse positivamente com a temperatura. As temperaturas testadas, entre 18 e 26ºC não influenciaram a sobrevivência das larvas. Não houve influencia da alimentação e nem da troca de água no desenvolvimento, crescimento e sobrevivência das larvas, bem como das dietas de microalgas na sobrevivência e desenvolvimento dos juvenis.Hatched larvae and field sampled juveniles of the sand crab Emeritabrasiliensis were reared at different temperatures and food diet in order to evaluate the best conditions for laboratory maintenance. The effects of frequency of changing the aquarium seawater on larval development was also studied evaluating the survival, growth and duration of larval stages. The duration of larval stage and growth of the last three zoes phases correlate positively with temperature. Temperatures between 18 and 26ºC did not influence the larval survival. The kind of food and frequency of water exchange did not influence the development, growth, and survival of larvae, as well as the development, and survival of juveniles.

  8. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  9. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... crab Paralithodes platypus. 923 Golden (brown) king crab Lithodes aequispinus. 924 Scarlet king crab... crab Chionoecetes tanneri. 934 Triangle Tanner crab Chionoecetes angulatus. 940 Korean horsehair crab...

  10. Crab Rationalization Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Crab Rationalization Program (Program) allocates BSAI crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities. The North Pacific Fishery Management...

  11. The Crab Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitton, S.

    1979-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, as follows: A.D.1054, a star explodes (historical account of observations of the supernova of which the Crab Nebula is the remnant); the telescope takes over (discovery and subsequent observation of the Crab Nebula); the message of the fiery remnant (detailed structure and its interpretation); the invisible nebula (electromagnetic radiation from the Crab Nebula and its interpretation); a beacon in the night (the discovery of pulsars, with special reference to the pulsar in the Crab Nebula; observation and theory); the strange world of a neutron star (theory, prediction and observation); magnetic fields and energy flow from the pulsar (stellar magnetosphere; luminosity of the nebula); how does the pulsar pulse (observation; models to explain beaming); outburst and aftermath (types of supernovae and their evolution; nucleosynthesis); supernovae and their remnants (account of observations since early records); the Crab Nebula and modern astronomy. (U.K.)

  12. Macroepizoísmo em Libinia ferreirae (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majidae Macroepizoites on Libinia ferreirae (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C. Winter

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo de distribuição dos macroepizóicos foi realizado numa população do caranguejo-aranha Libinia ferreirae Brito Capello, 1871 proveniente do litoral dos estados do Paraná e de Santa Catarina. O material biológico foi obtido junto aos pescadores, e faz parte do rejeito de pesca. Os caranguejos foram mensurados e os macroepizóicos identificados e contados. Os seguintes macroepizóicos sésseis foram registrados: Calliactis tricolor (Lesueur, 1817 (Cnidaria; Actiniaria (Cnidaria; Arca sp. (Mollusca; Ostreidae (Mollusca; Acanthodesia tenuis (Desor, 1848 (Bryozoa; Cirripedia e duas espécies tubícolas de Gammaridea (Crustacea. Além destes organismos ocorreram dois tubos desabitados e quatro animais vágeis. A anêmona C. tricolor foi a espécie mais abundante e freqüente, sendo, provavelmente, utilizada como mecanismo de camuflagem pelo caranguejo. O macroepizoísmo em L. ferreirae está relacionado com a idade ou tamanho do caranguejo, tendo maior incidência naqueles mais velhos ou de maior porte. Entretanto, a densidade dos macroepizóicos por caranguejo se mantém em torno de três. Não há relação entre o macroepizoísmo e o sexo do hospedeiro; somente fêmeas ovígeras utilizam desse recurso mais freqüentemente do que as não-ovígeras. Devido à maior área de fixação, os macroepizóicos colonizam principalmente a carapaça do caranguejo, enquanto nos pereiópodos há predominância de Bryozoa.A study of the distribution of the macroepizoites was carried out on a population of the spider crab Libinia ferreirae Brito Capello, 1871 from the Southern Brazilian coast. Crabs were obtained from shrimps and fishes by-catch. They were measured, and their macroepizoites were identified and counted. The following sessile macroepizoites were registered: Calliactis tricolor (Lesueur, 1817 (Cnidaria; Actiniaria (Cnidaria; Arca sp. (Mollusca; Ostreidae (Mollusca; Acanthodesia tenuis (Desor, 1848 (Bryozoa; Cirripedia and two species

  13. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun KIR

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000: 103-104

  14. Spatial distribution of the crab larvae (Decapoda: Anomura et Brachyura) in Possyet Bay (Peter the Great Bay of the Sea of Japan) in 2000-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryeva, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The analysis of the data obtained during the plankton surveys in Possyet Bay (Peter the Great Bay of the Sea of Japan) in 2000-2001 is presented. The larvae of eight crab species were registered in the plankton: the red king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus (Tilesius, 1815), the snow (opilio) crab Chionoecetes opilio (Fabricius, 1780), the Arctic lyre crab Hyas coarctatus ursinus (Leach, 1815), the kelp crab Pugettia quadridens (de Haan, 1839), the helmet crab Telmessus cheiragonus (Tilesius, 1815), the Japanese swimming crab Charybdis japonica (A. Milne-Edwards, 1861), the pea crab Pinnixa rathbuni (Sakai, 1934), and the porcelain crab Pachycheles stevensii (Stimpson, 1858). These species belonged to six families: Lithodidae, Atelecyclidae, Majidae, Portunidae, Porcellanidae, and Pinnotheridae. The role of the variability of some of the hydrological factors in the meroplankton larvae development was studied. In May, the crab larvae were found mostly in the open part of the bay. In June, they were transported by the current to the northern part of the bay. In July, they spread uniformly in all the bay areas; however, patchiness was observed. The maximal population density of the crab larvae was registered for July and varied from 6.8 to 23.3 ind. m-3. The crab larvae appeared in the plankton in 2000 and 2001 earlier than for the average season.

  15. On the misidentification of a common sandy beach crab belonging to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The three-spot swimming crab, a common intertidal resident of sandy beaches in southern Africa, has previously been misidentified as Ovalipes punctatus (De Haan, 1833). Inspection of local specimens indicates that the valid name for this species is O. trimaculatus (De Haan, 1833).

  16. Natural porous and nano fiber chitin structure from Gammarus argaeus (Gammaridae Crustacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Murat; Tozak, Kabil Özcan; Baran, Talat; Sezen, Göksal; Sargin, Idris

    2013-01-01

    Chitin and its derivatives are commercially important biopolymers due to their applications in medicine, agriculture, water treatment, cosmetics and various biotechnological areas. Since chitin and its derivatives exhibit different chemical and physical properties depending on the source and isolation method, there is a growing demand for new chitin sources other than crab and shrimp worldwide. In this study Gammarus, a Crustacea, was investigated as a novel chitin source. Gammarus, which belongs to the family Gammaridae Crustacea, lives in the bottom of aquatic ecosystems. More than 200 species are known worldwide. One of these species, G. argaeus was investigated for chitin isolation. The alpha chitin isolated from G. argaeus was characterized by using analysis techniques such as infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All these analyses confirmed that the isolated chitin from G. argaeus was in the alpha form. Furthermore, we described that dry weight of this species contained 11-12 % chitin. SEM examination of the isolated α-chitin revealed that it was composed of nanofibrils (15-55 nm) and pores (about 150 nm). PMID:26966425

  17. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  18. ARC Code TI: Swim

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Swim is a software information service for the grid built on top of Pour, which is an information service framework developed at NASA. Swim provides true software...

  19. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pool What to Do if You Have Diarrhea Diarrhea and Swimming Diarrhea and swimming don’t mix! ... small amount of pool water to become infected. Diarrhea and Spreading Illness at the Pool Infectious diarrhea ...

  20. Laryngoscopy during swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken

    2017-01-01

    that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  1. Food Habits of the Blue Swimming Crab Portunus pelagicus along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main food items included molluscs (51.3%), crustaceans (24.1%), fish bones (18%) and unidentified food items (6.6%). The dominant food item was the bivalve Arcuatula arcuatula Hanley, 1844. Other molluscs included the gastropod genera Nassarius, Littoraria and Conus sp. There was no significant difference in the ...

  2. Brain architecture in the terrestrial hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae), a crustacean with a good aerial sense of smell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzsch, Steffen; Hansson, Bill S

    2008-06-30

    During the evolutionary radiation of Crustacea, several lineages in this taxon convergently succeeded in meeting the physiological challenges connected to establishing a fully terrestrial life style. These physiological adaptations include the need for sensory organs of terrestrial species to function in air rather than in water. Previous behavioral and neuroethological studies have provided solid evidence that the land hermit crabs (Coenobitidae, Anomura) are a group of crustaceans that have evolved a good sense of aerial olfaction during the conquest of land. We wanted to study the central olfactory processing areas in the brains of these organisms and to that end analyzed the brain of Coenobita clypeatus (Herbst, 1791; Anomura, Coenobitidae), a fully terrestrial tropical hermit crab, by immunohistochemistry against synaptic proteins, serotonin, FMRFamide-related peptides, and glutamine synthetase. The primary olfactory centers in this species dominate the brain and are composed of many elongate olfactory glomeruli. The secondary olfactory centers that receive an input from olfactory projection neurons are almost equally large as the olfactory lobes and are organized into parallel neuropil lamellae. The architecture of the optic neuropils and those areas associated with antenna two suggest that C. clypeatus has visual and mechanosensory skills that are comparable to those of marine Crustacea. In parallel to previous behavioral findings of a good sense of aerial olfaction in C. clypeatus, our results indicate that in fact their central olfactory pathway is most prominent, indicating that olfaction is a major sensory modality that these brains process. Interestingly, the secondary olfactory neuropils of insects, the mushroom bodies, also display a layered structure (vertical and medial lobes), superficially similar to the lamellae in the secondary olfactory centers of C. clypeatus. More detailed analyses with additional markers will be necessary to explore the

  3. Brain architecture in the terrestrial hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae, a crustacean with a good aerial sense of smell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Bill S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the evolutionary radiation of Crustacea, several lineages in this taxon convergently succeeded in meeting the physiological challenges connected to establishing a fully terrestrial life style. These physiological adaptations include the need for sensory organs of terrestrial species to function in air rather than in water. Previous behavioral and neuroethological studies have provided solid evidence that the land hermit crabs (Coenobitidae, Anomura are a group of crustaceans that have evolved a good sense of aerial olfaction during the conquest of land. We wanted to study the central olfactory processing areas in the brains of these organisms and to that end analyzed the brain of Coenobita clypeatus (Herbst, 1791; Anomura, Coenobitidae, a fully terrestrial tropical hermit crab, by immunohistochemistry against synaptic proteins, serotonin, FMRFamide-related peptides, and glutamine synthetase. Results The primary olfactory centers in this species dominate the brain and are composed of many elongate olfactory glomeruli. The secondary olfactory centers that receive an input from olfactory projection neurons are almost equally large as the olfactory lobes and are organized into parallel neuropil lamellae. The architecture of the optic neuropils and those areas associated with antenna two suggest that C. clypeatus has visual and mechanosensory skills that are comparable to those of marine Crustacea. Conclusion In parallel to previous behavioral findings of a good sense of aerial olfaction in C. clypeatus, our results indicate that in fact their central olfactory pathway is most prominent, indicating that olfaction is a major sensory modality that these brains process. Interestingly, the secondary olfactory neuropils of insects, the mushroom bodies, also display a layered structure (vertical and medial lobes, superficially similar to the lamellae in the secondary olfactory centers of C. clypeatus. More detailed analyses with

  4. Crab As A Coconut Oil Separating Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Margino, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The role of sterilized and nonsterilized crab extract on the separation of coconut oil was examined using grated coconut meat as substrate. Sterilized crab extract was prepared by suspension and centrifugation of crushed crab and then filtrated using Millipore Utter. Sterilized crab extract has proteolytic activity but not lipolytic one. It was found that the sterilized crab extract supported the growth of proteolytic microbes, isolated from fermentation process of coconut oil. Both sterilize...

  5. Distribuição do caranguejo Hepatus pudibundus (Herbst, 1785 (Crustácea, Decapoda, Brachyura na Enseada da Fortaleza, Ubatuba (SP, Brasil Distribution of calico crab Hepatus Pudibunds (Herbst, 1785 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura in Fortaleza Bay, Ubatuba (SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luis Medina Mantelatto

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudos acurados sobre a fauna macrobêntica e sua relação com o ambiente são importantes para a análise da função e estrutura de áreas litorâneas. A ñnalidade deste trabalho é caracterizar uma população do caranguejo Hepatus pudibundus na Enseada de Fortaleza, Ubatuba (SP, enfocando sua distribuição espacial, relacionado-a aos fatores físico-químicos (profundidade, temperatura, oxigênio dissolvido, salinidade, textura e teor de matéria orgânica do sedimento. Com um barco de pesca, equipado com duas redes de arrasto para camarão (tipo "otter- trawl", procedeu-se a coleta dos caranguejos, efetuada mensalmente, no período de novembro/1988 a outubro/1989, em sete radiais de 1 Km cada. Foram obtidos 405 espécimes, mostrando uma abundância heterogênea. A radial IV apresentou o menor número de indivíduos, o que pode ser explicado pelas condições físicas do sedimento (bastante compactado devido a porcentagem de silte + argila e da água (baixa salinidade. Em função dos resultados obtidos, ha fortes indícios para concluir que a Enseada da Fortaleza reúne condições favoráveis à procriação e desenvolvimento de H. pudibundus. Tais condições levam a crer que pequenas variações nos fatores bióticos e abióticos não são suficientes para alterar o padrão de distribuição desta espécie, intimamente relacionada à textura e teor de matéria orgânica do sedimento.The goal of this work is to characterize the distribution of the calico crab Hepatiis pudibundus (HERBST, 1785 in Fortaleza Bay, Ubatuba (SP, analised as a function of several environmental factors. Total of 405 specimens were collected in seven radiais in the bay. Hepatus pudibundus occurred in all radiais with heterogeneous abundance and its distribution was associated to several factors, mainly the texture and organic of sediment.

  6. What regulates crab predation on mangrove propagules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nedervelde, Fleur; Cannicci, Stefano; Koedam, Nico; Bosire, Jared; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid

    2015-02-01

    Crabs play a major role in some ecosystems. To increase our knowledge about the factors that influence crab predation on propagules in mangrove forests, we performed experiments in Gazi Bay, Kenya in July 2009. We tested whether: (1) crab density influences propagule predation rate; (2) crab size influences food competition and predation rate; (3) crabs depredate at different rates according to propagule and canopy cover species; (4) vegetation density is correlated with crab density; (5) food preferences of herbivorous crabs are determined by size, shape and nutritional value. We found that (1) propagule predation rate was positively correlated to crab density. (2) Crab competitive abilities were unrelated to their size. (3) Avicennia marina propagules were consumed more quickly than Ceriops tagal except under C. tagal canopies. (4) Crab density was negatively correlated with the density of A. marina trees and pneumatophores. (5) Crabs prefer small items with a lower C:N ratio. Vegetation density influences crab density, and crab density affects propagule availability and hence vegetation recruitment rate. Consequently, the mutual relationships between vegetation and crab populations could be important for forest restoration success and management.

  7. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  8. Golden Crab Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In November 1995, a voluntary logbook program for the golden crab fishery in the waters under the jurisdiction of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council...

  9. Developmental ecology of the American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. BOTTON, Richard A. TANKERSLEY, Robert E. LOVELAND

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During spawning events, horseshoe crab eggs are released from the female’s oviducts, and fertilized by one or more males. Eggs are shaped by the female into discrete clutches deposited in nests at depths of 10-20 cm on intertidal estuarine beaches. Distinguishing between fresh eggs and the early developmental stages is obfuscated by the large amount of dense, opaque yolk. The first unambiguous confirmation of development is the formation of the rudimentary prosomatic appendages at the “limb bud” stage. Several days thereafter, the outer chorion is shed and the developing embryo expands and undergoes a series of molts within the clear inner egg membrane. The trilobite (first instar stage thus attained may remain within the beach sediments for several more weeks, until hatching is facilitated by environmental factors such as hydration, agitation, and osmotic shock that accompany the infiltration of seawater into the nests. Trilobites exhibit endogenous circatidal swimming rhythms that are entrained by mechanical agitation, suggesting that peaks in larval swimming are timed to coincide with periods of high water and the inundation of the nests. Larval swimming is limited and does not appear to result in long-distance dispersal. The limited dispersal of the larvae has important implications for the population dynamics of relatively isolated populations. The rate of larval development is highly plastic and is influenced by temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and the presence of pollutants. The broad environmental tolerances of horseshoe crab embryos and larvae are important in understanding their current geographic distribution and their evolutionary persistence [Current Zoology 56 (5: 550–562, 2010].

  10. A new species of Chonopeltis (Crustacea: Branchiura) from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A new species of Chonopeltis (Crustacea: Branchiura) is described from material collected from the gill chamber of the snake catfish Ciarias theodorae from the Mogalakwena River, a tributary of the Limpopo River in northern Transvaal.

  11. Decapod crustacea of the Atlantic Coast of Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Squires, Hubert J

    1990-01-01

    .... Distribution records for each species are provided. The Introduction has a brief history of collections of decapod Crustacea in the area, and the Appendix includes a list of mythological references to some taxonomic names used...

  12. Short-term exposure to benzo[a]pyrene causes oxidative damage and affects haemolymph steroid levels in female crab Portunus trituberculatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Jianmin; Pan, Luqing

    2016-01-01

    Concern has increased regarding the adverse effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on reproduction. However, limited information is available on the effects of PAHs in crustacean. In order to determine whether benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) could cause reproductive toxicity on the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus, sexually mature female crabs were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of B[a]P (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 2.5 μg/L) for 10 days. B[a]P treatments resulted in high accumulation in ovary, and induced oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner on ovary of crab. Furthermore, the haemolymph estradiol (E 2 ) and testosterone (T) levels were significantly decreased. Histological investigation also revealed the reproductive toxicity caused by B[a]P. The results demonstrated that waterborne exposure to B[a]P caused oxidative damage and disrupted sex steroids in female crab P. trituberculatus, ultimately resulting in histological alternation. - Highlights: • Waterborne exposure to B[a]P resulted in high accumulation in crab ovary. • The haemolymph 17β-estradiol and testosterone levels were significantly decreased by B[a]P exposure. • B[a]P induced oxidative damage in crab ovary. • B[a]P exposure caused histopathological alterations in crab ovary. - B[a]P disrupted sex steroids, caused oxidative damage and histological alternation in female crab P. trituberculatus.

  13. Population biology and distribution of the portunid crab Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda: Brachyura in an estuary-bay complex of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timoteo T. Watanabe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Trawl fisheries are associated with catches of swimming crabs, which are an important economic resource for commercial as well for small-scale fisheries. This study evaluated the population biology and distribution of the swimming crab Callinectes ornatus (Ordway, 1863 in the Estuary-Bay of São Vicente, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Crabs were collected from a shrimp fishing boat equipped with a semi-balloon otter-trawl net, on eight transects (four in the estuary and four in the bay from March 2007 through February 2008. Specimens caught were identified, sexed and measured. Samples of bottom water were collected and the temperature and salinity measured. A total of 618 crabs were captured (332 males, 267 females and 19 ovigerous females, with a sex ratio close to 1:1. A large number of juveniles were captured (77.67%. Crab spatial distributions were positively correlated with salinity (Rs = 0.73, p = 0.0395 and temperature (Rs = 0.71, p = 0.0092. Two peaks of recruitment occurred, in summer and autumn, and ovigerous females were mostly captured during summer, showing a seasonal reproductive pattern. The results showed that C. ornatus uses the bay as a nursery area for juvenile development. Callinectes ornatus is not yet a legally protected species, and the minimum allowed size of crabs caught in the area, although already restricted, should be carefully evaluated since the removal of large numbers of juveniles could negatively impact the local population.

  14. Characterization of a Freshwater Crab Sudanonautes aubryi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Recently, Cumberlidge and. Reed (2004) described the freshwater crab genus. Erimetopus of Congo basin. Sudanonautes aubryi, like all others edible crabs are also poorly understood. This preliminary study was undertaken to collect and realize a biometric characterization of this common freshwater crab ...

  15. Caught in the Crab's claws

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    'The crab', a new cryo magnet transport vehicle, starts work at CERN. Produced by the ESI group of EST division and built in Finland, it has the job of transporting LHC magnets in buildings SM18 and SMA18. If you see a huge crab scuttling around building SMA18 don't be afraid! It is the new Cryo Magnet Transport Vehicle produced by the ESI group (Engineering Support for Infrastructure, EST Division) for CERN's LHC project and built by Finnish Company ROCLA. This orange vehicle, nicknamed 'The Crab', is perhaps the strangest piece of equipment used for the construction of LHC magnets. It will start work at the end of this month. The crab will be used to transport LHC cryo-magnets and their components in the assembly and preparation building, SMA18, and test building, SM18. It has many capabilities that will allow CERN staff and contractors transport magnets between the two buildings and to locate them in the right position on the test beds. The crab in action during its first tests on 8 February. How does th...

  16. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  17. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  18. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  19. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  20. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  1. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  2. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  3. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  4. 2012 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  5. Are Crab nanoshots Schwinger sparks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, Albert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yoo, Hojin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The highest brightness temperature ever observed are from "nanoshots" from the Crab pulsar which we argue could be the signature of bursts of vacuum e± pair production. If so this would be the first time the astronomical Schwinger effect has been observed. These "Schwinger sparks" would be an intermittent but extremely powerful, ~103 L, 10 PeV e± accelerator in the heart of the Crab. These nanosecond duration sparks are generated in a volume less than 1 m3 and the existence of such sparks has implications for the small scale structure of the magnetic field of young pulsars such as the Crab. As a result, this mechanism may also play a role in producing other enigmatic bright short radio transients such as fast radio bursts.

  6. Swimming performance assessment in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Keith B

    2011-05-20

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming abilities of different physiological and ecological relevance. Most frequently step size is set to determine critical swimming velocity (U(crit;)), which is intended to capture maximum sustained swimming ability. Traditionally this test has consisted of approximately ten steps each of 20 min duration. However, steps of shorter duration (e.g. 1 min) are increasingly being utilized to capture acceleration ability or burst swimming performance. Regardless of step size, swimming tests can be repeated over time to gauge individual variation and recovery ability. Endpoints related to swimming such as measures of metabolic rate, fin use, ventilation rate, and of behavior, such as the distance between schooling fish, are often included before, during and after swimming tests. Given the diversity of fish species, the number of unexplored research questions, and the importance of many species to global ecology and economic health, studies of fish swimming performance will remain popular and invaluable for the foreseeable future.

  7. Stirring by swimming bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jeanluc@math.wisc.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 480 Lincoln Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute for Mathematics and Applications, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, 207 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Childress, Stephen [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-07-26

    We consider the stirring of an inviscid fluid caused by the locomotion of bodies through it. The swimmers are approximated by non-interacting cylinders or spheres moving steadily along straight lines. We find the displacement of fluid particles caused by the nearby passage of a swimmer as a function of an impact parameter. We use this to compute the effective diffusion coefficient from the random walk of a fluid particle under the influence of a distribution of swimming bodies. We compare with the results of simulations. For typical sizes, densities and swimming velocities of schools of krill, the effective diffusivity in this model is five times the thermal diffusivity. However, we estimate that viscosity increases this value by two orders of magnitude.

  8. Thermal biology of the sub-polar–temperate estuarine crab Hemigrapsus crenulatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Varunidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cumillaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimum temperatures can be measured through aerobic scope, preferred temperatures or growth. A complete thermal window, including optimum, transition (Pejus and critical temperatures (CT, can be described if preferred temperatures and CT are defined. The crustacean Hemigrapsus crenulatus was used as a model species to evaluate the effect of acclimation temperature on: (i thermal preference and width of thermal window, (ii respiratory metabolism, and (iii haemolymph proteins. Dependant on acclimation temperature, preferred temperature was between 11.8°C and 25.2°C while CT was found between a minimum of 2.7°C (CTmin and a maximum of 35.9°C (CTmax. These data and data from tropical and temperate crustaceans were compared to examine the association between environmental temperature and thermal tolerance. Temperate species have a CTmax limit around 35°C that corresponded with the low CTmax limit of tropical species (34–36°C. Tropical species showed a CTmin limit around 9°C similar to the maximum CTmin of temperate species (5–6°C. The maximum CTmin of deep sea species that occur in cold environments (2.5°C matched the low CTmin values (3.2°C of temperate species. Results also indicate that the energy required to activate the enzyme complex (Ei involved in respiratory metabolism of ectotherms changes along the latitudinal gradient of temperature.

  9. Marine pollution effects on the southern surf crab Ovalipes trimaculatus (Crustacea: Brachyura: Polybiidae) in Patagonia Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano, Aníbal Hernán; Rojas Quiroga, María Laura; Liberoff, Ana Laura; Van der Molen, Silvina

    2015-02-28

    We compared the carapace shape and thickness as well as the energy density of Ovalipes trimaculatus inhabiting areas comprising a gradient of marine pollution: high, moderate and undetected, in the Nuevo gulf (Patagonia Argentina). The carapace shape was evaluated by means of individual asymmetry scores (=fluctuating asymmetry) whereas the carapace thickness was assessed by measuring the carapace dry weight. The energy density was analyzed through its negative relationship with water content in muscle tissue. The individual asymmetry scores as well as the percentage of water content in muscle tissue were proportional to the marine pollution gradient, whereas the carapaces thickness did not differ among sampling sites. Our results are consistent with previous findings and demonstrate the direct effect of marine pollution on other taxa different from gastropods, cephalopods and polyplacophora and add to long-standing concerns about detrimental effects caused by marine pollution on the benthic community of the Nuevo gulf. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Jensen: Bitter crab disease mortality in SE Alaska Tanner crab

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from a laboratory experiment in which wild caught male Tanner crab (Chionoecetes bairdi) from Stephens Passage, SE Alaska were held to evaluate crab...

  11. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Montani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼1015 cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼109, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  12. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    OpenAIRE

    Maladen, Ryan D.; Ding, Yang; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numeric...

  13. Behavioural Response Thresholds in New Zealand Crab Megalopae to Ambient Underwater Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A.; Radford, Craig A.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    A small number of studies have demonstrated that settlement stage decapod crustaceans are able to detect and exhibit swimming, settlement and metamorphosis responses to ambient underwater sound emanating from coastal reefs. However, the intensity of the acoustic cue required to initiate the settlement and metamorphosis response, and therefore the potential range over which this acoustic cue may operate, is not known. The current study determined the behavioural response thresholds of four species of New Zealand brachyuran crab megalopae by exposing them to different intensity levels of broadcast reef sound recorded from their preferred settlement habitat and from an unfavourable settlement habitat. Megalopae of the rocky-reef crab, Leptograpsus variegatus, exhibited the lowest behavioural response threshold (highest sensitivity), with a significant reduction in time to metamorphosis (TTM) when exposed to underwater reef sound with an intensity of 90 dB re 1 µPa and greater (100, 126 and 135 dB re 1 µPa). Megalopae of the mud crab, Austrohelice crassa, which settle in soft sediment habitats, exhibited no response to any of the underwater reef sound levels. All reef associated species exposed to sound levels from an unfavourable settlement habitat showed no significant change in TTM, even at intensities that were similar to their preferred reef sound for which reductions in TTM were observed. These results indicated that megalopae were able to discern and respond selectively to habitat-specific acoustic cues. The settlement and metamorphosis behavioural response thresholds to levels of underwater reef sound determined in the current study of four species of crabs, enables preliminary estimation of the spatial range at which an acoustic settlement cue may be operating, from 5 m to 40 km depending on the species. Overall, these results indicate that underwater sound is likely to play a major role in influencing the spatial patterns of settlement of coastal crab

  14. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delayen, Jean [Yorktown, VA

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  15. Landpissebedden van de Ooijpolder: deel 2. Ecologie (Crustacea: Isopoda: Oniscidea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, H.

    2001-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods of the Ooijpolder: part 2. ecology (Crustacea: Isopoda: Oniscidea) From 1991 up to 1998 the isopod fauna of 1464 squares of 100x100 m was sampled in the Ooijpolder. This area is situated along the river Waal, east of Nijmegen (the Netherlands), close to the German border. In part

  16. Landpissebedden van de Ooijpolder: deel 1. verspreiding (Crustacea: Isopoda: Oniscidea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, H.

    2000-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods of the Ooijpolder: part 1. distribution (Crustacea: Isopoda: Oniscidea) The distributions and habitats of woodlice were investigated in ‘the Ooijpolder’, also named ‘the Ooij’. The area of approximately 41 square kilometers is located along the river Waal, east of Nijmegen,

  17. Introduction to Some Species of Argulus (Crustacea: Branchiura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    2017-12-12

    Dec 12, 2017 ... of the response of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss(Walbaum) to confinement, by an ectoparasitic (Argulus foliaceus L.) infestation and cortisol feeding. Fish Physiology and. Biochemistry. 20: 43-51. Saha, M; Bandyopadhyay, PK (2015). First report of three species of Argulus (Crustacea: Branchiura).

  18. The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    THESIS ANNOTATION Title: The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training Aim: To assess the impact of 'baby swimming' on the successfulness in introductory and partly in elementary swimming training, and to find out whether also other circumstances (for example the length of attendance at 'baby swimming') have some influence on introductory swimming training. Methods: We used a questionnaire method for the parents of children who had attended 'baby swimming' and f...

  19. Swimming level of pupils from elementary schools with own swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zálupská, Klára

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming level of pupils from primary school with private swimming pool. Work objectives: The aim is to identify assess level of swimming of pupils from first to ninth grade of primary school with a private pool in Chomutov district using continuous swimming test with regular swimming lessons, which is started in the first grade and persists until the ninth grade. The condition was organizing a school swimming lessons once a week for 45 minutes in all grades. Methodology: Swimming leve...

  20. Oldest record of Mathildellidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Goneplacoidea) associated with Retroplumidae from the Upper Cretaceous of NE Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Francisco J.; Ahyong, Shane T.; Espinosa, Belinda; Flores-Ventura, José; Luna, Laura; González-González, Arturo H.

    2018-03-01

    A new genus and species of the Mathildellidae Prebranchioplax cretacica (Crustacea: Decapoda: Goneplacoidea) is reported from shallow marine sediments of the upper Campanian Parras Shale and Cerro del Pueblo Formation (Parras Basin), Coahuila, NE Mexico. Prebranchioplax cretacica was collected from siliceous concretions associated with more abundant specimens of the retroplumid Costacopluma mexicana Vega and Perrilliat, 1989. P. cretacica bears similarities to Eocene species of Branchioplax from Japan, USA (Alaska and Washington), England, Hungary and Tajikistan as well as with Eogeryonidae (Portunoidea) species from the Upper Cretaceous of Spain and Marocarcinidae (Styracocarcinus) from Morocco. However, clear differences in the carapace frontal shape places P. cretacica in the Mathildellidae. This record represents the oldest known Mathildellidae, and along with the Retroplumidae, appear to have originated during the Late Cretaceous in ancient seas of Mexico, with a wide distribution during Paleogene times becoming restricted today to deep waters of the Indo-Pacific region and Atlantic Ocean. Comments on preservation and morphology of Costacopluma mexicana are also included. Crab specimens preserved in siliceous concretions from one locality (Entronque) show peculiar desiccation marks, and a possible model of taphonomy.

  1. Baby swimming and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystad, Wenche; Håberg, Siri E; London, Stephanie J; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per

    2008-05-01

    To estimate the effect of baby swimming in the first 6 months of life on respiratory diseases from 6 to 18 months. We used data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in children born between 1999 and 2005 followed from birth to the age of 18 months (n = 30,870). Health outcomes: lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), wheeze and otitis media between 6 and 18 months of age. baby swimming at the age of 6 months. The effect of baby swimming was estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. About 25% of the children participated in baby swimming. The prevalence of LRTI was 13.3%, wheeze 40.0% and otitis media 30.4%. Children who were baby swimming were not more likely to have LRTI, to wheeze or to have otitis media. However, children with atopic mothers who attended baby swimming had an increased risk of wheeze, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39), but not LRTI or otitis media. This was also the case for children without respiratory diseases before 6 months aOR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15). Baby swimming may be related to later wheeze. However, these findings warrant further investigation.

  2. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  3. Swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... The swimming endurance of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (11.04 ± 2.43 g) at five swimming speeds (23.0, 26.7, 31.0, 34.6 and 38.6 cm s-1) was determined in a circulating flume at 25.7 ± 0.7°C. The plasma glucose and total protein, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle glycogen ...

  4. Swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swimming endurance of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (11.04 ± 2.43 g) at five swimming speeds (23.0, 26.7, 31.0, 34.6 and 38.6 cm s-1) was determined in a circulating flume at 25.7 ± 0.7°C. The plasma glucose and total protein, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle glycogen concentrations were ...

  5. Novel Geometries for the LHC CRAB Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme b...

  6. Plant feeding promotes diversification in the Crustacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, Alistair G B; Ahyong, Shane T; Lowry, James K; Sotka, Erik E

    2017-08-15

    About half of the world's animal species are arthropods associated with plants, and the ability to consume plant material has been proposed to be an important trait associated with the spectacular diversification of terrestrial insects. We review the phylogenetic distribution of plant feeding in the Crustacea, the other major group of arthropods that commonly consume plants, to estimate how often plant feeding has arisen and to test whether this dietary transition is associated with higher species numbers in extant clades. We present evidence that at least 31 lineages of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial crustaceans (including 64 families and 185 genera) have independently overcome the challenges of consuming plant material. These plant-feeding clades are, on average, 21-fold more speciose than their sister taxa, indicating that a shift in diet is associated with increased net rates of diversification. In contrast to herbivorous insects, most crustaceans have very broad diets, and the increased richness of taxa that include plants in their diet likely results from access to a novel resource base rather than host-associated divergence.

  7. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  8. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084369; Levichev, Evgeny; Piminov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA$\\Phi$NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  9. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bogomyagkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DAΦNE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DAΦNE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  10. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  11. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) Featured Partners Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global WASH Other Uses of Water WASH-related Emergencies & Outbreaks Water, Sanitation, & Environmentally-related ...

  12. Free Swimming in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran-Carney, Jackson; Wagenhoffer, Nathan; Zeyghami, Samane; Moored, Keith

    2017-11-01

    A free-swimming potential flow analysis of unsteady ground effect is conducted for two-dimensional airfoils via a method of images. The foils undergo a pure pitching motion about their leading edge, and the positions of the body in the streamwise and cross-stream directions are determined by the equations of motion of the body. It is shown that the unconstrained swimmer is attracted to a time-averaged position that is mediated by the flow interaction with the ground. The robustness of this fluid-mediated equilibrium position is probed by varying the non-dimensional mass, initial conditions and kinematic parameters of motion. Comparisons to the foil's fixed-motion counterpart are also made to pinpoint the effect that free swimming near the ground has on wake structures and the fluid-mediated forces over time. Optimal swimming regimes for near-boundary swimming are determined by examining asymmetric motions.

  13. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  14. Swimming literacy field hockey woman player ground.

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming literacy field hockey woman player ground. Objectives: To obtain and analyze data on the level ground swimming literacy field hockey woman player. Their perception swimming literacy for life, the use of non-specific regeneration and as a training resource. Methods: Analysis of scientific literature, survey, case study, data analysis and graphical presentation of results. Results of the work: field hockey player as swimming literate, benefits swimming but not used as a means of...

  15. Water Evaporation in Swimming Baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which are repres...... are represented in instructions for carrying out and running swimming baths. If you follow the instructions you can achieve less investments, less heat consumption and a better comfort to the bathers....

  16. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  17. Swimming with the Shoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann

    2017-10-01

    This article responds to Yuli Rahmawati and Peter Charles Taylor's piece and explores my role as a science teacher, science teacher educator and researcher in two contexts, Sierra Leone and Bhutan. In the first part of the article I reflect on my 3 years as a science teacher in Sierra Leone and demonstrate resonances with Yuli's accounts of culture shock and with her positioning of herself in a third space. I also reflect on the importance of colleagues in helping me reshape my identity as a science teacher in this new context. The second part of the article reflects on much shorter periods of time in Bhutan and my work as a teacher educator and researcher where, unlike Sierra Leone, it was not possible because of the short periods I worked there, to occupy a third space. I close by discussing how in Bhutan, but also Sierra Leone, collaboration with colleagues allowed me to contribute my own expertise, despite my lack of a deep understanding of the cultural context, in a way that was as valuable as possible. I liken this way of collaborative working in my professional life as `swimming with the shoal'.

  18. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  19. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  20. Epizoic and ectoparasitic protozoans from crab larvae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santhakumari, V.

    A suctorian, Ephelota gemmipara Hertwig, infesting the zoea of the peacrab, Porcellana and an ectoparasitic flagellate Ellobiopsis chattoni Caullery infecting the zoea of the crab were observed from off Cape Comorin, the south-east coast of India...

  1. Influence of pre-school swimming on level of swimming abilities of early schol age children

    OpenAIRE

    Velová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    My thesis paper is focused on children swimming from their birth to early school age. The pivotal part of the paper is the comparison of swimming abilities between primary school children who have passed pre-school swimming training and those who have had no training at all. Theoretical framework of the paper is then focused on general swimming theory, characteristics of children's evolutionary stages within the context of swimming and definition of basic swimming skills.

  2. The anatomy of the king crab Hapalogaster mertensii Brandt, 1850 (Anomura: Paguroidea: Hapalogastridae): new insights into the evolutionary transformation of hermit crabs into king crabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keiler, J.; Richter, S.; Wirkner, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of king crabs from a hermit crab-like ancestor is one of the most curious events in decapod evolution. King crabs comprise two taxa, Lithodidae and Hapalogastridae, and while lithodids have formed the focus of various anatomical studies, the internal anatomy of hapalogastrids has never

  3. Crabs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Biodiversity_Western_Ghats_Inf_Kit_1994_3.6_1.pdf.txt stream_source_info Biodiversity_Western_Ghats_Inf_Kit_1994_3.6_1.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  4. Crescimento relativo de Macrobrachium acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cotroni Valenti

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the relative growth of Macrobrachium acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae, is presented; the cephalothorax length/abdominal length, telson length/abdominal length and abdominal length/total length relashionships were determined. The adjusted equations showed a isometric growth pattern. There are no changes in these relationships during the animals growth that may be significant in the maximization of the meat's profit.

  5. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  6. Perceptions of environmental changes and Lethargic crab disease among crab harvesters in a Brazilian coastal community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmo Angélica MS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD has caused significant mortalities in the population of Ucides cordatus crabs in the Mucuri estuary in Bahia State, Brazil, and has brought social and economic problems to many crab-harvesting communities that depend on this natural resource. The present work examined the perceptions of members of a Brazilian crab harvesting community concerning environmental changes and the Lethargic Crab Disease. Methods Field work was undertaken during the period between January and April/2009, with weekly or biweekly field excursions during which open and semi-structured interviews were held with local residents in the municipality of Mucuri, Bahia State, Brazil. A total of 23 individuals were interviewed, all of whom had at least 20 years of crab-collecting experience in the study region. Key-informants (more experienced crab harvesters were selected among the interviewees using the "native specialist" criterion. Results According to the collectors, LCD reached the Mucuri mangroves between 2004 and 2005, decimating almost all crab population in the area, and in 2007, 2008 and 2009 high mortalities of U. cordatus were again observed as a result of recurrences of this disease in the region. In addition to LCD, crabs were also suffering great stock reductions due to habitat degradation caused by deforestation, landfills, sewage effluents, domestic and industrial wastes and the introduction of exotic fish in the Mucuri River estuary. The harvesting community was found to have significant ecological knowledge about the functioning of mangrove swamp ecology, the biology of crabs, and the mass mortality that directly affected the economy of this community, and this information was largely in accordance with scientific knowledge. Conclusions The study of traditional knowledge makes it possible to better understand human interactions with the environment and aids in the elaboration of appropriate strategies for natural

  7. The shoulder in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A B; Jobe, F W; Collins, H R

    1980-01-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common orthopaedic problem in competitive swimming. In a group of 137 of this country's best swimmers, 58 had had symptoms of "swimmer's shoulder." Population characteristics of this group indicated that symptoms increased with the caliber of the athlete, were slightly more common in men, and were related to sprint rather than distance swimming. The use of hand-paddle training exacerbated symptoms, which were more common during the early and middle season. Consideration of shoulder mechanics in swimming reveals that freestyle, butterfly, and backstroke require similar motions; a swimmer using any of these strokes is susceptible to developing shoulder pain. Swimmer's shoulder represents chronic irritation of the humeral head and rotator cuff on the coracoacromial arch during abduction of the shoulder, the so-called impingement syndrome. Treatment included stretching, rest, ice therapy, oral antiinflammatory agents, judicious use of injectable steroids, and surgery as a last resort.

  8. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  9. Swimming in an Unsteady World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, M. A. R.

    2016-02-01

    When animals swim in marine habitats, the water through which they move is usually flowing. Therefore, an important part of understanding the physics of how animals swim in nature is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents in their environment. The research systems we have been using to address this question are microscopic marine animals swimming in turbulent, wavy water flow over spatially-complex communities of organisms growing on surfaces. Field measurements of water motion were used to design realistic turbulent flow in a laboratory wave-flume over different substrata, particle-image velocimetry was used to measure fine-scale, rapidly-varying water velocity vector fields, and planar laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure concentrations of chemical cues from the substratum. We used individual-based models of small animals swimming in this unsteady flow to determine how their trajectories and contacts with substrata were affected by their locomotion through the water, rotation by local shear, response to odors, and transport by ambient flow. We found that the shears, accelerations, and odor concentrations encountered by small swimmers fluctuate rapidly, with peaks much higher than mean values lasting fractions of a second. We identified ways in which the behavior of small, weak swimmers can bias how they are transported by ambient flow (e.g. sinking during brief encounters with shear or odor enhances settlement onto substrata below, whereas constant swimming enhances contact with surfaces above or beside larvae). Although microscopic organisms swim slowly relative to ambient water flow, their locomotory behavior in response to the rapidly-fluctuating shears and odors they encounter can affect where they are transported by ambient water movement.

  10. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  11. Modelling swimming hydrodynamics to enhance performance

    OpenAIRE

    Marinho, D.A.; Rouboa, A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Silva, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Swimming assessment is one of the most complex but outstanding and fascinating topics in biomechanics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology is one of the different methods that have been applied in swimming research to observe and understand water movements around the human body and its application to improve swimming performance. CFD has been applied attempting to understand deeply the biomechanical basis of swimming. Several studies have been conducted willing to analy...

  12. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... establishes an annual catch limit of crab that is based on the collective QS holdings of the members of the... the members of the crab harvesting cooperative. (2) Contents of application for annual crab harvesting... permit may appeal the IAD using the appeals procedures described in § 680.43. (c) Restrictions on fishing...

  13. Ghost crabs on a treadmill: Oxygen Uptake and Haemocyanin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghost crabs Ocypode ceratophthalmus were exercised on a specially constructed treadmill. At a running speed of 13,3 cm s-1, most crabs ran for 2 h before getting fatigued. At this speed the oxygen consumption rate (MO2) was measured in time intervals for a total of 52 min. For exercised crabs the MO2 values are about ...

  14. Shell utilization and morphometries of the hermit crab Diogenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fecundity, shell utilization, and crab and associated shell morphometries were investigated for the hermit crab Diogenes brevirostris collected from three intertidal sites in the eastern Cape. The relationship between crab fresh mass and egg number was linear. D. brevirostris was found to occupy 33 gastropod shell species ...

  15. Ghost crabs on a treadmill: Oxygen uptake and haemocyanin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-04-17

    Apr 17, 1990 ... 1991,26(2). Ghost crabs on a treadmill: Oxygen uptake and haemocyanin oxygen affinity. W.J, Van Aardt ... Ghost crabs Ocypode ceratophthalmus were exercised on a specially constructed treadmill. At a running speed of 13 ...... associated exchange of respiratory gasses in the land hermit crab (Coenobila.

  16. Genetic population structure of the Japanese mitten crab Eriocheir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fragment of 376 bp at the mitochondrial ND2 gene was sequenced for 133 individuals of Japanese mitten crab, Eriocheir japonica from 17 localities of Japan and 30 individuals of Chinese mitten crab, E. sinensis from 2 localities of China. In Japanese mitten crab, sequence comparison of this segment revealed 23 ...

  17. 43 CFR 423.36 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Swimming. 423.36 Section 423.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Swimming. (a) You may swim, wade, snorkel, scuba dive, raft, or tube at your own risk in Reclamation waters...

  18. 36 CFR 331.10 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 331.10 Section 331.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.10 Swimming. Swimming is prohibited unless authorized in writing by the District...

  19. 36 CFR 327.5 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 327.5 Section 327.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS... Swimming. (a) Swimming, wading, snorkeling or scuba diving at one's own risk is permitted, except at...

  20. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    schools. Oxygen consumption of swimming fish increases exponentially or as a power function with respect to swimming speed, and hence the decrease in oxygen saturation through the school is related to the swimming speed of the school. A model describing the oxygen saturation in a fish school from front...

  1. Myosin Va participates in acrosomal formation and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis belongs to the Class Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura. The spermatozoon of this species is of aflagellated type, it has a spherical acrosome surrounded by the cup-shaped nucleus, which are unique to brachyurans. For the past several decades, studies on the spermatogenesis of the mitten crab mainly focus on the morphology. Compared with the extensive study of molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis in mammals, relatively less information is available in crustacean species. Myosin Va, a member of Class V myosin, has been implicated in acrosome biogenesis and vesicle transport during spermatogenesis in mammals. In the present study we demonstrate the expression and cellular localization of myosin Va during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot demonstrated that myosin Va is expressed during spermatogenesis. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analyses showed that myosin Va mainly localizes in the cytoplasm in spermatocytes. At the early stage of spermiogenesis, myosin Va binds to the endoplasmic reticulum vesicle (EV and proacrosomal granule (PG. Subsequently, myosin Va localizes within the proacrosomal vesicle (PV formed by PG and EV fusion and locates in the membrane complex (MC at the mid spermatid stage. At the late spermatid stage, myosin Va is associated with the shaping nucleus and mitochondria. In mature spermatozoon, myosin Va predominates in acrosomal tubule (AT and nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates that myosin Va may be involved in acrosome biogenesis and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. Considering the distribution and molecular characteristics of myosin Va, we also propose a hypothesis of AT formation in this species. It is the first time to uncover the role of myosin Va in crustacean spermatogenesis.

  2. The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Široký, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Title: The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes Objectives: The objective of the thesis is to assess the effect of the elements of synchronized swimming at improving the techniques of swimming. Methods: The results were detected by overt observation with active participation and subsequent scaling on the ordinal scale 1 to 5. Results: The results show that the influence of the elements of synchronized swimming on improving the technique ...

  3. The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauga, Eric [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States); Powers, Thomas R [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912-9104 (United States)], E-mail: elauga@ucsd.edu, E-mail: Thomas_Powers@brown.edu

    2009-09-15

    Cell motility in viscous fluids is ubiquitous and affects many biological processes, including reproduction, infection and the marine life ecosystem. Here we review the biophysical and mechanical principles of locomotion at the small scales relevant to cell swimming, tens of micrometers and below. At this scale, inertia is unimportant and the Reynolds number is small. Our emphasis is on the simple physical picture and fundamental flow physics phenomena in this regime. We first give a brief overview of the mechanisms for swimming motility, and of the basic properties of flows at low Reynolds number, paying special attention to aspects most relevant for swimming such as resistance matrices for solid bodies, flow singularities and kinematic requirements for net translation. Then we review classical theoretical work on cell motility, in particular early calculations of swimming kinematics with prescribed stroke and the application of resistive force theory and slender-body theory to flagellar locomotion. After examining the physical means by which flagella are actuated, we outline areas of active research, including hydrodynamic interactions, biological locomotion in complex fluids, the design of small-scale artificial swimmers and the optimization of locomotion strategies.

  4. The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauga, Eric; Powers, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    Cell motility in viscous fluids is ubiquitous and affects many biological processes, including reproduction, infection and the marine life ecosystem. Here we review the biophysical and mechanical principles of locomotion at the small scales relevant to cell swimming, tens of micrometers and below. At this scale, inertia is unimportant and the Reynolds number is small. Our emphasis is on the simple physical picture and fundamental flow physics phenomena in this regime. We first give a brief overview of the mechanisms for swimming motility, and of the basic properties of flows at low Reynolds number, paying special attention to aspects most relevant for swimming such as resistance matrices for solid bodies, flow singularities and kinematic requirements for net translation. Then we review classical theoretical work on cell motility, in particular early calculations of swimming kinematics with prescribed stroke and the application of resistive force theory and slender-body theory to flagellar locomotion. After examining the physical means by which flagella are actuated, we outline areas of active research, including hydrodynamic interactions, biological locomotion in complex fluids, the design of small-scale artificial swimmers and the optimization of locomotion strategies.

  5. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  6. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    shark). Redrawn from Review of Fish. Swimming Modes for Aquatic. Locomotion, IEEE Journal of. Oceanic Engineering, Vol.24,. No.2, pp. 237–252, 1999, D M. Lane, M Sfakiotakis and J B C. Davies, Heriot-Watt University. undulatory → oscillatory caudaltail¯n (B C F ) m otions are know n collectively as. B C F sw im m ers.

  7. Shape Optimization of Swimming Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2005-03-01

    The swimming behavior of a flexible sheet which moves by propagating deformation waves along its body was first studied by G. I. Taylor in 1951. In addition to being of theoretical interest, this problem serves as a useful model of the locomotion of gastropods and various micro-organisms. Although the mechanics of swimming via wave propagation has been studied extensively, relatively little work has been done to define or describe optimal swimming by this mechanism.We carry out this objective for a sheet that is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous Newtonian fluid. Using a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics, we derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to optimize swimming speed and efficiency. The optimization equations are solved numerically using two different schemes: a limited memory BFGS method that uses cubic splines to represent the wave profile, and a multi-shooting Runge-Kutta approach that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method to vary the parameters of the equations until the constraints are satisfied. The former approach is less efficient but generalizes nicely to the non-lubrication setting. For each optimization problem we obtain a one parameter family of solutions that becomes singular in a self-similar fashion as the parameter approaches a critical value. We explore the validity of the lubrication approximation near this singular limit by monitoring higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and by comparing the results with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations.

  8. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 1. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming - Lift-based Propulsion. Jaywant H Arakeri. General Article Volume 14 Issue 1 January 2009 pp 32-46. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Sodium bicarbonate improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, A M; Peyrebrune, M C; Ingham, S A; Bailey, D M; Folland, J P

    2008-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate ingestion has been shown to improve performance in single-bout, high intensity events, probably due to an increase in buffering capacity, but its influence on single-bout swimming performance has not been investigated. The effects of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on 200 m freestyle swimming performance were investigated in elite male competitors. Following a randomised, double blind counterbalanced design, 9 swimmers completed maximal effort swims on 3 separate occasions: a control trial (C); after ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (SB: NaHCO3 300 mg . kg (-1) body mass); and after ingestion of a placebo (P: CaCO3 200 mg . kg (-1) body mass). The SB and P agents were packed in gelatine capsules and ingested 90 - 60 min prior to each 200 m swim. Mean 200 m performance times were significantly faster for SB than C or P (1 : 52.2 +/- 4.7; 1 : 53.7 +/- 3.8; 1 : 54.0 +/- 3.6 min : ss; p bicarbonate were all elevated pre-exercise in the SB compared to C and P trials (p < 0.05). Post-200 m blood lactate concentrations were significantly higher following the SB trial compared with P and C (p < 0.05). It was concluded that SB supplementation can improve 200 m freestyle performance time in elite male competitors, most likely by increasing buffering capacity.

  10. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    forces generated by their °apping tails. A nguilliform sw im m .... In natural systems, like a human walking or a ¯sh swimming, there is always unsteadiness. ... (L) mainly from the wings balances the weight (W). b) For the fish shown here the thrust is mainly from the flapping tail. Lift from fins and buoyancy (FB ) bal- ance the ...

  11. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  12. Black yeast-like fungi associated with Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) in the mangrove-land crab, Ucides cordatus (Ocypodidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicente, V.A.; Orelis-Ribeiro, R.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Sun, J.; Schier Guerra, R.; Miesch, S.; Ostrensky, A.; Meis, J.F.; Klaassen, C.H.; de Hoog, G.S.; Boeger, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) caused extensive epizootic mortality of the mangrove land crab Ucides cordatus (Brachyura: Ocypodidae) along the Brazilian coast, mainly in the Northeastern region. The disease was named after the symptoms of slow movement of infected crabs. Causative agents were

  13. Efficient Monitoring of CRAB Jobs at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J. M.D. [Sao Paulo, IFT; Balcas, J. [Caltech; Belforte, S. [INFN, Trieste; Ciangottini, D. [INFN, Perugia; Mascheroni, M. [Fermilab; Rupeika, E. A. [Vilnius U.; Ivanov, T. T. [Sofiya U.; Hernandez, J. M. [Madrid, CIEMAT; Vaandering, E. [Fermilab

    2017-11-22

    CRAB is a tool used for distributed analysis of CMS data. Users can submit sets of jobs with similar requirements (tasks) with a single request. CRAB uses a client-server architecture, where a lightweight client, a server, and ancillary services work together and are maintained by CMS operators at CERN. As with most complex software, good monitoring tools are crucial for efficient use and longterm maintainability. This work gives an overview of the monitoring tools developed to ensure the CRAB server and infrastructure are functional, help operators debug user problems, and minimize overhead and operating cost. This work also illustrates the design choices and gives a report on our experience with the tools we developed and the external ones we used.

  14. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  15. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Burt, G. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Lingwood, C. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Rimmer, Robert [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  16. Efficient monitoring of CRAB jobs at CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. M. D.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Ciangottini, D.; Mascheroni, M.; Rupeika, E. A.; Ivanov, T. T.; Hernandez, J. M.; Vaandering, E.

    2017-10-01

    CRAB is a tool used for distributed analysis of CMS data. Users can submit sets of jobs with similar requirements (tasks) with a single request. CRAB uses a client-server architecture, where a lightweight client, a server, and ancillary services work together and are maintained by CMS operators at CERN. As with most complex software, good monitoring tools are crucial for efficient use and longterm maintainability. This work gives an overview of the monitoring tools developed to ensure the CRAB server and infrastructure are functional, help operators debug user problems, and minimize overhead and operating cost. This work also illustrates the design choices and gives a report on our experience with the tools we developed and the external ones we used.

  17. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 in Nuclear Shaping during Spermatogenesis of the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Li Wu

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis in most animals, the basic proteins associated with DNA are continuously changing and somatic-typed histones are partly replaced by sperm-specific histones, which are then successively replaced by transition proteins and protamines. With the replacement of sperm nuclear basic proteins, nuclei progressively undergo chromatin condensation. The Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis is also known as the hairy crab or river crab (phylum Arthropoda, subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda, and family Grapsidae. The spermatozoa of this species are aflagellate, and each has a spherical acrosome surrounded by a cup-shaped nucleus, peculiar to brachyurans. An interesting characteristic of the E. sinensis sperm nucleus is its lack of electron-dense chromatin. However, its formation is not clear. In this study, sequences encoding histones H3 and H4 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Western blotting indicated that H3 and H4 existed in the sperm nuclei. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry demonstrated that histones H3 and H4 were both present in the nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and mature spermatozoa. The nuclear labeling density of histone H4 decreased in sperm nuclei, while histone H3 labeling was not changed significantly. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of histones H3 and H4 were higher at mitotic and meiotic stages than in later spermiogenesis. Our study demonstrates that the mature sperm nuclei of E. sinensis contain histones H3 and H4. This is the first report that the mature sperm nucleus of E. sinensis contains histones H3 and H4. This finding extends the study of sperm histones of E. sinensis and provides some basic data for exploring how decapod crustaceans form uncondensed sperm chromatin.

  18. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 in Nuclear Shaping during Spermatogenesis of the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang-Li; Kang, Xian-Jiang; Guo, Ming-Shen; Mu, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    During spermatogenesis in most animals, the basic proteins associated with DNA are continuously changing and somatic-typed histones are partly replaced by sperm-specific histones, which are then successively replaced by transition proteins and protamines. With the replacement of sperm nuclear basic proteins, nuclei progressively undergo chromatin condensation. The Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) is also known as the hairy crab or river crab (phylum Arthropoda, subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda, and family Grapsidae). The spermatozoa of this species are aflagellate, and each has a spherical acrosome surrounded by a cup-shaped nucleus, peculiar to brachyurans. An interesting characteristic of the E. sinensis sperm nucleus is its lack of electron-dense chromatin. However, its formation is not clear. In this study, sequences encoding histones H3 and H4 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Western blotting indicated that H3 and H4 existed in the sperm nuclei. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry demonstrated that histones H3 and H4 were both present in the nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and mature spermatozoa. The nuclear labeling density of histone H4 decreased in sperm nuclei, while histone H3 labeling was not changed significantly. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of histones H3 and H4 were higher at mitotic and meiotic stages than in later spermiogenesis. Our study demonstrates that the mature sperm nuclei of E. sinensis contain histones H3 and H4. This is the first report that the mature sperm nucleus of E. sinensis contains histones H3 and H4. This finding extends the study of sperm histones of E. sinensis and provides some basic data for exploring how decapod crustaceans form uncondensed sperm chromatin.

  19. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  20. Dominance and population structure of freshwater crabs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-02-06

    Feb 6, 1997 ... CHASE, l.D. 1974. Models of hierarchy formation in animal societies. Behav. Sct. 19: 374-382. DU PREEZ, H.H., STEENKAMP, V.E. & SCHOONBEE, HJ. 1993. Bioaccumulation of zinc and lead in selected tissues and organs of the freshwater crab. PotamonQutes warreni. Sci. Tot. Environ. Suppl.: 469-478.

  1. Ocean acidification impairs crab foraging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Luke F; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Piehler, Michael F; Westfield, Isaac; Ries, Justin B

    2015-07-07

    Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting impacts make it challenging to predict how acidification will alter species interactions and community structure. To examine effects of acidification on consumptive and behavioural interactions between mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica), oysters were reared with and without caged crabs for 71 days at three pCO2 levels. During subsequent predation trials, acidification reduced prey consumption, handling time and duration of unsuccessful predation attempt. These negative effects of ocean acidification on crab foraging behaviour more than offset any benefit to crabs resulting from a reduction in the net rate of oyster calcification. These findings reveal that efforts to evaluate how acidification will alter marine food webs should include quantifying impacts on both calcification rates and animal behaviour. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Corneal laceration caused by river crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuthinee N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Naidu Vinuthinee,1,2 Anuar Azreen-Redzal,1 Jaafar Juanarita,1 Embong Zunaina2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Sultanah Bahiyah, Alor Setar, 2Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia Abstract: A 5-year-old boy presented with right eye pain associated with tearing and photophobia of 1-day duration. He gave a history of playing with a river crab when suddenly the crab clamped his fingers. He attempted to fling the crab off, but the crab flew and hit his right eye. Ocular examination revealed a right eye corneal ulcer with clumps of fibrin located beneath the corneal ulcer and 1.6 mm level of hypopyon. At presentation, the Seidel test was negative, with a deep anterior chamber. Culture from the corneal scrapping specimen grew Citrobacter diversus and Proteus vulgaris, and the boy was treated with topical gentamicin and ceftazidime eyedrops. Fibrin clumps beneath the corneal ulcer subsequently dislodged, and revealed a full-thickness corneal laceration wound with a positive Seidel test and shallow anterior chamber. The patient underwent emergency corneal toileting and suturing. Postoperatively, he was treated with oral ciprofloxacin 250 mg 12-hourly for 1 week, topical gentamicin, ceftazidime, and dexamethasone eyedrops for 4 weeks. Right eye vision improved to 6/9 and 6/6 with pinhole at the 2-week follow-up following corneal suture removal. Keywords: corneal ulcer, pediatric trauma, ocular injury

  3. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  4. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  5. Kinematics of swimming garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Yonatan

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the kinematics of swimming garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) using a novel nonlinear regression-based digitization method to establish quantitative statistical support for non-constant wavelengths in the undulatory pattern exhibited by swimming snakes. We find that in swimming snakes, the growth of the amplitude of the propulsive wave head-to-tail is strongly correlated (p < 0.005) with the head-to-tail growth in the wavelength. We investigate correlations between kinematic parameters and steady swimming speed, and find a very strong positive correlation between swimming speed and undulation frequency. We furthermore find a statistically well-supported positive correlation between swimming speed and both the initial amplitude of the propulsive wave at the head and the degree of amplitude growth from head to tail.

  6. Enhanced active swimming in viscoelastic fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Emily E; Lauga, Eric Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Swimming microorganisms often self propel in fluids with complex rheology. While past theoretical work indicates that fluid viscoelasticity should hinder their locomotion, recent experiments on waving swimmers suggest a possible non-Newtonian enhancement of locomotion. We suggest a physical mechanism, based on fluid-structure interaction, leading to swimming in a viscoelastic fluid at a higher speed than in a Newtonian one. Using Taylor's two-dimensional swimming sheet model, we solve for the...

  7. Grooming behaviors and gill fouling in the commercially important blue crab (Callinectes sapidus and stone crab (Menippe mercenaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen L. Wortham

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Grooming behaviors reduce fouling of body regions. In decapods, grooming time budgets, body regions groomed, and grooming appendages are known in several species; however, little data exists on brachyuran crabs. In this study, grooming behaviors of two commercially important crabs were documented (blue crabs: Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896; stone crabs: Menippe mercenaria Say, 1818. These crabs are harvested by fishermen and knowing their grooming behaviors is valuable, as clean crabs are preferred by consumers and the stone crab fishery consequence of removing one cheliped to grooming behaviors is unknown. Crabs were observed individually and agonistically to determine how grooming behaviors vary in the presence of another conspecific. Both species frequently use their maxillipeds and groom, with the gills being cleaned by epipods. Respiratory and sensory structures were groomed frequently in both species. Removal of a grooming appendage resulted in higher fouling levels in the gills, indicating that grooming behaviors do remove fouling. Overall, stone crabs had a larger individual time budget for grooming, but agonistic grooming time budgets were similar. Stone crab chelipeds are used in grooming, especially cleaning the other cheliped. The chelipeds are not the main grooming appendage; however, implications of losing one cheliped may have large impacts.

  8. HYDRODINAMICS AND SWIMMING TEHNIQUE AS PARAMETERS FOR SUCCESSFULL SWIMMING AT THE AGE 10–12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Dimitrić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to confirm that swimming technique and hydrodynamic parameters of a swimmer are relevant for successful swimming. Total of 63 boys, at the age of 10-12, participated in this research. There were 15 criterion morphology and specific motoric skills variables as well as one predictive variable derived from FINA points. We have concluded that hydrodynamic and swimming technique significantly contributes for successful swimming. These facts should use trainers as guidance for workout plan.

  9. The Swimming Ability of Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benčuriková Ľubomíra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on findings of a pilot research to determine the level of swimming ability of children with weak respiratory system aged between 10 - 11 years, who attended special classes for asthmatics. Swimming ability was assessed by 25 m free style swimming test. The results of asthmatics were compared with healthy peers (Benčuriková 2006; Kováčová 2010; Labudová 2011. The results confirmed that the level of swimming capability of asthmatic children, despite their handicap, is significantly higher than their healthy peers.

  10. Tethered swimming can be used to evaluate force contribution for short-distance swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Keskinen, Kari L; Badillo, Juan J; Marques, Mário C

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to compare stroke and the physiological responses between maximal tethered and free front crawl swimming and (b) to evaluate the contribution of force exertion for swimming performance over short distances. A total of 34 male swimmers, representing various levels of competitive performance, participated in this study. Each participant was tested in both a 30-second maximal tethered swimming test and a 50-m free swimming test. The tethered force parameters, the swimming speed, stroke (stroke rate [SR]), and the physiological responses (increase in blood lactate concentration [ΔBLa], heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion) were recorded and calculated. The results showed no differences in stroke and the physiological responses between tethered and free swimming, with a high level of agreement for the SR and ΔBLa. A strong correlation was obtained between the maximum impulse of force per stroke and the speed (r = 0.91; p swimming performance. The relationship between the swimming speed and maximum force tended to be nonlinear, whereas linear relationships were observed with the maximum impulse. This study demonstrates that tethered swimming does not significantly alter stroke and the physiological responses compared with free swimming, and that the maximum impulse per stroke should be used to evaluate the balance between force and the ability to effectively apply force during sprint swimming. Consequently, coaches can rely on tethered forces to identify strength deficits and improve swimming performance over short distances.

  11. Composition and distribution of selected munnopsid genera (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota) in Icelandic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Sarah; Brandt, Angelika; Brix, Saskia; Fiorentino, Dario; Malyutina, Marina; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2014-02-01

    The Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is a major topographic feature, extending from Greenland to Scotland. It constrains the water exchange between the northernmost North Atlantic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland and Norwegian Seas (GIN Seas) and thus forms a potential barrier for faunal exchange from the Arctic to the North Atlantic (and vice versa). Recently an increase in Atlantic water inflow has been observed, leading to changes in physical parameters (i.e. temperature and salinity), which may have an impact on the resident fauna. In this study, we analyzed the composition and distribution of six selected genera of the isopod family Munnopsidae (Crustacea) occurring north and south of the GSR. We examined 82 epibenthic sledge samples and 26 additional sub-samples taken in the course of the Benthic Invertebrates of Icelandic Waters (BIOICE) and Icelandic Marine Animals: Genetics and Ecology (IceAGE) projects, respectively, covering a total depth range from 103 to 2752 m depth. Overall, 58 of the evaluated stations originated in the area north of the GSR, while the remaining 50 samples were collected south of the ridge. In total, 10517 individuals could be assigned to 15 species, most belonging to the genus EurycopeSars, 1864. Due to the presence of the GSR as well as differences in the environment, we expected significant dissimilarities in faunal composition between the two study areas. However, most species (8) occurred on both sides of the ridge, while four species were restricted to the region north of Iceland, and three to the region south of the ridge. Depth (or factors related to depth) appeared to be the most important factor in driving distributional patterns of the studied species. Temperature was also an important driver, but not to the same extent as depth. On the contrary, salinity and sediment type did not have much influence on munnopsid distribution patterns. Hence, the presence of the ridge does not restrict faunal exchange between the northern

  12. Ultrastructure of spermatozoa of spider crabs, family Mithracidae (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura): Integrative analyses based on morphological and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assugeni, Camila de O; Magalhães, Tatiana; Bolaños, Juan A; Tudge, Christopher C; Mantelatto, Fernando L; Zara, Fernando J

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies based on morphological and molecular data provide a new perspective concerning taxonomic aspects of the brachyuran family Mithracidae. These studies proposed a series of nominal changes and indicated that the family is actually represented by a different number and representatives of genera than previously thought. Here, we provide a comparative description of the ultrastructure of spermatozoa and spermatophores of some species of Mithracidae in a phylogenetic context. The ultrastructure of the spermatozoa and spermatophore was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The most informative morphological characters analysed were thickness of the operculum, shape of the perforatorial chamber and shape and thickness of the inner acrosomal zone. As a framework, we used a topology based on a phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial data obtained here and from previous studies. Our results indicate that closely related species share a series of morphological characteristics of the spermatozoa. A thick operculum, for example, is a feature observed in species of the genera Amphithrax, Teleophrys, and Omalacantha in contrast to the slender operculum observed in Mithraculus and Mithrax. Amphithrax and Teleophrys have a rhomboid perforatorial chamber, while Mithraculus, Mithrax, and Omalacantha show a wider, deltoid morphology. Furthermore, our results are in agreement with recently proposed taxonomic changes including the separation of the genera Mithrax (previously Damithrax), Amphithrax (previously Mithrax) and Mithraculus, and the synonymy of Mithrax caribbaeus with Mithrax hispidus. Overall, the spermiotaxonomy of these species of Mithracidae represent a novel set of data that corroborates the most recent taxonomic revision of the family and can be used in future taxonomic and phylogenetic studies within this family. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. First zoeal stage of the hermit crab Enallopaguropsis guatemoci (Glassell, 1937) (Crustacea: Anomura: Paguroidea: Paguridea) obtained in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayón-Parente, Manuel; Hendrickx, Michel E

    2017-02-03

    The first larval stage of Enallopaguropsis guatemoci is described in detail and illustrated. The larva is compared with larvae known for other genera of Paguridae except Pagurus. A synthesis of all characters provided herein indicates that first larvae of E. guatemoci can be separated from all known pagurid larvae (except Pagurus) by the combination of the following characters: carapace with long dorsal carina, posterolateral spines absent; abdominal somites 3-5 with pair of moderately long spines; telson narrowly triangular, not forked; spine at antennal protopod as long as endopod.

  14. Predatory blue crabs induce stronger nonconsumptive effects in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica than scavenging blue crabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery E. Scherer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By influencing critical prey traits such as foraging or habitat selection, predators can affect entire ecosystems, but the nature of cues that trigger prey reactions to predators are not well understood. Predators may scavenge to supplement their energetic needs and scavenging frequency may vary among individuals within a species due to preferences and prey availability. Yet prey reactions to consumers that are primarily scavengers versus those that are active foragers have not been investigated, even though variation in prey reactions to scavengers or predators might influence cascading nonconsumptive effects in food webs. Oysters Crassostrea virginica react to crab predators by growing stronger shells. We exposed oysters to exudates from crabs fed live oysters or fed aged oyster tissue to simulate scavenging, and to controls without crab cues. Oysters grew stronger shells when exposed to either crab exudate, but their shells were significantly stronger when crabs were fed live oysters. The stronger response to predators than scavengers could be due to inherent differences in diet cues representative of reduced risk in the presence of scavengers or to degradation of conspecific alarm cues in aged treatments, which may mask risk from potential predators subsisting by scavenging.

  15. Blood Collection from the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus Polyphemus

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Peter; Conrad, Mara

    2008-01-01

    The horseshoe crab has the best-characterized immune system of any long-lived invertebrate. The study of immunity in horseshoe crabs has been facilitated by the ease in collecting large volumes of blood and from the simplicity of the blood. Horseshoe crabs show only a single cell type in the general circulation, the granular amebocyte. The plasma has the salt content of sea water and only three abundant proteins, hemocyanin, the respiratory protein, the C-reactive proteins, which function in ...

  16. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers.

  17. Invasive Crabs in the Barents Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks; Fernandez, Linda; Kourantidou, Melina

    compare differences in the ecology and economics of the two species to enhance understanding of the trade-offs inherent in managing these economically profitable yet risky invaders. We then expand the application by using these ongoing invasions to illustrate the anticipated disruptions (with potentially......The recent invasions of the red king crab (RKC) and the snow crab (SC) in the Barents Sea represent the sorts of integrated ecological and economic shifts we may expect as climate change affects arctic seas. Economic incentives and ecological unknowns have combined to change the current...... both positive and negative impacts) from other introductions or range expansions of commercial species and the management steps that should be taken at earlier stages, including monitoring and preventive measures, in the changing ecological processes to minimize negative impacts....

  18. Halliwickov koncept učenja plavanja in ocenjevanje plavalnih veščin: The Halliwick concept of teaching of swimming and assessment of swimming skills: The Halliwick concept of teaching of swimming and assessment of swimming skills:

    OpenAIRE

    Groleger, Katja; Vidmar, Gaj; Vrečar, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The Halliwick concept of teaching of swimming is a comprehensive programme of adaptation to water, learning to breathe, moving in water and swimming, aimed mainly at persons with movement and/or learning disabilities of different age. Assessment of swimming ability is an integral part of the Halliwick concept. The system of Halliwick badges is used, which has recently been supplemented by the Swimming With Independent Measurement (SWIM). There is no data on sensitivity of the SWIM test in the...

  19. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  20. Multiband observations of the Crab Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krassilchtchikov, A M; Bykov, A M; Castelletti, G M; Dubner, G M; Kargaltsev, O Yu; Pavlov, G G

    2017-01-01

    Results of simultaneous imaging of the Crab Nebula in the radio (JVLA), optical ( HST ), and X-ray ( Chandra ) bands are presented. The images show a variety of small-scale structures, including wisps mainly located to the north-west of the pulsar and knots forming a ring-like structure associated with the termination shock of the pulsar wind. The locations of the structures in different bands do not coincide with each other. (paper)

  1. Prevalence, characterization and sources of Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab (Callinectus sapidus) meat and blue crab processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Parveen, Salina; Rippen, Thomas; Luchansky, John B; Call, Jeffrey E; Tamplin, Mark L; Porto-Fett, Anna C S

    2012-09-01

    Seven blue crab processing plants were sampled to determine the prevalence and sources of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes for two years (2006-2007). A total of 488 raw crabs, 624 cooked crab meat (crab meat) and 624 environmental samples were tested by standard methods. Presumptive Listeria spp. were isolated from 19.5% of raw crabs, 10.8% of crab meat, and 69.5% of environmental samples. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 4.5% of raw crabs, 0.2% of crab meat, and 2.1% of environmental samples. Ninety-seven percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the ten antibiotics tested. Eight different serotypes were found among 76 L. monocytogenes isolates tested with the most common being 4b, 1/2b and 1/2a. Automated EcoRI ribotyping differentiated 11 ribotypes among the 106 L. monocytogenes isolates. Based on ribotyping analysis, the distribution of the ribotypes in each processing plant had a unique contamination pattern. A total of 92 ApaI and 88 AscI pulsotypes among the 106 L. monocytogenes isolates were found and distinct pulsotypes were observed in raw crab, crab meat and environmental samples. Ribotypes and serotypes recovered from crab processing plants included subtypes that have been associated with listeriosis cases in other food outbreaks. Our findings suggest that molecular methods may provide critical information about sources of L. monocytogenes in crab processing plants and will augment efforts to improve food safety control strategies such as targeting specific sources of contamination and use of aggressive detergents prior to sanitizing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day. CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. The new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service. Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  3. Strouhal number for free swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Mehdi; van Buren, Tyler; Floryan, Daniel; Smits, Alexander; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present experimental results to explore the implications of free swimming for Strouhal number (as an outcome) in the context of a simple model for a fish that consists of a 2D virtual body (source of drag) and a 2D pitching foil (source of thrust) representing cruising with thunniform locomotion. The results validate the findings of Saadat and Haj-Hariri (2012): for pitching foils thrust coefficient is a function of Strouhal number for all gaits having amplitude less than a certain critical value. Equivalently, given the balance of thrust and drag forces at cruise, Strouhal number is only a function of the shape, i.e. drag coefficient and area, and essentially a constant for high enough swimming speeds for which the mild dependence of drag coefficient on the speed vanishes. Furthermore, a dimensional analysis generalizes the findings. A scaling analysis shows that the variation of Strouhal number with cruising speed is functionally related to the variation of body drag coefficient with speed. Supported by ONR MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  4. Growing swimming algae for bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Ottavio

    Biofuel production from photosynthetic microalgae is not commercially viable due to high processing costs. New engineering and biological solutions are being sought to reduce these costs by increasing processing efficiency (productivity per energy input). Important physics, however, is ignored. For example, the fluid dynamics of algal suspensions in photobioreactors (ponds or tube arrays) is non-trivial, particularly if the algae swim. Cell reorientation by passive viscous and gravitational torques (gyrotaxis) or active reorientation by light (phototaxis) cause swimming algae in suspension to structure in flows, even turbulent ones. This impacts the distribution and dispersion of swimmers, with significant consequences for photobioreactor operation and design. In this talk, I will describe a theory that predicts swimmer dispersion in laminar pipe flows. I will then then present experimental tests of the theory, as well as new results on the circadian suspension dynamics of the algaChlamydomonas reinhardtii in lab-scale photobioreactors. Finally, I will briefly consider the implications of our work, and related active matter research, for improving algal bioprocessing efficiency. Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability.

  5. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in

  6. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  7. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  8. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional

  9. Swimming dynamics of bidirectional artificial flagella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdeo, S.; Khaderi, S. N.; Onck, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We study magnetic artificial flagella whose swimming speed and direction can be controlled using light and magnetic field as external triggers. The dependence of the swimming velocity on the system parameters (e. g., length, stiffness, fluid viscosity, and magnetic field) is explored using a

  10. Prey capture by freely swimming flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Dolger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiorboe, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Flagellates are unicellular microswimmers that propel themselves using one or several beating flagella. Here, we explore the dependence of swimming kinematics and prey clearance rate on flagellar arrangement and determine optimal flagellar arrangements and essential trade-offs. To describe near-cell flows around freely swimming flagellates we consider a model in which the cell is represented by a no-slip sphere and each flagellum by a point force. For uniflagellates pulled by a single flagellum the model suggests that a long flagellum favors fast swimming, whereas high clearance rate is favored by a very short flagellum. For biflagellates with both a longitudinal and a transversal flagellum we explore the helical swimming kinematics and the prey capture sites. We compare our predictions with observations of swimming kinematics, prey capture, and flows around common marine flagellates. The Centre for Ocean Life is a VKR Centre of Excellence supported by the Villum Foundation.

  11. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    Soc for experimental Biol Annual Meeting - Salzburg 2012 John F. Steffensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) When a fish school swims through the water, every individual consumes a certain amount of oxygen, which means that less will be available for the trailing fish in the school. In 1967 Mc......Farland and Moss reported that the oxygen saturation decreased approximately 30% from the front to the rear of an approximately 150-m long school of mullets swimming in normoxic water. They also observed that the decline in oxygen saturation at the rear resulted in the school disintegrating into smaller separate...... schools. Oxygen consumption of swimming fish increases exponentially or as a power function with respect to swimming speed, and hence the decrease in oxygen saturation through the school is related to the swimming speed of the school. A model describing the oxygen saturation in a fish school from front...

  12. Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Mette; Kogevinas, Manolis; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined...... the association between swimming in pregnancy and preterm and postterm birth, fetal growth measures, small-for-gestational-age, and congenital malformations. METHODS: We used self-reported exercise data (swimming, bicycling, or no exercise) that were prospectively collected twice during pregnancy for 74......,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise...

  13. Potential Impact of Submarine Power Cables on Crab Harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, A. S.; Nishimoto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Offshore renewable energy installations convert wave or wind energy to electricity and transfer the power to shore through transmission cables laid on or buried beneath the seafloor. West coast commercial fishermen, who harvest the highly prized Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister) and the rock crab (Cancer spp.), are concerned that the interface of crabs and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from these cables will present an electrified fence on the seafloor that their target resource will not cross. Combined with the assistance of professional fishermen, submarine transmission cables that electrify island communities and offshore oil platforms in the eastern Pacific provide an opportunity to test the harvest of crab species across power transmission cables. In situ field techniques give commercial crab species a choice to decide if they will cross fully energized, EMF emitting, power transmission cables, in response to baited traps. Each independent trial is either one of two possible responses: the crab crosses the cable to enter a trap (1) or the crab does not cross the cable to enter a trap (0). Conditions vary among sample units by the following categorical, fixed factors (i.e., covariates) of cable structure (buried or unburied); direction of cable from crab position (west or east, north or south); time and season. A generalized linear model is fit to the data to determine whether any of these factors affect the probability of crabs crossing an energized cable to enter baited traps. Additionally, the experimental design, aside from the number of runs (set of sample trials) and the dates of the runs, is the same in the Santa Barbara Channel for rock crab and Puget Sound for Dungeness crab, and allows us to compare the capture rates of the two species in the two areas. We present preliminary results from field testing in 2015.

  14. Comparative analysis of the proximate and elemental composition of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, the warty crab Eriphia verrucosa, and the edible crab Cancer pagurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Zotti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The proximate composition and element contents of claw muscle tissue of Atlantic blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus were compared with the native warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa and the commercially edible crab (Cancer pagurus. The scope of the analysis was to profile the chemical characteristics and nutritive value of the three crab species. Elemental fingerprints showed significant inter-specific differences, whereas non-significant variations in the moisture and ash contents were observed. In the blue crab, protein content was significantly lower than in the other two species, while its carbon content resulted lower than that characterizing only the warty crab. Among micro-elements, Ba, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, and Pb showed extremely low concentrations and negligible among-species differences. Significant inter-specific differences were observed for Na, Sr, V, Ba, Cd and Zn; in particular, cadmium and zinc were characterized in the blue crab by concentrations significantly lower than in the other two species. The analysis of the available literature on the three species indicated a general lack of comparable information on their elemental composition. The need to implement extended elemental fingerprinting techniques for shellfish quality assessment is discussed, in view of other complementary profiling methods such as NMR-based metabolomics.

  15. Zoological notes from port Dickson : III. Crustacea Anomura and Brachyura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitendijk, A.M.

    1947-01-01

    From his stay at Port Dickson on the Malay Peninsula at the beginning of 1946 Major Dr. L. D. Brongersma of the N I C A Detachment brought home several species of crabs. A list of this material which is now incorporated in the collections of the Museum of Natural History at Leiden is given below,

  16. Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Sabah state in Borneo Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinev, Artem Y; Yusoff, Fatimah M

    2015-08-19

    Fauna of Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Sabah state of Malaysia, Borneo Island, was evaluated for the first time. Samples from 40 locations were studied, and 31 species of Cladocera were revealed, including three species of Sididae, one species of Daphnidae, one species of Moinidae, four species of Macrothricidae, two species of Ilyocryptidae, and 20 species of Chydoridae. One species of Ilyocryptidae, Ilyocryptus yooni Jeong, Kotov and Lee, 2012, is recorded for Malaysia for the first time, and one more, Anthalona sp., is probably new for science. Of 31 species recorded for Sabah, only three are true planktonic species and 28 are substrate-associated species. Absence of large natural lakes, habitats with most rich cladoceran fauna, can be an important factor limiting diversity of Cladocera in Sabah.

  17. Land crabs as key drivers in tropical coastal forest recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, E.S.; Krauss, K.W.; Green, P.T.; O'Dowd, D. J.; Sherman, P.M.; Smith, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant populations are regulated by a diverse assortment of abiotic and biotic factors that influence seed dispersal and viability, and seedling establishment and growth at the microsite. Rarely does one animal guild exert as significant an influence on different plant assemblages as land crabs. We review three tropical coastal ecosystems-mangroves, island maritime forests, and mainland coastal terrestrial forests-where land crabs directly influence forest composition by limiting tree establishment and recruitment. Land crabs differentially prey on seeds, propagules and seedlings along nutrient, chemical and physical environmental gradients. In all of these ecosystems, but especially mangroves, abiotic gradients are well studied, strong and influence plant species distributions. However, we suggest that crab predation has primacy over many of these environmental factors by acting as the first limiting factor of tropical tree recruitment to drive the potential structural and compositional organisation of coastal forests. We show that the influence of crabs varies relative to tidal gradient, shoreline distance, canopy position, time, season, tree species and fruiting periodicity. Crabs also facilitate forest growth and development through such activities as excavation of burrows, creation of soil mounds, aeration of soils, removal of leaf litter into burrows and creation of carbon-rich soil microhabitats. For all three systems, land crabs influence the distribution, density and size-class structure of tree populations. Indeed, crabs are among the major drivers of tree recruitment in tropical coastal forest ecosystems, and their conservation should be included in management plans of these forests. ?? 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  18. Effect of Mudflat Trampling on Activity of Intertidal Crabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Sanha; Lee, Jung-Ah

    2018-03-01

    Many people visit intertidal mudflats to collect bait and seafood, or for eco-tourism and recreation, and as a consequence trample on the mudflats frequently. Trampling would not be life threatening to most animals in the intertidal flats as they have evolved hiding behavior to escape predation. However, what is the effect of trampling on the behavior of intertidal animals? In this study, the effect of mudflat trampling on the activity of crabs (e.g. fiddler crabs, sentinel crabs) living on the mudflat was explored. The number of crabs active on the mudflat surface in experimental plots (1.5 × 1.5 m2) before and after (10 min. and 30 min.) trampling of three different intensities (Heavy trampling = 60 steps; Moderate trampling = 20 steps; and No trampling) was compared in two different mudflat systems. After trampling, the number of crabs active on the surface decreased and was significantly lower than that of control plots. The more intensively trampled the mudflat was, the fewer crabs were active on the mudflat surface. Surprisingly, the number of active crabs did not recover even 30 min. after trampling. The results clearly support the hypothesis that trampling can severely interfere with the behavior of crabs living on intertidal mudflats.

  19. Land crabs as key drivers in tropical coastal forest recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Erin Stewart; Krauss, Ken W; Green, Peter T; O'Dowd, Dennis J; Sherman, Peter M; Smith, Thomas J

    2009-05-01

    Plant populations are regulated by a diverse assortment of abiotic and biotic factors that influence seed dispersal and viability, and seedling establishment and growth at the microsite. Rarely does one animal guild exert as significant an influence on different plant assemblages as land crabs. We review three tropical coastal ecosystems-mangroves, island maritime forests, and mainland coastal terrestrial forests-where land crabs directly influence forest composition by limiting tree establishment and recruitment. Land crabs differentially prey on seeds, propagules and seedlings along nutrient, chemical and physical environmental gradients. In all of these ecosystems, but especially mangroves, abiotic gradients are well studied, strong and influence plant species distributions. However, we suggest that crab predation has primacy over many of these environmental factors by acting as the first limiting factor of tropical tree recruitment to drive the potential structural and compositional organisation of coastal forests. We show that the influence of crabs varies relative to tidal gradient, shoreline distance, canopy position, time, season, tree species and fruiting periodicity. Crabs also facilitate forest growth and development through such activities as excavation of burrows, creation of soil mounds, aeration of soils, removal of leaf litter into burrows and creation of carbon-rich soil microhabitats. For all three systems, land crabs influence the distribution, density and size-class structure of tree populations. Indeed, crabs are among the major drivers of tree recruitment in tropical coastal forest ecosystems, and their conservation should be included in management plans of these forests.

  20. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... salaries for foremen, managers, and other employees not included in direct labor costs; and other vessel... employees not included in direct labor costs; and other vessel-specific costs (specify). (xii) BSAI crab...; food and provisions; other costs for direct crab labor; insurance deductible fees; re-packing costs...

  1. Swimming of the Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Chris; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    When the weather gets hot, nursing honey bees nudge foragers to collect water for thermoregulation of their hive. While on their mission to collect water, foragers sometimes get trapped on the water surface, forced to interact with a different fluid environment. In this study, we present the survival strategy of the honey bees at the air-water interface. A high-speed videography and shadowgraph were used to record the honey bees swimming. A unique thrust mechanism through rapid vibration of their wings at 60 to 150 Hz was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  2. Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

  3. The critical velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Prampero, Pietro E; Dekerle, Jeanne; Capelli, Carlo; Zamparo, Paola

    2008-01-01

    In supra-maximal exercise to exhaustion, the critical velocity (cv) is conventionally calculated from the slope of the distance (d) versus time (t) relationship: d = I + St. I is assumed to be the distance covered at the expense of the anaerobic capacity, S the speed maintained on the basis of the subject's maximal O(2) uptake (VO2max) This approach is based on two assumptions: (1) the energy cost of locomotion per unit distance (C) is constant and (2) VO2max is attained at the onset of exercise. Here we show that cv and the anaerobic distance (d (anaer)) can be calculated also in swimming, where C increases with the velocity, provided that VO2max its on-response, and the C versus v relationship are known. d (anaer) and cv were calculated from published data on maximal swims for the four strokes over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m, on 20 elite male swimmers (18.9 +/- 0.9 years, 75.9 +/- 6.4 kg), whose VO2max and C versus speed relationship were determined, and compared to I and S obtained from the conventional approach. cv was lower than S (4, 16, 7 and 11% in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl) and I (=11.6 m on average in the four strokes) was lower than d (anaer). The latter increased with the distance: average, for all strokes: 38.1, 60.6 and 81.3 m over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m. It is concluded that the d versus t relationship should be utilised with some caution when evaluating performance in swimmers.

  4. Body roll in swimming: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psycharakis, Stelios G; Sanders, Ross H

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we present a critical review of the swimming literature on body roll, for the purposes of summarizing and highlighting existing knowledge, identifying the gaps and limitations, and stimulating further research. The main research findings can be summarized as follows: swimmers roll their shoulders significantly more than their hips; swimmers increase hip roll but maintain shoulder roll when fatigued; faster swimmers roll their shoulders less than slower swimmers during a 200-m swim; roll asymmetries, temporal differences in shoulder roll and hip roll, and shoulder roll side dominance exist in front crawl swimming, but there is no evidence to suggest that they affect swimming performance; and buoyancy contributes strongly to generating body roll in front crawl swimming. Based on and stimulated by current knowledge, future research should focus on the following areas: calculation of body roll for female swimmers and for backstroke swimming; differences in body roll between breathing and non-breathing cycles; causes of body roll asymmetries and their relation to motor laterality; body roll analysis across a wide range of velocities and swimming distances; exploration of the association between body roll and the magnitude and direction of propulsive/resistive forces developed during the stroke cycle; and the influence of kicking actions on the generation of body roll.

  5. Krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica) swim faster at night

    KAUST Repository

    Klevjer, Thor A.

    2011-05-01

    Krill are key members in marine food webs, and measurement of swimming speed is vital to assess their bioenergetic budgets, feeding, and encounters with predators. We document a consistent and marked diel signal in swimming speed of krill in their natural habitat that is not related to diel vertical migration. The results were obtained using a bottom-mounted, upward-looking echo sounder at 150-m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, spanning 5 months from late autumn to spring at a temporal resolution of ~1–2 records s−1. Swimming speed was assessed using acoustic target tracking of individual krill. At the start of the registration period, both daytime and nocturnal average swimming speeds of Meganyctiphanes norvegica were ~ 3.5 cm s−1 (~ 1 body lengths ([bl] s−1) in waters with oxygen concentrations of ~ 15–20% O2 saturation. Following intrusion of more oxygenated water, nocturnal average swimming speeds increased to ~ 10 cm s−1 (~ 3 bl s−1), i.e., more than double that of daytime swimming speeds in the same period. We hypothesize that krill activity during the first period was limited by oxygen, and the enhanced swimming at night subsequent to the water renewal is due to increased feeding activity under lessened danger of predation in darkness.

  6. SWIM EVERYDAY TO KEEP DEMENTIA AWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Singh

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A sound mind resides in a sound body. Many individuals with an active lifestyle show sharp mental skills at an advanced age. Regular exercise has been shown to exert numerous beneficial effects on brawn as well as brain. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of swimming on memory of rodents. A specially designed hexagonal water maze was used for the swimming exposures of animals. The learning and memory parameters were measured using exteroceptive behavioral models such as Elevated plus-maze, Hebb-Williams maze and Passive avoidance apparatus. The rodents (rats and mice were divided into twelve groups. The swimming exposure to the rodents was for 10- minute period during each session and there were two swimming exposures on each day. Rats and mice were subjected to swimming for -15 and -30 consecutive days. Control group animals were not subjected to swimming during above period. The learning index and memory score of all the animals was recorded on 1st, 2nd, 15th, 16th, 30th and 31st day employing above exteroceptive models. It was observed that rodents that underwent swimming regularly for 30- days showed sharp memories, when tested on above behavioral models whereas, control group animals showed decline in memory scores. Those animals, which underwent swimming for 15- days only showed good memory on 16th day, which however, declined after 30-days. These results emphasize the role of regular physical exercise particularly swimming in the maintenance and promotion of brain functions. The underlying physiological mechanism for improvement of memory appears to be the result of enhanced neurogenesis.

  7. Changes in ventilation and locomotion of Gammarus pulex (Crustacea, Amphipoda) in response to low concentrations of pharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de H.J.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to contaminants below lethal concentrations may affect the performance of organisms, resulting in measurable differences in behavior. We measured the response of the benthic invertebrate Gammarus pulex (Crustacea, Amphipoda) to sublethal concentrations of three pharmaceuticals, fluoxetine,

  8. A Review of Swimming Cues and Tips for Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Kelsey; Barney, David

    2016-01-01

    Swimming is a low-impact activity that causes little stress on joints so it can be done for a lifetime. Many teachers may wish to teach swimming but do not have cues or ideas for doing so. This article reviews swimming cues, relays and equipment that can help a physical education teacher include a swimming unit in their curriculum. Certification…

  9. Swimming without a spine: Computational modeling and analysis of the swimming hydrodynamics of the Spanish Dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuoyu; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-10-16

    Incompressible flow simulations are used to study the swimming of a Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus), a soft-bodied invertebrate marine gastropod that swims by combining body pitching with undulations of its large mantle. A simple model based on a field video is employed as the basis for the model and coupling of the flow with the body acceleration enables us to examine the free swimming of this animal. Simulations indicate propulsive efficiencies of up to about 57% and terminal swimming speeds of 1.33 body lengths per cycle. Examination of the effect of body planform on the swimming hydrodynamics suggests that the planform of this animal is likely adapted to enhance its swimming performance. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  11. ELEMENT MASSES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Katz, Andrea M.; Satterfield, Timothy J.; Vanderveer, Steven J.; MacAlpine, Gordon M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX 78212 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Using our previously published element abundance or mass-fraction distributions in the Crab Nebula, we derived actual mass distributions and estimates for overall nebular masses of hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. As with the previous work, computations were carried out for photoionization models involving constant hydrogen density and also constant nuclear density. In addition, employing new flux measurements for [Ni ii]  λ 7378, along with combined photoionization models and analytic computations, a nickel abundance distribution was mapped and a nebular stable nickel mass estimate was derived.

  12. Swimming championship finalist positions on success in international swimming competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustres, I; Martín, R; Fernández, L; González-Ravé, J M

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal was to determine whether the achievement of finalist positions in the Junior Championship was associated with the achievement of success in the International Swimming Federation (FINA) World Championship (WC). Secondary goals included analyzing the effect of various factors (gender, age, country, etc) on swimmers' performances. Data were obtained from FINA information about the finalists from 2007 to 2015 WCs and finalists from 2006 to 2013 Junior-WCs (2400 entries). Final filtered database just included swimmers who participated in both junior and senior WCs (719 entries). A univariate general linear model (GLM) was used to examine the association between time; origin (swimmer who participated in Junior WC or not); maintenance years (number of years achieving finalist positions); country; and age, adjusting for year of competition. An ordinal logistic regression (OLR) model was used to identify predictors of achieving the top positions. The origin variable was not significant in either the GLM or the OLR. The only significant variables in the GLM were maintenance years (F4,706 = 7.689; p getting better positions as you get more WCs (odds = 1.85). In conclusion, no evidence was obtained to conclude finalist position in Junior WC have influence in achieve success in FINA WC. Maintenance years in WCs have a positive impact to achieve better positions.

  13. Swimming championship finalist positions on success in international swimming competitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Yustres

    Full Text Available The primary goal was to determine whether the achievement of finalist positions in the Junior Championship was associated with the achievement of success in the International Swimming Federation (FINA World Championship (WC. Secondary goals included analyzing the effect of various factors (gender, age, country, etc on swimmers' performances. Data were obtained from FINA information about the finalists from 2007 to 2015 WCs and finalists from 2006 to 2013 Junior-WCs (2400 entries. Final filtered database just included swimmers who participated in both junior and senior WCs (719 entries. A univariate general linear model (GLM was used to examine the association between time; origin (swimmer who participated in Junior WC or not; maintenance years (number of years achieving finalist positions; country; and age, adjusting for year of competition. An ordinal logistic regression (OLR model was used to identify predictors of achieving the top positions. The origin variable was not significant in either the GLM or the OLR. The only significant variables in the GLM were maintenance years (F4,706 = 7.689; p < .05 and year of competition (F4,706 = 23.239; p < .05. The OLR revealed a strong association (p < .001 between the position variable and maintenance years, getting better positions as you get more WCs (odds = 1.85. In conclusion, no evidence was obtained to conclude finalist position in Junior WC have influence in achieve success in FINA WC. Maintenance years in WCs have a positive impact to achieve better positions.

  14. Swimming of Paramecium in confined channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Many living organisms in nature have developed a few different swimming modes, presumably derived from hydrodynamic advantage. Paramecium is a ciliated protozoan covered by thousands of cilia with a few nanometers in diameter and tens of micro-meters in length and is able to exhibit both ballistic and meandering motions. First, we characterize ballistic swimming behaviors of ciliated microorganisms in glass capillaries of different diameters and explain the trajectories they trace out. We develop a theoretical model of an undulating sheet with a pressure gradient and discuss how it affects the swimming speed. Secondly, investigation into meandering swimmings within rectangular PDMS channels of dimension smaller than Paramecium length. We find that Paramecium executes a body-bend (an elastic buckling) using the cilia while it meanders. By considering an elastic beam model, we estimate and show the universal profile of forces it exerts on the walls. Finally, we discuss a few other locomotion of Paramecium in other extreme environments like gel.

  15. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  16. Muscle dynamics in fish during steady swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadwick, RE; Steffensen, JF; Katz, SL

    1998-01-01

    SYNOPSIS. Recent research in fish locomotion has been dominated by an interest in the dynamic mechanical properties of the swimming musculature. Prior observations have indicated that waves of muscle activation travel along the body of an undulating fish faster than the resulting waves of muscular...... position in swimming fish. Quantification of muscle contractile properties in cyclic contractions relies on in vitro experiments using strain and activation data collected in vivo. In this paper we discuss the relation between these parameters and body kinematics. Using videoradiographic data from swimming...... constant cross-section of red muscle along much of the body suggests that positive power for swimming is generated fairly uniformly along the length of the fish....

  17. Hydrodynamic properties of some pelagic Crustacea from the North-Equatorial gulfstream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements on underwater weight, weight in air and terminal sinking rate were collected using 8 different species of pelagic Crustacea from the North-Equatorial Gulfstream. From these data (1) animal density, (2) shape constant, determining frictional resistance at terminal sinking velocity and

  18. Toxicity of Zinc, Copper and Lead to Idotea baltica (Crustacea, Isopoda)

    OpenAIRE

    BAT, Levent; SEZGİN, Murat; GÜNDOĞDU, Ayşe; ÇULHA, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The acute toxicity of zinc, copper and lead to the marine invertebrate Idotea baltica (Crustacea, Isopoda) was evaluated by static bioassays, calculating the LT 50 (lethality time for 50%) for males and females. Survival time decreased with increasing concentrations of zinc, copper and lead. Zinc was more toxic to Idotea than copper and lead. Lead was the least toxic of the metals tested.

  19. A new fresh-water prawn of the genus Macrobrachium (Crustacea Decapoda, Caridea) from Madagascar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holthuis, L.B.

    1965-01-01

    Due to the kindness of Mr. Y. Therezien, Ingénieur-hydrobiologiste of the Centre Technique Forestier Tropical at Tananarive, Madagascar, the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie received at several occasions freshwater Crustacea from Madagascar. Two previous reports (Holthuis, 1964, 1965) dealt with

  20. Distribution of Mysidium integrum (Tattersall) (Crustacea-mysidacea) in Venezuelan coral habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoppi de Roa, Evelyn; Pedro Alonso, G.

    1997-01-01

    ZOPPI DE ROA, EVELYN & PEDRO ALONSO G.: Distribution of Mysidium integrum (Tattersall) (Crustacea: Mysidacea) in Venezuelan coral habitats. Studies Nat. Hist. Caribbean Region 73, Amsterdam 1997: 55-62. This paper reports the occurrence, distribution and some ecological aspects of mysids in six

  1. The porcelain crab transcriptome and PCAD, the porcelain crab microarray and sequence database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Tagmount

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A set of approximately 30K unique sequences (UniSeqs representing approximately 19K clusters were generated from approximately 98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66% of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD, a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the

  2. Front Crawl Swimming Performance and Bi-Lateral Force Asymmetry during Land-Based and Tethered Swimming Tests

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Karini B.; Bento, Paulo C. Barauce; Pereira, Gleber; Payton, Carl; Rodacki, André L.F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether land-based and tethered swimming strength tests can explain swimming performance in 200-meter front crawl and, whether these tests were able to identify bilateral symmetry in force production. In the first session, eighteen swimmers completed a maximum effort 200 m front crawl swim (swimming performance) and 15 seconds maximal effort tethered front crawl swim. In the second session, participants performed the upper extremity isometric strengt...

  3. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Long: Data from: Effects of Ocean Acidification on Juvenile Red King Crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) and Tanner Crab (Chionoecetes bairdi) Growth, Condition, Calcification, and Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the results of a laboratory experiment. Juvenile red king crab and Tanner crab were reared in individual containers for nearly 200 days in flowing...

  4. [Chlorine concentrations in the air of indoor swimming pools and their effects on swimming pool workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; Gallardo, Leonor; Tamaral, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To describe chlorine levels in the air of indoor swimming pools in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) and relate them to other chemical parameters in the installation and to the health problems perceived by swimming pool workers. We analyzed 21 pools with chlorine as chemical treatment in Castilla-La Mancha. The iodometry method was applied to measure chlorine concentrations in the air. The concentrations of free and combined chlorine in water, pH and temperature were also evaluated. Health problems were surveyed in 230 swimming pool workers in these facilities. The mean chlorine level in the air of swimming pools was 4.3 ± 2.3mg/m(3). The pH values were within the legal limits. The temperature parameters did not comply with regulations in 17 of the 21 pools analyzed. In the pools where chlorine values in the air were above the legal regulations, a significantly higher percentage of swimming pool workers perceived eye irritation, dryness and irritation of skin, and ear problems. Chlorine values in the air of indoor swimming pools were higher than those reported in similar studies. Most of the facilities (85%) exceeded the concentration of 1.5mg/m(3) established as the limit for the risk of irritating effects. The concentration of chlorine in indoor swimming pool air has a direct effect on the self-perceived health problems of swimming pool workers. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Swimming performance in surf: the influence of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M; Reilly, T; Rees, A; Spray, G; Golden, F

    2008-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis (H1) that surf swimming involves a quantifiable experience component. Sixty-five beach lifeguards with (n = 35) and without surf experience (n = 30) completed: a best effort 200-m swim in a 25-m pool, a calm and a surf sea; an anthropometric survey; maximum effort 30-s swim bench test; 50-m pool swim (25 m underwater). In both groups, time to swim 200 m was slower in calm seas than in the pool and slower in surf than in either calm seas or the pool (p surf conditions (p surf experience as a predictor of surf swim time (R(2) = 0.32, p surf swimming. This limits the usefulness of pool swim times and other land-based tests as predictors of surf swimming performance. The hypothesis (H1) is accepted.

  6. Aggression and food resource competition between sympatric hermit crab species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mark V; O'Grady, Matthew; Colborn, Jeremiah; Van Ness, Kimberly; Hill, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    The vertical zonation patterns of intertidal organisms have been topics of interest to marine ecologists for many years, with interspecific food competition being implicated as a contributing factor to intertidal community organization. In this study, we used behavioral bioassays to examine the potential roles that interspecific aggression and food competition have on the structuring of intertidal hermit crab assemblages. We studied two ecologically similar, sympatric hermit crab species, Clibanarius digueti [1] and Paguristes perrieri [2], which occupy adjacent zones within the intertidal region of the Gulf of California. During the search phase of foraging, C. digueti showed higher frequencies of aggressive behaviors than P. perrieri. In competition assays, C. digueti gained increased access to food resources compared to P. perrieri. The results suggest that food competition may play an important role in structuring intertidal hermit crab assemblages, and that the zonation patterns of Gulf of California hermit crab species may be the result of geographical displacement by the dominant food competitor (C. digueti).

  7. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  8. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Urban: Golden King Crab tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data is comprised of the records of individual male golden king crab (GKC) tagged at the Kodiak Laboratory. Initial size, shell condition and missing limbs was...

  9. Crab cavities: Past, present, and future of a challenging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    In two-ring facilities operating with a crossing-angle collision scheme, luminosity can be limited due to an incomplete overlapping of the colliding bunches. Crab cavities then are introduced to restore head-on collisions by providing the destined opposite deflection to the head and tail of the bunch. An increase in luminosity was demonstrated at KEKB with global crab-crossing, while the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) at CERN currently is designing local crab crossing for the Hi-Lumi upgrade. Future colliders may investigate both approaches. In this paper, we review the challenges in the technology, and the implementation of crab cavities, while discussing experience in earlier colliders, ongoing R&D, and proposed implementations for future facilities, such as HiLumi-LHC, CERN’s compact linear collider (CLIC), the international linear collider (ILC), and the electron-ion collider under design at BNL (eRHIC).

  10. Morphometric characteristics in the horseshoe crab Tachypleus gigas (Arthropoda: Merostomata)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Das, S.; Chatterji, A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    The relationships observed between total carapace length with carapace width, carapace weight, telson length, body weight were found statistically significant (p < 0.05) in the male and female horseshoe crab, Tachypleus gigas (Muller). In females...

  11. Crab cavities: Past, present, and future of a challenging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    In two-ring facilities operating with a crossing-angle collision scheme, luminosity can be limited due to an incomplete overlapping of the colliding bunches. Crab cavities then are introduced to restore head-on collisions by providing the destined opposite deflection to the head and tail of the bunch. An increase in luminosity was demonstrated at KEKB with global crab-crossing, while the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) at CERN currently is designing local crab crossing for the Hi-Lumi upgrade. Future colliders may investigate both approaches. In this paper, we review the challenges in the technology, and the implementation of crab cavities, while discussing experience in earlier colliders, ongoing R&D, and proposed implementations for future facilities, such as HiLumi-LHC, CERN@@@s compact linear collider (CLIC), the international linear collider (ILC), and the electron-ion collider under design at BNL (eRHIC).

  12. AFSC/REFM: BSAI Crab Economic Data Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Economic data collected for years 1998, 2001, 2004, and 2005 and onward for the BSAI Crab Economic Data Report (EDR). Reporting is required of any owner or...

  13. New compact TEM-type deflecting and crabbing rf structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Delayen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new type of rf structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle beams is presented. The structure is comprised of a number of parallel TEM resonant lines operating in opposing phase from each other. One of its advantages is its compactness compared to conventional crabbing cavities operating in the TM_{110} mode, thus allowing low frequency designs. This geometry would also be effective for the deflection of beams propagating at velocities substantially less than that of light.

  14. Intermittent Swimming with a Flexible Propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Moored, Keith

    2017-11-01

    Aquatic animals use a variety of swimming gaits to propel themselves efficiently through the oceans. One type of gait known as intermittent or burst-and-coast swimming is used by species such as saithe, cod and trout. Recent studies have shown that this gait can save up to 60% of a swimmer's energy by exploiting an inviscid Garrick mechanism. These detailed studies have examined the effects of an intermittent swimming gait on rigid propulsors, yet the caudal fins of intermittent swimmers are in fact highly flexible propulsors. In this respect, to gain a comprehensive understanding of intermittent swimming, the effect of elasticity on the swimming performance and wake flow of an intermittent swimmer is investigated. To accomplish this a torsional spring structural model is strongly coupled to a fast boundary element method solver that captures the fluid-structure interaction of a two-dimensional self-propelled intermittently pitching hydrofoil. It is shown that flexibility introduces extra vortices to the coasting phase of motion that can either promote or diminish thrust production depending upon the hydrofoil parameters. An optimal intermittent flexible swimmer is shown to increase its efficiency by as much as 28% when compared to an optimal continuous flexible swimmer. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  15. Propulsive force asymmetry during tethered-swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, K B; Pereira, G; Papoti, M; Bento, P C B; Rodacki, A

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether: i) tethe-red-swimming can be used to identify the asymmetry during front crawl swimming style; ii) swimmers that perform unilateral breathing present greater asymmetry in comparison to others that use bilateral breathing; iii) swimmers of best performance present smaller asymmetry than their counterparts; iv) repeated front crawl swimming movements influence body asymmetry. 18 swimmers were assessed for propulsive force parameters (peak force, mean force, impulse and rate of force development) during a maximal front crawl tethered-swimming test lasting 2 min. A factorial analysis showed that propulsive forces decreased at the beginning, intermediate and end of the test (pforce parameters (p>0.05). When performance was considered (below or above mean group time), a larger asymmetry was found in the sub-group of lower performance in comparison to those of best performance (pforces can be detected using tethered-swimming. The propulsive forces decreased during the test but asymmetries did not change under testing conditions. Although breathing preference did not influence asymmetry, swimmers with best performance were less asymmetric than their counterparts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Burrowing and foraging activity of marsh crabs under different ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England salt marshes are susceptible to degradation and habitat loss as a result of increased periods of inundation as sea levels rise. Increased inundation may exacerbate marsh degradation that can result from crab burrowing and foraging. Most studies to date have focused on how crab burrowing and foraging can impact the dominant low marsh plant species, Spartina alterniflora. Here we used a mesocosm experiment to examine the relationship of foraging and burrowing activity in two dominant New England crab species, Sesarma reticulatum and Uca pugilator, and the combined effect of inundation, on the dominant high marsh plant species Spartina patens using a 3 × 2 factorial design with three crab treatments (Sesarma, Uca, control) at two levels of inundation (low, high). Plants were labeled with a nitrogen (N) stable isotope tracer to estimate plant consumption by the two crab species. At both levels of inundation, we found that S. reticulatum had a significant negative impact on both above- and below-ground biomass by physically clipping and uprooting the plants, whereas U. pugilator had no significant impact. Low inundation treatments for both crab species had significantly greater aboveground biomass than high inundation. Stable N isotope tracer levels were roughly the same for both S. reticulatum and U. pugilator tissue, suggesting that the impact of S. reticulatum on S. patens was not through consumption of the plants. Overall, our results suggest the pot

  17. A remarkable new crab-like hermit crab (Decapoda: Paguridae) from French Polynesia, with comments on carcinization in the Anomura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Arthur; Paulay, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Patagurus rex gen. et sp. nov., a deep-water pagurid hermit crab, is described and illustrated based on a single specimen dredged from 400 m off Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia. Patagurus is characterized by a subtriangular, vaulted, calcified carapace, with large, wing-like lateral processes, and is closely related to two other atypical pagurid genera, Porcellanopagurus Filhol, 1885 and Solitariopagurus Türkay, 1986. The broad, fully calcified carapace, calcified branchiostegites, as well as broad and rigidly articulated thoracic sternites make this remarkable animal one of the most crab-like hermit crabs. Patagurus rex carries small bivalve shells to protect its greatly reduced pleon. Carcinization pathways among asymmetrical hermit crabs and other anomurans are briefly reviewed and discussed.

  18. SWIMMING BEHAVIOR OF DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF THE CALANOID COPEPOD TEMORA-LONGICORNIS AT DIFFERENT FOOD CONCENTRATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDUREN, LA; VIDELER, JJ

    1995-01-01

    The swimming behaviour of developmental stages of the marine calanoid copepod Temora longicornis was studied using 2-dimensional observations under a microscope and a 3-dimensional filming technique to analyze swimming mode, swimming speed and swimming trajectories under different food

  19. Swimming type inspection device and system thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Arata; Kimura, Motohiko; Ito, Tomoyuki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a swimming type inspection device which can be reduced in the size, easily accessible to each portion of a reactor, and increase the degree of freedom of swimming and visual range, and facilitate visual inspection. The swimming type inspection device comprises two photographing devices, a device which can obtain propelling force by rotation of impellers, two second propelling devices having impellers disposed in perpendicular to the rotating axis of the impellers of the first propelling device, a control device for controlling control signals of first and second propelling devices and driving devices therefor and control image signals of the photographing devices, and transmission section for wireless transmitting of the control signals and the image signals. (N.H.)

  20. Swimming and feeding of mixotrophic biflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dölger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    with variable position next to a no-slip sphere. Utilizing the observations and the model we find that puller force arrangements favour feeding, whereas equatorial force arrangements favour fast and quiet swimming. We determine the capture rates of both passive and motile prey, and we show that the flow......Many unicellular flagellates are mixotrophic and access resources through both photosynthesis and prey capture. Their fitness depends on those processes as well as on swimming and predator avoidance. How does the flagellar arrangement and beat pattern of the flagellate affect swimming speed......, predation risk due to flow-sensing predators, and prey capture? Here, we describe measured flows around two species of mixotrophic, biflagellated haptophytes with qualitatively different flagellar arrangements and beat patterns. We model the near cell flows using two symmetrically arranged point forces...

  1. Quiet swimming at low Reynolds number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Wadhwa, Navish; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The stresslet provides a simple model of the flow created by a small, freely swimming and neutrally buoyant aquatic organism and shows that the far field fluid disturbance created by such an organism in general decays as one over distance squared. Here we discuss a quieter swimming mode...... that eliminates the stresslet component of the flow and leads to a faster spatial decay of the fluid disturbance described by a force quadrupole that decays as one over distance cubed. Motivated by recent experimental results on fluid disturbances due to small aquatic organisms, we demonstrate that a three......-Stokeslet model of a swimming organism which uses breast stroke type kinematics is an example of such a quiet swimmer. We show that the fluid disturbance in both the near field and the far field is significantly reduced by appropriately arranging the propulsion apparatus, and we find that the far field power laws...

  2. Swimming economy: determinant factors and assessment issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Novaes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Swimming economy is an important parameter in the control of the training process, since it has been demonstrated that this concept is related to the swimming performance. Swimming economy is affected by physiological and biomechanical constraints, therefore being a concept that reflects the swimmers´ adaptation to the liquid environment in those two domains. A review of the literature about swimming economy is presented, focusing some of the most relevant studies that have been conducted on this issue. Other than the biomechanical and physiological constraints, the swimming economy is influenced by other factors such as: swimming velocity, technical ability, training status, gender, age and anthropometric characteristics. Therefore a multitude of aspects are pertinent in the assessment of swimming economy and in the application of this concept in the control of the swimmers’ training process. A proper assessment of the swimming economy requires the direct measurement of the oxygen uptake. The choice of the protocol to assess the swimming economy must be carefully done. Particular attention must be paid to the oxygen uptake kinetics across the different levels of exercise intensity. Therefore, both exercise intensity and duration are to be considered. The attainment of swimming velocities as close as possible to the competition velocity is also an important issue. Although few studies have measured directly the oxygen uptake of top-level performers during swimming, the literature shows that a discontinuous protocol, with increasing exercise bouts of duration between three and six minutes seem appropriate to assess the swimming economy. RESUMO Economia de nado é um parâmetro importante no controle do processo de treinamento, desde que foi demonstrado que este conceito é relacionado ao desempenho de nado. Economia de nado é afetada por aspectosfisiológicos e biomecânicos, sendo então um conceito que reflete a adaptação de nadadores ao

  3. Virulent Naegleria fowleri in indoor swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, V; Skvárová, J; Cerva, L; Nebáznivá, D

    1980-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri was isolated from water during a hygienic inspection of a swimming pool in December 1977. This swimming pool was identified as a source of the infectious agent in the years 1962-1965, when a large outbreak of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAME) occurred. First two strains of N. fowleri, pathogenic for white mice after intracerebral and intranasal inoculation, were isolated from water of outlet troughs, additional strains were then isolated from various places; particularly from a cavity in the damaged wall of the pool. The incubation temperature did not inhibit a simultaneous growth of amoebae of the genera Acanthamoeba, Flabellula, Hartmannella and Vahlkampfia in the primocultures. Epidemiological investigations did not reveal any new case of PAME in relation with the occurrence of pathogenic N. fowleri in the swimming pool.

  4. Analysis of swimming performance: perceptions and practices of US-based swimming coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Robert; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Osborough, Conor; Newell, John; Quinlan, Leo Richard; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2016-01-01

    In elite swimming, a broad range of methods are used to assess performance, inform coaching practices and monitor athletic progression. The aim of this paper was to examine the performance analysis practices of swimming coaches and to explore the reasons behind the decisions that coaches take when analysing performance. Survey data were analysed from 298 Level 3 competitive swimming coaches (245 male, 53 female) based in the United States. Results were compiled to provide a generalised picture of practices and perceptions and to examine key emerging themes. It was found that a disparity exists between the importance swim coaches place on biomechanical analysis of swimming performance and the types of analyses that are actually conducted. Video-based methods are most frequently employed, with over 70% of coaches using these methods at least monthly, with analyses being mainly qualitative in nature rather than quantitative. Barriers to the more widespread use of quantitative biomechanical analysis in elite swimming environments were explored. Constraints include time, cost and availability of resources, but other factors such as sources of information on swimming performance and analysis and control over service provision are also discussed, with particular emphasis on video-based methods and emerging sensor-based technologies.

  5. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizhuang, Fan; Wei, Zhang; Bowen, Yuan; Gangfeng, Liu

    2017-04-15

    Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11%) between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58%) fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jizhuang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11% between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58% fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency.

  7. Determination of a quantitative parameter to evaluate swimming technique based on the maximal tethered swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncin, Rafael; Mezêncio, Bruno; Ferreira, Jacielle Carolina; Rodrigues, Sara Andrade; Huebner, Rudolf; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Szmuchrowski, Leszek

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new force parameter, associated with swimmers' technique and performance. Twelve swimmers performed five repetitions of 25 m sprint crawl and a tethered swimming test with maximal effort. The parameters calculated were: the mean swimming velocity for crawl sprint, the mean propulsive force of the tethered swimming test as well as an oscillation parameter calculated from force fluctuation. The oscillation parameter evaluates the force variation around the mean force during the tethered test as a measure of swimming technique. Two parameters showed significant correlations with swimming velocity: the mean force during the tethered swimming (r = 0.85) and the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation (r = 0.86). However, the intercept coefficient was significantly different from zero only for the mean force, suggesting that although the correlation coefficient of the parameters was similar, part of the mean velocity magnitude that was not associated with the mean force was associated with the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation. Thus, force fluctuation during tethered swimming can be used as a quantitative index of swimmers' technique.

  8. Paramecium swimming in a capillary tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-03-01

    Micro-organisms exhibit different strategies for swimming in complex environments. Many micro-swimmers such as paramecium congregate and tend to live near wall. We investigate how paramecium moves in a confined space as compared to its motion in an unbounded fluid. A new theoretical model based on Taylor's sheet is developed, to study such boundary effects. In experiments, paramecia are put inside capillary tubes and their swimming behavior is observed. The data obtained from experiments is used to test the validity of our theoretical model and understand how the cilia influence the locomotion of paramecia in confined geometries.

  9. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit the Information for Aquatics Professionals page. Pinworm & Swimming Pinworm infections are rarely spread through the use of swimming pools. Pinworm infections occur when a person swallows pinworm eggs ...

  10. Estimating energy expenditure during front crawl swimming using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Espinosa, Hugo G.; Van Thiel, David H

    2014-01-01

    The determination of energy expenditure is of major interest in training load and performance assessment. Small, wireless accelerometer units have the potential to characterise energy expenditure during swimming. The correlation between absorbed oxygen versus flume swimming speed and absorbed...

  11. Front Crawl Swimming Performance and Bi-Lateral Force Asymmetry during Land-Based and Tethered Swimming Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karini B. dos Santos, Paulo C. Barauce Bento, Gleber Pereira, Carl Payton, André L.F. Rodacki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate whether land-based and tethered swimming strength tests can explain swimming performance in 200-meter front crawl and, whether these tests were able to identify bilateral symmetry in force production. In the first session, eighteen swimmers completed a maximum effort 200 m front crawl swim (swimming performance and 15 seconds maximal effort tethered front crawl swim. In the second session, participants performed the upper extremity isometric strength test. Peak force production of tethered swimming and isometric strength tests were significantly correlated for the strongest and weakest sides (r = 0.58 and r = 0.63, respectively; p < 0.05, but only peak force production during tethered swimming correlated with 200 m swimming performance time (r = -0.55, p < 0.05. Bilateral asymmetries in peak force and rate of force development were similar between the tethered swimming and isometric strength tests (peak force: 13%, p = 0.24; rate of force development: 15%, p = 0.88 However, both tests detected significant difference of peak force and rate of force development between body sides. The tethered swimming test can partially explain the 200 m front crawl swimming performance. In addition, the land-based and tethered swimming tests may be used to identify bilateral asymmetry of swimming

  12. Front Crawl Swimming Performance and Bi-Lateral Force Asymmetry during Land-Based and Tethered Swimming Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Karini B; Bento, Paulo C Barauce; Pereira, Gleber; Payton, Carl; Rodacki, André L F

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether land-based and tethered swimming strength tests can explain swimming performance in 200-meter front crawl and, whether these tests were able to identify bilateral symmetry in force production. In the first session, eighteen swimmers completed a maximum effort 200 m front crawl swim (swimming performance) and 15 seconds maximal effort tethered front crawl swim. In the second session, participants performed the upper extremity isometric strength test. Peak force production of tethered swimming and isometric strength tests were significantly correlated for the strongest and weakest sides (r = 0.58 and r = 0.63, respectively; p force production during tethered swimming correlated with 200 m swimming performance time (r = -0.55, p force and rate of force development were similar between the tethered swimming and isometric strength tests (peak force: 13%, p = 0.24; rate of force development: 15%, p = 0.88) However, both tests detected significant difference of peak force and rate of force development between body sides. The tethered swimming test can partially explain the 200 m front crawl swimming performance. In addition, the land-based and tethered swimming tests may be used to identify bilateral asymmetry of swimming.

  13. First Zoeal Stage of Camptandrium sexdentatum (Crustacea: Decapoda: Camptandriidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park, Jay Hee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first zoea of Camptandrium sexdentatum is described for the first time with a digital image of live zoeas. An ovigerous crab of C. sexdentatum was collected at the muddy sand flat in Namhaedo Island on 2 June 2012 and hatched in the laboratory on 6 June 2012. In Camptandriidae, the first zoea of C. sexdentatum is distinguished from the first zoeas of Cleistostoma dilatatum and Deiratonotus cristatum by having no dorsal and lateral carapace spines, an abdomen significantly broadened posteriorly, and a subovoid telson without forks. Especially, the finding of a subovoid telson without forks is the first report in brachyuran zoeas.

  14. Training optimization of swimming of school-age children

    OpenAIRE

    Hudcová, Stanislava

    2011-01-01

    Subject matter: Training optimization of swimming of school-age children Objectives: The main goal of this research work is to suggest a model of advanced swimming training lessons with school-age children. Swimming training is practised in deep swimming pool. Next goal is to create an inventory of games and game disciplines which are suitable for training in deep water. Through the analysis of specialized literature and realization of experimental education we will be able to formulate new p...

  15. Specifies of teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Title: Specifics of teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder. Objectives: Creation and implementation of the concept of preparatory and basic swimming lessons for children with autism spectrum disorder. Evaluation of information on continuing education and the achieved level of swimming skills and swimming locomotion observed in children with autism spectrum disorder. Presentation and qualitative assessment of the four case studies and subsequent design of guidelines for sw...

  16. Efficacy of a modified tapering protocol on swimming performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance assessment following tapering consisted of 2 swims over a distance of 200 m, with a recovery period of 5 hours between swims. After resuming normal ... Total time and split times for each length, stroke rate, distance per stroke, and stroke index in a performance swim were determined as well as heart rate (HR) ...

  17. Isolation of Fungi in Swimming pools in Enugu, Nigeria | Mbata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been established that swimming pools contribute to the spread of fungal infections in susceptible hosts. Objectives: To isolate and identify fungi associated with swimming pools. Methods: A total of 147 samples from water and related areas of each swimming pool were tested for the presence of fungi.

  18. The fluid dynamics of swimming by jumping in copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Copepods swim either continuously by vibrating their feeding appendages or erratically by repeatedly beating their swimming legs resulting in a series of small jumps. The two swimming modes generate different hydrodynamic disturbances and therefore expose the swimmers differently to rheotactic pr...

  19. Ion-swimming speed variation of Vibrio cholerae cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work we report the variation in swimming speed of Vibrio cholerae with respect to the change in concentration of sodium ions in the medium. We have also studied the variation in swimming speed with respect to temperature. We find that the swimming speed initially shows a linear increase with the increase of ...

  20. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Long: Data from: Embryo development in golden king crab, Lithodes aequispina.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data from this study, describes embryo development in Golden king crab, Lithodes aequispinus. Six female multiparous golden king crab were captured from the...

  1. 78 FR 21912 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Crab Rationalization (CR) Program: Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Crab Rationalization (CR) Program: Annual Report AGENCY: National Oceanic and... for a new information collection. Since implementation of the Crab Rationalization (CR) Program (prior...

  2. Do all frogs swim alike? The effect of ecological specialization on swimming kinematics in frogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Robovská-Havelková, P.; Aerts, P.; Roček, Zbyněk; Přikryl, Tomáš; Fabre, A.-C.; Herrel, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 217, č. 20 (2014), s. 3637-3644 ISSN 0022-0949 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Anura * kinematics * locomotion * swimming Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2014

  3. The Effect of Different Feed and Stocking Densities on Growth And Survival Rate Of Blue Swimming Crablets (Portunus pelagicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyati, R. W.; Rejeki, S.; Bosma, R. H.

    2018-02-01

    Blue swimming crab is targeted by commercial fisheries because of the high economic value, good taste, and attractive colors. As a result, the stock is overexploited and fisherman catch market also juveniles. The most sustainable solution would be to stop fishing for commercial trade and to culture this crab from brood to market size. This study aimed to find the best feed and stocking density for the on-growing of crablets. In 20 tanks juvenile crabs with a carapace width±1 cm were stocked in three densities; 40, 60 and 80 crablets / m2, and fed ad-libitum twice a day with either trash fish or pellets of shrimp feed, for 8 weeks. The circular (ᴓ 1.6 m x 1 m) tanks with 1 m3 of water were aerated, and temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH recorded daily. In the end, growth and survival rates were determined. In general, feeding the crablets at a density of 40 m-2 gave the highest growth. For crablest fed with pellets, the density of 40 m-2 gave significantly better growth than 80 m-2. The crablets at a density 40 m-2 having a fish diet with the density 40 m-2 grew better than 60 and 80 m-2. There was no significant difference between fed used among different densities. The lower densities resulted in higher survival, either on crablets fed with pellets or fish. But, crablets fed the fish diet and cultured in the lowest density (40 m-2) had the highest survival rate.

  4. Swimming obstructed by dead-water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, S.P.M; Nuland, F.S.W.; Maas, L.; Toussaint, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    In nautical literature, ‘dead-water’ refers to the obstructive effect encountered by ships moving in stratified water due to the ship generating waves on an interface that separates different water masses. To investigate the hypothesis that open water swimming may also be obstructed by an encounter

  5. Swimming obstructed by dead-water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, S.P.; Nuland, F.S.; Maas, L.R.; Toussaint, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    In nautical literature, 'dead-water' refers to the obstructive effect encountered by ships moving in stratified water due to the ship generating waves on an interface that separates different water masses. To investigate the hypothesis that open water swimming may also be obstructed by an encounter

  6. Surveillance and Conformity in Competitive Youth Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Underpinned by a Foucauldian analysis of sporting practices, this paper identifies the disciplinary mechanism of surveillance at work in competitive youth swimming. It highlights the ways in which swimmers and their coaches are subject to and apply this mechanism to produce embodied conformity to normative behaviour and obedient, docile bodies.…

  7. Healthy Swimming Is a Partnership Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    While one cannot control the water chemistry, he/she can control personal hygiene and facility cleanliness. Giardia and cryptosporidium (crypto) are only two of the many recreational water illnesses (RWIs) that can turn happy swim memories into serious illness situations. In this article, the author discusses three factors that determine how…

  8. Biomechanics of swimming in developing larval fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesenek, Cees J.; Muijres, Florian T.; Leeuwen, Van Johan L.

    2018-01-01

    Most larvae of bony fish are able to swim almost immediately after hatching. Their locomotory system supports several vital functions: fish larvae make fast manoeuvres to escape from predators, aim accurately during suction feeding and maymigrate towards suitable future habitats. Owing to their

  9. Swimming in air-breathing fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, S; Domenici, P; McKenzie, D J

    2014-03-01

    Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. What Research Tells the Coach About Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, John A.

    This booklet is designed to make research findings about swimming available with interpretations for practical application. Chapter 1, "Physical Characteristics of Swimmers," discusses somatotyping, body composition, and growth. Chapter 2, "Physiological Characteristics of Swimmers," discusses resting rate, vital capacity, effects of water…

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic performances in tethered swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, M; da Silva, A S R; Araujo, G G; Santiago, V; Martins, L E B; Cunha, S A; Gobatto, C A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the critical force (CritF) and anaerobic impulse capacity (AIC) - estimated by tethered swimming - reflect the aerobic and anaerobic performance of swimmers. 12 swimmers performed incremental test in tethered swimming to determine lactate anaerobic threshold (AnTLAC), maximal oxygen uptake ( ˙VO2MAX) and force associated with the ˙VO2MAX (i ˙VO2MAX). The swimmers performed 4 exhaustive (tlim) exercise bouts (100, 110, 120 and 130% i ˙VO2MAX) to compute the CritF and AIC (F vs. 1/tlim model); a 30-s all-out tethered swimming bout to determine their anaerobic fitness (ANF); 100, 200, and 400-m time-trials to determine the swimming performance. CritF (57.09±11.77 N) did not differ from AnTLAC (53.96±11.52 N, (P>0.05) but was significantly lower than i ˙VO2MAX (71.02±8.36 N). In addition, CritF presented significant correlation with AnTLAC (r=0.76; Pswimming. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. How do amoebae swim and crawl?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Howe

    Full Text Available The surface behaviour of swimming amoebae was followed in cells bearing a cAR1-paGFP (cyclic AMP receptor fused to a photoactivatable-GFP construct. Sensitized amoebae were placed in a buoyant medium where they could swim toward a chemoattractant cAMP source. paGFP, activated at the cell's front, remained fairly stationary in the cell's frame as the cell advanced; the label was not swept rearwards. Similar experiments with chemotaxing cells attached to a substratum gave the same result. Furthermore, if the region around a lateral projection near a crawling cell's front is marked, the projection and the labelled cAR1 behave differently. The label spreads by diffusion but otherwise remains stationary in the cell's frame; the lateral projection moves rearwards on the cell (remaining stationary with respect to the substrate, so that it ends up outside the labelled region. Furthermore, as cAR1-GFP cells move, they occasionally do so in a remarkably straight line; this suggests they do not need to snake to move on a substratum. Previously, we suggested that the surface membrane of a moving amoeba flows from front to rear as part of a polarised membrane trafficking cycle. This could explain how swimming amoebae are able to exert a force against the medium. Our present results indicate that, in amoebae, the suggested surface flow does not exist: this implies that they swim by shape changes.

  13. [Lumbar hypermobility: where swimming becomes hydrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergeay, D; De Neve, M

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the clinical problem of lumbar hypermobility. The therapeutical possibilities are resumed briefly. The philosophy of medical training therapy ("Heilgymnastik") is described. More extensive the extra-advantages of hydrotherapy (methodical back-stroke swimming) are searched for in a theoretical deductive way. The authors found that: 1. swimming is a low-impact sport so far as the articulations are concerned, 2. back-stroke is done mainly in a lumbar kyphosis, 3. swimming is also an excellent cardiopulmonary training, 4. when swimming the muscles of the shoulder girdle and pelvic girdle are trained in a nearly isokinetic way (power-endurance), 5. the short transverso-spinal muscles are indirectly trained in their tonic more than phasic stretch reflex (posture function), 6. the muscles of the trunk are trained in a nearly isometric way in the appropriate angles (erect position), 7. the position of the head in the water facilitates the abdominal muscles (tonic neck reflex), 8. the cool temperature of the water generates training-enhancing stress-responses, 9. endurance-training is ideal for the postural function of the lower back muscles (especially the deeper layers near the spine) which are anatomical and physiological suited for this purpose, 10. warming-up and cooling-down procedures prepare the neuromuscular, the cardiovascular and metabolic functions before the workout-session (a cold shower afterwards acts to tonicize the skin and muscles).

  14. Sinusoidal cycling swimming pattern of reservoir fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čech, Martin; Kubečka, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2002), s. 456-471 ISSN 0022-1112 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6017901; GA AV ČR IAA6017201; GA ČR GA206/02/0520 Keywords : sinusoidal swimming * echosounder * reservoir Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.186, year: 2002

  15. Extreme swimming: The oceanic migrations of anguillids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Righton, David; Aarestrup, Kim; Jellyman, Don

    2013-01-01

    to their natal habitat to spawn. In temperate species, the migrations are extreme, requiring larvae and adults to swim thousands of km before reaching their destination, but the migrations of tropical species (hundreds of km) are still remarkable in comparison with many other fish species. To achieve...

  16. Processing and products quality assessment lyophilized mangrove crab(Ucides cordatus)

    OpenAIRE

    LucÃlia KÃtia de Lima

    2015-01-01

    The mangrove crab, Ucides cordatus is one of the most shellfish produced in Brazil, but his consumption becomes scarce during closed season. This study aimed development of freezedried products of the mangrove crab stored at ambient temperature and analyze the effect of lyophilization in relation to physicalchemical, microbiological, nutritional and sensory characteristics. Two products were developed: a "freeze-dried crab meat" and "freeze-dried crab cone". The product quality wa...

  17. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Artoos, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capelli, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Carra, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Leuxe, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Kuder, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zanoni, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ratti, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  18. Kick, Stroke and Swim: Complement Your Swimming Program by Engaging the Whole Body on Dry Land and in the Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Susan; Duell, Kelly; Dehaven, Carole; Heidorn, Brent

    2017-01-01

    The Kick, Stroke and Swim (KSS) program can be used to engage students in swimming-skill acquisition and fitness training using a variety of modalities, strategies and techniques on dry land. Practicing swim strokes and techniques on land gives all levels of swimmers--from beginner to competitive--a kinesthetic awareness of the individual…

  19. Ecomorfologia de caranguejos e siris (Crustacea Decapoda Brachyura) de ecossistemas costeiros

    OpenAIRE

    Marochi, Murilo Zanetti

    2012-01-01

    Resumo: Ecomorfologia de caranguejos e siris (CRUSTACEA DECAPODA BRACHYURA) de ecossistemas costeiros. O presente estudo objetivou avaliar se diferentes espécies de Brachyura possuem padrões ecomorfológicos em comum ligados ao habitat em que estão inseridas. Foram analisados 528 exemplares pertencentes a 24 espécies e provenientes dos seguintes ecossistemas costeiros: manguezal, costão rochoso, praia arenosa, bentopelagial e mar aberto. De todos os exemplares foram mensurada...

  20. Removal of off-flavours in some Australian crustacea by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Development of an export industry based on the deep sea royal red prawn, haliporoides sibogae and the shallow water shovel nosed lobster or balmain bug, lbacus peronii has been hampered by the sweet garlic off-flavour often encountered in both these species. A method for removing this noxious odour was developed which involved gamma irradiation of the affected crustacea using a cobalt-60 source

  1. Swimming pool use and birth defect risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, A J; Lupo, Philip J; Canfield, Mark A; Mitchell, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    Swimming during pregnancy is recommended. However, the use of swimming pools is also associated with infection by water-borne pathogens and exposure to water disinfection byproducts, which are 2 mechanisms that are suspected to increase risk for birth defects. Thus, we evaluated the relationship between maternal swimming pool use during early pregnancy and risk for select birth defects in offspring. Data were evaluated for nonsyndromic cases with 1 of 16 types of birth defects (n = 191-1829) and controls (n = 6826) from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study delivered during 2000-2006. Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each birth defect type. Separate analyses were conducted to assess any pool use (yes vs no) and frequent use (5 or more occasions in 1 month) during the month before pregnancy through the third month of pregnancy. There was no significant positive association between any or frequent pool use and any of the types of birth defects, even after adjustment for several potential confounders (maternal race/ethnicity, age at delivery, education, body mass index, folic acid use, nulliparity, smoking, annual household income, surveillance center, and season of conception). Frequent pool use was significantly negatively associated with spina bifida (adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.99). Among offspring of women 20 years old or older, pool use was associated with gastroschisis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8), although not significantly so. We observed little evidence suggesting teratogenic effects of swimming pool use. Because swimming is a common and suggested form of exercise during pregnancy, these results are reassuring. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unsteady propulsion by an intermittent swimming gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Moored, Keith W.

    2018-01-01

    Inviscid computational results are presented on a self-propelled swimmer modeled as a virtual body combined with a two-dimensional hydrofoil pitching intermittently about its leading edge. Lighthill (1971) originally proposed that this burst-and-coast behavior can save fish energy during swimming by taking advantage of the viscous Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning mechanism. Here, an additional inviscid Garrick mechanism is discovered that allows swimmers to control the ratio of their added mass thrust-producing forces to their circulatory drag-inducing forces by decreasing their duty cycle, DC, of locomotion. This mechanism can save intermittent swimmers as much as 60% of the energy it takes to swim continuously at the same speed. The inviscid energy savings are shown to increase with increasing amplitude of motion, increase with decreasing Lighthill number, Li, and switch to an energetic cost above continuous swimming for sufficiently low DC. Intermittent swimmers are observed to shed four vortices per cycle that form into groups that are self-similar with the DC. In addition, previous thrust and power scaling laws of continuous self-propelled swimming are further generalized to include intermittent swimming. The key is that by averaging the thrust and power coefficients over only the bursting period then the intermittent problem can be transformed into a continuous one. Furthermore, the intermittent thrust and power scaling relations are extended to predict the mean speed and cost of transport of swimmers. By tuning a few coefficients with a handful of simulations these self-propelled relations can become predictive. In the current study, the mean speed and cost of transport are predicted to within 3% and 18% of their full-scale values by using these relations.

  3. Effect of dielectrophoretic force on swimming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Phu; Marcos

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been applied widely in bacterial manipulation such as separating, concentrating, and focusing. Previous studies primarily focused on the collective effects of DEP force on the bacterial population. However, the influence of DEP force on the swimming of a single bacterium had not been investigated. In this study, we present a model to analyze the effect of DEP force on a swimming helically flagellated bacterium, particularly on its swimming direction and velocity. We consider a simple DEP force that acts along the X-direction, and its strength as well as direction varies with the X- and Y-positions. Resistive force theory is employed to compute the hydrodynamic force on the bacterium's flagellar bundle, and the effects of both DEP force and rotational diffusion on the swimming of the bacterium are simultaneously taken into consideration using the Fokker-Planck equation. We show the mechanism of how DEP force alters the orientation and velocity of the bacterium. In most cases, the DEP force dominantly influences the orientation of the swimming bacterium; however, when the DEP force strongly varies along the Y-direction, the rotational diffusion is also responsible for determining the bacterium's reorientation. More interestingly, the variance of DEP force along the Y-direction causes the bacterium to experience a translational velocity perpendicular to its primary axis, and this phenomenon could be utilized to focus the bacteria. Finally, we show the feasibility of applying our findings to achieve bacterial focusing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. [Distribution of Paragonimus (Digenea: Troglotrematidae) in Antioquia Province, Colombia, based on metacercariae counts in freshwater crabs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uruburu, Mónica; Granada, Mabel; Velásquez, Luz Elena

    2008-12-01

    Paragonimosis or lung fluke disease courses with signs similar to those seen in tuberculosis. The causative agent is a parasite of the genus Paragonimus (Digenea: Troglotrematidae). People become infected by ingesting raw or partially cooked crabs containing metacercariae. The first focus of human paragonimosis in Colombia was recorded in the county of Urrao, where two species of crabs infected with Paragonimus were found. In 2005, crabs with Paragonimus' metacercariae were captured near Medellín, western Colombia. This prompted a search for the parasite in other locations through its presence in the crabs. To establish the distribution of Paragonimus in Antioquia, we evaluated the presence of metacercaria in freshwater brachyuran crabs. From 2005 to 2007, crabs were captured in 13 counties of Antioquia. The crabs were relaxed and dissected to determine presence of trematodes and then to make the taxonomic identifications. From 52 crabs captured in 9 counties, 42 (80.8%) were found with Paragonimus metacercariae. The crabs were identified as Pseudothelphusidae in 2 genera--Hypolobocera and Strengeriana--and were assigned to four species. Three of the species were recorded for the first time as hosts of Paragonimus. A Paragonimus' distribution map was constructed for Antioquia; for the first time urban zones were included. Because of the high rate of infection, the handling and consumption of raw and poorly cooked crabs pose risk factors for human infection. Because crabs are affordable and provide means of easy diagnosis, crabs are targeted as primary agents of and diagnostic tools for paragonmosis.

  5. Status of the mud crab fishery in Kenya: A review | Mirera | Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Kenya, mud crabs are fished mainly by men and to a lesser extent by women and children due to the accessibility of the fishing areas by foot. This makes mud crabs a key fishery that is easily accessible for exploitation by most coastal artisanal fishers for subsistence and commercial purposes. Mud crabs have been a ...

  6. Simulating cryptic movements of a mangrove crab : Recovery phenomena after small scale fishery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piou, C.; Berger, U.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Grimm, V.; Diele, K.; D'Lima, C.

    2007-01-01

    The semi-terrestrial burrowing crab Ucides cordatus is an important ecological component and economic resource of Brazilian mangrove forests. The crab population of the Caete peninsula (the location of our study site) has been exploited for the last 40 years. Recovery of fished areas by crabs from

  7. 76 FR 25545 - Safety Zone; Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display, Little River, Little River, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display, Little River, Little River, SC AGENCY: Coast... zone on the waters of Little River in Little River, South Carolina during the Blue Crab Festival... this rule because the Coast Guard did not receive notice of the Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display...

  8. Systematics and biogeography of Cuban porcelain crabs (Decapoda: Anomura: Porcellanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Yander L; Lira, Carlos

    2017-01-10

    Marine crustaceans are a well-known invertebrates group in Cuban waters, but some taxa are not well catalogued and the literature about them is scattered. In this work, we present the checklist of porcelain crabs of Cuban Archipelago, including the literature registers and unpublished author's data. A key to the identification of 8 genera and 23 species of the Cuban porcelain crabs is provided. Information about the local distribution of species is presented. In addition, we analyzed the porcelain crab faunal affinities between the ecoregions of the Cuban platform, Greater Antilles islands and the Tropical Northwestern Atlantic (TNA) province. For the first time, we record the presence of the monotypic genus Parapetrolisthes Haig in Cuba. On the Cuban platform, the highest similarities are between the Southcentral and Northwestern ecoregions (50%) and between Northcentral and Northeastern (40%). In the Greater Antilles, Cuba and Puerto Rico are the most similar (54%), but in general, the porcelain crab composition shows a high variation (e. g. 19% between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico). In the Tropical Northwestern Atlantic, five homogeneous groups of porcelain crab species are distinguished. Cuban fauna is most similar to that of Floridian, Western Caribbean and Southern Gulf of Mexico ecoregions. The decrease in species richness is evident from south to north in the TNA Province.

  9. Habits and customs of crab catchers in southern Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmo, Angélica M S; Tognella, Mônica M P; Tenório, Gabrielle D; Barboza, Raynner R D; Alves, Rômulo R N

    2017-08-23

    Brazilian mangrove forests are widely distributed along the coast and exploited by groups of people with customs and habits as diverse as the biology of the mangrove ecosystems. This study identifies different methods of extracting crabs that inhabit the mangrove belts; some of these activities, such as catching individual crabs by hand, are aimed at maintaining natural stocks of this species in Mucuri (south Bahia), Brazil. In the studied community, illegal hunting activities that violate Brazilian legislation limiting the use of tangle-netting in mangrove ecosystem were observed. According to our observations, fishermen, to catch individual crabs, use the tangle-netting technique seeking to increase income and are from families that have no tradition of extraction. This analysis leads us to conclude that catchers from economically marginalised social groups enter mangroves for purposes of survival rather than for purposes of subsistence, because the catching by tangle-netting is a predatory technique. Tangle-netting  technique increase caught but also increases their mortality rate. We emphasise that traditional catching methods are unique to Brazil and that manual capturing of crab should be preserved through public policies aimed at maintaining the crab population.

  10. Lunar occultation observations of the Crab Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, F.P.

    1977-01-01

    Three lunar of occultations of the Crab Nebula were observed, two at 114 MHz and one at 26.3 MHz, during the 1974 series of events. The higher frequency observations were deconvolved of diffraction effects to yield four strip integrated brightness profiles of the Nebula, with an effective resolution of 30 arc-seconds. These four profiles were Fourier inverted and cleaned of sidelobe structure to synthesize a two-dimensional map of the Nebula. At 114 MHz, the Nebula is composed of a broad envelope of emission which contains several smaller sources. The attenuation of the low radio frequency radiation by the thermal hydrogen in the filaments is considered as a possible mechanism to explain these new data. The 26.3 MHz observations indicate the presence of a bright, localized source containing greater than 80% of the flux of the Nebula. The position of the source is confined by the data to a narrow strip centered at the pulsar position. Both sets of data are compared with past occultation observations

  11. 76 FR 35772 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... Tanner Crabs. Amendment 34 amends the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program to... for the Crab Rationalization Program are available from the NMFS Alaska Region Web site at http...

  12. 76 FR 35781 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program; Amendment 37 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... Tanner Crabs (FMP). This action amends the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program by... Assessment prepared for the Crab Rationalization Program are available from the NMFS Alaska Region Web site...

  13. 76 FR 47155 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program... program for the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands crab fisheries managed under the BSAI Crab Rationalization... Center Web site at http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/ . For further information on the Crab Rationalization...

  14. 75 FR 56485 - Groundfish Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    .../Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program; Recordkeeping and Reporting AGENCY: National Marine... rule. SUMMARY: NMFS issues regulations to remove the Crab Rationalization Program requirements for.... Background The Crab Rationalization (CR) Program is a limited-access system that allocates crab managed under...

  15. 77 FR 44216 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost... Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage for the 2012/2013 crab fishing year. DATES: Fee liability payments made by the Crab Rationalization...

  16. 76 FR 43658 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost... Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage... that must be submitted by July 31, 2012. DATES: The Crab Rationalization Program Registered Crab...

  17. 75 FR 43147 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost... Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage... that must be submitted by July 31, 2011. DATES: The Crab Rationalization Program Registered Crab...

  18. 78 FR 46577 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost... Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage... that must be submitted by July 31, 2014. DATES: The Crab Rationalization Program Registered Crab...

  19. The evolution of phenotypic plasticity in fish swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufiero, Christopher E.; Whitlow, Katrina R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fish have a remarkable amount of variation in their swimming performance, from within species differences to diversity among major taxonomic groups. Fish swimming is a complex, integrative phenotype and has the ability to plastically respond to a myriad of environmental changes. The plasticity of fish swimming has been observed on whole-organismal traits such as burst speed or critical swimming speed, as well as underlying phenotypes such as muscle fiber types, kinematics, cardiovascular system, and neuronal processes. Whether the plastic responses of fish swimming are beneficial seems to depend on the environmental variable that is changing. For example, because of the effects of temperature on biochemical processes, alterations of fish swimming in response to temperature do not seem to be beneficial. In contrast, changes in fish swimming in response to variation in flow may benefit the fish to maintain position in the water column. In this paper, we examine how this plasticity in fish swimming might evolve, focusing on environmental variables that have received the most attention: temperature, habitat, dissolved oxygen, and carbon dioxide variation. Using examples from previous research, we highlight many of the ways fish swimming can plastically respond to environmental variation and discuss potential avenues of future research aimed at understanding how plasticity of fish swimming might evolve. We consider the direct and indirect effects of environmental variation on swimming performance, including changes in swimming kinematics and suborganismal traits thought to predict swimming performance. We also discuss the role of the evolution of plasticity in shaping macroevolutionary patterns of diversity in fish swimming. PMID:29491937

  20. Energetics of median and paired fin swimming, body and caudal fin swimming, and gait transition in parrotfish (Scarus schlegeli) and triggerfish (Rhinecanthus aculeatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsmeyer, Keith E; Steffensen, John Fleng; Herskin, Jannik

    2002-01-01

    To determine the energetic costs of rigid-body, median or paired-fin (MPF) swimming versus undulatory, body-caudal fin (BCF) swimming, we measured oxygen consumption as a function of swimming speed in two MPF swimming specialists, Schlegel's parrotfish and Picasso triggerfish. The parrotfish swam.......1 L s(-1) (30 min U(crit)). In both species, the rates of increase in oxygen consumption with swimming speed were higher during BCF swimming than during rigid-body MPF swimming. Our results indicate that, for these species, undulatory swimming is energetically more costly than rigid-body swimming......, and therefore support the hypothesis that MPF swimming is more efficient. In addition, use of the BCF gait at higher swimming speed increased the cost of transport in both species beyond that predicted for MPF swimming at the same speeds. This suggests that, unlike for terrestrial locomotion, gait transition...

  1. A Correlational Analysis of Tethered Swimming, Swim Sprint Performance and Dry-land Power Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loturco, I; Barbosa, A C; Nocentini, R K; Pereira, L A; Kobal, R; Kitamura, K; Abad, C C C; Figueiredo, P; Nakamura, F Y

    2016-03-01

    Swimmers are often tested on both dry-land and in swimming exercises. The aim of this study was to test the relationships between dry-land, tethered force-time curve parameters and swimming performances in distances up to 200 m. 10 young male high-level swimmers were assessed using the maximal isometric bench-press and quarter-squat, mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat and countermovement jumps (dry-land assessments), peak force, average force, rate of force development (RFD) and impulse (tethered swimming) and swimming times. Pearson product-moment correlations were calculated among the variables. Peak force and average force were very largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m swimming performances (r=- 0.82 and -0.74, respectively). Average force was very-largely/largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m performances (r=- 0.85 and -0.67, respectively). RFD and impulse were very-largely correlated with the 50-m time (r=- 0.72 and -0.76, respectively). Tethered swimming parameters were largely correlated (r=0.65 to 0.72) with mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat-jump and countermovement jumps. Finally, mean propulsive power in jump-squat was largely correlated (r=- 0.70) with 50-m performance. Due to the significant correlations between dry-land assessments and tethered/actual swimming, coaches are encouraged to implement strategies able to increase leg power in sprint swimmers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Associational resistance protects mangrove leaves from crab herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Amy A.; Bell, Susan S.; Dawes, Clinton J.

    2012-05-01

    While associational defenses have been well documented in many plant and algal ecosystems, this study is the first to document associational resistance in mangroves. Mangrove tree crab (Aratus pisonii) density and herbivory on three life-stages of the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) were documented in pure red versus mixed-species and predominantly non-red mangrove stands containing black (Avicennia germinans) and white (Laguncularia racemosa) mangroves in 1999-2000 in Tampa Bay, Florida. This study first established that R. mangle is the focal species in the context of associational resistance because it is damaged more than either of the other mangrove species. Next, it was hypothesized that crab density and leaf damage on R. mangle would be lower when in mixed-species and predominantly non-red versus red mangrove stands. A non-significant trend suggested that crab density varies among stands, and crab damage on R. mangle leaves was significantly lower in mixed-species and non-red stands. Mechanisms to explain associational resistance were examined. Positive Pearson correlations between the percent of adult R. mangle in a stand and both crab density and R. mangle leaf damage provided support for the resource concentration hypothesis. Limited support was found for the attractant-decoy hypothesis because the total amount of damaged leaves of all mangrove species combined typically differed among stands, suggesting that crabs were not shifting to alternative mangrove species to offset reduced availability of R. mangle leaves. Finally, while R. mangle seedlings were shorter in non-red stands compared to others, intra-specific differences in R. mangle leaf chemistry and sclerophylly among stands failed to explain associational patterns. These combined results argue for the need for additional experiments to elucidate mechanisms responsible for defensive plant associations in mangrove ecosystems and to determine whether such associations could be of use in mangrove

  3. Habitat selection and energetics of the fiddler crab ( Uca tangeri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Marcel; Ens, Bruno J.

    We tried to unravel the possible links between the skewed predation risk in Uca tangeri (where large individuals are more at risk from avian predators) and size-dependent changes in the physiology and habitat choice of this fiddler crab species. Over a transect running from low to high in the tidal zone of a beach in Mauritania, the temperature profile at various depths in the substrate, the water-table level of seep water, salt concentration of seep water, depth of the aerobic level, operative temperatures on the surface, and size distribution of crabs were assessed. In addition, resting metabolic rates, Q 10 and thermal and starvation tolerances were estimated. Going from low to high in the tidal zone, crab size and burrow depth increased. At the preferred burrowing depth, microclimatological conditions appeared to be equally favourable at all sites. At the surface, conditions were more favourable low in the tidal zone, where also food availability is sufficient to enable small crabs to forage in the vicinity of their burrows. Large crabs have higher energy requirements and are thereby forced to forage in flocks low in the tidal zone where food is probably more abundant. Low in the tidal zone, digging deeply is impossible as the aerobic layer is rather thin. Large crabs prefer living high in the tidal zone as (1) deep burrows ensure better protection against predators, (2) more time is available for digging holes and (3) the substrate is better suited for reproduction. Energy reserves in late summer ensured an average of 34 days of survival. It is argued that the allotment of energy to growth must be considerable even in reproducing animals; the rewards of growth being the disproportional increase in reproductive output with size.

  4. Preliminary survey of a nemertean crab egg predator, Carcinonemertes, on its host crab, Callinectes arcuatus (Decapoda, Portunidae) from Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Robert K.; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The possible presence of egg predators in brood masses of portunid crabs from Pacific Central America has not been studied yet. This survey reports the finding of a nemertean crab egg predator on the portunid crab, Callinectes arcuatus, from the Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific Costa Rica. Nemerteans were found in the egg masses of 26 out of the 74 crabs for a prevalence of 35%. The intensity (mean number of worms/ infected crab) was estimated to be 18 with a variance of 1–123 worms/infected crab. No nemerteans were observed either in the 19 Callinectes arcuatus from Golfo Dulce (southern Pacific coast) and the 10 Portunus asper from Herradura-Jaco (central Pacific coast). This nemertean is a member of the genus Carcinonemertes, which has been reported from the Caribbean coast of Panama. However, the encountered Carcinonemertes sp. is the first published finding and report from Costa Rica and Pacific Central America. PMID:25561848

  5. Role of Halloween genes in ecdysteroids biosynthesis of the swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus): Implications from RNA interference and eyestalk ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xi; Liu, Zhiye; Liu, Mingxin; Tao, Tian; Shen, Xiquan; Zhu, Dongfa

    2016-09-01

    Molting, including metamorphosis molting in arthropods are controlled by the ecdysteroids that are synthesized and secreted by the crustacean Y-organ (YO) or the insect prothoracic gland (PG). The Halloween genes encoding the enzymes mainly involved in the biosynthesis of ecdysteroids are well studied in insects but not in crustaceans. Given the importance of Halloween genes in ecdysteroids biosynthesis, we have previously reported the cDNA cloning of disembodied (Dib) in P. trituberculatus. Here, cDNA sequences of another two Halloween genes, Spook (Spo) and Shadow (Sad), were further identified and characterized. The predicted amino acid sequences for these two Halloween genes of Portunus trituberculatus were compared to those of several other arthropods, and several typical domains of the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase (CYP) were identified. Similar to the tissue distribution of Dib, the Spo and Sad also showed high specificity to the YO. RNA interference (RNAi) of these 3 genes indicated they all play essential role in ecdysteroids biosynthesis. To investigate the relationships of the Halloween genes to the eyestalk neuropeptides such as molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), effects of eyestalk ablation (ESA) on the expression of Dib, Spo and Sad were detected. Expression of Dib and Sad, but not Spo, was significantly induced by ESA. The result indicated that the inhibition of MIH in ecdysteroids biosynthesis may be partly through the transcriptional regulation of certain Halloween genes, such as Dib and Sad, while the Spo might not be the target for MIH signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary study on domestication of coconut crab (Birgus latro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Sulistiono

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary study on domestication of coconut crab (Birgus latro had been done since June - November 2004 and December - 2005 February 2006.  Study was carried out in two locations namely Laboratory of Sekolah Tinggi Kelautan dan Perikanan, Palu to study adult crab, and Laboratory of Ecobiology of Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, Bogor Agricultural University to study crab in clomang stage.  Adult crabs were collected by using some fishing gears namely trap, net and directly using bamboo stick.  Domestication was done in rearing batch sized 1x1x1 m3 with artificial nests (30x15x15 cm3, and small batch for water (7x10x10 cm3.  While for clomang stage, crabs were reared in aquarium (80x40x40 cm3 with debris and small water batch.  Result showed that adult crab had a survival rate around 12.5-0%, and mortality around 50-87.5%.  A similar result was also in clomang stage, which was 12.5% for survival rate and 87.5% for mortality.  Adult coconut crab was preferred to feed coconut than other food likely vegetable and chick. Keywords: domestication, coconut crab, Birgus latro, food habit   ABSTRAK Penelitian awal mengenai kajian awal penangkaran kepiting kelapa (Birgus latro dilakukan pada bulan Juni - November 2004 dan Desember 2005 Februari 2006.  Pelaksanaan penelitian di lakukan di dua tempat, yaitu Laboratorium Sekolah Tinggi Kelautan dan Perikanan, Palu untuk percobaan kepiting dewasa, dan Laboratorium Ekobiologi Fakultas Perikanan dan Ilmu Kelautan IPB Bogor,  untuk percobaan kepiting tahap klomang.  Kepiting dewasa ditangkap dengan menggunakan beberapa peralatan a.l. perangkap, jaring dan secara langsung dengan tongkat.  Penangkaran dilakukan di bak-bak peliharaan berukuran 1x1x1 m3 yang dilengkapi dengan tempat persembunyian (30x15x15 cm3, dan bak kecil tempat air (7x10x10 cm3.  Sedangkan kepiting tahap klomang dipelihara di akuarium (80x40x40 cm3 yang diberi daun/serasah dan tempat air.  Hasil uji coba penangkaran

  7. [Marine biodiversity of Costa Rica: Crustacea: Infraorder Anomura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Rita; Cortés, Jorge

    2006-06-01

    The anomuran crabs are among the best known crustacean groups from the Pacific coast. However, this group is poorly known from the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. In this compilation based on the literature and the collection at the Zoology Museum, Biology School, University of Costa Rica, we report the presence of 114 species of the Infraorder Anomura for Costa Rica, 20 species from the Caribbean, 96 species from the Pacific (two are present on both coasts). Twenty-nine species are new reports for Costa Rica, 15 from the Caribbean coast (74% of the total of species from that coast) and 14 from the Pacific (15% of the total from the Pacific). The range often species is extended to Costa Rica, siete from the Caribbean and three from the Pacific. Six species are reported for the first time from Cocos Island, where there are also four endemic species.

  8. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    Swimming pools are used around the world for recreational, rehabilitation and physical activity and therefore it is imperative that the water and air quality are safe for the health of the bathers. Chlorination is by far the most widely applied method to control pool water quality and to prevent...... spreading of pathogens between swimmers because of its residual disinfection effect. In addition to potential contamination of pathogenic microorganisms, swimming pool water is polluted by organic matter deposited from the bathers such as saliva, urine, sweat, hair and personal care products. Since chlorine...... is a strong oxidant it oxidizes the organic matter in the pool water and forms disinfection byproducts (DBPs). More than 100 different DBPs have been identified. Some of these have been found to be genotoxic and may pose an increased cancer risk for the bathers. The aim of this thesis was to give an overview...

  9. Swimming Dynamics of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology.

  10. Addition of fraction in swimming context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, R. I. I.; Gunawan, M. S.; Zulkardi

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to produce learning trajectory that can help students in learning fractions by using swimming context. The study involved 37 fourth grade students with different capabilities in Elementary School IBA, South Sumatra, Indonesia. This study used an instructional theory called Indonesian version of Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI). This research used design research method with three stages: preliminary design, the design experiment, and retrospective analysis. Several techniques used for collecting data including a video recording of students interaction in the group discussion, students’ work, and interviewing the students. To conclude, the swimming context could stimulate students’ informal knowledge about the meaning of fractions in which it can be used in the additional learning either the same denominator or different denominator.

  11. Boxer crabs induce asexual reproduction of their associated sea anemones by splitting and intraspecific theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnytzer, Yisrael; Giman, Yaniv; Karplus, Ilan; Achituv, Yair

    2017-01-01

    Crabs of the genus Lybia have the remarkable habit of holding a sea anemone in each of their claws. This partnership appears to be obligate, at least on the part of the crab. The present study focuses on Lybia leptochelis from the Red Sea holding anemones of the genus Alicia (family Aliciidae). These anemones have not been found free living, only in association with L. leptochelis . In an attempt to understand how the crabs acquire them, we conducted a series of behavioral experiments and molecular analyses. Laboratory observations showed that the removal of one anemone from a crab induces a "splitting" behavior, whereby the crab tears the remaining anemone into two similar parts, resulting in a complete anemone in each claw after regeneration. Furthermore, when two crabs, one holding anemones and one lacking them, are confronted, the crabs fight, almost always leading to the "theft" of a complete anemone or anemone fragment by the crab without them. Following this, crabs "split" their lone anemone into two. Individuals of Alicia sp. removed from freshly collected L. leptochelis were used for DNA analysis. By employing AFLP (Fluorescence Amplified Fragments Length Polymorphism) it was shown that each pair of anemones from a given crab is genetically identical. Furthermore, there is genetic identity between most pairs of anemone held by different crabs, with the others showing slight genetic differences. This is a unique case in which one animal induces asexual reproduction of another, consequently also affecting its genetic diversity.

  12. Boxer crabs induce asexual reproduction of their associated sea anemones by splitting and intraspecific theft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisrael Schnytzer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Crabs of the genus Lybia have the remarkable habit of holding a sea anemone in each of their claws. This partnership appears to be obligate, at least on the part of the crab. The present study focuses on Lybia leptochelis from the Red Sea holding anemones of the genus Alicia (family Aliciidae. These anemones have not been found free living, only in association with L. leptochelis. In an attempt to understand how the crabs acquire them, we conducted a series of behavioral experiments and molecular analyses. Laboratory observations showed that the removal of one anemone from a crab induces a “splitting” behavior, whereby the crab tears the remaining anemone into two similar parts, resulting in a complete anemone in each claw after regeneration. Furthermore, when two crabs, one holding anemones and one lacking them, are confronted, the crabs fight, almost always leading to the “theft” of a complete anemone or anemone fragment by the crab without them. Following this, crabs “split” their lone anemone into two. Individuals of Alicia sp. removed from freshly collected L. leptochelis were used for DNA analysis. By employing AFLP (Fluorescence Amplified Fragments Length Polymorphism it was shown that each pair of anemones from a given crab is genetically identical. Furthermore, there is genetic identity between most pairs of anemone held by different crabs, with the others showing slight genetic differences. This is a unique case in which one animal induces asexual reproduction of another, consequently also affecting its genetic diversity.

  13. The use of artificial crabs for testing predatory behavior and health in the octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Piero; Andrews, Paul; Salemme, Marinella; Ponte, Giovanna; Fiorito, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris to attack a live crab is traditionally used as a method to assess the overall health and welfare of octopuses in the laboratory. This method requires placing a crab in the home tank of an animal, measuring the time (latency) taken for the octopus to initiate an attack and withdrawing the crab immediately prior to capture. The same crab is commonly used to assess multiple octopuses as part of daily welfare assessment. Growing concern for the welfare of crustaceans and a review of all laboratory practices for the care and welfare of cephalopods following the inclusion of this taxon in 2010/63/EU prompted a study of the utility of an artificial crab to replace a live crab in the assessment of octopus health. On consecutive days O. vulgaris (N=21) were presented with a live, a dead or an artificial crab, and the latency to attack measured. Despite differences in the predatory performance towards the three different crab alternatives, octopuses readily attacked the artificial (and the dead) crab, showing that they can generalize and respond appropriately towards artificial prey. Researchers should consider using an artificial crab to replace the use of a live crab as part of the routine health assessment of O. vulgaris.

  14. Quantification of the indirect effects of scallop dredge fisheries on a brown crab fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öndes, Fikret; Kaiser, Michel J; Murray, Lee G

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to describe the characteristics of the by-catch of Cancer pagurus in king scallop dredges in the Isle of Man, and to determine the damage, immediate mortality and estimated mortality during fishing seasons associated with scallop dredges. Based on dredge surveys, spatial and seasonal variations were observed, with the highest number of crabs found off the west coast of the Isle of Man in the autumn when berried females crabs were most frequently caught. In general, female crabs comprised 84% of the catch. The damage levels of crabs was high with 45% of crabs recorded as crushed or dead or with severe damage, whilst 24% of crabs exhibited missing limbs. Estimates of the potential mortality associated with scallop dredging led to a lower and upper estimate of possible crab by-catch mortality of 15t and 24t respectively which represented 3.0-4.8% of the commercial landings of brown crab for the Isle of Man. Heaviest mortalities of crabs occurred in autumn to the west of the Isle of Man when female berried crabs move offshore into deeper water. The use of a temporary and spatially restricted scallop dredging closure could provide a simple solution to mitigate additional crab mortality in the event that scallop dredging increased beyond current levels in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Crab Pulsar and Relativistic Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility that the Crab pulsar produces a separated ion-dominated and pair-plasma-dominated, magnetically striped relativistic wind is assessed by rough estimates of the polar cap acceleration of the ion and electron primary beams, the pair production of secondary electrons and positrons, and a simple model of the near-magnetosphere-wind zone. For simplicity, only the orthogonal rotator is considered. Below (above) the rotational equator, ions (electrons) are accelerated in a thin sheath, of order (much less than) the width of the polar cap, to Lorentz factor {γ }i≈ (5{--}10)× {10}7({γ }e≈ {10}7). The accelerating parallel electric field is shorted out by ion-photon (curvature synchrotron) pair production. With strong, but fairly reasonable, assumptions, a set of general magnetic geometry relativistic wind equations is derived and shown to reduce to conservation relations that are similar to those of the wind from a magnetic monopole. The strength of the field-aligned currents carried by the primary beams is determined by the wind’s Alfvén critical point condition to be about eight times the Goldreich-Julian value. A simple model for the transition from the dipole region wind to the asymptotic monopole wind zone is developed. The asymptotic ratio of Poynting flux to ion (pair plasma) kinetic energy flux—the wind {σ }w∞ -parameter—is found to be of order {σ }w∞ ≈ 1/2({10}4). The far wind zone is likely to be complex, with the ion-dominated and pair-plasma-dominated magnetic stripes merging, and the oppositely directed azimuthal magnetic fields annihilating.

  16. Quality versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Frank J; Comyns, Thomas M; Warrington, Giles D

    2017-06-01

    The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches' perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches' perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  17. Controlled-frequency breath swimming improves swimming performance and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, K M; Guenette, J A; Smoliga, J M; Zavorsky, G S

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can negatively impact athletic performance, but swimming has beneficial effects on the respiratory system and may reduce susceptibility to fatigue. Limiting breath frequency during swimming further stresses the respiratory system through hypercapnia and mechanical loading and may lead to appreciable improvements in respiratory muscle strength. This study assessed the effects of controlled-frequency breath (CFB) swimming on pulmonary function. Eighteen subjects (10 men), average (standard deviation) age 25 (6) years, body mass index 24.4 (3.7) kg/m(2), underwent baseline testing to assess pulmonary function, running economy, aerobic capacity, and swimming performance. Subjects were then randomized to either CFB or stroke-matched (SM) condition. Subjects completed 12 training sessions, in which CFB subjects took two breaths per length and SM subjects took seven. Post-training, maximum expiratory pressure improved by 11% (15) for all 18 subjects (P swimming may improve muscular oxygen utilization during terrestrial exercise in novice swimmers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Quality Versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Frank J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches’ perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches’ perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  19. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Propulsive force symmetry generated during butterfly swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Soares Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n6p704   The aim of the study was to analyze the hand force symmetry in butterfly swimming. Fourteen male and female swimmers (18.4 ± 4.9 years old, 71.8 ± 14.6 kg of body mass, 1.78 ± 0.09 m of height and mean performance that corresponds to 74.9 ± 5.8% of the world record. Subjects performed three trials of 25 m of butterfly swimming at maximal speed. Mean and maximum forces were estimated for each hand using pressure sensors of the Aquanex System (Swimming Technology Research, USA. The comparisons between force values for dominant and non-dominant hands were made through Student’s T test for dependent samples (p<0.05. In addition, the symmetry Index (SI was calculated as a relative measure of the force applied by each hand. The mean and maximum force for the dominant hand corresponded, respectively, to 55.7 ± 14.7 N and 114.7 ± 39.6 N. For the non-dominant hand, values were 51.2 ± 14.7 N for mean force and 110.7 ± 36.7 N for maximum force. Significant differences were found between dominant and non-dominant hands for both variables (p<0.01. The symmetry index analysis showed mean values of 8.9% for mean force and of 12.6% for maximum force, and most swimmers presented values higher than 10% for mean and/or maximum forces. Further studies should be performed in order to investigate the relationship between hand force symmetry and swimming performance.

  1. Swimming Three Ice Miles within Fifteen Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjepanovic, Mirko; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Knechtle, Beat

    2017-08-31

    Ice Mile swimming (1608 m in water of below 5 °Celsius) is becoming increasingly popular. This case study aimed to identify body core temperature and selected haematological and biochemical parameters before and after repeated Ice Miles. An experienced ice swimmer completed three consecutive Ice Miles within 15 h. Swim times, body core temperatures, and selected urinary and haematological parameters were recorded. Body core temperature reached its maximum between 5, 8 and 15 min after immersion (37.7°C, 38.1°C, and 38.0°C, respectively). The swimmer suffered hypothermia during the first Ice Mile (35.4°C) and body core temperature dropped furthermore to 34.5°C during recovery after the first Ice Mile. He developed a metabolic acidosis in both the first and the last Ice Mile (pH 7.31 and pH 7.34, respectively). We observed hyperkalaemia ([K⁺] > 5.5 mM) after the second Ice Mile (6.9 mM). This was followed by a drop in [K⁺] to3.7 mM after the third Ice Mile. Anticipatory thermogenesis (i.e. an initial increase of body core temperature after immersion in ice cold water) seems to be a physiological response in a trained athlete. The results suggest that swimming in ice-cold water leads to a metabolic acidosis, which the swimmer compensates with hyperventilation (i.e. leading to respiratory alkalosis). The shift of serum [K⁺] could increase the risk of a cardiac arrhythmia. Further studies addressing the physiology and potential risks of Ice Mile swimming are required to substantiate this finding.

  2. Swimming in a granular frictional fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    X-ray imaging reveals that the sandfish lizard swims within granular media (sand) using axial body undulations to propel itself without the use of limbs. To model the locomotion of the sandfish, we previously developed an empirical resistive force theory (RFT), a numerical sandfish model coupled to an experimentally validated Discrete Element Method (DEM) model of the granular medium, and a physical robot model. The models reveal that only grains close to the swimmer are fluidized, and that the thrust and drag forces are dominated by frictional interactions among grains and the intruder. In this talk I will use these models to discuss principles of swimming within these granular ``frictional fluids". The empirical drag force laws are measured as the steady-state forces on a small cylinder oriented at different angles relative to the displacement direction. Unlike in Newtonian fluids, resistive forces are independent of speed. Drag forces resemble those in viscous fluids while the ratio of thrust to drag forces is always larger in the granular media than in viscous fluids. Using the force laws as inputs, the RFT overestimates swimming speed by approximately 20%. The simulation reveals that this is related to the non-instantaneous increase in force during reversals of body segments. Despite the inaccuracy of the steady-state assumption, we use the force laws and a recently developed geometric mechanics theory to predict optimal gaits for a model system that has been well-studied in Newtonian fluids, the three-link swimmer. The combination of the geometric theory and the force laws allows us to generate a kinematic relationship between the swimmer's shape and position velocities and to construct connection vector field and constraint curvature function visualizations of the system dynamics. From these we predict optimal gaits for forward, lateral and rotational motion. Experiment and simulation are in accord with the theoretical prediction, and demonstrate that

  3. Volumetric flow around a swimming lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Colin, Sean P.; Costello, John H.; Leftwich, Megan C.; Tytell, Eric D.

    2015-11-01

    A primary experimental technique for studying fluid-structure interactions around swimming fish has been planar dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). Typically, two components of the velocity vector are measured in a plane, in the case of swimming studies, directly behind the animal. While useful, this approach provides little to no insight about fluid structure interactions above and below the fish. For fish with a small height relative to body length, such as the long and approximately cylindrical lamprey, 3D information is essential to characterize how these fish interact with their fluid environment. This study presents 3D flow structures along the body and in the wake of larval lamprey, P etromyzon m arinus , which are 10-15 cm long. Lamprey swim through a 1000 cm3 field of view in a standard 10 gallon tank illuminated by a green laser. Data are collected using the three component velocimeter V3V system by TSI, Inc. and processed using Insight 4G software. This study expands on previous works that show two pairs of vortices each tail beat in the mid-plane of the lamprey wake. NSF DMS 1062052.

  4. Three-link Swimming in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, R. L.; Ding, Yang; Masse, Andrew; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Many animals move within in granular media such as desert sand. Recent biological experiments have revealed that the sandfish lizard uses an undulatory gait to swim within sand. Models reveal that swimming occurs in a frictional fluid in which inertial effects are small and kinematics dominate. To understand the fundamental mechanics of swimming in granular media (GM), we examine a model system that has been well-studied in Newtonian fluids: the three-link swimmer. We create a physical model driven by two servo-motors, and a discrete element simulation of the swimmer. To predict optimal gaits we use a recent geometric mechanics theory combined with empirically determined resistive force laws for GM. We develop a kinematic relationship between the swimmer's shape and position velocities and construct connection vector field and constraint curvature function visualizations of the system dynamics. From these we predict optimal gaits for forward, lateral and rotational motion. Experiment and simulation are in accord with the theoretical predictions; thus geometric tools can be used to study locomotion in GM.

  5. The swimming of a perfect deforming helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koens, Lyndon; Zhang, Hang; Mourran, Ahmed; Lauga, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Many bacteria rotate helical flagellar filaments in order to swim. When at rest or rotated counter-clockwise these flagella are left handed helices but they undergo polymorphic transformations to right-handed helices when the motor is reversed. These helical deformations themselves can generate motion, with for example Rhodobacter sphaeroides using the polymorphic transformation of the flagellum to generate rotation, or Spiroplasma propagating a change of helix handedness across its body's length to generate forward motion. Recent experiments reported on an artificial helical microswimmer generating motion without a propagating change in handedness. Made of a temperature sensitive gel, these swimmers moved by changing the dimensions of the helix in a non-reciprocal way. Inspired by these results and helix's ubiquitous presence in the bacterial world, we investigate how a deforming helix moves within a viscous fluid. Maintaining a single handedness along its entire length, we discuss how a perfect deforming helix can create a non-reciprocal swimming stroke, identify its principle directions of motion, and calculate the swimming kinematics asymptotically.

  6. Distribution patterns of the ghost crab Ocypode cursor on sandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial distribution of the ghost crab Ocypode cursor was determined for beaches on eastern Boa Vista Island, Cabo Verde Archipelago. The main objectives were to analyse the across-shore distribution by means of burrow counts and to identify preferential zones and spatial segregation. Six beaches were investigated ...

  7. Haematological and Serum Biochemical Profile of the Blue Crab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematology and serum biochemistry of the crab, Callinectes amnicola from Epe and Lagos Lagoon in southwest Nigeria were investigated from March –August, 2013. Haemocyte samples were analyzed for haematological and biochemical parameters. The Total Haemocyte count (THC) of C. amnicola from Epe and ...

  8. Macro and Trace Element Accumulation in Edible Crabs and Frogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tissue accumulation of five macroelements (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Fe) and twelve trace elements (Vd, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Pb) were assessed in the organs of the edible frogs; Xenopus laevis and Rana esculentus, and whole body of the crab, Callinestes caught from Alaro Stream Floodplain (Ibadan, ...

  9. The temporal behaviour of Taurus X-1 (the Crab Nebula)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, P.J.N.

    1975-01-01

    Copernicus data on Taurus X-1 and the Crab pulsar extending over a 2 1/2-yr period indicate that under normal conditions the source has a flux that is constant to within 2.5 per cent at the 90 per cent confidence level. The pulsed/total flux ratio also shows no significant changes during the same time. (author)

  10. Multibaseline Observations of the Occultation of Crab Nebula by the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Observations of the radio source Crab Nebula were made at the time of transit during. June 1986 and 1987. The fringe amplitude V(S) for a baseline S was calibrated using the corresponding baseline fringe amplitude of radio source 3C123 or 3C134 and normalised to the preoccultation value V(O). Normalised fringe ...

  11. Size at Sexual Maturity in the Red Mangrove Crab Neosarmatium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sesarmid crab Neosarmatium meinertiis one of the most abundant species inhabiting the upper mangrove areas of many East African mangrove forests. However, several aspects concerning its reproduction are scarcely known. In this study, sexual maturity of N. meinerti is investigated. Samples were obtained during ...

  12. The larval development of the red mangrove crab Sesarma meinerti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The larval stages of the red mangrove crab Sesarma meinerti de Man were reared in the laboratory. Larval development consists of five zoeal stages and one megalopa. Zoeal development lasts an average of 25 days at 25°C. The external morphology of larvae is described in detail and their relationship with larvae of ...

  13. The Crab nebula's ''wisps'' as shocked pulsar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallant, Y.A.; Arons, J.; Langdon, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Crab synchrotron nebula has been successfully modelled as the post-shock region of a relativistic, magnetized wind carrying most of the spindown luminosity from the central pulsar. While the Crab is the best-studied example, most of the highest spindown luminosity pulsars are also surrounded by extended synchrotron nebulae, and several additional supernova remnants with ''plerionic'' morphologies similar to the Crab are known where the central object is not seen. All these objects have nonthermal, power-law spectra attributable to accelerated high-energy particles thought to originate in a Crab-like relativistic pulsar wind. However, proposed models have so far treated the wind shock as an infinitesimally thin discontinuity, with an arbitrarily ascribed particle acceleration efficiency. To make further progress, investigations resolving the shock structure seemed in order. Motivated by these considerations, we have performed ''particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of perpendicularly magnetized shocks in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. The shocks in pure electron-positron plasmas were found to produce only thermal distributions downstream, and are thus poor candidates as particle acceleration sites. When the upstream plasma flow also contained a smaller population of positive ions, however, efficient acceleration of positrons, and to a lesser extent of electrons, was observed in the simulations

  14. Breeding biology of the intertidal sand crab, Emerita (Decapoda: Anomura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramoniam, T; Gunamalai, V

    2003-01-01

    Emerita is a burrowing mole crab or sand crab, adapted to life in wave-washed sandy beaches of temperate and tropical seas. The reproductive biology of this anomuran crab presents several peculiarities, all contributing to its adaptation to this harsh environmental niche. We discuss the following aspects: 1) sex ratio and size at sexual maturity, 2) neoteny and protandric hermaphroditism, 3) mating behaviour and sperm transfer strategy, 4) synchronisation of moulting and reproduction, 5) environmental impact on reproductive cycle and egg production, 6) biochemistry of yolk utilisation and energetics, 7) larval development, dispersal and settlement and 8) the value of Emerita as indicator species. These aspects are discussed in the light of the life history pattern, comprising a sedentary adult and pelagic larval phases. The successful colonisation of the physically challenging habitat of the sandy beach by Emerita is attributable largely to reproductive strategy and the larval developmental and recruitment pattern. Sensitivity to changing environmental conditions, including pollution, make this intertidal crab an indicator species for monitoring anthropogenic impact.

  15. Substrate use and selection in sympatric intertidal hermit crab species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TURRA A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Coexisting hermit crabs may competitively interact for shells and microhabitats, mainly when shell availability is habitat-related. Three species of Clibanarius (C. antillensis, C. sclopetarius, and C. vittatus coexist in the intertidal region of Pernambuco Islet, Araçá Region, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. This study evaluated crab preferences for four substrate types used by these species in nature (rocky shore, pebbles, sand, and mud in allopatric (single species and sympatric (three species treatments in simulations of high tide and low tide. The substrate preference of the three hermit crabs did not vary between low and high tide situations. At low tide the crabs either moved into holes in the highly complex rocky substrate or buried themselves in mud. Substrate selection may explain the patterns of substrate use in nature only for C. vittatus. Clibanarius antillensis and C. sclopetarius showed closer similarities in the pattern of substrate selection in the sympatric treatment with the substrate use in nature than in allopatric treatment, indicating a positive influence (dependence of the presence of one species on the presence of another. Use of sub-optimal substrates, mainly by C. antillensis, may be caused by other factors such as its low desiccation tolerances. If competition for space takes place among these species, it would be more intense between C. sclopetarius and C. vittatus given their higher overlap in substrate preference than between them and C. antillensis.

  16. Substrate use and selection in sympatric intertidal hermit crab species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TURRA

    Full Text Available Coexisting hermit crabs may competitively interact for shells and microhabitats, mainly when shell availability is habitat-related. Three species of Clibanarius (C. antillensis, C. sclopetarius, and C. vittatus coexist in the intertidal region of Pernambuco Islet, Araçá Region, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. This study evaluated crab preferences for four substrate types used by these species in nature (rocky shore, pebbles, sand, and mud in allopatric (single species and sympatric (three species treatments in simulations of high tide and low tide. The substrate preference of the three hermit crabs did not vary between low and high tide situations. At low tide the crabs either moved into holes in the highly complex rocky substrate or buried themselves in mud. Substrate selection may explain the patterns of substrate use in nature only for C. vittatus. Clibanarius antillensis and C. sclopetarius showed closer similarities in the pattern of substrate selection in the sympatric treatment with the substrate use in nature than in allopatric treatment, indicating a positive influence (dependence of the presence of one species on the presence of another. Use of sub-optimal substrates, mainly by C. antillensis, may be caused by other factors such as its low desiccation tolerances. If competition for space takes place among these species, it would be more intense between C. sclopetarius and C. vittatus given their higher overlap in substrate preference than between them and C. antillensis.

  17. Hermit Crabs (Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridea) from the Seychelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, P.A.; Hogarth, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    A report on the hermit crabs collected during the Netherlands Seychelles Expedition, 1992-1993, supplemented by materials collected for Enterprise Oil and examined by one of the authors. Twentyseven species, representing three families, are recognized, including one new genus and four new species.

  18. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/ PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab Nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  19. Crab Nebula Variations in Hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was surprisingly variable from 2001-2010, with less variability before 2001 and since mid-2010. We presented evidence for spectral softening from RXTE, Swift/BAT, and Fermi GBM during the mid-2008-2010 flux decline. We see no clear connections between the hard X-ray variations and the GeV flares

  20. Mud Crab (Scylla serrata) Culture: Understanding the Technology in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—A study was conducted in Mtwapa creek on the north coast Kenya, during 2005-2007 to evaluate the viability of pens and drive-in cages for mud crab (S. serrata) culture as a mangrove management strategy and alternative source of income for local communities. Other objectives were to assess the effectiveness ...

  1. Project "Flappy Crab": An Edu-Game for Music Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Gomes, Cristina Maria; Guerreiro Figueiredo, Mauro Jorge; Bidarra, José; Cardoso Gomes, José Duarte

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some possibilities of gamification and remixing process for music education. Analyses also the concepts of gamification, mashup, remix and presents its possible usage in education--music teaching--through the development of the project/educational game "Flappy Crab". The article begins with a brief introduction to…

  2. The abundance and composition of crabs (Decapoda) in Uta Ewa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the physicochemical parameters were within limits of the National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agencies for aquatic life. A total of 107 crabs were collected from the two sampling stations. Goniopsis pelii was the most abundant in Station 1 accounting for 57.9%, followed by ...

  3. Genetic population structure of the Japanese mitten crab Eriocheir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... divergence between these two groups (Okinawa and main islands of Japan) is equivalent to the genetic distance between congeneric species. Our results failed to demonstrate significant geographical structure in main islands of Japan, indicating that populations of Japanese mitten crab are capable of.

  4. Occurrence and Toxicity of Hydrocarbon Residues in Crab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To elucidate seasonal changes in hydrocarbons including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to oil spill, tissues of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) were investigated. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (n-alkanes) concentrations ranged from 0.17-0.32ìg/gdw and 0.28-0.62ìg/gdw during the dry and wet seasons ...

  5. Reproduction in crabs: strategies, invasiveness and environmental influences thereon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis provides insights into the interconnectedness of crab reproductive biology, the selective forces leading to their development, the possible links to invasiveness and the influences of environmental factors thereon. The empirical data collected and presented in this thesis can be used

  6. The osmoregulatory ability of three grapsoid crab species in relation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The osmoregulatory abilities of the grapsoid crabs Cyclograpsus punctata, Sesarma catenata and Sesarma eulimene were studied comparatively in an attempt to explain, at least in part, their distribution in estuaries. Both survival and haemorymph osmotic pressure were used as indices of hyperosmotic regulatory ability.

  7. Antimicrobial lipids from the hemolymph of brachyuran crabs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravichandran, S.; Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Rameshkumar, G.

    or therapeutic drugs against bacterial infections. A lectin from the Scylla serrata crab hemolymph has been isolated and purified by affinity column chromatography and preparative electrophoresis [7]. Based on studies of the health-promoting activities... bacterial, fungal and multi drug resistant bacterial strains viz, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexineri, Klebsiella sp., Vibrio cholerae, Aspergillus fumigatus, Rhodotorula sp., Candida...

  8. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  9. The Physiology and Mechanics of Undulatory Swimming: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Medicinal Leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The medicinal leech is a useful animal model for investigating undulatory swimming in the classroom. Unlike many swimming organisms, its swimming performance can be quantified without specialized equipment. A large blood meal alters swimming behavior in a way that can be used to generate a discussion of the hydrodynamics of swimming, muscle…

  10. Laryngoscopy during swimming: A novel diagnostic technique to characterize swimming-induced laryngeal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken; Morris, Tessa E; Furber, Matthew; Backer, Vibeke; Hull, James H

    2017-10-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a key differential diagnosis for respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in aquatic athletes. A definitive diagnosis of EILO is dependent on laryngoscopy, performed continuously, while an athlete engages in the sport that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 127:2298-2301, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Zebrafish swimming in the flow: a particle image velocimetry study

    OpenAIRE

    Mwaffo, Violet; Zhang, Peng; Romero Cruz, Sebastián; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice for the study of a number of biomechanics problems, including balance development, schooling, and neuromuscular transmission. The precise quantification of the flow physics around swimming zebrafish is critical toward a mechanistic understanding of the complex swimming style of this fresh-water species. Although previous studies have elucidated the vortical structures in the wake of zebrafish swimming in placid water, the flow physics of zebrafish ...

  12. The swimming literacy of women in term sof self rescue

    OpenAIRE

    Vokurková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Work name: The swimming literacy of women in term of self rescue Aim of work: To acquire and analyze data about the level of the swimming literacy and self rescue skills of women aged 18 - 72 years, whether they can handle and use them. Method: Literature search, creation of the questionnaire, implementation survey, data analysis and graphical presentation of results. Results: The analysis of the swimming literacy and self rescue skills of women. Key words: literacy, physical literacy, swimmi...

  13. Roll and Yaw of Paramecium swimming in a viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Jana, Saikat; Giarra, Matt; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2012-11-01

    Many free-swimming microorganisms like ciliates, flagellates, and invertebrates exhibit helical trajectories. In particular, the Paramecium spirally swims along its anterior direction by the beating of cilia. Due to the oblique beating stroke of cilia, the Paramecium rotates along its long axis as it swims forward. Simultaneously, this long axis turns toward the oral groove side. Combined roll and yaw motions of Paramecium result in swimming along a spiral course. Using Particle Image Velocimetry, we measure and quantify the flow field and fluid stress around Paramecium. We will discuss how the non-uniform stress distribution around the body induces this yaw motion.

  14. Morning Exercise: Enhancement of Afternoon Sprint-Swimming Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Thompson, Kevin G; Raglin, John S; Rattray, Ben

    2017-05-01

    An exercise bout completed several hours prior to an event may improve competitive performance later that same day. To examine the influence of morning exercise on afternoon sprint-swimming performance. Thirteen competitive swimmers (7 male, mean age 19 ± 3 y; 6 female, mean age 17 ± 3 y) completed a morning session of 1200 m of variedintensity swimming (SwimOnly), a combination of varied-intensity swimming and a resistance-exercise routine (SwimDry), or no morning exercise (NoEx). After a 6-h break, swimmers completed a 100-m time trial. Time-trial performance was faster in SwimOnly (1.6% ± 0.6, mean ± 90% confidence limit, P confidence limit], P = .04), body (0.2°C ± 0.1°C, P = .02), and skin temperatures (0.3°C ± 0.3°C, P = .02) were higher in SwimDry than in NoEx. Completion of a morning swimming session alone or together with resistance exercise can substantially enhance sprint-swimming performance completed later the same day.

  15. Biomechanical Analysis of the Swim-Start: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Vantorre, Didier Chollet, Ludovic Seifert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This review updates the swim-start state of the art from a biomechanical standpoint. We review the contribution of the swim-start to overall swimming performance, the effects of various swim-start strategies, and skill effects across the range of swim-start strategies identified in the literature. The main objective is to determine the techniques to focus on in swimming training in the contemporary context of the sport. The phases leading to key temporal events of the swim-start, like water entry, require adaptations to the swimmer’s chosen technique over the course of a performance; we thus define the swim-start as the moment when preparation for take-off begins to the moment when the swimming pattern begins. A secondary objective is to determine the role of adaptive variability as it emerges during the swim-start. Variability is contextualized as having a functional role and operating across multiple levels of analysis: inter-subject (expert versus non-expert, inter-trial or intra-subject (through repetitions of the same movement, and inter-preference (preferred versus non-preferred technique. Regarding skill effects, we assume that swim-start expertise is distinct from swim stroke expertise. Highly skilled swim-starts are distinguished in terms of several factors: reaction time from the start signal to the impulse on the block, including the control and regulation of foot force and foot orientation during take-off; appropriate amount of glide time before leg kicking commences; effective transition from leg kicking to break-out of full swimming with arm stroking; overall maximal leg and arm propulsion and minimal water resistance; and minimized energy expenditure through streamlined body position. Swimmers who are less expert at the swim-start spend more time in this phase and would benefit from training designed to reduce: (i the time between reaction to the start signal and impulse on the block, and (ii the time in transition (i

  16. Zebrafish swimming in the flow: a particle image velocimetry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Mwaffo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice for the study of a number of biomechanics problems, including balance development, schooling, and neuromuscular transmission. The precise quantification of the flow physics around swimming zebrafish is critical toward a mechanistic understanding of the complex swimming style of this fresh-water species. Although previous studies have elucidated the vortical structures in the wake of zebrafish swimming in placid water, the flow physics of zebrafish swimming against a water current remains unexplored. In an effort to illuminate zebrafish swimming in a dynamic environment reminiscent of its natural habitat, we experimentally investigated the locomotion and hydrodynamics of a single zebrafish swimming in a miniature water tunnel using particle image velocimetry. Our results on zebrafish locomotion detail the role of flow speed on tail beat undulations, heading direction, and swimming speed. Our findings on zebrafish hydrodynamics offer a precise quantification of vortex shedding during zebrafish swimming and demonstrate that locomotory patterns play a central role on the flow physics. This knowledge may help clarify the evolutionary advantage of burst and cruise swimming movements in zebrafish.

  17. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Dredging For The Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2002-12-01

    The studies reported here focus on issues regarding the entrainment of Dungeness crab related to the proposed Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and provided direct measurements of crab entrainment rates at three locations (Desdomona Shoals, Upper Sands, and Miller Sands) from RM4 to RM24 during summer 2002. Entrainment rates for all age classes of crabs ranged from zero at Miller Sands to 0.224 crabs per cy at Desdemona Shoals in June 2002. The overall entrainment rate at Desdomona Shoals in September was 0.120 crabs per cy. A modified Dredge Impact Model (DIM) used the summer 2002 entrainment rates to project crab entrainment and adult equivalent loss and loss to the fishery for the Channel Improvement Project. To improve the projections, entrainment data from Flavel Bar is needed. The literature, analyses of salinity intrusion scenarios, and the summer 2002 site-specific data on entrainment and salinity all indicate that bottom salinity influences crab distribution and entrainment, especially at lower salinities. It is now clear from field measurements of entrainment rates and salinity during a period of low river flow (90-150 Kcfs) and high salinity intrusion that entrainment rates are zero where bottom salinity is less than 16 o/oo most of the time. Further, entrainment rates of 2+ and older crab fall with decreasing salinity in a clear and consistent manner. More elaboration of the crab distribution- salinity model, especially concerning salinity and the movements of 1+ crab, is needed.

  18. Distribution and shell selection by two hermit crabs in different habitats on Egyptian Red Sea Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kareem Ismail, Tarek Gad

    2010-05-01

    The present work aims to assess the spatial distribution, analyze shell utilization, shell fitness and determine the effect of coexistence of two hermit crabs Calcinus latens and Clibanarius signatus on used shell resources in various habitats on the Red Sea Coast. Also, to determine the choice of shells and investigate the shell species preference of C. latens and C. signatus in the laboratory. The hermit crabs C. latens and C. signatus were found to occupy shells of 39 gastropod species. The most commonly occupied gastropod shells are those belonging to genera Strombus, Nerita, Cerithium and Planaxis. The results showed that crab individuals utilized mainly the shell with elongate aperture. Laboratory experiments showed that two crab species preferred shells of Strombus followed by Cerithium and Nerita when offered shells of nearly similar size (optimal). Crab individuals showed a significant preference for optimal sized shells when given suboptimal shells as an alternative choice. Also, the hermit crabs avoid damaged shells when given a choice of optimal sized damaged shell and optimal sized intact one. In addition, two hermit crab species chose shells of smaller than optimal size when given a choice of damaged optimal sized shells and smaller intact ones. On the other hand, field observations showed that most crab individuals lived in adequate sized shells. The present data conclude that shell selection by hermit crabs C. latens and C. signatus depends mostly on shell internal volume, shell quality and shell aperture size than other factors, because they provide a maximum protection for hermit crabs.

  19. Comparative brain architecture of the European shore crab Carcinus maenas (Brachyura) and the common hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus (Anomura) with notes on other marine hermit crabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Jakob; Sombke, Andy; Seefluth, Florian; Kenning, Matthes; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    The European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the common hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus are members of the sister taxa Brachyura and Anomura (together forming the taxon Meiura) respectively. Both species share similar coastal marine habitats and thus are confronted with similar environmental conditions. This study sets out to explore variations of general brain architecture of species that live in seemingly similar habitats but belong to different major malacostracan taxa and to understand possible differences of sensory systems and related brain compartments. We examined the brains of Carcinus maenas, Pagurus bernhardus, and three other hermit crab species with immunohistochemistry against tyrosinated tubulin, f-actin, synaptic proteins, RF-amides and allatostatin. Our comparison showed that their optic neuropils within the eyestalks display strong resemblance in gross morphology as well as in detailed organization, suggesting a rather similar potential of processing visual input. Besides the well-developed visual system, the olfactory neuropils are distinct components in the brain of both C. maenas and P. bernhardus as well as the other hermit crabs, suggesting that close integration of olfactory and visual information may be useful in turbid marine environments with low visibility, as is typical for many habitats such as, e.g., the Baltic and the North Sea. Comparing the shape of the olfactory glomeruli in the anomurans showed some variations, ranging from a wedge shape to an elongate morphology. Furthermore, the tritocerebrum and the organization of the second antennae associated with the tritocerebrum seem to differ markedly in C. maenas and P. bernhardus, indicating better mechanosensory abilities in the latter close to those of other Decapoda with long second antennae, such as Astacida, Homarida, or Achelata. This aspect may also represent an adaptation to the "hermit lifestyle" in which competition for shells is a major aspect of their life history. The shore

  20. Effect of daily chlorhexidine bathing on acquisition of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) in the medical intensive care unit with CRAB endemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Seung Soon; Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Han-Sung; Shin, Kyong-Sok; Park, Eun Young; Kang, Bog Soun; Lee, Hee Jung; Kang, Hyun Joo

    2015-11-01

    There is insufficient evidence for daily chlorhexidine bathing to reduce nosocomial spread of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) in endemic situations. An interrupted time series study was performed to evaluate the effect of daily chlorhexidine bathing on the acquisition of CRAB in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) with CRAB endemicity. There was a 14-month control period and 12-month chlorhexidine bathing period. Segmented Poisson regression analysis was performed to assess the impact of chlorhexidine bathing on the level and trend of the series of prevalence rates and incidence density. Also, chlorhexidine susceptibility testing was performed on CRAB isolates collected during the chlorhexidine bathing period. There was a 51.8% reduction of CRAB acquisition rates after an introduction of daily chlorhexidine bathing (44.0 vs 21.2 cases/1,000 at-risk patient days, P chlorhexidine against a total of 98 CRAB isolates ranged from 8-64 μg/mL. Daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduces the acquisition of CRAB in a medical ICU with CRAB endemicity. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CRABS IN CRISIS:BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS, ABUNDANCES, AND VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE OF BRACHYURAN AND LITHODID CRABS FROM THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA TO THE BEAUFORT SEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    To predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change we analyzed the biogeographic and abundance patterns of the brachyuran or ‘True’ crabs (n=368) and lithodid or ‘King’ crabs (n=20) that are found in the twelve MEOW (“Mar...

  2. TUNING IN TO FISH SWIMMING WAVES - BODY FORM, SWIMMING MODE AND MUSCLE FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WARDLE, CS; VIDELER, JJ; ALTRINGHAM, JD

    Most fish species swim with lateral body undulations running from head to tail, These waves run more slowly than the waves of muscle activation causing them, reflecting the effect of the interaction between the fish's body and the reactive forces from the water, The coupling between both waves

  3. Front crawl swimming analysis using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa, Hugo G; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Thiel, David V

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical characteristics such as stroke rate and stroke length can be used to determine the velocity of a swimmer and can be analysed in both a swimming pool and a flume. The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the differences between the acceleration data collected from ...... movements (0.64 ≤ r ≤ 0.75). The correlation coefficients are (0.75 ≤ r ≤ 0.83) and (0.82 ≤ r ≤ 0.89) for the other two axes....

  4. Water Penetration into Middle Ear Through Ventilation Tubes in Children While Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Water penetration into the middle ear through ventilation tubes and middle ear infection are not likely when surface swimming. Children with ventilation tubes can enjoy swimming without protection in clean chlorinated swimming pools.

  5. Fertilidade do caranguejo de mangue Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ocypodidae, em Iguape (São Paulo, Brasil Fertility of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ocypodidae, at Iguape (São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Yomar Hattori

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 58 Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763 ovigerous females in final embryonic stage were collected in mangrove forest at Iguape (São Paulo. Each female were kept in laboratory until the larvae hatching and had their carapace width (CW measured with caliper (0.05 mm and the larval number (LN calculated by volumetric method. The hatching rates (HR were calculated for each animal's size class (5 mm. The values of LN and CW obtained were subjected to regression analyses and the best fitting model was chosen by comparing the obtained determination coefficients (R². The fertility varied from 71,200 to 220,800 larvae (147,169 ± 32,070 larvae, corresponding to 41.7 to 76.8 mm CW (63.7±7.9 mm, respectively. The relationship LNxCW was expressed by the equation LN = 284.1CW1.5º¹ (N = 58; R² = 0.74; p < 0.01, that showed a positive correlation between the variables. Most part of ovigerous females (89.7% showed their hatching during the nightly period. A negative correlation between HR and CW was observed in these animals (p < 0.05, probably due to reduction of spermatophores in the seminal receptacle (multiparous females or due to senility in the females with large size. The biological studies of U. cordatus are very important for practices adoption that preserve and make the rational use of this recourse in Brazilian's mangrove forests.

  6. Behavioral repertory of Trichodactylus panoplus (Crustacea: Trichodactylidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca L. Zimmermann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the behavioral repertory of Trichodactylus panoplus von Martens, 1869, based on the animals' diel activity and the possible substrate preference under laboratory experiments. Three experimental replicates were carried out, each using six animals (three males and three females. There were four periods of observation a day, with a total of 864 observation sessions and 144 hours of experiments. A total of 15 behavioral acts divided into five categories were recorded: feeding, exploration of the environment, immobility, social interaction, and self-grooming. The obtained results suggest that T. panoplus has greater activity during the night (p < 0.05, yet without showing an activity peak. In addition, the acceptance of food does not depend on the photoperiod. There was a significant preference for gravel as the chosen substrate. The Morisita index indicates an aggregated distribution of these animals, confirming their preference for substrate with gravel. The increase in activity at night and the preference for substrate with gravel, which can be used to disguise these individuals, would be associated to some anti-predator strategies of these crabs against visually orientated predators.

  7. Endemism in the Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda of Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Van Damme

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We review the current state of knowledge and patterns of distribution in the endemic Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda of Southern Africa and describe two species of the Western Cape, of which one is new to science. Frey (1993, Korovchinsky (2006 and Smirnov (2008 previously suggested that South Africa harbours few endemics in the Cladocera. In the current study, we show that so-called low endemism in this region is mainly attributed to our limited state of knowledge of the local cladoceran fauna. Many of the South African taxa are ignored and revisions are lacking, as we briefly discuss for the genus Daphnia. We list known Southern African endemic Cladocera with notes on their status, map the distributions of well-studied taxa, and discuss the importance of temporary freshwater rockpools. We confirm that Southern Africa is a region of endemism for the group. We recognise three categories of endemics: i Montane endemics in the East (e.g. Drakensberg mountains; ii endemics of the Western Cape (lowlands; iii South African endemics, widely distributed in the region, both in the mountains and the lowlands. South African endemics have previously been regarded as relicts (Korovchinsky 2006, yet for the two taxa explored in detail in this study, there are no specific primitive morphological characters in comparison to congeners (within their respective genus/species group and the morphology mainly suggests strong isolation. The two species belong to the Chydoridae and the Eurycercidae, respectively, and are used here as case studies for the investigation of Western Cape endemics. The first, Alona capensis Rühe, 1914 (Anomopoda: Chydoridae: Aloninae, is redescribed based on the type material. We discuss the affinities of this enigmatic species for the first time. Morphology of the habitus and the postabdomen parallel that of members of the Alona affinis-complex. The disconnected head pores and limb characters, on the other hand, place A. capensis in

  8. First Record of Hippa adactyla (Fabricius, 1787; Crustacea, Anomura, Hippidae) from Indonesian Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardika, Puji Utari; Farajallah, Achmad; Wardiatno, Yusli

    2015-12-01

    Specimens of Hippa adactyla (Crustacea, Anomura, Hippidae) were collected from several coasts of Indonesia (Sumatera, Java, Bali-Lombok and Sulawesi). This finding represents the first record of this species in Indonesia and confirms its presence in the Indian Ocean and in the Wallacea region. Its systematic and morphological characteristics are described, and its distribution in Indonesia is presented. One of the main characteristics of this species is a median lobe in the anterior part of the carapace, which has 3-4 lobes. Likewise, the left antenna has 2-6 articles.

  9. Fecundidade em Macrobrachium acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836 do Rio Ribeira de Iguape (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cotroni Valenti

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the fecundity in Macrobrachium acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836 of the Ribeira de Iguape river (Southern Brazil (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae, is presented. The mean individual fecundity of the population was estimated. Fecundity was related to either length and/or weight. Our data showed that this species presents high fecundity and is thus suitable for comercial culture. The fecundity/length and fecundity/weight relationships obtained are: F = - 14 712 + 2 311,8 L and F = -1493,9 + 798,76 W

  10. Energetics of median and paired fin swimming, body and caudal fin swimming, and gait transition in parrotfish (Scarus schlegeli) and triggerfish (Rhinecanthus aculeatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsmeyer, Keith E; Steffensen, John Fleng; Herskin, Jannik

    2002-01-01

    , and therefore support the hypothesis that MPF swimming is more efficient. In addition, use of the BCF gait at higher swimming speed increased the cost of transport in both species beyond that predicted for MPF swimming at the same speeds. This suggests that, unlike for terrestrial locomotion, gait transition......To determine the energetic costs of rigid-body, median or paired-fin (MPF) swimming versus undulatory, body-caudal fin (BCF) swimming, we measured oxygen consumption as a function of swimming speed in two MPF swimming specialists, Schlegel's parrotfish and Picasso triggerfish. The parrotfish swam...... exclusively with the pectoral fins at prolonged swimming speeds up to 3.2 total lengths per second (L s(-1); 30 min critical swimming speed, U(crit)). At higher speeds, gait transferred to a burst-and-coast BCF swimming mode that resulted in rapid fatigue. The triggerfish swam using undulations of the soft...

  11. Effects of intraspecific variation in reproductive traits, pectoral fin use and burst swimming on metabolic rates and swimming performance in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Banet, Amanda I.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2013-01-01

    of reproductive traits, pectoral fin use and burse-assisted swimming on swimming metabolic rate, standard metabolic rate (MO2std) and prolonged swimming performance (Ucrit). Reproductive traits included reproductive allocation and pregnancy stage, the former defined as the mass of the reproductive tissues divided...... by the total body mass. Results showed that the metabolic rate increased curvilinearly with swimming speed. The slope of the relationship was used as an index of swimming cost. There was no evidence that reproductive traits correlated with swimming cost, MO2std or Ucrit. In contrast, data revealed strong...... effects of pectoral fin use on swimming cost and Ucrit. Poecilia reticulata employed body-caudal fin (BCF) swimming at all tested swimming speeds; however, fish with a high simultaneous use of the pectoral fins exhibited increased swimming cost and decreased Ucrit. These data indicated that combining BCF...

  12. Study of Maximum Swimming Speed Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus) for Fisheries Management

    OpenAIRE

    Primeswari, Ridha; ', Nofrizal; Sari, T. Ersti Yulika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the swimming speed of the free swimming intank and flume tank, an outdoor durability of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and maximumswimming speed tilapia in flume tank. Therefore, to use experimental methods. Free swimmingspeed was 0,25 BL/sec, maximum swimming speed of fish occurs when the fish are given ashock to swim. Negative correlation between speed and endurance swimming R2 = 0,7295 showsa fish swimming endurance decreases at higher speeds. S...

  13. Mechanical krill models for studying coordinated swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Alice; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    The global biomass of Homo sapiens is about a third of the biomass of Euphausia superba, commonly known as the Antarctic krill. Krill participate in organized social behavior. Propulsive jets generated by individual krill in a school have been suggested to be important in providing hydrodynamic sensory cues. The importance of body positions and body angles on the wakes generated is challenging to study in free swimming krill. Our solution to study the flow fields of multiple krill was to develop mechanical krill robots. We designed krillbots using mostly 3D printed parts that are actuated by stepper motors. The krillbot limb lengths, angles, inter-limb spacing and pleopod stroke frequency were dynamically scaled using published data on free-swimming krill kinematics. The vertical and horizontal spacing between krillbots, as well as the body angle, are adjustable. In this study, we conducted particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements with two tethered krillbots in a flow tank with no background flow. One krillbot was placed above and behind the other. Both krillbots were at a zero-degree body angle. Wake-body interactions visualized from PIV data will be presented.

  14. Viscoelasticity promotes collective swimming of sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    From flocking birds to swarming insects, interactions of organisms large and small lead to the emergence of collective dynamics. Here, we report striking collective swimming of bovine sperm, with sperm orienting in the same direction within each cluster, enabled by the viscoelasticity of the fluid. A long-chain polyacrylamide solution was used as a model viscoelastic fluid such that its rheology can be fine-tuned to mimic that of bovine cervical mucus. In viscoelastic fluid, sperm formed dynamic clusters, and the cluster size increased with elasticity of the polyacrylamide solution. In contrast, sperm swam randomly and individually in Newtonian fluids of similar viscosity. Analysis of the fluid motion surrounding individual swimming sperm indicated that sperm-fluid interaction is facilitated by the elastic component of the fluid. We note that almost all biological fluids (e.g. mucus and blood) are viscoelastic in nature, this finding highlights the importance of fluid elasticity in biological function. We will discuss what the orientation fluctuation within a cluster reveals about the interaction strength. Supported by NIH Grant 1R01HD070038.

  15. Body dynamics and hydrodynamics of swimming larvae: a computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, G.; Müller, U.K.; Leeuwen, van J.L.; Liu, H.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanics of fish swimming, we need to know the forces exerted by the fluid and how these forces affect the motion of the fish. To this end, we developed a 3-D computational approach that integrates hydrodynamics and body dynamics. This study quantifies the flow around a swimming

  16. Modulation of the anticonvulsant effect of swim stress by agmatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahremand, Taraneh; Payandemehr, Pooya; Riazi, Kiarash; Noorian, Ali Reza; Payandemehr, Borna; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2018-01-01

    Agmatine is an endogenous l-arginine metabolite with neuroprotective effects in the stress-response system. It exerts anticonvulsant effects against several seizure paradigms. Swim stress induces an anticonvulsant effect by activation of endogenous antiseizure mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the interaction of agmatine with the anticonvulsant effect of swim stress in mice on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure threshold. Then we studied the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) pathway and endogenous opioid system in that interaction. Swim stress induced an anticonvulsant effect on PTZ seizures which was opioid-independent in shorter than 1-min swim durations and opioid-dependent with longer swims, as it was completely reversed by pretreatment with naltrexone (NTX) (10mg/kg), an opioid receptor antagonist. Agmatine significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of opioid-independent shorter swim stress, in which a combination of subthreshold swim stress duration (45s) and subeffective dose of agmatine (1mg/kg) revealed a significantly higher seizure threshold compared with either one. This effect was significantly reversed by NO synthase inhibitor N G -nitro-l-arginine (L-NAME (Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), 5mg/kg), suggesting an NO-dependent mechanism, and was unaffected by NTX (10mg/kg), proving little role for endogenous opioids in the interaction. Our data suggest that pretreatment of animals with agmatine acts additively with short swim stress to exert anticonvulsant responses, possibly by mediating NO pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomechanical aspects of peak performance in human swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, H.M.; Truijens, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Peak performances in sport require the full deployment of all the powers an athlete possesses. How factors such as mechanical power output, technique and drag, each individually, but also in concert, determine swimming performance is the subject of this enquiry. This overview of swimming

  18. The Complex Hydrodynamics of Swimming in the Spanish Dancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuoyu; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-11-01

    The lack of a vertebra seems to have freed marine gastropods to explore and exploit a stupendous variety of swimming kinematics. In fact, examination of just a few animals in this group reveal locomotory modes ranging from insect-like flapping, to fish-like undulatory swimming, jet propulsion, and rajiform (manta-like) swimming. There are also a number of marine gastropods that have bizarre swimming gaits with no equivalent among fish or marine mammals. In this latter category is the Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus) a sea slug that swims with a complex combination of body undulations and flapping parapodia. While the neurobiology of these animals has been relatively well-studied, less is known about their propulsive mechanism and swimming energetics. In this study, we focus on the hydrodynamics of two distinct swimmers: the Spanish Dancer, and the sea hare Aplysia; the latter adopts a rajiform-like mode of swimming by passing travelling waves along its parapodia. In the present study an immersed boundary method is employed to examine the vortex structures, hydrodynamic forces and energy costs of the swimming in these animals. NSF Grant No. 1246317.

  19. Health risks associated with swimming at an inland river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming exposure to fecally-contaminated oceans and lakes has been associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness. Although treated and untreated sewage are often discharged to rivers, the health risks of swimming exposure on rivers has been less frequently ...

  20. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is a water-scarce country where the sustainable provision of water to its citizens is one of the most significant challenges faced. A recent study in Cape Town, South Africa, investigated the impact of residential swimming pools on household water demand and found that, on average, the presence of a swimming ...

  1. Protection of swimming-induced oxidative stress in some vital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... study of transaminase activities in liver and kidney. Results lead to conclude that the composite extract of above three plant parts has a therapeutic protective effect on forced swimming-induced oxidative stress in vital organs. Keywords: Brain tissues, metabolic organs, oxidative stress, phytotherapy, swimming, vitamin-E.

  2. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.734 Navesink River (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1 through...

  3. Peculiarities of a backstroke swimming technique acceleration in elementary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya Sheyko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to research the possibility of intensification and improvement of the efficiency of swimming training for adults by use of accelerated learning backstroke swimming techniques. Material & Methods: the study involved a total of 43 people aged 30–40 years. Applied: analysis and generalization of scientific and methodological literature; analysis of the learning process of swimming training for adults; development and approbation of an accelerated backstroke swimming technique on the base of the recreational sports complex LLC «Technocom» (Kharkiv, Author's swimming school of U. Blyzniuk, teacher observation, experiment. Results: a study shows that developing of swimming skills of people tested occurs faster and more effectively if the accelerated procedure is used. Backstroke swimming skill formation time for examinees: check group had 26 to 36 lessons, there were 25 to 32 exercises with and without use of supporting means; the experimental group had 12 to 24 lessons with use of 15 exercises without supporting means. Conclusions: as a result of the experiment, it was found that the use of the proposed accelerated training method allows to intensify backstroke swimming learning process for people aged 30–40, due to training course total duration reduction (2 times and number of exercises used, and also allows to master quicker the main improving distance according to age of the engaged.

  4. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-01-01

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids

  5. Relationship between Muscle Strength and Front Crawl Swimming Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gola Radosław

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. competitive performance in swimming depends on a number of factors including, among others, the development of relevant muscle groups. The aim of the study was to clarify the relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity and the role of individual muscle groups in front crawl swimming. Methods. sixteen physical education university students participated in the study. The strength values, defined as torque produced during isometric contractions, of eight upper and lower extremity muscle groups were measured. Data were compared with participants' front crawl swim times in the 25m and 50m distances. Results. correlation analysis demonstrated a relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity. statistically significant relationships were observed between swimming velocity and the torque values of the elbow flexor and shoulder extensor muscles as well as the sum of upper extremity muscle torque values (p ⋋ 0.05. Conclusions. The results indicate the need for a focus on training those muscle groups identified as having a statistically significant relationship with swimming velocity for a given distance, as the sample showed deficiencies in the strength of those muscle groups responsible for generating propulsive force in the front crawl. Additionally, the collected data can serve as a diagnostic tool in evaluating the development of muscle groups critical for swimming performance.

  6. The determination of drag in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, H.M.; Roos, P.E.; Kolmogorov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of drag while swimming (i.e. active drag) is a controversial issue. Therefore, in a group of six elite swimmers two active drag measurement methods were compared to assess whether both measure the same retarding force during swimming. In method 1 push-off forces are measured directly

  7. Children's Activity Levels and Lesson Context during Summer Swim Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamberger, Benjamin; Wahl-Alexander, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Summer swim programs provide a unique opportunity to engage children in PA as well as an important lifesaving skill. Offering summer swim programs is critical, especially for minority populations who tend to have higher rates of drowning, specifically in youth populations. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesson context and…

  8. Assessing Water Quality: Staphylococci as Microbial Indicators in Swimming Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jo. Bechaida T.; Adera, Tilahun

    1991-01-01

    This study suggests that staphylococci may be the preferred microbial indicators of swimming pool water quality because these organisms met all criteria for best microbial indicators in terms of amount of recovery, resistance to disinfectants, and risk to bathers using water samples from nine swimming pools in Linn and Benton Counties, Oregon. (30…

  9. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demand. The study shows the need to reduce the impact of swimming pools. This could include: pool covers to reduce evaporation, the recycling of backwash water, the use of rainwater to top up swimming pools, water use surcharges and, finally, appropriate regulation and enforcement to prevent the use of municipal water ...

  10. Physiological responses to swimming fatigue of juvenile white-leg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swimming performance is one of the crucial factors determining the lifestyle and survival of Penaeid shrimps. This study examined under controlled laboratory conditions, the physiological responses to swimming fatigue of juvenile white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (8.85 ± 0.05 cm TL) exposed to different current ...

  11. A meta-analysis of steady undulatory swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weerden, J. Fransje; Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.

    The mechanics underlying undulatory swimming are of great general interest, both to biologists and to engineers. Over the years, more data of the kinematics of undulatory swimming have been reported. At present, an integrative analysis is needed to determine which general relations hold between

  12. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  13. How to improve hygienic behaviour in holiday park swimming pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, I.; Keuten, M.G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on contamination of swimming pool water showed that the hygienic behaviour of swimmers is the most important factor. The suggested hygienic behaviour is; having a pre-swim shower and using the toilet when nature calls. Knowing the importance of hygienic behaviour is one thing,

  14. Wild-type Zebrafish subjected to swim-training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiaz, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarray analysis of the effects of swim-training on zebrafish larval development. Zebrafish were subjected to swim-training from 5 days post fertilization (dpf) until 10 dpf. Subsequently, we performed a genome-wide microarray analysis of trained and control fish at 10 dpf. The goal

  15. Swimming efficiency in a shear-thinning fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganguia, Herve; Pietrzyk, Kyle; Pak, On Shun

    2017-12-01

    Micro-organisms expend energy moving through complex media. While propulsion speed is an important property of locomotion, efficiency is another factor that may determine the swimming gait adopted by a micro-organism in order to locomote in an energetically favorable manner. The efficiency of swimming in a Newtonian fluid is well characterized for different biological and artificial swimmers. However, these swimmers often encounter biological fluids displaying shear-thinning viscosities. Little is known about how this nonlinear rheology influences the efficiency of locomotion. Does the shear-thinning rheology render swimming more efficient or less? How does the swimming efficiency depend on the propulsion mechanism of a swimmer and rheological properties of the surrounding shear-thinning fluid? In this work, we address these fundamental questions on the efficiency of locomotion in a shear-thinning fluid by considering the squirmer model as a general locomotion model to represent different types of swimmers. Our analysis reveals how the choice of surface velocity distribution on a squirmer may reduce or enhance the swimming efficiency. We determine optimal shear rates at which the swimming efficiency can be substantially enhanced compared with the Newtonian case. The nontrivial variations of swimming efficiency prompt questions on how micro-organisms may tune their swimming gaits to exploit the shear-thinning rheology. The findings also provide insights into how artificial swimmers should be designed to move through complex media efficiently.

  16. EFFECT OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE RESULTS OF DOLPHIN SWIMMING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slađana Tošić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the impact of flexibility on the results in swimming, we conducted a study on a sample of 50 female patients aged 11-14 years of age who are in the training process in the swimming clubs „Nis 2005“ and „Sveti Nikola“ in Nis. The study is applied to 14 measuring instruments that were divided into three groups: Measuring instruments for the assessment of flexibility (11; Measuring instruments for assessing the results of swimming (1; Measuring instruments for evaluation of morphological characteristics (2. The regression analysis determined the impact of flexibility on the results in swimming. The regression analysis didn't confirmed the assumption that there is a statistically significant effect of flexibility variables on results in swimming for female swimmers

  17. EFFECTS OF THREE FEEDBACK CONDITIONS ON AEROBIC SWIM SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pérez Soriano

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (a to develop an underwater chronometer capable to provide feedback while the athlete is swimming, as well as being a control tool for the coach, and (b to analyse its feedback effect on swim pace control compared with feedback provided by the coach and with no feedback, in 25 m and 50 m swimming pools. 30 male swimmers of national level volunteer to participate. Each swimmer swam 3 x 200 m at aerobic speed (AS and 3 x 200 m just under the anaerobic threshold speed (AnS, each swam repetition with a different feedback condition: chronometer, coach and without feedback. Results (a validate the chronometer system developed and (b show that swimmers pace control is affected by the type of feedback provided, the swim speed elected and the size of the swimming pool

  18. Crabs mediate interactions between native and invasive salt marsh plants: a mesocosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Jia, Xin; Chen, Yang-Yun; Shao, Jun-Jiong; Wu, Xin-Ru; Shang, Lei; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Soil disturbance has been widely recognized as an important factor influencing the structure and dynamics of plant communities. Although soil reworkers were shown to increase habitat complexity and raise the risk of plant invasion, their role in regulating the interactions between native and invasive species remains unclear. We proposed that crab activities, via improving soil nitrogen availability, may indirectly affect the interactions between invasive Spartina alterniflora and native Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter in salt marsh ecosystems. We conducted a two-year mesocosm experiment consisting of five species combinations, i.e., monocultures of three species and pair-wise mixtures of invasive and native species, with crabs being either present or absent for each combination. We found that crabs could mitigate soil nitrogen depletion in the mesocosm over the two years. Plant performance of all species, at both the ramet-level (height and biomass per ramet) and plot-level (density, total above- and belowground biomass), were promoted by crab activities. These plants responded to crab disturbance primarily by clonal propagation, as plot-level performance was more sensitive to crabs than ramet-level. Moreover, crab activities altered the competition between Spartina and native plants in favor of the former, since Spartina was more promoted than native plants by crab activities. Our results suggested that crab activities may increase the competition ability of Spartina over native Phragmites and Scirpus through alleviating soil nitrogen limitation.

  19. Edible crabs "go west": migrations and incubation cycle of Cancer pagurus revealed by electronic tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan Hunter

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are key components of marine ecosystems which, like other exploited marine taxa, show seasonable patterns of distribution and activity, with consequences for their availability to capture by targeted fisheries. Despite concerns over the sustainability of crab fisheries worldwide, difficulties in observing crabs' behaviour over their annual cycles, and the timings and durations of reproduction, remain poorly understood. From the release of 128 mature female edible crabs tagged with electronic data storage tags (DSTs, we demonstrate predominantly westward migration in the English Channel. Eastern Channel crabs migrated further than western Channel crabs, while crabs released outside the Channel showed little or no migration. Individual migrations were punctuated by a 7-month hiatus, when crabs remained stationary, coincident with the main period of crab spawning and egg incubation. Incubation commenced earlier in the west, from late October onwards, and brooding locations, determined using tidal geolocation, occurred throughout the species range. With an overall return rate of 34%, our results demonstrate that previous reluctance to tag crabs with relatively high-cost DSTs for fear of loss following moulting is unfounded, and that DSTs can generate precise information with regards life-history metrics that would be unachievable using other conventional means.

  20. Diet selectivity of juvenile blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Rochelle D; Knick, Kathleen E; Westphal, Miranda

    2011-10-01

    Shallow coves in Chesapeake Bay have abundant food and serve as nursery grounds for juvenile blue crabs. In this study, we examined the relationships between the diet of very small (4-40 mm CW) juvenile blue crabs and the benthic infauna in shallow, unvegetated nursery coves. We compared infauna in benthic samples with gut contents of juvenile blue crabs from six shallow coves in each of two sub-estuaries (Rappahannock and York Rivers) in Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, USA. Benthic communities differed depending on river and location, with abundant clams in upriver regions and abundant polychaetes in downriver regions. Juvenile crabs, like adults, appeared to be opportunistic feeders, with gut contents including clams, amphipods, polychaetes, small crustaceans, plant matter, and detritus. There was a positive relationship between polychaetes in the benthic samples and in crab guts, suggesting that juvenile crabs are opportunistic feeders on polychaetes in the benthos. Moreover, Ivlev's electivity index and foraging ratio showed that clams and polychaetes were selectively eaten at all locations. Alternatively, crabs selectively rejected amphipods. Crab densities corresponded positively with polychaete densities, which suggests that there may be bottom-up control of crab distributions and that food resources are important in nursery habitats.

  1. Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensitivity of ventilation in amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, breathing air and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Andrew T; Henry, Raymond P

    2004-05-01

    Amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, were acclimated to breathing either air or water and exposed to altered levels of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide in the medium. Hypercapnia (22, 36 and 73 torr CO(2)) stimulated a significant hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) in both groups of crabs, with a much greater effect on scaphognathite frequency (Deltaf(SC)=+700%) in air-breathing crabs than water-breathing crabs (Deltaf(SC)=+100%). In contrast, hyperoxia induced significant hypoventilation in both sets of crabs. However, simultaneous hyperoxia and hypercapnia triggered a greater than 10-fold increase in f(SC) in air-breathing crabs but no change in water-breathing crabs. For water-breathing crabs hypoxia simultaneous with hypercapnia triggered the same response as hypoxia alone-bradycardia (-50%), and a significant increase in f(SC) at moderate exposures but not at the more extreme levels. The response of air-breathing crabs to hypoxia concurrent with hypercapnia was proportionally closer to the response to hypercapnia alone than to hypoxia. Thus, C. guanhumi were more sensitive to ambient CO(2) than O(2) when breathing air, characteristic of fully terrestrial species, and more sensitive to ambient O(2) when breathing water, characteristic of fully aquatic species. C. guanhumi possesses both an O(2)- and a CO(2)-based ventilatory drive whether breathing air or water, but the relative importance switches when the respiratory medium is altered.

  2. Crabs mediate interactions between native and invasive salt marsh plants: a mesocosm study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Zhang

    Full Text Available Soil disturbance has been widely recognized as an important factor influencing the structure and dynamics of plant communities. Although soil reworkers were shown to increase habitat complexity and raise the risk of plant invasion, their role in regulating the interactions between native and invasive species remains unclear. We proposed that crab activities, via improving soil nitrogen availability, may indirectly affect the interactions between invasive Spartina alterniflora and native Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter in salt marsh ecosystems. We conducted a two-year mesocosm experiment consisting of five species combinations, i.e., monocultures of three species and pair-wise mixtures of invasive and native species, with crabs being either present or absent for each combination. We found that crabs could mitigate soil nitrogen depletion in the mesocosm over the two years. Plant performance of all species, at both the ramet-level (height and biomass per ramet and plot-level (density, total above- and belowground biomass, were promoted by crab activities. These plants responded to crab disturbance primarily by clonal propagation, as plot-level performance was more sensitive to crabs than ramet-level. Moreover, crab activities altered the competition between Spartina and native plants in favor of the former, since Spartina was more promoted than native plants by crab activities. Our results suggested that crab activities may increase the competition ability of Spartina over native Phragmites and Scirpus through alleviating soil nitrogen limitation.

  3. Infestation of parasitic rhizocephalan barnacles Sacculina beauforti (Cirripedia, Rhizocephala in edible mud crab, Scylla olivacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khor Waiho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Screening of mud crab genus Scylla was conducted in four locations (Marudu Bay, Lundu, Taiping, Setiu representing Malaysia. Scylla olivacea with abnormal primary and secondary sexual characters were prevalent (approximately 42.27% of the local screened S. olivacea population in Marudu Bay, Sabah. A total of six different types of abnormalities were described. Crabs with type 1 and type 3 were immature males, type 2 and type 4 were mature males, type 5 were immature females and type 6 were mature females. The abdomen of all crabs with abnormalities were dented on both sides along the abdomen’s middle line. Abnormal crabs showed significant variation in their size, weight, abdomen width and/or gonopod or pleopod length compared to normal individuals. The mean body weight of abnormal crabs (type 1–5 were higher than normal crabs with smaller body size, while females with type 6 abnormality were always heavier than the normal counterparts at any given size. Sacculinid’s externa were observed in the abdomen of crabs with type 4 and type 6 abnormalities. The presence of embryos within the externa and subsequent molecular analysis of partial mitochondrial COI region confirmed the rhizocephalan parasite as Sacculina beauforti. Future in-depth descriptions of the life cycle and characteristics of S. beauforti are recommended as it involves a commercially important edible crab species and the effect on human health from the consumption of crabs is of crucial concern.

  4. Studies on the ecology and behaviour of the ghost crab, Ocypode cursor (L. in northern Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Strachan

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of the ecology and behaviour of Ocypode cursor were studied on the beaches of Northern Cyprus. The crabs were widely distributed around the north coast of the island, occurring on 68 of the 77 sandy beaches investigated. At the main study beach at Alagadi, crabs occupied a band approximately 12 m wide; starting approximately 3 m horizontally from the edge of the sea (tidal fluctuation was minimal. Most small burrows occurred near to the sea, with the burrows of larger crabs predominating higher up the beach. Burrow numbers varied during the summer which was mainly attributable to variations in the numbers of burrows of juveniles. The sex ratio of emergent crabs also varied during the summer, possibly reflecting burrow oriented behaviour of reproductive females. There were strong correlations between burrow diameters and carapace lengths of the occupant crabs. There was a positive correlation between the presence of crab burrows and the number of people using sections of beach. The crabs were principally nocturnal, benefitting from food discarded by tourists. They also scavenged animal carcasses and were active predators of turtle eggs and hatchlings. Crab burrows usually had a single opening oriented towards the sea and those cast were L- or J-shaped. Burrows did not penetrate to the water table. The water content of the sand at the bottom of burrows was around 14 % by weight. Their burrows in the well-sorted sand provided the crabs with a thermally stable environment.

  5. Edible crabs "go west": migrations and incubation cycle of Cancer pagurus revealed by electronic tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ewan; Eaton, Derek; Stewart, Christie; Lawler, Andrew; Smith, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Crustaceans are key components of marine ecosystems which, like other exploited marine taxa, show seasonable patterns of distribution and activity, with consequences for their availability to capture by targeted fisheries. Despite concerns over the sustainability of crab fisheries worldwide, difficulties in observing crabs' behaviour over their annual cycles, and the timings and durations of reproduction, remain poorly understood. From the release of 128 mature female edible crabs tagged with electronic data storage tags (DSTs), we demonstrate predominantly westward migration in the English Channel. Eastern Channel crabs migrated further than western Channel crabs, while crabs released outside the Channel showed little or no migration. Individual migrations were punctuated by a 7-month hiatus, when crabs remained stationary, coincident with the main period of crab spawning and egg incubation. Incubation commenced earlier in the west, from late October onwards, and brooding locations, determined using tidal geolocation, occurred throughout the species range. With an overall return rate of 34%, our results demonstrate that previous reluctance to tag crabs with relatively high-cost DSTs for fear of loss following moulting is unfounded, and that DSTs can generate precise information with regards life-history metrics that would be unachievable using other conventional means.

  6. A horseshoe crab receptor structurally related to Drosophila Toll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, K; Koori, K; Mishima, C; Muta, T; Kawabata, S

    2000-01-01

    Innate immunity against microbial pathogens relies on the pattern recognition of cell wall components on invading microbes. Recent evidence has shown that a mammalian Toll-like receptor (TLR) is activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The innate immunity in invertebrates is also triggered by LPS, as seen in the hemolymph coagulation in horseshoe crab. We report the cloning of a TLR from the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. A cDNA coding for Tachypleus Toll was isolated from a hemocyte cDNA library and the open reading frame codes for a proprotein including a signal sequence. Like Drosophila Toll, Tachypleus Toll is a type I transmembrane protein with an extracellular domain consisting of two leucine-rich repeats flanked by two cystein-rich clusters and a cytoplasmic domain exhibiting striking similarity with the cytoplasmic domain of interleukin-1 receptor. Tachypleus Toll is most similar to Drosophila Toll in the domain architecture and the overall length.

  7. Shell selection of hermit crabs is influenced by fluid drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Barbara; Ledesma, Rene; Alcaraz, Guillermina; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    The flow around gastropod shells used by hermit crabs (Calcinus californiensis) was visualized experimentally. These crabs choose their shells according to many factors; we found that the choice of shell (shape and weight) is directly related to the drag caused over them by the exposure to wave action. Tests were conducted in a wind tunnel to investigate flow differences for shells of various shapes. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to visualize the flow field. The images above show the flow field around two types of shells (Thais speciosa and Nerita scabircosta) for Reynolds numbers of O(10^5). Using a control volume analysis, the drag coefficient was inferred. Several shell geometries, orientations and mean flow velocities were tested. In this talk, the flow and drag force will be shown for the different arrangements. A discussion of the relation between drag and shape will be presented.

  8. M10.3.1: LHC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, E

    2010-01-01

    • The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. • The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues a...

  9. LHC crab cavity specifications milestone: M10.3.1

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Jensen, E; McIntosh, P; Shaposhnikova, E; Tuckmantel, J; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues arise fro...

  10. Combined inhalation of beta2 -agonists improves swim ergometer sprint performance but not high-intensity swim performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders; Hostrup, Morten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ), in permitted doses within the World Anti-Doping Agency 2013 prohibited list, in elite swimmers with (AHR, n = 13) or without (non-AHR, n = 17) AHR. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of m. quadriceps (MVC), sprint performance on a swim ergometer and performance in an exhaustive swim test at 110% of VO2max...

  11. First Test Results of the 4-ROD Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Burt, G; Calaga, R; Capatina, O; Calatroni, S; Ciapala, E; Doherty, D; Ferreira, L; Jensen, E; Hall, B; Lingwood, C; Maesen, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The first compact prototype crab cavity with the 4rod geometry has undergone surface treatment and cold testing. Due to the complex geometry and unique fabrication procedure, RF validation of the field at beyond the nominal operating voltage at a sufficiently high Q0 is an important pre-requisite. Preliminary results of the first cold tests are presented along with cavity performance at different stages of the cavity processing is described.

  12. Crab Hole Mosquito Blues—The Story

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-12

    This podcast reports on a humorous song that takes a look at a very serious human and equine disease. Written and performed by the MARU Health Angels Band, Bill Dietz, director of the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity at CDC, talks about the song, "Crab Hole Mosquito Blues", and the history behind it.  Created: 5/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/23/2011.

  13. A new hermit crab species of Pylopaguropsis (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from the western Pacific, and supplemental note on P. laevispinosa McLaughlin and Haig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Osawa, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    Pylopaguropsis vicina, a new species of the Paguridae, is described and illustrated from southern Japan and Indonesia. This new species is most similar to P. laevispinosa McLaughlin and Haig, but is distinguished by the armature of the chelae and ambulatory dactyli, spination of the telson, and stripe pattern of the pereopods. Reexamination of specimens referred to P. laevispinosa by recent authors has shown these assignments to be incorrect. A brief supplemental description is provided for P. laevispinosa in order to clarify its systematic status. An amended key to species of the genus Pylopaguropsis is presented.

  14. New taxonomic and distributional information on hermit crabs (Crustacea: Anomura: Paguroidea) from the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and Atlantic coast of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Rafael; Tavares, Marcos

    2015-08-04

    A collection of Paguroidea recently obtained during deep-water expeditions along the coast of Brazil, forms the basis of this report. Of the 14 species reported from Brazil, 11 represent range extensions to the south, and one, Michelopagurus atlanticus (Bouvier, 1922), is a first record for the western Atlantic. The specimens were compared with types and western Atlantic materials deposited in various major museums. A diagnosis and illustrations are presented for each of seven species found to be poorly or insufficiently known. New material and information is reported for two additional species that occur in Brazil but not found in the recent deep-water collections: Clibanarius symmetricus (Randall, 1840) and Mixtopagurus paradoxus A. Milne-Edwards, 1880. Remarkable and unique color photographs of live or fresh specimens of Allodardanus bredini Haig & Provenzano, 1965, Bathynarius anomalus (A. Milne-Edwards & Bouvier, 1893), Pylopagurus discoidalis (A. Milne-Edwards, 1880), Paguristes spinipes A. Milne-Edwards, 1880, Parapagurus pilosimanus Smith, 1876, and P. alaminos Lemaitre, 1986, are presented. A review of published records and museum collections of the terrestrial Coenobita clypeatus (Fabricius, 1787), has shown that the southern range limit of this species does not extend beyond the southern Caribbean and Trinidad and Tobago, and thus does not occur on the Brazilian coast as previously believed. A distribution map of C. clypeatus is provided based on specimens in the collections of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. New distribution records in the Gulf of Mexico and southern Caribbean, and morphological information, are included for Pagurus rotundimanus Wass, 1963, a species originally described from the Florida Keys but rarely reported since. Relevant remarks on the taxonomy, morphology, and distribution of all these species are included. The revised list of Paguroidea known from Brazil is updated, and now includes a total of 62 species in the families Pylochelidae (1), Diogenidae (27), Paguridae (28), and Parapaguridae (6). A synopsis of primary taxonomic works on western Atlantic Paguroidea is also presented.

  15. Enneophyllus ecarina, a new species of scaphopod shell dwelling hermit crab (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from deep-sea off the Ryukyu Islands, southern Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki

    2017-05-24

    A second species of the pagurid genus Enneophyllus McLaughlin, 1997, E. ecarina n. sp., is described and illustrated on the basis of two specimens collected from the upper bathyal depths off Amami-ohshima Island, Ryukyu Islands, southern Japan. The new species is immediately distinguished from the sole known congener, E. spinirostris McLaughlin, 1997, from the Banda Sea, Indonesia, by the non-operculiform right chela and fewer ventral spiniform setae of the ambulatory dactyli. The type species of Enneophillus, E. spinirostris, was represented only by the male holotype, and examination of the female paratype of this new species enables documentation of female characteristics in the generic diagnosis. Like E. spinirostris, the new species inhabits scaphopod shells.

  16. First record of the hermit crab genus Cestopagurus Bouvier, 1897 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from the South Pacific Ocean and description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Clark, Malcolm R

    2014-09-14

    A fifth species of the pagurid genus Cestopagurus Bouvier, 1897, is described and illustrated on the basis of a single male specimen collected at a depth of 499 m from Hinepuia submarine volcano in the Kermadec Arc, New Zealand. The new species, C. hinepuia, appears similar to C. puniceus Komai & Takeda, 2005 known from waters off Japan, but the different armature of chelipeds distinguishes the new species. It is the first representative of the genus recorded from the South Pacific Ocean. A key for identification of species of the genus is presented. 

  17. A new species of hermit crab of the genus Pagurus Fabricius, 1775 (Crustacea: Anomura: Paguridae) from the southern Caribbean off Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Daniel José Marcondes; Lemaitre, Rafael

    2016-09-06

    A male specimen of a new species of the heterogeneous genus Pagurus Fabricius, 1775, collected in 1968 off the Caribbean coast of Venezuela, was discovered among the vast crustacean collections of the Smithsonian Institution. This new species herein described and illustrated is named P. scopaopsis, and is characterized primarily by the presence of: a brush-like setation pattern on the dactyl of the left third pereopod, dense small tubercles on the dorsal surfaces of the dactyl and fixed finger of the right chela, and a raised longitudinal ridge armed with spines on the palm and fixed finger of the left chela.

  18. Significance of the sexual openings and supplementary structures on the phylogeny of brachyuran crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura), with new nomina for higher-ranked podotreme taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Danièle; Tavares, Marcos; Castro, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The patterns of complexity of the male and female sexual openings in Brachyura, which have been the source of uncertainties and conflicting opinions, are documented, together with a study of the morphologies of the coxal and sternal gonopores in both sexes, penises, spermathecae, and gonopods. The vulvae, male gonopores and penises are described among selected taxa of Eubrachyura, and their function and evolution examined in the context of a wide variety of mating behaviours. The location of female and male gonopores, the condition of the penis (coxal and sternal openings and modalities of protection), and related configurations of thoracic sternites 7 and 8, which are modified by the intercalation of a wide sternal part (thoracic sternites 7 and 8) during carcinisation, show evidence of deep homology. They represent taxonomic criteria at all ranks of the family-series and may be used to test lineages. Of particular significance are the consequences of the posterior expansion of the thoracic sternum, which influences the condition, shape, and sclerotisation of the penis, and its emergence from coxal (heterotreme) to coxo-sternal, which is actually still coxal (heterotreme), in contrast to a sternal emergence (thoracotreme). The heterotreme-thoracotreme distinction results from two different trajectories of the vas deferens and its ejaculatory duct via the P5 coxa (Heterotremata) or through the thoracic sternum (Thoracotremata). Dissections of males of several families have demonstrated that this major difference not only affects the external surface (perforation of the coxa or the sternum by the ejaculatory duct) but also the internal anatomy. There is no evidence for an ejaculatory duct passing through the articular membrane between the P5 coxa and the thoracic sternum in any Brachyura, even when the sternal male gonopore is very close to the P5 coxa. Trends towards the coxo-sternal condition are exemplified by multistate characters, varying from a shallow depression to a long groove along expanded sternites 7 and 8, and ultimately their complete, extended junction typifying the most derived coxo-sternal condition. The coxo-sternal condition is indicative of a long evolutionary history, as evidenced by the presence of multistate characters (e.g., Dorippidae, Goneplacoidea) or by a single, well-established condition (e.g., Chasmocarcinidae, Ethusidae, Panopeidae Eucratopsinae, Rhizopidae, Scalopidiidae). The penial area proves to be an essential diagnostic feature in Brachyura, with a value comparable to that of the gonopods. Penis protection is ubiquitous in Brachyura irrespective of length, and several modalities of protection prevail, which necessitate different modifications of associated structures. A long penis in a gutter developed from a partial invagination of sternite 8 induces the formation of a new "suture" at the same level as the preceding suture 6/7. Such a "supplementary suture 7/8" exists among unrelated heterotreme families (e.g., Ethusidae, Panopeidae Eucratopsinae, Pseudorhombilidae, Rhizopidae). A fully protected penis, concealed in a groove within a complete invagination of sternite 8 in the form of two contiguous plates, evolved independently (homoplasy) in Palicoidea and Chasmocarcinidae (Goneplacoidea), with sternite 8 present as a single plate in females. In condylar protection, described for the first time and occurring in several heterotreme families, the penis emerges from the extremity of the P5 coxo-sternal condyle or from its anterior border instead of from the coxa itself. A penis precisely lodged in a small excavation on sternite 8, which is lined by a row of stiff setae, is unique to Brachyura, and represents a new synapomorphy of the Homoloidea. Five modalities of penis protection are recognised in Podotremata, eight in Eubrachyura (six in Heterotremata and two in Thoracotremata). Special attention has been paid to Dorippoidea (Dorippidae and Ethusidae), which shows transformation series from coxal to coxo-sternal conditions. The coxo-sternal condition is not an int

  19. Differential escape from parasites by two competing introduced crabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, April M.; Keogh, Carolyn L.; Byers, James E.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Torchin, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Although introduced species often interact with one another in their novel communities, the role of parasites in these interactions remains less clear. We examined parasite richness and prevalence in 2 shorecrab species with different invasion histories and residency times in an introduced region where their distributions overlap broadly. On the northeastern coast of the USA, the Asian shorecrab Hemigrapsus sanguineus was discovered 20 yr ago, while the European green crab Carcinus maenas has been established for over 200 yr. We used literature and field surveys to evaluate parasitism in both crabs in their native and introduced ranges. We found only 1 parasite species infecting H. sanguineus on the US East Coast compared to 6 species in its native range, while C. maenas was host to 3 parasite species on the East Coast compared to 10 in its native range. The prevalence of parasite infection was also lower for both crabs in the introduced range compared to their native ranges; however, the difference was almost twice as much for H. sanguineus as for C. maenas. There are several explanations that could contribute to C. maenas' greater parasite diversity than that of H. sanguineus on the US East Coast, including differences in susceptibility, time since introduction, manner of introduction (vector), distance from native range, taxonomic isolation, and the potential for parasite identification bias. Our study underscores not just that non-native species lose parasites upon introduction, but that they may do so differentially, with ramifications for their direct interactions and with potential community-level influences.

  20. On the injection of relativistic particles into the Crab Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklovskij, I.S.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that a flux of relativistic electrons from the NP 0532 pulsar magnetosphere, responsible for its synchrotron emission, cannot provide the necessary energy pumping to the Crab Nebula. A conclusion is reached that such a pumping can be effectuated by a flow of relativistic electrons leaving the NP 0532 magnetosphere at small pitch angles and giving therefore no appreciable contribution to the synchrotron emission of the pulsar. An interpretation of the Crab Nebula synchrotron spectrum is given on the assumption of secular ''softening'' of the energy spectrum of the relativistic electrons injected into the Nebula. A possibility of explanation of the observed rapid variability of some features in the central part of the Nebula by ejection of free - neutron - rich dense gas clouds from the pulsar surface during ''starquakes'' is discussed. The clouds of rather dense (nsub(e) approximately 10 7 cm -3 ) plasma, thus formed at about 10 13 cm from pulsar, will be accelerated up to relativistic velocities by the pressure of the magneto-dipole radiation of NP 0532 and will deform the magnetic field in the inner part (R 17 cm) of the Crab Nebula, that is the cause of the variability observed. In this case, favourable conditions for the acceleration of the particles in the cloud up to relativistic energies are realized; that may be an additional source of injection

  1. Observation and Spectral Measurements of the Crab Nebula with Milagro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Allen, B. T.; Aune, T.; Benbow, W.; Berley, D.; Chen, C.; Christopher, G. E.; DeYoung, T.; Dingus, B. L.; Falcone, A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was detected with the Milagro experiment at a statistical significance of 17 standard deviations over the lifetime of the experiment. The experiment was sensitive to approximately 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma ray air showers by observing the particle footprint reaching the ground. The fraction of detectors recording signals from photons at the ground is a suitable proxy for the energy of the primary particle and has been used to measure the photon energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula between 1 and 100 TeV. The TeV emission is believed to be caused by inverse-Compton up-scattering scattering of ambient photons by an energetic electron population. The location of a Te V steepening or cutoff in the energy spectrum reveals important details about the underlying electron population. We describe the experiment and the technique for distinguishing gamma-ray events from the much more-abundant hadronic events. We describe the calculation of the significance of the excess from the Crab and how the energy spectrum is fit.

  2. Swimming and Persons with Mild Persistant Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Arandelovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of recreational swimming on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR in patients with mild persistent asthma. This study included 65 patients with mild persistent asthma, who were divided into two groups: experimental group A (n = 45 and control group B (n = 20. Patients from both groups were treated with low doses of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and short-acting β2 agonists salbutamol as needed. Our program for patients in group A was combined asthma education with swimming (twice a week on a 1-h basis for the following 6 months. At the end of the study, in Group A, we found a statistically significant increase of lung function parameters FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (3.55 vs. 3.65 (p < 0.01, FVC (forced vital capacity (4.27 vs. 4.37 (p < 0.05, PEF (peak expiratory flow (7.08 vs. 7.46 (p < 0.01, and statistically significant decrease of BHR (PD20 0.58 vs. 2.01 (p < 0.001. In Group B, there was a statistically significant improvement of FEV1 3.29 vs. 3.33 (p < 0.05 and although FVC, FEV1/FVC, and PEF were improved, it was not significant. When Groups A and B were compared at the end of the study, there was a statistically significant difference of FVC (4.01 vs. 4.37, FEV1 (3.33 vs. 3.55, PEF (6.79 vs.7.46, and variability (p <0.001, and statistically significantly decreased BHR in Group A (2.01 vs. 1.75 (p < 0.001. Engagement of patients with mild persistent asthma in recreational swimming in nonchlorinated pools, combined with regular medical treatment and education, leads to better improvement of their parameters of lung function and also to more significant decrease of their airway hyperresponsiveness compared to patients treated with traditional medicine

  3. Removal of garlic-like off-odours from crustacea by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, D.J.; Izzard, M.E.; Whitfield, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    The strong garlic-like off-odours associated with the male shovel-nosed lobster (Ibacus peronii) and the royal red prawn (Hymenopenaeus sibogae) have been attributed principally to the presence of the sulphur-containing compound bis-(methylthio)-methane. In the male shovel-nosed lobster the concentration of this compound increases very rapidly following death, and a small number of contaminated crustacea may cause an entire consignment to be condemned. A method for removing this noxious odour was developed which involved gamma-irradiation of the affected crustacea using a cobalt-60 source. Eight lobsters were subjected to gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 10 kGy an hour; one half of each was given a dose of 25 kGy and the other half a dose of 5 kGy. Results showed that a high dose completely removes the existing off-odour, and also prevents its further formation. With the lower dose the off-odour is not completely removed. A trial using fresh royal red prawns at doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy showed irradiation removed all traces of the off-odour, but in those irradiated at the higher dose a slight burnt flavour was noticeable

  4. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    New observations of the spectrum of the rapidly spinning neutron star (the `pulsar') in the Crab Nebula have been carried out with the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT) by a group of Italian astronomers [1]. Because of greatly improved spectral resolution which allows to register even very fine details in the pulsar's spectrum, they are able to determine for the first time with high accuracy the overall dependance of the emission on wavelength, i.e. the `shape' of the spectrum. Quite unexpectedly, they also detect a hitherto unknown 100 A (10 nm) broad `absorption dip', which can be securely attributed to the pulsar. These results open an exciting new window for the study of the extreme physical processes close to a pulsar. The Nature of Pulsars It is estimated that there may be as many as 100 million neutron stars in our Galaxy. A neutron star is the superdense remnant of the extremely violent supernova explosion that occurs at the end of the life of a comparatively massive star. In fact, all stars that are more than about 6 times heavier than the Sun are believed to end their lives as supernovae. During the explosion, the central core of the dying star collapses in a few milliseconds and the matter at the centre is compressed to a density comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. Due to the enormous inward pressure, the atomic particles are squeezed together into a kind of neutron jam. The outcome is the formation of a neutron star with a diameter of 10-15 kilometres, weighing as much as the Sun. In accordance with the physical law that implies that the rotation momentum of the exploding star must be conserved, newborn neutron stars will rotate very rapidly around their axis, in some cases as fast as 100 times per second. In the same way, the new neutron star is expected to possess a strong magnetic field. Of these myriads of neutron stars, about 700 have been observed to emit radio pulses (hence the name `pulsar'). A few of these can also be detected

  5. AFSC/RACE/SAP: Detailed Crab Data From NOAA Fisheries Service 2012 Chukchi Sea Bottom Trawl Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detailed crab data collected from the 2012 NOAA/NMFS/AFSC/RACE crab-groundfish bottom trawl survey of the Chukchi Sea. 71 survey stations were...

  6. Swimming Performance of Adult Asian Carp: Field Assessment Using a Mobile Swim Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    data are needed to manage invasive bigheaded or “ Asian ” carps (Figure 1). However, such data are limited within the scientific literature . The large...ERDC/TN ANSRP-16-1 August 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Swimming Performance of Adult Asian Carp: Field...these invasive species in North American waterways. Such data can be used to assess rates of movement (Konagaya and Cai 1987; 1989), the likelihood of

  7. To Swim or Not to Swim: Potential Transmission of Balaenophilus manatorum (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in Marine Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Francesc; Tomás, Jesús; Crespo-Picazo, José Luis; García-Párraga, Daniel; Raga, Juan Antonio; Aznar, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Species of Balaenophilus are the only harpacticoid copepods that exhibit a widespread, obligate association with vertebrates, i.e., B. unisetus with whales and B. manatorum with marine turtles and manatees. In the western Mediterranean, juveniles of the loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta are the only available hosts for B. manatorum, which has been found occurring at high prevalence (>80%) on them. A key question is how these epibionts are transmitted from host to host. We investigated this issue based on experiments with live specimens of B. manatorum that were cultured with turtle skin. Specimens were obtained from head-started hatchlings of C. caretta from the western Mediterranean. Hatched nauplii crawled only on rough substrates and lacked the ability to swim. Only copepodites IV and V, and adults, were able to perform directional swimming. Legs 2, 3 and 4 played a major role in swimming and were only well-developed in these stages. Nauplii reared in wells with turtle skin readily fed on this item. Late copepodites and adults also fed on turtle skin but did not consume other potential food items such as fish skin, baleen plates or planktonic algae. Evidences suggest that the transmission of B. manatorum should rely on hosts' bodily contacts and/or swimming of late developmental stages between spatially close hosts. The possibility of long-ranged dispersal is unlikely for two reasons. First, all developmental stages seem to depend on turtle skin as a food resource. Second, the average clutch size of ovigerous females was small (turtles that occur at very low densities (turtles·km-2) in the western Mediterranean. The high prevalence of B. manatorum in loggerhead turtles in this area raises the question whether these turtles have contacts, or tend to closely aggregate, more than is currently believed.

  8. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  9. Acanthocephala Parasite (Profilicollis spp.) Loads in Correlation to Pacific Mole Crab (Emerita analoga) Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T.; Huang, S.; Galathe, M.; Jenkins, M.; Ramirez, A.; Crosby, L.; Barrera, J.; FitzHoward, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2002, San Francisco Bay students have been conducting marine ecosystem monitoring through a joint project with the Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students (LiMPETS), in conjunction with the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Each year students collect population and demographic data on Pacific mole crabs (Emerita analoga), an indicator species that lives in the sandy beach habitat in temperate regions along the Pacific Ocean. Pacific mole crabs are filter feeding crustaceans that inhabit the intertidal swash zone and are known to be an intermediate host for parasitic ';spiny-headed' worms in the phylum Acanthocephala (Profilicollis spp.). Sampling takes place during their reproductive period, which occurs from spring to fall, and includes measuring total body length of the Pacific mole crabs and dissecting them to determine presence of Acanthocephalan parasites. We hypothesize that due to larger body mass, larger Pacific mole crabs will have a greater number of Acanthocephala parasites.We conducted several analyses using the LiMPETS long-term data. Specifically, we compared body length, crab gender, and parasite abundance from Pacific mole crabs sampled from four beaches located in the county and city of San Francisco. Our results indicated that larger Pacific mole crabs do not necessarily have more parasites, but are more likely to have at least one parasite, while female Pacific mole crabs carrying eggs, have more parasites than males or females without eggs. We also found that parasite loads per mole crab was highest in the spring. Further analysis will be conducted to determine factors affecting Pacific mole crab parasite loads. Studying Pacific mole crabs help evaluate the health of California's intertidal systems and how human activities, geologic changes, and climate changes all make huge impacts to the intertidal ecosystems.

  10. Mechanical Study of Standard Six Beat Front Crawl Swimming by Using Swimming Human Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Motomu

    There are many dynamical problems in front crawl swimming which have not been fully investigated by analytical approaches. Therefore, in this paper, standard six beat front crawl swimming is analyzed by the swimming human simulation model SWUM, which has been developed by the authors. First, the outline of the simulation model, the joint motion for one stroke cycle, and the specifications of calculation are described respectively. Next, contribution of each fluid force component and of each body part to the thrust, effect of the flutter kick, estimation of the active drag, roll motion, and the propulsive efficiency are discussed respectively. The following results were theoretically obtained: The thrust is produced at the upper limb by the normal drag force component. The flutter kick plays a role in raising the lower half of the body. The active drag coefficient in the simulation becomes 0.082. Buoyancy determines the primal wave of the roll motion fluctuation. The propulsive efficiency in the simulation becomes 0.2.

  11. Do all frogs swim alike? The effect of ecological specialization on swimming kinematics in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robovska-Havelkova, Pavla; Aerts, Peter; Rocek, Zbynek; Prikryl, Tomas; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Herrel, Anthony

    2014-10-15

    Frog locomotion has attracted wide scientific interest because of the unusual and derived morphology of the frog pelvic girdle and hind limb. Previous authors have suggested that the design of the frog locomotor system evolved towards a specialized jumping morphology early in the radiation of the group. However, data on locomotion in frogs are biased towards a few groups and most of the ecological and functional diversity remains unexplored. Here, we examine the kinematics of swimming in eight species of frog with different ecologies. We use cineradiography to quantify movements of skeletal elements from the entire appendicular skeleton. Our results show that species with different ecologies do differ in the kinematics of swimming, with the speed of limb extension and especially the kinematics of the midfoot being different. Our results moreover suggest that this is not a phylogenetic effect because species from different clades with similar ecologies converge on the same swimming kinematics. We conclude that it is important to analyze frog locomotion in a broader ecological and evolutionary context if one is to understand the evolutionary origins of this behavior. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Crabbing system for an electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As high energy and nuclear physicists continue to push further the boundaries of knowledge using colliders, there is an imperative need, not only to increase the colliding beams' energies, but also to improve the accuracy of the experiments, and to collect a large quantity of events with good statistical sensitivity. To achieve the latter, it is necessary to collect more data by increasing the rate at which these processes are being produced and detected in the machine. This rate of events depends directly on the machine's luminosity. The luminosity itself is proportional to the frequency at which the beams are being delivered, the number of particles in each beam, and inversely proportional to the cross-sectional size of the colliding beams. There are several approaches that can be considered to increase the events statistics in a collider other than increasing the luminosity, such as running the experiments for a longer time. However, this also elevates the operation expenses, while increasing the frequency at which the beams are delivered implies strong physical changes along the accelerator and the detectors. Therefore, it is preferred to increase the beam intensities and reduce the beams cross-sectional areas to achieve these higher luminosities. In the case where the goal is to push the limits, sometimes even beyond the machines design parameters, one must develop a detailed High Luminosity Scheme. Any high luminosity scheme on a modern collider considers|in one of their versions|the use of crab cavities to correct the geometrical reduction of the luminosity due to the beams crossing angle. In this dissertation, we present the design and testing of a proof-of-principle compact superconducting crab cavity, at 750 MHz, for the future electron-ion collider, currently under design at Jefferson Lab. In addition to the design and validation of the cavity prototype, we present the analysis of the first order beam dynamics and the integration of the

  13. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  14. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of [ 3 H]Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in [14C]iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress [an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures], although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results

  15. Transitions between three swimming gaits in Paramecium escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, Cathy; Combettes, Laurent; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-05-03

    Paramecium and other protists are able to swim at velocities reaching several times their body size per second by beating their cilia in an organized fashion. The cilia beat in an asymmetric stroke, which breaks the time reversal symmetry of small scale flows. Here we show that Paramecium uses three different swimming gaits to escape from an aggression, applied in the form of a focused laser heating. For a weak aggression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity. As the heating amplitude is increased, a higher acceleration and faster swimming are achieved through synchronized beating of the cilia, which begin by producing oscillating swimming velocities and later give way to the usual gait. Finally, escape from a life-threatening aggression is achieved by a "jumping" gait, which does not rely on the cilia but is achieved through the explosive release of a group of trichocysts in the direction of the hot spot. Measurements through high-speed video explain the role of trichocysts in defending against aggressions while showing unexpected transitions in the swimming of microorganisms. These measurements also demonstrate that Paramecium optimizes its escape pattern by taking advantage of its inertia.

  16. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Villanueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks.

  17. Optimal shape and motion of undulatory swimming organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokić, Grgur; Yue, Dick K P

    2012-08-07

    Undulatory swimming animals exhibit diverse ranges of body shapes and motion patterns and are often considered as having superior locomotory performance. The extent to which morphological traits of swimming animals have evolved owing to primarily locomotion considerations is, however, not clear. To shed some light on that question, we present here the optimal shape and motion of undulatory swimming organisms obtained by optimizing locomotive performance measures within the framework of a combined hydrodynamical, structural and novel muscular model. We develop a muscular model for periodic muscle contraction which provides relevant kinematic and energetic quantities required to describe swimming. Using an evolutionary algorithm, we performed a multi-objective optimization for achieving maximum sustained swimming speed U and minimum cost of transport (COT)--two conflicting locomotive performance measures that have been conjectured as likely to increase fitness for survival. Starting from an initial population of random characteristics, our results show that, for a range of size scales, fish-like body shapes and motion indeed emerge when U and COT are optimized. Inherent boundary-layer-dependent allometric scaling between body mass and kinematic and energetic quantities of the optimal populations is observed. The trade-off between U and COT affects the geometry, kinematics and energetics of swimming organisms. Our results are corroborated by empirical data from swimming animals over nine orders of magnitude in size, supporting the notion that optimizing U and COT could be the driving force of evolution in many species.

  18. Physiological and biomechanical in different swimming intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Iberes Lopes de Melo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the physiological and biomechanical responses of swimmers at different swimming intensities. The intentionally selected sample was composed by seven athletes with swimming times for qualifying on the Brazilian Swimming Championship. A series of 8x200 free style swimming at speeds of 80%, 85%, 90%, 95% and 100% of individual maximum effort was used as the task. A film camera of 60 Hz and an Accusport mMol lactimeter were used for data collection. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA with “post-hoc” Tukey test and Spearman’s correlation were used for statistical analyses to identify the differences between athletes for the variables blood lactate, crawl stroke frequency (FB and dimension (BR at different intensities. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Based on the results, there were significant differences on swimming technique among effort intensities, for both the physiological and mechanical responses, especially at levels above 95% individual maximum effort. The high correlation between blood lactate and crawl stroke frequency and length, and between crawl stroke frequency and length, with the last two correlations being negative, indicated that the proposed series was adequate to analyze physiological and biomechanical response. It was concluded that as the intensity increases, there is a need for mechanical adjustments to enable the athletes to endure different speeds. It was also possible to establish the ideal swimming speed for each energetic zone, providing data for coaches and athletes to train both speed and technique within the specific energetic zones. RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar as respostas fisiológicas e biomecânicas de nadadores em diferentes intensidades de nado. A amostra, intencionalmente escolhida, foi composta por sete atletas que possuíam índices de participação em campeonato brasileiro absoluto. Foi utilizada como tarefa de

  19. Declines in swimming performance with age: a longitudinal study of Masters swimming champions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin RT

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert T Rubin,1,2 Sonia Lin,3 Amy Curtis,4 Daniel Auerbach,5 Charlene Win6 1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2UCLA Bruin Masters Swim Club, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA; 4Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA, USA Introduction: Because of its many participants and thorough records, competitive Masters swimming offers a rich data source for determining the rate of physical decline associated with aging in physically fit individuals. The decline in performance among national champion swimmers, both men and women and in short and long swims, is linear, at about 0.6% per year up to age 70–75, after which it accelerates in quadratic fashion. These conclusions are based primarily on cross-sectional studies, and little is known about individual performance declines with aging. Herein we present performance profiles of 19 male and 26 female national and international champion Masters swimmers, ages 25 to 96 years, participating in competitions for an average of 23 years. Methods and results: Swimmers’ longitudinal data were compared with the fastest times of world record holders across ages 35–100 years by two regression methods. Neither method proved to accurately model this data set: compared with the rates of decline estimated from the world record data, which represent the best recorded times at given ages, there was bias toward shallower rates of performance decline in the longitudinal data, likely owing to a practice effect in some swimmers as they began their Masters programs. In swimmers’ later years, once maximum performance had been achieved, individual profiles followed the decline represented in the world records, and a few swimmers became the world record holders. In some instances

  20. Pilot study on infant swimming classes and early motor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jorge A B de S; Manoel, Edison de J; Dias, Roberta B de M; Okazaki, Victor H A

    2013-12-01

    Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) scores were examined before and after four months of swimming classes in 12 babies (ages 7 to 9 mo.) assigned to Experimental (n = 6) and Control (n = 6) groups matched on age and developmental status. Infants from both groups improved their developmental status from pre- to post-test; the Experimental group improved on mean percentile rank. The sample size and the discriminative power of the AIMS do not allow conclusive judgments on these group differences, hence on the effect of infant swimming classes. Nevertheless, a number of recommendations are made for future studies on the effect of swimming classes on infant motor development.