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Sample records for swedish national screening

  1. Ambassadors of the Swedish Nation: National Images in the Teaching of the Swedish Lecturers in Germany 1918-1945

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerlund, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the teaching of Swedish language lecturers active in Germany during the first half of the twentieth century. It shows the centrality of literature and literary constructions and analyses images of Swedishness and the Swedish nation present in the teaching material of that time in relation to the national image present in…

  2. Stage and survival in breast cancer patients in screened and non-screened Danish and Swedish populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anni R; Garne, Jens P; Storm, Hans H

    2003-01-01

    approach those of the Swedish registry. Complete population-based cohorts of patients with breast cancer in the years 1996-1997 from well-defined areas in Denmark and Sweden were compared. The study regions were a Danish (Funen) and a Swedish (Malmö) county with mammography screening and two Danish...... of populations provided with a screening programme. Five-year survival was 5-6%, higher in screening populations than in Danish non-screening counties. Corresponding disease-specific survival enhanced the difference. In a multivariate analysis increasing age, tumour size and stage decreased survival. Adjusting......Comparisons between the Danish and Swedish Cancer Registry revealed a 9% difference in 5-year survival for breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1983 and 1989. The purpose of this study was to determine whether previous differences in survival and stage still exist or whether the Danish figures...

  3. The Swedish national public health policy report 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linell, Anita; Richardson, Matt X; Wamala, Sarah

    2013-02-01

    In 2003, the Swedish Parliament adopted a cross-sectorial national public health policy based on the social determinants of health, with an overarching aim--to create societal conditions that will ensure good health, on equal terms, for the entire population--and eleven objective domains. At that time the policy was globally unique, and serves as guidance for public health practice at the national, regional and local levels. The development of the public health policy and the determinants of health are presented regularly in various reports by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health. This supplement is a condensed version of the 174-page Public Health Policy Report 2010, the second produced since the national policy was adopted in 2003. In order to provide a holistic approach to analysing implemented measures and providing new recommendations within the eleven objective domains of the Swedish national public health policy, we have divided these in three strategic areas. These are: Good Living Conditions, Health-Promoting Living Environments and Living Habits, and Alcohol, Illicit Drugs, Doping, Tobacco and Gambling, each described in the respective introductions for Chapters 3-5. The production of the report was supported by a common analytical model that clarified the societal prerequisites for health in the eleven objective domains. These are factors that can be influenced by political actions in order to create a change. Economic analyses have also been developed to provide a priority basis for political decisions. Analyses of the development of public health determinants were based on data from the National Public Health Survey and data delivered from about 15 various national agencies. Measures that have been implemented between 2004 and 2009 are analysed in details, as the basis for new recommendations for future measures. The introduction describes Swedish public health policy in the new millennium and how it has developed, the role of the Swedish

  4. Chemistry inside an Epistemological Community Box! Discursive Exclusions and Inclusions in Swedish National Tests in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Marie; Hussénius, Anita

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the Swedish national tests in chemistry for implicit and explicit values. The chemistry subject is understudied compared to biology and physics and students view chemistry as their least interesting science subject. The Swedish national science assessments aim to support equitable and fair evaluation of students, to concretize…

  5. The Swedish RES national action plan from a forest perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerheden, R. (Uppsala Science Park (Sweden), The Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden), e-mail: rolf.bjorheden@skogforsk.se

    2010-07-01

    The goal set up for Sweden by the EU RES Directive stipulates that Sweden should reach a 49 per cent proportion of renewable energy by 2020. Although this is the highest proportion of energy from RES for any member state in the EU, Sweden has unilaterally decided on a national goal of 50 per cent. Thus, Sweden feels confident that it will be able to comply with the goals. In the current RES mix, forest biomass already plays an important role and there is potential for a substantial increase of forest fuel recovery. But there are a number of outstanding question marks considering follow-up procedures, what fuels that are considered as renewable etc. It is important that the interpretation of current EU regulations is clarified and that they coincide with the current Swedish standpoint. If Nordic forestry is not judged to yield renewable fuel, the EU goals will be much harder to meet. (orig.)

  6. Non-attendance of mammographic screening: the roles of age and municipality in a population-based Swedish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, Maria Norfjord; Larm, Peter; Tillgren, Per; Akhavan, Sharareh

    2015-12-30

    Inequality in health and health care is increasing in Sweden. Contributing to widening gaps are various factors that can be assessed by determinants, such as age, educational level, occupation, living area and country of birth. A health care service that can be used as an indicator of health inequality in Sweden is mammographic screening. The non-attendance rate is between 13 and 31 %, while the average is about 20 %. This study aims to shed light on three associations: between municipality and non-attendance, between age and non-attendance, and the interaction of municipality of residence and age in relation to non-attendance. The study is based on data from the register that identifies attenders and non-attenders of mammographic screening in a Swedish county, namely the Radiological Information System (RIS). Further, in order to provide a socio-demographic profile of the county's municipalities, aggregated data for women in the age range 40-74 in 2012 were retrieved from Statistics Sweden (SCB), the Public Health Agency of Sweden, the National Board of Health and Welfare, and the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. The sample consisted of 52,541 women. Analysis conducted of the individual data were multivariate logistic regressions, and pairwise chi-square tests. The results show that age and municipality of residence associated with non-attendance of mammographic screening. Municipality of residence has a greater impact on non-attendance among women in the age group 70 to 74. For most of the age categories there were differences between the municipalities in regard to non-attendance to mammographic screening. Age and municipality of residence affect attendance of mammographic screening. Since there is one sole and pre-selected mammographic screening facility in the county, distance to the screening facility may serve as one explanation to non-attendance which is a determinant of inequity. From an equity perspective, lack of equal access to health and health care

  7. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-11-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress spontaneously but the study was possibly confounded by use of hormone replacement therapy in the population. We did a similar analysis of data collected during an earlier period when few women were exposed to hormone replacement therapy. We compared cumulative breast cancer incidence in age-matched cohorts of women living in seven Swedish counties before and after the initiation of public mammography screening between 1986 and 1990. Women aged 40-49 years were invited to screening every year and women aged 50-74 years were invited every 2 years. A screened group including all women aged 40-69 years (n=328,927) was followed-up for 6 years after the first invitation to the programme. A control group including all women in the same age range (n=317,404) was also followed-up for 6 years--4 years without screening and 2 years when they entered the screening programme. Screening attendance was much the same in both groups (close to 80%). Counts of incident invasive breast cancers were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry (in-situ cancers were excluded). Before the age-matched controls were invited to be screened at the end of their follow-up period, the 4-year cumulative incidence of invasive breast cancer was significantly higher in the screened group (982 per 100,000) than it was in the control group (658 per 100,000) (relative risk [RR] 1·49, 95% CI 1·41-1·58). Even after prevalence screening in the control group, the screened group had higher 6-year cumulative incidence of invasive breast cancer (1443 per 100,000 vs 1269 per 100,000; RR 1·14, 1·10-1·18). Because the cumulative incidence among controls did not reach that of the screened group, we believe that many

  8. Impact of the Swedish National Stroke Campaign on stroke awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanstig, A; Asplund, K; Norrving, B; Wahlgren, N; Wester, P; Rosengren, L

    2017-10-01

    Time delay from stroke onset to arrival in hospital is an important obstacle to widespread reperfusion therapy. To increase knowledge about stroke, and potentially decrease this delay, a 27-month national public information campaign was carried out in Sweden. To assess the effects of a national stroke campaign in Sweden. The variables used to measure campaign effects were knowledge of the AKUT test [a Swedish equivalent of the FAST (Face-Arm-Speech-Time)] test and intent to call 112 (emergency telephone number) . Telephone interviews were carried out with 1500 randomly selected people in Sweden at eight points in time: before, three times during, immediately after, and nine, 13 and 21 months after the campaign. Before the campaign, 4% could recall the meaning of some or all keywords in the AKUT test, compared with 23% during and directly after the campaign, and 14% 21 months later. Corresponding figures were 15%, 51%, and 50% for those remembering the term AKUT and 65%, 76%, and 73% for intent to call 112 when observing or experiencing stroke symptoms. During the course of the campaign, improvement of stroke knowledge was similar among men and women, but the absolute level of knowledge for both items was higher for women at all time points. The nationwide campaign substantially increased knowledge about the AKUT test and intention to call 112 when experiencing or observing stroke symptoms, but knowledge declined post-intervention. Repeated public information therefore appears essential to sustain knowledge gains. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Evaluation issues in the Swedish Two-County Trial of breast cancer screening: An historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabar, Laszlo; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Wu, Wendy Yi-Ying; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Beckmann, Kerri; Smith, Robert A; Duffy, Stephen W

    2017-03-01

    Objectives To summarize debate and research in the Swedish Two-County Trial of mammographic screening on key issues of trial design, endpoint evaluation, and overdiagnosis, and from these to infer promising directions for the future. Methods A cluster-randomized controlled trial of the offer of breast cancer screening in Sweden, with a single screen of the control group at the end of the screening phase forms the setting for a historical review of investigations and debate on issues of design, analysis, and interpretation of results of the trial. Results There has been considerable commentary on the closure screen of the control group, ascertainment of cause of death, and cluster randomization. The issues raised were researched in detail and the main questions answered in publications between 1989 and 2003. Overdiagnosis issues still remain, but methods of estimation taking full account of lead time and of non-screening influences on incidence (taking place mainly before 2005) suggest that it is a minor phenomenon. Conclusion Despite resolution of issues relating to this trial in peer-reviewed publications dating from years, or even decades ago, issues that already have been addressed continue to be raised. We suggest that it would be more profitable to concentrate efforts on current research issues in breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  10. Cytokine autoantibody screening in the Swedish Addison Register identifies patients with undiagnosed APS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Dalin, Frida; Eriksson, Gabriel Nordling; Landegren, Nils; Bianchi, Matteo; Hallgren, Åsa; Dahlqvist, Per; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Ekwall, Olov; Winqvist, Ola; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Rönnelid, Johan; Hulting, Anna-Lena; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Husebye, Eystein S; Knappskog, Per Morten; Pielberg, Gerli Rosengren; Bensing, Sophie; Kämpe, Olle

    2017-10-20

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a monogenic disorder that features autoimmune Addison's disease as a major component. Although APS1 accounts for only a small fraction of all Addison's disease cases, it is vital with an early identification of these individuals in order to prevent potentially lethal complications of APS1. To determine whether available serological and genetic markers are valuable screening tools for the identification of APS1 among patients diagnosed with Addison's disease. We systematically screened 677 Addison patients enrolled in the Swedish Addison Register for autoantibodies against interleukin-22 and interferon-α4. Autoantibody positive patients were investigated for clinical manifestations of APS1, additional APS1-specific autoantibodies, and DNA sequence and copy number variation of AIRE. In total, 17 (2.5%) patients displayed autoantibodies against interleukin-22 and/or interferon-α4, of which 9 were known APS1-cases. Four patients, previously undiagnosed with APS1, fulfilled clinical, genetic and serological criteria. Hence, we identified four undiagnosed APS1 patients with this screening procedure. We propose that patients with Addison's disease should be routinely screened for cytokine autoantibodies. Clinical or serological support for APS1 should warrant DNA sequencing and copy number analysis of AIRE to enable early diagnosis and prevention of lethal complications.

  11. Validity of ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis diagnoses in the Swedish National Patient Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, U; Exarchou, S; Sigurdardottir, V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Epidemiological studies of spondyloarthritis (SpA), using ICD codes from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR), offer unique possibilities but hinge upon an understanding of the validity of the codes. The aim of this study was to validate the ICD codes for ankylosing spondylitis...

  12. The Swedish National Defence Research Establishment and the plans for Swedish nuclear weapons; Foersvarets forskningsanstalt och planerna paa svenska kaernvapen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonter, Thomas [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History

    2001-03-01

    This study analyses the Swedish nuclear weapons research since 1945 carried out by the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). The most important aspect of this research was dealing with protection in broad terms against nuclear weapons attacks. However, another aspect was also important from early on - to conduct research aiming at a possible production of nuclear weapons. FOA performed an extended research up to 1968, when the Swedish Government signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which meant the end of these production plans. Up to this date, five main investigations about the technical conditions were made, 1948, 1953, 1955, 1957 and 1965, which all together expanded the Swedish know-how to produce a bomb. The Swedish plans to procure nuclear weapons were not an issue in the debate until the mid 50's. The reason for this was simple, prior to 1954 the plans were secretly held within a small group of involved politicians, military and researchers. The change of this procedure did take place when the Swedish Supreme Commander in a public defence report in 1954 favoured a Swedish Nuclear weapons option. In 1958 FOA had reached a technical level that allowed the Parliament to make a decision. Two programs were proposed - the L-programme (the Loading Programme), to be used if the parliament would say yes to a production of nuclear weapons, and the S-programme (the Protection Programme), if the Parliament would say no. The debate on the issue had now created problems for the Social Democratic Government. The Prime Minister, Tage Erlander, who had earlier defended a procurement of nuclear weapons, was now forced to reach a compromise. The compromise was presented to the parliament in a creative manner that meant that only the S-programme would be allowed. The Government argued that the technical level did allow a 'freedom of action' up to at least the beginning of the 60's when Sweden was mature to make a decision on the issue

  13. Institutional profile: the national Swedish academic drug discovery & development platform at SciLifeLab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Per I; Sandberg, Kristian; Sakariassen, Kjell S

    2017-06-01

    The Science for Life Laboratory Drug Discovery and Development Platform (SciLifeLab DDD) was established in Stockholm and Uppsala, Sweden, in 2014. It is one of ten platforms of the Swedish national SciLifeLab which support projects run by Swedish academic researchers with large-scale technologies for molecular biosciences with a focus on health and environment. SciLifeLab was created by the coordinated effort of four universities in Stockholm and Uppsala: Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Uppsala University, and has recently expanded to other Swedish university locations. The primary goal of the SciLifeLab DDD is to support selected academic discovery and development research projects with tools and resources to discover novel lead therapeutics, either molecules or human antibodies. Intellectual property developed with the help of SciLifeLab DDD is wholly owned by the academic research group. The bulk of SciLifeLab DDD's research and service activities are funded from the Swedish state, with only consumables paid by the academic research group through individual grants.

  14. Mathematical Reasoning Requirements in Swedish National Physics Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Helena

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of mathematical competence, namely mathematical reasoning, and how this competency influences students' knowing of physics. This influence was studied by analysing the mathematical reasoning requirements upper secondary students meet when solving tasks in national physics tests. National tests are constructed to…

  15. The carotenoid content in certain plants from Abisko National Park (Swedish Lapland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Czeczuga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of columnar and thin-layer chromatography, the presence of carotenoids in Lichens (2 species, Sphagnaceae (l species, Lycopodiaceae (l species and in 23 species of the higher plants from Abisko National Park (Swedish Lapland was studied. 34 carotenoids were identified and total content ranged from 0.05 mg/g to 0.85 mg/g dry mass.

  16. Mutation screening of patients with Alzheimer disease identifies APP locus duplication in a Swedish patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Missense mutations in three different genes encoding amyloid-β precursor protein, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are recognized to cause familial early-onset Alzheimer disease. Also duplications of the amyloid precursor protein gene have been shown to cause the disease. At the Dept. of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, patients are referred for mutation screening for the identification of nucleotide variations and for determining copy-number of the APP locus. Methods We combined the method of microsatellite marker genotyping with a quantitative real-time PCR analysis to detect duplications in patients with Alzheimer disease. Results In 22 DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer disease, we identified one patient carrying a duplication on chromosome 21 which included the APP locus. Further mapping of the chromosomal region by array-comparative genome hybridization showed that the duplication spanned a maximal region of 1.09 Mb. Conclusions This is the first report of an APP duplication in a Swedish Alzheimer patient and describes the use of quantitative real-time PCR as a tool for determining copy-number of the APP locus. PMID:22044463

  17. Initial Screening of Contaminated Land: A Comparison of US and Swedish Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergius, Kristine; Öberg, Tomas

    2007-02-01

    Preliminary surveys are used to prioritize between contaminated sites to select those to be investigated more thoroughly. The data-gathering steps are almost identical between countries; however, the assessment procedures differ significantly. In this study, we have investigated 21 contaminated sites assessed as belonging to the high-risk or the very high-risk class using the Swedish Methods for Inventories of Contaminated Sites (MICS). We then applied the US Preliminary Assessment (PA) method to the same sites and compared the results and conclusions from the two screening procedures. In both cases, all sites were recommended for further investigation and the two approaches seem to corroborate one another; however, the PA assessment scores and the preliminary MICS classifications did not correlate. The results obtained with the PA method were easier to explain than the final MICS classification. The PA method also seems more transparent and easier to standardize, although objections could be made regarding the weighting scheme, because the outcome in this study was entirely dependent on the surface exposure pathway. However, to examine this in greater detail, it is necessary to include sites with less contamination: The importance of preliminary surveys in the overall risk management process gives a strong motivation for such an evaluation. Generally, the lack of research and scientific support for the various assessment procedures in use suggests that there is a need for method development, standardization, and validation.

  18. The National Early Warning Score: Translation, testing and prediction in a Swedish setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spångfors, Martin; Arvidsson, Lisa; Karlsson, Victoria; Samuelson, Karin

    2016-12-01

    The National Early Warning Score - NEWS is a "track and trigger" scale designed to assess in-hospital patients' vital signs and detect clinical deterioration. In this study the NEWS was translated into Swedish and its association with the need of intensive care was investigated. A total of 868 patient charts, recorded by the medical emergency team at a university hospital, containing the parameters needed to calculate the NEWS were audited. The NEWS was translated into Swedish and tested for inter-rater reliability with a perfect agreement (weighted κ=1.0) among the raters. The median score for patients admitted to the ICU were higher than for those who were not (10 vs. 8, pscores for the parameters oxygen saturation and level of consciousness in the NEWS may predict admission to the ICU. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Screening of environmental pressure from products in the Swedish railway infrastructure: Implications for strategic environmental management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats [Environmental Technology and Management, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    This paper proposes a method to be used in environmental reviews as an initial tool for estimating upstream environmental pressures from material use in organisations dealing mostly with construction materials. Upstream environmental pressures are often omitted in environmental reviews from organisations and instead tend to be site specific, with a limited life-cycle perspective. This paper uses the Swedish National Rail Authority as a case to present the approach. An energy indicator is used to estimate the environmental pressure of material use. In the studied building project, a small set of products contribute to a major part of the material use and the material-related energy use. The energy use is almost exclusively of nonrenewable energy carriers. The three most important products are all homogenous and non-complex, which makes the energy indicator well suited for the analysis. The organisation can use the results to focus on the most important products and also to see which parts of the organisation contribute to the material-related energy use. Rail traffic in Sweden is almost exclusively from non-fossil-based energy carriers. This highlights the importance of the infrastructure to the overall environmental pressure of the railway. Consequently, if road transport were to shift away from fossil fuels, railways earlier environmental advantages would diminish, since research suggests that railway infrastructure is more energy intensive than road infrastructure. (author)

  20. Exhibitionistic and voyeuristic behavior in a Swedish national population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Långström, Niklas; Seto, Michael C

    2006-08-01

    We examined the prevalence and correlates of self-reported sexual arousal from exposing one's genitals to a stranger (exhibitionistic behavior) and spying on others having sex (voyeuristic behavior) in a representative national sample. In 1996, 2,450 randomly selected 18-60 year-olds from the general population of Sweden were interviewed in a broad survey of sexuality and health. A total of 76 (3.1%) respondents reported at least one incident of being sexually aroused by exposing their genitals to a stranger and 191 (7.7%) respondents reported at least one incident of being sexually aroused by spying on others having sex. Exhibitionistic and voyeuristic behaviors were examined for possible associations with 9 sociodemographic, 5 health, 4 risk-taking, and 17 sexuality variables. Both paraphilia-like behaviors were positively associated with being male and having more psychological problems, lower satisfaction with life, greater alcohol and drug use, and greater sexual interest and activity in general, including more sexual partners, greater sexual arousability, higher frequency of masturbation, higher frequency of pornography use, and greater likelihood of having had a same-sex sexual partner. Consistent with previous research in clinical samples of men with paraphilias, respondents who reported either exhibitionistic or voyeuristic behavior had substantially greater odds of reporting other atypical sexual behavior (sadomasochistic or cross-dressing behavior). There was evidence both for general and specific associations between sexual fantasies and their corresponding paraphilia-like behaviors. The implications of these findings for research on atypical sexual interests, atypical sexual behavior, and paraphilias are discussed.

  1. Does patient education facilitate diabetic patients' possibilities to reach national treatment targets? A national survey in Swedish primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolfsson, Eva Thors; Smide, Bibbi; Rosenblad, Andreas; Wikblad, Karin

    2009-01-01

    To describe how patient education is arranged in Swedish primary healthcare (PHC) and to assess whether the type of patient education and individual goal setting have an impact on diabetic patients' possibilities of reaching national treatment targets. A Swedish national survey. Swedish PHC. Data from 485 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) and 91,637 diabetic patients reported by the PHCCs to the National Diabetes Register in 2006. Description of how patient education is arranged, HbA(1c), body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, and physical activity. Of the PHCCs that reported how they performed the individual counselling, 50% reported checklist-driven counselling and 8% individualized counselling based on patients' needs. A total of 105 PHCCs reported that they arranged group education. Of these, 67% used pre-planned programmes and 9% individualized the programme to the patients' needs. The majority of PHCCs (96%) reported that they set individual goals (HbA(1c), blood pressure, lipids, and lifestyle). A minority of the PHCCs (27%) reported that the patients were involved in the final decision concerning their goals. Individual goal-setting facilitated patients' possibilities of reaching treatment targets. Goal-setting, list size of PHCCs, and personnel resources explained a variance of 2.1-5.7%. Neither individual counselling (checklist-driven or individualized to patients' needs) nor group education had an impact on patients' possibilities of reaching the targets. The current study indicates that improvement is needed in patient education in PHC to facilitate diabetic patients' possibilities of reaching national treatment targets.

  2. Chemistry inside an epistemological community box! Discursive exclusions and inclusions in Swedish National tests in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Marie; Hussénius, Anita

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the Swedish national tests in chemistry for implicit and explicit values. The chemistry subject is understudied compared to biology and physics and students view chemistry as their least interesting science subject. The Swedish national science assessments aim to support equitable and fair evaluation of students, to concretize the goals in the chemistry syllabus and to increase student achievement. Discourse and multimodal analyses, based on feminist and critical didactic theories, were used to examine the test's norms and values. The results revealed that the chemistry discourse presented in the tests showed a traditional view of science from the topics discussed (for example, oil and metal), in the way women, men and youth are portrayed, and how their science interests are highlighted or neglected. An elitist view of science emerges from the test, with distinct gender and age biases. Students could interpret these biases as a message that only "the right type" of person may come into the chemistry epistemological community, that is, into this special sociocultural group that harbours a common view about this knowledge. This perspective may have an impact on students' achievement and thereby prevent support for an equitable and fair evaluation. Understanding the underlying evaluative meanings that come with science teaching is a question of democracy since it may affect students' feelings of inclusion or exclusion. The norms and values harboured in the tests will also affect teaching since the teachers are given examples of how the goals in the syllabus can be concretized.

  3. [National and regional prioritisation in Swedish health care: experiences from cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Prioritisation of medical services in Sweden takes place on two different levels. On the national level, the Swedish priority guidelines ascribe priority values ranging from 1 (high priority) to 10 (low priority) to measures (in terms of condition-treatment pairs) of prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, this list contains interventions that should be avoided and those that should only be provided as part of clinical research projects. The government then commissions a multi-professional team under the supervision of the National Board of Health and Welfare "Socialstyelsen" with the development of corresponding guidelines. In addition to the scientific evidence, the priority lists incorporate ethical and economical aspects and are based on the so-called ethics platform consisting of human dignity, needs, solidarity and cost-effectiveness. At the other level of prioritisation there are regional projects aiming at the in- and exclusion of medical measures. The Swedish prioritisation process will be described using the example of priority lists in cardiology. (As supplied by publisher). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. The association between cannabis abuse and subsequent schizophrenia: a Swedish national co-relative control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, G N; Ohlsson, H; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J; Kendler, K S

    2015-01-01

    Although cannabis abuse (CA) is known to be associated with schizophrenia, the causal nature of this association is unclear, with prodromal effects complicating its interpretation. From Swedish national registry databases, we used a co-relative case-control design with full-sibling, half-sibling and first-cousin comparisons, alongside a general Swedish population sample. Using ICD codes, 5456 individuals with an initial diagnosis of schizophrenia (2000-2010) were matched with five schizophrenia-free controls. We further identified first-cousin, half-sibling and full-sibling pairs discordant for CA and statistically extrapolated results for discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins. Within the general Swedish population, CA was strongly associated with later schizophrenia [odds ratio (OR) 10.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.99-12.11]. This association was substantially attenuated both by increasing temporal delays between CA exposure and schizophrenia diagnosis and by controlling for increasing degrees of familial confounding. Extrapolated discordant MZ pairs suggested that fully controlling for confounding familial factors reduced the association between CA and later schizophrenia to more modest levels (ORs of approximately 3.3 and 1.6 with 3- and 7-year temporal delays respectively). Opiate, sedative, cocaine/stimulant and hallucinogen abuse were also strongly associated with subsequent schizophrenia in the general population. After controlling for familial confounding, only cocaine/stimulant exposure remained associated. CA has an appreciable causal impact on future risk for schizophrenia. However, population-based estimates of cannabis-schizophrenia co-morbidity substantially overestimate their causal association. Predictions of the cases of schizophrenia that might be prevented by reduced cannabis consumption based on population associations are therefore likely to be considerably overestimated.

  5. Hospital Admission and Criminality Associated with Substance Misuse in Young Refugees - A Swedish National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhica, Hélio; Gauffin, Karl; Almqvist, Ylva B; Rostila, Mikael; Hjern, Anders

    2016-01-01

    High rates of mental health problems have been described in young refugees, but few studies have been conducted on substance misuse. This study aimed to investigate the patterns of hospital care and criminality associated with substance misuse in refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers. Gender stratified Cox regression models were used to estimate the risks of criminal convictions and hospital care associated with substance misuse from national Swedish data for 2005-2012. We focused on 22,992 accompanied and 5,686 unaccompanied refugees who were aged 13-19 years when they settled in Sweden and compared them with 1 million native Swedish youths from the same birth cohort. The risks of criminal conviction associated with substance misuse increased with the length of residency in male refugees, after adjustment for age and domicile. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 5.21 (4.39-6.19) for unaccompanied and 3.85 (3.42-4.18) for accompanied refugees after more than 10 years of residency, compared with the native population. The risks were slightly lower for hospital care, at 2.88 (2.18-3.79) and 2.52(2.01-3.01) respectively. Risks were particularly pronounced for male refugees from the Horn of Africa and Iran. The risks for all male refugees decreased substantially when income was adjusted for. Young female refugees had similar risks to the general population. The risks of criminality and hospital care associated with substance misuse in young male refugees increased with time of residency in Sweden and were associated with a low level of income compared with the native Swedish population. Risks were similar in accompanied and unaccompanied refugees.

  6. The Swedish strategy and method for development of a national healthcare information architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenälv, Jessica; Lundell, Karl-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    "We need a precise framework of regulations in order to maintain appropriate and structured health care documentation that ensures that the information maintains a sufficient level of quality to be used in treatment, in research and by the actual patient. The users shall be aided by clearly and uniformly defined terms and concepts, and there should be an information structure that clarifies what to document and how to make the information more useful. Most of all, we need to standardize the information, not just the technical systems." (eHälsa - nytta och näring, Riksdag report 2011/12:RFR5, p. 37). In 2010, the Swedish Government adopted the National e-Health - the national strategy for accessible and secure information in healthcare. The strategy is a revision and extension of the previous strategy from 2006, which was used as input for the most recent efforts to develop a national information structure utilizing business-oriented generic models. A national decision on healthcare informatics standards was made by the Swedish County Councils, which decided to follow and use EN/ISO 13606 as a standard for the development of a universally applicable information structure, including archetypes and templates. The overall aim of the Swedish strategy for development of National Healthcare Information Architecture is to achieve high level semantic interoperability for clinical content and clinical contexts. High level semantic interoperability requires consistently structured clinical data and other types of data with coherent traceability to be mapped to reference clinical models. Archetypes that are formal definitions of the clinical and demographic concepts and some administrative data were developed. Each archetype describes the information structure and content of overarching core clinical concepts. Information that is defined in archetypes should be used for different purposes. Generic clinical process model was made concrete and analyzed. For each decision

  7. Swedish Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borgvall, Jonathan; Lif, Patrik

    2005-01-01

    .... The military research work presented here includes the three military administrations, FOI -- Swedish Defence Research Agency, FMV -- Swedish Defence Materiel Administration, and SNDC -- Swedish...

  8. Newborn screening for hemoglobinopathies at Muhimbili National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Newborn screening (NBS) for hemoglobinopathies is important for the early detection and effective management of affected children. Objectives: To determine the frequency of occurrence, types of, and factors associated with abnormal haemoglobins in newborns at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es ...

  9. Digitising the Archaeological Process at the Swedish National Heritage Board: producing, managing and sharing archaeological information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa M. Larsson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available he Digital Archaeological Process (DAP programme was initiated by the Swedish National Heritage Board in order to create a more seamless process for storing and sharing digital information generated through archaeological surveys and excavations. The programme aims to increase the availability of digital data as well as the quality and usefulness of the information. The Cultural Environment Register is being developed, which will contain and/or link to information about where fieldwork has been done and what was found: archaeological sites, field documentation, finds, as well as the reports and publications. In addition to creating a new system for storing this information, a large amount of old digital projects previously kept by museums and archaeological contractors is being collected to be made publicly available. Our goal is to make heritage management more efficient, and in the process the information will also become more useful to researchers, museums and the general public.

  10. Poor Kids? Economic Resources and Adverse Peer Relations in a Nationally Representative Sample of Swedish Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Simon

    2018-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the impact of economic resources on adverse peer relations during adolescence. This study used a nationally representative sample (n = 4725, 51% girls) of Swedish eighth-grade students (approximately age fourteen) to examine associations between economic resources and adverse peer relations in the form of peer rejection and bullying victimization. Adolescents from households in the lowest within-school household income quintile were found to be rejected by school class peers to a greater extent than more advantaged students, but an association was not found between relative household income and bullying victimization. In contrast, adolescents unable to participate in activities with peers for economic reasons experienced more rejection and were at higher risk of victimization. The results underline the multidimensionality of adverse peer relations and advance our knowledge on how economic resources relate to peer relations in youth.

  11. User-Centred Design and Agile Development: Rebuilding the Swedish National Union Catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Lindström

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available With a new generation of OPACs emerging that attempt to address longstanding shortcomings, how do we make sure that we do not lose ground again in the future? This article suggests a combination of iterative development and user-centred design as a way to develop systems that will meet the constantly changing expectations of users by providing both functionality and usability. It gives a short introduction to iterative software development and user-centred design. A case study of the development of the new version of LIBRIS (http://libris.kb.se, the Swedish National Union Catalogue, is used as an example of how these methodologies can benefit from each other in practice.

  12. Hypersexual Disorder According to the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory in Help-Seeking Swedish Men and Women With Self-Identified Hypersexual Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Görts Öberg, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Öberg KG, Hallberg J, Kaldo V, et al. Hypersexual Disorder According to the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory in Help-Seeking Swedish Men and Women With Self-Identified Hypersexual Behavior. Sex Med 2017;5:e229–e236.

  13. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...

  14. Incidence of acute pulmonary embolism, related comorbidities and survival; analysis of a Swedish national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese; Söderberg, Stefan

    2017-06-14

    The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in Sweden and any regional differences. To assess short- and long-term survival analysis after an episode of PE, before and after excluding patients with known malignancies, and to determine the most common comorbidities prior to the PE event. All in-hospital patients, including children, diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 were retrieved from the Swedish National Patient Registry (NPR) and incidence rates were calculated. All registered comorbidities from 1998 until the index events were collected and survival up to 4 years after the event were calculated and compared to matched controls. There were 5793 patients of all ages diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 resulting in a national incidence of 0.6/1000/year. The mean age was 70 years and 52% were women. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac-, vascular-, infectious- and gastrointestinal diseases, injuries and malignancies. The mortality rates were more than doubled in patients with recent PE compared to that in a matched control group (49.1% vs 21.9%), and the excess mortality remained after exclusion of deaths occurring within one year and after exclusion of patients with any malignancy prior to the event. PE is associated with high age as well as with multiple comorbidities, and with an increased short- and long-term mortality. This study highlights the importance of a proper follow-up after an acute PE.

  15. The Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste. A Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell (Karita Research AB, Taeby (Sweden)), E-Mail: kjell.andersson@karita.se

    2009-12-15

    In this paper the activities of the Transparency Programme of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste have been explored. Comparisons have been made with other activities using the same transparency approach and observations made from different reports that deal with the programme or parts of it have been taken into account. Obviously, to make firm conclusions to what extent the aims of the Transparency Programme have been achieved a formal review should be done. It seems evident however that the programme has vitalized the overall dialogue about the Swedish nuclear waste management programme and that the hearings held have raised the awareness about issues that have been dealt with such as value-laden aspects of disposals methods, feasibility of certain alternatives, the need for clarification of how regulatory criteria can be applied and the use of research on governance processes. Stakeholders seem to have appreciated the overall organization and the stretching that took place during the hearings held. For possible future activities, the observations made about the antagonism between certain parties which has existed since a long time ago and the common language and culture need to be taken into account. The core problem, however, is to reach out to the political decision makers at the national level, especially since the time distance between hearings held so far and critical government decisions is at least six years which put a high demand on the reporting system. Taking the experiences from other transparency projects into account, the Council might consider the possibility to establish a reference group with participation from different stakeholders and politicians who could have a role for conveying results to wider groups. One observer has concluded that the reporting from the Transparency Programme should be open in the sense that it should not make conclusions on the issues as such (e.g. if a certain disposal method is to prefer or not). Instead

  16. The effect of a biological explanation on attitudes towards homosexual persons. A Swedish national sample study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landén, Mikael; Innala, Sune

    2002-01-01

    Studies assessing attitudes towards homosexuals have revealed widespread homophobia. The first aim of this study was to assess potential changes in public attitudes after important legislative changes related to homosexuals in Sweden. The second aim was to test whether the attitudes differ: 1) between people who believe in biological vs. people who believe in psychological theories in explanation of homosexuality, 2) between men and women, and 3) between the older and younger age groups. To this end, a questionnaire survey of a representative, randomly selected, national sample of 992 adult Swedish residents was carried out. The response rate was 67%, which is considered high in this context. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a clear-cut change towards more tolerant attitudes towards homosexual men and women compared to earlier studies. The reasons for this change is discussed; among factors of importance are anti-discrimination legislation, increased visibility of homosexual people, and that more people currently regard homosexuality as a biologically determined, natural variant of human sexuality than was the case 10 years ago. In accordance, this study gave further support to the notion that those who believe that homosexuality is caused by biological factors have a less restrictive view on homosexuality than do people who hold a psychological view.

  17. Educational achievement and vocational career in twins - a Swedish national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjern, Anders; Ekeus, Cecilia; Rasmussen, Finn; Lindblad, Frank

    2012-06-01

    To investigate how being born and raised as a twin is associated with IQ, educational achievement and vocational career. Register study in a national birth cohort, complemented with a siblings study. The study population included 13,368 individuals born and raised as twins and 837,752 singletons, including 3019 siblings of twins, in the Swedish birth cohorts of 1973-1981. Our outcome measures were mean grade points on a five point scale from ninth grade of primary school at 15-16 years, IQ tests on a nine grade point scale from male conscripts at 18-19 years, highest completed education, disability benefits, work income and employment at 27-35 years of age. Twins had slightly better mean grade point averages in ninth grade; +0.08 (95% CI 0.04-0.11) and more often had completed a university education in young adulthood; OR 1.16 (1.02-1.21) compared with singleton siblings, despite male twins having a slightly lower IQ at military conscription compared with male singletons. Employment rates, mean income and disability benefits were similar in twins and singletons. Twins have slightly better educational careers and similar vocational careers compared with those born as singletons. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  18. Binge-eating disorder in the Swedish national registers: Somatic comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Laura M; Watson, Hunna J; Jangmo, Andreas; Welch, Elisabeth; Wiklund, Camilla; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne; Norring, Claes; Herman, Barry K; Larsson, Henrik; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate associations between binge-eating disorder (BED) and somatic illnesses and determine whether medical comorbidities are more common in individuals who present with BED and comorbid obesity. Cases (n = 850) were individuals with a BED diagnosis in the Swedish eating disorders quality registers. Ten community controls were matched to each case on sex, and year, month, and county of birth. Associations of BED status with neurologic, immune, respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, musculoskeletal, genitourinary, circulatory, and endocrine system diseases were evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. We further examined these associations by adjusting for lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. Amongst individuals with BED, we explored whether comorbid obesity was associated with risk of somatic disorders. BED was associated with most classes of diseases evaluated; strongest associations were with diabetes [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 5.7 (3.8; 8.7)] and circulatory systems [1.9 (1.3; 2.7)], likely indexing components of metabolic syndrome. Amongst individuals with BED, those with comorbid obesity were more likely to have a lifetime history of respiratory [1.5 (1.1; 2.1)] and gastrointestinal [2.6 (1.7; 4.1)] diseases than those without comorbid obesity. Increased risk of some somatic disease classes in individuals with BED was not simply due to obesity or other lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. The association of BED with many somatic illnesses highlights the morbidity experienced by individuals with BED. Clinicians treating patients with BED should be vigilant for medical comorbidities. Nonpsychiatric providers may be the first clinical contact for those with BED underscoring the importance of screening in primary care. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Eating Disorders Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:58-65). © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Eating Disorders Published by Wiley

  19. Childhood socio-economic status, school failure and drug abuse: a Swedish national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffin, Karl; Vinnerljung, Bo; Fridell, Mats; Hesse, Morten; Hjern, Anders

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether socio-economic status (SES) in childhood and school failure at 15 years of age predict illicit drug abuse in youth and young adulthood. Register study in a Swedish national cohort born 1973-88 (n = 1,405,763), followed from age 16 to 20-35 years. Cox regression analyses were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for any indication of drug abuse. Our outcomes were hospital admissions, death and criminality associated with illicit drug abuse. Data on socio-demographics, school grades and parental psychosocial problems were collected from censuses (1985 and 1990) and national registers. School failure was defined as having mean school grades from the final year in primary school lower than -1 standard deviation and/or no grades in core subjects. School failure was a strong predictor of illicit drug abuse with an HR of 5.87 (95% CI: 5.76-5.99) after adjustment for age and sex. Childhood SES was associated with illicit drug abuse later in life in a stepwise manner. The lowest stratum had a HR of 2.28 (95% CI: 2.20-2.37) compared with the highest stratum as the reference, when adjusted for other socio-demographic variables. In the fully adjusted model, the effect of SES was greatly attenuated to an HR of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.19-1.28) in the lowest SES category, while the effect of school failure remained high with an HR of 4.22 (95% CI: 4.13-4.31). School failure and childhood socio-economic status predict illicit drug abuse independently in youth and young adults in Sweden. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Economic hardships in adulthood and mental health in Sweden. the Swedish National Public Health Survey 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnquist Johanna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Possible accumulative effects of a combined economic hardship's measure, including both income and non-income related economic hardships measures, on mental health has not been well investigated. The aim of this paper was to investigate; (i independent associations between multiple measures of economic hardships and mental health problems, and (ii associations between a combined economic hardships measure and mental health problems. Methods We analysed data from the 2009 Swedish National Survey of Public Health comprising a randomly selected representative national sample combined with a randomly selected supplementary sample from four county councils and three municipalities consisting of 23,153 men and 28,261 women aged 16-84 years. Mental health problems included; psychological distress (GHQ-12, severe anxiety and use of antidepressant medication. Economic hardship was measured by a combined economic hardships measure including low household income, inability to meet expenses and lacking cash reserves. Results The results from multivariate adjusted (age, country of birth, educational level, occupational status, employment status, family status and long term illness logistic regression analysis indicate that self-reported current economic difficulties (inability to pay for ordinary bills and lack of cash reserves, were significantly associated with both women's and men's mental health problems (all indicators, while low income was not. In addition, we found a statistically significant graded association between mental health problems and levels of economic hardships. Conclusions The findings indicate that indicators of self-reported current economic difficulties seem to be more strongly associated with poor mental health outcomes than the more conventional measure low income. Furthermore, the likelihood of mental health problems differed significantly in a graded fashion in relation to levels of economic hardships.

  1. National minorities in history teaching : images of Roma in programs produced by the Swedish Educational Broadcasting Company, 1975-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Indzic Dujso, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    In 2000 when Sweden signed the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities the Roma minority became one of the acknowledged national minorities in the country. It meant that the rights of the Roma mi-nority would be safeguarded and the knowledge of its history and culture would be spread. In that context, the Swedish school, with its founded as-signment of democracy, was given an important role. The education was to communicate the multicultural values of the society and to...

  2. Intestinal biospy in children with coeliac disease; a Swedish national study of radiation dose and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persliden, J.; Pettersson, H.B.L. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Faelth-Magnusson, K. [University of Linkoeping (Sweden). Faculty of Health Sciences

    1995-12-31

    In paediatric patients, fluoroscopy is used to monitor intestinal biopsies obtained for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. The radiation dose to the child is dependent on the equipment, the sedation of the patient and the experience of the operator. This study presents patient measurements from a national study in Sweden. The cancer excess lifetime mortality risk (CELMR) and the loss of life expectancy (LLE) are calculated for this patient group. TLD measurements were performed by dosemeters at 40 Swedish paediatric departments performing these biopsies. Information was received on sedation techniques, equipment used and fluoroscopy duration. An exponential curve fit was applied to the entrance and exit dose values and this dose distribution was integrated to get the integral dose. From this the mean absorbed dose in the irradiated volume was calculated. The mean and the median of the mean absorbed dose in the irradiated volume to the children was found to be 1.3 mGy (range 0.05-17.5 mGy) and 0.56 mGy respectively. The mean value of the entrance surface dose was 3.0 mGy (range 0.10-27.1 mGy) and the median was 1.4 mGy. The annual collective dose was calculated to 3.3 man Gy, based on 2500 biopsies per year. Variation in doses was found to depend on, e.g. the age of the equipment, focus to patient distance, sedation and operator experience. With this knowledge of doses received by the children in the diagnosis of coeliac disease, CELMR was found to be 0.5 per 25000 biopsies and LLE was 18 years. Recommendations are given on the proper choice of equipment for the reduction of fluoroscopy doses in pediatric radiology. (Author).

  3. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and later dementia: a Swedish National Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolf, Ellika G; Sydsjö, Gunilla C M; Bladh, Marie K; Berg, Goran; Sharma, Surendra

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the rate of vascular dementia and dementia in women with previous hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, since white matter lesions of the brain and cardiovascular disease are linked both to dementia and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Prospective population-based registry study on all women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1975 (284 598). Women with and without hypertensive disorders in pregnancy were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register and linked to the National Patient Register, where data on somatic disease later in life were obtained. International classification of disease was used. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios for both groups and adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures were in-hospital diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia and dementia. No increased risks were seen for vascular dementia or dementia after any hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. If broken down in specific diagnoses for hypertensive disease in pregnancy, adjusted risks for vascular dementia after hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy the hazard ratio was 6.27 (95% CI 1.65-27.44). Higher risks for cardiovascular disease were confirmed. Because of the very low absolute risk, the wide confidence interval and risk of misclassification, our results on vascular dementia could be questioned. Considering the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, the findings of brain lesions and the increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the possibly increased risk for all kinds of dementia must be investigated in larger and more well-defined cohorts. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Hardell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR and Causes of Death Register (CDR to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  5. Childhood Household Dysfunction, Social Inequality and Alcohol Related Illness in Young Adulthood. A Swedish National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffin, Karl; Hjern, Anders; Vinnerljung, Bo; Björkenstam, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate the cumulative effect of childhood household dysfunction (CHD) on alcohol related illness and death later in life and to test the interaction between CHD and socioeconomic background. The study utilised Swedish national registers including data of a Swedish national cohort born 1973-82 (n = 872,912), which was followed from age 18 to 29-40 years. Cox regression analyses were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for alcohol related illness or death in young adulthood. The CHD measure consisted of seven indicators: parental alcohol/drug misuse, mental health problems, criminality, death, divorce, social assistance, and child welfare interventions. Childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) was indicated by parental occupational status. Outcomes were alcohol related inpatient hospital care, specialised outpatient care or deaths. Using the highest socioeconomic group without CHD experience as a reference, those in the same socioeconomic group with one indicator of CHD had HRs of 2.1 [95% CI: 1.7-2.5], two CHD indicators 5.6 [4.4-7.1], three or more indicators 9.4 [7.1-12.4] for retrieving inpatient care. Socioeconomic disadvantage further increased the risks-those with low socioeconomic background and three CHD indicators or more had a HR of 12.5 [10.9-14.3]. Testing for interaction suggests that the combined HRs deviates from additivity [Synergy index: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.4-1.9]. The results for outpatient care were similar, but not as pronounced. In conclusion, this Swedish national cohort study shows that childhood household dysfunction is strongly and cumulatively associated to alcohol related illness later in life and that it interacts with socioeconomic disadvantage.

  6. Swedish emergency department triage and interventions for improved patient flows: a national update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhnia, Nasim; Göransson, Katarina E

    2011-12-08

    In Scandinavia, emergency department triage and patient flow processes, are under development. In Sweden, the triage development has resulted in two new triage scales, the Adaptive Process Triage and the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System. Both these scales have logistic components, aiming to improve patient flows. The aim of this study was to report the development and current status of emergency department triage and patient flow processes in Sweden. In 2009 and 2010 the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment sent out a questionnaire to the ED managers in all (74) Swedish hospital emergency departments. The questionnaire comprised questions about triage and interventions to improve patient flows. Nearly all (97%) EDs in Sweden employed a triage scale in 2010, which was an increase from 2009 (73%). Further, the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System was the triage scale most commonly implemented across the country. The implementation of flow-related interventions was not as common, but more than half (59%) of the EDs have implemented or plan to implement nurse requested X-ray. There has been an increase in the use of triage scales in Swedish EDs during the last few years, with acceleration for the past two years. Most EDs have come to use the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System, which also indicates regional co-operation. The implementation of different interventions for improved patient flows in EDs most likely is explained by the problem of crowding. Generally, more studies are needed to investigate the economical aspects of these interventions.

  7. Interval cancer rates in the Irish national breast screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Dwane, Fiona; Kelleher, Tracy; Sharp, Linda; Comber, Harry

    2015-09-01

    To compare interval cancer rates from the Irish breast screening programme, BreastCheck, for the period 2000-2007 with those from other European countries. Data from BreastCheck was linked to National Cancer Registry breast cancer registrations, to calculate numbers of women screened, screen-detected cancers, and interval cancers, by year of screening, in the first and second years after screening, and by initial or subsequent screen. Estimated underlying cancer incidence from the period 1996-1999 inclusive was used to calculate proportionate incidence. We calculated the interval cancer ratio as an alternative measure of the burden of interval cancers. There were 372,658 screening records for 178,147 women in the period 2000-2007. The overall interval rate was 9.6 per 10,000 screens. In the first year after screening, the interval cancer rate was 5.8 per 10,000 screens and this increased to 13.4 in the second year after screening. The screen detection rate for the period was 53.6 per 10,000 screened for all screens combined. Initial screens produced a higher detection rate at 66.9 per 10,000 screened compared with subsequent screens with a screen-detected rate of 41.4 per 10,000 screens. Interval breast cancer rates for the first years of the programme are within acceptable limits and are comparable with those in other European programmes. Nationwide roll-out together with the adoption of digital mammography may have an impact on interval cancer rates in future years. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Hospital Admission and Criminality Associated with Substance Misuse in Young Refugees – A Swedish National Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhica, Hélio; Gauffin, Karl; Almqvist, Ylva B.; Rostila, Mikael; Hjern, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of mental health problems have been described in young refugees, but few studies have been conducted on substance misuse. This study aimed to investigate the patterns of hospital care and criminality associated with substance misuse in refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers. Methods Gender stratified Cox regression models were used to estimate the risks of criminal convictions and hospital care associated with substance misuse from national Swedish data for 2005–2012. We focused on 22,992 accompanied and 5,686 unaccompanied refugees who were aged 13–19 years when they settled in Sweden and compared them with 1 million native Swedish youths from the same birth cohort. Results The risks of criminal conviction associated with substance misuse increased with the length of residency in male refugees, after adjustment for age and domicile. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 5.21 (4.39–6.19) for unaccompanied and 3.85 (3.42–4.18) for accompanied refugees after more than 10 years of residency, compared with the native population. The risks were slightly lower for hospital care, at 2.88 (2.18–3.79) and 2.52(2.01–3.01) respectively. Risks were particularly pronounced for male refugees from the Horn of Africa and Iran. The risks for all male refugees decreased substantially when income was adjusted for. Young female refugees had similar risks to the general population. Conclusion The risks of criminality and hospital care associated with substance misuse in young male refugees increased with time of residency in Sweden and were associated with a low level of income compared with the native Swedish population. Risks were similar in accompanied and unaccompanied refugees. PMID:27902694

  9. From National Policy-Making to Global Edu-Business: Swedish Edu-Preneurs on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Linda

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the movements of some Swedish former education policy-makers that are currently active as commercial edu-business actors with the ambition to expand in the Global Education Industry (GEI). The aim is to map and analyze how a selection of Swedish edu-preneurs affiliated with a particular Swedish school chain enter the GEI and…

  10. The National Newborn Bloodspot Screening Programme (NNBSP) process review 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, P; Hegarty, M; Smith, L

    2013-06-01

    The National Newborn Bloodspot Screening Programme (NNBSP) incorporates screening for several conditions where early identification helps prevent serious disability or mortality. A national group was established (2009) to plan for the inclusion of screening for cystic fibrosis (CF); as part of this process a review of the existing NNBSP was undertaken. Information was obtained through consultation with the Director of the National Newborn Bloodspot Screening Laboratory (NNBSL) and survey of maternity units (20), Local Health Office (LHO) areas (32), and practicing domiciliary midwives (16). Response rate: hospitals 100%; LHO areas 100%; domiciliary midwives 56%. Potential for strengthening quality assurance was identified e.g. single comprehensive screening register, consistent and timely procedures for checking results. Recommendations, many of which have since been implemented, included overall governance structure, liaison officer, quality assurance programme, ring-fenced funding, standardised unique identifier, dedicated laboratory IT system, secure web-based transmission of results and fail-safe method of tracking samples.

  11. Menstrual irregularity and use of oral contraceptives in female adolescent athletes in Swedish National Sports High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, Philip; Heijne, Annette; Frohm, Anna; Fridén, Cecilia

    2017-11-23

    Objective Female adolescent athletes seem to use oral contraceptives (OCs) in the same proportion as the general population. In athletes not using OCs, menstrual irregularity (MI) is reported to be common but there are few studies of MI in adolescent athletes. The aim of the study was to survey menarche, menstrual irregularity and use of OCs in adolescent athletes in the National Sports High Schools in Sweden. A further aim was to study the associations between current sport injury and menstrual irregularity as well as use of OCs. Subjects Two hundred and ninety-eight female adolescent athletes at Swedish National Sports High Schools. Methods A web-based questionnaire containing questions related to menstrual status, contraception and current injury. Results One third (32.6%) of the athletes used OCs and of the remaining athletes 31.8% had MI. The group of athletes with MI had a significantly (p = 0.038; Cohen's d, 0.32) lower BMI and consisted of a significantly (p = 0.043) higher proportion of endurance athletes. OC users were less likely to participate in endurance sports compared to non-OC users (p = 0.024). Current injury was equally distributed in the OC and the non-OC group but athletes with MI had fewer sports injuries compared to eumenorrheic women. Conclusion OCs are frequently used among athletes at Swedish National Sports High Schools. OC users were less likely to participate in endurance sports compared to non-OC users. MI was common and athletes with MI had lower BMI compared to eumenorrheic athletes. Sports injuries were not associated with use of OC and eumenorrheic athletes had a higher proportion of current injury.

  12. National Lung Screening Trial: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... become life threatening. This phenomenon, called overdiagnosis (see definitions below), puts some screening recipients at risk from unnecessary diagnostic biopsies or additional surgeries as well as unnecessary treatments for cancer, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. On Dec. 9, 2013, in ...

  13. TOTALL: high cost of allergic rhinitis-a national Swedish population-based questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Olsson, Petter; Andersson, Morgan; Welin, Karl-Olof; Svensson, Johanna; Tennvall, Gunnel Ragnarson; Hellgren, Johan

    2016-02-04

    Allergic rhinitis is a global illness with a well-recognised impact on quality of life and work performance. Comparatively little is known about the extent of its economic impact on society. The TOTALL study estimates the total cost of allergic rhinitis using a sample representing the entire Swedish population of working age. A questionnaire focused on allergic rhinitis was mailed out to a random population of Swedish residents, aged 18-65 years. Health-care contacts, medications, absenteeism (absence from work) and presenteeism (reduced working capacity at work) were assessed, and the direct and indirect costs of allergic rhinitis were calculated. Medication use was evaluated in relation to the ARIA guidelines. In all, 3,501 of 8,001 (44%) answered the questionnaire, and 855 (24%) of these reported allergic rhinitis. The mean annual direct and indirect costs because of allergic rhinitis were €210.3 and €750.8, respectively, resulting in a total cost of €961.1 per individual/year. Presenteeism represented 70% of the total cost. Antihistamines appear to be used in excess in relation to topical steroids, and the use of nasal decongestants was alarmingly high. The total cost of allergic rhinitis in Sweden, with a population of 9.5 million, was estimated at €1.3 billion annually. These unexpectedly high costs could be related to the high prevalence of disease, in combination with the previously often underestimated indirect costs. Improved adherence to guidelines might ease the economic burden on society.

  14. The effect of childhood socioeconomic position on alcohol-related disorders later in life: a Swedish national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffin, Karl; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Hjern, Anders

    2013-11-01

    Alcohol use is the third most important global-health risk factor and a main contributor to health inequalities. Previous research on social determinants of alcohol-related disorders has delivered inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate whether socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood predicts alcohol-related disorders in young adulthood in a Swedish national cohort. We studied a register-based national cohort of Swedish citizens born during 1973-1984 (N=948 518) and followed them up to 2009 from age 15. Childhood SEP was defined by a six-category socioeconomic index from the Censuses of 1985 and 1990. HRs of alcohol-related disorders, as indicated by register entries on alcohol-related death and alcohol-related medical care, were analysed in Cox regression models with adjustment for sociodemographic variables and indicators of parental morbidity and criminality. Low childhood SEP was associated with alcohol-related disorders later in life among both men and women in a stepwise manner. Growing up in a household with the lowest SEP was associated with risk for alcohol-related disorders of HR: 2.24 (95% CI 2.08 to 2.42) after adjustment for sociodemographic variables, compared with the highest SEP group. Adjusting the analysis for parental psychosocial problems attenuated the association to HR 1.87 (95% CI 1.73 to 2.01). The study demonstrates that low SEP in childhood predicts alcohol-related disorders in young adulthood. Alcohol abuse needs to be addressed in policies to bridge the gap of health inequalities.

  15. TOTALL: high cost of allergic rhinitis—a national Swedish population-based questionnaire study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Olsson, Petter; Andersson, Morgan; Welin, Karl-Olof; Svensson, Johanna; Tennvall, Gunnel Ragnarson; Hellgren, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a global illness with a well-recognised impact on quality of life and work performance. Comparatively little is known about the extent of its economic impact on society. The TOTALL study estimates the total cost of allergic rhinitis using a sample representing the entire Swedish population of working age. A questionnaire focused on allergic rhinitis was mailed out to a random population of Swedish residents, aged 18–65 years. Health-care contacts, medications, absenteeism (absence from work) and presenteeism (reduced working capacity at work) were assessed, and the direct and indirect costs of allergic rhinitis were calculated. Medication use was evaluated in relation to the ARIA guidelines. In all, 3,501 of 8,001 (44%) answered the questionnaire, and 855 (24%) of these reported allergic rhinitis. The mean annual direct and indirect costs because of allergic rhinitis were €210.3 and €750.8, respectively, resulting in a total cost of €961.1 per individual/year. Presenteeism represented 70% of the total cost. Antihistamines appear to be used in excess in relation to topical steroids, and the use of nasal decongestants was alarmingly high. The total cost of allergic rhinitis in Sweden, with a population of 9.5 million, was estimated at €1.3 billion annually. These unexpectedly high costs could be related to the high prevalence of disease, in combination with the previously often underestimated indirect costs. Improved adherence to guidelines might ease the economic burden on society. PMID:26845513

  16. Economic evaluation of prostate cancer screening test as a national cancer screening program in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangjin; Kim, Youn Hee; Hwang, Jin Sub; Lee, Yoon Jae; Lee, Sang Moo; Ahn, Jeonghoon

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is rapidly increasing in Korea and professional societies have requested adding prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing to the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP), but this started a controversy in Korea and neutral evidence on this issue is required more than ever. The purpose of this study was to provide economic evidence to the decision makers of the NCSP. A cost-utility analysis was performed on the adoption of PSA screening program among men aged 50-74-years in Korea from the healthcare system perspective. Several data sources were used for the cost-utility analysis, including general health screening data, the Korea Central Cancer Registry, national insurance claims data, and cause of mortality from the National Statistical Office. To solicit the utility index of prostate cancer, a face-to-face interview for typical men aged 40 to 69 was conducted using a Time-Trade Off method. As a result, the increase of effectiveness was estimated to be very low, when adopting PSA screening, and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was analyzed as about 94 million KRW. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the incidence rate, screening rate, cancer stage distribution, utility index, and treatment costs but the results were consistent with the base analysis. Under Korean circumstances with a relatively low incidence rate of prostate cancer, PSA screening is not cost-effective. Therefore, we conclude that adopting national prostate cancer screening would not be beneficial until further evidence is provided in the future.

  17. Balancing performance-based expectations with a holistic perspective on coaching: a qualitative study of Swedish women?s national football team coaches? practice experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Eva-Carin; Barker-Ruchti, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how an exclusive sample of women?s national football team coaches described how they implement careful coaching while facing social and organizational pressure to win medals. Method: To consider coaches? negotiations, we drew on Noddings? concept of caring. Using an interpretive research paradigm, we conducted in-depth interviews with five Swedish women?s national football team coaches. An abductive approach was used to simultaneously...

  18. Sickness presenteeism predicts suboptimal self-rated health and sickness absence: a nationally representative study of the Swedish working population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Taloyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have suggested that sickness presenteeism (SP may be a risk factor for future health problems. The purpose of the present study was to test this in a nationally representative prospective study of Swedish workers. METHODS: Prospective cohort with a representative sample of the Swedish working population surveyed in 2008 and 2010. Odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Those who reported more than 7 days of SP had higher risk of suboptimal SRH compared to those who reported no SP (OR = 5.95; 95% CI 4.98-7.12, also after adjustment for confounders (OR = 1.64; 95% CI 1.30-2.06. Those who reported 1-7 days of SP also had an increased risk before and after adjustments. Inclusion of self-rated physical and psychological work capacity did not attenuate the associations, whereas of emotional exhaustion attenuated the ORs to non-significance for both outcomes, indicating that the health consequences associated with SP are largely related to mental health. CONCLUSION: The results strengthen earlier findings suggesting that SP can be a risk factor for future suboptimal general health and sickness absence, particularly through mental health problems. This indicates that asking about SP could yield important information for employers, occupational health practitioners and GPs, possibly leading to more timely intervention that could decrease the risk of future sickness absence and more serious health problems, especially in the mental domain. Further studies of the possible causal pathways between SP and future health development are also warranted, especially since going to work is often seen as desirable also for those with poor health.

  19. Sickness Presenteeism Predicts Suboptimal Self-Rated Health and Sickness Absence: A Nationally Representative Study of the Swedish Working Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taloyan, Marina; Aronsson, Gunnar; Leineweber, Constanze; Magnusson Hanson, Linda; Alexanderson, Kristina; Westerlund, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Background Earlier studies have suggested that sickness presenteeism (SP) may be a risk factor for future health problems. The purpose of the present study was to test this in a nationally representative prospective study of Swedish workers. Methods Prospective cohort with a representative sample of the Swedish working population surveyed in 2008 and 2010. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results Those who reported more than 7 days of SP had higher risk of suboptimal SRH compared to those who reported no SP (OR = 5.95; 95% CI 4.98–7.12), also after adjustment for confounders (OR = 1.64; 95% CI 1.30–2.06). Those who reported 1–7 days of SP also had an increased risk before and after adjustments. Inclusion of self-rated physical and psychological work capacity did not attenuate the associations, whereas of emotional exhaustion attenuated the ORs to non-significance for both outcomes, indicating that the health consequences associated with SP are largely related to mental health. Conclusion The results strengthen earlier findings suggesting that SP can be a risk factor for future suboptimal general health and sickness absence, particularly through mental health problems. This indicates that asking about SP could yield important information for employers, occupational health practitioners and GPs, possibly leading to more timely intervention that could decrease the risk of future sickness absence and more serious health problems, especially in the mental domain. Further studies of the possible causal pathways between SP and future health development are also warranted, especially since going to work is often seen as desirable also for those with poor health. PMID:22984547

  20. Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persenius, Mona; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Eva

    2015-09-01

    To describe nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality in Swedish stroke wards. A high risk of undernutrition places great demand on nutritional care in stroke wards. Evidence-based guidelines exist, but healthcare professionals have reported low interest in nutritional care. The Donabedian framework of structure, process and outcome is recommended to monitor and improve nutrition quality. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, a web-based questionnaire regarding nutritional care quality was delivered to eligible participants. Most clinical nursing leaders reported structure indicators, e.g. access to dieticians. Among process indicators, regular assessment of patients' swallowing was most frequently reported in comprehensive stroke wards compared with other stroke wards. Use of outcomes to monitor nutrition quality was not routine. Wards using standard care plans showed significantly better results. Using the structure, process and outcome framework to examine nutrition quality, quality-improvement needs became visible. To provide high-quality nutrition, all three structure, process and outcome components must be addressed. The use of care pathways, standard care plans, the Senior Alert registry, as well as systematic use of outcome measures could improve nutrition quality. To assist clinical nursing leaders in managing all aspects of quality, structure, process and outcome can be a valuable framework. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The influence of bereavement on body mass index: results from a national Swedish survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldair J Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous findings suggest that the loss of a family member is associated with health and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between bereavement experiences and BMI, and whether there are socio-demographic differences in this association. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between bereavement experiences and BMI, and whether there are socio-demographic differences in this association. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data with retrospective questions from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU of 2000, including 5,142 individuals. The bereavement experiences examined in the study include the loss of a sibling, a parent or a spouse, and time since the death of a parent. BMI (kg/m2 was calculated using self-reported measurements of weight and height. The association between bereavement and BMI was evaluated through linear regressions. RESULTS: After controlling for possible confounders, most of the models detected an association between bereavement and BMI. The fully-adjusted model showed that loss of parents was associated with a 0.45 increase in BMI (SE = 0.20. The effect also seemed to be dependent on time since the loss and social class position. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to examine associations between different types of familial losses and BMI. We find an association between the death of a family member and BMI, but it appears to be related to time since the death, type of bereavement experience and social class.

  2. The influence of bereavement on body mass index: results from a national Swedish survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aldair J; Rostila, Mikael; Saarela, Jan; Lopes, Claudia S

    2014-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that the loss of a family member is associated with health and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between bereavement experiences and BMI, and whether there are socio-demographic differences in this association. To investigate the association between bereavement experiences and BMI, and whether there are socio-demographic differences in this association. We used cross-sectional data with retrospective questions from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) of 2000, including 5,142 individuals. The bereavement experiences examined in the study include the loss of a sibling, a parent or a spouse, and time since the death of a parent. BMI (kg/m2) was calculated using self-reported measurements of weight and height. The association between bereavement and BMI was evaluated through linear regressions. After controlling for possible confounders, most of the models detected an association between bereavement and BMI. The fully-adjusted model showed that loss of parents was associated with a 0.45 increase in BMI (SE = 0.20). The effect also seemed to be dependent on time since the loss and social class position. The present study is the first to examine associations between different types of familial losses and BMI. We find an association between the death of a family member and BMI, but it appears to be related to time since the death, type of bereavement experience and social class.

  3. Understanding the Relation between Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa in a Swedish National Twin Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura; Root, Tammy L.; Pisetsky, Emily M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Background We present a bivariate twin analysis of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) to determine the extent to which shared genetic and environmental factors contribute to liability to these disorders. Method Focusing on females from the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) (N=7000), we calculated heritability estimates for narrow and broad AN and BN and estimated their genetic correlation. Results In the full model, the heritability estimate for narrow AN was (a2 = .57; 95% CI: .00, .81) and for narrow BN (a2 = .62; 95% CI: .08, .70) with the remaining variance accounted for by unique environmental factors. Shared environmental factors estimates were (c2 = .00; 95% CI: .00, .67) for AN and (c2 = .00; 95% CI: .00, .40) for BN. Moderate additive genetic (.46) and unique environmental (.42) correlations between AN and BN were observed. Heritability estimates for broad AN were lower (a2 = .29; 95% CI: .04, .43) than for narrow AN, but estimates for broad BN were similar to narrow BN. The genetic correlation for broad AN and BN was .79 and the unique environmental correlation was .44. Conclusions We highlight the contribution of additive genetic factors to both narrow and broad AN and BN and demonstrate a moderate overlap of both genetic and unique environmental factors that influence the two conditions. Common concurrent and sequential comorbidity of AN and BN can in part be accounted for by shared genetic and environmental influences on liability although independent factors also operative. PMID:19828139

  4. Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - the case of a Swedish waste incineration tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Anna E; Finnveden, Göran

    2007-01-01

    At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

  5. Mobile phones, cordless phones and rates of brain tumors in different age groups in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cancer Register during 1998-2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Hardell

    Full Text Available We used the Swedish Inpatient Register (IPR to analyze rates of brain tumors of unknown type (D43 during 1998-2015. Average Annual Percentage Change (AAPC per 100,000 increased with +2.06%, 95% confidence interval (CI +1.27, +2.86% in both genders combined. A joinpoint was found in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC 1998-2007 of +0.16%, 95% CI -0.94, +1.28%, and 2007-2015 of +4.24%, 95% CI +2.87, +5.63%. Highest AAPC was found in the age group 20-39 years. In the Swedish Cancer Register the age-standardized incidence rate per 100,000 increased for brain tumors, ICD-code 193.0, during 1998-2015 with AAPC in men +0.49%, 95% CI +0.05, +0.94%, and in women +0.33%, 95% CI -0.29, +0.45%. The cases with brain tumor of unknown type lack morphological examination. Brain tumor diagnosis was based on cytology/histopathology in 83% for men and in 87% for women in 1980. This frequency increased to 90% in men and 88% in women in 2015. During the same time period CT and MRI imaging techniques were introduced and morphology is not always necessary for diagnosis. If all brain tumors based on clinical diagnosis with CT or MRI had been reported to the Cancer Register the frequency of diagnoses based on cytology/histology would have decreased in the register. The results indicate underreporting of brain tumor cases to the Cancer Register. The real incidence would be higher. Thus, incidence trends based on the Cancer Register should be used with caution. Use of wireless phones should be considered in relation to the change of incidence rates.

  6. Mobile phones, cordless phones and rates of brain tumors in different age groups in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cancer Register during 1998-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We used the Swedish Inpatient Register (IPR) to analyze rates of brain tumors of unknown type (D43) during 1998-2015. Average Annual Percentage Change (AAPC) per 100,000 increased with +2.06%, 95% confidence interval (CI) +1.27, +2.86% in both genders combined. A joinpoint was found in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) 1998-2007 of +0.16%, 95% CI -0.94, +1.28%, and 2007-2015 of +4.24%, 95% CI +2.87, +5.63%. Highest AAPC was found in the age group 20-39 years. In the Swedish Cancer Register the age-standardized incidence rate per 100,000 increased for brain tumors, ICD-code 193.0, during 1998-2015 with AAPC in men +0.49%, 95% CI +0.05, +0.94%, and in women +0.33%, 95% CI -0.29, +0.45%. The cases with brain tumor of unknown type lack morphological examination. Brain tumor diagnosis was based on cytology/histopathology in 83% for men and in 87% for women in 1980. This frequency increased to 90% in men and 88% in women in 2015. During the same time period CT and MRI imaging techniques were introduced and morphology is not always necessary for diagnosis. If all brain tumors based on clinical diagnosis with CT or MRI had been reported to the Cancer Register the frequency of diagnoses based on cytology/histology would have decreased in the register. The results indicate underreporting of brain tumor cases to the Cancer Register. The real incidence would be higher. Thus, incidence trends based on the Cancer Register should be used with caution. Use of wireless phones should be considered in relation to the change of incidence rates.

  7. Cross-national invariance of dimensions of parental rearing behaviour: comparison of psychometric data of Swedish depressives and healthy subjects with Dutch target ratings on the EMBU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrindell, W A; Perris, C; Perris, H; Eisemann, M; van der Ende, J; von Knorring, L

    1986-03-01

    A psychometric study on Swedish and Dutch samples used the EMBU, a self-report instrument designed to assess memories of parents' rearing behaviour. Of the four primary factors identified previously with Dutch individuals (Rejection, Emotional Warmth, Over-protection, and Favouring Subject), the first three were retrieved in a similar form in the two Swedish groups (depressives and healthy, non-patients). Examination of the metric equivalence of the scales and the strength of the factors for each group indicated that comparisons of patterns and levels between groups from the respective countries on the three factors showing cross-national constancy would be warranted. Scale-level factor analyses of these dimensions produced identical two-factor compositions (CARE and PROTECTION) across national groups which further supported this conclusion.

  8. Cognitive ability, lifestyle risk factors, and two-year survival in first myocardial infarction men: A Swedish National Registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallert, John; Madison, Guy; Held, Claes; Olsson, Erik

    2017-03-15

    General cognitive ability (CA) is positively associated with later physical and mental health, health literacy, and longevity. We investigated whether CA estimated approximately 30years earlier in young adulthood predicted lifestyle-related risk factors and two-year survival in first myocardial infarction (MI) male patients. Young adulthood CA estimated through psychometric testing at age 18-20years was obtained from the mandatory military conscript registry (INSARK) and linked to national quality registry SWEDEHEART/RIKS-HIA data on smoking, diabetes, hypertension, obesity (BMI>30kg/m2) in 60years or younger Swedish males with first MI. Patients were followed up in the Cause of Death registry. The 5659 complete cases (deceased=106, still alive=5553) were descriptively compared. Crude and adjusted associations were modelled with logistic regression. After multivariable adjustment, one SD increase in CA was associated with a decreased odds ratio of being a current smoker (0.63 [0.59, 0.67], Plifestyle risk factors smoking, diabetes, and obesity, and two-year survival in first MI male patients. CA assessment might benefit risk stratification and possibly aid further tailoring of secondary preventive strategy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A European and Swedish perspective on ICT – policies and strategies in education. National and institutional pathways: crossings, blind alleys and uphill slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Hansson

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at answering the following questions: 1. What general goals do politicians in Europe express in national policy documents for the integration of information and communication technology (ICT in their education systems? To develop that theme further we explored the situation in our own country Sweden as a case. 2. What policies and strategies for ICT in education do leaders of Swedish higher education institutions develop? 3. How do Swedish national priorities and academic institutional interests match? The globalisation of education forces different value systems to meet. There is on the national level highly different political values on what kind of education system to prefer – the Scandinavian model and the American model are two extremes. There are also very different values inherent in higher education institutions, the academia, - compared with the values and visions held by the political leaders. These value differences between and within countries are elaborated and discussed. A Swedish, Scandinavian and European perspective is adopted, but a wider international outlook is also given. It is suggested that the value conflicts, often not explicit, understood or recognised, are one of the major inhibitors for systemic change. The direction of change cannot be taken for granted – the driving forces pull in opposing directions. Different visions of the future struggle to be fulfilled.

  10. Cancer screening in Korea, 2012: results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mina; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Yoon Young; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cancer screening rates for five types of cancer (stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervix uteri) using data from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), which is a nationwide, annual cross-sectional survey. The eligible study population included cancer-free men 40 years of age and older and women 30 years of age and older. The lifetime screening rate and screening rate with recommendation were calculated. The lifetime screening rates for gastric, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers were 77.9%, 69.9%, 65.8%, 82.9%, and 77.1%, respectively. The screening rates with recommendation were 70.9%, 21.5%, 44.7%, 70.9%, and 67.9%, respectively. The most common reason for all types of cancer was "no symptoms, " followed by "lack of time" and "fear of the examination procedure. " Efforts to facilitate participation in liver and colorectal cancer screening among Korean men and women are needed.

  11. Salmonella in Swedish cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ågren, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    In Sweden, all herds detected with salmonella are put under restrictions and measures aiming at eradication are required. The purpose of these studies was to provide a basis for decisions on how surveillance and control of salmonella in Swedish cattle can be made more cost-efficient. Results from a bulk milk screening were used to investigate seroprevalence of salmonella and to study associations between salmonella status and geographical location, local animal density, number of test pos...

  12. A Third Wave of European Education Policy: Transnational and National Conceptions of Knowledge in Swedish Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Ninni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine how transnational concepts within educational policies influence national curricula in the reconceptualisation of educational policy into concrete curriculum texts. Based on a critical discourse analysis and the concepts of recontextualisation, convergence and divergence, a third wave of European policy…

  13. Effect of endoscopy screening on stage at gastric cancer diagnosis: results of the National Cancer Screening Programme in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, K S; Jun, J K; Suh, M; Park, B; Noh, D K; Song, S H; Jung, K W; Lee, H-Y; Choi, I J; Park, E-C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although gastric cancer screening is common among countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer, there is little data to support the effectiveness of this screening. This study was designed to determine the differences in stage at diagnosis of gastric cancer according to the screening history and screening method (upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) vs endoscopy). Methods: The study population was derived from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP), a nationwide orga...

  14. Performance of gastric cancer screening by endoscopy testing through the National Cancer Screening Program of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kui Son; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Park, Sohee; Jung, Kyu Won; Han, Mi Ah; Choi, Il Ju; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2011-08-01

    Recent reports have proposed endoscopy as an alternative strategy to radiography for gastric cancer (GC) screening. The current study presents the first reported population-based data from a large GC screening program that provided endoscopic examinations. A retrospective population-based study was conducted using the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) database. We evaluated GC detection rates, sensitivity, specificity, and the positive predictive value of an endoscopic screening program for the average-risk Korean population, aged 40 years and older, who underwent the NCSP from 2002 to 2005. The detection rates of GC by endoscopy in the first and subsequent rounds were 2.71 and 2.14 per 1000 examinations, respectively. Localized cancer accounted for 45.7% of screen-detected GC cases. The sensitivity of endoscopy was 69% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 66.3-71.8). The endoscopic screening was less sensitive for the detection of localized GC (65.7%, 95% CI = 61.8-69.5) than for regional or distant GC (73.6%, 95% CI = 67.4-79.8). In the multiple logistic models for localized GC and all combined GC, the odds ratio (OR) of sensitivity for the undifferentiated type was statistically significantly higher than that for the differentiated type, whereas the OR of sensitivity for the mixed type was lower than that for the differentiated type. The sensitivity of the endoscopic test in a population-based screening was slightly higher for the detection of regional or distant GC than for localized GC. Further evaluation of the impact of endoscopic screening should take into account the balance of cost and mortality reduction. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Trace element concentration in wheat grain: results from the Swedish long-term soil fertility experiments and national monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmann, Holger; Mattsson, Lennart; Eriksson, Jan

    2009-10-01

    Concentrations of trace elements in wheat grain sampled between 1967 and 2003 from the Swedish long-term soil fertility experiments were analyzed using ICP-MS. The long-term effect of inorganic and organic fertilization on trace metal concentrations was investigated including the impact of atmospheric deposition and myccorhiza, whereas other factors such as soil conditions, crop cultivar, etc. are not discussed in this paper. Mean values derived from 10 experimental sites were reported. Significantly declining Pb and Cd concentrations in wheat grain could be explained by lower atmospheric deposition. Mean Se contents in all samples were 0.031 mg kg(-1) grain dry weight. No samples had sufficiently high Se concentrations for human (0.05 mg Se kg(-1)) or animal demand (0.1 mg Se kg(-1)). Concentrations of Co in wheat grain were extremely low, 0.002-0.005 mg Co kg(-1) grain dry weight, and far below the minimum levels required by animals, which applied to all fertilizer treatments. A doubling of Mo concentrations in grain since 1975 resulted in Cu/Mo ratios often below one, which may cause molybdenosis in ruminants. The increase in Mo concentrations in crops correlated with the decline in sulfur deposition. Concentrations of Cu and Fe declined in NPK-fertilized wheat as compared to unfertilized or manure-treated wheat. Very low concentrations of Se and Co and low concentrations of Fe and Cu require attention to counteract risks for deficiencies. The main characteristic of the study is that there are few significant changes over time between different fertilizer treatments, but throughout there are low concentrations of most trace elements in all treatments. In general, good agreement between concentrations in wheat from the long-term fertility experiments and the national monitoring program indicate that values are representative.

  16. Treatment-seeking patients with binge-eating disorder in the Swedish national registers: clinical course and psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Elisabeth; Jangmo, Andreas; Thornton, Laura M; Norring, Claes; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne; Herman, Barry K; Pawaskar, Manjiri; Larsson, Henrik; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2016-05-26

    We linked extensive longitudinal data from the Swedish national eating disorders quality registers and patient registers to explore clinical characteristics at diagnosis, diagnostic flux, psychiatric comorbidity, and suicide attempts in 850 individuals diagnosed with binge-eating disorder (BED). Cases were all individuals who met criteria for BED in the quality registers (N = 850). We identified 10 controls for each identified case from the Multi-Generation Register matched on sex, and year, month, and county of birth. We evaluated characteristics of individuals with BED at evaluation and explored diagnostic flux across eating disorders presentations between evaluation and one-year follow-up. We applied conditional logistic regression models to assess the association of BED with each comorbid psychiatric disorder and with suicide attempts and explored whether risk for depression and suicide were differentially elevated in individuals with BED with or without comorbid obesity. BED shows considerable diagnostic flux with other eating disorders over time, carries high psychiatric comorbidity burden with other eating disorders (OR 85.8; 95 % CI: 61.6, 119.4), major depressive disorder (OR 7.6; 95 % CI: 6.2, 9.3), bipolar disorder (OR 7.5; 95 % CI: 4.8, 11.9), anxiety disorders (OR 5.2; 95 % CI: 4.2, 6.4), and post-traumatic stress disorder (OR 4.3; 95 % CI: 3.2, 5.7) and is associated with elevated risk for suicide attempts (OR 1.8; 95 % CI: 1.2, 2.7). Depression and suicide attempt risk were elevated in individuals with BED with and without comorbid obesity. Considerable flux occurs across BED and other eating disorder diagnoses. The high psychiatric comorbidity and suicide risk underscore the severity and clinical complexity of BED.

  17. Genetic and family and community environmental effects on drug abuse in adolescence: a Swedish national twin and sibling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Maes, Hermine H; Sundquist, Kristina; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Using Swedish nationwide registry data, the authors investigated genetic and environmental risk factors in the etiology of drug abuse by twin sibling modeling. The authors followed up with epidemiological analyses to identify shared environmental influences on drug abuse. Drug abuse was defined using public medical, legal, or pharmacy records. Twin and sibling pairs were obtained from the national twin and genealogical registers. Information about sibling pair residence within the same household, small residential area, or municipality was obtained from Statistics Sweden. The authors predicted concordance for drug abuse by years of co-residence until the older sibling turned 21 and risk for future drug abuse in adolescents living with parental figures as a function of family-level socioeconomic status and neighborhood social deprivation. The best twin sibling fit model predicted substantial heritability for drug abuse in males (55%) and females (73%), with environmental factors shared by siblings operating only in males and accounting for 23% of the variance in liability. For each year of living in the same household, the probability of sibling concordance for drug abuse increased 2%-5%. When not residing in the same household, concordance was predicted from residence in the same small residential area or municipality. Risk for drug abuse was predicted both by family socioeconomic status and neighborhood social deprivation. Controlling for family socioeconomic status, each year of living in a high social deprivation neighborhood increased the risk for drug abuse by 2%. Using objective registry data, the authors found that drug abuse is highly heritable. A substantial proportion of the shared environmental effect on drug abuse comes from community-wide rather than household-level influences. Genetic effects demonstrated in twin studies have led to molecular analyses to elucidate biological pathways. In a parallel manner, environmental effects can be followed up by

  18. National energy policies: Obstructing the reduction of global CO{sub 2} emissions? An analysis of Swedish energy policies for the district heating sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difs, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.difs@liu.s [Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linkoping University, SE-581 83 Linkoping (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The effect of national energy policies on a local Swedish district heating (DH) system has been studied, regarding the profitability of new investments and the potential for climate change mitigation. The DH system has been optimised regarding three investments: biomass-fuelled CHP (bio CHP), natural gas-fuelled combined cycle CHP (NGCC CHP) and biomass-fuelled heat-only boiler (bio HOB) in two scenarios (with or without national taxes and policy instruments). In both scenarios EU's tradable CO{sub 2} emission permits are included. Results from the study show that when national policies are included, the most cost-effective investment option is the bio CHP technology. However, when national taxes and policy instruments are excluded, the DH system containing the NGCC CHP plant has 30% lower system cost than the bio CHP system. Regardless of the scenario and when coal condensing is considered as marginal electricity production, the NGCC CHP has the largest global CO{sub 2} reduction potential, about 300 ktonne CO{sub 2}. However, the CO{sub 2} reduction potential is highly dependent on the marginal electricity production. Demonstrated here is that national policies such as tradable green certificates can, when applied to DH systems, contribute to investments that will not fully utilise the DH systems' potential for global CO{sub 2} emissions reductions. - Research highlights: {yields}Swedish energy policies are promoting biomass fuelled electricity generating technologies over efficient fossil fuel electricity generating technologies. {yields}An efficient fossil fuel technology like the natural gas combine cycle CHP technology with high power-to-heat ratio has potential to reduce the global CO{sub 2} emissions more than a biomass fuelled electricity generating technology. {yields}Swedish energy policies such as tradable green certificates for renewable electricity can, when applied to district heating systems, contribute to investments that will not fully

  19. Emergent programme theories of a national quality register - a longitudinal study in Swedish elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Annika; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Andersson, Ann-Christine

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to explore programme theories of a national quality register. A programme theory is a bundle of assumptions underpinning how and why an improvement initiative functions. The purpose was to examine and establish programme theories of a national quality register widely used in Sweden: Senior alert. The paper reports on how programme theories among change recipients emerge in relation to the established programme theory of the initiator. A qualitative approach and a longitudinal research design were used. To develop programme theories among change recipients, individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Three sets of interviews were conducted in the period of 2011 to 2013, totalling 22 interviews. In addition, 4 participant observations were made. To develop the initiator's programme theory, an iterative multistage collaboration process between the researchers and the initiator was used. A directed content analysis was used to analyse data. The initiator and change recipients described similar programme logics, but differing programme theories. With time, change recipients' programme theories emerged. Their programme theories converged and became more like the programme theory of the initiator. This study has demonstrated the importance of making both the initiator's and change recipients' programme theories explicit. To learn about conditions for improvement initiatives, comparisons between their programme theories are valuable. Differences in programme theories provide information on how initiators can customize support for their improvement initiatives. Similar programme logics can be underpinned by different programme theories, which can be deceptive. Programme theories emerge over time and need to be understood as dynamic phenomena. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments. A report from the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's scientific workshop, on November 16, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    In 2010 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, plans to submit its license application for the final repository of spent nuclear fuel. The proposed method is the so-called KBS-3 method and implies placing the spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters, surrounded by a buffer of bentonite clay, at 500 m depth in the bedrock. The site selected by SKB to host the repository is located in the municipality of Oesthammar on the Swedish east coast. The copper canister plays a key role in the design of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The long-term physical and chemical stability of copper in aqueous environments is fundamental for the safety evolution of the proposed disposal concept. However, the corrosion resistance of copper has been questioned by results obtained under anoxic conditions in aqueous solution. These observations caused some head-lines in the Swedish newspapers as well as public and political concerns. Consequently, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste organized a scientific workshop on the issue 'Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments'. The purpose of the workshop was to address the fundamental understanding of the corrosion characteristics of copper regarding oxygen-free environments, and to identify what additional information is needed to assess the validity of the proposed corrosion mechanism and its implication on the containment of spent nuclear fuel in a copper canister. This seminar report is based on the presentations and discussions at the workshop. It also includes written statements by the members of the expert panel

  1. Self-image and suicide in a Swedish national eating disorders clinical register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runfola, Cristin D; Thornton, Laura M; Pisetsky, Emily M; Bulik, Cynthia M; Birgegård, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Using a prospective design, to examine the relation between self-image (assessed using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior) and suicide attempts/completions in women with anorexia nervosa-restricting type (ANR), anorexia nervosa-binge/purge type (ANBP), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS); and to assess whether these self-image variables add unique predictive value to suicide when considering other baseline predictors. Women (N=2269) aged 12 to 45 (M=22.1) presenting to specialist eating disorders clinics in Sweden between 2005 and 2009 were identified through the Stepwise Eating Disorders Quality Register. Data on age, body mass index, eating disorder severity (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire scores), psychiatric comorbidity, global assessment of functioning, and self-image were abstracted from Stepwise and included as baseline predictors or covariates. Suicide information (prior attempt and attempt/completion after Stepwise registration) was obtained from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Prevalence of detected suicide attempts/completions over the study period was 9.2%. Negative self-image variables were associated with prior suicide attempts in ANR and EDNOS and later suicide attempts/completions in women with BN. In a stepwise Cox proportional hazards model, only low self-affirmation predicted time to suicide attempts/completions in women with BN when accounting for age and prior suicide attempt. Assessing self-image might assist with identifying women with BN at elevated risk for suicide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Negotiating the Nation in History: the Swedish State Approval Scheme for Textbooks and Teaching Aids from 1945 to 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmersjö, Henrik Åström

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the discussions concerning history textbooks that occurred within the Swedish State Approval Scheme for Textbooks (Statens läroboksnämnd) from 1945 to 1983. By focusing on the negotiation of nationhood and the process of textbook approval as an arena for the renegotiation of ways in which history was taught in schools, the…

  3. Reformation of VET and Demands on Teachers' Subject Knowledge--Swedish Vocational Teachers' Recurrent Participation in a National CPD Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpsén, S.; Andersson, P.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates continuing professional development (CPD) of vocational teachers, with a focus on recurrent participation. Vocational teachers need to be competent as teachers and in relation to their vocational teaching subject. Reformation of Swedish vocational education in order to strengthen the working-life connection imposes demands…

  4. Cancer risk factors and screening in First Nations in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maegan V. Mazereeuw

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A lack of identifiers in health administrative databases limits our understanding of the cancer burden in First Nations. This study compares cancer risk factors and screening between First Nations in Ontario (on and off reserve and non-Aboriginal Ontarians using two unique health surveys. Methods: We measured age-standardized prevalence estimates using the First Nations Regional Health Survey (RHS Phase 2, 2008/10 (for First Nations on reserve and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS, 2007–2013 (for First Nations off reserve and non-Aboriginal Ontarians. We used prevalence rate ratios (RR and Pearson’s chisquare tests for differences in proportions to compare estimates between First Nations (on and off reserve and non-Aboriginal Ontarians. Results: A higher proportion of First Nation men, women and adolescents on reserve smoked (RR = 1.97, 2.78 and 7.21 respectively and were obese (RR = 1.73, 2.33 and 3.29 respectively compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Similar patterns were observed for First Nations off reserve. Frequent binge drinking was also more prevalent among First Nation men and women living on reserve (RR = 1.28 and 2.22, respectively and off reserve (RR = 1.70 and 1.45, respectively than non-Aboriginal Ontarians. First Nation men and women on reserve were about half as likely to consume fruit at least twice per day and vegetables at least twice per day compared to non-Aboriginal men and women (RR = 0.53 and 0.54, respectively. Pap test uptake was similar across all groups, while First Nation women on reserve were less likely to have had a mammogram in the last five years than non-Aboriginal women (RR = 0.85. Conclusion: First Nations, especially those living on reserve, have an increased risk for cancer and other chronic diseases compared to non-Aboriginal Ontarians. These results provide evidence to support policies and programs to reduce the future burden of cancer and other chronic diseases in

  5. Bread consumption patterns in a Swedish national dietary survey focusing particularly on whole-grain and rye bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Sandvik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bread types with high contents of whole grains and rye are associated with beneficial health effects. Consumer characteristics of different bread consumption patterns are however not well known. Objective: To compare bread consumption patterns among Swedish adults in relation to selected socio-demographic, geographic, and lifestyle-related factors. For selected consumer groups, the further aim is to investigate the intake of whole grains and the context of bread consumption, that is, where and when it is consumed. Design: Secondary analysis was performed on bread consumption data from a national dietary survey (n=1,435. Respondents were segmented into consumer groups according to the type and amount of bread consumed. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to study how selected socio-demographic, geographic, and lifestyle-related factors were associated with the consumer groups. Selected consumption groups were compared in terms of whole-grain intake and consumption context. Consumption in different age groups was analysed more in detail. Results: One-third of the respondents consumed mainly white bread. Socio-demographic, geographic, and healthy-lifestyle-related factors were associated with the bread type consumed. White bread consumption was associated with younger age groups, less education, children in the family, eating less fruit and vegetables, and more candy and snacks; the opposite was seen for mainly whole-grain bread consumers. Older age groups more often reported eating dry crisp bread, whole-grain bread, and whole-grain rye bread with sourdough whereas younger respondents reported eating bread outside the home, something that also mainly white bread eaters did. Low consumers of bread also consumed less whole grain in total. Conclusions: Traditional bread consumption structures were observed, as was a transition among young consumers who more often consumed fast food bread and bread outside the home, as well as

  6. Mortality patterns and risk among older men and women with intellectual disability: a Swedish national retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawi Ng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sweden has closed all institutions and imposed legislation to ensure service and support for individuals with intellectual disability (ID. Understanding mortality among older individuals with ID is essential to inform development of health promotion and disease control strategies. We investigated patterns and risk of mortality among older adults with ID in Sweden. Methods This retrospective cohort study compared older adults aged 55 years and older with ID with a control population. Participants were followed during 2002–2015 or death, and censored if they moved out of Sweden. Individuals with ID were identified from two national registers: one covering all specialist health-care visits (out-patient visits and hospitalisation and the other covering people accessing social/support services. Individuals with ID (n = 15,289 were matched with a control population by sex, birth year, and year of first hospitalisation/out-patient visit/access to LSS services. Cause-of-death data were recorded using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Cox proportional hazards regression were conducted to assess if overall and cause-specific mortality rate among individuals with ID was higher than in the Swedish population. Results The overall mortality rate among individuals with ID was 2483 per 100,000 people compared with 810 in the control population. Among those who died, more individuals with ID were younger than 75 years and unmarried. Leading causes of death among individuals with ID were circulatory diseases (34%, respiratory diseases (17% and neoplasms (15%. Leading causes of death in a sub-sample with Down syndrome (DS were respiratory diseases (37%, circulatory diseases (26% and mental/behavioural disorders (11%. Epilepsy and pneumonitis were more common among individuals with ID than controls. Alzheimer’s disease was common in the control population and individuals with DS, but not among those with ID when

  7. Bread consumption patterns in a Swedish national dietary survey focusing particularly on whole-grain and rye bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Pernilla; Kihlberg, Iwona; Lindroos, Anna Karin; Marklinder, Ingela; Nydahl, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    Background Bread types with high contents of whole grains and rye are associated with beneficial health effects. Consumer characteristics of different bread consumption patterns are however not well known. Objective To compare bread consumption patterns among Swedish adults in relation to selected socio-demographic, geographic, and lifestyle-related factors. For selected consumer groups, the further aim is to investigate the intake of whole grains and the context of bread consumption, that is, where and when it is consumed. Design Secondary analysis was performed on bread consumption data from a national dietary survey (n=1,435). Respondents were segmented into consumer groups according to the type and amount of bread consumed. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to study how selected socio-demographic, geographic, and lifestyle-related factors were associated with the consumer groups. Selected consumption groups were compared in terms of whole-grain intake and consumption context. Consumption in different age groups was analysed more in detail. Results One-third of the respondents consumed mainly white bread. Socio-demographic, geographic, and healthy-lifestyle-related factors were associated with the bread type consumed. White bread consumption was associated with younger age groups, less education, children in the family, eating less fruit and vegetables, and more candy and snacks; the opposite was seen for mainly whole-grain bread consumers. Older age groups more often reported eating dry crisp bread, whole-grain bread, and whole-grain rye bread with sourdough whereas younger respondents reported eating bread outside the home, something that also mainly white bread eaters did. Low consumers of bread also consumed less whole grain in total. Conclusions Traditional bread consumption structures were observed, as was a transition among young consumers who more often consumed fast food bread and bread outside the home, as well as less rye and whole

  8. Screening migrants for tuberculosis - a missed opportunity for improving knowledge and attitudes in high-risk groups: A cross-sectional study of Swedish-language students in Umeå, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlm Clas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migrants from countries with a high-burden of tuberculosis (TB are at a particular risk of contracting and developing the disease. In Sweden, new immigrants are routinely offered screening for the disease, yet very little is known about their beliefs about the disease which may affect healthcare-seeking behaviours. In this study we assessed recent immigrant students' knowledge of, and attitudes towards TB, and their relationship with the screening process. Methods Data were collected over a one-year period through a survey questionnaire completed by 268 immigrants consecutively registered at two Swedish-language schools in Umeå, Sweden. Participants originated from 133 different countries and their ages varied between 16-63 years. Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were then performed. Results Though most of them (72% were screened, knowledge was in general poor with several misconceptions. The average knowledge score was 2.7 ± 1.3 (SD, (maximum = 8. Only 40 (15 % of the 268 respondents answered at least half of the 51 knowledge items correctly. The average attitude score was 5.1 ± 3.3 (SD (maximum = 12 which meant that most respondents held negative attitudes towards TB and diseased persons. Up to 67% lacked knowledge about sources of information while 71% requested information in their vernacular. Knowledge level was positively associated with having more than 12 years of education and being informed about TB before moving to Sweden. Attitude was positively associated with years of education and having heard about the Swedish Communicable Disease Act, but was negatively associated with being from the Middle East. Neither knowledge nor attitude were affected by health screening or exposure to TB information after immigration to Sweden. Conclusions Though the majority had contact with Swedish health professionals through the screening process, knowledge about tuberculosis among these immigrants was

  9. Effect of endoscopy screening on stage at gastric cancer diagnosis: results of the National Cancer Screening Programme in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K S; Jun, J K; Suh, M; Park, B; Noh, D K; Song, S H; Jung, K W; Lee, H-Y; Choi, I J; Park, E-C

    2015-02-03

    Although gastric cancer screening is common among countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer, there is little data to support the effectiveness of this screening. This study was designed to determine the differences in stage at diagnosis of gastric cancer according to the screening history and screening method (upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) vs endoscopy). The study population was derived from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP), a nationwide organised screening programme in Korea. The study cohort consisted of 19 168 gastric cancer patients who had been diagnosed in 2007 and who were invited to undergo gastric cancer screening via the NCSP between 2002 and 2007. Compared with never-screened patients, the odds ratios for being diagnosed with localised gastric cancer in endoscopy-screened patients and UGIS-screened patients were 2.10 (95% CI=1.90-2.33) and 1.24 (95% CI=1.13-1.36), respectively. Screening by endoscopy was more strongly associated with a diagnosis of localised stage gastric cancer compared with screening by UGIS.

  10. Interval lung cancer after a negative CT screening examination: CT findings and outcomes in National Lung Screening Trial participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierada, David S. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Pinsky, Paul F. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Duan, Fenghai [Brown University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Garg, Kavita [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Mail Stop F726, Box 6510, Aurora, CO (United States); Hart, Eric M. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kazerooni, Ella A. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nath, Hrudaya; Watts, Jubal R. [University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Department of Radiology-JTN370, Birmingham, AL (United States); Aberle, Denise R. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This study retrospectively analyses the screening CT examinations and outcomes of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had interval lung cancer diagnosed within 1 year after a negative CT screen and before the next annual screen. The screening CTs of all 44 participants diagnosed with interval lung cancer (cases) were matched with negative CT screens of participants who did not develop lung cancer (controls). A majority consensus process was used to classify each CT screen as positive or negative according to the NLST criteria and to estimate the likelihood that any abnormalities detected retrospectively were due to lung cancer. By retrospective review, 40/44 cases (91%) and 17/44 controls (39%) met the NLST criteria for a positive screen (P < 0.001). Cases had higher estimated likelihood of lung cancer (P < 0.001). Abnormalities included pulmonary nodules ≥4 mm (n = 16), mediastinal (n = 8) and hilar (n = 6) masses, and bronchial lesions (n = 6). Cancers were stage III or IV at diagnosis in 32/44 cases (73%); 37/44 patients (84%) died of lung cancer, compared to 225/649 (35%) for all screen-detected cancers (P < 0.0001). Most cases met the NLST criteria for a positive screen. Awareness of missed abnormalities and interpretation errors may aid lung cancer identification in CT screening. (orig.)

  11. Sociodemographic gradients in breast and cervical cancer screening in Korea: the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS) 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Jin; Park, Eun-Cheol; Choi, Kui Son; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon

    2011-06-17

    Cancer screening rates in Korea for five cancer types have increased steadily since 2002. With regard to the life-time cancer screening rates in 2009 according to cancer sites, the second highest was breast cancer (78.1%) and the third highest was cervical cancer (76.1%). Despite overall increases in the screening rate, disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening, based on sociodemographic characteristics, still exist. Data from 4,139 women aged 40 to 74 years from the 2005 to 2009 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey were used to analyze the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and receiving mammograms and Pap smears. The main outcome measures were ever having had a mammogram and ever having had a Pap smear. Using these items of information, we classified women into those who had had both types of screening, only one screening type, and neither screening type. We used logistic regression to investigate relationships between screening history and sociodemographic characteristics of the women. Being married, having a higher education, a rural residence, and private health insurance were significantly associated with higher rates of breast and cervical cancer screening after adjusting for age and sociodemographic factors. Household income was not significantly associated with mammograms or Pap smears after adjusting for age and sociodemographic factors. Disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening associated with low sociodemographic status persist in Korea.

  12. Swedish electricity market 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The organization of the Swedish electricity market has been in a state of continual change since the electricity market reform was started in the early 1990s. The conditions for the development of the electricity market have changed since the new Electricity Act came into force on 1 January 1996. The purpose of the reform is to introduce greater competition on the electricity market and provide the consumers with greater freedom of choice and, by open trade in electricity, to create the conditions for more efficient pricing. Being the central energy authority, the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development, NUTEK, was entrusted by the Government with the task of following developments on the Swedish electricity market. The Network Authority, which has the supervisory function for the new electricity market, were entrusted by the Government with the task of following developments on the Swedish electricity market and regularly compiling and reporting current market information. The new electricity market has now been operative for ten months. The Network Authority has submitted to the Government a detailed report entitled `Developments on the electricity market`, dealing with the experience gained from the electricity market reform. The purpose of the publication is to provide the players on the electricity market - the decision makers, the media and the general public - with comprehensive and easily accessible information on the market conditions. The publication includes summaries of information on electricity production and use in recent years, the structure of the electricity market from the perspective of a player, electricity trade in Sweden and in northern Europe, electricity prices in Sweden and other countries, and the impact of the electricity sector on the environment

  13. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; White, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cespedes, Ernesto [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bowerman, Biays [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Bush, John [Battelle

    2010-11-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009. The primary results of this effort are described in this document and can be summarized as follows: (1) Completed a gap analysis that identified threat signatures and observables, candidate technologies for detection, their current state of development, and provided recommendations for improvements to meet air cargo screening requirements. (2) Defined a Commodity/Threat/Detection matrix that focuses modeling and experimental efforts, identifies technology gaps and game-changing opportunities, and provides a means of summarizing current and emerging capabilities. (3) Defined key properties (e.g., elemental composition, average density, effective atomic weight) for basic commodity and explosive benchmarks, developed virtual models of the physical distributions (pallets) of three commodity types and three

  14. National energy policies. Obstructing the reduction of global CO{sub 2} emissions? An analysis of Swedish energy policies for the district heating sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difs, Kristina [Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linkoping University, SE-581 83 Linkoping (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The effect of national energy policies on a local Swedish district heating (DH) system has been studied, regarding the profitability of new investments and the potential for climate change mitigation. The DH system has been optimised regarding three investments: biomass-fuelled CHP (bio CHP), natural gas-fuelled combined cycle CHP (NGCC CHP) and biomass-fuelled heat-only boiler (bio HOB) in two scenarios (with or without national taxes and policy instruments). In both scenarios EU's tradable CO{sub 2} emission permits are included. Results from the study show that when national policies are included, the most cost-effective investment option is the bio CHP technology. However, when national taxes and policy instruments are excluded, the DH system containing the NGCC CHP plant has 30% lower system cost than the bio CHP system. Regardless of the scenario and when coal condensing is considered as marginal electricity production, the NGCC CHP has the largest global CO{sub 2} reduction potential, about 300 ktonne CO{sub 2}. However, the CO{sub 2} reduction potential is highly dependent on the marginal electricity production. Demonstrated here is that national policies such as tradable green certificates can, when applied to DH systems, contribute to investments that will not fully utilise the DH systems' potential for global CO{sub 2} emissions reductions. (author)

  15. A European and Swedish perspective on ICT – policies and strategies in education. National and institutional pathways: crossings, blind alleys and uphill slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Hansson

    2004-04-01

    The globalisation of education forces different value systems to meet. There is on the national level highly different political values on what kind of education system to prefer – the Scandinavian model and the American model are two extremes. There are also very different values inherent in higher education institutions, the academia, - compared with the values and visions held by the political leaders. These value differences between and within countries are elaborated and discussed. A Swedish, Scandinavian and European perspective is adopted, but a wider international outlook is also given. It is suggested that the value conflicts, often not explicit, understood or recognised, are one of the major inhibitors for systemic change. The direction of change cannot be taken for granted – the driving forces pull in opposing directions. Different visions of the future struggle to be fulfilled.

  16. Nation-wide data on screening performance during the transition to digital mammography: observations in 6 million screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijt, Paula A; Fracheboud, Jacques; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A M; den Heeten, Gerard J; de Koning, Harry J

    2013-11-01

    To critically evaluate and confirm previous results regarding the diagnostic accuracy of digital mammography screening (DM), compared to screen-film mammography (SFM) in the whole Dutch screening programme, in the period of 2004-2010, during which a full transition from SFM to DM was made. 1.5 million DM and 4.6 million SFM were read in the Dutch national breast cancer screening programme in the period of 2004-2010. We evaluated recall rate, detection rate, positive predictive value and tumour-size distribution for younger and older women, for first time participants and women having a timely subsequent screen. We compared DM screens read by radiologists reading DM and SFM (DM-group) to SFM screens read by these radiologists (SFM-group) and to SFM screens read by radiologists reading only SFM (SFMonly-group). Recall rate was 2.0% (95% confidence interval (C.I.): 2.0; 2.1) in the DM-group, compared to 1.6% (95% C.I.: 1.6; 1.6) in the SFM-group and 1.6% (95% C.I.: 1.5; 1.6) in the SFM only-group. The overall detection rates were 5.9/1000 screens (95% C.I.: 5.7; 6.0) in the DM-group, 5.1/1000 screens (95% C.I.: 5.0; 5.2) in the SFM-group and 5.0/1000 screens (95% C.I.: 5.0; 5.1) in the SFM only-group. Detection rate rose most markedly in younger women (age 49-54) from 4.0/1000 screens to 5.1/1000 screens (p-valuescreens (95% C.I.: 4.7; 5.3) in 2004 to 5.5/1000 screens (95% C.I.: 5.2; 5.7) in 2010. Detection rate in DM-group rose mostly due to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) detection especially in younger women/first screens. The proportion of T1a tumours was significantly higher in DM-group; otherwise size distribution did not change significantly for invasive carcinoma. Recall rates were variable between different screening regions. In accordance to previous, smaller, studies, we can confirm that DM has a higher detection rate compared to SFM, at the cost of a higher recall rate and lower PPV. More DCIS and a higher fraction of very small tumours were detected with

  17. Family environment and the malleability of cognitive ability: a Swedish national home-reared and adopted-away cosibling control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Turkheimer, Eric; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-04-14

    Cognitive ability strongly aggregates in families, and prior twin and adoption studies have suggested that this is the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used a powerful design--home-reared and adopted-away cosibling controls--to investigate the role of the rearing environment in cognitive ability. We identified, from a complete national Swedish sample of male-male siblings, 436 full-sibships in which at least one member was reared by one or more biological parents and the other by adoptive parents. IQ was measured at age 18-20 as part of the Swedish military service conscription examination. Parental educational level was rated on a 5-point scale. Controlling for clustering of offspring within biological families, the adopted siblings had an IQ 4.41 (SE = 0.75) points higher than their nonadopted siblings. Each additional unit of rearing parental education was associated with 1.71 (SE = 0.44) units of IQ. We replicated these results in 2,341 male-male half-sibships, in which, controlling for clustering within families, adoption was associated with a gain of IQ of 3.18 (SE = 0.34) points. Each additional unit of rearing parental education was associated with 1.94 (SE = 0.18) IQ units. Using full- and half-sibling sets matched for genetic background, we found replicated evidence that (i) rearing environment affects IQ measured in late adolescence, and (ii) a portion of the IQ of adopted siblings could be explained by the educational level of their adoptive parents.

  18. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  19. Prostate Cancer Screening in Jamaica: Results of the Largest National Screening Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda F. Morrison

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is highly prevalent in Jamaica and is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Our aim was to evaluate the patterns of screening in the largest organized screening clinic in Jamaica at the Jamaica Cancer Society. A retrospective analysis of all men presenting for screening at the Jamaica Cancer Society from 1995 to 2005 was done. All patients had digital rectal examinations (DRE and prostate specific antigen (PSA tests done. Results of prostate biopsies were noted. 1117 men of mean age 59.9 ± 8.2 years presented for screening. The median documented PSA was 1.6 ng/mL (maximum of 5170 ng/mL. Most patients presented for only 1 screen. There was a gradual reduction in the mean age of presentation for screening over the period. Prostate biopsies were requested on 11% of screening visits; however, only 59% of these were done. 5.6% of all persons screened were found to have cancer. Of the cancers diagnosed, Gleason 6 adenocarcinoma was the commonest grade and median PSA was 8.9 ng/mL (range 1.5–1059 ng/mL. Older men tend to screen for prostate cancer in Jamaica. However, compliance with regular maintenance visits and requests for confirmatory biopsies are poor. Screening needs intervention in the Jamaican population.

  20. Cancer screening in Korea, 2010: results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Yoon Young; Jun, Jae Kwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the participation rates in gastric, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening in Korea, including both organised and opportunistic programmes, a nationwide interview survey using multi-stage random sampling was conducted in 2010. A total of 4,056 cancer-free men aged over 40 years and women aged 30 years participated. Lifetime screening rates ranged from 54.2% (liver cancer) to 79.5% (breast cancer) and rates of screening in accordance with guidelines ranged from 22.9% (liver cancer) to 65.1% (gastric cancer). Upper endoscopy was the preferred method for gastric cancer, whereas the faecal occult blood test was conducted most often for colorectal cancer. The main reason stated for non attendance was 'no symptoms'. To increase attendance at cancer-screening programmes, efforts to increase education and accessibility of screening programmes are necessary.

  1. Balancing performance-based expectations with a holistic perspective on coaching: a qualitative study of Swedish women's national football team coaches' practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Eva-Carin; Barker-Ruchti, Natalie

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how an exclusive sample of women's national football team coaches described how they implement careful coaching while facing social and organizational pressure to win medals. To consider coaches' negotiations, we drew on Noddings' concept of caring. Using an interpretive research paradigm, we conducted in-depth interviews with five Swedish women's national football team coaches. An abductive approach was used to simultaneously process the theoretical framework of "ethics of care" and the empirical data. The coaches unanimously adopted a holistic perspective to coaching. The coaching strategies they described included promoting players' development, well-being, and sustainable elite performance; listening to the players' voices and engaging in dialogue; and creating a positive environment and promoting fair play. These findings demonstrate that the women coaches, despite performance pressure, adopt caring coaching in the form of Noddings' pedagogical modelling, dialogue, and confirmation strategies, and provide an example of how coaches can adopt caring, holistic, and athlete-centred coaching while working at the highest level of competitive sport and achieving competitive success.

  2. Balancing performance-based expectations with a holistic perspective on coaching: a qualitative study of Swedish women’s national football team coaches’ practice experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Eva-Carin; Barker-Ruchti, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how an exclusive sample of women’s national football team coaches described how they implement careful coaching while facing social and organizational pressure to win medals. Method: To consider coaches’ negotiations, we drew on Noddings’ concept of caring. Using an interpretive research paradigm, we conducted in-depth interviews with five Swedish women’s national football team coaches. An abductive approach was used to simultaneously process the theoretical framework of “ethics of care” and the empirical data. Results: The coaches unanimously adopted a holistic perspective to coaching. The coaching strategies they described included promoting players’ development, well-being, and sustainable elite performance; listening to the players’ voices and engaging in dialogue; and creating a positive environment and promoting fair play. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that the women coaches, despite performance pressure, adopt caring coaching in the form of Noddings’ pedagogical modelling, dialogue, and confirmation strategies, and provide an example of how coaches can adopt caring, holistic, and athlete-centred coaching while working at the highest level of competitive sport and achieving competitive success. PMID:28812449

  3. Discrepancies between the electronic medical record, the prescriptions in the Swedish national prescription repository and the current medication reported by patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedahl, Anders; Brosius, Helen; Jönsson, Julia; Karlsson, Hanna; Yngvesson, Maria

    2011-11-01

    To study discrepancies between (i) the prescribed current treatment stated by patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) compared with patients with other chronic diseases, (ii) the data in the medication list (ML) in the electronic medical record and (iii) the data in the prescription list (PL) on the prescriptions stored in the national prescription repository in Sweden, to determine current, noncurrent, duplicate and missing prescriptions. At one healthcare centre, a random sample of patients 18 years and older with a diagnosis of CHF, diabetes mellitus (DM) or osteoarthritis (OA) provided written informed consent to participate. Participants were interviewed by telephone on the prescribed current treatment. Of 161 invited patients (61 CHF, 50 DM and 50 OA), 66 patients were included. More than 80% of the patients had at least one discrepancy, a noncurrent, a duplicate or a missing prescription, in the ML and PL. The overall congruence for unique prescriptions on current treatment between the ML and the PL was only 55%. Patients with CHF had overall more discrepancies and patients with DM fewer discrepancies in the ML. Prescriptions for noncurrent treatment, duplicates and missing prescriptions are common in both the ML in the electronic medical record and the list on prescriptions stored in the Swedish National Prescription Repository. Patients with CHF had more discrepancies in the ML. The risk for medication errors in primary care due to incorrect information on prescribed treatment may be substantial. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. National Library of Norway's new database of 22 manuscript maps concerning the Swedish King Charles XII's campaign in Norway in 1716 and 1718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicte Gamborg Brisa

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Library of Norway is planning to digitise approximately 1,500 manuscript maps. Two years ago we started working on a pilot project, and for this purpose we chose 22 maps small enough to be photographed in one piece. We made slides 6 x 7 cm in size, converted the slides into PhotoCDs and used four different resolutions on JPEG-files. To avoid large file sizes, we had to divide the version with the biggest resolution into four pieces. The preliminary work was done in Photoshop, the database on the web is made in Oracle. You can click on the map to zoom. Norwegians and probably Swedes during the Great Northern War drew the 22 maps when the Swedish King Charles XII in 1716 and 1718 unsuccessfully attempted to conquer Norway. The database is now accessible on the National Library of Norway's web site. The database is in Norwegian, but we are working on an English version as well. The maps are searchable on different topics, countries, counties, geographical names, shelfmarks or a combination of these. We are planning to expand the database to other manuscript maps later. This is the reason why it is possible to search for obvious subjects as Charles XII and the Great Northern War.

  5. Trends in surgery for screen-detected and interval breast cancers in a national screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederend, J; Duijm, L E M; Louwman, M W J; Roumen, R M H; Jansen, F H; Voogd, A C

    2014-07-01

    This population-based study aimed to evaluate trends in surgical approach for screen-detected cancer versus interval breast cancer, and to determine the factors associated with positive resection margins. Screening mammograms of women aged 50-75 years, who underwent biennial screening in a Dutch breast-screening region between 1997 and 2011, were included. Patient and tumour characteristics were compared between women who underwent mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for screen-detected or interval cancer, and women with a negative or positive resection margin after BCS. Some 417,013 consecutive screening mammograms were included. A total of 2224 screen-detected and 825 interval cancers were diagnosed. The BCS rate remained stable (mean 6.1 per 1000 screened women; P = 0.099), whereas mastectomy rates increased significantly during the study from 0.9 (1997-1998) to 1.9 (2009-2010) per 1000 screened women (P breasts, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, microcalcifications, architectural distortion, tumour size over 20 mm, axillary lymph node metastasis and treating hospital were independent risk factors for mastectomy. Interval cancer, image-guided tumour localization, microcalcifications, breast parenchyma asymmetry, tumour size greater than 20 mm, lobular tumour histology, low tumour grade, extensive invasive component and treating hospital were independent risk factors for positive resection margins. Mastectomy rates doubled during a 14-year period of screening mammography and the proportion of positive resection margins decreased, with variation among hospitals. The latter observation stresses the importance of quality control programmes for hospitals treating women with breast cancer. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Gastric Cancer Screening Uptake Trends in Korea: Results for the National Cancer Screening Program From 2002 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangeun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Suh, Mina; Park, Boyoung; Noh, Dai Keun; Jung, Kyu-Won; Choi, Kui Son

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the effectiveness of mass screening for gastric cancer remains controversial, several countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer have implemented nationwide gastric cancer screening programs. This study was conducted to assess trends in the use of either upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) or endoscopy to screen for gastric cancer, as well as to assess factors strongly associated with changes therein, over a 10-year period. Data were obtained from the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) database from 2002 to 2011 in Korea. The NCSP provides biennial gastric cancer screening with either UGIS or endoscopy for men and women aged ≥40 years. Using the NCSP database, overall screening rates for gastric cancer and percentages of endoscopy use among participants were analyzed from 2002 to 2011. To estimate changes in participation rates and endoscopy use over time, we assessed the average annual percentage change (APC) by comparing the rates from 2002 and 2011 as relative rates. Participation rates for gastric cancer screening increased 4.33% annually from 2002 to 2011. In terms of screening method, a substantial increase in endoscopy use was noted among the gastric cancer screening participants over the 10-year period. The percentage of participants who had undergone endoscopy test increased from 31.15% in 2002 to 72.55% in 2011, whereas the percentage of participants who underwent UGIS decreased tremendously. Increased endoscopy test use was greatest among participants aged 40 to 49 (APC = 4.83%) and Medical Aid Program recipients (APC = 5.73%). Overall, men, participants of ages 40 to 49 years, and National Health Insurance beneficiaries of higher socioeconomic status were more likely to undergo screening via endoscopy. This study of nationwide empirical data from 2002 to 2011 showed that endoscopy is increasingly being used for gastric cancer screening in Korea, compared with UGIS. Nevertheless, further study of the impact of

  7. IQ and schizophrenia in a Swedish national sample: their causal relationship and the interaction of IQ with genetic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    The authors sought to clarify the relationship between IQ and subsequent risk for schizophrenia. IQ was assessed at ages 18-20 in 1,204,983 Swedish males born between 1951 and 1975. Schizophrenia was assessed by hospital diagnosis through 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate future risk for schizophrenia in individuals as a function of their IQ score, and then stratified models using pairs of relatives were used to adjust for familial cluster. Finally, regression models were used to examine the interaction between IQ and genetic liability on risk for schizophrenia. IQ had a monotonic relationship with schizophrenia risk across the IQ range, with a mean increase in risk of 3.8% per 1-point decrease in IQ; this association was stronger in the lower than the higher IQ range. Co-relative control analyses showed a similar association between IQ and schizophrenia in the general population and in cousin, half-sibling, and full-sibling pairs. A robust interaction was seen between genetic liability to schizophrenia and IQ in predicting schizophrenia risk. Genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia had a much stronger impact on risk of illness for those with low than high intelligence. The IQ-genetic liability interaction arose largely from IQ differences between close relatives. IQ assessed in late adolescence is a robust risk factor for subsequent onset of schizophrenia. This association is not the result of a declining IQ associated with insidious onset. In this large, representative sample, we found no evidence for a link between genius and schizophrenia. Co-relative control analyses showed that the association between lower IQ and schizophrenia is not the result of shared familial risk factors and may be causal. The strongest effect was seen with IQ differences within families. High intelligence substantially attenuates the impact of genetic liability on the risk for schizophrenia.

  8. Revision surgery in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a cohort study of 17,682 patients from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Neel; Andernord, Daniel; Sundemo, David; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie; Forssblad, Magnus; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the association between surgical variables and the risk of revision surgery after ACL reconstruction in the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register. This cohort study was based on data from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register. Patients who underwent primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon were included. Follow-up started with primary ACL reconstruction and ended with ACL revision surgery or on 31 December, 2014, whichever occurred first. Details on surgical technique were collected using an online questionnaire. All group comparisons were made in relation to an "anatomic" reference group, comprised of essential AARSC items, defined as utilization of accessory medial portal drilling, anatomic tunnel placement, visualization of insertion sites and pertinent landmarks. Study end-point was revision surgery. A total of 108 surgeons (61.7%) replied to the questionnaire. A total of 17,682 patients were included [n = 10,013 males (56.6%) and 7669 females (43.4%)]. The overall revision rate was 3.1%. Older age as well as cartilage injury evident at index surgery was associated with a decreased risk of revision surgery. The group using transtibial drilling and non-anatomic bone tunnel placement was associated with a lower risk of revision surgery [HR 0.694 (95% CI 0.490-0.984); P = 0.041] compared with the anatomic reference group. The anatomic reference group showed no difference in risk of revision surgery compared with the transtibial drilling groups with partial anatomic [HR 0.759 (95% CI 0.548-1.051), n.s.] and anatomic tunnel placement [HR 0.944 (95% CI 0.718-1.241), n.s.]. The anatomic reference group showed a decreased risk of revision surgery compared with the transportal drilling group with anatomic placement [HR 1.310 (95% CI 1.047-1.640); P = 0.018]. Non-anatomic bone tunnel placement via transtibial drilling resulted in the lowest risk of revision surgery after ACL reconstruction. The risk of revision surgery

  9. How national institutions mediate the global : Screen translation, institutional interdependencies and the production of national difference in four European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.

    2015-01-01

    How do national institutional contexts mediate the global? This article aims to answer this question by analyzing screen translation—the translation of audiovisual materials like movies and television programs—in four European countries: France, Italy, the Netherlands, and Poland. A cross-national,

  10. Newborn hearing screening: a regional example for national care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adelola, O A

    2010-05-01

    Congenital Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment (PCHI) is known to have a negative effect on language acquisition, cognitive development and social integration. Since 2000 our department has implemented a UNHS program in the West of Ireland. We describe our experience and detail our results to date. All neonates born from October 2000 to November 2007 were screened using a 2-stage protocol. Transient evoked oto-acoustic emissions (TEOAEs) were used to screen all neonates, followed by automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) in those who did not pass TEOAE, and all neonates at audiological risk. 26,281 babies were born over the eight year period. 25,742 underwent the screening process, achieving a coverage rate of 98%. The prevalence of PCHI in the population tested was 1.21\\/1000 live births (31\\/25,731). Our results show that a hospital based 2-stage UNHS protocol using TEOAEs and AABR is accurate, feasible and effective.

  11. Prenatal detection of congenital heart disease - Results of a national screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Velzen, C. L.; Clur, S. A.; Rijlaarsdam, M. E B; Bax, C. J.; Pajkrt, E.; Heymans, M. W.; Bekker, M. N.; Hruda, J.; De Groot, C. J M; Blom, N. A.; Haak, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and causes major morbidity and mortality. Prenatal detection improves the neonatal condition before surgery, resulting in less morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands a national prenatal screening programme was

  12. Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howell, A; Astley, S; Warwick, J; Stavrinos, P; Sahin, S; Ingham, S; McBurney, H; Eckersley, B; Harvie, M; Wilson, M; Beetles, U; Warren, R; Hufton, A; Sergeant, J; Newman, W; Buchan, I; Cuzick, J; Evans, D. G

    2012-01-01

    ...; and Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge; UK). Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme (Review). J Intern Med 2012; 271 : 321–330...

  13. Improving population-based cervical cancer screening in general practice : effects of a national strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Mulder, J; Tacken, M A; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a Dutch national prevention programme, aimed at general practitioners (GPs), on the adherence to organizational guidelines for effective cervical cancer screening in general practice. To identify the characteristics of general practices determining success.

  14. Comparison of direct digital mammography, computed radiography, and film-screen in the French national breast cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séradour, Brigitte; Heid, Patrice; Estève, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the performance of digital mammography using hardcopy image reading against film-screen mammography in a French national routine population-based screening program with a decentralized organization. The French context offered the opportunity to examine separately computed radiography and direct digital mammography performances in a large cohort. The study includes 23,423 direct digital mammography, 73,320 computed radiography, and 65,514 film-screen mammography examinations performed by 123 facilities in Bouches du Rhône, France, for women 50-74 years old between 2008 and 2010. We compared abnormal mammography findings rate, cancer detection rate, and tumor characteristics among the technologies. Abnormal finding rates were higher for direct digital mammography (7.78% vs 6.11% for film-screen mammography and 5.34% for computed radiography), particularly in younger women and in denser breasts. Cancer detection rates were also higher for direct digital mammography (0.71% vs 0.66% for film-screen mammography and 0.55% for computed radiography). The contrast between detection rates was stronger for ductal carcinoma in situ. Breast density was the main factor explaining the differences in detection rates. For direct digital mammography only, the detection rate was clearly higher in dense breasts whatever the age (odds ratio, 2.20). Except for grade, no differences were recorded concerning tumor characteristics in which the proportion of high-grade tumors was larger for direct digital mammography for invasive and in situ tumors. Direct digital mammography has a higher detection rate than film-screen mammography in dense breasts and for tumors of high grade. This latter association warrants further study to measure the impact of technology on efficacy of screening. The data indicate that computed radiography detects fewer tumors than film-screen mammography in most instances.

  15. Cognitive ability in late adolescence and disability pension in middle age: follow-up of a national cohort of Swedish males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Sörberg

    Full Text Available Low cognitive ability in late adolescence has previously been shown to be associated with disability pension (DP in young adulthood. However, most DP's are granted later in working life, and the mechanisms of the association are not fully understood. We aimed to investigate the association between cognitive ability in late adolescence and DP at ages 40-59, and investigate the role of individual and socioeconomic factors. Information on cognitive ability, health status, personality aspects and health behaviours at age 18-20 was obtained from the 1969-70 conscription cohort, comprising 49,321 Swedish men. Data on DP's 1991-2008 was obtained from the Longitudinal Database of Education, Income and Employment. Information on socioeconomic and work-related factors in childhood and adulthood was obtained from national sociodemographic databases. Hazard ratios for DP during follow-up were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. We found a graded relationship between cognitive ability in late adolescence and DP in middle age. One step decrease on the nine-point stanine scale of cognitive ability was associated with a crude hazard ratio of 1.26 (95% CI 1.24-1.27. Socioeconomic and work-related circumstances in adulthood explained much of the association, but factors measured already in late adolescence also showed importance. The findings suggest an accumulation of risks over the life course. Although attenuated, the graded relationship remained after adjusting for all factors.

  16. Associations between dental anxiety, sense of coherence, oral health-related quality of life and health behavior--a national Swedish cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Viktor; Hakeberg, Magnus; Wide Boman, Ulla

    2015-09-02

    Dental anxiety (DA) is a common condition associated with avoidance of dental care and subsequent health-related and psychosocial outcomes, in what has been described as the vicious circle of DA. Also, recent studies have found an association between the psychosocial concept of sense of coherence (SOC) and DA. More studies are needed to verify the relationship between DA and SOC, especially using population-based samples. There is also a need for studies including factors related to the vicious circle of DA, such as oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), in order to further establish the correlates of DA in the general population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between DA and SOC, OHRQoL and health-related behaviour in the general Swedish population. The survey included a randomly selected sample of the adult Swedish population (N = 3500, age 19 - 96 years.). Data was collected by means of telephone interviews. Dental anxiety was measured with a single question. The SOC measure consisted of three questions conceptualising the dimensions of the SOC: comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness. The data collection also included the five-item version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-5), as a measure of OHRQoL, as well as questions on oral health-related behaviour and socioeconomic status. Statistical analyses were made with descriptive statistics and inference testing using Chi-square, t--test and logistic regression. High DA was associated with low OHRQoL, irregular dental care and smoking. There was a statistically significant relationship between the SOC and DA in the bivariate, but not in the multivariate, analyses. Dental anxiety was not associated with oral health-related behaviour or socioeconomic status. This cross-sectional national survey gives support to the significant associations between high dental anxiety, avoidance of dental care and health-related outcomes, which may further reinforce the

  17. Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) test used in the implementation of assessment instruments and treatment methods in a Swedish National study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billsten, Johan; Fridell, Mats; Holmberg, Robert; Ivarsson, Andréas

    2018-01-01

    Organizational climate and related factors are associated with outcome and are as such of vital interest for healthcare organizations. Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) is the questionnaire used in the present study to assess the influence of organizational factors on implementation success. The respondents were employed in one of 203 Swedish municipalities within social work and psychiatric substance/abuse treatment services. They took part in a nationwide implementation project organized by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR), commissioned by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. The aims were: (a) to identify classes (clusters) of employees with different ORC profiles on the basis of data collected in 2011 and (b) to investigate ORC profiles which predicted the use of assessment instruments, therapy methods and collaborative activities in 2011 and 2013. The evaluation study applied a naturalistic design with registration of outcome at consecutive assessments. The participants were contacted via official e-mail addresses in their respective healthcare units and were encouraged by their officials to participate on a voluntary basis. Descriptive statistics were obtained using SPSS version 23. A latent profile analysis (LPA) using Mplus 7.3 was performed with a robust maximum likelihood estimator (MLR) to identify subgroups (clusters) based on the 18 ORC indexes. A total of 2402 employees responded to the survey, of whom 1794 (74.7%) completed the ORC scores. Descriptive analysis indicated that the respondents were a homogenous group of employees, where women (72.0%) formed the majority. Cronbach's alpha for the 18 ORC indexes ranged from α=0.67 to α=0.78. A principal component analysis yielded a four-factor solution explaining 62% of the variance in total ORC scores. The factors were: motivational readiness (α=0.64), institutional resources (α=0.52), staff attributes (α=0.76), and organizational climate (α=0

  18. Utilization of breast cancer screening methods in a developing nation: results from a nationally representative sample of Malaysian households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2011-01-01

    As is the case in many developing nations, previous studies of breast cancer screening behavior in Malaysia have used relatively small samples that are not nationally representative, thereby limiting the generalizability of results. Therefore, this study uses nationally representative data from the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 to investigate the role of socio-economic status on breast cancer screening behavior in Malaysia, particularly differences in screening behaviour between ethnic groups. The decisions of 816 women above age 40 in Malaysia to screen for breast cancer using mammography, clinical breast exams (CBE), and breast self-exams (BSE) are modeled using logistic regression. Results indicate that after adjusting for differences in age, education, household income, marital status, and residential location, Malay women are less likely than Chinese and Indian women to utilize mammography, but more likely to perform BSE. Education level and urban residence are positively associated with utilization of each method, but these relationships vary across ethnicity. Higher education levels are strongly related to using each screening method among Chinese women, but have no statistically significant relationship to screening among Malays. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Change in depressive symptoms over higher education and professional establishment - a longitudinal investigation in a national cohort of Swedish nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensson, Anna; Runeson, Bo; Dickman, Paul W; Vaez, Marjan

    2010-06-15

    There are indications of a high prevalence of psychological distress among students in higher education and also that distress increases over the course of study. However, not all studies on student distress controlled for sociodemographic differences and few followed development of distress over an extended period through professional establishment. We investigated if there is an independent effect of time in education and the first two years in the profession on depressive symptoms and mapped change over the period in a national cohort of students. Data came from LANE, a nation-wide longitudinal panel survey of Swedish nursing students (N = 1700) who responded to annual questionnaires over five years from 2002 to 2007. Depressive symptoms were measured by the Major Depression Inventory and change over time analysed in a linear mixed effects model for repeated measures. There was a significant change in level of depressive symptoms over time: an increase from the first to later years in education and a decrease to levels similar to baseline after graduation and a year in the profession. The change in symptoms remained significant after adjustment for sociodemographic factors (p education and professional establishment on depressive symptoms. We think heightened distress over education abates as the graduate accommodates to the profession. Nevertheless, within education, the differences in depressive symptoms associated to demographic factors can help identify student groups more vulnerable to distress. Also, as individual differences in distress seem to persist over time, perhaps students highly distressed in the beginning of education can be helped by awareness among educators of the elevated levels of distress in late education.

  20. Diversity, difference and nation: indigenous peoples on screen in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    de la Garza, Armida

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on constructivist theories of identity that regard the self as, paradoxically, coming into existence through interaction with the other, to investigate the discursive formation of indigenous people in the forging of Mexican national identity. The aim of the essay is to show how difference has been managed and deployed in the establishment of national Mexican identities from independence until the present. This is done with reference to visual culture and film and illustrated ...

  1. Parents' views of including young boys in the Swedish national school-based HPV vaccination programme : a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Gottvall, Maria; Stenhammar, Christina; Grandahl, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore parents' views of extending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme to also include boys. Design: Explorative qualitative design using individual, face-to-face, interviews and inductive thematic analysis. Setting: 11 strategically chosen municipalities in central Sweden. Participants: Parents (n= 42) who were offered HPV vaccination for their 11-12 years old daughter in the national school-based vaccination programme. Results: The key themes were: equality f...

  2. [National congenital hypothyroidism screening in Peru: a broken program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Sáenz, Lina; Del Águila, Carlos; Espinoza, Oscar; Falen-Boggio, Juan; Mitre, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most important cause of preventable mental retardation. The prevalence of CH varies by geographic region, race and ethnicity. In the countries of the Northern hemisphere, the prevalence has been reported as 1:4,000 live newborns. The prevalence is remarkably different among the countries of Latin America not only because of their different races and ethnicities but also because of the heterogeneous social-economic development. The prevalence of CH in 1984 in Peru was reported as 1:1250. In 2007, the reported incidence by the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal was 1:1638. A recent retrospective study performed by the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño in Lima, Peru described the average age of diagnosis of CH as 5,9 months +/- 5,28. This late age of CH diagnosis certainly suggests the poor efficiency of the current neonatal CH screening programs in Peru. Every Peruvian infant deserves a timely newborn screening and treatment for CH. The Peruvian government is responsible for ensuring this mandatory goal is achieved promptly.

  3. AB017. The extended newborn screening by tandem mass in Taiwan—results from two national newborn screening centers: Taipei Institute of Pathology & Chinese Foundation of Health

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Dau-Ming; Chiang, Chuan-Chi; Ho, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Since 2001, tandem mass spectrometry was introduced for newborn screening by two Taiwan national newborn screening centers: Taipei Institute of Pathology and Chinese Foundation of Health, in Taiwan, respectively. A total of 24 metabolic disorders, including 6 amino acidopathies, 8 organic acid disorders and 9 fatty acid disorders, etc., were screened and the newborns with positive screening result were referred to Taipei Veterans General Hospital for confirmatory diagnosis. Until Dec 2014, a ...

  4. Creation of a National, At-home Model for Ashkenazi Jewish Carrier Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinzaid, Karen Arnovitz; Page, Patricia Zartman; Denton, Jessica Johnson; Ginsberg, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Ethnicity-based carrier screening for the Ashkenazi Jewish population has been available and encouraged by advocacy and community groups since the early 1970's. Both the American College of Medical Genetics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend carrier screening for this population (Obstetrics and Gynecology, 114(4), 950-953, 2009; Genetics in Medicine, 10(1), 55-56, 2008). While many physicians inquire about ethnic background and offer appropriate carrier screening, studies show that a gap remains in implementing recommendations (Genetic testing and molecular biomarkers, 2011). In addition, education and outreach efforts targeting Jewish communities have had limited success in reaching this at-risk population. Despite efforts by the medical and Jewish communities, many Jews of reproductive age are not aware of screening, and remain at risk for having children with preventable diseases. Reaching this population, preferably pre-conception, and facilitating access to screening is critically important. To address this need, genetic counselors at Emory University developed JScreen, a national Jewish genetic disease screening program. The program includes a national marketing and PR campaign, online education, at-home saliva-based screening, post-test genetic counseling via telephone or secure video conferencing, and referrals for face-to-face genetic counseling as needed. Our goals are to create a successful education and screening program for this population and to develop a model that could potentially be used for other at-risk populations.

  5. Implementation of national palliative care guidelines in Swedish acute care hospitals: A qualitative content analysis of stakeholders' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, S; Wallin, L; Brytting, T; Fürst, C J; Sandberg, J

    2017-11-01

    In high-income countries a large proportion of all deaths occur in hospitals. A common way to translate knowledge into clinical practice is developing guidelines for different levels of health care organisations. During 2012, national clinical guidelines for palliative care were published in Sweden. Later, guidance for palliative care was issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare. The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate perceptions regarding these guidelines and identify obstacles and opportunities for implementation of them in acute care hospitals. Interviews were conducted with local politicians, chief medical officers and health professionals at acute care hospitals. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used in a directed content analysis approach. The results showed little knowledge of the two documents at all levels of the health care organisation. Palliative care was primarily described as end of life care and only few of the participants talked about the opportunity to integrate palliative care early in a disease trajectory. The environment and culture at hospitals, characterised by quick decisions and actions, were perceived as obstacles to implementation. Health professionals' expressed need for palliative care training is an opportunity for implementation of clinical guidelines. There is a need for further implementation of palliative care in hospitals. One option for further research is to evaluate implementation strategies tailored to acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High quality cord blood banking is feasible with delayed clamping practices. The eight-year experience and current status of the national Swedish Cord Blood Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frändberg, Sofia; Waldner, Berit; Konar, Jan; Rydberg, Lennart; Fasth, Anders; Holgersson, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The National Swedish Cord Blood Bank (NS-CBB) is altruistic and publicly funded. Herein we describe the status of the bank and the impact of delayed versus early clamping on cell number and volume. Cord Blood Units (CBUs) were collected at two University Hospitals in Sweden. Collected volume and nucleated cell content (TNC) were investigated in 146 consecutive Cord Blood (CB) collections sampled during the first quarter of 2012 and in 162 consecutive CB collections done in the first quarter of 2013, before and after clamping practices were changed from immediate to late (60 s) clamping. NS-CBB now holds close to 5000 units whereof 30 % are from non-Caucasian or mixed origins. Delayed clamping had no major effect on collection efficiency. The volume collected was slightly reduced (mean difference, 8.1 ml; 95 % CI, 1.3-15.0 ml; p = 0.02), while cell recovery was not (p = 0.1). The proportion of CBUs that met initial total TNC banking criteria was 60 % using a TNC threshold of 12.5 × 10(8), and 47 % using a threshold of 15 × 10(8) for the early clamping group and 52 and 37 % in the late clamping group. Following implementation of delayed clamping practices at NS-CBB; close to 40 % of the collections in the late clamping group still met the high TNC banking threshold and were eligible for banking, implicating that that cord blood banking is feasible with delayed clamping practices.

  7. Health-related quality of life in children with surgery for CHD: a study from the Swedish National Registry for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Birgitta; Idvall, Ewa; Nilsson, Fredrik; Liuba, Petru

    2017-03-01

    As survival of children with CHD needing surgery has improved significantly, the need for follow-up in terms of health-related quality of life has become increasingly important. In this study, we sought to describe health-related quality of life in children with CHD in relation to cardiac surgery. A retrospective Swedish National Registry for Congenital Heart Disease survey measured using DISABKIDS chronic generic measure-short version included 337 children (age 9-17 years; 39% girls). The majority (n=319, 95%) of children had a biventricular heart, whereas the remaining had a univentricular heart. Cardiac surgery was performed in 197 (58%) children. Health-related quality of life was expressed as total score (100 highest) and given as medians and 10-90th percentiles. The overall total score was 95 (88-100). Children with a biventricular heart who had undergone three or more surgeries (n=31; 9%) had the lowest total score of 81 (61-97; pChildren with two or more surgeries and those with univentricular heart were classified in NYHA II more frequently than children with one or no cardiac surgery (p=0.005 and Children with three or more surgeries and those with univentricular heart needed more help at school (pchildren with other chronic diseases, children with CHD had a high total score except for children with three or more surgeries who had comparable total scores with children with other chronic diseases. Children with three or more cardiac surgeries and those with a univentricular heart appear to have lower health-related quality of life, cognitive ability, and NYHA classification.

  8. Parents' views of including young boys in the Swedish national school-based HPV vaccination programme: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottvall, Maria; Stenhammar, Christina; Grandahl, Maria

    2017-02-28

    To explore parents' views of extending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme to also include boys. Explorative qualitative design using individual, face-to-face, interviews and inductive thematic analysis. 11 strategically chosen municipalities in central Sweden. Parents (n=42) who were offered HPV vaccination for their 11-12 years old daughter in the national school-based vaccination programme. The key themes were: equality from a public health perspective and perception of risk for disease. Parents expressed low knowledge and awareness about the health benefits of male HPV vaccination, and they perceived low risk for boys to get HPV. Some parents could not see any reason for vaccinating boys. However, many parents preferred gender-neutral vaccination, and some of the parents who had not accepted HPV vaccination for their daughter expressed that they would be willing to accept vaccination for their son, if it was offered. It was evident that there was both trust and distrust in authorities' decision to only vaccinate girls. Parents expressed a preference for increased sexual and reproductive health promotion such as more information about condom use. Some parents shared that it was more important to vaccinate girls than boys since they believed girls face a higher risk of deadly diseases associated with HPV, but some also believed girls might be more vulnerable to side effects of the vaccine. A vaccine offered only to girls may cause parents to be hesitant to vaccinate, while also including boys in the national vaccination programme might improve parents' trust in the vaccine. More information about the health benefits of HPV vaccination for males is necessary to increase HPV vaccination among boys. This may eventually lead to increased HPV vaccine coverage among both girls and boys. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Are self-report of disability pension and long-term sickness absence accurate? Comparisons of self-reported interview data with national register data in a Swedish twin cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichtenstein Paul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reported disability pension (DP and sickness absence are commonly used in epidemiological and other studies as a measure of exposure or even as an outcome. The aims were (1 to compare such self-reports with national register information in order to evaluate the validity of self-reported DP and sickness absence, and (2 to estimate the concordance of reporting behaviour in different twin zygosity groups, also by sex. Methods All Swedish twins born 1933-1958 who participated in the Screening Across the Lifespan Twin study (SALT 1998-2003, were included (31,122 individuals. The self-reported DP and long-term sickness absence (LTSA at the time of interview was compared to the corresponding register information retrieved from the National Social Insurance Agency by calculating the proportions of agreements, kappa, sensitivity, specificity, concordance rates, and chi-square test, to evaluate construct validity. Results The proportions of overall agreement were 96% and specificity 99% for both DP and LTSA, while the sensitivity was 70% for DP and 45% for LTSA. Kappa estimates were 0.76 for DP, and 0.58 for LTSA. The proportions of positive agreement were 64% for DP and 42% for LTSA. No difference in response style was found between zygosity groups among complete twin pairs for DP and LTSA. Results were similar for women and men and across age. Kappa estimates for DP differed somewhat depending on years of education, 0.68 (college/university vs. 0.77 (less than 13 years in school but not for LTSA. Conclusions Self-reported DP data may be very useful in studies when register information is not available, however, register data is preferred especially for LTSA. The same degree of twin similarity was found for truthful self-report of DP and LTSA in both monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. Thus, the response style was not influenced by genetic factors. One consequence of this would be that when estimating the relative importance of

  10. Cost-effectiveness outcomes of the national gastric cancer screening program in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun; Kang, Moon Hae; Choi, Kui Son; Suh, Mina; Jun, Jae Kwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Although screening is necessary where gastric cancer is particularly common in Asia, the performance outcomes of mass screening programs have remained unclear. This study was conducted to evaluate cost-effectiveness outcomes of the national cancer screening program (NCSP) for gastric cancer in South Korea. People aged 40 years or over during 2002-2003 (baseline) were the target population. Screening recipients and patients diagnosed with gastric cancers were identified using the NCSP and Korea Central Cancer Registry databases. Clinical outcomes were measured in terms of mortality and life-years saved (LYS) of gastric cancer patients during 7 years based on merged data from the Korean National Health Insurance Corporation and National Statistical Office. We considered direct, indirect, and productivity-loss costs associated with screening attendance. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) estimates were produced according to screening method, sex, and age group compared to non-screening. The age-adjusted ICER for survival was 260,201,000-371,011,000 Korean Won (KW; 1USD=1,088 KW) for the upper-gastrointestinal (UGI) tract over non-screening. Endoscopy ICERs were lower (119,099,000-178,700,000 KW/survival) than UGI. To increase 1 life-year, additional costs of approximately 14,466,000-15,014,000 KW and 8,817,000-9,755,000 KW were required for UGI and endoscopy, respectively. Endoscopy was the most cost-effective strategy for males and females. With regard to sensitivity analyses varying based on the upper age limit, endoscopy NCSP was dominant for both males and females. For males, an upper limit of age 75 or 80 years could be considered. ICER estimates for LYS indicate that the gastric cancer screening program in Korea is cost-effective. Endoscopy should be recommended as a first-line method in Korea because it is beneficial among the Korean population.

  11. Knowing Is Not Half the Battle: Impacts of the National Health Screening Program in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyuncheol Bryant; Lee, Suejin; Lim, Wilfredo

    2017-01-01

    Health screening provides information on disease risk and diagnosis, but whether this promotes health is unclear. We estimate the impacts of the National Health Screening Program in Korea for diabetes, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. In this setting, information on disease risk and prompting for a secondary examination vary at different biomarker thresholds. We find evidence for increased diabetes medication and weight loss around the high risk threshold for diabetes, where information is combin...

  12. The Swedish Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari

    2012-01-01

    The main characteristics of ‘the Swedish model’ are arguably related to the country's knowledge-intensive industry and its advanced welfare state. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the historical development of these two features of the Swedish economy. The first part looks at industrial...

  13. National Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Singapore: evaluation of participation and performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, En Yun; Molinar, Darko; Chow, Khuan Yew; Fock, Christine

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate participation rates and performance indicators in the National Breast Cancer Screening Programme, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS). Data on women aged 40-69 screened in the period 2002-2009 was obtained from BSS and from the Singapore Cancer Registry. Participation rates and performance indicators (including screen detection rates, small tumour detection rates, recall rates, accuracy and interval cancer rates) were examined. BSS participation rate has remained above 10% since 2005. Based on health surveys, national mammography rates have increased from 29.7% before BSS to 39.6% in 2010 after BSS. Performance indicators, with the exception of recall rates, specificity, and interval cancer rate (for first screen), generally improved from 2002-2006 to 2007-2009 and are comparable with organized breast screening programmes in other developed countries. BSS breast cancer screening coverage and rescreen rates in Singapore could be improved. Mechanisms to monitor recall rates are in place, and training opportunities are provided to aid the professional development of radiologists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Triparental families: a new genetic-epidemiological design applied to drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior in a Swedish national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-06-01

    The authors sought to clarify the sources of parent-offspring resemblance for drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior, using a novel genetic-epidemiological design. Using national registries, the authors identified rates of drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior in 41,360 Swedish individuals born between 1960 and 1990 and raised in triparental families comprising a biological mother who reared them, a "not-lived-with" biological father, and a stepfather. When each syndrome was examined individually, hazard rates for drug abuse in offspring of parents with drug abuse were highest for mothers (2.80, 95% CI=2.23-3.38), intermediate for not-lived-with fathers (2.45, 95% CI=2.14-2.79), and lowest for stepfathers (1.99, 95% CI=1.55-2.56). The same pattern was seen for alcohol use disorders (2.23, 95% CI=1.93-2.58; 1.84, 95% CI=1.69-2.00; and 1.27, 95% CI=1.12-1.43) and criminal behavior (1.55, 95% CI=1.44-1.66; 1.46, 95% CI=1.40-1.52; and 1.30, 95% CI=1.23-1.37). When all three syndromes were examined together, specificity of cross-generational transmission was highest for mothers, intermediate for not-lived-with fathers, and lowest for stepfathers. Analyses of intact families and other not-lived-with parents and stepparents showed similar cross-generation transmission for these syndromes in mothers and fathers, supporting the representativeness of results from triparental families. A major strength of the triparental design is its inclusion, within a single family, of parents who provide, to a first approximation, their offspring with genes plus rearing, genes only, and rearing only. For drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, and criminal behavior, the results of this study suggest that parent-offspring transmission involves both genetic and environmental processes, with genetic factors being somewhat more important. These results should be interpreted in the context of the strengths and limitations of national registry data.

  15. Prenatal detection of congenital heart disease--results of a national screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, C L; Clur, S A; Rijlaarsdam, M E B; Bax, C J; Pajkrt, E; Heymans, M W; Bekker, M N; Hruda, J; de Groot, C J M; Blom, N A; Haak, M C

    2016-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and causes major morbidity and mortality. Prenatal detection improves the neonatal condition before surgery, resulting in less morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands a national prenatal screening programme was introduced in 2007. This study evaluates the effects of this screening programme. Geographical cohort study. Large referral region of three tertiary care centres. Fetuses and infants diagnosed with severe CHD born between 1 January 2002 and 1 January 2012. Cases were divided into two groups: before and after the introduction of screening. Detection rates were calculated. The prenatal detection rate (n = 1912) increased with 23.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 19.5-28.3) from 35.8 to 59.7% after the introduction of screening and of isolated CHD with 21.4% (95% CI 16.0-26.8) from 22.8 to 44.2%. The highest detection rates were found in the hypoplastic left heart syndrome, other univentricular defects and complex defects with atrial isomerism (>93%). Since the introduction of screening, the 'late' referrals (after 24 weeks of gestation) decreased by 24.3% (95% CI 19.3-29.3). This is the largest cohort study to investigate the prenatal detection rate of severe CHD in an unselected population. A nationally organised screening has resulted in a remarkably high detection rate of CHD (59.7%) compared with earlier literature. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. Creating a Screening Measure of Health Literacy for the Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlin, Sara; Mackert, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Create a screening measure of health literacy for use with the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Participants completed a paper-based survey. Items from the survey were used to construct a health literacy screening measure. A population-based survey conducted in geographic areas of high and low minority frequency and in Central Appalachia. Two thousand nine hundred four English-speaking participants were included in this study: 66% white, 93% completed high school, mean age = 52.53 years (SD = 16.24). A health literacy screening measure was created using four items included in the HINTS survey. Scores could range from 0 (no questions affirmative/correct) to 4 (all questions answered affirmatively/correctly). Multiple regression analysis was used to determine whether demographic variables known to predict health literacy were indeed associated with the constructed health literacy screening measure. The weighted average health literacy score was 2.63 (SD = 1.00). Those who were nonwhite (p = .0005), were older (p literacy screening measure scores. This study highlights the need to assess health literacy in national surveys, but also serves as evidence that screening measures can be created within existing datasets to give researchers the ability to consider the impact of health literacy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Swedish Government Minister at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research recently visited CERN. The Swedish Minister was greeted by Swedish scientists working at CERN. Signing of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding. Pär Omling, Director-General of the Swedish Research Council (left), and Jos Engelen, CERN’s Chief Scientific Officer. Lars Leijonborg, the Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research, was welcomed to CERN by Director-General Robert Aymar on 10 March. After an introduction to the Laboratory’s activities, the Minister was given guided tours of the control room, the ATLAS surface hall and experiment cavern and the adjoining LHC tunnel. Mr Leijonborg was then greeted by Swedish scientists and given an overview of the Swedish research programme at CERN. Five Swedish university groups are taking part in LHC research. Swedish universities are notably involved in the manufacture of parts for the sub-detectors of AT...

  18. Increasing participation in cervical cancer screening: offering a HPV self-test to long-term non-attendees as part of RACOMIP, a Swedish randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Gudrun; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Miao Jonasson, Junmei; Ryd, Mare-Liis; Holtenman, Mikael; Milsom, Ian; Strander, Björn

    2014-05-01

    RACOMIP is a population-based, randomized trial of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different interventions aimed at increasing participation in a well-run cervical cancer screening program in western Sweden. In this article, we report results from one intervention, offering non-attendees a high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) self-test. Comparison was made with standard screening invitation routine or standard routine plus a telephone call. Women (8,800), aged 30-62, were randomly selected among women without a registered Pap smear in the two latest screening rounds. These women were randomized 1:5:5 to one of three arms: 800 were offered a high-risk HPV self-test, 4,000 were randomized to a telephone call (reported previously) and 4,000 constituted a control group (standard screening invitation routine). Results were based on intention to treat analysis and cost-effectiveness was calculated as marginal cost per cancer case prevented. The endpoint was the frequency of testing. The total response rate in the self-testing arm was 24.5%, significantly higher than in the telephone arm (18%, RR 1.36, 95% CI 1.19-1.57) and the control group (10.6%, RR 2.33, 95% CI 2.00-2.71). All nine women who tested positive for high-risk HPV attended for a cervical smear and colposcopy. From the health-care sector perspective, the intervention will most likely lead to no additional cost. Offering a self-test for HPV as an alternative to Pap smears increases participation among long-term non-attendees. Offering various screening options can be a successful method for increasing participation in this group. © 2013 UICC.

  19. Who participates in the gastric cancer screening and on-time rescreening in the National Cancer Screening Program? A population-based study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung-Il; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan; Oh, Dongkwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2011-12-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) screening is a major challenge in countries where the disease is highly prevalent. This study was conducted to identify the factors associated with participation in GC screening and on-time rescreening among the average-risk population in Korea. The study population was derived from the National Cancer Screening Program database. The population for this study was 22 913 618 individuals aged ≥40 years who had been invited to participate in a GC screening program from 2005 to 2006. We determined whether these individuals had attended the GC screening program and which method - an upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) or endoscopy-they underwent. We followed the participants to determine whether they had a second GC screening after 2 years. The overall participation rate in the GC screening was 20.5%. More people underwent UGIS than endoscopy. Individuals who had been screened by endoscopy rather than UGIS were more likely to be younger, male, or those who were National Health Insurance (NHI) beneficiaries with a higher premium rate. Of those who underwent baseline screening, 59.4% participated in a rescreening program 2 years later. NHI beneficiaries with a higher premium rate were significantly more likely to be rescreened than medical aid recipients. The results from this study showed that the UGIS were more commonly used in organized GC screenings in Korea, and those who underwent UGIS were more likely to return for subsequent screening compared to those who underwent an endoscopy. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Australia's national bowel cancer screening program: does it work for indigenous Australians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Aliki; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Thompson, Sandra C

    2010-06-25

    Despite a lower incidence of bowel cancer overall, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage when prognosis is poor. Bowel cancer screening is an effective means of reducing incidence and mortality from bowel cancer through early identification and prompt treatment. In 2006, Australia began rolling out a population-based National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) using the Faecal Occult Blood Test. Initial evaluation of the program revealed substantial disparities in bowel cancer screening uptake with Indigenous Australians significantly less likely to participate in screening than the non-Indigenous population.This paper critically reviews characteristics of the program which may contribute to the discrepancy in screening uptake, and includes an analysis of organisational, structural, and socio-cultural barriers that play a part in the poorer participation of Indigenous and other disadvantaged and minority groups. A search was undertaken of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other grey literature using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Articles were critically evaluated for relevance to themes that addressed the research questions. The NBCSP is not reaching many Indigenous Australians in the target group, with factors contributing to sub-optimal participation including how participants are selected, the way the screening kit is distributed, the nature of the test and comprehensiveness of its contents, cultural perceptions of cancer and prevailing low levels of knowledge and awareness of bowel cancer and the importance of screening. Our findings suggest that the population-based approach to implementing bowel cancer screening to the Australian population unintentionally excludes vulnerable minorities, particularly Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This potentially contributes to exacerbating the already widening disparities in cancer outcomes that exist among

  1. Colorectal cancer screening of immigrants to Italy. Figures from the 2013 National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, Anna; Zorzi, Manuel; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Senore, Carlo; Campari, Cinzia; Fedato, Chiara; Naldoni, Carlo; Anghinoni, Emanuela; Carrozzi, Giuliano; Sassoli De' Bianchi, Priscilla; Zappa, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer screening programmes in Italy invite 50-69-year-old residents for a faecal immunochemical test every two years, regardless of their citizenship. The 2013 National Survey on Italian colorectal cancer screening programmes compared immigrants born in low- or middle-income countries with subjects who were born in Italy, by collecting aggregated data on compliance, faecal immunochemical test results, compliance with colonoscopy, detected lesions and stage at diagnosis separately for Italians and immigrants. Overall, 85 screening programmes invited 3,292,451 subjects, of whom 192,629 had been born abroad (5.9%). Compliance with invitation was lower in immigrants (34.3% vs. 51.3% in Italians), with pimmigrants but in the oldest of Italians. Immigrants showed a borderline excess of standardised faecal immunochemical test positivity rate at first screening (5.4% vs. 5.1% in Italians, p=0.05) and a significant excess at repeat screenings (4.8% vs. 4.4%, p=0.002). The detection rates for carcinoma and advanced adenomas were lower in immigrants than in Italians at first screening (respectively 1.34‰ vs. 1.62‰ and 8.41‰ vs. 9.25‰) - although the differences were not statistically significant - but not at repeat screening (respectively 1.06‰ vs. 0.98‰ and 6.90‰ vs. 6.79‰). Migrants showed a lower compliance with screening than Italians. The prevalence of neoplasia was lower at first screening and similar to the Italians' at repeat screenings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Living in two homes-a Swedish national survey of wellbeing in 12 and 15 year olds with joint physical custody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The practice of joint physical custody, where children spend equal time in each parent’s home after they separate, is increasing in many countries. It is particularly common in Sweden, where this custody arrangement applies to 30 per cent of children with separated parents. The aim of this study was to examine children’s health-related quality of life after parental separation, by comparing children living with both parents in nuclear families to those living in joint physical custody and other forms of domestic arrangements. Methods Data from a national Swedish classroom study of 164,580 children aged 12 and 15-years-old were analysed by two-level linear regression modelling. Z-scores were used to equalise scales for ten dimensions of wellbeing from the KIDSCREEN-52 and the KIDSCREEN-10 Index and analysed for children in joint physical custody in comparison with children living in nuclear families and mostly or only with one parent. Results Living in a nuclear family was positively associated with almost all aspects of wellbeing in comparison to children with separated parents. Children in joint physical custody experienced more positive outcomes, in terms of subjective wellbeing, family life and peer relations, than children living mostly or only with one parent. For the 12-year-olds, beta coefficients for moods and emotions ranged from −0.20 to −0.33 and peer relations from −0.11 to −0.20 for children in joint physical custody and living mostly or only with one parent. The corresponding estimates for the 15-year-olds varied from −0.08 to −0.28 and from −0.03 to −0.13 on these subscales. The 15-year-olds in joint physical custody were more likely than the 12-year-olds to report similar wellbeing levels on most outcomes to the children in nuclear families. Conclusions Children who spent equal time living with both parents after a separation reported better wellbeing than children in predominantly single parent care. This was

  3. Living in two homes-a Swedish national survey of wellbeing in 12 and 15 year olds with joint physical custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Malin; Modin, Bitte; Fransson, Emma; Rajmil, Luis; Berlin, Marie; Gustafsson, Per A; Hjern, Anders

    2013-09-22

    The practice of joint physical custody, where children spend equal time in each parent's home after they separate, is increasing in many countries. It is particularly common in Sweden, where this custody arrangement applies to 30 per cent of children with separated parents. The aim of this study was to examine children's health-related quality of life after parental separation, by comparing children living with both parents in nuclear families to those living in joint physical custody and other forms of domestic arrangements. Data from a national Swedish classroom study of 164,580 children aged 12 and 15-years-old were analysed by two-level linear regression modelling. Z-scores were used to equalise scales for ten dimensions of wellbeing from the KIDSCREEN-52 and the KIDSCREEN-10 Index and analysed for children in joint physical custody in comparison with children living in nuclear families and mostly or only with one parent. Living in a nuclear family was positively associated with almost all aspects of wellbeing in comparison to children with separated parents. Children in joint physical custody experienced more positive outcomes, in terms of subjective wellbeing, family life and peer relations, than children living mostly or only with one parent. For the 12-year-olds, beta coefficients for moods and emotions ranged from -0.20 to -0.33 and peer relations from -0.11 to -0.20 for children in joint physical custody and living mostly or only with one parent. The corresponding estimates for the 15-year-olds varied from -0.08 to -0.28 and from -0.03 to -0.13 on these subscales. The 15-year-olds in joint physical custody were more likely than the 12-year-olds to report similar wellbeing levels on most outcomes to the children in nuclear families. Children who spent equal time living with both parents after a separation reported better wellbeing than children in predominantly single parent care. This was particularly true for the 15-year-olds, while the reported

  4. A Simulation Screening Mammography Module Created for Instruction and Assessment: Radiology Residents vs National Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, Jeffrey D; Chetlen, Alison L

    2016-11-01

    To improve mammographic screening training and breast cancer detection, radiology residents participated in a simulation screening mammography module in which they interpreted an enriched set of screening mammograms with known outcomes. This pilot research study evaluates the effectiveness of the simulation module while tracking the progress, efficiency, and accuracy of radiology resident interpretations and also compares their performance against national benchmarks. A simulation module was created with 266 digital screening mammograms enriched with high-risk breast lesions (seven cases) and breast malignancies (65 cases). Over a period of 27 months, 39 radiology residents participated in the simulation screening mammography module. Resident sensitivity and specificity were compared to Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC data through 2009) national benchmark and American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) acceptable screening mammography audit ranges. The sensitivity, the percentage of cancers with an abnormal initial interpretation (BI-RADS 0), among residents was 84.5%, similar to the BCSC benchmark sensitivity of 84.9% (sensitivity for tissue diagnosis of cancer within 1 year following the initial examination) and within the acceptable ACR BI-RADS medical audit range of ≥75%. The specificity, the percentage of noncancers that had a negative image interpretation (BI-RADS 1 or 2), among residents was 83.2% compared to 90.3% reported in the BCSC benchmark data, but lower than the suggested ACR BI-RADS range of 88%-95%. Using simulation modules for interpretation of screening mammograms is a promising method for training radiology residents to detect breast cancer and to help them achieve competence toward national benchmarks. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prenatal detection of congenital heart diseaseresults of a national screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, C. L.; Clur, S. A.; Rijlaarsdam, Meb; Bax, C. J.; Pajkrt, E.; Heymans, M. W.; Bekker, M. N.; Hruda, J.; de Groot, Cjm; Blom, N. A.; Haak, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveCongenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation and causes major morbidity and mortality. Prenatal detection improves the neonatal condition before surgery, resulting in less morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands a national prenatal screening programme was

  6. Dieting Behavior and Alcohol Use Behaviors among National Eating Disorders Screening Program Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberg, Natalie F.; Correia, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Research has shown that college students have elevated rates of alcohol use and problematic eating behaviors. The current study focused on the relationships between dieting behaviors and alcohol use among a sample of undergraduates attending National Eating Disorder Screening Program. Method: All participants (n=70, 100% female, average…

  7. Hepatitis B prevalence in the Turkish population of Arnhem: implications for national screening policy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, C.; Beest, G.T.; Sancak, I.; Aydinly, R.; Bulbul, K.; Laetemia-Tomata, F.; Leeuw, M. de; Waegemaekers, T.; Swanink, C.; Roovers, E.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C in most migrant groups in The Netherlands, a national screening policy for these infections is not available. In order to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B and C in the largest group of first-generation migrants (FGM) in The Netherlands, we

  8. Drinking Game Participation among Undergraduate Students Attending National Alcohol Screening Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jennifer M.; Heidelberg, Natalie; Simmons, Lisa; Lyle, Sarah B.; Mitra-Varma, Kathakali; Correia, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives, Participants, Methods: Drinking game participation has increased in popularity among college students and is associated with increased alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. The current study investigated drinking game participation among 133 undergraduates attending National Alcohol Screening Day (NASD) in April of 2007.…

  9. The Association between Smoking Abstinence and Mortality in the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Nichole T; Kanodra, Neeti M; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Payne, Elizabeth; Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Warren, Graham W; Egede, Leonard E; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2016-03-01

    Smoking is the largest contributor to lung cancer risk, and those who continue to smoke after diagnosis have a worse survival. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) reduces mortality in high-risk individuals. Smoking cessation is an essential component of a high-quality screening program. To quantify the effects of smoking history and abstinence on mortality in high-risk individuals who participated in the NLST (National Lung Screening Trial). This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial (NLST). Measurements included self-reported demographics, medical and smoking history, and lung cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Cox regression was used to study the association of mortality with smoking status and pack-years. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were examined for differences in survival based on trial arm and smoking status. Current smokers had an increased lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio [HR], 2.14-2.29) and all-cause mortality (HR, 1.79-1.85) compared with former smokers irrespective of screening arm. Former smokers in the control arm abstinent for 7 years had a 20% mortality reduction comparable with the benefit reported with LDCT screening in the NLST. The maximum benefit was seen with the combination of smoking abstinence at 15 years and LDCT screening, which resulted in a 38% reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality (HR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.76). Seven years of smoking abstinence reduced lung cancer-specific mortality at a magnitude comparable with LDCT screening. This reduction was greater when abstinence was combined with screening, highlighting the importance of smoking cessation efforts in screening programs.

  10. Development of a national protocol to screen Dutch cancer survivors on late cancer treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, M W M; Van den Bos, C; Heinen, R C; Bakker, P J M; Geenen, M M; Kremer, L C; Van Leeuwen, F; Caron, H N

    2007-04-01

    The development of a national protocol to formalize the screening of Dutch cancer survivors on potential late cancer treatment effects and the medical terminology used in describing the patient follow up procedures. A combined evidence-based and qualitative approach, the Glaser's State of the Art Strategy, was used to reach consensus on how to screen Dutch cancer survivors on late cancer treatment effects. A core working group set up a first proposal of a screening protocol and a handbook of medical term definitions by incorporating available research evidence (1980-2003), clinical expertise and definitions from Dutch medical dictionaries and textbooks. External experts reviewed this proposal in a cycle of two postal and two discussion rounds. The follow-up procedures and medical term definitions described in the draft screening protocol were to be accepted if consensus among external experts was > or =50%. A protocol for screening cancer survivors on late cancer treatment effects was developed describing the follow-up procedures for cancer survivors according to previous therapeutic exposures. Four hundred and twenty one medical terms were used in describing these follow-up procedures. One hundred and fifteen of these terms were classified as multi-interpretable and 101 of these terms were defined. No definitions could be found for the remaining 14 medical terms. We succeeded in reaching consensus throughout The Netherlands on a protocol to screen cancer survivors on late cancer treatment effects. This protocol is now in use by all Dutch outpatient clinics and warrants that the screening of cancer survivors is consistent across The Netherlands. The screening protocol specifies in detail how screening of cancer survivors should take place and can therefore be used by clinicians who were not involved in the consensus study.

  11. Trends in Cancer Screening Rates among Korean Men and Women: Results from the Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS), 2004-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Ha; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Choi, Kui Son; Jun, Jae Kwan; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Jin Soo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The Korean National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS) is a continuous nationwide survey implemented by the National Cancer Center in Korea since 2004. The purpose of the present study was to report trends in cancer screening rates for the five major cancers (stomach, liver, colorectal, breast, and cervix uteri) in Korean men and women. Materials and Methods The study used KNCSS data collected between 2004 and 2010. The survey was conducted on Korean men aged 40-74 years and Korean women...

  12. The expansion and performance of national newborn screening programmes for cystic fibrosis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barben, Jürg; Castellani, Carlo; Dankert-Roelse, Jeannette; Gartner, Silvia; Kashirskaya, Nataliya; Linnane, Barry; Mayell, Sarah; Munck, Anne; Sands, Dorota; Sommerburg, Olaf; Pybus, Simon; Winters, Victoria; Southern, Kevin W

    2017-03-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is a well-established public health strategy with international standards. The aim of this study was to provide an update on NBS for CF in Europe and assess performance against the standards. Questionnaires were sent to key workers in each European country. In 2016, there were 17 national programmes, 4 countries with regional programmes and 25 countries not screening in Europe. All national programmes employed different protocols, with IRT-DNA the most common strategy. Five countries were not using DNA analysis. In addition, the processing and structure of programmes varied considerably. Most programmes were achieving the ECFS standards with respect to timeliness, but were less successful with respect to sensitivity and specificity. There has been a steady increase in national CF NBS programmes across Europe with variable strategies and outcomes that reflect the different approaches. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening Program Reduced Melanoma Mortality at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1984-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, MD, J S; II, PhD, D; MD, PhD, M

    2006-10-12

    Worldwide incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased substantially, and no screening program has yet demonstrated reduction in mortality. We evaluated the education, self examination and targeted screening campaign at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from its beginning in July 1984 through 1996. The thickness and crude incidence of melanoma from the years before the campaign were compared to those obtained during the 13 years of screening. Melanoma mortality during the 13-year period was based on a National Death Index search. Expected yearly deaths from melanoma among LLNL employees were calculated by using California mortality data matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity and adjusted to exclude deaths from melanoma diagnosed before the program began or before employment at LLNL. After the program began, crude incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm decreased from 18 to 4 cases per 100,000 person-years (p = 0.02), while melanoma less than 0.75mm remained stable and in situ melanoma increased substantially. No eligible melanoma deaths occurred among LLNL employees during the screening period compared with a calculated 3.39 expected deaths (p = 0.034). Education, self examination and selective screening for melanoma at LLNL significantly decreased incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm and reduced the melanoma-related mortality rate to zero. This significant decrease in mortality rate persisted for at least 3 yr after employees retired or otherwise left the laboratory.

  14. Are Cryptocurrencies the Future of Money? : Whether a Transition to Cryptocurrency, as National Currency of Sweden, Would be Possible and What it Would Imply for the Swedish Society

    OpenAIRE

    Gartz, Madeleine; Linderbrandt, Ida

    2017-01-01

    The underlying technology of cryptocurrencies is a broadly discussed subject. In Sweden, a growing interest for digital assets and payment methods can be observed. The fact that this coincides with an increasing acceptance for cryptocurrencies creates interesting possibilities. Some claim that cryptocurrency could be the future mean of payment. The objective of this report is therefore to examine whether a cryptocurrency could replace the Swedish krona, and what such a transition would imply ...

  15. National trends in screening, prevalence, and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Sundar; Nietert, Paul J

    2003-04-01

    Few studies have documented national trends in screening, awareness, and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors. We evaluated trends in screening, prevalence, and treatment of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Data were analyzed from the 1984-1998 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a series of yearly cross-sectional population-based surveys of U.S. adults. Unadjusted and adjusted time trends (age-, gender-, ethnicity-, education-, and income-adjusted) in screening, prevalence, and treatment were evaluated. From 1984 to 1998, a larger proportion of U.S. adults were older, more educated, richer, and Hispanic. Hypertension screening was >97% (1988-1998), prevalence ranged from 21 to 24% (1984-1998), and approximately 58% (1984-1992) were prescribed blood-pressure-lowering medications. Hypercholesterolemia screening increased from 47 to 67% (1987-1998), prevalence from 18 to 31% (1987-1998), and cholesterol-lowering prescriptions from 22 to 25% (1988-1990). Smoking prevalence remained around 28% (1984-1998), while quit attempts declined from 63 to 47% (1990-1998). Although screening for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia has increased, a substantial proportion of cases were not being prescribed medications. While the prevalence of smoking remains constant, quit attempts have fallen. Continuing challenges for cardiovascular disease prevention include identification of individuals with hypercholesterolemia, appropriate prescription (initiation and/or maintenance) of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications, and intensifying smoking cessation efforts.

  16. Screen time in Mexican children: findings from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Janssen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide descriptive information on the screen time levels of Mexican children. Materials and methods. 5 660 children aged 10-18 years from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012 were studied. Screen time (watching television, movies, playing video games and using a computer was self-reported. Results. On average, children engaged in 3 hours/day of screen time, irrespective of gender and age. Screen time was higher in obese children, children from the northern and Federal District regions of the country, children living in urban areas, and children in the highest socioeconomic status and education categories. Approximately 33% of 10-14 year olds and 36% of 15-18 year olds met the screen time guideline of ≤2 hours/day. Conclusions. 10-18 year old Mexican children accumulate an average of 3 hours/day of screen time. Two thirds of Mexican children exceed the recommended maximal level of time for this activity.

  17. Effectiveness of the Korean National Cancer Screening Program in Reducing Gastric Cancer Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae Kwan; Choi, Kui Son; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Suh, Mina; Park, Boyoung; Song, Seung Hoon; Jung, Kyu Won; Lee, Chan Wha; Choi, Il Ju; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Dukhyoung

    2017-05-01

    It is not clear whether screening for gastric cancer by upper endoscopy or upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series examinations (looking at the upper and middle sections of the gastrointestinal tract by imaging techniques) reduces mortality. Nevertheless, the Korean National Cancer Screening Program for gastric cancer was launched in 1999 to screen individuals 40 years and older for gastric cancer using these techniques. We evaluated the effectiveness of these techniques in gastric cancer detection and compared their effects on mortality in the Korean population. We performed a nested case-control study using data from the Korean National Cancer Screening Program for gastric cancer since 2002. A total of 16,584,283 Korean men and women, aged 40 years and older, comprised the cancer-free cohort. Case subjects (n = 54,418) were defined as individuals newly diagnosed with gastric cancer from January 2004 through December 2009 and who died before December 2012. Cases were matched with controls (subjects who were alive on the date of death of the corresponding case subject, n = 217,672) for year of entry into the study cohort, age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained via conditional logistic regression analysis. Compared with subjects who had never been screened, the overall OR for dying from gastric cancer among ever-screened subjects was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.77-0.81). According to screening modality, the ORs of death from gastric cancer were 0.53 (95% CI, 0.51-0.56) for upper endoscopy and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95-1.01) for UGI series. As the number of endoscopic screening tests performed per subject increased, the ORs of death from gastric cancer decreased: 0.60 (95% CI, 0.57-0.63), 0.32 (95% CI, 0.28-0.37), and 0.19 (95% CI, 0.14-0.26) for once, twice, and 3 or more times, respectively. Within the Korean National Cancer Screening Program, patients who received an upper endoscopy were less likely to die from gastric

  18. Psychological impact of electrocardiogram screening in National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Irfan M; Annett, Scott; Ewing, Joseph A; Abdelfattah, Ramy; Sutphin, Brittan; Conley, Kyle; Rothmier, Justin; Harmon, Kimberly G; Drezner, Jonathan A

    2017-10-01

    Determine the psychological impact of false-positive ECG screening in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. Athletes representing seven NCAA institutions received a standardised history, physical examination and ECG interpreted using the 2013 Seattle Criteria. Assessments of health attitudes, anxiety and impact of screening on sport were conducted using validated prescreen and postscreen measurements. 1192 student-athletes participated (55.4% male, median age 19 years, 80.4% Caucasian). 96.8% of athletes had a normal cardiovascular screen, 2.9% had a false-positive ECG and 0.3% were diagnosed with a serious cardiac condition. Prior to screening, 4.5% worried about potentially harbouring cardiac disease and 70.1% preferred knowing about an underlying condition, rather than play sports without this knowledge. There was no difference in anxiety described by athletes with a normal versus false-positive screen (p=0.369). Reported anxiety levels during screening also did not differ when analysed by different gender, race, division of play or sport. Athletes with normal and false-positive screens had similar levels of satisfaction (p=0.714) and would recommend ECG screening to other athletes at similar rates (p=0.322). Compared with athletes with a normal screen, athletes with false-positive results also reported feeling safer during competition (p>0.01). In contrast, athletes with false-positive screens were more concerned about the possibility of sports disqualification (pAthletes with a false-positive ECG do not experience more anxiety than athletes with a normal screen but do express increased concern regarding sports disqualification and the development of a cardiac disorder. These findings do not justify avoiding advanced cardiovascular screening protocols. Further understanding of athlete experiences could better prepare the practising physician to counsel athletes with an abnormal ECG. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  19. Two Swedish screening instruments for exhaustion disorder: cross-sectional associations with burnout, work stress, private life stress, and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Roger; Österberg, Kai; Viborg, Njördur; Jönsson, Peter; Tenenbaum, Artur

    2017-06-01

    To examine the relationships of two screening instruments recently developed for assessment of exhaustion disorder (ED) with some other well-known inventories intended to assess ED-related concepts and self-reports of job demands, job control, job support, private life stressors, and personality factors. A cross-sectional population sample ( n = 1355) completed: the Karolinska Exhaustion Disorder Scale (KEDS), Self-reported Exhaustion Disorder Scale (s-ED), Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9), Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), Big Five Inventory (BFI), and items concerning family-to-work interference and stress in private life. Compared to participants without any indication of ED, participants classified as having ED on KEDS or s-ED had higher scores on all four SMBQ subscales, lower scores on the UWES-9 subscales vigor and dedication, higher JCQ job demands scores, lower JCQ job support scores, higher degrees of family-to-work interference and stress in private life, and higher BFI neuroticism and openness scores. In addition, participants classified as having ED on KEDS had lower scores on the UWES-9 absorption subscale, the JCQ job control scale, and lower BFI extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness scores, compared to the subgroup not classified as having ED. As expected, we observed an overall pattern of associations between the ED screening inventories KEDS and s-ED and measures of burnout, work engagement, job demands-control-support, stress in private life, family-to-work interference, and personality factors. The results suggest that instruments designed to assess burnout, work engagement, and ED share common ground, despite their conceptual differences.

  20. National Prostate Cancer Screening Rates After the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Discouraging Prostate-Specific Antigen-Based Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazer, Michael W; Huo, Dezheng; Eggener, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) discouraged prostate-specific antigen (PSA) -based prostate cancer screening. Previous USPSTF recommendations did not appreciably alter prostate cancer screening. Therefore, we designed a trend analysis to determine the population-based impact of the 2012 recommendation. The nationally representative National Health Interview Survey was used to estimate the proportion of men age 40 years and older who saw a physician and were screened for prostate cancer in 2013. An externally validated 9-year mortality index was used to analyze screening rates based on remaining life expectancy. Screening rates from 2005, 2010, and 2013 were compared using logistic regression. PSA-based screening did not significantly change from 2010 to 2013 among 40- to 49-year-old men (from 12.5% to 11.2%; P = .4). Screening rates significantly declined in men age 50 to 59 years (from 33.2% to 24.8%; P screened for prostate cancer despite a high risk (> 52%) of 9-year mortality, including approximately one third of men older than age 75 years. Approximately 1.4 million men age 65 years or older with a high risk (> 52%) of 9-year mortality were screened in 2013. Prostate cancer screening significantly declined among men older than age 50 years after the 2012 USPSTF guideline discouraging PSA-based screening. A significant proportion of men continue to be screened despite a high risk of 9-year mortality, including one third of men age 75 years and older. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Level of implementation of guidelines on screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintaudi, Basilio; Fresa, Raffaella; Dalfrà, Mariagrazia; Marcone, Teresa; Dodesini, Alessandro Roberto; Napoli, Angela; Bonomo, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    To describe the degree of diffusion and acceptance of national guideline on screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) among Italian diabetes centers and to detect possible areas for benchmarking. In 2013 the Italian Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group structured a national survey, focused on GDM screening and diagnostic procedures, that was administered to diabetologists. Overall, 122 diabetologists of 122 different diabetes centers (21.7% territorial, 78.3% hospital/University) completed the questionnaire. All respondents declared to execute a 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as diagnostic test. Almost one in five centers preferred a universal screening procedure, the others executing a selective risk factors-based screening. In patients at high risk for GDM the OGTT was performed at 16-18 weeks' gestation in 84.0% of the cases; only 6.5% of respondents preferred to execute it as soon as possible; and 9.5% used to wait until 24-28 weeks' gestation. In the case of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 5.1 mmol/l (92 mg/dl), two third of respondents used to proceed with the execution of the complete diagnostic OGTT, the others considering sufficient the FPG value for the diagnosis. Good level of reception of national recommendations was documented. The diagnostic procedure was generally accepted and applied. Some criticisms were specifically linked to the choice of universal or risk factor-based screening procedure, and to the right time for executing the OGTT in women at high risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Level of physical activity associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases and mortality in patients with type-2 diabetes: report from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zethelius, B; Gudbjörnsdottir, S; Eliasson, B; Eeg-Olofsson, K; Cederholm, J

    2014-02-01

    To estimate risks of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and total mortality with low or higher levels of physical activity (PA) assessed with questionnaire, in an observational study of patients with type-2 diabetes from the Swedish National Diabetes Register. A total of 15,462 patients (60 years), were followed for 5 years from baseline in 2004 until 2009, with 760 CVD events and 427 total mortality events based on 54,344 person-years. Comparing 6963 patients with low baseline PA (never or 1-2 times/week for 30 min) and 8499 patients with higher baseline PA (regular 3 times/week or more), hazard ratios for fatal/nonfatal CHD, fatal/nonfatal CVD, fatal CVD, and total mortality were 1.25 (95% CI 1.05-1.48; p = 0.01), 1.26 (95% CI 1.09-1.45; p = 0.002), 1.69 (95% CI 1.18-2.41; p = 0.004), and 1.48 (95% CI 1.22-1.79; p < 0.001), adjusting for age, sex, diabetes duration, diabetes treatment, and smoking (model 1). Adjusting also for HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, body mass index, and albuminuria (model 2), HRs were 1.19 (95% CI 1.00-1.42; p = 0.049), 1.18 (95% CI 1.02-1.36; p = 0.04), 1.54 (95% CI 1.07-2.22; p = 0.02), and 1.41 (95% CI 1.16-1.72; p < 0.001), respectively. Corresponding results (model 2), comparing 4166 patients having low PA both baseline and at follow up with all other 11,296 patients were 1.68 (95% CI 1.41-2.01), 1.68 (95% CI 1.45-1.96), 2.12 (95% CI 1.48-3.03), and 2.03 (95% CI 1.66-2.48) (all p < 0.001) and compared to 2797 patients with low baseline PA and higher PA at follow up were 2.51 (95% CI 1.87-3.38), 2.54 (95% CI 1.98-3.27), 3.26 (95% CI 1.74-6.10), and 2.91 (95% CI 2.08-4.07) (all p < 0.001). This large observational study of patients with type-2 diabetes showed considerably increased risks for CVD and mortality with low PA.

  3. Surgical management of lobular carcinoma from a national screening program: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S D J; Barry, M; O'Reilly, E A; Kell, M R

    2015-01-01

    To compare the surgical outcomes of women diagnosed with invasive ductal and lobular carcinoma of the breast. The role of Breast Conserving Surgery (BCS) for invasive cancers of the breast is well established; however its role for invasive lobular carcinoma is less well defined. Concerns exist regarding the need for re-excision of margins and the eventual need for mastectomy in women with Invasive Lobular Carcinoma (ILC) compared with Ductal Carcinoma (IDC). In this study we compare the surgical results of these two groups examining BCS from a national breast cancer screening program. Analysis of mammographically detected ILC and IDC tumours obtained from the national breast cancer screening program of the Republic of Ireland (BreastCheck) was performed. BreastCheck offers biannual screening mammograms to women throughout the Republic of Ireland between 50 and 65 years of age. We examined and pooled the data across 4 screening zones from 2005 to 2010. We observed similar success rates and trends in both the ILC and IDC groups where BCS was attempted. Patients selected for BCS with ILC were statistically more likely to have successful surgery compared with IDC as tumour size increased. There however was no statistical difference in a pooled analysis of successful treatment across all tumour sizes in comparing the two groups. We conclude that BCS is an appropriate and acceptable treatment option for women diagnosed with ILC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes In Functional Movement Screen Scores Of Slovak Women’s National Football Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábriš Csaba

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess movement patterns by using Functional Movement Screen in three categories of Slovak women’s national football teams during two occasions interpressed with one year. The reason for this was to answer the questions: 1. if there is a tendency to perform better in the screen with respect to age category, and 2. if the players who did the screen more times and recieve recommendations, perform better after a year, irrespective to age category. Our results showed that every category achieved significant improvements (p<0.10 in total test score when compared the two occasions (2013 vs. 2014, except WU17, where significant decrement was found (p<0.01. These results probably represent the fact, that the WU17 is the less experienced category regarding FMS™, and the group where the most turbulence occurs in the nomination list. However, when we assessed the group of players who were present at both occasions of screening, irrespectively to age group they belong, results revealed significant overall improvements (p<0.05. In conclusion, we would suggest FMS™ as a useful tool to reveal potentially weak links in player's movement and therefore determine injury risk. Our results suggest that professional recommendations to remove these are effective and at least as much important as the screening scores alone.

  5. Colorectal cancer screening of high-risk populations: A national survey of physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Pascale M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of colorectal cancer can be decreased by appropriate use of screening modalities. Patients with a family history of colon cancer and of African-American ethnicity are known to be at higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. We aimed to determine if there is a lack of physician knowledge for colorectal cancer screening guidelines based on family history and ethnicity. Between February and April 2009 an anonymous web-based survey was administered to a random sample selected from a national list of 25,000 internists, family physicians and gastroenterologists. A stratified sampling strategy was used to include practitioners from states with high as well as low CRC incidence. All data analyses were performed following data collection in 2009. Results The average knowledge score was 37 ± 18% among the 512 respondents. Gastroenterologists averaged higher scores compared to internists, and family physicians, p = 0.001. Only 28% of physicians correctly identified the screening initiation point for African-Americans while only 12% of physicians correctly identified the screening initiation point and interval for a patient with a family history of CRC. The most commonly cited barriers to referring high-risk patients for CRC screening were "patient refusal" and "lack of insurance reimbursement." Conclusions There is a lack of knowledge amongst physicians of the screening guidelines for high-risk populations, based on family history and ethnicity. Educational programs to improve physician knowledge and to reduce perceived barriers to CRC screening are warranted to address health disparities in colorectal cancer.

  6. Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: does it work for Indigenous Australians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judith M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a lower incidence of bowel cancer overall, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage when prognosis is poor. Bowel cancer screening is an effective means of reducing incidence and mortality from bowel cancer through early identification and prompt treatment. In 2006, Australia began rolling out a population-based National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP using the Faecal Occult Blood Test. Initial evaluation of the program revealed substantial disparities in bowel cancer screening uptake with Indigenous Australians significantly less likely to participate in screening than the non-Indigenous population. This paper critically reviews characteristics of the program which may contribute to the discrepancy in screening uptake, and includes an analysis of organisational, structural, and socio-cultural barriers that play a part in the poorer participation of Indigenous and other disadvantaged and minority groups. Methods A search was undertaken of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other grey literature using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Articles were critically evaluated for relevance to themes that addressed the research questions. Results The NBCSP is not reaching many Indigenous Australians in the target group, with factors contributing to sub-optimal participation including how participants are selected, the way the screening kit is distributed, the nature of the test and comprehensiveness of its contents, cultural perceptions of cancer and prevailing low levels of knowledge and awareness of bowel cancer and the importance of screening. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the population-based approach to implementing bowel cancer screening to the Australian population unintentionally excludes vulnerable minorities, particularly Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This potentially contributes to exacerbating

  7. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the regression of gastric polyps in National Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Su Youn; Park, Bum Joon; Ryu, Kum Hei; Nam, Ji Hyung

    2017-12-14

    Western guidelines recommend Helicobacter pylori eradication in H. pylori-associated gastric polyps; however, there is no standard guideline in Korea. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of H. pylori eradication on the regression of gastric hyperplastic polyps in National Cancer Screening Cohort, representative of general population. Among participants in National Cancer Screening Program, subjects who had H. pylori positive gastric hyperplastic polyps less than 10 mm and underwent follow-up endoscopy and H. pylori testing were enrolled. The effect of H. pylori eradication on hyperplastic gastric polyps was estimated using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 183 H. pylori infected subjects with hyperplastic polyp at baseline underwent follow-up endoscopy and H. pylori test after mean of 2.2 years. Successful H. pylori eradication markedly induced the disappearance of hyperplastic polyps comparing to non-eradication group (83.7% vs. 34.1%, p = 0.001). Successful eradication increased the possibility of disappearance of hyperplastic polyps (adjusted OR, 5.56; 95% CI, 2.63 to 11.11). Polyp size was inversely related with the disappearance of hyperplastic polyps (adjusted OR, 59; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.71). Eradication of H. pylori infection may induce disappearance of gastric hyperplastic polyps in National Cancer Screening Cohort.

  8. The Swedish Academy Dictionary Project

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    (bo.wendt@svenskaakademien.se), Dictionary Staff of the Swedish Academy,. Lund, Sweden. Abstract: The Swedish Academy Dictionary is one of the world's largest dictionary projects. Work on it was started in 1884 and it will be completed by 2017. The dictionary describes the writ- ten standard language of Swedish from ...

  9. Is adding HCV screening to the antenatal national screening program in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, cost-effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, Anouk T.; van Keep, Marjolijn; Matser, Amy A.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Weegink, Christine J.; van den Hoek, Anneke; Prins, Maria; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to severe liver disease. Pregnant women are already routinely screened for several infectious diseases, but not yet for HCV infection. Here we examine whether adding HCV screening to routine screening is cost-effective. METHODS: To estimate

  10. Ecological aspects of historical and contemporary Swedish and Danish mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Oluf

    2014-01-01

    preventive and curative measures introduced in the second half of the twentieth century? Hansen (2013) proposed a multivariate hazard model aiming at separating ecological factors in terms of endogenous biological from exogenous effects in human mortality. He explored some of its analytic potentials...... the early 1960s to now. This has been a blow to the national pride. Is the better contemporary Swedish life expectancy associated with selection spurred by different timing of the modern Swedish and Danish long term decline of mortality? Or could it be rooted in more expedient Swedish behavior and better...

  11. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base.

  12. The criteria for metabolic syndrome and the national health screening and education system in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Two major definitions of metabolic syndrome have been proposed. One focuses on the accumulation of risk factors, a measure used by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); the other focuses on abdominal obesity, a measure used by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Japanese government. The latter definition takes waist circumference (WC) into consideration as an obligatory component, whereas the former does not. In 2009, the IDF, NHLBI, AHA, and other organizations attempted to unify these criteria; as a result, WC is no longer an obligatory component of those systems, while it remains obligatory in the Japanese criteria. In 2008, a new Japanese cardiovascular screening and education system focused on metabolic syndrome was launched. People undergoing screening are classified into three groups according to the presence of abdominal obesity and the number of metabolic risk factors, and receive health educational support from insurers. This system has yielded several beneficial outcomes: the visibility of metabolic syndrome at the population level has drastically improved; preventive measures have been directed toward metabolic syndrome, which is expected to become more prevalent in future generations; and a post-screening education system has been established. However, several problems with the current system have been identified and are under debate. In this review, we discuss topics related to metabolic syndrome, including (1) the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome; (2) metabolic syndrome and the universal health screening and education system; and (3) recent debates about Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome.

  13. Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högberg, Torbjörn; Magnusson, Annabella; Lützén, Kim; Ewalds-Kvist, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Negative and stigmatizing attitudes towards persons with mental illness must be dealt with to facilitate the sufferers' social acceptance. The present study aimed at survey Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness related to factors impacting these attitudes. New CAMI-S based on the questionnaire "Community Attitudes to Mental Illness in Sweden" ([CAMI] Taylor & Dear, 1981) was developed with nine behavioral-intention items and thus comprised a total of 29 items. Of 5000 Swedish people, 2391 agreed to complete the questionnaire. Principal component analysis rendered four factors reflecting attitudes towards the mentally ill: Intention to Interact, Fearful and Avoidant, Open-minded and Pro-Integration, as well as Community Mental Health Ideology. The factors were analyzed for trends in attitudes. By MANOVA, the experience of mental illness effects on mind-set towards the sufferers was assessed. By means of logistic regression, demographic factors contributing to positive attitudes towards persons with mental illness residing in the neighborhood were assessed. By New CAMI-S, the Swedish attitudes towards the mentally ill were surveyed and trends in agreement with living next to a person with mental illness were revealed in three out of four factors derived by principal component analysis. Aspects impacting the Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness and willingness to have him/her residing in the neighborhood comprised experience of mental illness, female gender, age (31-50 years), born in Scandinavia or outside Europe, only 9 years of compulsory school and accommodation in flat. The New CAMI-S came out as a useful tool to screen Swedish attitudes towards persons with mental illness. Most Swedes were prepared to live next to the mentally ill.

  14. Accessibility of standardized information of a national colorectal cancer screening program for low health literate screening invitees: A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Mirjam P; Dekker, Evelien; Timmermans, Daniëlle R M; Uiters, Ellen; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2017-02-01

    To explore the accessibility of standardized printed information materials of the national Dutch colorectal cancer screening program among low health literate screening invitees and to assess the effect of the information on their knowledge about colorectal cancer and the screening program. Linguistic tools were used to analyze the text and design characteristics. The accessibility, comprehensibility and relevance of the information materials were explored in interviews and in observations (n=25). The effect of the information on knowledge was assessed in an online survey (n=127). The materials employed a simple text and design. However, respondents expressed problems with the amount of information, and the difference between screening and diagnostic follow-up. Knowledge significantly increased in 10 out of 16 items after reading the information but remained low for colorectal cancer risk, sensitivity of testing, and the voluntariness of colorectal cancer screening. Despite intelligible linguistic and design characteristics, screening invitees with low health literacy had problems in accessing, comprehending and applying standard information materials on colorectal cancer screening, and lacked essential knowledge for informed decision-making about participation. To enable equal access to informed decision-making, information strategies need to be adjusted to the skills of low health literate screening invitees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementation of a nation-wide automated auditory brainstem response hearing screening programme in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, H.L.M. van; Hille, E.T.M.; Kok, J.H.; Verkerk, P.H.; Baerts, W.; Bunkers, C.M.; Smink, E.W.A.; Elburg, R.M. van; Kleine, M.J.K. de; Ilsen, A.; Maingay-Visser, A.P.G.F.; Vries, L.S. de; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: As part of a future national neonatal hearing screening programme in the Netherlands, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening was implemented in seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objective was to evaluate key outcomes of this programme: participation rate,

  16. Newborn Screening: National Library of Medicine Literature Search, January 1980 through March 1987. No. 87-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrias, Karen

    This bibliography, prepared by the National Library of Medicine through a literature search of its online databases, covers all aspects of newborn screening. It includes references to screening for: inborn errors of metabolism, such as phenylketonuria and galactosemia; hemoglobinopathies, particularly sickle cell disease; congenital hypothyroidism…

  17. Description of the national situation of cervical cancer screening in the member states of the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Ahti; Ronco, Guglielmo; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2009-01-01

    This report up-dates information on the national situation of cervical cancer screening in the member states of the European Union. There is yet high diversity in the status of cervical screening, and rapid changes expected to occur in the situation in many countries. It is important to underline...

  18. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, L E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide background information for strengthening cervical cancer prevention in the Pacific by mapping current human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening practices, as well as intent and barriers to the introduction and maintenance of national HPV vaccinatio...

  19. Teaching tools to engage Anishinaabek First Nations women in cervical cancer screening: Report of an educational workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Wood, Brianne; Wakewich, Pamela; Maar, Marion; Escott, Nicholas; Jumah, Naana; Little, Julian

    2016-04-01

    To explore educational strategies for engaging First Nations women in Canada to attend cervical cancer screening. Within a participatory action research framework, semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in First Nations communities revealed that education about the value of screening is perceived as being a key factor to promote cervical cancer screening. To obtain feedback from workshop informants, a 1-day educational workshop was held to identify appropriate educational intervention strategies, which would be applied in a forthcoming randomised controlled cervical screening trial. Common discussion and discussion groups, which were facilitated by a First Nations workshop moderator and a note taker. This workshop helped to strengthen the ethical space dialogue with the First Nations communities with whom the study team had established research partnerships. The workshop atmosphere was relaxed and the invited informants decided that an educational health promotion event for community women needed to be held prior to inviting them to the cervical screening trial. Such an event would provide an opportunity to communicate the importance of attending regular cervical screening allowing women to make informed decisions about screening participation. Complementary promotional items, including an eye-catching pamphlet and storytelling, were also suggested. The key messages from the events and promotional items can help to destigmatise women who develop a type of cancer that is caused by a sexually transmitted virus that affects both men and women. Developing and implementing positive health education that respectfully depicts female bodies, sexuality and health behaviours through a First Nations lens is strongly warranted.

  20. Doctrinal Imbalance: A Study of Swedish Army Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    patience with endless grammar and spelling corrections. Furthermore, Dr. Sterrett also involved his wife, military historian Dr. Corinne Mahaffey, and his...provocative statement of the Swedish supreme commander. The Swedish Army teaches that doctrine derives from a balance between resources, national...it comes to writing a new doctrine, but none of them evaluates doctrine against a specific scenario using the actual forces the doctrine is supposed

  1. Prevalence of footrot in Swedish slaughter lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman Ann-Kristin J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Footrot is a world-wide contagious disease in sheep and goats. It is an infection of the epidermis of the interdigital skin, and the germinal layers of the horn tissue of the feet. The first case of footrot in Swedish sheep was diagnosed in 2004. Due to difficulties in distinguishing benign footrot from early cases of virulent footrot and because there is no possibility for virulence testing of strains of Dichelobacter nodosus in Sweden, the diagnosis is based of the presence or absence of clinical signs of footrot in sheep flocks. Ever since the first diagnosed case the Swedish Animal Health Service has worked intensively to stop the spread of infection and control the disease at flock level. However, to continue this work effectively it is important to have knowledge about the distribution of the disease both nationally and regionally. Therefore, the aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of footrot in Swedish lambs at abattoirs and to assess the geographical distribution of the disease. Methods A prevalence study on footrot in Swedish lambs was performed by visual examination of 2000 feet from 500 lambs submitted from six slaughter houses. Each foot was scored according to a 0 to 5 scoring system, where feet with score ≥2 were defined as having footrot. Moreover, samples from feet with footrot were examined for Dichelobacter nodosus by culture and PCR. Results The prevalence of footrot at the individual sheep level was 5.8%, and Dichelobacter nodosus was found by culture and PCR in 83% and 97% of the samples from feet with footrot, respectively. Some minor differences in geographical distribution of footrot were found in this study. Conclusions In a national context, the findings indicate that footrot is fairly common in Swedish slaughter lambs, and should be regarded seriously.

  2. Sweden's second national report under the Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Joint Convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-01

    Article 32 of the Joint Convention calls for a self-assessment by each Contracting Party regarding compliance with the obligations of the Convention. Sweden's self-assessment has demonstrated compliance with all the obligations of the Convention, as shown in detail in sections B to K of this report. Having taken a very active part in the creation of the Joint Convention, Sweden wishes to emphasise the incentive character of the Convention. In Sweden's opinion, the Convention implies a commitment to continuous improvement of safety whenever operating experience, safety research or technical development indicates that there is room for such improvement. Continuous learning from experience and a proactive approach to safety are in fact corner stones of the current Swedish nuclear and radiation safety work, both for the industry and the regulatory bodies. Therefore, Sweden has found it important that its National Report highlights strong features in national practices, as well as areas in which improvements are justified. Implementation of such improvements should then be followed up in the National Reports to subsequent Review Meetings. The major events in the Swedish nuclear programme since the first report to the Convention was issued are: - The general safety regulations of SKI have been revised and issued as SKIFS 2004:1. - A commission of inquiry has been carried out in order to review and suggest improvements to the financing system. - The second unit of the twin nuclear power plant unit at Barsebaeck (Barsebaeck 2) was permanently shut down 31 May 2005. The first unit (Barsebaeck 1) was closed in 1999. - The research reactors R2 and R2-0 at the Studsvik site were permanently shut down 16 June 2005. - The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) has announced its decision to take over operation of the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (Clab). The operation of Clab is currently contracted out to OKG, who operates the three

  3. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Wesseling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The integration of mental and neurologic services in healthcare is a global priority. The universal Social Security of Costa Rica aspires to develop national screening of neurodegenerative disorders among the elderly, as part of the non-communicable disease agenda. Objective: This study assessed the feasibility of routine screening for Parkinson's disease (PD and Alzheimer's disease (AD within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica. Design: The population (aged ≥65 in the catchment areas of two primary healthcare clinics was targeted for motor and cognitive screening during routine annual health check-ups. The screening followed a tiered three-step approach, with increasing specificity. Step 1 involved a two-symptom questionnaire (tremor-at-rest; balance and a spiral drawing test for motor assessment, as well as a three-word recall and animal category fluency test for cognitive assessment. Step 2 (for those failing Step 1 was a 10-item version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Step 3 (for those failing Step 2 was a comprehensive neurologic exam with definitive diagnosis of PD, AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, other disorders, or subjects who were healthy. Screening parameters and disease prevalence were calculated. Results: Of the 401 screened subjects (80% of target population, 370 (92%, 163 (45%, and 81 (56% failed in Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, respectively. Thirty-three, 20, and 35 patients were diagnosed with PD, AD, and MCI, respectively (7 were PD with MCI/AD; 90% were new cases. Step 1 sensitivities of motor and cognitive assessments regarding Step 2 were both 93%, and Step 2 sensitivities regarding definitive diagnosis 100 and 96%, respectively. Specificities for Step 1 motor and cognitive tests were low (23% and 29%, respectively and for Step 2 tests acceptable (76%, 94%. Based on international data, PD prevalence was 3.7 times higher than expected; AD prevalence

  4. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Catharina; Román, Norbel; Quirós, Indiana; Páez, Laura; García, Vilma; Mora, Ana María; Juncos, Jorge L; Steenland, Kyle N

    2013-12-27

    The integration of mental and neurologic services in healthcare is a global priority. The universal Social Security of Costa Rica aspires to develop national screening of neurodegenerative disorders among the elderly, as part of the non-communicable disease agenda. This study assessed the feasibility of routine screening for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica. The population (aged ≥65) in the catchment areas of two primary healthcare clinics was targeted for motor and cognitive screening during routine annual health check-ups. The screening followed a tiered three-step approach, with increasing specificity. Step 1 involved a two-symptom questionnaire (tremor-at-rest; balance) and a spiral drawing test for motor assessment, as well as a three-word recall and animal category fluency test for cognitive assessment. Step 2 (for those failing Step 1) was a 10-item version of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination. Step 3 (for those failing Step 2) was a comprehensive neurologic exam with definitive diagnosis of PD, AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), other disorders, or subjects who were healthy. Screening parameters and disease prevalence were calculated. Of the 401 screened subjects (80% of target population), 370 (92%), 163 (45%), and 81 (56%) failed in Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, respectively. Thirty-three, 20, and 35 patients were diagnosed with PD, AD, and MCI, respectively (7 were PD with MCI/AD); 90% were new cases. Step 1 sensitivities of motor and cognitive assessments regarding Step 2 were both 93%, and Step 2 sensitivities regarding definitive diagnosis 100 and 96%, respectively. Specificities for Step 1 motor and cognitive tests were low (23% and 29%, respectively) and for Step 2 tests acceptable (76%, 94%). Based on international data, PD prevalence was 3.7 times higher than expected; AD prevalence was as expected. Proposed protocol adjustments

  5. Cervical and breast cancer screening participation for women with chronic conditions in France: results from a national health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Panayotis; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Menvielle, Gwenn

    2016-03-31

    Comorbidity at the time of diagnosis is an independent prognostic factor for survival among women suffering from cervical or breast cancer. Although cancer screening practices have proven their efficacy for mortality reduction, little is known about adherence to screening recommendations for women suffering from chronic conditions. We investigated the association between eleven chronic conditions and adherence to cervical and breast cancer screening recommendations in France. Using data from a cross-sectional national health survey conducted in 2008, we analyzed screening participation taking into account self-reported: inflammatory systemic disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, depression, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, osteoarthritis and thyroid disorders. We first computed age-standardized screening rates among women who reported each condition. We then estimated the effect of having reported each condition on adherence to screening recommendations in logistic regression models, with adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic position, health behaviours, healthcare access and healthcare use. Finally, we investigated the association between chronic conditions and opportunistic versus organized breast cancer screening using multinomial logistic regression. The analyses were conducted among 4226 women for cervical cancer screening and 2056 women for breast cancer screening. Most conditions studied were not associated with screening participation. Adherence to cervical cancer screening recommendations was higher for cancer survivors (OR = 1.73 [0.98-3.05]) and lower for obese women (OR = 0.73 [0.57-0.93]), when accounting for our complete range of screening determinants. Women reporting chronic respiratory disease or diabetes participated less in cervical cancer screening, except when adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations was lower for

  6. Ephemeral Transparency: Glass as a Reflective Screen and Opaque Veil in the New National Gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Balik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the dilemma between intentions and outcomes, based on the transparency debate that has recently resurfaced, by undertaking a critical reading of essential architectural history texts. Using the New National Gallery by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, in Berlin, as the central focus, it argues that, in reality, transparent buildings do not always allow clear vision, free flow, circulation, connection, and accessibility. As a result, the building challenges modern notions by presenting glass as an ephemeral and temporal reflective screen and a condensed opaque veil due to its context and content.

  7. Evolution and Innovations of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos de Céspedes; Manuel Saborío; Rafael Trejos; Gabriela Abarca; Avelino Sánchez

    2004-01-01

    We present the evolution, organization and results of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica (PNT). This program has been working uninterruptedly for more than fourteen years. Costa Rica currently has a literacy rate of 95%. To August 2004 the rate of infant mortality was 9.74 per 1000 births and to 2003, life expectancy was 76.3 years for men and 81.1 years for women. The control of infectious and parasitic diseases, as well as of severe malnutrition, has given r...

  8. Evolution and Innovations of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    de Céspedes, Carlos; Saborío, Manual; Trejos, Rafael; Abarca, Gabriela; Sánchez, Avelino; Rojas, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We present the evolution, organization and results of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica (PNT). This program has been working uninterruptedly for more than fourteen years. Costa Rica currently has a literacy rate of 95%. To August 2004 the rate of infant mortality was 9.74 per 1000 births and to 2003, life expectancy was 76.3 years for men and 81.1 years for women. The control of infectious and parasitic diseases, as well as of severe malnutrition, has given r...

  9. Third trimester screening for alloimmunisation in Rhc-negative pregnant women : evaluation of the Dutch national screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, Y. M.; Koelewijn, J. M.; van Kamp, I. L.; van der Bom, J. G.; Oepkes, D.; de Haas, M.

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the effect of red blood cell (RBC) antibody screening in the 27th week of pregnancy in Rhc-negative women, on detection of alloimmunisation, undetected at first trimester screening (late' alloimmunisation), and subsequent haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), to

  10. Gastric cancer screening uptake trends in Korea: results for the National Cancer Screening Program from 2002 to 2011: a prospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangeun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Suh, Mina; Park, Boyoung; Noh, Dai Keun; Jung, Kyu-Won; Choi, Kui Son

    2015-02-01

    Although the effectiveness of mass screening for gastric cancer remains controversial, several countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer have implemented nationwide gastric cancer screening programs. This study was conducted to assess trends in the use of either upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) or endoscopy to screen for gastric cancer, as well as to assess factors strongly associated with changes therein, over a 10-year period. Data were obtained from the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) database from 2002 to 2011 in Korea. The NCSP provides biennial gastric cancer screening with either UGIS or endoscopy for men and women aged ≥40 years. Using the NCSP database, overall screening rates for gastric cancer and percentages of endoscopy use among participants were analyzed from 2002 to 2011. To estimate changes in participation rates and endoscopy use over time, we assessed the average annual percentage change (APC) by comparing the rates from 2002 and 2011 as relative rates. Participation rates for gastric cancer screening increased 4.33% annually from 2002 to 2011. In terms of screening method, a substantial increase in endoscopy use was noted among the gastric cancer screening participants over the 10-year period. The percentage of participants who had undergone endoscopy test increased from 31.15% in 2002 to 72.55% in 2011, whereas the percentage of participants who underwent UGIS decreased tremendously. Increased endoscopy test use was greatest among participants aged 40 to 49 (APC = 4.83%) and Medical Aid Program recipients (APC = 5.73%). Overall, men, participants of ages 40 to 49 years, and National Health Insurance beneficiaries of higher socioeconomic status were more likely to undergo screening via endoscopy. This study of nationwide empirical data from 2002 to 2011 showed that endoscopy is increasingly being used for gastric cancer screening in Korea, compared with UGIS. Nevertheless, further study of the impact of endoscopy

  11. Eating Disorder Inventory-3, validation in Swedish patients with eating disorders, psychiatric outpatients and a normal control sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman-Carlsson, Erika; Engström, Ingemar; Norring, Claes; Nevonen, Lauri

    2015-02-01

    The Eating Disorder Inventory-3 (EDI-3) is designed to assess eating disorder psychopathology and the associated psychological symptoms. The instrument has been revised and has not yet been validated for Swedish conditions in its current form. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of this inventory and present national norms for Swedish females. Data from patients with eating disorders (n = 292), psychiatric outpatients (n = 140) and normal controls (n = 648), all females, were used to study the internal consistency, the discriminative ability, and the sensitivity and specificity of the inventory using preliminary cut-offs for each subscale and diagnosis separately. Swedish norms were compared with those from Denmark, USA, Canada, Europe and Australian samples. The reliability was acceptable for all subscales except Asceticism among normal controls. Analysis of variance showed that the EDI-3 discriminates significantly between eating disorders and normal controls. Anorexia nervosa was significantly discriminated from bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified on the Eating Disorder Risk Scales. Swedish patients scored significantly lower than patients from other countries on the majority of the subscales. Drive for Thinness is the second best predictor for an eating disorder. The best predictor for anorexia nervosa was Interoceptive Deficits and Bulimia for the other diagnoses. Conclusions/clinical implications: The EDI-3 is valid for use with Swedish patients as a clinical assessment tool for the treatment planning and evaluation of patients with eating-related problems. However, it still exist some uncertainty regarding its use as a screening tool.

  12. The role of National Library of Medicine web sites in newborn screening education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomous, Cathy; Miller, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    Expanded newborn screening programs and subsequent detection of rare genetic disorders challenge parents and their medical providers to learn about the treatment and management of these disorders. Many people seek medical information on the Internet but may encounter requests for registration or fees, or find that resources are out of date, difficult to understand, or buried in advertisements. The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), a component of the National Institutes of Health, provides web-based resources that address the challenges of newborn screening education. These resources include MedlinePlus, Genetics Home Reference, ClinicalTrials.gov, and PubMed. NLM websites are not commercial, do not require registration or fees, and provide varied levels of information for a continuum of audiences from low-literacy consumers to health professionals. Using phenylketonuria as an example, this study describes the information that parents and their medical providers can find through NLM resources. NLM has embraced the digital age and provides the public with reliable, accurate, and up-to-date educational materials. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Physician behaviors to promote informed decisions for prostate cancer screening: a National Research Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Suzanne K; Kallen, Michael A; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Galliher, James M; Swank, Paul R; Chan, Evelyn C Y; Volk, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Clinical guidelines for prostate cancer screening (PCS) advise physicians to discuss the potential harms and benefits of screening. However, there is a lack of training programs for informed decision-making (IDM), and it is unknown which IDM behaviors physicians have the most difficulty performing. Identifying difficult behaviors can help tailor training programs. In the context of developing a physician-IDM program for PCS, we aimed to describe physicians' use of nine key IDM behaviors for the PCS discussion and to examine the relation between the behaviors and physician characteristics. A cross-sectional sample of The American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network completed surveys about their behavior regarding PCS (N = 246; response rate = 58%). The surveys included nine physician key IDM behaviors for PCS and a single-item question describing their general practice style for PCS. The most common IDM behavior was to invite men to ask questions. The two least common reported behaviors concerned patients uncertain about screening (i.e., arrange follow-up and provide additional information for undecided men). Physicians reported difficulty with these two behaviors regardless whether they reported to discuss or not to discuss PCS with patients. Reported use of key IDM behaviors was associated with a general practice style for PCS and being affiliated with a residency-training program. Physician training programs for IDM should include physician skills to address the needs of patients uncertain about screening. Future research should determine if actual behavior is associated with self-reported behavior for the PCS discussion.

  14. Parameter estimates for invasive breast cancer progression in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, S; Banjevic, D; Miller, A B; Montgomery, N; Jardine, A K S; Harvey, B J

    2013-02-19

    The aim of screening is to detect a cancer in the preclinical state. However, a false-positive or a false-negative test result is a real possibility. We describe invasive breast cancer progression in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study and construct progression models with and without covariates. The effect of risk factors on transition intensities and false-negative probability is investigated. We estimate the transition rates, the sojourn time and sensitivity of diagnostic tests for women aged 40-49 and 50-59. Although younger women have a slower transition rate from healthy state to preclinical, their screen-detected tumour becomes evident sooner. Women aged 50-59 have a higher mortality rate compared with younger women. The mean sojourn times for women aged 40-49 and 50-59 are 2.5 years (95% CI: 1.7, 3.8) and 3.0 years (95% CI: 2.1, 4.3), respectively. Sensitivity of diagnostic procedures for older women is estimated to be 0.75 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.88), while women aged 40-49 have a lower sensitivity (0.61, 95% CI: 0.42, 0.77). Age is the only factor that affects the false-negative probability. For women aged 40-49, 'age at entry', 'history of breast disease' and 'families with breast cancer' are found to be significant for some of the transition rates. For the age-group 50-59, 'age at entry', 'history of breast disease', 'menstruation length' and 'number of live births' are found to affect the transition rates. Modelling and estimating the parameters of cancer progression are essential steps towards evaluating the effectiveness of screening policies. The parameters include the transition rates, the preclinical sojourn time, the sensitivity, and the effect of different risk factors on cancer progression.

  15. Self-reported frequency of sex as self-injury (SASI) in a national study of Swedish adolescents and association to sociodemographic factors, sexual behaviors, abuse and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredlund, Cecilia; Svedin, Carl Göran; Priebe, Gisela; Jonsson, Linda; Wadsby, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Sex as self-injury has become a concept in Swedish society; however it is a largely unexplored area of research, not yet conceptualized and far from accepted in the research field. The use of sex as a way of affect regulation is known in the literature and has, in interviews with young women who sell sex, been compared to direct self-injury, such as cutting or burning the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported frequency of sex as self-injury and the association to sociodemographic factors, sexual orientation, voluntary sexual experiences, sexual risk-taking behaviors, sexual, physical and mental abuse, trauma symptoms, healthcare for psychiatric disorders and non-suicidal self-injury. A representative national sample of 5750 students in the 3rd year of Swedish high school, with a mean age of 18 years was included in the study. The study was questionnaire-based and the response rate was 59.7%. Mostly descriptive statistics were used and a final logistic regression model was made. Sex as self-injury was reported by 100 (3.2%) of the girls and 20 (.8%) of the boys. Few correlations to sociodemographic factors were noted, but the group was burdened with more experiences of sexual, physical and emotional abuse. Non-heterosexual orientation, trauma symptoms, non-suicidal self-injury and healthcare for suicide attempts, depression and eating disorders were common. Sex used as self-injury seems to be highly associated with earlier traumas such as sexual abuse and poor mental health. It is a behavior that needs to be conceptualized in order to provide proper help and support to a highly vulnerable group of adolescents.

  16. Swedish Family Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrstrom, Staffan

    1986-01-01

    Family policy remains one of the leading issues of Swedish domestic politics. All parties are agreed that families with children must be given a better deal in the wake of the economic crisis. But how is this to be done and how quickly can it be achieved? Is the expansion of day nursery facilities to be speeded up, or are parents to be given a…

  17. Positive predictive values of International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision codes for dermatologic events and hypersensitivity leading to hospitalization or emergency room visit among women with postmenopausal osteoporosis in the Danish and Swedish national patient registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelborg K

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kasper Adelborg,1 Lotte Brix Christensen,1 Troels Munch,1 Johnny Kahlert,1 Ylva Trolle Lagerros,2,3 Grethe S Tell,4 Ellen M Apalset,4,5 Fei Xue,6 Vera Ehrenstein1 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark; 2Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, 3Department of Medicine, Clinic of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, 5Department of Rheumatology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 6Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc. Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Background: Clinical epidemiology research studies, including pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacovigilance studies, use routinely collected health data, such as diagnoses recorded in national health and administrative registries, to assess clinical effectiveness and safety of treatments. We estimated positive predictive values (PPVs of International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10 codes for primary diagnoses of dermatologic events and hypersensitivity recorded at hospitalization or emergency room visit in the national patient registries of Denmark and Sweden among women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO. Methods: This validation study included women with PMO identified from the Danish and Swedish national patient registries (2005–2014. Medical charts of the potential cases served as the gold standard for the diagnosis confirmation and were reviewed and adjudicated by physicians. Results: We obtained and reviewed 189 of 221 sampled medical records (86%. The overall PPV was 92.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 85.1%–96.3% for dermatologic events, while the PPVs for bullous events and erythematous dermatologic events were 52.5% (95% CI, 37.5%–67.1% and 12.5% (95% CI, 2.2%–47.1%, respectively. The PPV was 59.0% (95% CI, 48.3%–69.0% for hypersensitivity; however

  18. A closer look at cervical smear uptake and results pre- and post- introduction of the national screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, F

    2012-02-01

    Prior to the introduction of a national cervical screening programme, death rates from cervical cancer in the Republic of Ireland were greater than the death rates in all other regions in Britain and Northern Ireland. The following audit compares the impact of the national cervical screening programme, established on 1 September \\'08, on uptake and results per age group screened before and after its implementation. This retrospective audit was carried out in a four-doctor practice with approximately 1554 GMS and 5000 private patients. Data over a ten month period in \\'08\\/\\'09 was collected from the practice record of cervical smears and compared to the same period in \\'07\\/\\'08. A cohort of 534 Irish urban women was included. A total number of 148 women were screened between October 2007 and July 2008 compared with 386 women screened over the same months in 2008\\/2009. Increase in uptake was most marked in the 25-44 years age group, 100 (\\'07-\\'08) vs. 303 (\\'08-\\'09). The majority of results for both time periods were negative (85% 07\\/08, 81% 08\\/09). There was a higher number of HSIL in \\'08-\\'09 (an increase from 1% to 3.37% of the total screened). This audit clearly supports the introduction of the national cervical screening programme showing both an increase in uptake and a increased pick-up of high grade lesions.

  19. Deliveries among teenage women – with emphasis on incidence and mode of delivery: a Swedish national survey from 1973 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the 1970-ies Sweden has actively developed strategies in social care, education and health care in order to counteract the negative consequences of adolescent parenthood. The aims of this study are to determine the annual incidence of singleton delivery among adolescents 1973–2010 and analyse obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study, using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register was conducted. All singleton deliveries in Sweden between 1973 and 2010 were included. Totally 1,941,940 women had 3,761,576 deliveries during the period. Analyses of obstetric and neonatal outcome were restricted to 1992–2010. Adolescents were subdivided into three groups: teenage births decreased significantly from 7.7 to 1.6%. Teenagers were more likely to deliver normally vaginally (aOR 1.70 (95%CI 1.64-1.75), less likely to have Caesarean section (aOR 0.61 (95%CI 0.58-0.64), and had a greater risk of delivering prematurely ( 1000 ml and perineal rupture were significantly lower among teenagers. Although the rate with Apgar score teenager’s neonates showed less fetal distress and meconium aspiration. Conclusion Adolescent births have steadily decreased in Sweden. Adolescents were more likely to be delivered vaginally than the adult women. The risks for obstetric maternal complications for adolescents were lower than for adult women except for the risk of prematurity. PMID:24207112

  20. The Pre-National Period’s Swedish Documents as a Source for the Study of the Russian Anthroponymy of Karelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Kyurshunova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the late 16th — early 17th centuries Swedish documents that reflect the anthroponymic system of Kexholm County, one of the territories ceded to Sweden by the Treaty of Stolbovo in 1617. This led to the formation of a unique onomasticon which combined Christian names of different religions and ethnic groups. The author analyses Russian anthroponymic units as documented in the above sources and conclude that they all have features proper to the Russian system of personal naming of that period: non-calendar personal names are preserved; calendar names are few in number and display a great variation of forms; russianised names have grammatical properties that distinguish them from corresponding West European Christian names; patronyms derived from those names are formed according to Russian patronymic patterns; naming formulas may vary, however, the binomial pattern ‘personal (calendar, most often modified, or non-calendar name + patronym’ prevails. The studied documents contain a considerable number of nicknames made up following Russian patterns and onomasiological models of naming. The author shows that all these features were widespread on the former Russian territories and in some neighbouring areas. Also, Russian onomasticon had a strong impact on the non-Slavic onomasticon which manifested itself in the emergence of modified Russian names and trinomial patterns of personal naming.

  1. Studies in Swedish Energy Opinion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Soeren; Hedberg, Per

    2012-07-01

    the 1970s, energy production was politicized big time in the industrialized world. The birth of the environmental movement, the oil crises in 1973 - 74 and the beginning conflict surrounding civilian nuclear power, put energy issues center stage on the political agenda. Energy policies - especially related to the development of nuclear power - came to dominate election campaigns, like in Sweden in 1976 or be the subject of referendums, like in Austria in 1978 or in Sweden in 1980. Critical voices toward the peaceful use of nuclear power - having started in America before being exported to Europe - gained real strength and public support all over the Western world by the nuclear accident at the Three Mile Island plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1979. The energy genie was out of the bottle and out to stay. Fueled by the nuclear meltdowns in Chernobyl in 1986 and in Fukushima in 2011 and supplemented by conflicts over how to reduce the use of oil and coal, how to sensibly exploit the waste gas reserves, and how to develop renewable energy sources based on sun, wind and waves – have made all kinds of energy issues the focal point of political contentions ever since the early 1970s. In Sweden, as in many other countries, energy policies - often with nuclear power in the center - have been one of the most fought-over policy areas during the last thirty-forty years. And the contentious character of energy policies is not limited to the elite level of politics - to politicians, to media pundits or to lobbyists. It is also manifest among ordinary citizens. Energy issues - nuclear power and wind power in particular - are highly polarizing among voters as well. Given this historic background, starting in the 1970s, it was rather natural that energy questions - featuring most prominently questions related to nuclear power - would be important parts of the voter surveys performed by the Swedish National Elections Studies (SNES) at the Univ. of Gothenburg. The first book

  2. Is screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk groups cost-effective? - Experience from a Danish national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sorensen, Jan; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, symptoms are few and diffuse, and when the diagnosis has been made only 10-15% would benefit from resection. Surgery is the only potentially curable treatment for pancreatic cancer, and the prognosis seems to improve with early detection. A hereditary component has been identified in 1-10% of the PC cases. To comply with this, screening for PC in high-risk groups with a genetic disposition for PC has been recommended in research settings. Between January 2006 and February 2014 31 patients with Hereditary pancreatitis or with a disposition of HP and 40 first-degree relatives of patients with Familial Pancreatic Cancer (FPC) were screened for development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with yearly endoscopic ultrasound. The cost-effectiveness of screening in comparison with no-screening was assessed by the incremental cost-utility ratio (ICER). By screening the FPC group we identified 2 patients with PDAC who were treated by total pancreatectomy. One patient is still alive, while the other died after 7 months due to cardiac surgery complications. Stratified analysis of patients with HP and FPC provided ICERs of 47,156 US$ vs. 35,493 US$ per life-year and 58,647 US$ vs. 47,867 US$ per QALY. Including only PDAC related death changed the ICER to 31,722 US$ per life-year and 42,128 US$ per QALY. The ICER for patients with FPC was estimated at 28,834 US$ per life-year and 38,785 US$ per QALY. With a threshold value of 50,000 US$ per QALY this screening program appears to constitute a cost-effective intervention although screening of HP patients appears to be less cost-effective than FPC patients. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Marine wind farms and seabirds. Updated national screening of potential conflict areas; Offshore vindenergianlegg og sjoefugl. Oppdatert screening av potensielle konfliktomraader paa nasjonal skala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Signe; Lorentsen, Svein-Haakon; Hanssen, Frank; Systad, Geir Helge

    2011-07-01

    In 2010 NINA performed a screening of areas that may be suitable for the establishment of offshore wind power plants (Christensen-Dalsgaard et al. 2010). The surveyed area ranged from the Swedish border in the south (North Sea/Skagerrak) to the northern tip of Andoeya (Norwegian Sea). Following the publishing of the report the Directorate for Nature management wanted to extend the analysis so that it also covered the Barents Sea (National scale). While the 2010-report also included potential effects on white-tailed eagles, Eurasian eagle owl and waders this geographically extended analysis only covers seabirds. Marine wind farms are a relatively new element in European waters, and at present there have been few investigations carried out to study their short- and long-term environmental effects. While there have been several studies to identify environmental impacts of wind farms in other countries, there is currently only one such study in Norway, on the island of Smoela. So far, four mechanisms have been emphasized with regard to the impact of wind farms on birds: 1) mortality resulting from collisions with wind turbines (tower and wings), 2) avoidance due to interference from installations in operation and from the activity associated with the construction of wind farms; 3) loss and change of habitat, through habitat degradation and fragmentation, and 4) barrier effects, which may increase the flight distance and increase the birds' energy demands. In this report, we have chosen to use a methodology that was developed to evaluate seabird vulnerability to marine wind farms in German waters. This method provides a species-specific vulnerability index (SSI) based on nine factors: flight maneuverability, flight altitude, percentage of time flying, nocturnal flight activity, sensitivity towards disturbance by ship/helicopter traffic, flexibility in habitat use, bio geographical population size, adult survival rate and conservation status. In addition we added a

  4. The Relations Between False Positive and Negative Screens and Smoking Cessation and Relapse in the National Lung Screening Trial: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa A; Gorelick, Jeremy J; Sicks, JoRean D; Park, Elyse R; Graham, Amanda L; Abrams, David B; Gareen, Ilana F

    2016-01-01

    Lung screening is an opportunity for smoking cessation and relapse prevention, but smoking behaviors may differ across screening results. Changes in smoking were evaluated among 18 840 current and former smokers aged 55-74 scheduled to receive three annual lung screenings. Participants were randomized to low-dose computed tomography or single-view chest radiography in the American College of Radiology/National Lung Screening Trial. Outcome measures included point and sustained (6-month) abstinence and motivation to quit among smokers; and relapse among smokers who quit during follow-up, recent quitters (quit < 6 months), and long-term former smokers (quit ≥ 6 months). During five years of follow-up, annual point prevalence quit rates ranged from 11.6%-13.4%; 48% of current smokers reported a quit attempt and 7% of long-term former smokers relapsed. Any false positive screening result was associated with subsequent increased point (multivariable hazard ratio HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.35) and sustained (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.43) abstinence among smokers. Recent quitters with ≥1 false positive screen were less likely to relapse (HR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.54, 0.96). Screening result was not associated with relapse among long-term former smokers or among baseline smokers who quit during follow-up. A false positive screen was associated with increased smoking cessation and less relapse among recent quitters. Consistently negative screens were not associated with greater relapse among long-term former smokers. Given the Affordable Care Act requires most health plans to cover smoking cessation and lung screening, the impact and cost-effectiveness of lung screening could be further enhanced with the addition of smoking cessation interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Adherence over time to cervical cancer screening guidelines: insights from the Canadian National Population Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Catherine; McLeish, Kendra; Fuller-Thomson, Esme

    2012-02-01

    A substantial percentage of North American women are nonadherent to cervical cancer screening guidelines despite the effectiveness of the Papinicolaou (pap) test for papillomavirus. Our objective was to determine factors associated with changes in adherence for cervical cancer screening guidelines over a 14-year period. Using data from cycles 1 (1994-1995) through 7 (2006-2007) of the Canadian National Population Health Survey, we used logistic regression to compare the regularity of pap testing (at least once every 36 months) among women. We compared women with increasing adherence to pap testing guidelines to those who were never adherent, and women with decreasing adherence to those who were always adherent. The sample included women aged 20-70 years who responded in at least three of seven waves of data collection and had not undergone a hysterectomy (n=4949). Independent variables were based on Andersen's Behavioral Model of predisposing, enabling, and need variables. The majority of our sample were either always adherent (61.4%) or had increasing adherence (9.9%) over the course of the study. Another 4.8% were never adherent, and 6.6% had decreasing adherence over their involvement in the study. Predominantly, both enabling (e.g., presence of regular doctor) and need (e.g., birth control pill use, obesity) factors were associated with changing patterns of adherence. Physicians have a crucial role to play in the trajectories of adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines over time. In addition, women with obesity need to be particularly targeted for services because they are vulnerable to negative trajectories in adherence over time.

  6. Fasting Might Not Be Necessary Before Lipid Screening: A Nationally Representative Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Perrin, Eliana M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are barriers to fasting lipid screening for at-risk children. Results of studies in adults have suggested that lipid testing might be reliably performed without fasting. OBJECTIVE: To examine population-level differences in pediatric lipid values based on length of fast before testing. METHODS: We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008) to examine total cholesterol (TC), HDL (high-density lipoprotein), LDL (low-density lipoprotein), and triglyceride cholesterol components on the basis of the period of fasting. Young children fasted for varying times before being tested, and children older than 12 years were asked to fast; however, adherence was variable. We used ordinary least-squares regression to test for differences in lipid values that were based on fasting times, controlling for weight status, age, race, ethnicity, and gender. RESULTS: TC, HDL, LDL, or triglyceride values were available for 12 744 children. Forty-eight percent of the TC and HDL samples and 80% of the LDL and triglyceride samples were collected from children who had fasted ≥8 hours. Fasting had a small positive effect for TC, HDL, and LDL, resulting in a mean value for the sample that was 2 to 5 mg/dL higher with a 12-hour fast compared with a no-fast sample. Fasting time had a negative effect on triglycerides (β = −0.859; P = .02), which resulted in values in the fasting group that were 7 mg/dL lower. DISCUSSION: Comparison of cholesterol screening results for a nonfasting group of children compared with results for a similar fasting group resulted in small differences that are likely not clinically important. Physicians might be able to decrease the burden of childhood cholesterol screening by not requiring prescreening fasting for these components. PMID:21807697

  7. Predictors of competing mortality to invasive breast cancer incidence in the Canadian National Breast Screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghipour Sharareh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of breast cancer screening requires estimates of the absolute risk of breast cancer, which is modified by various risk factors. Breast cancer incidence, and thus mortality, is altered by the occurrence of competing events. More accurate estimates of competing risks should improve the estimation of absolute risk of breast cancer and benefit from breast cancer screening, leading to more effective preventive, diagnostic, and treatment policies. We have previously described the effect of breast cancer risk factors on breast cancer incidence in the presence of competing risks. In this study, we investigate the association of the same risk factors with mortality as a competing event with breast cancer incidence. Methods We use data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, consisting of two randomized controlled trials, which included data on 39 risk factors for breast cancer. The participants were followed up for the incidence of breast cancer and mortality due to breast cancer and other causes. We stratified all-cause mortality into death from other types of cancer and death from non-cancer causes. We conducted separate analyses for cause-specific mortalities. Results We found that “age at entry” is a significant factor for all-cause mortality, and cancer-specific and non-cancer mortality. “Menstruation length” and “number of live births” are significant factors for all-cause mortality, and cancer-specific mortality. “Ever noted lumps in right/left breasts” is a factor associated with all-cause mortality, and non-cancer mortality. Conclusions For proper estimation of absolute risk of the main event of interest common risk factors associated with competing events should be identified and considered.

  8. Effect of Marriage on Risk for Onset of Alcohol Use Disorder: A Longitudinal and Co-Relative Analysis in a Swedish National Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Lönn, Sara Larsson; Salvatore, Jessica; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-09-01

    The authors sought to clarify the relationship between marriage and risk for alcohol use disorder. The association between marital status and risk for first registration for alcohol use disorder in medical, criminal, and pharmacy registries was assessed in a population-based Swedish cohort (N=3,220,628) using longitudinal time-dependent survival and co-relative designs. First marriage was associated with a substantial decline in risk for onset of alcohol use disorder in men (hazard ratio=0.41, 95% CI=0.40-0.42) and women (hazard ratio=0.27, 95% CI=0.26-0.28). This association was slightly stronger when the spouse had no lifetime alcohol use disorder, while marriage to a spouse with lifetime alcohol use disorder increased risk for subsequent alcohol use disorder registration in both men (hazard ratio=1.29, 95% CI=1.16-1.43) and women (hazard ratio=1.18, 95% CI=1.06-1.30). In both sexes, the protective effect of marriage was significantly stronger in those with than those without a family history of alcohol use disorder. In both men and women, the associations between marriage and risk for alcohol use disorder in cousins, half siblings, full siblings, and monozygotic twins discordant for marital status were as strong as that seen in the general population. First marriage to a spouse with no lifetime alcohol use disorder is associated with a large reduction in risk for alcohol use disorder. This association cannot be explained by standard covariates or, as indicated by co-relative analyses, familial genetic or shared environmental confounders. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the psychological and social aspects of marriage, and in particular health-monitoring spousal interactions, strongly protect against the development of alcohol use disorder. The protective effects of marriage on risk for alcohol use disorder are increased in those at high familial risk for alcoholism.

  9. Influence of BMI on short-term surgical outcome after colorectal cancer surgery: a study based on the Swedish national quality registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hede, Per; Sörensson, Marina Åkerblom; Polleryd, Per; Persson, Kamilla; Hallgren, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that an increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with cancer development. Results from studies on colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment outcome and BMI are however conflicting. Our hypothesis was that a high as well as a low BMI will have negative effects on short-term outcome after CRC surgery. Data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry from 2007 to 2012 was analyzed. A total of 24,587 patients operated on for CRC were included in the study and divided into one of five categories for BMI. Operative bleeding, operating time, surgical complications, and 30-day mortality were compared between groups. Operative bleeding as well as operating time was significantly increased when comparing normal-weight patients to overweight (p < 0.001). 15.1% of normal-weight patients suffered from postoperative surgical complications. This was significantly increased with each BMI step but did not affect the 30-day mortality. However, underweight patients, on the other hand, had fewer complications (13.3%) but an increased 30-day mortality. Longer operating times and increased perioperative bleeding may be explanatory factors behind increased postoperative complication rates for CRC patients with higher BMI. In underweight patients, advanced disease may be a reason for a higher 30-day mortality. To improve outcome, specific precautions are suggested when operating on under- as well as overweight CRC patients. We also suggest that the registry introduces a better marker than BMI for central visceral fat-the link between obesity and cancer development. Further studies are needed to analyze the findings in detail and to study long-term effects.

  10. The Participation of HPV-Vaccinated Women in a National Cervical Screening Program: Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Herweijer

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised that HPV-vaccination might affect women's cervical screening behavior. We therefore investigated the association between opportunistic HPV-vaccination and attendance after invitation to cervical screening.A cohort of all women resident in Sweden, born 1977-1987 (N=629,703, and invited to cervical screening, was followed October 2006 - December 2012. Invitations to screening were identified via the National Quality Register for Cervical Cancer Prevention, as was the primary outcome of a registered smear. Vaccination status was obtained from two nationwide health data registers. Hazard ratios (HR were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for age, education level and income (HRadj. Women were individually followed for up to 6 years, of which the first and second screening rounds were analyzed separately.Screening attendance after three years of follow-up was 86% in vaccinated women (N=4,897 and 75% in unvaccinated women (N=625,804. The crude HR of screening attendance in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated women was 1.31 (95% CI 1.27-1.35 in the first screening round. Adjustment for education and income reduced but did not erase this difference (HRadj=1.09, 95% CI 1.05-1.13. In the second screening round, attendance was likewise higher in HPV-vaccinated women (crude HR=1.26, 95% CI 1.21-1.32; HRadj=1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20.HPV-vaccination is so far associated with equal or higher attendance to cervical screening in Sweden in a cohort of opportunistically vaccinated young women. Most but not all of the difference in attendance was explained by socioeconomic differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated women. HPV vaccine effectiveness studies should consider screening attendance of HPV-vaccinated women when assessing incidence of screen-detected cervical lesions.

  11. The Associations of Youth Physical Activity and Screen Time with Fatness and Fitness: The 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the associations of youth physical activity and screen time with weight status and cardiorespiratory fitness in children and adolescents, separately, utilizing a nationally representative sample. A total of 1,113 participants (692 children aged 6-11 yrs; 422 adolescents aged 12-15 yrs from the 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey. Participants completed physical activity and screen time questionnaires, and their body mass index and cardiorespiratory fitness (adolescents only were assessed. Adolescents completed additional physical activity questions to estimate daily MET minutes. Children not meeting the screen time guideline had 1.69 times the odds of being overweight/obese compared to those meeting the screen time guideline, after adjusting for physical activity and other control variables. Among adolescent, screen time was significantly associated with being overweight/obese (odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-3.15, but the association attenuated toward the borderline of being significant after controlling for physical activity. Being physically active was positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness, independent of screen time among adolescents. In joint association analysis, children who did not meet physical activity nor screen time guidelines had 2.52 times higher odds of being overweight/obese than children who met both guidelines. Adolescents who did not meet the screen time guideline had significantly higher odds ratio of being overweight/obese regardless of meeting the physical activity guideline. Meeting the physical activity guideline was also associated with cardiorespiratory fitness regardless of meeting the screen time guideline in adolescents. Screen time is a stronger factor than physical activity in predicting weight status in both children and adolescents, and only physical activity is strongly associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents.

  12. Is adding HCV screening to the antenatal national screening program in Amsterdam, the Netherlands cost-effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, A.; Van Keep, M.; Matser, A.; Rozenbaum, M.; Weegink, C.; Van Den Hoek, A.; Prins, M.; Postma, M.

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) can lead to severe liver disease. Recently new improved treatment options have been introduced. Pregnant women are already routinely screened for several infectious diseases, however not yet for HCV infection. Here we examine whether adding HCV

  13. Parental Decisions about Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis among Infants with Trisomy 21 in a National Cohort with High Uptake of Combined First-Trimester Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltoft, Caroline Borregaard; Wulff, Camilla B; Kjærgaard, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to investigate the parental decisions about prenatal screening and diagnosis among infants with trisomy 21 (T21) in a national cohort with high uptake of combined first-trimester screening (cFTS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a nationwide population-based study including...... alive with T21. The cFTS risk was true-positive, false-negative or not obtained in 21.6, 48.0 and 30.4%, respectively, of these pregnancies. DISCUSSION: In this large national cohort, 4.4 per 10,000 live-born infants had T21. Of 102 infants with T21 from 2009 to 2012, 52.0% were born after the women had...

  14. Environmental Management at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, all Swedish public authorities, which includes most universities, have been made responsible for contributing to the sustainable development of the society. Swedish universities are thus required to submit annual environmental reports about their policies, structures and actions. This study provides a review of the activities that…

  15. The National Cancer Screening Program for breast cancer in the Republic of Korea: is it cost-effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moon Hae; Park, Eun-Cheol; Choi, Kui Son; Suh, Mina; Jun, Jae Kwan; Cho, Eun

    2013-01-01

    This goal of this research was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) for breast cancer in the Republic of Korea from a government expenditure perspective. In 2002-2003 (baseline), a total of 8,724,860 women aged 40 years or over were invited to attend breast cancer screening by the NCSP. Those who attended were identified using the NCSP database, and women were divided into two groups, women who attended screening at baseline (screened group) and those who did not (non-screened group). Breast cancer diagnosis in both groups at baseline, and during 5-year follow-up was identified using the Korean Central Cancer Registry. The effectiveness of the NCSP for breast cancer was estimated by comparing 5-year survival and life years saved (LYS) between the screened and the unscreened groups, measured using mortality data from the Korean National Health Insurance Corporation and the National Health Statistical Office. Direct screening costs, indirect screening costs, and productivity costs were considered in different combinations in the model. When all three of these costs were considered together, the incremental cost to save one life year of a breast cancer patient was 42,305,000 Korean Won (KW) (1 USD=1,088 KW) for the screened group compared to the non-screened group. In sensitivity analyses, reducing the false-positive rate of the screening program by half was the most cost-effective (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, ICER=30,110,852 KW/LYS) strategy. When the upper age limit for screening was set at 70 years, it became more cost-effective (ICER=39,641,823 KW/LYS) than when no upper age limit was set. The NCSP for breast cancer in Korea seems to be accepted as cost-effective as ICER estimates were around the Gross Domestic Product. However, cost-effectiveness could be further improved by increasing the sensitivity of breast cancer screening and by setting appropriate age limits.

  16. Entrepreneurial Learning in Swedish Preschools: Possibilities for and Constraints on Children's Active Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulander, Eva; Ehrlin, Anna; Sandberg, Anette

    2015-01-01

    The website of the Swedish National Agency for Education states that preschools are to promote entrepreneurial learning. Many Swedish preschools, therefore, have started to work consciously with entrepreneurial learning as a way of fostering pupils' creativity and ability to make their own decisions. This article investigates whether and how…

  17. From Cancer Screening to Treatment: Service Delivery and Referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W.; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D.; Royalty, Janet E.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. PMID:25099897

  18. The Association between Working Memory and Educational Attainment as Measured in Different Mathematical Subtopics in the Swedish National Assessment: Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyroos, Mikaela; Wiklund-Hornqvist, Carola

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between working memory capacity and mathematical performance measured by the national curriculum assessment in third-grade children (n = 40). The national tests concerned six subareas within mathematics. One-way ANOVA, two-tailed Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were…

  19. A national survey of lung cancer specialists' views on low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Wook; Chun, Sohyun; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Seung Joon; Kim, Jung Soo; Chong, SeMin; Park, Young Sik; Song, Sang-Yun; Lee, Jin Han; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Kim, Eun Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Cho, Deog Gon; Jang, Tae Won; Son, Ji Woong; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Cho, Moon-June

    2018-01-01

    Lung cancer specialists play an important role in designing and implementing lung cancer screening. We aimed to describe their 1) attitudes toward low-dose lung computed tomography (LDCT) screening, 2) current practices and experiences of LDCT screening and 3) attitudes and opinions towards national lung cancer screening program (NLCSP). We conducted a national web-based survey of pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, and radiological oncologists who are members of Korean Association for Lung Cancer (N = 183). Almost all respondents agreed that LDCT screening increases early detection (100%), improves survival (95.1%), and gives a good smoking cessation counseling opportunity (88.6%). Most were concerned about its high false positive results (79.8%) and the subsequent negative effects. Less than half were concerned about radiation hazard (37.2%). Overall, most (89.1%) believed that the benefits outweigh the risks and harms. Most (79.2%) stated that they proactively recommend LDCT screening to those who are eligible for the current guidelines, but the screening propensity varied considerably. The majority (77.6%) agreed with the idea of NLCSP and its beneficial effect, but had concerns about the quality control of CT devices (74.9%), quality assurance of radiologic interpretation (63.3%), poor access to LDCT (56.3%), and difficulties in selecting eligible population using self-report history (66.7%). Most (79.2%) thought that program need to be funded by a specialized fund rather than by the National Health Insurance. The opinions on the level of copayment for screening varied. Our findings would be an important source for health policy decision when considering for NLCSP in Korea.

  20. Patient safety as perceived by Swedish leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härenstam, Karin Pukk; Elg, Mattias; Svensson, Carina; Brommels, Mats; Ovretveit, John

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to survey Swedish healthcare leaders' patient safety awareness, the priority they give to safety issues and their views on suitable safety management strategies. A total 623 leaders of a sample of 1,129 responded to a mail questionnaire (55 percent response rate). Descriptive statistics of the responses are presented as frequency distributions across respondent subgroups. Means were tested for similarity by a repetitive one-way ANOVA procedure. Homogeneous response groups were sought by hierarchical cluster analysis. Swedish healthcare leaders show relatively high safety awareness and how their organizations prioritize safety management. There is a marked polarization between leaders; half feel that the system works reasonably well, and that adequate funds are available to improve or maintain services. The other half thinks the system needs major change and calls for additional funding. A majority sees system errors as the main cause for adverse events; a substantial minority find human errors to be more important. Two-thirds were willing to make safety performance information on organizations and specialties public, one third was restrictive. Survey instruments used to explore leaders' patient safety views have not yet been rigorously tested against psychometric criteria. One hospital type was slightly over-represented and three regions somewhat under-represented in the respondent groups. This is the first systematic attempt to explore the views of Swedish healthcare leaders on patient safety. It provides input to a national strategy to improve patient safety.

  1. Usability Testing of a National Substance Use Screening Tool Embedded in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Anne; DeStio, Catherine; McCullagh, Lauren; Kapoor, Sandeep; Morley, Jeanne; Conigliaro, Joseph

    2016-07-08

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is currently being implemented into health systems nationally via paper and electronic methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the integration of an electronic SBIRT tool into an existing paper-based SBIRT clinical workflow in a patient-centered medical home. Usability testing was conducted in an academic ambulatory clinic. Two rounds of usability testing were done with medical office assistants (MOAs) using a paper and electronic version of the SBIRT tool, with two and four participants, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative data was analyzed to determine the impact of both tools on clinical workflow. A second round of usability testing was done with the revised electronic version and compared with the first version. Personal workflow barriers cited in the first round of testing were that the electronic health record (EHR) tool was disruptive to patient's visits. In Round 2 of testing, MOAs reported favoring the electronic version due to improved layout and the inclusion of an alert system embedded in the EHR. For example, using the system usability scale (SUS), MOAs reported a grade "1" for the statement, "I would like to use this system frequently" during the first round of testing but a "5" during the second round of analysis. The importance of testing usability of various mediums of tools used in health care screening is highlighted by the findings of this study. In the first round of testing, the electronic tool was reported as less user friendly, being difficult to navigate, and time consuming. Many issues faced in the first generation of the tool were improved in the second generation after usability was evaluated. This study demonstrates how usability testing of an electronic SBRIT tool can help to identify challenges that can impact clinical workflow. However, a limitation of this study was the small sample size of MOAs that participated. The results may have been biased to

  2. The Effect of National Cancer Screening on Disparity Reduction in Cancer Stage at Diagnosis by Income Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Min Jung

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer is an effective and efficient cancer management strategy. In South Korea, the National Health Insurance administers the National Cancer Screening Program to its beneficiaries. We examined the impact of the National Cancer Screening Program on socioeconomic disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis.Cancer patients registered in the Korean Central Cancer Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 with a diagnosis of gastric cancer (n = 22,470, colon cancer (n = 16,323, breast cancer (n = 10,076, or uterine cervical cancer (n = 2,447 were included. Income level was divided into three groups according to their monthly contribution of National Health Insurance. We employed absolute (age-standardized prevalence rate, slope index of inequality and relative (relative index of inequality measures to separately examine social disparities among participants and non-participants of the National Cancer Screening Program in terms of the early-stage rate.Age-standardized prevalence rates of early-stage by income group were always higher in participants than in non-participants. Furthermore, the age-standardized prevalence rate of early-stage in the low income group of the participants was also higher than that of the high income group of the non-participants. The sizes of disparities (both slope index of inequality and relative index of inequality are smaller in participants compared to non-participants.National Cancer Screening Program participation reduced income disparity in cancer stage at diagnosis. Population-based cancer screening programs can be used as an effective measure to reduce income disparity in cancer care.

  3. The Effect of National Cancer Screening on Disparity Reduction in Cancer Stage at Diagnosis by Income Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hye-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Lairson, David R; Kim, Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of cancer is an effective and efficient cancer management strategy. In South Korea, the National Health Insurance administers the National Cancer Screening Program to its beneficiaries. We examined the impact of the National Cancer Screening Program on socioeconomic disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis. Cancer patients registered in the Korean Central Cancer Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 with a diagnosis of gastric cancer (n = 22,470), colon cancer (n = 16,323), breast cancer (n = 10,076), or uterine cervical cancer (n = 2,447) were included. Income level was divided into three groups according to their monthly contribution of National Health Insurance. We employed absolute (age-standardized prevalence rate, slope index of inequality) and relative (relative index of inequality) measures to separately examine social disparities among participants and non-participants of the National Cancer Screening Program in terms of the early-stage rate. Age-standardized prevalence rates of early-stage by income group were always higher in participants than in non-participants. Furthermore, the age-standardized prevalence rate of early-stage in the low income group of the participants was also higher than that of the high income group of the non-participants. The sizes of disparities (both slope index of inequality and relative index of inequality) are smaller in participants compared to non-participants. National Cancer Screening Program participation reduced income disparity in cancer stage at diagnosis. Population-based cancer screening programs can be used as an effective measure to reduce income disparity in cancer care.

  4. Annual effective dose due to residential radon progeny in Sweden: Evaluations based on current risk projections models and on risk estimates from a nation-wide Swedish epidemiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, M. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Lagarde, F. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine; Falk, R.; Swedjemark, G.A. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Effective dose per unit radon progeny exposure to Swedish population in 1992 is estimated by the risk projection model based on the Swedish epidemiological study of radon and lung cancer. The resulting values range from 1.29 - 3.00 mSv/WLM and 2.58 - 5.99 mSv/WLM, respectively. Assuming a radon concentration of 100 Bq/m{sup 3}, an equilibrium factor of 0.4 and an occupancy factor of 0.6 in Swedish houses, the annual effective dose for the Swedish population is estimated to be 0.43 - 1.98 mSv/year, which should be compared to the value of 1.9 mSv/year, according to the UNSCEAR 1993 report. 27 refs, tabs, figs.

  5. Screening for substance misuse in the dental care setting: findings from a nationally representative survey of dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Carrigan L.; Pereyra, Margaret R.; Pollack, Harold A.; Cardenas, Gabriel; Castellon, Pedro C.; Abel, Stephen N.; Singer, Richard; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The dental setting is a potentially valuable venue for screening for substance misuse. Therefore, we assessed dentists’ inquiry of substance misuse through their patient medical history forms and their agreement with the compatibility of screening as part of the dentists’ professional role. Design A nationally representative survey of general dentists using a sampling frame obtained from the American Dental Association Survey Center (November 2010 – November 2011). Setting United States of America Participants 1,802 general dentists Measurements A 38 item survey instrument assessing the relationship between dentists’ practice, knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes with their query about substance misuse and their belief that such screening is part of their professional role. Findings Dentists who accepted substance misuse screening as part of their professional role were more likely to query about misuse with their patients (85.8%) compared with those who did not accept such screening as part of their role (68.2%) (pdentists’ inquiry about patient substance use/misuse and acceptance of screening as part of their role in their clinical practice (pdentists-report that they ask their patients about substance misuse, two-thirds do not agree that such screening is compatible with their professional role. PMID:26032243

  6. Who requires emergency surgery for colorectal cancer and can national screening programmes reduce this need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Alan; Nachiappan, Subramanian; Currie, Andrew; Bottle, Alex; Abercrombie, John; Athanasiou, Thanos; Faiz, Omar

    2017-06-01

    Patients undergoing emergency colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery are at higher risk of poor outcome than those managed electively. The aim of this national study is to identify groups at high risk of undergoing unplanned CRC surgery and assess short and long-term outcome in this cohort subsequent morbidity and mortality as well as quantify their long-term survival. The aim of this national study is to identify groups at high risk of undergoing unplanned CRC surgery and assess short and long-term outcome, subsequent morbidity and mortality as well as quantify their long-term survival. The Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database between the years of 1997-2012 was used to identify all patients that had undergone surgery for colorectal cancer. Multivariable logistic regression analysis and cox regression analyses were undertaken to identify patient factors predictive of undergoing emergency and quantify their long-term survival. A total of 286,591 patients underwent resection for CRC between April 1997 and April 2012, of which 24.3% (69,718 patients) were admitted as emergencies and underwent emergency surgery. Independent predictors of undergoing emergency surgery were female gender (OR 1.23, CI: 1.21-1.25, p 79 years old OR 1.55, CI: 1.50-1.60, p emergency group was significantly higher than that for the electively managed patients group (13.3% versus compared with 3.4% at 30-days) as was 90-day (20.0% versus compared with 5.8% at 90-days). Amongst patients eligible for bowel screening there was an approximate 40% significant reduction in the proportion of patients requiring emergency surgery before and after its introduction in 2006 (23.4%-14.9%, p emergency surgery included both proximal and distal cancer resections. Older, socially deprived and ethnic minority patients with colorectal cancer are more likely to present as emergencies requiring CRC surgery. Public health initiatives, such as bowel cancer screening, appear to have concomitantly reduced emergency

  7. A National Survey of Mental Health Screening and Assessment Practices in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Jacqueline M.; Gagnon, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mental health screening and assessment is crucial within juvenile correctional facilities (JC). However, limited information is available about the current screening and assessment procedures specifically within JC. Objective: The purpose of the current study was to obtain information about the mental health screening and assessment…

  8. Study examines cancer overdiagnosis in National Lung Screening Trial | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for lung cancer has the potential to reduce mortality, but in addition to detecting aggressive tumors, screening will also detect indolent tumors that otherwise may not cause clinical symptoms. These overdiagnosis cases represent an important potential harm of screening because they incur additional cost, anxiety, and morbidity associated with cancer treatment... |

  9. Cost-effectiveness of national mandatory screening of all admissions to English National Health Service hospitals for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a mathematical modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, Julie V; Deeny, Sarah R; Fuller, Chris; Hopkins, Susan; Cookson, Barry; Stone, Sheldon

    2016-03-01

    In December, 2010, National Health Service (NHS) England introduced national mandatory screening of all admissions for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this policy, from a regional or national health-care decision makers' perspective, compared with alternative screening strategies. We used an individual-based dynamic transmission model parameterised with national MRSA audit data to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of admission screening of patients in English NHS hospitals compared with five alternative strategies (including no screening, checklist-activated screening, and high-risk specialty-based screening), accompanied by patient isolation and decolonisation, over a 5 year time horizon. We evaluated strategies for different NHS hospital types (acute, teaching, and specialist), MRSA prevalence, and transmission potentials using probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Compared with no screening, mean cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of screening all admissions was £89,000-148,000 (range £68,000-222,000), and this strategy was consistently more costly and less effective than alternatives for all hospital types. At a £30,000/QALY willingness-to-pay threshold and current prevalence, only the no-screening strategy was cost effective. The next best strategies were, in acute and teaching hospitals, targeting of high-risk specialty admissions (30-40% chance of cost-effectiveness; mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratios [ICERs] £45,200 [range £35,300-61,400] and £48,000/QALY [£34,600-74,800], respectively) and, in specialist hospitals, screening these patients plus risk-factor-based screening of low-risk specialties (a roughly 20% chance of cost-effectiveness; mean ICER £62,600/QALY [£48,000-89,400]). As prevalence and transmission increased, targeting of high-risk specialties became the optimum strategy at the NHS willingness-to-pay threshold (£30,000/QALY

  10. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  11. Breast cancer risk in young women in the national breast screening programme: implications for applying NICE guidelines for additional screening and chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D Gareth; Brentnall, Adam R; Harvie, Michelle; Dawe, Sarah; Sergeant, Jamie C; Stavrinos, Paula; Astley, Susan; Wilson, Mary; Ainsworth, John; Cuzick, Jack; Buchan, Iain; Donnelly, Louise S; Howell, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    In the United Kingdom, women at moderate and high risk of breast cancer between the ages of 40 and 49 years are eligible for annual mammographic screening and preventive therapy with tamoxifen. Here, we estimate the numbers of women in a population eligible for this service and the proportion of breast cancers detected in this group compared with the whole population. Women screening in the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) completed a risk questionnaire. The proportion at moderate and high risk according to National Institute of Health Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines was estimated. An estimate was also made using a different model of risk estimation (Tyrer-Cuzick). The numbers of cancers detected in the moderate/high risk groups were compared with numbers detected in the whole population. Completed questionnaires were available for 4,360 women between ages 46 and 49 years. Thirty women [0.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-1.0%] were at high risk and 130 (3.0%, 2.5-3.5%) were at moderate risk according to NICE guidelines. Thirty-seven cancers were detected by mammography in the whole group. Five of these were found in the moderate-/high-risk group giving a 3.2-fold increase in detection compared with the standard risk group. More women were assigned to the moderate- or high-risk group using the Tyrer-Cuzick model (N = 384), but the numbers of cancers in this group were not appreciably increased (N = 8). Systematic assessment of family history in primary care or through population-based screening will identify appreciable numbers of women in their forties, eligible for additional surveillance and chemoprevention. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Integration of the functional movement screen into the National Hockey League Combine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Chip P; Kuropkat, Christiane; Gumieniak, Robert J; Gledhill, Norman; Jamnik, Veronica K

    2015-05-01

    The sport of ice hockey requires coordination of complex skills involving musculoskeletal and physiological abilities while simultaneously exposing players to a high risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed to assess fundamental movement patterns that underlie both sport performance and injury risk. The top 111 elite junior hockey players from around the world took part in the 2013 National Hockey League Entry Draft Combine (NHL Combine). The FMS was integrated into the comprehensive medical and physiological fitness evaluations at the request of strength and conditioning coaches with affiliations to NHL teams. The inclusion of the FMS aimed to help develop strategies that could maximize its utility among elite hockey players and to encourage or inform further research in this field. This study evaluated the outcomes of integrating the FMS into the NHL Combine and identified any links to other medical plus physical and physiological fitness assessment outcomes. These potential associations may provide valuable information to identify elements of future training programs that are individualized to athletes' specific needs. The results of the FMS (total score and number of asymmetries identified) were significantly correlated to various body composition measures, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, leg power, timing of recent workouts, and the presence of lingering injury at the time of the NHL Combine. Although statistically significant correlations were observed, the implications of the FMS assessment outcomes remain difficult to quantify until ongoing assessment of FMS patterns, tracking of injuries, and hockey performance are available.

  13. Evolution and Innovations of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Céspedes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the evolution, organization and results of the National Neonatal and High Risk Screening Program in Costa Rica (PNT. This program has been working uninterruptedly for more than fourteen years. Costa Rica currently has a literacy rate of 95%. To August 2004 the rate of infant mortality was 9.74 per 1000 births and to 2003, life expectancy was 76.3 years for men and 81.1 years for women. The control of infectious and parasitic diseases, as well as of severe malnutrition, has given room to a prevalence of chronic diseases with a pathology profile similar to that of a developed country. The clinical observation, mainly starting from early 70s, of a growing number of patients with mental retardation and other disabilities caused by congenital hypothyroidism and hereditary metabolic diseases that could have been prevented in many cases with an early diagnosis and opportune treatment, led us to the decision to implement a systematically massive neonatal screening for these diseases. The presence of a single Public System of Social Security in Costa Rica, which currently includes from primary health care up to the hospitals of tertiary attention, with a single Children’s Hospital for the whole country, as well as communication facilities, are factors that offered, in principle, favorable conditions for this effort, even for a developing country. To September 2004, 835,217 children have been screened. There is a coverage of 95.1% of the newborns in the country. Also to this date, 259 children with congenital hypothyroidism, 18 with phenylketonuria, 20 with the maple syrup disease, 30 with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and 10 with galactosemia have been detected, confirmed and treated, for a total of 337 children that were spared of mental retardation, other disabilities and even death. Massive neonatal screening for organic acidemias recently started in June of 2004. Cystic fibrosis is under a pilot study and the screening for

  14. Attack rates of dengue fever in Swedish travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocklöv, Joacim; Lohr, Wolfgang; Hjertqvist, Marika; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2014-06-01

    Dengue is endemic in many countries visited by Swedish travellers. We aimed to determine the attack rate of dengue in Swedish travellers and analyse the trends over time and the geographical variation. We obtained the following data from the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control for the y 1995-2010: number of Swedish residents with confirmed dengue, the country and year of infection. We also obtained registers on the Swedish annual air traveller arrivals to dengue endemic areas from the United Nations World Tourist Organization for the time period. We estimated attack rates with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In total, 925 Swedish travellers with confirmed dengue were reported. We found an increasing trend over time for most destinations. The majority of the dengue cases were acquired in Thailand (492 out of 925 travellers; 53%), with an attack rate of 13.6 (95% CI 12.7, 14.4) per 100,000 travellers. However, the 2 highest attack rates per 100,000 travellers were found for Sri Lanka (45.3, 95% CI 34.3, 56.4) and Bangladesh (42.6, 95% CI 23.8, 61.5). Information on attack rates in travellers is more helpful in guiding travel medicine practitioners than reports of absolute numbers, as the latter reflect travel preferences rather than the true risk. Although the majority of dengue infections in Swedish travellers were acquired in Thailand, the attack rates for dengue in travellers to Sri Lanka and Bangladesh were much higher. These data aid in refining information on the risk of dengue in travellers.

  15. Strategic analysis of Swedish agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Fogelfors, Håkan; Wivstad, Maria; Eckersten, Henrik; Holstein, Fredrik; Johansson, Susanne; Verwijst, Theo

    2009-01-01

    This strategic analysis of Swedish agriculture – production systems and agricultural landscapes in a time of change – focuses on climate change, future availability of natural resources and economic regulation in a global food market. The background to the project was that the Faculty of Natural Resources and Agriculture of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences identified an urgent need to explore the implications and opportunities of coming changes for agricultural production syste...

  16. [Screening for breast cancer: worries about its effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autier, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer screening in France is done though two parallel systems: individualized screening and a national programme of organized screening. The latter is free of charge and manages a double-reading of mammography films. Since 2004, a steadily greater proportion of French women 50 to 74 years of age participate to the national programme. Justification of screening in France is based on Swedish randomised trials that documented the ability of mammography screening to reduce the risk to die from breast cancer. However, since 3 years, a growing number of studies indicate that screening seems not to have much influence on the incidence of advanced breast cancer and on mortality from breast cancer Moreover, numerous breast cancers are detected that would have never clinically surfaced and would have never been life threatening (overdiagnosis). In view of current doubts, it is better to inform women on health benefits, limitations and possible side effects of mammography screening. For women willing to be screened, it is recommended to invite them to participate to the national programme.

  17. Obesity and Insulin Resistance Screening Tools in American Adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joey A; Laurson, Kelly R

    2016-08-01

    To identify which feasible obesity and insulin resistance (IR) screening tools are most strongly associated in adolescents by using a nationally representative sample. Adolescents aged 12.0 to 18.9 years who were participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (n=3584) and who were measured for height, weight, waist circumference (WC), triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness, glycated hemoglobin, fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) level were included. Adolescents were split by gender and grouped by body mass index (BMI) percentile. Age- and gender-specific classifications were constructed for each obesity screening tool measure to account for growth and maturation. General linear models were used to establish groups objectively for analysis based on when IR began to increase. Additional general linear models were used to identify when IR significantly increased for each IR measure as obesity group increased and to identify the variance accounted for among each obesity-IR screening tool relationship. As the obesity group increased, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and FI significantly increased, while FG increased only (above the referent) in groups with BMI percentiles ≥95.0, and glycated hemoglobin level did not vary across obesity groups. The most strongly associated screening tools were WC and FI in boys (R(2)=0.253) and girls (R(2)=0.257). FI had the strongest association with all of the obesity measures. BMI associations were slightly weaker than WC in each in relation to IR. Our findings show that WC and FI are the most strongly associated obesity and IR screening tool measures in adolescents. These feasible screening tools should be utilized in screening practices for at-risk adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The perception of aquaculture on the Swedish West Coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste E.; Nordström, Leif Jonas; Risén, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Efforts are on the way on the Swedish West Coast to develop the capacity for cultivation of marine resources, notably of kelps. Given that this is a region of great natural and national heritage, public opposition to marine developments has been identified as a possible risk factor. This survey...

  19. Patterns of Authority in Swedish Higher Education and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andren, Carl-Gustaf

    1983-01-01

    The current structure of governance and decision making in Swedish higher education and the effects of recent national reform on perceived and actual autonomy at the central, regional, and local levels are discussed. An initial desire for more decentralized decision making has turned to increasing demand for more guidance by central organizations.…

  20. Only a minority of sex chromosome abnormalities are detected by a national prenatal screening program for Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Mette Hansen; Stochholm, Kirstine; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: How does a national prenatal screening program for Down syndrome (DS) perform in detecting sex chromosome abnormalities (SCAs)-Turner syndrome (TS), Klinefelter syndrome, 47,XXX and 47,XYY syndromes. SUMMARY ANSWER: The SCA detection rate resulting from DS screening was below 50...... and placenta weights than non-SCA controls (both P = 0.0001). A few SCA cases localized in DCCR could not be found in DFMD (n = 16). LIMITATIONS, REASON FOR CAUTION: Controls were matched on sex of the fetus of cases, meaning that all electively aborted fetuses (before week 12) were excluded, possibly reducing...

  1. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a health risk and ecological risk screening analysis for Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) using available data to identify contaminants and environmental pathways that will require either further investigation or immediate consideration for remediation based on the screening indices. The screening analysis will also identify contaminants that can be assigned a low priority for further investigation and those that require additional data.

  2. Deregulation and internationalisation - impact on the Swedish nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haukeland, Sverre R. [Swedish Nuclear Society, Vattenfall Research and Development, 162 89 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The deregulation of the Swedish electricity market in 1996 was well known in advance, and the nuclear power plants in Sweden, as well as their main suppliers, made early preparations for a this new situation. In a study - performed by the author at Malardalen University in Sweden - it is concluded that the electricity industry, including the nuclear power plants, was fundamentally transformed in conjunction with market liberalisation. Two large foreign companies, E-on and Fortum, entered the Swedish market and became part-owners of the nuclear plants. After deregulation, the electricity market in Sweden is dominated by these two companies and the large national company Vattenfall. Similarly, Vattenfall has recently grown into an international energy company, acquiring generation capacity in Northern Europe outside of Sweden, including nuclear power plants in Germany. Restructuring of the nuclear industry on the supplier side started in the 1980's, when the Swedish company ASEA and BBC of Switzerland merged to become ABB. Several years later the Swedish nuclear plant supplier ABB-Atom became part of Westinghouse Electric Company, today owned by Toshiba. The Swedish experience thus confirms an international trend of mergers and consolidation in the nuclear industry. (authors)

  3. Predictive factors warrant screening for obstructive sleep apnea in COPD: a Taiwan National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang LW

    2016-03-01

    questionnaire to assess COPD symptoms and OSA risk, comorbidities, and performance of daily activities. Data from COPD cohorts with and without risk of OSA were analyzed and compared. Results: Of 6,600 interviews completed, 404 subjects fit the epidemiological case definition of COPD – an overall prevalence of 6.1% in this national sample. Data on OSA risk were available for 292 of this COPD cohort, of whom 29.5% were at risk of OSA. Compared to those without risk of OSA, those with risk of OSA were significantly more likely to have hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes, had significantly higher body mass index and COPD Assessment Test scores, and reported impaired work performance and leisure activities. Conclusion: Among adults in Taiwan who fulfill epidemiologic criteria for COPD, 29.5% have coexisting risk of OSA. Comorbid hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes are common and significantly more prevalent among the COPD population at risk of OSA than those who are not. OSA screening is warranted in patients with COPD with those risk factors that are more prevalent in COPD with risk of OSA than without, to target early interventions to reduce adverse cardiovascular sequelae from overlap syndrome. Keywords: cardiovascular risk, COPD, coexistent, obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, overlap syndrome

  4. Renal-cell carcinoma risk estimates based on participants in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial and national lung screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Yair; Karam, Jose A; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Gupta, Amit; Roupret, Morgan; Bensalah, Karim; Margulis, Vitaly

    2016-04-01

    Current knowledge regarding risk of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) is based on meta-analyses of case-control studies. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) provide robust prospective databases with clinical information and rates of cancer development. PLCO and NLST were used to identify risk factors for RCC. Data were extracted from PLCO and NLST to stratify risk of RCC by sex, race, age at inclusion, obesity, and smoking status. Incidence rates between groups were compared using the chi-square test. We excluded urothelial carcinomas. Overall, 701/154,118 and 190/53,242 RCCs were detected in PLCO and NLST, respectively. Incidence rates were higher in men (PLCO: 0.56 vs. 0.28/1000 person y, NLST: 0.73 vs. 0.35/1000 person y; both with P60 years, obesity, and intensity of smoking were associated with higher risk of developing RCC. In the NLST, sex and morbid obesity increased the risk for RCC but age, ethnicity, and smoking intensity were not predictors. There was no effect of screening for other cancers on detection of RCC. High-grade (grades ≥3) RCCs were diagnosed in 145 (20.7%) and 60 (31.6%) in the PLCO and NLST. In PLCO, age (60-64y), male sex, obesity, and current smokers with>50 pack years were at increased risk for high-grade RCC. In NLST, only male sex was an independent predictor of high-grade RCC. Age over 60 years, male sex, smoking intensity, and obesity affect the risk of RCC. Identification of a high-risk population may allow a pilot study of rational screening for RCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors contributing to the differences in work related injury rates between Danish and Swedish construction workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangenberg, S.; Baarts, C.; Dyreborg, J.

    2002-01-01

    of injury risk factors at group and individual level for Danish and Swedish workers. LTI-rates and injury risk factors were compared for Danish and Swedish workers during the construction of the combined rail and road link across the 16-km wide sound, Oresund, between Denmark and Sweden. The comparison......Comparison of Danish and Swedish national occupational injury statistics shows that the reported LTI-rate, or number of reported lost-time injuries per million working hours, for Danish construction workers is significantly higher than the reported LTI-rate for Swedish construction workers...... showed that the LTI-rate of the Danish construction workers was approximately fourfold the LTI-rate of the Swedish construction workers. Factors at the micro-level (group and individual level) e.g. differences in education and experience, training and learning, and attitude were important...

  6. Women's preferences for the delivery of the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsell, Louise; Forbes, Lindsay J L; Patnick, Julietta; Wardle, Jane; Austoker, Joan; Ramirez, Amanda J

    2010-01-01

    To elicit women's preferences for delivery of the National Health Service (NHS) Breast Screening Programme. Interview survey. Private households in the UK. Five hundred and ninety-seven women aged 45-75 interviewed as part of the National Statistics Omnibus Survey, December 2008 and January 2009. Preferred setting (hospital or community) and preferred type of screening unit (mobile or permanent). Rated importance of distance, time, convenience and cost of travelling to a screening unit. Forty per cent of women did not mind whether the screening unit was based in a community or hospital setting, and 52% did not mind whether the unit was permanent or mobile. Among those who expressed a preference, 59% preferred a hospital to a community setting, and 62% preferred a permanent to a mobile unit. Many women (63%) said distance to a breast screening unit was an important factor, as was time to travel (58%). Among those with access to a car, 80% regarded the availability of parking as important, but only 40% regarded the cost of car travel as important. Among women with no access to a car, there was a similar pattern for ease of public transport (76%) and cost of public transport (48%). Many women were unconcerned about the type and setting of breast screening units. Among those who were concerned, most preferred hospital over community settings and permanent over mobile units, but nonetheless most women said time and distance were important. Well-situated units with advanced publicity about public transport links and parking facilities may encourage greater uptake.

  7. Swedish encapsulation station review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Sven Olof; Brunzell, P.; Heibel, R.; McCarthy, J.; Pennington, C.; Rusch, C.; Varley, G. [NAC International, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1998-06-01

    In the Encapsulation Station (ES) Review performed by NAC International, a number of different areas have been studied. The main objectives with the review have been to: Perform an independent review of the cost estimates for the ES presented in SKB`s document `Plan 1996`. This has been made through comparisons between the ES and BNFL`s Waste Encapsulation Plant (WEP) at Sellafield as well as with the CLAB facility. Review the location of the ES (at the CLAB site or at the final repository) and its interaction with other parts of the Swedish system for spent fuel management. Review the logistics and plant capacity of the ES. Identify important safety aspects of the ES as a basis for future licensing activities. Based on NAC International`s experience of casks for transport and storage of spent fuel, review the basic design of the copper/steel canister and the transport cask. This review insides design, manufacturing, handling and licensing aspects. Perform an overall comparison between the ES project and the CLAB project with the objective to identify major project risks and discuss their mitigation 19 refs, 9 figs, 35 tabs

  8. Swedish vineyards: a utopia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mårtensson A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anna Mårtensson,1 Thord Karlsson,2 Jan-Gunnar Gustafsson31Department of Soil and Environment, 2Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; 3Bio Evaluation AB, Uppsala, SwedenAbstract: As there is an increasing interest for setting up vineyards and wineries in Sweden, a cost analysis is becoming necessary. In this study, we assessed the potential for wine production in Sweden. The estimated annual costs varied from €15.1/per L for production of 1800 L wine per ha to €41.9 for 525 L per ha. For an annual production of 1800 L per ha potentially achieved in an established vineyard, the capital requirement is €730,000. It would take 6 years for the investment to be paid off if the wine was sold for €37.5 per L. The high production costs mean that the only viable option for success is to orientate production towards the exclusive upper segment.Keywords: cold climate conditions, wine production costs, wine quality

  9. Public health implications of establishing a national programme to screen young athletes in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Julian; Stein, Ken

    2011-06-01

    To assess how much competitive sport contributes to sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young athletes and the impact on population health if this group were to be screened in the UK. Using reported and imputed incidence rates of SCD in athletes and non-athletes and false-negative and false-positive test rates reported in three key Italian screening studies, the authors calculated the population and attributable risk fractions of SCD in young athletes and the total population (athletes and non-athletes) aged 12-35 years before and after screening; the number of athletes needed to screen (NNS) to prevent one SCD and the sensitivity and the specificity of screening with electrocardiogram. Using these parameters, the authors developed a decision tree model based on the UK population aged 12-35 years to estimate the annual number of SCDs, the expected number of screening and diagnostic tests and the number of athletes disqualified from competitive sport per SCD prevented. Participation in competitive athletics contributes to 81.9% (62.4% to 91.6%) of SCD in athletes but only 26.6% (-20.3% to 55.8%) in the total population. After screening, the contribution in the total population falls to 7.2% (-10.7% to 22.4%). The NNS is 38 151 (20 534 to 267 380). A UK screening programme would result in 1 520 021 young athletes being screened, with 140 361 referred for diagnosis. Of an expected 196 SCDs per year, 40 (6 to 74) would be prevented. For every life saved, 791 athletes would be disqualified. The impact of screening on reducing SCD in young athletes is only modest and would be achieved with significant harms to population health.

  10. Impact of a national beta-thalassemia carrier screening program on the birth rate of thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Jimmy P S; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Su, Yi-Ning; Lu, Meng-Yao; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Wang, Shih-Chung; Lin, Kuo-Sin

    2006-01-01

    In Taiwan, the prevalence of beta-thalassemia trait is at least 1.1%. The Taiwan government initiated a National Screening Program in 1993. Herein we examine the differences before and after the initiation of this program. Data consisting of the total number of patients and the birth prevalence beta-thalassemia major were collected. Ninety-one patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia treated in our hospitals were included for analysis. DNA analysis was performed for 86 patients. In Taiwan 361 patients exist. The birth prevalence of per 100,000 births was 5.6% in 1994 and declined to 1.21 in 2002. Fourteen patients were born after the program's initiation. DNA analysis of them revealed a new mutation (IVS-1-5 (G-C)), which was introduced through an inter-racial marriage. Otherwise, the remainder was the common beta-thalassemia mutations found in Taiwan. Despite how successful the National Screening Program is, a few doctors still failed to detect parents at risk. In addition, we are concerned about the emerging problem of the increase of interracial marriages where parents may not have appropriate screening. Hence, postgraduate education programs for physicians, health education for the general population, and timely screening of inter-racial marriage should become a priority.

  11. Mortality in Swedish patients with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löf Granström, Anna; Wester, Tomas

    2017-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) has previously been associated with increased mortality. The aim of this study was to assess mortality in patients with Hirschsprung disease in a population-based cohort. This was a nationwide, population-based cohort study. The study exposure was HSCR and the study outcome was death. The cohort included all individuals with HSCR registered in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964 and 2013 and ten age- and sex-matched controls per patient, randomly selected from the Population Register. Mortality and cause of death were assessed using the Swedish National Causes of Death Register. The cohort comprised 739 individuals with HSCR (565 male) and 7390 controls (5650 male). Median age of the cohort was 19 years (range 2-49). Twenty-two (3.0%) individuals with HSCR had died at median age 2.5 years (range 0-35) compared to 49 (0.7%) controls at median age 20 years (0-44), p < 0.001. Hazard ratio for death in HSCR patients compared to healthy controls was 4.77 (confidence interval (CI) 95% 2.87-7.91), and when adjusted for Down syndrome, the hazard ratio was 3.6 (CI 95% 2.04-6.37). The mortality rate in the HSCR cohort was 3%, which was higher than in controls also when data were adjusted for Down syndrome.

  12. Bacterial screening of platelet components by National Health Service Blood and Transplant, an effective risk reduction measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Carl; Allen, Jennifer; Brailsford, Susan; Roy, Anjana; Ball, Joanne; Moule, Richard; Vasconcelos, Mariza; Morrison, Rachael; Pitt, Tyrone

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood components remains a major cause of sepsis in transfusion medicine. Between 2006 and 2010 in the 5 years before the introduction of bacterial screening of platelet (PLT) components by National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), seven cases of PLT component-associated transmission of bacterial infection were recorded for 10 patients, three of which were fatal. Sampling of individual PLT components was undertaken at 36 to 48 hours after donation and tested in the BacT/ALERT system with 8 mL inoculated into each of aerobic and anaerobic culture bottles. Bottles were incubated until the end of the 7-day shelf life and initial reactive bottles were examined for contamination. Bacterial screened time-expired PLTs were tested as in the screen method. From February 2011 to September 2015, a total of 1,239,029 PLT components were screened. Initial-reactive, confirmed-positive, and false-positive rates were 0.37, 0.03, and 0.19%, respectively. False-negative cultures, all with Staphylococcus aureus, occurred on four occasions; three were visually detected before transfusion and one confirmed transmission resulted in patient morbidity. The NHSBT screening protocol effectively reduced the number of clinically adverse transfusion transmissions by 90% in this reporting period, compared to a similar time period before implementation. Delayed testing of 4515 time-expired PLT units after screening revealed no positives. The implementation of bacterial screening of PLT components with the NHSBT BacT/ALERT protocol was an effective risk reduction measure and increased the safety of the blood supply. © 2017 AABB.

  13. Respiratory Tract Infection and Risk of Hospitalization in Children with Congenital Heart Defects During Season and Off-Season: A Swedish National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granbom, Elin; Fernlund, Eva; Sunnegårdh, Jan; Lundell, Bo; Naumburg, Estelle

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTI) are common among young children, and congenital heart defect (CHD) is a risk factor for severe illness and hospitalization. This study aims to assess the relative risk of hospitalization due to RTI in winter and summer seasons for different types of CHD. All children born in Sweden and under the age of two, in 2006-2011, were included. Heart defects were grouped according to type. Hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and RTI in general were retrieved from the national inpatient registry. The relative risk of hospitalization was calculated by comparing each subgroup to other types of CHD and otherwise healthy children. The relative risk of hospitalization was increased for all CHD subgroups, and there was a greater increase in risk in summer for the most severe CHD. This included RSV infection, as well as RTI in general. The risk of hospitalization due to RTI is greater for CHD children. Prophylactic treatment with palivizumab, given to prevent severe RSV illness, is only recommended during winter. We argue that information to healthcare staff and parents should include how the risk of severe infectious respiratory tract illnesses, RSV and others, is present all year round for children with CHD.

  14. The Swedish Energy Market 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-10-01

    The Swedish Energy Market, 2005 is an annual publication that presents information and statistics on the network based energy markets in Sweden, i.e. the markets for electricity, natural gas and district heating. It also provides an overview of the issues that have arisen on these markets during the second half of 2004 and the first half of 2005. Considerable work is being carried out in the EU on creating a single market for electricity and natural gas. This publication therefore describes expansion of the Swedish market towards a Nordic and a European market. The publication normally includes a theme chapter, describing some event of particular interest for the Swedish energy market during the year. This year, the theme chapter is devoted to the Storm Gudrun, which struck the south of the country at the beginning of January, and its effects on electricity supply throughout the country. The chapter is based on the report submitted to the Government by the Energy Markets Inspectorate in the spring of 2005, and also includes a summary of the Inspectorate's proposals for measures to improve the security of electricity transmission. Energy in Sweden, which is another of the Swedish Energy Agency's annual publications, provides information and statistics on the development of the entire Swedish energy system.

  15. Health and safety strategy in Swedish agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Peter; Svennefelt, Catharina Alwall

    2012-01-01

    In Sweden there is a joint focus on injury prevention in agriculture and this is coordinated through the Swedish Committee on Working Environment (LAMK). LAMK is a network working for a good, healthy and safe working environment in Swedish agriculture from the view of the enterprise with the humans in focus. It is a committee consisting of representatives of authorities, institutions, companies, research & education institutions and organisations referring to the green sector. Examples of on-going initiatives & partners are presented which are included in this mission against injuries in agriculture. It involves the Swedish Work Environment Authority,, the Federation of Swedish Farmers (LRF), the Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU, the Federation of Swedish Forestry and Agricultural Employers (SLA) and the Swedish Municipal Worker's Union.

  16. Is the Swedish FRAX model appropriate for Swedish immigrants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, H; Odén, A; Lorentzon, M; McCloskey, E; Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Karlsson, M K; Mellström, D

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of hip fracture in Sweden is substantially lower in immigrants than in the population born in Sweden. Thus, the use of a FRAX® model in immigrants overestimates the risk of fracture, and the use of country of origin-specific models may be more appropriate. Age-specific fracture and mortality rates vary between countries so that FRAX tools are country-specific. In the case of immigrants, it is not known whether the model for the original or the new country is most appropriate. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of hip fractures in foreign-born and Swedish-born individuals residing in Sweden. We studied the incidence of hip fracture in all men and women aged 50 years or more in Sweden between 1987 and 2002. The population comprised 2.8 million Swedish-born and 270,000 foreign-born individuals. Incident hip fractures occurred in 239,842 Swedish-born and 12,563 foreign-born individuals. The hip fracture incidence rose with age for both groups and was higher for women than men amongst both Swedish-born and foreign-born individuals. The hip fracture incidence for the Swedish-born cohort was approximately twice that of immigrants. For example, at the age of 70 years, the annual hip fracture incidence (per 100,000) was 450 (95 % CI 446-454) for a Swedish-born woman and 239 (95 % CI 223-257) for a foreign-born woman at the time of immigration. The hip fracture incidence rose slowly with time from immigration (0.6 % per annum, 95 % CI 0.5-0.8 %) but remained significantly lower than for Swedish-born individuals even after 40 years of residence. The incidence of hip fracture in Sweden is substantially lower in immigrants than in the population native to Sweden. Although there was a small rise in age- and sex-specific incidence after immigration, the incidence remained markedly lower than that observed in Swedish-born individuals. Thus, the use of a FRAX model for Sweden will overestimate the risk of fracture for foreign-born individuals living

  17. The Swedish Armed Forces Operational Challenges for Command and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Contracted Expeditionary Force Challenge - transforming the Manning system Swe Lead nation for EU NBG 11 + NBG 14 HEADQUARTERS SWEDISH ARMED...Sweden – Advanced parts of the SwAF, for example data-links within the Air Force since 1970-ies – Defence-, IT- and Telecomm industry...Information Management Portal (SHAREPOINT) Exercise Management System (EXONAUT) National simulation systems (TYR, JCATS, GESI, TCT) Air & Combat

  18. Screening and assessment of nutritional status following stroke: results from a national survey of registered dietitians in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Lauren; O'Connor, Colleen; Giroux, Isabelle; Teasell, Robert; Foley, Norine

    2015-07-26

    The objective of this study was to survey registered dietitians (RDs) at acute care hospitals across Canada to determine whether valid screening and assessment methods (i.e. those with formal evaluation of the psychometric and/or clinimetric properties of the tool) are used to identify protein-energy malnutrition following stroke. One hundred and twenty-five Canadian healthcare institutions admitting high volumes (≥100/year) of acute stroke patients were identified. RDs at these sites who provided services to patients recovering from acute stroke were contacted and invited to participate in an online survey. Ninety-five RDs completed the survey. Sixty dietitians (63%) indicated that patients were screened routinely at their institution, which was conducted primarily by dietitians (n = 64, 67.3%). Ten respondents (10.5%) stated they used a screening tool with previously-established validity, while 32 (33.7%) indicated they used a validated assessment tool. Among dietitians using validated tools, 40% and 64% indicated that they used modified versions of the original screening and assessment tools. The most frequently cited tools used for both screening and assessment purposes were Subjective Global Assessment and Mini Nutritional Assessment. The results of this national survey suggest that screening and assessment of nutritional status following acute stroke is conducted using tools that have not been validated previously. Implications for Rehabilitation Although the use of valid screening and assessment tools is considered part of evidence-based practice, and recommendations for their adoption are included in several national stroke-specific clinical practice guidelines, the results from an online survey suggest that they are not used in clinical practice by RDs in Canada caring for patients following stroke. There are associated risks with the use of screening and assessment tools, which have not been formally validated. The true nutritional status of

  19. Impact of a new national screening policy for Down's syndrome in Denmark: population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte K; Jørgensen, Finn Stener; Petersen, Olav Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of a screening strategy in the first trimester, introduced in Denmark during 2004-6, on the number of infants born with Down's syndrome and the number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses, and to determine detection and false positive rates...... and newborn infants with Down's syndrome diagnosed prenatally and postnatally and number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses carried out. Secondary outcomes measured were number of women screened in 2005 and 2006, screen positive rate, and information on screening in 2005 and 2006 for infants...... with a postnatal diagnosis of Down's syndrome. RESULTS: The number of infants born with Down's syndrome decreased from 55-65 per year during 2000-4 to 31 in 2005 and 32 in 2006. The total number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses carried out decreased from 7524 in 2000 to 3510 in 2006. The detection...

  20. Impact of a new national screening policy for Down's syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte K; Jørgensen, Finn Stener; Petersen, Olav Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of a screening strategy in the first trimester, introduced in Denmark during 2004-6, on the number of infants born with Down's syndrome and the number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses, and to determine detection and false positive rates...... and newborn infants with Down's syndrome diagnosed prenatally and postnatally and number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses carried out. Secondary outcomes measured were number of women screened in 2005 and 2006, screen positive rate, and information on screening in 2005 and 2006 for infants...... with a postnatal diagnosis of Down's syndrome. RESULTS: The number of infants born with Down's syndrome decreased from 55-65 per year during 2000-4 to 31 in 2005 and 32 in 2006. The total number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses carried out decreased from 7524 in 2000 to 3510 in 2006. The detection...

  1. Impact and costs of targeted recruitment of minorities to the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Catherine; Mahon, Irene; Chen, Mei Hsiu; Snyder, Bradley; Barr, Richard; Chiles, Caroline; Falk, Robert; Fishman, Elliot K; Gemmel, David; Goldin, Jonathan G; Brown, Kathleen; Munden, Reginald F; Vydareny, Kay; Aberle, Denise R

    2011-04-01

    To promote results in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) that are generalizable across the entire US population, a subset of NLST sites developed dedicated strategies for minority recruitment. To report the effects of targeted strategies on the accrual of underrepresented groups, to describe participant characteristics, and to estimate the costs of targeted enrollment. The 2002-2004 Tobacco Use Supplement was used to estimate eligible proportions of racial and ethnic categories. Strategic planning included meetings/conferences with key stakeholders and minority organizations. Potential institutions were selected based upon regional racial/ethnic diversity and proven success in recruitment of underrepresented groups. Seven institutions submitted targeted recruitment strategies with budgets. Accrual by racial/ethnic category was tracked for each institution. Cost estimates were based on itemized receipts for minority strategies relative to minority accrual. Of 18,842 participants enrolled, 1576 (8.4%) were minority participants. The seven institutions with targeted recruitment strategies accounted for 1223 (77.6%) of all minority participants enrolled. While there was a significant increase in the rate of minority accrual pre-implementation to post-implementation for the institutions with targeted recruitment (9.3% vs. 15.2%, p institutions without (3.5% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.46). Minority enrollees at the seven institutions tended to have less than a high school education, be economically disadvantaged, and were more often uninsured. These socio-demographic differences persisted at the seven institutions even after adjusting for race and ethnicity. The success of different strategies varied by institution, and no one strategy was successful across all institutions. Costs for implementation were also highly variable, ranging from $146 to $749 per minority enrollee. Data on minority recruitment processes were not consistently kept at the individual institutions. In

  2. Bonjour tristesse in Swedish suburbia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas E

    2013-01-01

    the country. Global news media paralleled the Swedish situation with previous incidents in Paris in 2007, Athens in 2008 and London in 2011. Foreign offices, among others the American, British, Danish, and Norwegian ones, advised their citizens not to travel to Sweden: the Swedish welfare model...... and a high unemployment rate. The young generation experienced a Bonjour Tristesse! existence going in and out of unemployment. An existing dismay with architecture and physical planning of suburbia surfaced: The plausible responsibility of the body of architects was debated, since many esteemed profiles...... of the Swedish functionalist architecture had been involved in its realisation. One representative of the profession stated the need for upgrading the existing architecture to new user needs, while another one emphasised that the real group of inhabitants in suburbia is often not the group of users envisioned...

  3. Obstetric Thromboprophylaxis: The Swedish Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelle G. Lindqvist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric thromboprophylaxis is difficult. Since 10 years Swedish obstetricians have used a combined risk estimation model and recommendations concerning to whom, at what dose, when, and for how long thromboprophylaxis is to be administrated based on a weighted risk score. In this paper we describe the background and validation of the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis in women with moderate-high risk of VTE, that is, at similar or higher risk as the antepartum risk among women with history of thrombosis. The risk score is based on major risk factors (i.e., 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolism. We present data on the efficacy of the model, the cost-effectiveness, and the lifestyle advice that is given. We believe that the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis aid clinicians in providing women at increased risk of VTE with effective and appropriate thromboprophylaxis, thus avoiding both over- and under-treatment.

  4. HPV immunisation and increased uptake of cervical screening in Scottish women; observational study of routinely collected national data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, T J; McFadden, M; Pollock, K G J; Kavanagh, K; Cuschieri, K; Cruickshank, M; Nicoll, S; Robertson, C

    2016-03-01

    To measure the uptake of first invitation to cervical screening by vaccine status in a population-based cohort offered HPV immunisation in a national catch-up campaign. A retrospective observational study of routinely collected data from the Scottish Cervical Screening Programme. Data were extracted and linked from the Scottish Cervical Call Recall System, the Scottish Population Register and the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation. Records from 201 023 women born between 1 January 1988 and 30 September 1993 were assessed. Women born in or after 1990 were eligible for the national catch-up programme of HPV immunisation. Attendance for screening was within 12 months of the first invitation at age 20 years. There was a significant decline in overall attendance from the 1988 cohort to the 1993 cohort with the adjusted attendance ratio of the 1988 cohort being 1.49 times (95% CI 1.46-1.52) that of the 1993 cohort. Immunisation compensated for this decrease in uptake with unvaccinated individuals having a reduced ratio of attendance compared with those fully vaccinated (RR=0.65, 95% CI 0.64-0.65). Not taking up the opportunity for HPV immunisation was associated with an attendance for screening below the trend line for all women before the availability of HPV immunisation. HPV immunisation is not associated with the reduced attendance for screening that had been feared. Immunised women in the catch-up cohorts appear to be more motivated to attend than unimmunised women, but this may be a result of a greater awareness of health issues. These results, while reassuring, may not be reproduced in routinely immunised women. Continued monitoring of attendance for the first smear and subsequent routine smears is needed.

  5. School Principals' Perceptions of "Basic Values" in the Swedish Compulsory School System in Regard to Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakenberg, Margareth; Malmgren, Therese Vincenti

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare how Swedish school principals understand basic values that are important in fulfilling the Swedish national curriculum, Curriculum 1994 (a new curriculum, Curriculum 2011, which came into operation in autumn 2011, has only minor differences compared to the common text in Curriculum 1994), considering…

  6. Screening for Acute Childhood Malnutrition during the National Nutrition Week in Mali Increases Treatment Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirandutiye, Daniele H.; Ag Iknane, Akory; Fofana, Amadou; Brown, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a pilot intervention designed to integrate mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) screening for acute malnutrition into the semi-annual Child Nutrition Week (Semaine d'Intensification des Activités de Nutrition, or “SIAN”) activities carried out in June 2008. Design A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Kolokani and Nara, two health districts in the Koulikoro region of Mali, 4–5 months after the SIAN, using a population-proportionate, multi-stage random sample of: 1) health centers, and 2) households in communities linked to each of the selected health centers. Caregivers of 1543 children who were 6–59 months of age at the time of the SIAN, 17 community-based volunteers and 45 health center staff members were interviewed. Results A total of 1278 children 6–59 months (83% of those studied) reportedly participated in SIAN. Of the participating children, 1258 received vitamin A (98% of SIAN participants; 82% of all eligible children), 945 received anti-helminth tablets (84% of participants; 71% of eligibles), and 669 were screened for acute malnutrition (52% of participants; 43% of eligibles). 186 of the children screened (27%) were reportedly identified as acutely malnourished. SIAN screening covered a significantly greater proportion of children than were examined in both community-based (22% of children) and health center-based screening activities (5% of children) combined during the 4-5 months after the SIAN (P<0.0001). In general, community volunteers and health personnel positively evaluated their experience adding MUAC screening to SIAN. Conclusion Integrating MUAC screening for acute malnutrition in SIAN permits the assessment of a large number of children for acute malnutrition, and should be continued. PMID:21731602

  7. Patient-specific prescriber feedback can increase the rate of osteoporosis screening and treatment: results from two national interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch Ellett, Lisa M; Pratt, N L; Sluggett, J K; Ramsay, E N; Kerr, M; LeBlanc, V T; Barratt, J D; Roughead, E E

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis interventions targeting older Australians and clinicians were conducted in 2008 and 2011 as part of a national quality improvement program underpinned by behavioural theory and stakeholder engagement. Uptake of bone mineral density (BMD) tests among targeted men and women increased after both interventions and sustained increases in osteoporosis treatment were observed among men targeted in 2008. Educational interventions incorporating patient-specific prescriber feedback have improved osteoporosis screening and treatment among at-risk patients in clinical trials but have not been evaluated nationally. This study assessed uptake of BMD testing and osteoporosis medicines following two national Australian quality improvement initiatives targeting women (70-79 years) and men (75-85 years) at risk of osteoporosis. Administrative health claims data were used to determine monthly rates of BMD testing and initiation of osteoporosis medicines in the 9-months post-intervention among targeted men and women compared to older cohorts of men and women. Log binomial regression models were used to assess differences between groups. In 2008 91,794 patients were targeted and 52,427 were targeted in 2011. There was a twofold increase in BMD testing after each intervention among targeted patients compared to controls (p theory and stakeholder engagement that target both primary care clinicians and patients can improve osteoporosis screening and management at the national level.

  8. Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines for U.S. women aged 25-64: data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wendy; Moser, Richard P; Gaffey, Allison; Waldron, William

    2009-11-01

    Although it is widely accepted that Papanicolaou (Pap) screening can reduce cervical cancer mortality, many women still do not maintain regular cervical cancer screenings. To describe the prevalence of cervical cancer screening and the demographic, behavioral, psychological, and cancer-related knowledge factors associated with adherence to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cervical cancer screening guidelines among women in the United States. Data for women aged 25-64 were obtained from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Women were considered adherent to screening guidelines if they had two consecutive, on-schedule screenings and planned to have another within the next 3 years. The sample comprised 2070 women. Ninety-eight percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, 90% reported having had a recent Pap smear (within 3 years), and 84% were adherent to USPSTF screening guidelines. Maintaining regular cervical cancer screening was significantly associated with having health insurance, normal body mass index (BMI), smoking status (nonsmoker), mood (absence of a mood disturbance), and being knowledgeable about cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Based on the observation that women who were current smokers, obese, or experiencing a substantial degree of psychological distress were significantly less likely to adhere to recommended screening guidelines, we suggest that healthcare providers pay particular attention to the screening needs of these more vulnerable women.

  9. The Swedish Perception of European Security in the Light of the Crisis in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobierecka Anna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The events in Ukraine, the annexation of Crimea, and the Russian attitude towards Ukraine show an evident change in European relations. The escalation of conflict between Russia and Ukraine however does not affect only those two countries, but also those in the nearest vicinity. Especially in Scandinavian and Nordic countries change in social ambience can be observed. The aim of this article is essentially to analyze Swedish reaction to the Ukrainian Crisis, the change in Swedish attitude towards international security systems, especially NATO, and Swedish perception of its national safety.

  10. The Parametrisation of Legal Terminology Concerning Child Maintenance Support in the Swedish and Polish Legal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryan Milena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with translating legal terminology concerning child maintenance from Polish to Swedish. The analysis covers selected terms regulated in the Polish civil law and their possible Swedish equivalents. The method used is based on the parameterisation of legal terms, which allows the specification of terms by selected parameters, which are understood as mutually exclusive properties. The parameterised equivalents are analysed in the context of various types of recipients. This provides the basis for the choice of appropriate translation strategies. The author also discusses pragmatic equivalents featured in Rikstermbanken, the Swedish national terminological database, and those used in practice.

  11. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base.

  12. Evaluation of the introduction of the national Down syndrome screening program in the Netherlands: age-related uptake of prenatal screening and invasive diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Melanie A J; Bhola, Shama L; Twisk, Jos W R; Blankenstein, Marinus A; van Vugt, John M G

    2014-03-01

    To study the effect of different government prenatal screening (PNS) policies on the uptake of PNS and prenatal diagnostic testing (PND) over the periods 2001-2003 (PNS on request), 2004-2006 (permission to offer the first-trimester combined test (FCT) to women of advanced maternal age (AMA), with women aged evaluate whether trends in uptake are related to maternal age. The indication AMA for PND is still warranted, and the costs for FCT are only reimbursed for AMA women. Analysis of data on the first- and second-trimester screening program (n=41,600) for Down syndrome (DS) and on PND (n=10,795) performed from 2001 to 2010 in the region North-Holland of the Netherlands. To evaluate the actual participation in PNS and PND in different maternal age groups, estimation of the age distribution of women who underwent a fetal anomaly scan in 2009 (n=14,481) was used as a reference population (participation of 85.2%). The overall uptake of FCT was 35.2% in 2010. Over the years the number of FCT in all age groups increased significantly (P<0.001). Overall the number of PND decreased significantly; the number of PND for AMA decreased and the number of PND for increased risk at FCT (in women <36 and ≥36 years) increased (P<0.05). Since 2004 significantly more DS cases were detected with FCT in AMA women and fewer with PND for AMA, and since 2007 more DS cases were detected with FCT in women <36 years (P<0.001). The effect of the national screening program is limited. Significantly more women opt for PNS but the overall uptake remains low, especially in younger women. A significant number of AMA women still opt for PND for AMA. The choice for FCT and PND for AMA seems dependent on background risk. To accomplish a more effective screening policy, reimbursement of the cost of the test should apply to all women and the indication for PND for AMA should be abolished. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased odds of patient-reported success at 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients without cartilage lesions: a cohort study from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrin Senorski, Eric; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie; Krupic, Ferid; Desai, Neel; Westin, Olof; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2017-06-07

    To investigate whether the surgical technique of single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the visualization of anatomic surgical factors and the presence or absence of concomitant injuries at primary ACL reconstruction are able to predict patient-reported success and failure. The hypothesis of this study was that anatomic single-bundle surgical procedures would be predictive of patient-reported success. This cohort study was based on data from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register during the period of 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014. Patients who underwent primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendons were included. Details on surgical technique were collected using an online questionnaire comprising essential anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction scoring checklist items, defined as the utilization of accessory medial portal drilling, anatomic tunnel placement, the visualization of insertion sites and pertinent landmarks. A univariate logistic regression model adjusted for age and gender was used to determine predictors of patient-reported success and failure, i.e. 20th and 80th percentile, respectively, in the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), 2 years after ACL reconstruction. In the 6889 included patients, the surgical technique used for single-bundle ACL reconstruction did not predict the predefined patient-reported success or patient-reported failure in the KOOS4. Patient-reported success was predicted by the absence of concomitant injury to the meniscus (OR = 0.81 [95% CI, 0.72-0.92], p = 0.001) and articular cartilage (OR = 0.70 [95% CI, 0.61-0.81], p techniques used in primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction did not predict the KOOS 2 years after the reconstruction. However, the absence of concomitant injuries at index surgery predicted patient-reported success in the KOOS. The results provide further evidence that concomitant injuries at ACL reconstruction affect

  14. No differences in subjective knee function between surgical techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at 2-year follow-up: a cohort study from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrin Senorski, Eric; Sundemo, David; Murawski, Christopher D; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie; Desai, Neel; Stålman, Anders; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different techniques of single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affect subjective knee function via the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) evaluation 2 years after surgery. It was hypothesized that the surgical techniques of single-bundle ACL reconstruction would result in equivalent results with respect to subjective knee function 2 years after surgery. This cohort study was based on data from the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register during the 10-year period of 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014. Patients who underwent primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstrings tendon autograft were included. Details on surgical technique were collected using a web-based questionnaire comprised of essential AARSC items, including utilization of accessory medial portal drilling, anatomic tunnel placement, and visualization of insertion sites and landmarks. A repeated measures ANOVA and an additional linear mixed model analysis were used to investigate the effect of surgical technique on the KOOS4 from the pre-operative period to 2-year follow-up. A total of 13,636 patients who had undergone single-bundle ACL reconstruction comprised the study group for this analysis. A repeated measures ANOVA determined that mean subjective knee function differed between the pre-operative time period and at 2-year follow-up (p technique or gender. Additionally, the linear mixed model adjusted for age at reconstruction, gender, and concomitant injuries showed no difference between surgical techniques in KOOS4 improvement from baseline to 2-year follow-up. However, KOOS4 improved significantly in patients for all surgical techniques of single-bundle ACL reconstruction (p techniques of primary single-bundle ACL reconstruction did not demonstrate differences in the improvement in baseline subjective knee function as measured with the KOOS4 during the first 2 years after surgery. However

  15. Towards critical literacy: A national test and prescribed classroom preparations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ekvall, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses, from a bilingual perspective, on how a Swedish national test is intended to promote critical literacy and language development in line with related aims in syllabuses for Swedish...

  16. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section for Science and Technology Studies

    2006-09-15

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions

  17. The Role of National Library of Medicine[R] Web Sites in Newborn Screening Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomous, Cathy; Miller, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    Expanded newborn screening programs and subsequent detection of rare genetic disorders challenge parents and their medical providers to learn about the treatment and management of these disorders. Many people seek medical information on the Internet but may encounter requests for registration or fees, or find that resources are out of date,…

  18. Results of a nationally implemented de novo cardiac screening programme in elite rugby players in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Saqib; Papadakis, Michael; Kemp, Simon; Zaidi, Abbas; Sheikh, Nabeel; Gati, Sabiha; Raju, Hariharan; Smith, Andy; Palmer, Corin; Somauroo, John; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-06-23

    Screening of young competitive athletes remains a contentious issue. In 2010, a nationwide cardiac screening for all elite rugby players was introduced in England. This provided a unique opportunity to prospectively assess the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of a de novo, ECG-based cardiac screening programme. Between 2010 and 2012, 1191 rugby players aged ≥14 years underwent cardiac screening with a health questionnaire, 12-lead ECG and a consultation with a cardiologist. The players with concerning findings on initial evaluation were offered on-site transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). Athletes were referred for further investigations as deemed necessary. The overall cost of the screening programme was estimated. After initial evaluation, 9.7% of athletes underwent on-site TTE; 8.2% underwent on-site TTE due to ECG anomalies and 1.4% underwent on-site TTE due to concerns on the questionnaire. After TTE, only 2.9% of the total cohort was referred for further evaluation. Two players were diagnosed with potentially serious conditions; one with Wolff-Parkinson-White, who resumed competition after catheter ablation, and one with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, who withdrew from competition. During a mean follow-up of 52.8±5.5 months, none of the players who were reassured experienced any adverse cardiac events. The total cost of the screening programme was £59 875, which averaged to a cost of £50 per player or £29 938 per condition identified. Application of refined ECG criteria would reduce the ECG false-positive rate to 4.9%. Preparticipation cardiac screening with 12-lead ECG is feasible. Refinement of the ECG criteria, the use of on-site TTE and expert setting can minimise the burden of unnecessary investigations and reduce costs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Buprenorphine maintenance treatment retention improves nationally recommended preventive primary care screenings when integrated into urban federally qualified health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Marwan S; Zelenev, Alexei; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-02-01

    Buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) expands treatment access for opioid dependence and can be integrated into primary health-care settings. Treating opioid dependence, however, should ideally improve other aspects of overall health, including preventive services. Therefore, we examined how BMT affects preventive health-care outcomes, specifically nine nationally recommended primary care quality health-care indicators (QHIs), within federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) from an observational cohort study of 266 opioid-dependent patients initiating BMT between 07/01/07 and 11/30/08 within Connecticut's largest FQHC network. Nine nationally recommended preventive QHIs were collected longitudinally from electronic health records, including screening for chronic infections, metabolic conditions, and cancer. A composite QHI score (QHI-S), based on the percentage of eligible QHIs achieved, was categorized as QHI-S ≥80% (recommended) and ≥90% (optimal). The proportion of subjects achieving a composite QHI-S ≥80 and ≥90 % was 57.1 and 28.6%, respectively. Screening was highest for hypertension (91.0%), hepatitis C (80.1%), hepatitis B (76.3%), human immunodeficiency virus (71.4%), and hyperlipidemia (72.9%) and lower for syphilis (49.3%) and cervical (58.5%), breast (44.4%), and colorectal (48.7%) cancer. Achieving QHI-S ≥80% was positively and independently associated with ≥3-month BMT retention (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.18-4.04) and BMT prescription by primary care providers (PCPs) rather than addiction psychiatric specialists (AOR = 3.38; 95% CI = 1.78-6.37), and negatively with being female (AOR = 0.30; 95% CI = 0.16-0.55). Within primary health-care settings, achieving greater nationally recommended health-care screenings or QHIs was associated with being able to successfully retain patients on buprenorphine longer (3 months or more) and when buprenorphine was prescribed

  20. Cervical cancer knowledge and screening behaviors among female university graduates of year 2012 attending national graduate orientation program, Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhendup, Tshering; Tshering, Pandup

    2014-03-12

    Cervical cancer is the leading female cancer in Bhutan. This study describes the level of cervical cancer knowledge and screening behaviors among female university graduates attending the National Graduate Orientation Program (NGOP), 2012. A cross-sectional study of female graduates attending NGOP was conducted using self-administered anonymous questionnaire developed through literature reviews and expert discussions to elicit information on demographic characteristics, knowledge, screening behaviors and determinants of cervical cancer. The association of demographic and other important study characteristics with uptake of Pap test was investigated using cross tabulation and Fischer Exact test. Frequencies and percentages were calculated for all the questions. The average age of the participants was 23.43 ± SD 2.73. About 92% (n = 513) of the respondents were aged 25 years or less and 7.9% (n = 44) of the respondents were aged 26 or more. The study revealed low cervical cancer knowledge and poor screening behavior among the graduates. The mean knowledge score was 3.571 (SD1.75, Range 0-8). About 6% (n=34) of the respondents reported undergoing Pap test at least once and 94% reported as never having done Pap test. The most commonly cited reasons for not doing Pap test included "never thought I needed one" (57%, n = 320), "embarrassment of being examined by male health professional" and "fear of finding out cancer". The study revealed evidence of significant association between increasing age, those who are married, knowledge score and those recommended for screening by health professionals with the uptake of Pap test. Our study revealed poor knowledge and screening behaviors among female university graduates in Bhutan. This may be suggestive of even poorer awareness and screening practices among young unmarried women who are less educated or with no education. Although our study group is not appropriate for measuring practice of cervical cancer

  1. The impact of new national guidelines on screening for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, F M

    2013-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has important maternal and fetal implications. In 2010, the Health Service Executive published guidelines on GDM. We examined the impact of the new guidelines in a large maternity unit. In January 2011, the hospital replaced the 100 g Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) with the new 75 g OGTT. We compared the first 6 months of 2011 with the first 6 months of 2010. The new guidelines were associated with a 22% increase in women screened from 1375 in 2010 to 1679 in 2011 (p < 0.001). Of the women screened, the number diagnosed with GDM increased from 10.1% (n=139) to 13.2% (n=221) (p<0.001).The combination of increased screening and a more sensitive OGTT resulted in the number of women diagnosed with GDM increasing 59% from 139 to 221 (p = 0.02).This large increase has important resource implications but, if clinical outcomes are improved, there should be a decrease in long-term costs.

  2. Screening and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in Scottish obstetric units: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirrat, Laura I; Denison, Fiona C; Love, Corinne D B; Lindsay, Robert S; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-02-01

    The last study of screening practices for gestational diabetes (GDM) in the UK concluded that a lack of consensus about screening was due to a lack of clinical guidelines. We aimed to determine current practices in Scotland since new guidelines recommended that diagnosis should be made at a lower level of hyperglycaemia. An online questionnaire designed to investigate the screening and management of GDM was distributed to all maternity units in Scotland managing women with GDM (n = 15) for completion by relevant clinical team members. The response rate was 100%. Considerable variation in clinical practice existed between units. Thirteen units (86.7%) had adopted the lower glucose tolerance values for diagnosis of GDM (fasting ≥5.1 mmol/L; 2-h ≥8.5 mmol/L) recommended by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network in 2010. Available data from units using this guideline (n = 3) revealed a significant increase in the percentage of women diagnosed with GDM between 2010 and 2012 (2010: 1.28%, 2012: 2.54%; p management of GDM in Scotland. If a similar increase in the prevalence of GDM is experienced across Scotland, there will be major implications for health care provision and resource allocation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Palliative Care Providers' Practices Surrounding Psychological Distress Screening and Treatment: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Elissa; Eghan, Claude; Moran, Sheila; Herr, Keela; Reid, M Carrington

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how inpatient palliative care teams nationwide currently screen for and treat psychological distress. A web-based survey was sent to inpatient palliative care providers of all disciplines nationwide asking about their practice patterns regarding psychological assessment and treatment. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and responses, and analysis of variance was conducted to determine whether certain disciplines were more likely to utilize specific treatment modalities. A total of N = 236 respondents were included in the final analyses. Providers reported that they encounter psychological distress regularly in their practice and that they screen for distress using multiple methods. When psychological distress is detected, providers reported referring patients to an average of 3 different providers (standard deviation = 1.46), most frequently a social worker (69.6%) or chaplain (65.3%) on the palliative care team. A total of 84.6% of physicians and 54.5% of nurse practitioners reported that they prescribe anxiolytics or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to patients experiencing psychological distress. This study revealed significant variability and redundancy in how palliative care teams currently manage psychological distress. The lack of consistency potentially stems from the variability in the composition of palliative care teams across care settings and the lack of scientific evidence for best practices in psychological care in palliative care. Future research is needed to establish best practices in the screening and treatment of psychological distress for patients receiving palliative care.

  4. Cervical cancer screening of underserved women in the United States: results from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangka, Florence K L; Howard, David H; Royalty, Janet; Dalzell, Lucinda P; Miller, Jacqueline; O'Hara, Brett J; Sabatino, Susan A; Joseph, Kristy; Kenney, Kristy; Guy, Gery P; Hall, Ingrid J

    2015-05-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screens to low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women. We describe the number and proportion of women eligible for cervical cancer screening services and the proportion of eligible women screened over the period 1997-2012. Low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women aged 18-64 years who have not had a hysterectomy are eligible for cervical cancer screening through the NBCCEDP. We estimated the number of low-income, uninsured women using data from the US Census Bureau. We adjusted our estimates for hysterectomy status using the National Health Interview Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. We used data from the NBCCEDP to describe the number of women receiving NBCCEDP-funded screening and calculated the proportion of eligible women who received screening through the NBCCEDP at the national level (by age group, race/ethnicity) and at the state level by age group. We used the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to estimate the proportion of NBCCEDP-eligible women who were screened outside the NBCCEDP and the proportion that are not screened. We estimate that in 2010-2012, 705,970 women aged 18-64 years, 6.5 % (705,970 of 9.8 million) of the eligible population, received NBCCEDP-funded Pap tests. We estimate that 60.2 % of eligible women aged 18-64 years were screened outside the NBCCEDP and 33.3 % were not screened. The NBCCEDP provided 623,603 screens to women aged 40-64 years, an estimated 16.5 % of the eligible population, and 83,660 screens to women aged 18-39 years, representing an estimated 1.2 % of the eligible population. The estimated proportions of eligible women screened in each state ranged from 1.5 to 32.7 % and 5 % to 73.2 % among the 18-64 and 40-64 years age groups, respectively. Changes in the proportion of eligible women screened over the study period were nonsignificant. Although the program provided cervical

  5. Screening level contaminant survey of the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge lies within the Portsmouth, NH - Portland, ME urban corridor, and is situated within watersheds that reflect the developed...

  6. Screening-level assessment of organochlorine compounds in raccoons (Procyon lotor) at Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1998 on the site of the former Loring Air Force Base (LAFB), a cold‐war era Strategic Air Command facility....

  7. Screening-level assessment of organochlorine compounds in raccoons (Procyon lotor) at Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1998 on the site of the former Loring Air Force Base (LAFB), a cold‐war era Strategic Air Command facility....

  8. Introducing the National Institute for Sports Medicine in Hungary: a complex sports medical healthcare and screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laki, Judit; Soós, Ágnes; Jákó, Péter; Tállay, András; Perjés, Ábel; Szabó, Anita Megyeriné

    2017-01-01

    The Hungarian National Institute for Sports Medicine (NISM) was founded in 1952 to provide medical coverage for national teams, screening and periodic health evaluation (PHE) for all Hungarian athletes. The system of 'all in one and ASAP' evolved by now to a specific state-funded healthcare provider with complex sports medical and sport-related services available for athletes. The NISM created a countrywide network to make health clearance available for all athletes close to their place of residency. This centralised system guarantees the uniformity and financial independence of the network, as it is directly financed by the government and free for every competitive athlete. Thus, it leaves no chance for conflict of interest in evaluating athletes' eligibility. In 2013, NISM established an online registry for preparticipation screening and PHE. This made the registry available for sports physicians and certain data for both sports physicians and athletes themselves. Furthermore, NISM created a nationwide, centrally coordinated, out of turn care with central coordination for elite athletes nationwide. Outpatient and inpatient clinics of NISM provide sports-specific care. Most of the minimally invasive techniques used at the Department of Sports Surgery are applied only here in the country. The medical staff of NISM has special experience in Sports Medicine and sport-related conditions. All tasks are managed within the same system, within institutional frames by professionals at Sports Medicine, which guarantees institutional expertise, competence and responsibility. Our aim is to introduce the complex system, the services and the recent achievements of the Hungarian NISM.

  9. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening, Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-07-01081

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip [ORNL; Bush, John [Battelle Memorial Institute; Bowerman, Biays [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Cespedes, Ernesto [Idaho National Laboratory; White, Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2004-12-01

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009.

  10. Predictors of all-cause mortality among 514,866 participants from the Korean National Health Screening Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Choonghyun; Park, Sue K.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is not enough evidence regarding how information obtained from general health check-ups can predict individual mortality based on long-term follow-ups and large sample sizes. This study evaluated the applicability of various health information and measurements, consisting of self-reported data, anthropometric measurements and laboratory test results, in predicting individual mortality. Methods The National Health Screening Cohort included 514,866 participants (aged 40–79 years) who were randomly selected from the overall database of the national health screening program in 2002–2003. Death was determined from causes of death statistics provided by Statistics Korea. We assessed variables that were collected at baseline and repeatedly measured for two consecutive years using traditional and time-variant Cox proportional hazards models in addition to random forest and boosting algorithms to identify predictors of 10-year all-cause mortality. Participants’ age at enrollment, lifestyle factors, anthropometric measurements and laboratory test results were included in the prediction models. We used c-statistics to assess the discriminatory ability of the models, their external validity and the ratio of expected to observed numbers to evaluate model calibration. Eligibility of Medicaid and household income levels were used as inequality indexes. Results After the follow-up by 2013, 38,031 deaths were identified. The risk score based on the selected health information and measurements achieved a higher discriminatory ability for mortality prediction (c-statistics = 0.832, 0.841, 0.893, and 0.712 for Cox model, time-variant Cox model, random forest and boosting, respectively) than that of the previous studies. The results were externally validated using the community-based cohort data (c-statistics = 0.814). Conclusions Individuals’ health information and measurements based on health screening can provide early indicators of their 10-year death risk

  11. Patient experience of CT colonography and colonoscopy after fecal occult blood test in a national screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumb, Andrew A.; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, Division of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ghanouni, Alex; Von Wagner, Christian [University College London, Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, London (United Kingdom); Rees, Colin J. [Durham University School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham (United Kingdom); Hewitson, Paul [University of Oxford, Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, Oxford (United Kingdom); Nickerson, Claire; Wright, Suzanne [Fulwood House, NHS Cancer Screening Programmes, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate patient experience of CT colonography (CTC) and colonoscopy in a national screening programme. Retrospective analysis of patient experience postal questionnaires. We included screenees from a fecal occult blood test (FOBt) based screening programme, where CTC was performed when colonoscopy was incomplete or deemed unsuitable. We analyzed questionnaire responses concerning communication of test risks, test-related discomfort and post-test pain, as well as complications. CTC and colonoscopy responses were compared using multilevel logistic regression. Of 67,114 subjects identified, 52,805 (79 %) responded. Understanding of test risks was lower for CTC (1712/1970 = 86.9 %) than colonoscopy (48783/50975 = 95.7 %, p < 0.0001). Overall, a slightly greater proportion of screenees found CTC unexpectedly uncomfortable (506/1970 = 25.7 %) than colonoscopy (10,705/50,975 = 21.0 %, p < 0.0001). CTC was tolerated well as a completion procedure for failed colonoscopy (unexpected discomfort; CTC = 26.3 %: colonoscopy = 57.0 %, p < 0.001). Post-procedural pain was equally common (CTC: 288/1970,14.6 %, colonoscopy: 7544/50,975,14.8 %; p = 0.55). Adverse event rates were similar in both groups (CTC: 20/2947 = 1.2 %; colonoscopy: 683/64,312 = 1.1 %), but generally less serious with CTC. Even though CTC was reserved for individuals either unsuitable for or unable to complete colonoscopy, we found only small differences in test-related discomfort. CTC was well tolerated as a completion procedure and was extremely safe. CTC can be delivered across a national screening programme with high patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  12. Endoparasites in some Swedish Amphibians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1988-01-01

    A study was made of the endoparasites in specimens of Rana arvalis and R. temporaria collected on two occasions from a locality of southern Sweden. Some frogs were investigated directly after capture while other frogs were kept hibernating and the composition of the parasites as well as the behav...... not previously been reported from Sweden. The late Prof. O. Nybelin's unpublished records of parasites found in Swedish amphibians are also given....

  13. Swedish minister rebuilds scientists' trust

    CERN Multimedia

    Sylwan, P

    1999-01-01

    Thomas Ostros, Sweden's new science minister is aiming to improve links with the science community, severely strained during the tenure of Carl Tham. Significantly, he confirmed that he will not be making any further changes to the managment of the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research. He also announced a 5 per cent increase in government funding for science which will be used to strengthen basic research and education (1 page).

  14. A national survey on the use of screening tools to detect physical child abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Kristin Garton; Cooper, Jennifer N; Minneci, Peter C; Groner, Jonathan I; Thackeray, Jonathan D; Deans, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    Recognition of physical child abuse is imperative for ensuring children's safety. Screening tools (ST) may increase identification of physical abuse; however, the extent of their use is unknown. This study assessed use of STs for physical abuse in children's hospitals and determined attitudes regarding STs. A web-based survey was sent to child abuse program contacts at 103 children's hospitals. The survey assessed institutional use of a ST for physical abuse and characteristics of the ST used. Respondents were asked to identify benefits and liabilities of STs used or barriers to ST use. Seventy-two respondents (70 %) completed the survey; most (64 %) were child abuse pediatricians. Nine (13 %) respondents reported using a ST for physical abuse; STs varied in length, population, administration, and outcomes of a positive screen. Most respondents (86 %) using a ST felt that it increased detection of abuse. Barriers noted included lack of time for development and provider completion of a ST. While few respondents endorsed use of a ST for physical abuse, most believed that it increased detection of abuse. Future research should focus on development of a brief, uniform ST for physical abuse which may increase detection in at-risk children.

  15. Chris Berry and Mary Farquhar, China on Screen: Cinema and Nation

    OpenAIRE

    Troost, Kristof Van Den

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, books and papers on Chinese cinema have multiplied almost exponentially. One of the major problems engaged in those writings has been the very question of how to write on Chinese cinemas. Should one include the works of Hong Kong and Taiwan filmmakers? What about “transnational” films such as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)? And can we still speak of a “Chinese national cinema”? In their new book, Berry and Farquhar convincingly argue that “the national informs a...

  16. Jazz and nation in Australia: bridging the gap on screen, 1919–1933

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, B.

    2011-01-01

    When jazz arrived in Australia as live performance in 1918, it initially was \\ud taken by the establishment as a threat to national identity, in particular \\ud as that identity had been associated with masculinist rural mythologies \\ud centred on what was known as ‘the Bush’.1\\ud The Bush was where the nation \\ud was created, through the heroic labour required for the conquest of the \\ud land. With its roots in nineteenth century pioneer frontier narratives, the \\ud values of the Bush were at...

  17. New Swedish environmental and sustainable education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Öhman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of Education & Democracy presents examples froma new generation of Swedish research on environmental and sustainability education and thereby complement the picture of the current Swedish environmental and sustainability education research outlined in the recent Danish-Swedish special issue of Environmental EducationResearch (Vol 16, No 1 and the anthology Democracy and Values inEducation for Sustainable Development – Contributions from Swedish Research (Öhman 2008. All the contributors to this issue are associatedwith the Graduate School in Education and Sustainable Development (GRESD, either as PhD students or as supervisors.

  18. Self-reported frequency of sex as self-injury (SASI) in a national study of Swedish adolescents and association to sociodemographic factors, sexual behaviors, abuse and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Fredlund, Cecilia; Svedin, Carl Göran; Priebe, Gisela; Jonsson, Linda; Wadsby, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Sex as self-injury has become a concept in Swedish society; however it is a largely unexplored area of research, not yet conceptualized and far from accepted in the research field. The use of sex as a way of affect regulation is known in the literature and has, in interviews with young women who sell sex, been compared to direct self-injury, such as cutting or burning the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the self-reported frequency of sex as self-injury and the associ...

  19. Risk factors for displaced abomasum or ketosis in Swedish dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengärde, L; Hultgren, J; Tråvén, M; Holtenius, K; Emanuelson, U

    2012-03-01

    Risk factors associated with high or low long-term incidence of displaced abomasum (DA) or clinical ketosis were studied in 60 Swedish dairy herds, using multivariable logistic regression modelling. Forty high-incidence herds were included as cases and 20 low-incidence herds as controls. Incidence rates were calculated based on veterinary records of clinical diagnoses. During the 3-year period preceding the herd classification, herds with a high incidence had a disease incidence of DA or clinical ketosis above the 3rd quartile in a national database for disease recordings. Control herds had no cows with DA or clinical ketosis. All herds were visited during the housing period and herdsmen were interviewed about management routines, housing, feeding, milk yield, and herd health. Target groups were heifers in late gestation, dry cows, and cows in early lactation. Univariable logistic regression was used to screen for factors associated with being a high-incidence herd. A multivariable logistic regression model was built using stepwise regression. A higher maximum daily milk yield in multiparous cows and a large herd size (p=0.054 and p=0.066, respectively) tended to be associated with being a high-incidence herd. Not cleaning the heifer feeding platform daily increased the odds of having a high-incidence herd twelvefold (pketosis in Swedish dairy herds. These results confirm the importance of housing, management and feeding in the prevention of metabolic disorders in dairy cows around parturition and in early lactation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The perception of aquaculture on the Swedish West Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste E; Nordström, Jonas; Risén, Emma; Malmström, Maria E; Gröndahl, Fredrik

    2017-09-22

    Efforts are on the way on the Swedish West Coast to develop the capacity for cultivation of marine resources, notably of kelps. Given that this is a region of great natural and national heritage, public opposition to marine developments has been identified as a possible risk factor. This survey thus sought to shed light on awareness levels, perceptions of different types of aquaculture and on reactions to a scenario depicting future aquaculture developments on the West Coast. When asked about their general opinions of aquaculture, respondents tended to be favourable though a majority chose neutral responses. On the whole, respondents were favourable to the depicted scenario. Finally, it was found that the high-awareness group tended to be more supportive than the low or medium-awareness groups, hinting at the benefits of increasing awareness to reduce public aversion and to support a sustainable development of aquaculture on the Swedish West Coast.

  1. Nurses Contribution to Swedish eHealth Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnvall, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In 2005 the Swedish government identified the need of common development of information and communication technology in health and social care. The purpose of this paper is to describe nurses' contribution to the establishment of a national cooperation concerning eHealth development in health and social care. The Swedish strategy of eHealth have six actions areas eServices for accessibility and empowerment, Usable and accessible information (for staff), Knowledge management, innovation and learning, Creating a common technical infrastructure, Creating a common information structure and Bringing laws and regulations into line with extended use of ICT. Nurses are involved in all action areas and emphasize the empowerment and safety of the patient and account of ethical values. Patients' possibility to take part of the information and adding information in their own patient health record, nurses' education and safe IT support in medication are areas that need further development.

  2. Data-driven decision support for radiologists: re-using the National Lung Screening Trial dataset for pulmonary nodule management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James J; Hostetter, Jason; Wang, Kenneth; Siegel, Eliot L

    2015-02-01

    Real-time mining of large research trial datasets enables development of case-based clinical decision support tools. Several applicable research datasets exist including the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a dataset unparalleled in size and scope for studying population-based lung cancer screening. Using these data, a clinical decision support tool was developed which matches patient demographics and lung nodule characteristics to a cohort of similar patients. The NLST dataset was converted into Structured Query Language (SQL) tables hosted on a web server, and a web-based JavaScript application was developed which performs real-time queries. JavaScript is used for both the server-side and client-side language, allowing for rapid development of a robust client interface and server-side data layer. Real-time data mining of user-specified patient cohorts achieved a rapid return of cohort cancer statistics and lung nodule distribution information. This system demonstrates the potential of individualized real-time data mining using large high-quality clinical trial datasets to drive evidence-based clinical decision-making.

  3. Patient-Provider Communication About Prostate Cancer Screening and Treatment: New Evidence From the Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Gupta, Niodita; Isharwal, Sudhir; LaGrange, Chad; Mahmood, Asos; Gentry, Dan

    2015-11-26

    The American Urological Association, American Cancer Society, and American College of Physicians recommend that patients and providers make a shared decision with respect to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer (PCa). The goal of this study is to determine the extent of patient-provider communication for PSA testing and treatment of PCa and to examine the patient specific factors associated with this communication. Using recent data from the Health Information National Trends Survey, this study examined the association of patient characteristics with four domains of patient-provider communication regarding PSA test and PCa treatment: (1) expert opinion of PSA test, (2) accuracy of PSA test, (3) side effects of PCa treatment, and (4) treatment need of PCa. The current results suggested low level of communication for PSA testing and treatment of PCa across four domains. Less than 10% of the respondents report having communication about all four domains. Patient characteristics like recent medical check-up, regular healthcare provider, global health status, age group, marital status, race, annual household income, and already having undergone a PSA test are associated with patient-provider communication. There are few discussions about PSA testing and PCa treatment options between healthcare providers and their patients, which limits the shared decision-making process for PCa screening and treatment as recommended by the current best practice guidelines. This study helps identify implications for changes in physician practice to adhere with the PSA screening guidelines. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Introducing the National Institute for Sports Medicine in Hungary: a complex sports medical healthcare and screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laki, Judit; Soós, Ágnes; Jákó, Péter; Tállay, András; Perjés, Ábel; Szabó, Anita Megyeriné

    2017-01-01

    The Hungarian National Institute for Sports Medicine (NISM) was founded in 1952 to provide medical coverage for national teams, screening and periodic health evaluation (PHE) for all Hungarian athletes. The system of ‘all in one and ASAP’ evolved by now to a specific state-funded healthcare provider with complex sports medical and sport-related services available for athletes. The NISM created a countrywide network to make health clearance available for all athletes close to their place of residency. This centralised system guarantees the uniformity and financial independence of the network, as it is directly financed by the government and free for every competitive athlete. Thus, it leaves no chance for conflict of interest in evaluating athletes’ eligibility. In 2013, NISM established an online registry for preparticipation screening and PHE. This made the registry available for sports physicians and certain data for both sports physicians and athletes themselves. Furthermore, NISM created a nationwide, centrally coordinated, out of turn care with central coordination for elite athletes nationwide. Outpatient and inpatient clinics of NISM provide sports-specific care. Most of the minimally invasive techniques used at the Department of Sports Surgery are applied only here in the country. The medical staff of NISM has special experience in Sports Medicine and sport-related conditions. All tasks are managed within the same system, within institutional frames by professionals at Sports Medicine, which guarantees institutional expertise, competence and responsibility. Our aim is to introduce the complex system, the services and the recent achievements of the Hungarian NISM. PMID:29071113

  5. Factors associated with the use of gastric cancer screening services in Korea: the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008 (KNHANES IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Duk-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Despite government efforts to increase participation in gastric cancer screening, the rate is still suboptimal in Korea. Therefore, we explored barriers to and predictors of gastric cancer screening participation among a nationally representative sample. We used the Health Interview Survey sub-dataset derived from the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008 (KNHANES IV) to evaluate participation in gastric cancer screening and factors associated with attendance in individuals age ≥ 40 years. We enrolled 4,464 subjects who completed the questionnaire and were not previously diagnosed with gastric cancer. Four groups of factors were considered potential predictors of gastric cancer screening in a multivariate analysis: sociodemographic, health behavior, psychological and cognitive, and dietary factors. Overall, 41.3% complied with the gastric cancer screening recommendations. Younger age, lower education level, living without a spouse, frequent binge drinker, and current smoker were significantly associated with less participation in gastric cancer screening. To improve participation in gastric cancer screening, more focused interventions should be directed to vulnerable populations, such as groups with low socioeconomic status or unhealthy behavior. In addition, there should be new promotional campaigns and health education to provide information targeting these vulnerable populations.

  6. Swedish Opinion on Nuclear Power 1986 - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Soeren

    2012-11-01

    This report contains the Swedish opinion on Nuclear Power and European Attitudes on Nuclear Power. It also includes European Attitudes Towards the Future of Three Energy Sources; Nuclear Energy, Wind Power and Solar Power - with a focus on the Swedish opinion. Results from measurements done by the SOM Inst. are presented.

  7. Is spoken Danish less intelligible than Swedish?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooskens, Charlotte; van Heuven, Vincent J.; van Bezooijen, Renee; Pacilly, Jos J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The most straightforward way to explain why Danes understand spoken Swedish relatively better than Swedes understand spoken Danish would be that spoken Danish is intrinsically a more difficult language to understand than spoken Swedish. We discuss circumstantial evidence suggesting that Danish is

  8. Cadmium exposure in the Swedish environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report gives a thorough description of cadmium in the Swedish environment. It comprises three parts: Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks;, Cadmium in goods - contribution to environmental exposure;, and Cadmium in fertilizers, soil, crops and foods - the Swedish situation. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all three parts

  9. Perceived discrimination is associated with reduced breast and cervical cancer screening: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Rathouz, Paul J; Karavolos, Kelly; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Janssen, Imke; Kravitz, Howard M; Lewis, Tené T; Powell, Lynda H

    2014-02-01

    Racial disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening have been documented in African American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. Perceived discrimination may contribute to this disparity. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between perceived everyday racial/ethnic and other discrimination and receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a multiethnic population of women. We analyzed data from 3,258 women participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multiethnic/racial, longitudinal cohort study of the natural history of the menopausal transition conducted at seven U.S. sites. Participants completed a validated measure of perceived discrimination and reasons for believing that they were treated differently, along with Pap smears, clinical breast exams (CBE), and mammography at each follow-up period. We used multiple logistic regression for the binary outcomes of having a Pap smear, CBE, or mammogram in each of the two follow-up years, using self-reported "race discrimination" and "other discrimination" at baseline as the main predictors. African American women reported the highest percentage of racial discrimination (35%), followed by Chinese (20%), Hispanic (12%), Japanese (11%), and non-Hispanic white women (3%). Non-Hispanic white women reported the highest percentage of "other" discrimination (40%), followed by Chinese (33%), African American (24%), Japanese (23%), and Hispanic women (16%). Perceived racial discrimination was not associated with reduced receipt of preventive screening, except in one fully adjusted model. Reported discrimination owing to "other" reasons, such as age or gender, was associated with reduced receipt of Pap smear (odds ratio [OR] 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-0.99), CBE (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.67-0.91), and mammography (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.69-0.92) regardless of patient race. Perceived discrimination is an important issue across racial/ethnic groups and is negatively

  10. A Query Tool for Investigator Access to the Data and Images of the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commean, Paul K; Rathmell, Joshua M; Clark, Ken W; Maffitt, Dave R; Prior, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in conjunction with blinded university, provides a mechanism to enable public access to the study data, CT radiology images, and pathology images from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Access to the data and images is through the NCI-sponsored, blinded university-hosted The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), a repository of more than 40 study collections of cancer images. Once access to the NLST data has been granted by NCI, a Query Tool within TCIA is used to access the NLST data and images. The Query Tool is a simple-to-use menu-driven database application designed to quickly pose queries and retrieve/save results (from 53,452 NLST participants), download CT images (~20 million available), and view pathology images (~1200 available). NLST study data are contained in 17 Query Tool tables with ~370 variables to query. This paper describes Query Tool design, functionality, and usefulness for researchers, clinicians, and software developers to query data, save query results, and download/view images.

  11. The Swedish personal identity number: possibilities and pitfalls in healthcare and medical research

    OpenAIRE

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Otterblad-Olausson, Petra; Pettersson, Birgitta U.; Ekbom, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Swedish health care and national health registers are dependent on the presence of a unique identifier. This paper describes the Swedish personal identity number (PIN) and explores ethical issues of its use in medical research. A ten-digit-PIN is maintained by the National Tax Board for all individuals that have resided in Sweden since 1947. Until January 2008, an estimated 75,638 individuals have changed PIN. The most common reasons for change of PIN are incorrect recording of date of birth ...

  12. Factors associated with organized and opportunistic cancer screening: Results of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minsun; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Park, Eun-Cheol; Kwon, Kisung; Kim, Gaeun; Kim, Doo Ree; Kwon, Jeoung A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Korea. To reduce cancer incidence, the Korean National Cancer Center (KNCC) has been expanding its organized cancer screening program. In addition, there are opportunistic screening programs that can be chosen by individuals or their healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors associated with participation in organized and opportunistic cancer screening programs, with a particular focus on socioeconomic factors. We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a cross-sectional nationwide study conducted by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare from 2007 to 2011. The study included information from 9,708 men and 12,739 women aged 19 years or over. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted, adjusting for age, year of data collection, residential region, current smoking status, current alcohol consumption status, exercise, marriage status, job status, perceived health status, stress level, BMI, limitation of activities, cancer history, health insurance type, and private insurance status, to investigate the association between education level, economic status, and cancer screening participation. In terms of education level, disparities in attendance were observed only for the opportunistic screening program. In contrast, there was no association between education level and participation in organized screening. In terms of economic status, disparities in opportunistic screening participation were observed at all income levels, but disparities in organized screening participation were observed only at the highest income level. Our findings reveal that socioeconomic factors, including educational level and economic status, were not significantly associated with participation in organized cancer screening, except at the highest level of income.

  13. Comparison of milk protein composition and rennet coagulation properties in native Swedish dairy cow breeds and high-yielding Swedish Red cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nina A; Glantz, Maria; Rosengaard, Anette K; Paulsson, Marie; Larsen, Lotte B

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies have reported a very high frequency of noncoagulating milk in Swedish Red cows. The underlying factors are not fully understood. In this study, we explored rennet-induced coagulation properties and relative protein profiles in milk from native Swedish Mountain and Swedish Red Polled cows and compared them with a subset of noncoagulating (NC) and well-coagulating (WC) milk samples from modern Swedish Red cows. The native breeds displayed a very low prevalence of NC milk and superior milk coagulation properties compared with Swedish Red cows. The predominant variants in both native breeds were αS1-casein (αS1-CN) B, β-CN A2 and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) B. For κ-CN, the B variant was predominant in the Swedish Mountain cows, whereas the A variant was the most frequent in the Swedish Red Polled. The native breeds displayed similar protein composition, but varied in content of αS1-CN with 9 phosphorylated serines (9P) form. Within the Swedish Mountain cows, we observed a strong inverse correlation between the relative concentration of κ-CN and micelle size and a positive correlation between ionic calcium and gel firmness. For comparison, we investigated a subset of 29 NC and 28 WC milk samples, representing the extremes with regard to coagulation properties based on an initial screening of 395 Swedish Red cows. In Swedish Red, NC milk properties were found to be related to higher frequencies of β-CN A2, κ-CN E and A variants, as well as β-LG B, and the predominant composite genotype of β- and κ-CN in the NC group was A2A2/AA. Generally, the A2A2/AA composite genotype was related to lower relative concentrations of κ-CN isoforms and higher relative concentrations of αS1-, αS2-, and β-CN. Compared with the group of WC milk samples, NC milk contained a higher fraction of αS2-CN and α-lactalbumin (α-LA) but a lower fraction of αS1-CN 9P. In conclusion, milk from native Swedish breeds has good characteristics for cheese milk, which could be

  14. Women do not fare worse than men after lumbar fusion surgery: Two-year follow-up results from 4,780 prospectively collected patients in the Swedish National Spine Register with lumbar degenerative disc disease and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebel, Jan; Snellman, Greta; Sandén, Bengt; Strömqvist, Fredrik; Robinson, Yohan

    2017-05-01

    Proper patient selection is of utmost importance in the surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Among other factors, gender was previously found to influence lumbar fusion surgery outcome. This study investigates whether gender affects clinical outcome after lumbar fusion. This is a national registry cohort study. Between 2001 and 2011, 2,251 men and 2,521 women were followed prospectively within the Swedish National Spine Register (SWESPINE) after lumbar fusion surgery for DDD and CLBP. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), visual analog scale (VAS) for leg and back pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), quality of life (QoL) parameter EQ5D, and labor status and pain medication were collected preoperatively, 1 and 2 years after surgery. Gender differences of baseline data and PROM improvement from baseline were analyzed. The effect of gender on clinically important improvement of PROM was determined in a multivariate logistic regression model. Furthermore, gender-related differences in return-to-work were investigated. Preoperatively, women had worse leg pain (pback pain (p=.002), lower QoL (ppain, function, and QoL (all ppain (odds ratio [OR]=1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-1.61, pback pain (OR=1.20,95% CI:1.03-1.40, p=.02) as well as ODI (OR=1.24, 95% CI:1.05-1.47, p=.01), but improved at a slower pace in leg pain (pback pain (p=.009), and disability (p=.008). No gender differences were found in QoL and return to work at 2 years postoperatively. Swedish women do not have worse results than men after spinal fusion surgery. Female patients present with worse pain and function preoperatively, but improve more than men do after surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a screening method to assess flood risk on danish national roads and highway systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, N H; Larsen, M R A; Rasmussen, S F

    2011-01-01

    A method to assess flood risk on Danish national roads in a large area in the middle and southern part of Jutland, Denmark, was developed for the Danish Road Directorate. Flood risk has gained renewed focus due to the climate changes in recent years and extreme rain events are expected to become more frequent in the future. The assessment was primarily based on a digital terrain model (DTM) covering 7,500 km2 in a 1.6 x 1.6 m grid. The high-resolution terrain model was chosen in order to get an accurate estimation of the potential flooding in the road area and in the immediate vicinity, but also put a high requirement on the methods, hardware and software applied. The outcome of the analysis was detailed maps (as GIS layers) illustrating the location of depressions with depths, surface area and volume data for each depression. Furthermore, preferential flow paths, catchment boundaries and ranking of each depression were calculated. The ranking was based on volume of depressions compared with upstream catchment and a sensitivity analysis of the runoff coefficient. Finally, a method for assessing flood risk at a more advanced level (hydrodynamic simulation of surface and drainage) was developed and used on a specific blue spot as an example. The case study shows that upstream catchment, depressions, drainage system, and use of hydrodynamic calculations have a great influence on the result. Upstream catchments can contribute greatly to the flooding.

  16. Risk Gambling and Personality: Results from a Representative Swedish Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Kristina; Wennberg, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The association between personality and gambling has been explored previously. However, few studies are based on representative populations. This study aimed at examining the association between risk gambling and personality in a representative Swedish population. A random Swedish sample (N = 19,530) was screened for risk gambling using the Lie/Bet questionnaire. The study sample (N = 257) consisted of those screening positive on Lie/Bet and completing a postal questionnaire about gambling and personality (measured with the NODS-PERC and the HP5i respectively). Risk gambling was positively correlated with Negative Affectivity (a facet of Neuroticism) and Impulsivity (an inversely related facet of Conscientiousness), but all associations were weak. When taking age and gender into account, there were no differences in personality across game preference groups, though preferred game correlated with level of risk gambling. Risk gamblers scored lower than the population norm data with respect to Negative Affectivity, but risk gambling men scored higher on Impulsivity. The association between risk gambling and personality found in previous studies was corroborated in this study using a representative sample. We conclude that risk and problem gamblers should not be treated as a homogeneous group, and prevention and treatment interventions should be adapted according to differences in personality, preferred type of game and the risk potential of the games.

  17. The psychometric properties of the AUDIT: a survey from a random sample of elderly Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källmén, Håkan; Wennberg, Peter; Ramstedt, Mats; Hallgren, Mats

    2014-07-01

    Increasing alcohol consumption and related harms have been reported among the elderly population of Europe. Consequently, it is important to monitor patterns of alcohol use, and to use a valid and reliable tool when screening for risky consumption in this age group. The aim was to evaluate the internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in elderly Swedish adults, and to compare the results with the general Swedish population. Another aim was to calculate the level of alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C) to be used for comparison in future studies. The questionnaire was sent to 1459 Swedish adults aged 79-80 years with a response rate of 73.3%. Internal consistency reliability, were assessed using Cronbach alpha, and confirmatory factor analysis assessed construct validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in elderly population as compared to a Swedish general population sample. The results showed that AUDIT was more reliable and valid among the Swedish general population sample than among the elderly and that Item 1 and 4 in AUDIT was less reliable and valid among the elderly. While the AUDIT showed acceptable psychometric properties in the general population sample, it's performance was of less quality among the elderly respondents. Further psychometric assessments of the AUDIT in elderly populations are required before it is implemented more widely.

  18. [Personality Traits Screening in a Colombian Adult Population Sample - Colombian National Survey of Mental Health-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Gabriel Fernando; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Rondón, Martín; Borda Bohigas, Juan Pablo; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    Personality refers to the individual style in characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving. Traits may configure a personality disorder when there is a long-lasting rigid pattern of inner experience that deviates from the expectations of the individual's culture, are inflexible and form maladaptative schemes in different interpersonal scenarios. Given the pervasiveness of this structure, they cause impairment of functioning in the affected person. To establish the prevalence of personality traits in all selected adults, using the module-structured interview WHO WHM-CIDI-CAPI for clusters A, B and C of personality traits. Colombian National Survey on Mental Health with persons older than 18 years of age. Personality traits that are the most frequently described: Cluster A 46% (95%CI, 45.2-48.1) of people believe they are convinced that there are conspiracies behind many things in the world. Regarding the features of cluster B, 35.6% (95%CI, 34.2-37.0) of the population reports that generally they do not feel bad when offending or upsetting someone and 35.4% (95%CI, 33.9-36.8) refer to show feelings to anyone. The highest proportion of traits were found to the probable borderline personality disorder, as 4.6% (95%CI, 4.1-5.2) of the Colombian population aged 18 and older has 6 or more features of this type, and is the widely reported as an individual entity with similar rates in men and women. The high prevalence of disruptive personality traits requires more research. The high prevalence reported for borderline personality traits suggests the need to implement measures to improve and integrate a collaborative model of care for people afflicted with a possible borderline personality disorder. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Successful Repatriation of Breast Cancer Surveillance for High-Risk Women to the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Wiggins, Jennifer; Ward, Simon; Kemp, Zoe; George, Angela J

    2017-10-28

    Since April 2013, the UK's National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) centers have been obliged to provide services for women at the highest risk of breast cancer, including those carrying highly penetrant single gene mutations (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53). Since then, such individuals previously undergoing surveillance in the Royal Marsden Hospital were referred to their local NHSBSP centers. We aimed to assess patient experience of surveillance provided by local NHSBSP services at 1 and 3 years after repatriation. High-risk gene mutation carriers referred to the NHSBSP for breast cancer surveillance were identified from a departmental database in the Cancer Genetics Unit and invited to complete questionnaires about their experience of surveillance under this new pathway, first in 2014 and again in 2016. Three hundred forty-six individuals were invited to participate in 2014, of whom 182 responded (53%). A total of 464 patients were invited in 2016, of whom 246 (53%) completed the second questionnaire. Ninety-four percent of patients with residual breast tissue received some screening at the first (n = 161) and second (n = 185) time points. Ninety-one percent of patients (n = 146) received at least recommended surveillance in the year preceding the initial survey, a proportion decreasing slightly by the second time point (n = 164, 87%). Seventeen percent of individuals required additional diagnostic investigations, with cancers detected in 2%. These proportions remained stable between surveys. Repatriation of high-risk individuals from Royal Marsden Hospital to NHSBSP centers has been successfully accomplished. Most individuals received appropriate recommended annual surveillance. Further improvements are required to ensure equal and timely provision of recommended surveillance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    2004 was somewhat of a record year for the Swedish nuclear power stations. No serious faults occurred, and production exceeded previous record outputs. Total output from the eleven nuclear power units during the year amounted to 75 TWh, which is the largest amount of power ever produced by nuclear power in Sweden. Corresponding figures for earlier years are 59 TWh (2003), 65 TWh (2002) and 69 TWh (2001). An important reason for this excellent result was the very high energy availability. Forsmark 1, for example, exceeded 97 % availability, while Forsmark 2 just reached 97 %. For all the Swedish nuclear power stations as a whole, availability in 2004 amounted to 91 %. In addition to the connection between production and energy availability, there is also a connection with safety. During the year, safety in the Swedish power stations has been high, not only in absolute terms but also in an international perspective. One measure of safety is to be found in the number of accidents, incidents, anomalies or deviations reported to the IAEA on a scale known as the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). Sweden has undertaken to report all events in accordance with this international system. Three reports were submitted by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, which is responsible for national reporting, during the year. None of them had any significance for reactor safety: all were categorised as incidents or minor deviations from the regulations. Summarising, 2004 has been an excellent year for nuclear power safety, which is also reflected by the record electricity production during the year.

  1. National screening guidelines and developments in prenatal diagnoses and live births of Down syndrome in the period 1973-2016 in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Stina; Petersen, Olav Bjørn; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Denmark was the first country in the world to implement a national, free-for-all offer of prenatal screening for Down syndrome to all pregnant women. It has a high uptake (> 90%) compared to other countries. Thus, Denmark offers an interesting case for investigating the consequences...... of implementing a comprehensive, national prenatal screening guideline. The aim of this study was to describe the historical developments in invasive procedures, pre-/postnatal diagnoses of Down syndrome and Down syndrome live births in the period 1973-2016 in Denmark MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data on invasive...... procedures, pre- and postnatal Down syndrome diagnoses were retrieved from the Danish Cytogenetic Central Registry RESULTS: From 1973-1993 screening based on maternal age and high-risk indications resulted in a constant increase in invasive procedures. After the introduction of the triple test in 1994...

  2. The association between social networks and colorectal cancer screening in American males and females: data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiali; Williams, Shanita D; Xu, Zhiheng

    2009-09-01

    We sought to explore the relationship between social networks and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among males and females. We examined 960 men and 1,947 women aged 50 years or older who participated in the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. Bivariate analysis showed that lower levels of social integration were associated with a lower likelihood of CRC screening for both genders. After controlling for sociodemographic variables, the level of social integration remained independently associated with CRC screening. The link between each component of social networks and CRC screening was also examined. Among men, those who did not have friends/family to talk to about their health were less likely to be screened (OR 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30-0.77). Among women, those who were unmarried (OR 0.67, 95% CI: 0.41-0.93), those who did not have friends/family to talk to about their health (OR 0.62, 95% CI: 0.43-0.77), and those who were not a member of any community organizations (OR 0.58, 95% CI: 0.43-0.90) were less likely to be screened. For both men and women, individuals who were socially isolated were less likely to get CRC screening compared with individuals who were less isolated. The observed gender differences indicate the need for investigation of the social context and the meaning of elements of social networks in men and women.

  3. Athletes' Perceptions of National Collegiate Athletic Association--Mandated Sickle Cell Trait Screening: Insight for Academic Institutions and College Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Raymona H.; Shah, Gulzar H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study objective was to explore athletes' perspectives of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)--mandated sickle cell trait (SCT)--screening policy by examining race- and gender-related differences in athletes' perceptions regarding risk of having SCT and concern about loss of playing time. Participants: Participants were…

  4. Evaluation of a Stratified National Breast Screening Program in the United Kingdom : An Early Model-Based Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gray, Ewan; Donten, Anna; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Gils, Carla|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17443068X; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Astley, Sue; Payne, Katherine

    Objectives: To identify the incremental costs and consequences of stratified national breast screening programs (stratified NBSPs) and drivers of relative cost-effectiveness. Methods: A decision-analytic model (discrete event simulation) was conceptualized to represent four stratified NBSPs (risk 1,

  5. Gender Integration and the Swedish Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Daniel Marcus Sunil

    This paper discusses different gender aspects of the Swedish Armed Forces with specific references to sexual harassment and prostitution. By using the concept of Hegemonic Masculinity, sexual harassment of the women in the Swedish Armed Forces is explained in terms of a need of the men within...... the organisation to reinforce the notion of women as inferior and subordinate to men, whereby the external hegemony is believed to be restored. Likewise, male Swedish peacekeepers’ demand for prostitution during international peacekeeping missions is explained in terms of a need to confirm manhood and as homo...

  6. Evaluation of the introduction of the national Down syndrome screening program in the Netherlands: age-related uptake of prenatal screening and invasive diagnostic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, M.A.M.J.; Bhola, S.L.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Blankenstein, M.A.; van Vugt, J.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of different government prenatal screening (PNS) policies on the uptake of PNS and prenatal diagnostic testing (PND) over the periods 2001-2003 (PNS on request), 2004-2006 (permission to offer the first-trimester combined test (FCT) to women of advanced maternal age

  7. Evaluation of the introduction of the national Down syndrome screening program in the Netherlands: age-related uptake of prenatal screening and invasive diagnostic testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, M.A.J.; Bhola, S.L.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Vugt, J.M.G. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of different government prenatal screening (PNS) policies on the uptake of PNS and prenatal diagnostic testing (PND) over the periods 2001-2003 (PNS on request), 2004-2006 (permission to offer the first-trimester combined test (FCT) to women of advanced maternal age

  8. Cancer screening rate in people with diabetes in the Korean population: results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, Kumban Walter; Hwang, Minji; Choi, Kui Son; Suh, Mina; Jun, Jae Kwan; Park, Boyoung

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the screening rates for gastric, breast, and cervical cancer in people with diabetes compared with people without diabetes. Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009) were used. Cancer-free men who were 40 years old and over and cancer-free women who were 30 years old and over were included. The lifetime screening rate and regular screening rate were compared in people with and without diabetes. Fewer people with diabetes than people without diabetes had ever received cancer screening (53.5 vs. 59.5%, pgastric cancer; 60.5 vs. 71.5%, pcancer; and 49.1 vs. 59.6%, pcancer). Fewer people with diabetes than people without diabetes received the recommended screenings for gastric cancer (38.9 vs. 42.9%, pcancer (38.8 vs. 44.6%, pcancer (35.1 vs. 51.2%, pscreening rates were lower in the diabetic population in most socioeconomic subgroups. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for socioeconomic factors, people with diabetes showed lower lifetime screening rates for gastric and cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 0.9 and OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.9), and lower regular screening rates for breast and cervical cancer (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.9 and OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9). The cancer screening rate in people with diabetes was lower than in people without diabetes. Considering the higher cancer risk in people with diabetes, efforts to increase the screening rate in this high-risk population should be implemented.

  9. Tuberculosis Screening and Reactivation Among a National Cohort of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treated with Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jason K; Kramer, Jennifer R; Richardson, Peter; Sansgiry, Shubhada; El-Serag, Hashem B

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNFs) are effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but may cause reactivation of tuberculosis (TB). TB screening rates and related outcomes are not well described among patients with IBD. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of TB screening before anti-TNF initiation and related outcomes among patients with IBD. We identified patients with IBD with filled prescriptions for anti-TNFs using the National Veterans Affairs administrative data sets. Determinants of TB screening were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with TB reactivation were identified by ICD9 codes or prescriptions for isoniazid, and confirmed by chart review. A total of 3357 patients with IBD were identified with filled anti-TNF prescriptions. Approximately 72% to 86% of patients received TB screening. In multivariate analyses, patients in rural areas were less likely to be screened for TB compared with those in urban areas (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence ratio 0.54-0.95). Patients who received care at academically affiliated facilities were more likely to have received screening for TB (odds ratio 1.49, 95% confidence ratio 1.31-1.95). In 7210 patient-years of follow-up on anti-TNF, TB reactivation was confirmed in 2 patients, both of whom had a history and treatment of latent TB before anti-TNF initiation. TB screening before anti-TNF is estimated to be between 72% and 86%. Receipt of care at urban, academic-affiliated, high-volume IBD facilities is associated with higher rates of screening. Reactivation of TB in a highly screened cohort is estimated to be 2.8 per 10,000 patient-years.

  10. Views of supervisors of colonoscopy training on quality issues for the national bowel cancer screening program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentti, Marita; Muller, Jennifer; Janda, Monika; Newman, Beth

    2009-02-01

    To describe the views of supervisors of colonoscopy training in regard to colonoscopy training capacity and quality in Australia. Anonymous postal surveys from March to May 2007 were posted to 127 colonoscopy training supervisors (30.2% estimated response rate). The surveys queried colonoscopy training capacity and quality, supervisors' views and opinions on innovative approaches to colonoscopy training, number of colonoscopies and time required by trainees to gain competence in colonoscopy. Approximately 50% of trainers agreed and 27% disagreed that current numbers of training places were adequate to maintain a skilled colonoscopy workforce in preparation for the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP). A collaborative approach with the private sector was seen as beneficial by 65%. Non-gastroenterologists (non-GEs) were more likely than gastroenterologists (GEs) to be of the opinion that simulators are beneficial for colonoscopy training (chi(2)-test = 5.55, P = 0.026). The majority of trainers did not support training either nurses (73%) or general practitioners (GPs) in colonoscopy (71%). Approximately 60% of trainers considered that the current requirements for recognition of training in colonoscopy could be insufficient for trainees to gain competence and 80% of those indicated that > or = 200 colonoscopies were needed. Colonoscopy training in Australia has traditionally followed the apprenticeship model. Projected increases in demand for colonoscopy with the introduction of the NBCSP may require additional training places and new and innovative approaches to training in order to ensure the provision of high-quality colonoscopy services under the NBCSP.

  11. Workplace Incivility in a Swedish Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Torkelson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated workplace incivility in a Swedish context. The first aim was to assess how common the phenomenon is and the second was to study which groups (gender, age, ethnicity, and power position are most targeted by workplace incivility and are more prone to act in an uncivil way. Additionally, the relationships between experienced and witnessed incivility and wellbeing as well as instigated incivility were investigated. An online survey was administered by SIFO (the national public opinion poll agency. The collected data consist of a stratified sample whose composition is identical to the working population in Sweden (N = 3001. The results show that almost three quarters of the respondents had been the target of coworker incivility and 52% of supervisor incivility at least one to two times in the past year. Of the respondents, 75% had witnessed coworkers and 58% witnessed a supervisor treating others in an uncivil way. Furthermore, 66% had instigated uncivil acts toward others. The results also show that female and younger employees are slightly more targeted by incivility from coworkers and younger employees and supervisors are slightly more prone to instigate incivility. Moreover, it was found that that experienced incivility was the strongest predictor of low well-being and that witnessed incivility was the strongest predictor of instigated incivility.

  12. Is population coronary heart disease risk screening justified? A discussion of the National Service Framework for coronary heart disease (Standard 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, A; Adab, P

    2001-01-01

    Standard 4 of the National Service Framework (NSF) for coronary heart disease (CHD) describes population cardiovascular risk screening at primary care level. General practitioners (GPs) are expected to deliver this standard and have their performance monitored as part of their clinical governance programme. Although CHD is an important preventable health problem in the United Kingdom (UK), the effectiveness of primary prevention screening programmes are minimal, even within clinical trial settings, and their cost-effectiveness is not clear. The National Screening Committee has identified clear standards for establishing a screening programme in the UK and the activities described in Standard 4 do not fulfill many of these criteria. Specifically, there are no plans for central organisation and co-ordination, no agreed quality assurance standards, and no uniform system for performance management. The clinical, social, and ethical acceptability of the interventions mandated have not been established, and GPs are left to consider how to redirect resources to achieve the standard. We argue that the benefits of population cardiovascular screening must be established through properly conducted trials and, if a programme is introduced, adequate resources and management structures must first be identified. PMID:11677709

  13. Ferride geochemistry of Swedish precambrian iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loberg, B. E. H.; Horndahl, A.-K.

    1983-10-01

    Chemical analysis for major and trace elements have been performed on 30 Swedish Precambrian iron ores and on some from Iran and Chile. The Swedish ores consist of apatite iron ores, quartz-banded iron ores, skarn and limestone iron ores from the two main ore districts of Sweden, the Bergslagen and the Norrbotten province. Some Swedish titaniferous iron ores were also included in the investigation. The trace element data show that the Swedish ores can be subdivided into two major groups: 1. orthomagmatic and exhalative, 2. sedimentary. Within group 1 the titaniferous iron ores are distinguished by their high Ti-contents. From the ferride contents of the Kiruna apatite iron ores, the ores are considered to be mobilization products of skarn iron ores from the Norbotten province.

  14. National screening guidelines and developments in prenatal diagnoses and live births of Down syndrome in the period 1973-2016 in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Stina; Petersen, Olav Bjørn; Jørgensen, Finn Stener; Lund, Ida Charlotte Bay; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Vogel, Ida

    2017-12-01

    Denmark was the first country in the world to implement a national, free-for-all offer of prenatal screening for Down syndrome to all pregnant women. It has a high uptake (> 90%) compared to other countries. Thus, Denmark offers an interesting case for investigating the consequences of implementing a comprehensive, national prenatal screening guideline. The aim of this study was to describe the historical developments in invasive procedures, pre-/postnatal diagnoses of Down syndrome and Down syndrome live births in the period 1973-2016 in Denmark MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data on invasive procedures, pre- and postnatal Down syndrome diagnoses were retrieved from the Danish Cytogenetic Central Registry RESULTS: From 1973-1993 screening based on maternal age and high-risk indications resulted in a constant increase in invasive procedures. After the introduction of the triple test in 1994, invasive procedures decreased for the first time in 20 years. Following the introduction of an offer of combined screening to all pregnant women in 2004, the number of invasive procedures decreased markedly while there was a concurrent increase in prenatal diagnoses of Down syndrome. Additionally, the number of Down syndrome live births decreased suddenly and significantly, but subsequently stabilized at 23-35 annual live births. Of these, the majority was diagnosed postnatally CONCLUSIONS: Though prenatal screening technologies constantly improve, it is the introduction of and adherence to national guidelines that resulted in marked shifts in screening procedures and outcome in Denmark. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening for prostate cancer: the current evidence and guidelines controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomella, Leonard G; Liu, Xiaolong S; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Kelly, Wm Kevin; Myers, Ronald; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam; Wender, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer presents a global public health dilemma. While screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than in previous years, the potential for negative effects from over-diagnosis and treatment cannot be ignored. We reviewed Medline for recent articles that discuss clinical trials, evidence based recommendations and guidelines from major medical organizations in the United States and worldwide concerning prostate cancer screening. Results from the European Randomized Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, and Göteborg Swedish trials regarding prostate screening are controversial with the ERSPC and Göteborg showing a reduction in prostate cancer mortality and the PLCO trial showing no benefit. Recommendations from the American Urological Association (AUA), Japanese Urological Association (JUA), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) have recommended that all men obtain a baseline PSA beginning at age 40. The American Cancer Society (ACS) stratifies screening recommendations based on age and risk, but states that screening should take place only after an informed discussion between provider and patient. The United States Preventative Health Service Task Force (USPSTF) states that evidence is insufficient to assess the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening in men younger than 75 years. Other major international health organizations offer a similar reserved approach or recommend against screening for prostate cancer. Most groups indicate that screening to determine who should undergo prostate biopsy typically includes both a serum PSA and digital rectal examination, with the latest ACS publications noting that the rectal exam is optional. A common theme from all groups is that an informed discussion with the patients is strongly recommended and that screening does increase the number of men diagnosed with non

  16. Physical activity, screen time and obesity status in a nationally representative sample of Maltese youth with international comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decelis, Andrew; Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R

    2014-06-28

    There is some evidence that physical activity (PA), sedentary time and screen time (ST) are associated with childhood obesity, but research is inconclusive and studies are mainly based on self-reported data. The literature is dominated by data from North American countries and there is a shortage of objective data from Malta which has one of the highest prevalences of childhood obesity in the world. The aims of this study were to assess the PA levels and ST patterns of Maltese boys and girls and how they compared with children in other countries while also examining differences in PA and ST by weight status. A nationally representative sample of 1126 Maltese boys and girls aged 10-11 years, of which 811 provided complete data. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometry, and ST by questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from measured height and weight. Only 39% of boys and 10% of girls met the recommendation of one hour of daily MVPA. Comparison with international data indicated that mean MVPA (58.1 min for boys; 41.7 min for girls) was higher than in North America and Australia, but lower than in England. Girls were less active than boys at all measured times and spent less time in ST. A quarter of the children exceeded guidelines of two hours of TV on weekends, and double the amount on weekdays. Obese children were less active than normal weight children on weekdays and on weekends, reaching significance during the period after school, and they spent more time in ST than their normal weight counterparts. A low percentage of Maltese 10-11 year olds, particularly girls, reached the recommended levels of daily MVPA and spent large amounts of time engaged in screen time. Obese children were less active than non-obese children. As children spend most of their waking time at school and that activity during this time is less than one third of the daily requirements, aiming to increase MVPA at school for all Maltese children is likely to be an important

  17. Global Flows in Local Language Planning: Articulating Parallel Language Use in Swedish University Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Francis M.; Källkvist, Marie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the language policies of three Swedish universities are examined as instances of language planning in local contexts. Although Sweden has the national Language Act of 2009 (SFS 2009:600) as well as a general Higher Education Ordinance (SFS 1993:100; SFS 2014:1096), language planning for higher education is left to the purview of…

  18. Thinking and Caring about Indigenous Peoples' Human Rights: Swedish Students Writing History beyond Scholarly Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to national and international guidelines, schools should promote historical thinking and foster moral values. Scholars have debated, but not analysed in depth in practice, whether history education can and should hold a normative dimension. This study analyses current human rights education in two Swedish senior high school groups, in…

  19. Swedish PE Teachers' Understandings of Legitimate Movement in a Criterion-Referenced Grading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svennberg, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Background: Physical Education (PE) has been associated with a multi-activity model in which movement is related to sport discourses and sport techniques. However, as in many international contexts, the Swedish national PE syllabus calls for a wider and more inclusive concept of movement. Complex movement adapted to different settings is valued,…

  20. Teaching of Chemical Bonding: A Study of Swedish and South African Students' Conceptions of Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmermark, Anders; Ohrstrom, Lars; Mårtensson, Jerker; Davidowitz, Bette

    2016-01-01

    Almost 700 Swedish and South African students from the upper secondary school and first-term chemistry university level responded to our survey on concepts of chemical bonding. The national secondary school curricula and most common textbooks for both countries were also surveyed and compared for their content on chemical bonding. Notable…

  1. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a health risk and ecological risk screening analysis for Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) using available data to identify contaminants and environmental pathways that will require either further investigation or immediate consideration for remediation based on the screening indices. The screening analysis will also identify contaminants that can be assigned a low priority for further investigation and those that require additional data.

  2. Cervical and breast cancer screening participation for women with chronic conditions in France: results from a national health survey

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinou, Panayotis; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Menvielle, Gwenn

    2016-01-01

    Background Comorbidity at the time of diagnosis is an independent prognostic factor for survival among women suffering from cervical or breast cancer. Although cancer screening practices have proven their efficacy for mortality reduction, little is known about adherence to screening recommendations for women suffering from chronic conditions. We investigated the association between eleven chronic conditions and adherence to cervical and breast cancer screening recommendations in France. Metho...

  3. Breast Cancer Screening Programmes across the WHO European Region: Differences among Countries Based on National Income Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emma; Rapacchietta, Leonardo; Angeletti, Paolo Matteo; Barbante, Luca; Profeta, Filippo Valerio; Fagnano, Roberto

    2017-04-23

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent tumour affecting women all over the world. In low- and middle-income countries, where its incidence is expected to rise further, BC seems set to become a public health emergency. The aim of the present study is to provide a systematic review of current BC screening programmes in WHO European Region to identify possible patterns. Multiple correspondence analysis was performed to evaluate the association among: measures of occurrence; GNI level; type of BC screening programme; organization of public information and awareness campaigns regarding primary prevention of modifiable risk factors; type of BC screening services; year of screening institution; screening coverage and data quality. A key difference between High Income (HI) and Low and Middle Income (LMI) States, emerging from the present data, is that in the former screening programmes are well organized, with approved screening centres, the presence of mobile units to increase coverage, the offer of screening tests free of charge; the fairly high quality of occurrence data based on high-quality sources, and the adoption of accurate methods to estimate incidence and mortality. In conclusion, the governments of LMI countries should allocate sufficient resources to increase screening participation and they should improve the accuracy of incidence and mortality rates.

  4. Breast Cancer Screening Programmes across the WHO European Region: Differences among Countries Based on National Income Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Altobelli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most frequent tumour affecting women all over the world. In low- and middle-income countries, where its incidence is expected to rise further, BC seems set to become a public health emergency. The aim of the present study is to provide a systematic review of current BC screening programmes in WHO European Region to identify possible patterns. Multiple correspondence analysis was performed to evaluate the association among: measures of occurrence; GNI level; type of BC screening programme; organization of public information and awareness campaigns regarding primary prevention of modifiable risk factors; type of BC screening services; year of screening institution; screening coverage and data quality. A key difference between High Income (HI and Low and Middle Income (LMI States, emerging from the present data, is that in the former screening programmes are well organized, with approved screening centres, the presence of mobile units to increase coverage, the offer of screening tests free of charge; the fairly high quality of occurrence data based on high-quality sources, and the adoption of accurate methods to estimate incidence and mortality. In conclusion, the governments of LMI countries should allocate sufficient resources to increase screening participation and they should improve the accuracy of incidence and mortality rates.

  5. Cognitive ability and personality as predictors of participation in a national colorectal cancer screening programme: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R; Deary, Ian J; Wardle, Jane; Zaninotto, Paola; Batty, G David

    2015-06-01

    The English NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme has offered biennial faecal occult blood testing to people aged 60-69 years since 2006, and to those aged 60-74 years since 2010. Analysis of the first 2.6 million screening invitations found that 54% of eligible people took up the invitation. The reasons for this low uptake are unclear. We investigated whether participation in screening varies according to cognitive ability and personality. Participants were members of The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. In 2010-2011, respondents were asked about participation in bowel cancer screening, and cognitive ability and the 'Big Five' personality traits were assessed. Logistic regression was used to examine the cross-sectional relationships between cognitive ability and personality and screening participation in 2681 people aged 60-75 years who were eligible to have been invited to take part in the UK national screening programme for bowel cancer. In age-adjusted and sex-adjusted analyses, better cognition and higher conscientiousness were associated with increased participation in cancer screening. ORs (95% CIs) per SD increase were 1.10 (1.03 to 1.18) for cognitive ability and 1.10 (1.01 to 1.19) for conscientiousness. After further adjustment for household wealth and health literacy-shown previously to be associated with participation-these associations were attenuated (ORs were 1.07 (1.00 to 1.15) and 1.07 (0.97 to 1.18), respectively). We found some indication that better cognitive function and greater conscientiousness may be linked with a slightly increased likelihood of participation in bowel cancer screening. These relationships need investigation in other cohorts of older people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Physical and meteorological data collected from current meters and other instruments from Swedish Lightships from 1860 to 1989 (NODC Accession 0113242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lightships were placed along the Swedish coast to lead the Mariners from 1844 to 1972. From 1860 routine measurements of meteorological and oceanographic...

  7. Cancer risk factors and screening in the off-reserve First Nations, Métis and non-Aboriginal populations of Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withrow, D R; Amartey, A; Marrett, L D

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the prevalence of smoking, obesity, sedentary behaviour/physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption and alcohol use as well as the uptake of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening among First Nations and Métis adults in Ontario and compares these to that of the non-Aboriginal population. We used the Canadian Community Health Survey (2007 to 2011 combined) to calculate prevalence estimates for the 3 ethnocultural populations. First Nations and Métis adults were significantly more likely than non-Aboriginal adults to self-report smoking and/or to be classified as obese. Alcohol use exceeding cancer prevention recommendations and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption were more common in First Nations people than in the non-Aboriginal population. First Nations women were more likely to report having had a Fecal Occult Blood Test in the previous 2 years than non-Aboriginal women. No significant differences across the 3 ethnocultural groups were found for breast and cervical screening among women or colorectal screening among men. Without intervention, we are likely to continue to see a significant burden of smoking- and obesity-related cancers in Ontario's Aboriginal population.

  8. The Vancouver Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model: Assessment by Using a Subset of the National Lung Screening Trial Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles S; Dharaiya, Ekta; Campbell, Erin; Boroczky, Lilla

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To assess the likelihood of malignancy among a subset of nodules in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) by using a risk calculator based on nodule and patient characteristics. Materials and Methods All authors received approval for use of NLST data. An institutional review board exemption and a waiver for informed consent were granted to the author with an academic appointment. Nodule characteristics and patient attributes with regard to benign and malignant nodules in the NLST were applied to a nodule risk calculator from a group in Vancouver, Canada. Patient populations and their nodule characteristics were compared between the NLST and Vancouver cohorts. Multiple thresholds were tested to distinguish benign nodules from malignant nodules. An optimized threshold value was used to determine positive and negative predictive values, and a full logistic regression model was applied to the NLST data set. Results Sufficient data were available for 4431 nodules (4315 benign nodules and 116 malignant nodules) from the NLST data set. The NLST and Vancouver data sets differed in that the former included fewer nodules per study, fewer nonsolid nodules, and more nodule spiculation and emphysema. A composite risk score threshold of 10% was determined to be optimal, demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 85.3%, 93.9%, 27.4%, and 99.6%, respectively. The receiver operating characteristic curve for the full regression model applied to the NLST database demonstrated an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.963 (95% confidence interval: 0.945, 0.974). Conclusion Application of an NLST data subset to the Vancouver risk calculator yielded a high discriminant value, which supports the use of a risk calculator method as a valuable approach to distinguish between benign and malignant nodules. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  9. MRI screening for breast cancer in women with familial or genetic predisposition : design of the Dutch National Study (MRISC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M; Brekelmans, C T; Boetes, C; Rutgers, E J; Oosterwijk, J C; Tollenaar, R A; Manoliu, R A; Holland, R; de Koning, H J; Klijn, J G

    2001-01-01

    Mammography screening of women aged 50-70 years for breast cancer has proven to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality. There is no consensus about the value of breast cancer screening in women aged 40-49 years. Five to ten per cent of all breast cancers are hereditary. One of the options

  10. Active play and screen time in US children aged 4 to 11 years in relation to sociodemographic and weight status characteristics: a nationally representative cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Must Aviva

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of childhood obesity underscores the importance of monitoring population trends in children's activity and screen time, and describing associations with child age, gender, race/ethnicity, and weight status. Our objective was to estimate the proportion of young children in the US who have low levels of active play or high levels of screen time, or who have both these behaviors, and to describe associations with age, gender, race/ethnicity, and weight status. Methods We analyzed data collected during the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2001–2004, a US nationally representative cross-sectional study. We studied 2964 children aged 4.00 to 11.99 years. Our main outcomes were reported weekly times that the child played or exercised hard enough to sweat or breathe hard (active play, daily hours the child watched television/videos, used computers, or played computer games (screen time, and the combination of low active play and high screen time. Low active play was defined as active play 6 times or less per week. High screen time was defined as more than 2 hours per day. We accounted for the complex survey design in analyses and report proportions and 95% confidence intervals. We used Wald Chi-square to test for differences between proportions. To identify factors associated with low active play and high screen time, we used multivariate logistic regression. Results Of US children aged 4 to 11 years, 37.3% (95% confidence interval, 34.1% to 40.4% had low levels of active play, 65.0% (95% CI, 61.4% to 68.5% had high screen time, and 26.3% (95% CI, 23.8% to 28.9% had both these behaviors. Characteristics associated with a higher probability of simultaneously having low active play and high screen time were older age, female gender, non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity, and having a BMI-for-age ≥95th percentile of the CDC growth reference. Conclusion Many young children in the US are reported to

  11. Predictors of work disability after start of anti-TNF therapy in a national cohort of Swedish patients with rheumatoid arthritis: does early anti-TNF therapy bring patients back to work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, T; Petersson, I F; Eriksson, J K; Englund, M; Nilsson, J A; Geborek, P; Jacobsson, L T H; Askling, J; Neovius, M

    2017-07-01

    To examine predictors of work ability gain and loss after anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) start, respectively, in working-age patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a special focus on disease duration. Patients with RA, aged 19-62 years, starting their first TNF inhibitor 2006-2009 with full work ability (0 sick leave/disability pension days during 3 months before bio-start; n=1048) or no work ability (90 days; n=753) were identified in the Swedish biologics register (Anti-Rheumatic Treatment In Sweden, ARTIS) and sick leave/disability pension days retrieved from the Social Insurance Agency. Outcome was defined as work ability gain ≥50% for patients without work ability at bio-start and work ability loss ≥50% for patients with full work ability, and survival analyses conducted. Baseline predictors including disease duration, age, sex, education level, employment, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Disease Activity Score 28 and relevant comorbidities were estimated using Cox regression. During 3 years after anti-TNF start, the probability of regaining work ability for totally work-disabled patients was 35% for those with disease duration start, disease duration did not predict work ability loss. Baseline disability pension was also a strong predictor of work ability gain after treatment start. A substantial proportion of work-disabled patients with RA who start anti-TNF therapy regain work ability. Those initiating treatment within 5 years of symptom onset have a more than doubled 3-year probability of regaining work ability compared with later treatment starts. This effect seems largely due to the impact of disease duration on disability pension status. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Evaluation of family history as a risk factor and screening tool for detecting undiagnosed diabetes in a nationally representative survey population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Susan; Yoon, Paula W; Moonesinghe, Ramal; Valdez, Rodolfo; Khoury, Muin J

    2006-12-01

    We examined the utility of a three-level familial risk stratification system as a screening tool for diabetes in a nationally representative sample of the U.S. adult population. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data were used to assess the prevalence and distribution of familial risk for diabetes, the association between three levels of familial risk and undiagnosed diabetes, and the use of familial risk as a screening tool for diabetes, alone and in combination with body mass index and age. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 3% and increased with increasing familial risk (average = 2%, moderate = 4%, high = 10%). High familial risk was significantly associated with undiagnosed diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.9-11.3). The use of a three-tiered familial risk stratification for diabetes screening yielded higher specificity (94%) and positive predictive value (9.9%) for high familial risk than body mass index > or = 25 (specificity = 38%, positive predictive value = 4.2%). High familial risk and body mass index > or = 25 combined had higher specificity (97%) and positive predictive value (13.4%); the addition of age > or = 45 years further improved positive predictive value (21.0%) without reducing specificity. There was a strong and proportional association between familial risk and undiagnosed diabetes, suggesting that a three-tiered assessment of familial diabetes risk may increase the effectiveness of diabetes screening.

  13. Swedish health care in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O W

    1992-01-01

    The evolution and current problems of the Swedish health services are placed in an international comparative perspective with other industrially developed democratic states as to cost control, distribution of facilities and personnel, management of waiting lists for services, and differences in use of services. All of these countries are experiencing the same aforementioned problems differing mainly in degree. It is suggested that Sweden as well as other countries needs to reconceptualize the meaning of equality of access relative to the apparent emergence of private insurance as waiting lists grow for quality of life procedures such as lens and hip replacement. A concept of a basic service for everybody and so-called luxury service for those who wish to buy it needs to be faced in political debate. It is clear that government is unable to finance and supply the range of demand of a consumption good represented by a modern medicine. In so far as Sweden has been regarded as a model it appears that no country is a model anymore. The complexities of a modern health service has overwhelmed all countries and can be regarded as a sublime loss of innocence.

  14. The Swedish personal identity number: possibilities and pitfalls in healthcare and medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Otterblad-Olausson, Petra; Pettersson, Birgitta U; Ekbom, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Swedish health care and national health registers are dependent on the presence of a unique identifier. This paper describes the Swedish personal identity number (PIN) and explores ethical issues of its use in medical research. A ten-digit-PIN is maintained by the National Tax Board for all individuals that have resided in Sweden since 1947. Until January 2008, an estimated 75,638 individuals have changed PIN. The most common reasons for change of PIN are incorrect recording of date of birth or sex among immigrants or newborns. Although uncommon, change of sex always leads to change of PIN since the PIN is sex-specific. The most common reasons for re-use of PIN (n = 15,887), is when immigrants are assigned a PIN that has previously been assigned to someone else. This is sometimes necessary since there is a shortage of certain PIN combinations referring to dates of birth in the 1950s and 1960s. Several ethical issues can be raised pro and con the use of PIN in medical research. The Swedish PIN is a useful tool for linkages between medical registers and allows for virtually 100% coverage of the Swedish health care system. We suggest that matching of registers through PIN and matching of national health registers without the explicit approval of the individual patient is to the benefit for both the individual patient and for society.

  15. Cholesterol screening in US adults and awareness of high cholesterol among individuals with severe hypertriglyceridemia: National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Jennifer Briley; Bourgeois, Nancy Ellen; Lowe, Kimberly Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol screening is an effective method for identifying individuals with elevated triglyceride levels. Individuals with severe hypertriglyceridemia (SHTG; ≥500 mg/dL) have a substantially higher risk for developing coronary heart disease and acute pancreatitis than individuals with lower triglyceride levels. The aims of this study were to estimate the proportion of US adults who reported having their cholesterol checked, to evaluate the characteristics associated with having cholesterol checked, and to assess factors that are associated with awareness of having high cholesterol among adults with SHTG. The sample included 7988 adults who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2001-2008. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to identify factors that were associated with time since the last cholesterol screening, categorized as never screened, screened less than 2 years ago, and screened 2 or more years ago. Approximately 71% of the US adults reported ever having their cholesterol checked. Only 56% of the individuals with SHTG were aware of having high cholesterol. Factors associated with awareness of high cholesterol among those with SHTG included obesity, education, having insurance, having diabetes, and having a history of cardiovascular events. Most adults in the United States have had their cholesterol checked; however, only half of those with SHTG were aware of having high cholesterol. Awareness is the first step in implementing strategies to attenuate the health risks associated with dyslipidemia.

  16. Can a national lung cancer screening program in combination with smoking cessation policies cause an early decrease in tobacco deaths in Italy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Giulia; Gorini, Giuseppe; Paci, Eugenio

    2012-06-01

    Objective is to predict smoking attributable deaths (SAD) for lung cancer and all causes in Italy, 2015 to 2040, assuming a yet unimplemented tobacco control policies (TCP) and a national, low-dose, lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) annual screening program (CT screen). A dynamic model describing the evolution of smoking habits was developed to estimate quit rates, 1986 to 2009, and to predict SAD under different scenarios: keeping the status quo; raising cigarette taxes by 20%; implementing cessation treatment policies (funding treatment, setting up an active quitline, promoting counseling among health professionals); introducing a three-round annual CT screen for current and former heavy smokers aged 55 to 74, 70% compliance, 20% lung cancer mortality reduction; combining all the above-mentioned measures. The CT screen brought a 3.0% constant annual reduction in lung cancer SAD and decreased or postponed all-cause SAD by 1.7% annually (a half due to respiratory diseases), relative to the status quo scenario. The effect was noticeable after few years from its introduction. TCP showed a steadily strengthening effect starting from 5 to 10 years after implementation. The lung cancer and all-cause SAD under cessation treatment policies, for instance, were reduced by 8.4% and 12.0% in 2030, respectively, and by 16.1% and 20.0% in 2040. TCP gave a greater effect than CT screen in reducing all-cause SAD because cessation brought about a reduction in smoking-related SAD other than lung cancer and respiratory diseases. Combining TCP and CT screen could bring about an early decrease in lung cancer and respiratory disease SAD due to CT screen, followed by a more substantial drop in all-cause SAD in subsequent decades due to TCP. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Transition from film to digital mammography: impact for breast cancer screening through the national breast and cervical cancer early detection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; van Lier, Lisanne; Schechter, Clyde B; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Royalty, Janet; Miller, Jacqueline W; Near, Aimee M; Cronin, Kathleen A; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A M; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; de Koning, Harry J

    2015-05-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides mammograms and diagnostic services for low-income, uninsured women aged 40-64 years. Mammography facilities within the NBCCEDP gradually shifted from plain-film to digital mammography. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of replacing film with digital mammography on health effects (deaths averted, life-years gained [LYG]); costs (for screening and diagnostics); and number of women reached. NBCCEDP 2010 data and data representative of the program's target population were used in two established microsimulation models. Models simulated observed screening behavior including different screening intervals (annual, biennial, irregular) and starting ages (40, 50 years) for white, black, and Hispanic women. Model runs were performed in 2012. The models predicted 8.0-8.3 LYG per 1,000 film screens for black women, 5.9-7.5 for white women, and 4.0-4.5 for Hispanic women. For all race/ethnicity groups, digital mammography had more LYG than film mammography (2%-4%), but had higher costs (34%-35%). Assuming a fixed budget, 25%-26% fewer women could be served, resulting in 22%-24% fewer LYG if all mammograms were converted to digital. The loss in LYG could be reversed to an 8%-13% increase by only including biennial screening. Digital could result in slightly more LYG than film mammography. However, with a fixed budget, fewer women may be served with fewer LYG. Changes in the program, such as only including biennial screening, will increase LYG/screen and could offset the potential decrease in LYG when shifting to digital mammography. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of Obesity and Mobility Disability in Access to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in France: Results from the National Health and Disability Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Clémence Bussière; Jonathan Sicsic; Nathalie Pelletier-Fleury

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to disentangle the effects of obesity and mobility limitation on cervical and breast cancer screening among community dwelling women. METHODS: The data source was the French national Health and Disability Survey - Household Section, 2008. The Body Mass Index (BMI) was used to categorize obesity status. We constructed a continuous score of mobility limitations to assess the severity of disability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84). Logistic regressions were performed to examine the...

  19. Swedish Seafarers' Commitment to Work in Times of Flagging out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hult

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study takes its departure in the difficulties to recruit and retain qualified senior seafarers in the Swedish shipping sector. The study focus is on seafarers' motivation at work for the specific shipping company (organizational commitment, and seafarers' motivation towards their occupation (occupational commitment, in times of flagging out. It was hypothesized that the youngest seafarers and the oldest may be most sensitive to foreign registration of ships. Statistical analyses were employed, using a survey material of 1,309 Swedish seafarers randomly collected in 2010 from a national register of seafarers. The results of the analyses show that flagging-out imposes a significant decline in organizational commitment for all seafarers. This decline is related to the perception of the social composition of crew. In addition, the oldest seafarers (age 55+ demonstrate diminished occupational commitment under a foreign flag. This decline is related to the degree of satisfaction with the social security structure. Occupational commitment among the youngest seafarers (age 19-30 is not affected by the nationality of flag. However, this type of commitment is decreasing by the time served on the same ship. This effect is partly related to a decline in satisfaction with the work content. In the concluding discussion, the findings are discussed in more details and recommendations are put forward.

  20. Cancer screening rate in people with diabetes in the Korean population: results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumban Walter Chuck

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To investigate the screening rates for gastric, breast, and cervical cancer in people with diabetes compared with people without diabetes. METHODS Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009 were used. Cancer-free men who were 40 years old and over and cancer-free women who were 30 years old and over were included. The lifetime screening rate and regular screening rate were compared in people with and without diabetes. RESULTS Fewer people with diabetes than people without diabetes had ever received cancer screening (53.5 vs. 59.5%, p<0.001 for gastric cancer; 60.5 vs. 71.5%, p<0.001 for breast cancer; and 49.1 vs. 59.6%, p<0.001 for cervical cancer. Fewer people with diabetes than people without diabetes received the recommended screenings for gastric cancer (38.9 vs. 42.9%, p<0.001, breast cancer (38.8 vs. 44.6%, p<0.001, and cervical cancer (35.1 vs. 51.2%, p<0.001. In subgroup analyses according to socioeconomic factors, the lifetime and recommended screening rates were lower in the diabetic population in most socioeconomic subgroups. In the multivariate analysis adjusted for socioeconomic factors, people with diabetes showed lower lifetime screening rates for gastric and cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 0.9 and OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.9, and lower regular screening rates for breast and cervical cancer (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.9 and OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9. CONCLUSIONS The cancer screening rate in people with diabetes was lower than in people without diabetes. Considering the higher cancer risk in people with diabetes, efforts to increase the screening rate in this high-risk population should be implemented.

  1. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis: whom and how?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Götz (Hannelore)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractChlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infections are sexually transmitted, often asymptomatic, and may lead to reduced fertility in women. Available sensitive detection methods on urine and effective single-dose treatment have made home-based screening for Ct infections feasible. In Swedish

  2. Governance of Swedish school mathematics — where and how did it happen? A study of different modes of governance in Swedish school mathematics, 1910-1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Prytz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to revise a standard narrative about governance of the Swedish school system in the period of 1910-1908. According to this narrative, the Swedish school system was centralized during this period. However, this narrative does not fit the history of Swedish mathematics education (years 1-9. The research questions are: where in the school system was change initiated and how was change enforced? On the basis of studies of syllabi, textbooks, teaching literature, teacher journals and reports from investigations and development projects, different modes of governance of school mathematics are identified. The main results are that textbook producers rather than national syllabi and exams were drivers of change in the period 1910-1960. Moreover, the centralized attempts to change school mathematics, prepared in the 1960s, were soon abandoned in the early 1970s. Thus, centralized governance of Swedish school mathematics, with the ambition to achieve change, was something that took effect relatively late and during a very short period of time.

  3. Position paper on screening for breast cancer by the European Society of Breast Imaging (EUSOBI) and 30 national breast radiology bodies from Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Aase, Hildegunn S; Álvarez, Marina

    2017-01-01

    be given to population screening programmes on a territorial basis, with double reading. Adoption of digital mammography (not film-screen or phosphor-plate computer radiography) is a priority, which also improves sensitivity in dense breasts. Radiologists qualified as screening readers should be involved...... national breast radiology bodies support screening mammography. • A first priority is double-reading biennial mammography for women aged 50-69 years. • Extension to 73-75 and from 40-45 to 49 years is also encouraged. • Digital mammography (not film-screen or computer radiography) should be used. • DBT...

  4. Factors associated with breast and cervical cancer screening in Korea: data from a national community health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Soyeun; Jeon, Young-Jee; Oh, Myungju

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated factors associated with breast and cervical cancer screening using data from a nationwide community survey. A nationwide cross-sectional study was performed in all 253 administrative districts of Korea. The breast and cervical cancer screening rate was negatively associated with the obesity (β = -2.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -4.73 to -1.03; β = -1.93, 95% CI = -3.43 to -0.43), positively associated with the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions scale (β =2.53, 95% CI = 0.24 to 4.81; β = 2.51, 95% CI = 0.68 to 4.34). Moreover, higher alcohol consumption rate was negatively related to screening rates for breast cancer, while areas with higher proportion of diabetes were found to have higher screening rates. Area with higher rate of osteoarthritis had a lower screening rate for cervical cancer. This study showed breast and cervical cancer screening was associated with particular area characteristics. This ecological approach is thought to be a major complement to measures of health attributes.

  5. Quality of cholesterol screening and management with respect to the National Cholesterol Education's Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATPIII) guideline in primary care practices in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Alain G; Bonds, Denise E; Steffes, Susan; Jackson, Eric; Crago, Lenore; Balasubramanyam, Aarthi; Chen, Haiying; Goff, David C

    2006-10-01

    Adherence to previous national cholesterol guidelines has been low. We assessed whether lipid screening and management was consistent with the National Cholesterol Education's ATPIII in a sample of primary care practices participating in a quality improvement study. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from charts of 5071 patients aged 21 to 84 years, which were seen between June 1, 2001, and May 31, 2003, at 60 practices. Clinical sites were non-university-based primary care practices from 22 North Carolina counties. A dyslipidemia screening test was defined as a lipid profile performed on persons when not on a lipid-lowering drug. Among patients receiving a lipid profile, the proportion of patients appropriately treated, per ATPIII, was calculated. Practice level variation in screening and management was examined using the 50th (20th and 80th) percentile values across practices. The median practice level dyslipidemia screening rate during the 2 years was 40.1% (25.8%, 53.7%) of their age-eligible patients. The appropriate decision regarding lipid-lowering therapy was documented within 4 months of the lipid profile for 79.3% (69.0%, 86.0%) of practices' patients. Within 4 months, among the drug-ineligible patients, 100% (94%, 100%) were not prescribed drugs; 33.3% (6.3%, 50.0%) of the drug-eligible patients were prescribed lipid-lowering agents. The median dyslipidemia screening rate met the recommendations. There remains a need to improve the management of dyslipidemia; in particular, there was a significant underprescription of lipid-lowering drugs.

  6. Reasons for accepting or declining Down syndrome screening in Dutch prospective mothers within the context of national policy and healthcare system characteristics: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombag, Neeltje M T H; Boeije, Hennie; Iedema-Kuiper, Rita; Schielen, Peter C J I; Visser, Gerard H A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2016-05-26

    Uptake rates for Down syndrome screening in the Netherlands are low compared to other European countries. To investigate the low uptake, we explored women's reasons for participation and possible influences of national healthcare system characteristics. Dutch prenatal care is characterised by an approach aimed at a low degree of medicalisation, with pregnant women initially considered to be at low risk. Prenatal screening for Down syndrome is offered to all women, with a 'right not to know' for women who do not want to be informed on this screening. At the time this study was performed, the test was not reimbursed for women aged 35 and younger. We conducted a qualitative study to explore reasons for participation and possible influences of healthcare system characteristics. Data were collected via ten semi-structured focus groups with women declining or accepting the offer of Down syndrome screening (n = 46). All focus groups were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim, coded and content analysed. Women declining Down syndrome screening did not consider Down syndrome a condition severe enough to justify termination of pregnancy. Young women declining felt supported in their decision by perceived confirmation of their obstetric caregiver and reassured by system characteristics (costs and age restriction). Women accepting Down syndrome screening mainly wanted to be reassured or be prepared to care for a child with Down syndrome. By weighing up the pros and cons of testing, obstetric caregivers supported young women who accepted in the decision-making process. This was helpful, although some felt the need to defend their decision to accept the test offer due to their young age. For some young women accepting testing, costs were considered a disincentive to participate. Presentation of prenatal screening affects how the offer is attended to, perceived and utilised. By offering screening with age restriction and additional costs, declining is considered the

  7. Compensation in Swedish infrastructure projects and suggestions on policy improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Persson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental compensation includes a range of activities intended to counterbalance such negative impacts of development projects that remain in the environment after all preventive and corrective measures have been fully implemented. Sweden, being a member state of the European Union (EU, must implement environmental compensation under EU directives such as the Habitat Directive. However, like in other countries, implementation is not yet widespread in Sweden, and new practices and guidelines remain to be developed both nationally and at European level. This need is all the more urgent considering that the European Commission estimates that, within the EU, about 100,000 hectares of land is converted from its natural state each year. The aim of this paper is to describe current environmental-compensation practices in Swedish road and railway projects and to discuss issues of vital importance to the development of compensation policy, such as what to compensate for, how much, and how. A national inventory was performed, for the first time in Sweden, to identify compensation measures in road and railway projects. Data were collected from a national mailing list including 141 officials at county administrative boards (CABs, internal e-mail correspondence within the Swedish Transport Administration and databases of court decisions. The inventory focused on compensation measures ordered by virtue of the Swedish Environmental Code. In addition, two case studies were carried out to investigate the planning of compensation measures. The results showed that CABs and courts rarely order compensation in infrastructure projects, even though this is possible under Swedish law. Between 1999 and 2012, 37 cases (i.e. permits issued were found for which compensation was ordered. Of these cases, 76% concerned compensation for encroachments on minor habitats such as small ponds and cairns. No CAB ordered compensation for non-protected areas. Compensation ratios

  8. Tensions in Stakeholder Relations for a Swedish Football Club

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junghagen, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Swedish football is an industry not yet being as commercial as the big leagues and is regulated in terms of ownership of clubs. This implies a need for management of stakeholder relations for a Swedish football club. This paper identifies important stakeholders in Swedish football and discusses...

  9. Working on an historical dictionary: the Swedish academy dictionary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Working on an historical dictionary: the Swedish academy dictionary project. P Stille, B-O Wendt. Abstract. The Swedish Academy Dictionary is one of the world's largest dictionary projects. Work on it was started in 1884 and it will be completed by 2017. The dictionary describes the written standard language of Swedish ...

  10. Swedish strategies for health and safety in agriculture: a coordinated multiagency approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Peter; Alwall Svennefelt, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Occupational injuries are a major problem in agriculture world-wide. Sweden is developing a national approach to scoordinate different stakeholders with the common goal of reducing injuries in the agricultural sector. The Swedish strategy involves important factors, such as: 1) Collaboration between all stakeholders involved in health and safety in agriculture, 2) A national programme on injury prevention, 3) Coordination of actions and 4) Knowledge, attitude and behaviour in focus. This approach is being coordinated through the Swedish Committee on Working Environment (LAMK), a network acting to achieve a good, healthy and safe working environment in Swedish agriculture. The Committee consists of representatives of authorities, institutions, companies, research and education institutions and organisations working in the green sector. The Swedish model will be evaluated as a whole concept on its effect on the frequency of injuries in the agricultural industry in the beginning of 2014. Promising results has been shown in evaluations of minor parts. This coordinated approach has been applied in others countries (United States and New Zealand) as well and seems like an efficient way of using limited resources to achieve higher impact on a specific problems such as occupational injuries in agriculture.

  11. Asymptomatic breast cancer in non-participants of the national screening programme in Norway: a confounding factor in evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Solveig R; Klepp, Olbjørn; Hofvind, Solveig

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the extent and histopathological characteristics of asymptomatic breast cancer detected outside the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in women targeted by the programme. Our study included 568 primary breast cancers (523 invasive and 45 ductal carcinoma in situ) diagnosed in 553 women aged 50-70, residing in Møre og Romsdal County, 2002-2008. The cancers were divided into screening-detected cancers in the NBCSP, interval cancers (ICs) and cancers detected in women not participating in the NBCSP (never participated and lapsed attendees), and further into asymptomatic and symptomatic cancers. Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) was used for comparisons across the groups and the distributions were compared using chi-square tests for statistical significance. Twenty percent (19/97) of the ICs and 32% (69/213) of the breast cancers in non-participants were asymptomatic, with opportunistic screening as the most frequent detection method (42%, 8/19 for ICs and 54%, 37/69 for non-participants). There were no differences in distribution of NPI prognostic categories across subgroups of asymptomatic invasive cancers (screening-detected cancers in the NBCSP, asymptomatic ICs and asymptomatic cancers in non-participants) or between subgroups of symptomatic invasive cancers (symptomatic ICs and symptomatic cancers in non-participants). Asymptomatic cancers had a significantly more favourable distribution of NPI prognostic categories compared with symptomatic cancers (P breast cancers detected outside the organized screening programme were asymptomatic, with a prognostic profile comparable with screening-detected breast cancers in the NBCSP. Individual data regarding the detection method for all breast cancers are needed for a complete evaluation of the organized screening programme in Norway.

  12. Phonology of a southern Swedish idiolect

    OpenAIRE

    Svantesson, Jan-Olof

    2001-01-01

    In this egocentric article I describe briefly the segmental phonology of my own southern Swedish idiolect. I grew up in Getinge in central Halland, about 20 km north of Halmstad, speaking a regional variant of southern Standard Swedish. Although my dialect has certainly changed somewhat after I moved to Lund in 1964 at the age of 20, I believe that I still retain the basic pronunciation of vowels and consonants from my original dialect. There is one older description of the Getinge dialect by...

  13. Market reforms in Swedish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diderichsen, Finn

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the main characteristics of reforms in the Swedish health services, as exemplified by the "Stockholm Model" introduced in 1992 in Stockholm county. The author discusses the motives behind these reforms, the already-evident increases in costs that are occurring, and the effect...... of these reforms on public support for the welfare state.......This report presents the main characteristics of reforms in the Swedish health services, as exemplified by the "Stockholm Model" introduced in 1992 in Stockholm county. The author discusses the motives behind these reforms, the already-evident increases in costs that are occurring, and the effect...

  14. Speaking with forked tongues - Swedish public administration and the European employment strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Casula Vifell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand how decision making processes within the EU comes to affect the structures for national policy making within the employment field. The paper addresses the question of how the process of writing new employment guidelines for the EES – European employment strategy, has affected the work of the Swedish public administration. Through applying a neo-institutionalist perspective, it contributes to the understanding of effects that the increased embededness of states, often characterized as Europeanization, invoke on national administrations. I argue that the way the process has been managed can be analyzed from an organizational perspective where conflicting demands on the Swedish state has led to a certain organization of the work activities. On the one hand, Swedish representatives have to act according to the norms of the European cooperation in order to be seen as a legitimate actor. On the other hand, EU and European influence on Swedish employment policy is not a legitimate concept at national level. In order to satisfy these two seemingly incompatible demands the organizing principle of decoupling is being used to create space for maneuvering for the administration. However, through participation at EU-level organizational identities are partly transformed which in time leads to a situation where changed practices are not met by changes in formal structures. As a consequence the Swedish representatives are in a manner ‘speaking with forked tongue’ and obscuring the new way in which policy making is conducted thus introducing democratic shortcomings in terms of transparency and accountability.

  15. Health workforce planning and service expansion during an economic crisis: A case study of the national breast screening programme in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S M; Tyrrell, E; Johnson, B; Healy, O; Perry, I J; Normand, C

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to estimate the workforce and resource implications of the proposed age extension of the national breast screening programme, under the economic constraints of reduced health budgets and staffing levels in the Irish health system. Using a mixed method design, a purposive sample of 20 participants were interviewed and data were analysed thematically (June-September 2012). Quantitative data (programme-level activity data, screening activity, staffing levels and screening plans) were used to model potential workload and resource requirements. The analysis indicates that over 90% operational efficiency was achieved throughout the first six months of 2012. Accounting for maternity leave (10%) and sick leave (3.5%), 16.1 additional radiographers (whole time equivalent) would be required for the workload created by the age extension of the screening programme, at 90% operational efficiency. The results suggest that service expansion is possible with relatively minimal additional radiography resources if the efficiency of the skill mix and the use of equipment are improved. Investing in the appropriate skill mix should not be limited to clinical groups but should also include administrative staff to manage and support the service. Workload modelling may contribute to improved health workforce planning and service efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of Electronic Health Record Use and Patient-Centered Communication on Cancer Screening Behavior: An Analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzkay, Daniel; Silk, Kami J; Sheff, Sarah E

    2017-07-01

    The present study used the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 3185) to examine the effects of patient-centered communication (PCC) and the use of electronic health records (EHRs) on the likelihood of patients receiving a recommended screening for cancer (i.e., mammogram, PSA test). Self-determination theory, a framework of self-initiated extrinsic behaviors, was applied to test mediation models of PCC and EHR use, respectively, through patient activation. The results demonstrated that PCC and EHR use predicted cancer screening (mediated through patient activation), but only for women recommended for biannual mammograms. The aforementioned relationship was not found for men who are recommended for prostate cancer screening. PCC and EHRs do appear to facilitate a patient's ability to take care of their own health, but only under certain circumstances. It was additionally found that men were more likely to report higher degrees of physician PCC when their physicians maintained an EHR, whereas women reported no difference. Future research should examine more nuanced personality factors that affect the perception of PCC in the presence of EHRs and the relationship between men's activation and likelihood of receiving a cancer screen.

  17. Cultural Aspects when Implementing Lean Production and Lean Product Development – Experiences from a Swedish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promporn Wangwacharakul

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lean principles and methods, originating in a Japanese cultural context, have spread to a large number of companies throughout the world. The aim of this case study research is to identify and compare national cultural aspects that influence Lean Production and Lean Product Development implementation in Swedish companies. Data were collected through questionnaires, interviews and an industrial workshop with Swedish Lean practitioners. The study shows that some sub-areas in Lean, such as value definition, control systems, leadership, team development, knowledge management, and strategies, are highly dependent on contextual factors related to human, cultural and organizational aspects. These are related to the national culture and should be considered to a higher extent for successful sustainable implementation of Lean in different cultural contexts. As for implementing Lean in Sweden, national cultural characteristics, such as individualism, autonomy and supportive management style fit well with Lean thinking.

  18. Evaluation of Frequency-Doubling Technology Perimetry as a Means of Screening for Glaucoma and Other Eye Diseases Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael V; Gupta, Priya; Ko, Fang; Zhao, Di; Guallar, Eliseo; Friedman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a significant cause of global blindness and there are, as yet, no effective means of screening. To assess the potential role of frequency-doubling technology (FDT) perimetry in screening for glaucoma using data collected as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Reanalysis of cross-sectional data of 6797 participants in the 2005-2008 cycles of the NHANES, which evaluated a sample of the noninstitutionalized US population with at least light-perception vision. A subset of optic nerve photographs were regraded by 3 glaucoma specialists in December 2012. Each participant underwent visual field testing, including FDT perimetry screening, and had fundus photographs taken. Sensitivity and specificity of FDT perimetry to detect glaucoma, macular disease, or decreased visual acuity. A total of 5746 NHANES participants had optic images originally graded. We regraded 1201 images of 1073 eyes of 548 participants with initial cup-disc ratio (CDR) of 0.6 or greater and 423 images of 360 eyes of 180 randomly selected participants with initial CDR less than 0.6. Diagnoses of glaucoma by disc photograph were 1.6% (3 of 180) in the CDR less than 0.6 group and 31.4% (172 of 548) in the CDR of 0.6 or greater group. The sensitivity of FDT was 33% (95% CI, 0%-87%) and specificity was 77% (95% CI, 71%-84%). For the group with at least 1 CDR of 0.6 or greater, sensitivity of FDT was 66% (95% CI, 59%-73%) and specificity was 70% (95% CI, 66%-75%). When analyzed to give FDT credit for identifying glaucoma, macular disease, or decreased visual acuity, the sensitivity of the test was 80% (95% CI, 77%-83%) and the specificity was 83% (95% CI, 82%-84%). Approximately 25% of the NHANES population was not able to successfully complete FDT testing, representing screening failures and decreasing specificity. Using the 2005-2008 waves of the NHANES as a model of population-based screening for eye disease, FDT perimetry lacks both sensitivity and

  19. Energy Performance Indicators in the Swedish Building Procurement Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Allard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, all new buildings need to comply with the National Board of Housing, Building and Planning’s requirement on specific purchased energy (kWh/m2. Accordingly, this indicator is often used to set design criteria in the building procurement process. However, when energy use is measured in finished buildings, the measurements often deviate significantly from the design calculations. The measured specific purchased energy does not necessarily reflect the responsibility of the building contractor, as it is influenced by the building operation, user behavior and climate. Therefore, Swedish building practitioners may prefer other indicators for setting design criteria in the building procurement process. The aim of this study was twofold: (i to understand the Swedish building practitioners’ perspectives and opinions on seven building energy performance indicators (envelope air leakage, U-values for different building parts, average U-value, specific heat loss, heat loss coefficient, specific net energy, and specific purchased energy; and (ii to understand the consequences for the energy performance of multi-family buildings of using the studied indicators to set criteria in the procurement process. The study involved a Delphi approach and simulations of a multi-family case study building. The studied indicators were discussed in terms of how they may meet the needs of the building practitioners when used to set building energy performance criteria in the procurement process.

  20. Experiences of Injuries and Injury Reporting among Swedish Skydivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Jong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to illuminate the experience of injuries and the process of injury reporting within the Swedish skydiving culture. Data contained narrative interviews that were subsequently analyzed with content analysis. Seventeen respondents (22–44 years were recruited at three skydiving drop zones in Sweden. In the results injury events related to the full phase of a skydive were described. Risk of injury is individually viewed as an integrated element of the recreational activity counterbalanced by its recreational value. The human factor of inadequate judgment such as miscalculation and distraction dominates the descriptions as causes of injuries. Organization and leadership act as facilitators or constrainers for reporting incidents and injuries. On the basis of this study it is interpreted that safety work and incident reporting in Swedish skydiving may be influenced more by local drop zone culture than the national association regulations. Formal and informal hierarchical structures among skydivers seem to decide how skydiving is practiced, rules are enforced, and injuries are reported. We suggest that initial training and continuing education need to be changed from the current top-down to a bottom-up perspective, where the individual skydiver learns to see the positive implications of safety work and injury reporting.

  1. Experiences of Injuries and Injury Reporting among Swedish Skydivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Mats; Westman, Anton; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to illuminate the experience of injuries and the process of injury reporting within the Swedish skydiving culture. Data contained narrative interviews that were subsequently analyzed with content analysis. Seventeen respondents (22-44 years) were recruited at three skydiving drop zones in Sweden. In the results injury events related to the full phase of a skydive were described. Risk of injury is individually viewed as an integrated element of the recreational activity counterbalanced by its recreational value. The human factor of inadequate judgment such as miscalculation and distraction dominates the descriptions as causes of injuries. Organization and leadership act as facilitators or constrainers for reporting incidents and injuries. On the basis of this study it is interpreted that safety work and incident reporting in Swedish skydiving may be influenced more by local drop zone culture than the national association regulations. Formal and informal hierarchical structures among skydivers seem to decide how skydiving is practiced, rules are enforced, and injuries are reported. We suggest that initial training and continuing education need to be changed from the current top-down to a bottom-up perspective, where the individual skydiver learns to see the positive implications of safety work and injury reporting.

  2. Screening for lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosch, H.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the current data about low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) lung cancer screening.The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was the first study that provided statistical evidence that LD-CT screening for lung cancer significantly reduces lung

  3. Concern about developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia and intention to be screened: An analysis of national survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weizhou; Kannaley, Kristie; Friedman, Daniela B; Edwards, Valerie J; Wilcox, Sara; Levkoff, Sue E; Hunter, Rebecca H; Irmiter, Cheryl; Belza, Basia

    2017-07-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or dementia is important so that patients can express treatment preferences, subsequently allowing caregivers to make decisions consistent with their wishes. This study explored the relationship between people's concern about developing AD/dementia, likelihood to be screened/tested, if experiencing changes in cognitive status or functioning, and concerns about sharing the diagnostic information with others. A descriptive study was conducted using Porter Novelli's SummerStyles 2013 online survey data. Of the 6105 panelists aged 18+ who received the survey, 4033 adults responded (response rate: 66%). Chi squares were used with case-level weighting applied. Almost 13% of respondents reported being very worried or worried about getting AD/dementia, with women more worried than men (pdementia caregivers more worried than other types of caregivers (p=.04). Women were also more likely than men to agree to be screened/tested if experiencing changes in memory and/or thinking (pdementia is associated with the reported likelihood that individuals agree to be screened/tested. This information will be useful in developing communication strategies to address public concern about AD/dementia that may increase the likelihood of screening and early detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. After the Introduction into the National Newborn Screening Program : Who Is Receiving Genetic Counseling for Hemoglobinopathies in The Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, J. O.; Krapels, I. P. C.; Van Brussel, B. T. J.; Zekveld-Vroon, R. C.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van Erp, F.; van Echtelt, J.; Zwijnenburg, P. J. G.; Petrij, F.; Bakker, E.; Giordano, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Universal newborn screening for hemoglobinopathies started in The Netherlands in 2007. Herewith severe conditions, such as sickle cell disease, β-thalassemia major and hemoglobin H disease are putatively identified. Additionally, at least 1,800 carriers of hemoglobin variants associated

  5. Compliance with National Institute of Health and Care Excellence risk-based screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in nulliparous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicolai M; McCarthy, Fergus P; Khashan, Ali S; Myers, Jenny E; Simpson, Nigel A B; Kearney, Patricia M; Greene, Richard A; Poston, Lucilla; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-04-01

    To investigate compliance with risk-based screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) in a nulliparous cohort. A retrospective analysis of nulliparous women recruited to a prospective cohort, the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study, was performed. Population included 2428 healthy nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies, recruited within Cork, Ireland; and Manchester, Leeds and London, United Kingdom. Compliance with risk factor screening for GDM was assessed in relation to the following risk factors: obesity, family history of diabetes and increased ethnic risk. GDM was diagnosed using an oral Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) with locally employed diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS V22). Descriptive statistics are presented for the various baseline characteristics using numbers and percentages. Cross tabulation was used to compare relevant groups. When comparing group distributions Chi-square test was used. p-value gestational window (24-28 weeks) 56.6% (n=371) of the time. This study highlights poor compliance with risk factor screening for GDM in nulliparous women. Further investigation into the underlying reasons is warranted as well as the implications for pregnancy outcome. ACTRN12607000551493. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  7. Training Entrepreneurship at Universities: A Swedish Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klofsten, Magnus

    2000-01-01

    The Entrepreneurship and New Business Development Program trains Swedish individuals in the startup of technology- or knowledge-based enterprises. Built on the characteristics of entrepreneurial behavior, the program features a holistic outlook, a network of established entrepreneurs, mentoring, a mix of theory and practice, and focus on the…

  8. Exergy use in the Swedish society 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, G.

    1997-07-01

    The exergy concept is reviewed as a tool for resource accounting. Conversions of energy and material resources in the Swedish society in 1994 are described in terms of exergy. Necessary concepts and conventions are introduced. Exergy losses in transformations of material resources and in conversions of various forms of energy into heat are described in some detail

  9. SWEDISH CRIME FICTION AS SOCIALLY INVOLVED LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Samsel-Chojnacka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Swedish crime novel has been transforming for many years to become more socially involved. The ambition of many writers is not only to entertain the readers but also to participating in the social debate, criticizing the political and economical system, focusing on important issues such as violence against women, exploitation of working class by the privileged ruling class, the problems of a modern family and the situation of immigrants. Since the moment when in the mid 60’s two journalists Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö decided to use popular literature to spread social matters many other Swedish writers have decided to follow their way. Some of them are journalists – like Liza Marklund, Börge Hellström and Anders Roslund or Stieg Larsson. Their novels as well as the ones written by Henning Mannkel on Kurt Wallander have become crucial evidence of changes of Swedish society in the past twenty years. Modern Swedish crime fiction illustrates the population in the model fashion that is the reason why it can become one of the interests of the sociology of literature.

  10. Mathematics and Didactic Contract in Swedish Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study and analyse how a teacher implements an outdoor realistic problem situation for children aged 4-5 in a Swedish preschool. By an "outdoor realistic problem situation", I mean a situation initiated by a teacher in which children come into contact with mathematical concepts and in which the outside…

  11. Using Simulation to Model and Validate Invasive Breast Cancer Progression in Women in the Study and Control Groups of the Canadian National Breast Screening Studies I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Sharareh; Caudrelier, Laurent N; Miller, Anthony B; Harvey, Bart

    2017-02-01

    Modeling breast cancer progression and the effect of various risk is helpful in deciding when a woman should start and end screening, and how often the screening should be undertaken. We modeled the natural progression of breast cancer using a hidden Markov process, and incorporated the effects of covariates. Patients are women aged 50-59 (older) and 40-49 (younger) years from the Canadian National Breast Screening Studies. We included prevalent cancers, estimated the screening sensitivities and rates of over-diagnosis, and validated the models using simulation. We found that older women have a higher rate of transition from a healthy to preclinical state and other causes of death but a lower rate of transition from preclinical to clinical state. Reciprocally, younger women have a lower rate of transition from a healthy to preclinical state and other causes of death but a higher rate of transition from a preclinical to clinical state. Different risk factors were significant for the age groups. The mean sojourn times for older and younger women were 2.53 and 2.96 years, respectively. In the study group, the sensitivities of the initial physical examination and mammography for older and younger women were 0.87 and 0.81, respectively, and the sensitivity of the subsequent screens were 0.78 and 0.53, respectively. In the control groups, the sensitivities of the initial physical examination for older and younger women were 0.769 and 0.671, respectively, and the sensitivity of the subsequent physical examinations for the control group aged 50-59 years was 0.37. The upper-bounds for over-diagnosis in older and younger women were 25% and 27%, respectively. The present work offers a basis for the better modeling of cancer incidence for a population with the inclusion of prevalent cancers.

  12. Necessity of organized low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer: From epidemiologic comparisons between China and the Western nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Hong-Feng; Liu, Yang; Yang, Tian-Xia; Zhou, Cheng; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2017-01-03

    To compare the proportion of stage I lung cancer and population mortality in China to those in U.S. and Europe where lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) has been already well practiced. The proportions of stage I lung cancer in LDCT screening population in U.S. and Europe were retrieved from NLST and NELSON trials. The general proportion of stage I lung cancer in China was retrieved from a rapid meta-analysis, based on a literature search in the China National Knowledge Infrastructure database. The lung cancer mortality and prevalence of China, U.S. and Europe was retrieved from Globocan 2012 fact sheet. Mortality-to-prevalence ratio (MPR) was applied to compare the population survival outcome of lung cancer. The estimated proportion of stage I lung cancer in China is merely 20.8% among hospital-based cross-sectional population, with relative ratios (RRs) being 2.40 (95% CI 2.18-2.65) and 2.98 (95% CI 2.62-3.38) compared by LDCT-screening population in U.S. and Europe trials, respectively. MPR of lung cancer is as high as 58.9% in China, with RRs being 0.46 (95% CI 0.31-0.67) and 0.58 (95% CI 0.39-0.85) compared by U.S. and Europe, respectively. By the epidemiological inference, the LDCT mass screening might be associated with increasing stage I lung cancer and therefore improving population survival outcome. How to translate the experiences of lung cancer screening by LDCT from developed counties to China in a cost-effective manner needs to be further investigated.

  13. Evaluation of a Stratified National Breast Screening Program in the United Kingdom: An Early Model-Based Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ewan; Donten, Anna; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Gils, Carla; Evans, D Gareth; Astley, Sue; Payne, Katherine

    2017-09-01

    To identify the incremental costs and consequences of stratified national breast screening programs (stratified NBSPs) and drivers of relative cost-effectiveness. A decision-analytic model (discrete event simulation) was conceptualized to represent four stratified NBSPs (risk 1, risk 2, masking [supplemental screening for women with higher breast density], and masking and risk 1) compared with the current UK NBSP and no screening. The model assumed a lifetime horizon, the health service perspective to identify costs (£, 2015), and measured consequences in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Multiple data sources were used: systematic reviews of effectiveness and utility, published studies reporting costs, and cohort studies embedded in existing NBSPs. Model parameter uncertainty was assessed using probabilistic sensitivity analysis and one-way sensitivity analysis. The base-case analysis, supported by probabilistic sensitivity analysis, suggested that the risk stratified NBSPs (risk 1 and risk-2) were relatively cost-effective when compared with the current UK NBSP, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of £16,689 per QALY and £23,924 per QALY, respectively. Stratified NBSP including masking approaches (supplemental screening for women with higher breast density) was not a cost-effective alternative, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of £212,947 per QALY (masking) and £75,254 per QALY (risk 1 and masking). When compared with no screening, all stratified NBSPs could be considered cost-effective. Key drivers of cost-effectiveness were discount rate, natural history model parameters, mammographic sensitivity, and biopsy rates for recalled cases. A key assumption was that the risk model used in the stratification process was perfectly calibrated to the population. This early model-based cost-effectiveness analysis provides indicative evidence for decision makers to understand the key drivers of costs and QALYs for exemplar stratified NBSP. Copyright

  14. Professional reinventions: Swedish psychologists, 1990-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagius, Peter; Münger, Ann-Charlotte

    2016-11-01

    Since the early 20th century, the Swedish psychology profession has undergone several changes in its essential tasks, epistemological foundations, and social roles. These changes occurred through an ongoing "tuning" with Swedish society, in which the profession strove to appear relevant to society's concerns and problems as well as enroll others to share the profession's goals and aims. Studying the history of the profession can thus shed light on the changing definitions and contours of the psychology profession itself as well as on the organization of the society in which it acts. This article examines the history of the Swedish psychology profession from 1990 to 2010, through an analysis of the discussions and debates taking place in the Swedish Psychological Association's journal. The analytical framework used draws on work done within actor-network theory and science studies. We argue that the profession's institutional connections, defining tasks, epistemological underpinnings, and social position have changed in major ways during these 2 decades. Overall, as a result of an increasingly felt insecurity, the profession has turned outward and tried to find new ways to legitimize itself to politicians, the media, patients, and customers through means such as a more economized vocabulary and novel forms of empirical research. These changes have led to a more socialized profession, now more closely tuned to other actors in Swedish society, leading to conflicts within the profession over whether this is an opportunity to better control their own destiny or if it will lead to a loss of autonomy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. An attempt to appoint a Swedish vice consul to Bucharest (1834-1835

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniamin Ciobanu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The economic development of Sweden at the end of the second decade of the nineteenth century accentuated the interest of the Swedish ruling circles to valorize the new economic potential. A series of measures, as the dissolution of the terrestrial customs between Sweden and Norway in 1825, or the abolition of the protectionist policy in imports, opened the way for the conclusion of certain commercial treaties with other states, such as that with Great Britain in 1826 or with the Ottoman Empire in 1827. Consequently, the commercial fleet, especially the Norwegian one, registered a substantial development. In this context, the Swedish diplomacy continued to pay close attention to Eastern Europe where favorable conditions for the extension of the foreign trade of Sweden and Norway could be found. This space, where the Romanian Principalities were located, had a geostrategic position and economic potential that had to be valorized. In order to achieve this goal, Sweden appointed consuls and vice consuls in the Romanian Principalities. The attempt to appoint a vice consul to Bucharest between 1834 and 1835 circumscribes this effort. The information regarding these demarches came from Swedish diplomatic reports, held in the funds of the National Archives of Sweden (Sveriges Riksarkivet, from Stockholm and offers, among many other details which may serve to broaden the horizon of the research regarding the history of Romanian-Swedish relations in the first half of the nineteenth century, an image of the Lutheran community from the capital of Wallachia.

  16. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Olof Hedman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Method: Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289. Results: Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. Conclusion: The decentralist intention of the reform—to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances—has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change.

  17. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olof Hedman, Nils; Johansson, Roine; Rosenqvist, Urban

    2007-09-12

    To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289). Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units) tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units) with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. The decentralist intention of the reform-to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances-has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change.

  18. Evaluation of a controlled, national collaboration study on a clinical pharmacy service of screening for risk medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Clemmensen, Marianne Hald; Kronborg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk medications are frequently associated with adverse events and hospitalisations. Objective To evaluate a risk medication screening service for in-patients at Danish hospitals. Setting Danish hospitals. Methods The study was designed as a controlled, prospective intervention study....... Inpatients were screened for the use of five risk medications; anticoagulants, digoxin, methotrexate, NSAIDs and opioids, and during the intervention period recommendations were made by clinical pharmacists according to a standardized intervention scheme. The recommendations were discussed with the physician...... hospitals were treated with at least one of the five selected risk medications, significantly more drug related problems (DRPs) were identified during the control period (1.7/patient during the control and 1.4/patient during the intervention period (p ...

  19. Gambling Motives in a Representative Swedish Sample of Risk Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Kristina; Jonsson, Jakob; Wennberg, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Motives for gambling have been shown to be associated with gambling involvement, and hence important in the understanding of the etiology of problem gambling. The aim of this study was to describe differences in gambling motives in different subgroups of lifetime risk gamblers, categorized by: age, gender, alcohol- and drug habits and type of game preferred, when considering the level of risk gambling. A random Swedish sample (n = 19,530) was screened for risk gambling, using the Lie/Bet questionnaire. The study sample (n = 257) consisted of the respondents screening positive on Lie/Bet and completing a postal questionnaire about gambling and motives for gambling (measured with the NODS-PERC and the RGQ respectively). When considering the level of risk gambling, motives for gambling were not associated with gender, whereas younger persons gambled for the challenge more often than did older participants. Card/Casino and Sport gamblers played to a greater extent for social and challenge reasons then did Lotto/Bingo-gamblers. EGM-gamblers played more for coping reasons than did Lotto/Bingo gamblers. However, this association turned non-significant when considering the level of risk gambling. Moderate risk gamblers played for the challenge and coping reasons to a greater extent than low risk gamblers motives for gambling differ across subgroups of preferred game and between gamblers with low and moderate risk. The level of risk gambling is intertwined with motives for gambling and should be considered when examining gambling reasons.

  20. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression Screening Substance Abuse Screening Alcohol Use Screening Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  1. Prevalence of Precancerous Conditions and Gastric Cancer Based upon the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea for 7 Years, Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyuk Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Gastric cancer is the second most prevalent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Korea. The National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP has implemented esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD biennially for all Koreans starting in their 40s. This study was conducted to estimate the clinical relevance of NCSP through identifying the prevalence of gastric disease, including cancer. Materials and Methods. Data from 40,821 subjects who received the screening EGD in the single center for 7 years were retrospectively investigated. Results. The overall prevalence of nonatrophic/atrophic/metaplastic gastritis, peptic ulcer, adenoma, early gastric cancer (EGC, and advanced gastric cancer (AGC was 44.28%, 27.97%, 14.95%, 0.59%, 0.43%, 0.21%, and 0.09%, respectively. The prevalence of metaplastic gastritis, peptic ulcer, adenoma, EGC, and AGC was significantly higher in men than in women. The prevalence of preneoplastic/neoplastic disease significantly increased with age. Judged from the ratio of EGC to AGC, the proportion of EGC made up to 70% of all cancers. Conclusions. Screening endoscopy starting for people in their 40s should be strongly recommended for the elderly. Through the NCSP, the early detection of gastric cancer might contribute to the decreased mortality rate due to gastric cancer in Korea.

  2. Viagra selfhood: pharmaceutical advertising and the visual formation of Swedish masculinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asberg, Cecilia; Johnson, Ericka

    2009-06-01

    Using material from the Pfizer sponsored website providing health information on erectile dysfunction to potential Swedish Viagra customers (www.potenslinjen.se), this article explores the public image of masculinity in relation to sexual health and the cultural techniques for creating pharmaceutical appeal. We zoom in on the targeted ideal users of Viagra, and the nationalized, racialized and sexualized identities they are assigned. As part of Pfizer's marketing strategy of adjustments to fit the local consumer base, the ways in which Viagra is promoted for the Swedish setting is telling of what concepts of masculinity are so stable and unassailable that they can withstand the association with a drug that is, in essence, an acknowledgement of 'failed' masculinity and 'dysfunctional' sexuality. With comparative national examples, this study presents an interdisciplinary take on the 'glocalized' cultural imaginary of Viagra, and the masculine subject positions it engenders.

  3. Breast cancer screening in an era of personalized regimens: a conceptual model and National Cancer Institute initiative for risk-based and preference-based approaches at a population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Sprague, Brian L; Barlow, William E; Haas, Jennifer S; Tosteson, Anna N A; D Schnall, Mitchell; Armstrong, Katrina; Schapira, Marilyn M; Geller, Berta; Weaver, Donald L; Conant, Emily F

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer screening holds a prominent place in public health, health care delivery, policy, and women's health care decisions. Several factors are driving shifts in how population-based breast cancer screening is approached, including advanced imaging technologies, health system performance measures, health care reform, concern for "overdiagnosis," and improved understanding of risk. Maximizing benefits while minimizing the harms of screening requires moving from a "1-size-fits-all" guideline paradigm to more personalized strategies. A refined conceptual model for breast cancer screening is needed to align women's risks and preferences with screening regimens. A conceptual model of personalized breast cancer screening is presented herein that emphasizes key domains and transitions throughout the screening process, as well as multilevel perspectives. The key domains of screening awareness, detection, diagnosis, and treatment and survivorship are conceptualized to function at the level of the patient, provider, facility, health care system, and population/policy arena. Personalized breast cancer screening can be assessed across these domains with both process and outcome measures. Identifying, evaluating, and monitoring process measures in screening is a focus of a National Cancer Institute initiative entitled PROSPR (Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens), which will provide generalizable evidence for a risk-based model of breast cancer screening, The model presented builds on prior breast cancer screening models and may serve to identify new measures to optimize benefits-to-harms tradeoffs in population-based screening, which is a timely goal in the era of health care reform. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. "The Feelings Have Come Home to Me." Examining Advertising Films on the Swedish Website of El Sistema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuse, Anna-Karin; Lindgren, Monica; Skåreus, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze how the music educational program of El Sistema Sweden is advertised and legitimized through moving images. The films are a major part of the information on the Swedish national website of El Sistema and are supposed to contribute to the picture that the organization and its founders wish to market. The use…

  5. Ethnic Swedish parents' experiences of minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence in Swedish paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Azar G; Kabir, Zarina Nahar; Jirwe, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Sweden has a population of a little more than 9.4 million. The rapid growth of immigration in Sweden has resulted in an increased number of minority ethnic patients and minority ethnic nurses in the Swedish healthcare system. This also applies to paediatric care. The purpose of this study was to explore how parents with ethnic Swedish backgrounds experience minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence and the care the nurses provide in a Swedish paediatric care context. This exploratory qualitative study is of 14 parents with an ethnic Swedish background whose child was in a ward at a children's hospital in Stockholm County Council. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews to identify parents' perceptions and experiences of minority ethnic nurses' cultural competence. The interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The analyses of the interviews led to four main categories: influence of nurses' ethnicity; significance of cross-cultural communication; cross-cultural skills; and the importance of nursing education. Nurses' ethnicity did not have much impact on parents' satisfaction with their child's care. The parents attached importance to nurses' language skills and to their adaptation and awareness of Swedish culture. They also attached weight to nurses' professional knowledge and personal attributes. The role of nursing education to increase nurses' cultural awareness was highlighted too. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Reregulation of the Swedish pharmacy sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisell, Kristin; Winblad, Ulrika; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, a reregulation of the Swedish pharmacy sector took place, and a fundamental change in ownership and structure followed. The reregulation provides an opportunity to reveal the politicians' views on pharmacies. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze the political arguments...... for the reregulation of the Swedish pharmacy sector in 2009. The method used was a qualitative content analysis of written political documents regarding the reregulation. The primary rationales for the reregulation were better availability, efficiency, price pressure, and safe usage of medicines. During...... are better equipped to perform public activities. The results point to that the reform was done almost solely in order to introduce private ownership in the pharmacy sector, and was not initiated in order to solve any general problems, or to enhance patient outcomes of medicine use....

  7. Workplace Incivility in a Swedish Context

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Torkelson; Kristoffer Holm; Martin Bäckström

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated workplace incivility in a Swedish context. The first aim was to assess how common the phenomenon is and the second was to study which groups (gender, age, ethnicity, and power position) are most targeted by workplace incivility and are more prone to act in an uncivil way. Additionally, the relationships between experienced and witnessed incivility and wellbeing as well as instigated incivility were investigated. An online survey was administered by SIFO (the nat...

  8. Diversity work in a Swedish Municipality

    OpenAIRE

    Risberg, Annette

    2012-01-01

    This paper builds on a case study of diversity work in a Swedish municipality, Malmö. It focuses on certain actors partaking in the diversity work done in the municipality that of a gender and diversity committee and its members – here called diversity ambassadors. I will describe the work of the diversity ambassadors and discuss what impact they could possibly have on the organization. Organizational efforts to change inequalities at the workplace may take different forms. The literature ...

  9. The swedish challenge; Le pari Suedois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tregouet, R

    2006-07-01

    Sweden decided to be the first country without petroleum for 2020. The author presents the major energy policy axis implemented by the swedish government to delete the part of the produced energy by the petroleum: development of the renewable energies, research programs of the transportation sector concerning the alternative fuels for the motors, energy efficiency and development of the biomass to replace the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  10. Patient safety as perceived by Swedish leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Härenstam, Karin Pukk; Elg, Mattias; Svensson, Carina; Brommels, Mats; Øvretveit, John

    2009-01-01

    Artikkelen beskriver en studie hvor hensikten var å kartlegge svenske helselederes bevissthet knyttet til pasientsikkerhet, deres prioritering av sikkerhetsspørsmål, og deres syn på ledelsesstrategier som er egnet i pasientsikkerhetsarbeid. The purpose of this paper is to survey Swedish healthcare leaders' patient safety awareness, the priority they give to safety issues and their views on suitable safety management strategies. A total 623 leaders of a sample of 1,129 responded to a mail q...

  11. Spirometric reference equations for Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisman, Jonas; Kim, Jeong-Lim; Olin, Anna-Carin; Torén, Kjell; Bake, Björn

    2017-11-01

    New spirometric reference equations for Swedish adults are required. Three different older sets of reference equations clinically used in Sweden have various drawbacks and the recently published 'The Global Lung Function 2012 (GLI) equations' have been shown not to be adequate for Swedish normal, healthy non-smokers. We have recently concluded that a piecewise linear model presented by Lubinski and Gólczewski accurately describes the distribution of spirometric variables in a large Swedish random population sample. This piecewise linear model also offers the important advantage of implementing easily physiologically interpretable coefficients. The present study aimed at presenting piecewise linear reference equations for Swedish adults based on a random population sample of 6685 individuals aged 25-75 years. Predicted normal values by the piecewise linear reference equations and lower limit normal (LLN) were compared with the three reference equations frequently used clinically in Sweden and the GLI equations. We found predicted normal values according to the present piecewise linear reference equations close to 100% predicted normal as expected, whereas the other equations either overestimated or underestimated normal subjects. Concerning LLN, the present equations, i.e. 1·645 × RSD, showed the least deviation from the expected 5% and, e.g., the GLI equations systematically identified too few subjects below LLN. We conclude that the present piecewise linear reference equations, based on a relatively large general population sample, ought to be considered for clinical use in Sweden. Application of 1·645 × RSD below predicted value gave an acceptably accurate LLN. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Psychosocial work environment among Swedish audiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, K Jonas; Båsjö, Sara; Larsson, Josefina; Lood, Sofie; Lundå, Stefan; Notsten, Margareta; Taheri, Satu Turunen

    2013-03-01

    The study examined the self-reported psychosocial work environment for audiologists working in three practice types (public, completely private, and private but publicly funded). A cross-sectional e-mail survey using the demand-control-support questionnaire, a short version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, and descriptive data. Five-hundred Swedish licensed audiologists. Overall, the results indicate differences in psychosocial work environment pertaining to the practice types. These differences are small and the type explains few percent of the variability accounted in the measures of psychosocial work environment. Social support seems important for the psychosocial work environment and is considered a reward in itself. Using the demand-control model, 29% of the audiologists reported working in a high-stress psychosocial work environment. Using the ERI-ratio to estimate the imbalance between effort and reward it was shown that that 86% of the participants experienced an unfavorable work situation where the rewards do not correspond to the efforts made. The organizational framework has minor effect on self-reported psychosocial work environment for Swedish licensed audiologists. The percentage of unfavorable ERI-ratios seen in Swedish audiologists seems conspicuously high compared to other working populations in general, but also compared to other health service workers.

  13. Tanning beauty ideals among Swedish adults who exercise regularly

    OpenAIRE

    Cedercreutz, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Tanning beauty ideals among Swedish adults who exercise regularly Introduction: The majority of the Swedish population exercise regularly, and it has been reported that they believe having an attractive body is important. While research has shown that Swedes wish to be tanned, it is unknown whether there are any correlations to their exercise habits. Aims: The primary aim was to determine tanned skin tone ideals and tanning beauty ideals among regularly exercising Swedish adults. Associati...

  14. The Swedish version of the Regulatory Mode Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danilo; Rosenberg, Patricia; Lindskär, Erik; Amato, Clara; Al Nima, Ali

    2017-10-01

    The data include responses to the Swedish version of a questionnaire used to operationalize self-regulation or regulatory mode: assessment and locomotion. The data was collected among 567 Swedish high school and university students (see Garcia and Lindskär, 2016 [1]). In this article, we also include the Swedish version of the Regulatory Mode Questionnaire. The data is available, SPSS file, as supplementary material in this article.

  15. Did death certificates and a death review process agree on lung cancer cause of death in the National Lung Screening Trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Pamela M; Doria-Rose, Vincent Paul; Gareen, Ilana F; Brewer, Brenda; Clingan, Kathy; Keating, Kristen; Rosenbaum, Jennifer; Rozjabek, Heather M; Rathmell, Joshua; Sicks, JoRean; Miller, Anthony B

    2016-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials frequently use death review committees to assign a cause of death rather than relying on cause of death information from death certificates. The National Lung Screening Trial, a randomized controlled trial of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography versus chest X-ray for heavy and/or long-term smokers ages 55-74 years at enrollment, used a committee blinded to arm assignment for a subset of deaths to determine whether cause of death was due to lung cancer. Deaths were selected for review using a pre-determined computerized algorithm. The algorithm, which considered cancers diagnosed during the trial, causes and significant conditions listed on the death certificate, and the underlying cause of death derived from death certificate information by trained nosologists, selected deaths that were most likely to represent a death due to lung cancer (either directly or indirectly) and deaths that might have been erroneously assigned lung cancer as the cause of death. The algorithm also selected deaths that might be due to adverse events of diagnostic evaluation for lung cancer. Using the review cause of death as the gold standard and lung cancer cause of death as the outcome of interest (dichotomized as lung cancer versus not lung cancer), we calculated performance measures of the death certificate cause of death. We also recalculated the trial primary endpoint using the death certificate cause of death. In all, 1642 deaths were reviewed and assigned a cause of death (42% of the 3877 National Lung Screening Trial deaths). Sensitivity of death certificate cause of death was 91%; specificity, 97%; positive predictive value, 98%; and negative predictive value, 89%. About 40% of the deaths reclassified to lung cancer cause of death had a death certificate cause of death of a neoplasm other than lung. Using the death certificate cause of death, the lung cancer mortality reduction was 18% (95% confidence interval: 4.2-25.0), as

  16. Pharmacoepidemiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder: A Swedish nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Kayoko; Nordsletten, Ashley E; Rück, Christian; Ljung, Rickard; Ivarsson, Tord; Larsson, Henrik; Mataix-Cols, David

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which clinicians adhere to international guidelines for the pharmacological management of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is unknown. We aimed to comprehensively map the patterns of prescription of psychotropic drugs for OCD patients (adults and children) at the Swedish national level and to compare these prescription patterns to best-practice recommendations in international guidelines. We linked the Swedish National Patient Register and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, which includes a record for all medications prescribed and dispensed in Sweden since July 2005. Of all active OCD cases in the Swedish National Patient Register between July 1st, 2005, and December 31st 2008 (N=10,523), 85% received at least one psychotropic drug. Most of the medicated adults and children with OCD (88%) received serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Of all adults and children prescribed SRIs, 16% received sub-optimal doses. An additional 12% of all medicated patients were prescribed drugs that never included an SRI. Approximately 75% of the patients on SRIs received additional drugs (67% anxiolytics/hypnotics, 27% antipsychotics, 17% serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, 24% other antidepressants). Twelve percent of all medicated patients were at least 'regular' users, and 3% 'heavy' users of benzodiazepines. We also observed important variations in prescription practices according to patient's gender, age, and comorbidity status. We conclude that a substantial number of OCD patients might benefit from changes in their prescriptions. Dissemination of best-practice prescription guidelines for OCD is a major educational goal for the future. Monitoring of these prescription patterns over time is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Screening for psychopathology in a national cohort of 8- to 15-year-old children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskaite, Gija; Bilenberg, Niels; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is often accompanied by psychopathology and learning disability. Aims: (1) to evaluate the prevalence of psychopathology as estimated by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) parental questionnaire in 8- to 15-year-old Danish children with CP and to analyze its association...... with cognitive ability and families' social characteristics; (2) to examine to what extent children with CP had been evaluated by a child psychiatrist and/or psychologist. Method: The parents of 462 children with CP answered a questionnaire about their child's treatment and the family's characteristics and 446...... was associated with an increased prevalence of psychopathology (odds ratio (OR) 2.6, CI 1.4-4.6, for Developmental Quotient of cognitive function (DQ) 50-85 and OR 3.0, CI 1.3-7.0, for DQ. Children with CP and a single parent showed increased odds for a positive CBCL screening compared to children living...

  18. The national neonatal screening programme for congenital toxoplasmosis in Denmark: results from the initial four years, 1999-2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Dorte Remmer; Høgh, Birthe; Andersen, O

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the outcome of four years' nationwide neonatal screening for congenital toxoplasmosis in liveborn newborns. METHODS: Congenital toxoplasmosis was diagnosed if specific Toxoplasma gondii IgM antibodies were detected in eluate from the PKU Guthrie filter paper card from a child....... Infants diagnosed with congenital toxoplasmosis were examined for intracranial and retinal lesions and treated for three months with sulphadiazine, pyrimethamine, and folinic acid continuously. RESULTS: Eluates from PKU-cards from 262 912 newborns were analysed. The birth prevalence of congenital...... toxoplasma infection was 2.1 per 10 000 liveborns. Congenital toxoplasmosis was suspected in 96 infants and confirmed in 55. Forty seven children were examined for intracranial and retinal lesions soon after birth; 12 had clinical signs at this first examination. Of these, 5 had intracranial calcifications...

  19. Mental health and social competencies of 10- to 12-year-old children born at 23 to 25 weeks of gestation in the 1990s: a Swedish national prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Aijaz; Hägglöf, Bruno; Sedin, Gunnar; Gothefors, Leif; Serenius, Fredrik

    2007-07-01

    We investigated a national cohort of extremely immature children with respect to behavioral and emotional problems and social competencies, from the perspectives of parents, teachers, and children themselves. We examined 11-year-old children who were born before 26 completed weeks of gestation in Sweden between 1990 and 1992. All had been evaluated at a corrected age of 36 months. At 11 years of age, 86 of 89 survivors were studied and compared with an equal number of control subjects, matched with respect to age and gender. Behavioral and emotional problems, social competencies, and adaptive functioning at school were evaluated with standardized, well-validated instruments, including parent and teacher report questionnaires and a child self-report, administered by mail. Compared with control subjects, parents of extremely immature children reported significantly more problems with internalizing behaviors (anxiety/depression, withdrawn, and somatic problems) and attention, thought, and social problems. Teachers reported a similar pattern. Reports from children showed a trend toward increased depression symptoms compared with control subjects. Multivariate analysis of covariance of parent-reported behavioral problems revealed no interactions, but significant main effects emerged for group status (extremely immature versus control), family function, social risk, and presence of a chronic medical condition, with all effect sizes being medium and accounting for 8% to 12% of the variance. Multivariate analysis of covariance of teacher-reported behavioral problems showed significant effects for group status and gender but not for the covariates mentioned above. According to the teachers' ratings, extremely immature children were less well adjusted to the school environment than were control subjects. However, a majority of extremely immature children (85%) were functioning in mainstream schools without major adjustment problems. Despite favorable outcomes for many

  20. Impact of sedation method on the diagnosis of hip and elbow dysplasia in Swedish dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Sofia; Strandberg, Erling; Danell, Birgitta; Audell, Lars; Swenson, Lennart; Hedhammar, Ake

    2007-03-17

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of sedation method on the screening result for hip and elbow dysplasia. The study was based on a questionnaire survey of routines for hip and elbow screening at Swedish veterinary clinics and results of hip and elbow status, for eight breeds (Bernese Mountain Dog, Boxer, German Shepherd Dog, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Newfoundland, Rottweiler, and Saint Bernard) recorded by the Swedish Kennel Club. In total 5877 and 5406 dogs examined for hip and elbow dysplasia, respectively, from January 2002 through March 2003 were included. We used logistic regression to examine whether the type of chemical restraint used for sedation affected the screening result for hip and elbow dysplasia. In addition to sedation method, the effects of veterinary clinic, sex, breed, and age at screening were studied. The type of chemical restraint used for sedation affected the screening result for hip but not for elbow dysplasia. Acepromazine gave less than half the odds of hip dysplasia compared with medetomidine and butorphanol (the most common method), medetomidine alone or xylazine. Females had about 25% higher odds for developing hip dysplasia whereas males had almost 40% higher odds for developing elbow dysplasia. Saint Bernard, Newfoundland and German Shepherd Dog had the highest odds of developing hip dysplasia, whereas Rottweiler and Labrador Retriever had the lowest odds. Boxer had the lowest risk for elbow dysplasia, followed by Labrador Retriever. Saint Bernard and Rottweiler had the highest odds of elbow dysplasia. Increasing age increased the odds of both hip and elbow dysplasia, by about 2.5% per month. Following the results in this study, recording of the type of chemical restraint used for sedation during hip screening has now become mandatory in Sweden. This makes it possible to account for the effect of sedation method in a model for prediction of breeding values for hip dysplasia.

  1. Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Jenny; Fransson, Eleonor I; Reynolds, Chandra A; Finkel, Deborah; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dahl Aslan, Anna K

    2017-09-09

    Research indicate that cognitive impairment might be related to hospitalization, but little is known about these effects over time. To assess cognitive change before and after hospitalization among older adults in a population-based longitudinal study with up to 25 years of follow-up. A longitudinal study on 828 community living men and women aged 50-86 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to The Swedish National Inpatient Register. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance (general cognitive ability, verbal, spatial/fluid, memory, and processing speed) from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between cognitive performance and hospitalization including spline models to analyse cognitive trajectories pre- and post-hospitalization. A total of 735 persons (89%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. Mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (±9.3)years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in general ability, processing speed and spatial/fluid ability compared with those who were not hospitalized. The two-slope models revealed steeper cognitive decline before hospitalization than after among those with at least one hospitalization event, as compared to non-hospitalized persons who showed steeper cognitive decline after the centering age of 70 years. Persons being hospitalized in late life have lower cognitive performance across all assessed domains. The results indicate that the main decline occurs before the hospitalization, and not after. This might indicate that when you get treatment you also benefit cognitively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. ‘It is a dilemma’: perspectives of nurse practitioners on health screening of newly arrived migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustine K. Nkulu Kalengayi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Screening newly arrived migrants from countries with high burden of communicable diseases of public health significance is part of the Swedish national strategy against the spread of these diseases. However, little is known about its implementation. Objective: This study aimed at exploring caregivers’ experiences in screening newly arrived migrants to generate knowledge that could inform policy and clinical practice. Design: Using an interpretive description framework, we conducted semistructured interviews between November and December 2011 in four Swedish counties, with 15 purposively selected nurses with experience in screening migrants. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Participants described a range of challenges including discordant views between migrants and the nurses about medical screening, inconsistencies in rules and practices, and conflicting policies. Participants indicated that sociocultural differences resulted in divergent expectations with migrants viewing the participants as agents of migration authorities. They also expressed concern over being given a new assignment without training and being expected to share responsibilities with staff from other agencies without adequate coordination. Finally, they indicated that existing policies can be confusing and raise ethical issues. All these were compounded by language barriers, making their work environment extremely complex and stressful. Conclusions: These findings illuminate complex challenges that could limit access to, uptake, and delivery of health screening and undermine public health goals, and highlight the need for a multilevel approach. This entails avoiding the conflation of migration with health issues, harmonizing existing policies to make health care services more accessible and acceptable to migrants, and facilitating health professionals’ work in promoting public health, improving interagency collaboration and the skills of all

  3. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Kieler, Helle; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. Using national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross-national, population-based cohort study. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child cohorts were ascertained through disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication, specific hospital contacts, or both. In both countries the incidence rate of atopic dermatitis was stable during the study periods. The incidence rate of asthma increased until 2006 and stabilized for the rest of the study period in Denmark and increased in Sweden. The incidence rate of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis decreased in both countries. The study revealed similar trends, with stable incidence rates of atopic dermatitis in both Danish and Swedish children, an increase and then stabilization in asthma incidence rates in Denmark and an increase in Sweden, and a decrease in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis incidence rates. At age 5 years, one third of all children were affected with at least one of the conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening of native plants and algae growing on fly-ash affected areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India for accumulation of toxic heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, S; Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Dixit, B; Kumar, A; Tripathi, R D

    2008-10-30

    The present investigation was carried out to screen native plants growing in fly-ash (FA) contaminated areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India with a view to using them for the eco-restoration of the area. A total number of 17 plants (9 aquatic, 6 terrestrial and 2 algal species) were collected and screened for heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, B, Si, Al, Cr, Pb, Cd, Hg and As) accumulation. Differential accumulation of various heavy metals by different species of plants was observed. Hydrilla verticillata was found to be the most efficient metal accumulator among 9 aquatic plants, Eclipta alba among 6 terrestrial plants and Phormedium papyraceum between 2 algal species. In general, the maximum levels of most metals were found in terrestrial plants while the lowest in algal species. However, translocation of the metals from root to shoot was found to be higher in aquatic plants than terrestrial ones. These results suggest that various aquatic, terrestrial and algal species of plants may be used in a synergistic way to remediate and restore the FA contaminated areas.

  5. Why does the Iranian national program of screening newborns for G6PD enzyme deficiency miss a large number of affected infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaryan, Mehrnoush; Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza; Jalali, Hossein; Roshan, Payam

    2014-02-01

    G6PD enzyme deficiency is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders worldwide and it has high incidence rate in Northern provinces of Iran. It was observed that national neonatal screening for G6PD enzyme deficiency fails to detect all affected infants. In order to clarify the cause, this study has been done in Thalassemia Research Center, Sari, Iran. This was a diagnostic study. The newborns with parents of Mazandarani origin were enrolled. Cord blood from the placental side was collected and used for decolorization test, quantitative enzyme assay (QEA) and DNA study. A heel-prick sample collected on day 3-5 after birth was used for fluorescent spot test (FST). In male cases, QEA was considered as the gold standard. For females, DNA study was considered as the gold standard. Based on QEA test results, neonates with deficient and partial deficient, respectively. A total of 365 neonates (52.3% females and 47.7% males) were studied. According to FST, 13 male newborns had G6PD deficiency. No deficient female was detected. Decolorization test diagnosed 18 male and one female as G6PD deficient newborns. QEA diagnosed 19 males and 28 females with G6PD enzyme deficiency (26 partial, 2 total deficient cases). DNA analysis detected 14 males as hemizygote and 34 females as heterozygote. FST does not have the required sensitivity for newborn screening and QEA is recommended as the preferred method.

  6. Hepatitis B prevalence in Denmark - an estimate based on nationwide registers and a national screening programme, as on 31 December 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N; Hay, G; Cowan, S

    2013-01-01

    in Denmark using four nationwide registers. The population with undiagnosed chronic HBV infection was estimated by incorporating data from a two-year nationwide HBsAg screening programme in pregnant women. We identified 4,466 individuals with chronic HBV infection in the four registers until the end of 2007......The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Denmark is not clear. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of chronic HBV infection in Denmark. The capture–recapture method was used to estimate the total population diagnosed with chronic HBV infection......, and the capture–recapture estimate of the total population diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B was 7,112 (95% confidence interval (CI): 6,953–10,747). Only 17% of the identified patients attended recommended clinical care according to national guidelines. Including undiagnosed patients, the current population...

  7. Genetic overlap between type 2 diabetes and depression in Swedish and Danish twin registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kan, C; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Christensen, K

    2016-01-01

    address is the extent to which the co-occurrence of diabetes and depression is due to correlated genetic and/or environmental risk factors. In this study, we performed structural equation model fitting to population-level data from the Swedish (n=68 606) and Danish (n=95 403) twin registries. The primary......A bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and depression has been consistently reported. Depression is associated with worse biomedical outcomes and increased mortality. The mechanisms underlying the association of T2DM with depression remain unclear. One possible question we can...... outcomes were clinical diagnosis of T2DM and depression using national hospital discharge registries. The phenotypic correlation between T2DM and depression is modest in both samples. In the Swedish sample, unique environmental effects explain a greater proportion of the covariance in males, whereas...

  8. Genetic overlap between type 2 diabetes and depression in Swedish and Danish twin registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kan, C; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Christensen, K

    2016-01-01

    A bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and depression has been consistently reported. Depression is associated with worse biomedical outcomes and increased mortality. The mechanisms underlying the association of T2DM with depression remain unclear. One possible question we can...... address is the extent to which the co-occurrence of diabetes and depression is due to correlated genetic and/or environmental risk factors. In this study, we performed structural equation model fitting to population-level data from the Swedish (n=68 606) and Danish (n=95 403) twin registries. The primary...... outcomes were clinical diagnosis of T2DM and depression using national hospital discharge registries. The phenotypic correlation between T2DM and depression is modest in both samples. In the Swedish sample, unique environmental effects explain a greater proportion of the covariance in males, whereas...

  9. Psychometric evaluation of the Danish and Swedish Satisfaction with Life Scale in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochwälder, Jacek; Mattsson, Maria; Holmqvist, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To psychometrically evaluate the Satisfaction with Life Scale in two cohorts of first-episode psychosis patients in the Danish National Schizophrenia Project and in the Swedish Parachute Project. METHOD: Four properties of the Satisfaction with Life Scale were examined in the Danish cohort...... with Life Scale and various life conditions were investigated in the Swedish cohort. RESULTS: For both samples, the analysis indicated that the obtained four-dimensional 11-item scale had satisfactory properties. Moderately high scores were obtained in the four subscales: "living," "social relationships......," "self and present life" and "work." They correlated positively with each other, the internal consistencies of the subscales were acceptable and the means for the subscales indicated no apparent floor or ceiling effects. The four dimensions obtained seem relevant and presented good face validity...

  10. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lonny; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the prevalence of the frequent chronic conditions of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergy has increased substantially for reasons not fully understood. Atopic diseases affect quality of life in both children and their family members. OBJECTIVE: Using...... national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. METHODS: Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross...... similar trends, with stable incidence rates of atopic dermatitis in both Danish and Swedish children, an increase and then stabilization in asthma incidence rates in Denmark and an increase in Sweden, and a decrease in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis incidence rates. At age 5 years, one third of all children...

  11. Indoor air quality in the Swedish housing stock and its dependence on building characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Sarka; Bekö, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Data from a recent Swedish survey on the status of the housing stock and indoor air quality were placed in the public domain by the Swedish National Board of Housing, Building and Planning in 2011. The available parameters included the year of construction, dwelling location, type of ventilation...... exchange rate was a significant predictor of the concentrations of all three indoor pollutants. While ventilation seemed to be a source of NO2, increased ventilation rate appeared to decrease the indoor concentrations of formaldehyde and TVOC. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....... system, temperature, relative humidity, air exchange rate (AER), and concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC) from 157 single-family houses and 148 apartments. The median AER was lower in the single-family houses than in apartments (0.33h-1 vs. 0...

  12. Swedish Climate Strategy. A basis for the evaluation of Swedish climate work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-12-01

    The assignment of producing a basis for the evaluation of Sweden's climate policy is mainly focused on the national interim target for the 2008-2012 period. An assessment is to be made of the possibility of achieving the national interim target using current policy instruments and measures. Proposals for new or extended policy instruments, the consequences of which have been assessed, are to be submitted where necessary. The assignment also includes a study of the consequences of integrating the flexible mechanisms into the interim target. Our proposals for how the Swedish climate strategy could be reinforced have their roots in the above assignment, but we also wish to stress the following important points. Solving the climate problem requires a high degree of international collaboration. It is, for example, of great importance that the EU countries find joint ways of reducing emissions, thus enabling them to drive global developments forward. In the Swedish national strategy, there should be a stronger link to international and joint EU policy instruments. The proposals must also have a long-term perspective and not simply be based on the short-term achievement of targets in Sweden. We propose the following changes to policy instruments for sectors outside the trading sector (assuming an allocation of emissions allowances somewhat below the current forecast): introduction of CO{sub 2}-differentiated vehicle taxes for light vehicles; that the free-fuel benefit for company cars be valued at a factor of x1.8 market price, instead of the present 1.2; introduction of kilometre tax for trucks from 2008; continued and increased national funding support to local climate investment programmes during the period 2006-2008. The programmes should primarily give grants to long-term strategic measures; continued climate information campaign for 2006-2008; The EC Directive on the energy performance of buildings is implemented in a way that utilises the potential for greater

  13. Cardiovascular Endurance, Body Mass Index, Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Carotenoid Intake of Children: NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan A. Vaccaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Approximately 17% of children aged 6–11 years were classified as obese in the United States. Obesity adversely affects physical functioning and leads to reduced quality of life. Heart function for overweight and obese children has not been reported. Methods. Data for this study were from NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey (NNYFS conducted in conjunction with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES in 2012. This study used data from children aged 6–12 (N=732 that had the cardiorespiratory endurance measure, body mass index for age and sex, and dietary data (N=682. Cardiovascular endurance was estimated by heart rate reserve. Results. Compared to the highest percentile of heart rate reserve, those in the first percentile had 3.52 (2.36, 5.24 odds and those in the second percentile had 3.61 (1.84, 7.06 odds of being in the overweight/obese as compared to the under/normal weight category. Considering the highest percentile, boys had a heart rate reserve of 35%, whereas girls had a heart rate reserve of 13% (less than half that of boys. Conclusion. Having an overweight or obese classification for children in this study demonstrated a compromise in cardiovascular endurance. Parental awareness should be raised as to the detrimental consequence of overweight and heart health.

  14. Problem Solving in Swedish Mathematics Textbooks for Upper Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Daniel; Ryve, Andreas; Van Steenbrugge, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse how mathematical problem solving is represented in mathematical textbooks for Swedish upper secondary school. The analysis comprises dominating Swedish textbook series, and relates to uncovering (a) the quantity of tasks that are actually mathematical problems, (b) their location in the chapter, (c) their…

  15. Psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms among Swedish employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Theorell, Töres; Bech, Per

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate prospective associations between working conditions and depressive symptoms in Swedish men and women. METHODS: The study was based on SLOSH (N = 5,985), a follow-up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Swedes 16-64 years of age from the Swedish Work Environment...

  16. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  17. Parental Expectations of the Swedish Municipal School of Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilliedahl, Jonathan; Georgii-Hemming, Eva

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on a study designed to analyse parental expectations of the Swedish municipal school of arts (hereafter MSA) (in Swedish: kommunal musik- och kulturskola). The study is based on in-depth interviews conducted and informed by grounded theory. Although parental expectations are scarcely uniform, the study reveals a hope that the…

  18. The Position of the Deaf in the Swedish Labor Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, Emelie; Gellerstedt, Lotta Coniavitis; Danermark, Berth

    2010-01-01

    The position of deaf people in the Swedish labor market is described and analyzed. A population of 2,144 people born from 1941 to 1980 who attended special education programs for the deaf was compared to 100,000 randomly chosen individuals from the total Swedish population born during the same period. Data on these individuals consisted of…

  19. Global health education in Swedish medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, S; Agardh, A; Holmer, H; Krantz, G; Hagander, L

    2015-11-01

    Global health education is increasingly acknowledged as an opportunity for medical schools to prepare future practitioners for the broad health challenges of our time. The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of global health education in Swedish medical schools and to assess students' perceived needs for such education. Data on global health education were collected from all medical faculties in Sweden for the years 2000-2013. In addition, 76% (439/577) of all Swedish medical students in their final semester answered a structured questionnaire. Global health education is offered at four of Sweden's seven medical schools, and most medical students have had no global health education. Medical students in their final semester consider themselves to lack knowledge and skills in areas such as the global burden of disease (51%), social determinants of health (52%), culture and health (60%), climate and health (62%), health promotion and disease prevention (66%), strategies for equal access to health care (69%) and global health care systems (72%). A significant association was found between self-assessed competence and the amount of global health education received (pmedical students (83%) wished to have more global health education added to the curriculum. Most Swedish medical students have had no global health education as part of their medical school curriculum. Expanded education in global health is sought after by medical students and could strengthen the professional development of future medical doctors in a wide range of topics important for practitioners in the global world of the twenty-first century. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  20. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    screening policy. Response frequency was 96% (122/127). Data were derived from The Pediatric Cataract Register, PECARE Sweden. All Swedish children diagnosed with congenital cataract and operated on before 1 year of age between January 2007 and December 2009 were included. Statistical comparison...

  1. Environmental Stress Screening 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbel, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The following identifies the authors of this report and the organizations that sponsored the effort conducted under the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) Environmental Stress Screening (ESS) 2000 Project.

  2. The impact of a bodyweight and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) initiated through a national colorectal cancer screening programme: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annie S; Craigie, Angela M; Caswell, Stephen; Treweek, Shaun; Stead, Martine; Macleod, Maureen; Daly, Fergus; Belch, Jill; Rodger, Jackie; Kirk, Alison; Ludbrook, Anne; Rauchhaus, Petra; Norwood, Patricia; Thompson, Joyce; Wardle, Jane; Steele, Robert J C

    2014-03-07

    To evaluate the impact of a diet and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) on weight change in people with a body mass index >25 weight (kg)/height (m)(2) at increased risk of colorectal cancer and other obesity related comorbidities. Multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Four Scottish National Health Service health boards. 329 overweight or obese adults (aged 50 to 74 years) who had undergone colonoscopy after a positive faecal occult blood test result, as part of the national bowel screening programme, and had a diagnosis of adenoma confirmed by histopathology. 163 were randomised to intervention and 166 to control. Participants were randomised to a control group (weight loss booklet only) or 12 month intervention group (three face to face visits with a lifestyle counsellor plus monthly 15 minute telephone calls). A goal of 7% reduction in body weight was set and participants received a personalised energy prescription (2508 kJ (600 kcal) below that required for weight maintenance) and bodyweight scales. Motivational interviewing techniques explored self assessed confidence, ambivalence, and personal values concerning weight. Behavioural strategies included goal setting, identifying intentions of implementation, self monitoring of body weight, and counsellor feedback about reported diet, physical activity, and weight change. The primary outcome was weight change over 12 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting cardiovascular biomarkers, and glucose metabolism variables, physical activity, diet, and alcohol consumption. At 12 months, data on the primary outcome were available for 148 (91%) participants in the intervention group and 157 (95%) in the control group. Mean weight loss was 3.50 kg (SD 4.91) (95% confidence interval 2.70 to 4.30) in the intervention group compared with 0.78 kg (SD 3.77) (0.19 to 1.38) in the control group. The group difference was 2.69 kg (95% confidence interval 1

  3. Adaptation of "Seniors in the community risk evaluation for eating and nutrition, Version II" (SCREEN II) for use in Sweden : report on the translation process

    OpenAIRE

    Westergren, Albert; Nilsson, Maria; Hagell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the initial stages of the Swedish adaptation of "Seniors in the community: Risk evaluation for eating and nutrition, Version II" (SCREEN II) that has been developed by Heather Keller.

  4. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  5. Communication problems in Swedish Mental Health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    In a study on the implementation of the Swedish Mental Health reform in the county of Gavleborg in Sweden, attention was called, at an early stage, to the need for relevant theories on the nature of the obstacles that slowed down the reform process. Data had initially been gathered from interviews with persons from all levels of the implementation work. A Grounded Theory (GT) study was carried out using these data in order to generate a theory on the nature of the obstacles. Two separate analyses were made, one based on data from experts and decision makers and the other based on data from consumers and staff. Each of these analyses generated a theory with great explanatory and predictive value. In a further analysis, it became possible to merge the theories into an expanded theory with a greater general validity within the entire field of the Swedish Mental Health reform process. The expanded theory states that the psychiatric reform in Sweden is slowed down by obstacles preventing the transfer of information: 1) between staff in the mental health services and staff in the social services; 2) between social services' care givers and consumers. One reason for not removing these obstacles is that they serve an important purpose for those involved, in terms of preserving group identity, which gives them the opportunity to exert influence on their situation and provides room for manoeuvring.

  6. The effects of obesity and mobility disability in access to breast and cervical cancer screening in france: results from the national health and disability survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussière, Clémence; Sicsic, Jonathan; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to disentangle the effects of obesity and mobility limitation on cervical and breast cancer screening among community dwelling women. The data source was the French national Health and Disability Survey - Household Section, 2008. The Body Mass Index (BMI) was used to categorize obesity status. We constructed a continuous score of mobility limitations to assess the severity of disability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84). Logistic regressions were performed to examine the association between obesity, mobility limitations and the use of Pap test (n = 8 133) and the use of mammography (n = 7 561). Adjusted odds ratios were calculated (AOR). Interaction terms between obesity and the disability score were included in models testing for effect modifications. Compared with non-obese women, the odds of having a Pap test in the past 3 years was 24% lower in obese women (AOR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65 to 0.89), the odds of having a mammogram in the past 2 years was 23% lower (AOR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66 to 0.91). Each time the disability score was 5 points higher, the odds of having a Pap test decreases by 20% (AOR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98), the odds of having a mammogram decreases by 25% (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.97). There was no significant interaction between obesity and disability score. Obesity and mobility limitation are independently associated with a lower likelihood of cervical and breast cancer screening. Protective outreach and follow-up are necessary to reduce inequalities and thus to reduce health disparities in these vulnerable and high-risk populations of obese women with disabilities.

  7. The effects of obesity and mobility disability in access to breast and cervical cancer screening in france: results from the national health and disability survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Bussière

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to disentangle the effects of obesity and mobility limitation on cervical and breast cancer screening among community dwelling women. METHODS: The data source was the French national Health and Disability Survey - Household Section, 2008. The Body Mass Index (BMI was used to categorize obesity status. We constructed a continuous score of mobility limitations to assess the severity of disability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84. Logistic regressions were performed to examine the association between obesity, mobility limitations and the use of Pap test (n = 8 133 and the use of mammography (n = 7 561. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated (AOR. Interaction terms between obesity and the disability score were included in models testing for effect modifications. RESULTS: Compared with non-obese women, the odds of having a Pap test in the past 3 years was 24% lower in obese women (AOR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65 to 0.89, the odds of having a mammogram in the past 2 years was 23% lower (AOR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66 to 0.91. Each time the disability score was 5 points higher, the odds of having a Pap test decreases by 20% (AOR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98, the odds of having a mammogram decreases by 25% (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.97. There was no significant interaction between obesity and disability score. CONCLUSION: Obesity and mobility limitation are independently associated with a lower likelihood of cervical and breast cancer screening. Protective outreach and follow-up are necessary to reduce inequalities and thus to reduce health disparities in these vulnerable and high-risk populations of obese women with disabilities.

  8. Packages of participation: Swedish employees' experience of Lean depends on how they are involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännmark, Mikael; Holden, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Lean Production is a dominant approach in Swedish and global manufacturing and service industries. Studies of Lean's employee effects are few and contradictory. Employee effects from Lean are likely not uniform. This paper investigates the effect of employees' participation on their experiences of Lean. This study investigated how different packages of employee participation in Lean affected manufacturing workers' experiences of Lean. During 2008-2011, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from Swedish manufacturing companies participating in the national Swedish Lean Production program Produktionslyftet. Data from 129 surveys (28 companies), 39 semi-structured interviews, and 30 reports were analyzed. In the main analysis, comparisons were made of the survey-reported Lean experiences of employees in three groups: temporary group employees (N = 36), who participated in Lean mostly through intermittent projects; continuous group employees (N = 69), who participated through standing improvement groups; and combined group employees (N = 24), who participated in both ways. Continuous group employees had the most positive experience of Lean, followed by the combined group. Temporary group employees had the least positive experiences, being less likely than their counterparts to report that Lean improved teamwork, occupational safety, and change-related learning, decision making, and authority. These findings support the importance of continuous, structured opportunities for participation but raise the possibility that more participation may result in greater workload and role overload, mitigating some benefits of employee involvement. Consequently, companies should consider involving employees in change efforts but should attend to the specific design of participation activities.

  9. The good work--a Swedish trade union vision in the shadow of lean production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jan; Abrahamsson, Lena

    2009-07-01

    "The Good Work" (Det goda arbetet) was established as a highly praised and established concept in the Swedish working life debate in the middle of the 1980s. In this paper, we are going to discuss the concept in relation to the massive introduction of lean production in Swedish industry. The aim of this paper is to restore the theory of the good work into the industrial society of today. We will search for a model for 'good work' in balance between the demands from production and good conditions for a learning environment. The theoretical base for this paper will be found in both organisational research and research on production technology systems. We identify three strong trends in Swedish industrial companies giving both pitfalls and possibilities for the good work; the learning focus as a way to increase productivity and improve working conditions; Lean Production in most cases imply narrow short-cyclic work tasks; and the global market that reduces national discretion. As a result, we formulate a new set of criteria for "the good work".

  10. Distribution of personality, individual characteristics and internet usage in Swedish older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Jessica; Rennemark, Mikael; Jogréus, Claes; Berglund, Johan

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated factors associated with internet usage in the Swedish older adults ranging in age from 60 to 96. Personality traits and individual characteristics have been previously noted to influence internet usage, where older adults have not been the focus population. In this study, the relationships between personality, individual characteristics and internet usage were investigated. A descriptive analysis of the personality tests of a total of 1402 subjects included in the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care was conducted. Three variables were controlled for: sex, age and education. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests, chi-square tests and a logistic regression were used in order to detect the relationships with internet usage. Men differ significantly from women in the personality traits analysis. Those with higher education were more open and neuroticism was lower in the oldest older adults. Internet usage declined significantly with age and those with middle to higher education were using the internet the most. No other associations with internet use were found. Personality traits and individual characteristics do not seem to influence the Swedish older adult and their internet usage. What one needs to account for is the age and education of the person. The more educated and the youngest cohorts were using the internet more frequently.

  11. Transforming Ottawa Charter health promotion concepts into Swedish public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Bosse

    2007-01-01

    Swedish public health policy clearly illustrates how the concept of the Ottawa Charter for health promotion can be utilized at a national level. The impact has been more implicit than explicit. Public health has a long history in Sweden and much of the present and future is, and will be, linked to traditional values and structures. International input, however, has been essential to prompt new approaches and change. Health inequalities remain the major shortcoming. The Swedish system offers universal access to healthcare in a decentralized system. Still, primary healthcare, and the health services as a whole have not yet sufficiently embraced the idea of health promotion. Political attention to modern public health at the Prime Minister level was established in late 1980s. Since, continuous initiatives in terms of organization, infrastructure and funding have taken place. With regard to funding, a vast majority of the resources allocated to health promotion will be found outside the health sector. An interesting observation is that the Swedish public health policy with its 11 objective domains remains the same, also after a change of government. Future challenges include maintaining and developing an intersectoral mechanism for implementation, allocating more resources for intervention research to strengthen knowledge-based health promotion, and developing tools for coping better with the challenges of globalisation identified in the Bangkok Charter.

  12. Potential for natural gas based CHP generation in Swedish district heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutsson, David; Werner, Sven [Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden). Div. of Energy Systems Technology

    2002-07-01

    Sweden has the second lowest carbon dioxide emissions per capita in the European Union, 28% below the EU average. The major explanation for this fact is the dominating resources of hydropower and nuclear power in the Swedish power generation. As the deregulation of the European electricity markets will continue, the electricity systems inside the Union will become more integrated. Hence, Sweden is merging into a carbon rich power generation system. Currently, the Swedish district heating sector has a very low national power-to-heat-ratio, which implicates that Sweden has great potential for additional electricity production in the existing district heating systems. This paper shows, that if the extension of the natural gas grid proposed in the Nordic Gas Grid project is realised, the annual potential for further natural gas based electricity production in the Swedish district heating systems is 26 TWh. In the short range, the corresponding carbon dioxide reduction in northern Europe is 16 M ton. This is approximately one quarter of the total annual carbon dioxide emissions in Sweden today.

  13. Reported sexually transmitted infections in Swedish Internet-using men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M W; Daneback, K; Mansson, S-A; Berglund, T; Tikkanen, R

    2008-06-01

    Although the Internet has become a forum for making sexual contacts, and has been associated with increased sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission, we have little information of history of STIs in Internet-based samples. The Internet behaviours that are associated with STI acquisition are poorly understood. We analysed STI histories reported by 904 Swedish men and 931 Swedish women who responded to an Internet-based survey on sexual behaviour in 2002: 16.6% of men and 22.5% of women reported a lifetime history of STIs, with Chlamydia being the most common for both genders. 3% of men and 5% of women who reported an STI, indicated that they had had more than one. Sources of the STI, where known, were Internet-acquired partners in only 3% of cases. There were no differences between men and women with or without an STI history regarding the kind of online sexual activities they engaged in, how they found sexual material online, and the reasons they engage in sexual activities. These rates are similar to those reported in a national random study of sexuality in Sweden. Contrary to prior research, these results suggest no relationship between STI and specific Internet characteristics usage patterns. These data suggest that the Internet is not yet a major source of STIs in Swedish men and women. Given these STI histories, the Internet may be a useful medium to include in STI prevention efforts.

  14. Occurrence and reduction of pharmaceuticals in the water phase at Swedish wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falås, Per; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Ledin, Anna

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, several screening programs for pharmaceuticals at Swedish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been conducted by research institutes, county councils, and wastewater treatment companies. In this study, influent and effluent concentrations compiled from these screening...... programs were used to assess the occurrence and reduction of non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals for human usage. The study is limited to full-scale WWTPs with biological treatment. Based on the data compiled, a total of 70 non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals have been detected, at concentrations ranging from a few...... WWTPs were identified. Further comparison based on the biological treatment showed lower reduction degrees for several pharmaceuticals in trickling filter plants compared to activated sludge plants with nitrogen removal....

  15. Estimating the cost-per-result of a national reflexed Cryptococcal antigenaemia screening program: Forecasting the impact of potential HIV guideline changes and treatment goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Naseem; Coetzee, Lindi Marie; Schnippel, Kathryn; Glencross, Deborah Kim

    2017-01-01

    During 2016, the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) introduced laboratory-based reflexed Cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) screening to detect early Cryptococcal disease in immunosuppressed HIV+ patients with a confirmed CD4 count of 100 cells/μl or less. The aim of this study was to assess cost-per-result of a national screening program across different tiers of laboratory service, with variable daily CrAg test volumes. The impact of potential ART treatment guideline and treatment target changes on CrAg volumes, platform choice and laboratory workflow are considered. CD4 data (with counts testing volumes with appropriately-matched CrAg testing platforms allocated at each of 52 NHLS CD4 laboratories. A cost-per-result was calculated for four scenarios, including the existing service status quo (Scenario-I), and three other settings (as Scenarios II-IV) which were based on information from recent antiretroviral (ART) guidelines, District Health Information System (DHIS) data and UNAIDS 90/90/90 HIV/AIDS treatment targets. Scenario-II forecast CD4 testing offered only to new ART initiates recorded at DHIS. Scenario-III projected all patients notified as HIV+, but not yet on ART (recorded at DHIS) and Scenario-IV forecast CrAg screening in 90% of estimated HIV+ patients across South Africa (also DHIS). Stata was used to assess daily CrAg volumes at the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles across 52 CD4-laboratories. Daily volumes were used to determine technical effort/ operator staff costs (% full time equivalent) and cost-per-result for all scenarios. Daily volumes ranged between 3 and 64 samples for Scenario-I at the 5th and 95th percentile. Similarly, daily volumes ranges of 1-12, 2-45 and 5-100 CrAg-directed samples were noted for Scenario's II, III and IV respectively. A cut-off of 30 CrAg tests per day defined use of either LFA or EIA platform. LFA cost-per-result ranged from $8.24 to $5.44 and EIA cost-per-result between $5.58 and $4

  16. Incompleteness of Swedish local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schytt, Erica; Halvarsson, Anna; Pedersen-Draper, Christina; Mårtensson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the presence and content of local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment in Swedish labor and postnatal wards. A Swedish national survey. Presence and content of clinical guidelines for acupuncture. Setting. All Swedish labor and postnatal wards at the time of data collection (April 2007-March 2008). Enquiry was made on local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment at 50 labor and 50 postnatal wards. The standards for reporting interventions in controlled trials of acupuncture document was used to identify core aspects of acupuncture treatment and the proportion of wards with guidelines on these aspects was evaluated. Guidelines were obtained from 27 labor wards and 22 postnatal wards. Descriptions of the core aspects of acupuncture treatment, such as acupuncture rationale, needling details and treatment regimens, were limited in most. All local guidelines included indications for treatment, but these were not based on scientific evidence of effect, and only two mentioned the importance of achieving de-qi - a feeling of soreness reflecting an effective treatment. Few clinical guidelines required that the practitioners' acupuncture education should be on an academic level and relevant references based on clinical trials were lacking in all guidelines. Swedish local clinical guidelines on acupuncture for childbirth-related symptoms lack sufficient information to support midwives and obstetricians in administering acupuncture treatment. The content of the guidelines was unclear, inconclusive and, in some cases, irrelevant, and a majority lacked important information on indications and technique. © 2010 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2010 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Trends in breast cancer mortality in Sweden before and after implementation of mammography screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Haukka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Incidence-based mortality modelling comparing the risk of breast cancer death in screened and unscreened women in nine Swedish counties has suggested a 39% risk reduction in women 40 to 69 years old after introduction of mammography screening in the 1980s and 1990s. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated changes in breast cancer mortality in the same nine Swedish counties using a model approach based on official Swedish breast cancer mortality statistics, robust to effects of over-diagnosis and treatment changes. Using mortality data from the NordCan database from 1974 until 2003, we estimated the change in breast cancer mortality before and after introduction of mammography screening in at least the 13 years that followed screening start. RESULTS: Breast mortality decreased by 16% (95% CI: 9 to 22% in women 40 to 69, and by 11% (95% CI: 2 to 20% in women 40 to 79 years of age. DISCUSSION: Without individual data it is impossible to completely separate the effects of improved treatment and health service organisation from that of screening, which would bias our results in favour of screening. There will also be some contamination of post-screening mortality from breast cancer diagnosed prior to screening, beyond our attempts to adjust for delayed benefit. This would bias against screening. However, our estimates from publicly available data suggest considerably lower benefits than estimates based on comparison of screened versus non-screened women.

  18. Comparing Danish and Swedish versions of PISA scientific literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serder, Malmø University, Margareta; Sørensen, Helene

    This paper presents a comparison between the Swedish, Danish, English, and French versions of three scientific literacy test-units from the released PISA items 2006. More specifically it compares how different words and concepts have been translated in the Swedish and Danish tests, compared...... to the English and French original versions. Differences that occur as a result of the translation process concerning words’ meaning are demonstrated. The possible consequences of such differences are exemplified by an excerpt from a situation in which Swedish 15-year-old students collaboratively worked...

  19. Mental Health Screening in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weist, Mark D.; Rubin, Marcia; Moore, Elizabeth; Adelsheim, Steven; Wrobel, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Background: This article discusses the importance of screening students in schools for emotional/behavioral problems. Methods: Elements relevant to planning and implementing effective mental health screening in schools are considered. Screening in schools is linked to a broader national agenda to improve the mental health of children and…

  20. Managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence and sickness presenteeism among Swedish men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Anna; Westerlund, Hugo; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Theorell, Töres

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between managerial leadership and self-reported sickness absence/presenteeism among Swedish men and women. Five thousand one hundred and forty-one Swedish employees, 56% of the participants in a nationally representative sample of the Swedish working population, were included in this cross-sectional questionnaire study. The leadership dimensions measured were five subscales of a standardized leadership questionnaire (Global Leadership and Organizational Behaviour Effectiveness Programme): Integrity, Team integration, Inspirational leadership, Autocratic leadership, and Self-centred leadership. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted, adjusting for factors in private life, employment category, labour-market sector, working conditions, self-reported general health, and satisfaction with life in general. Inspirational leadership was associated with a lower rate of short spells of sickness absence (leadership was related to a greater amount of total sick days taken by men. Sometimes showing integrity was associated with higher rate of sickness absence >1 week among men, and seldom showing integrity was associated with more sickness presenteeism among women. Managers performing Team integration were sometimes associated with women taking fewer short (1 week) spells of sickness absence. Adjustment for self-reported general health did not alter these associations for men, but did so to some extent for women. Managerial leadership was found to be relevant for the understanding of sickness absence in the Swedish working population. There were distinctive gender differences.

  1. Are boys discriminated in Swedish high schools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinnerich, Bjørn Tyrefors; Höglin, Erik; Johannesson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Girls typically have higher grades than boys in school and recent research suggests that part of this gender difference may be due to discrimination of boys in grading.Werigorously test this in a field experiment where a random sample of the same tests in the Swedish language is subject to blind...... and non-blind grading. The non-blind test score is on average 15% lower for boys than for girls. Blind grading lowers the average grades with 13%, indicating that personal ties and/or grade inflation are important in non-blind grading. But we find no evidence of discrimination against boys in grading....... The point estimate of the discrimination effect is close to zero with a 95% confidence interval of±4.5% of the average non-blind grade....

  2. Wood flow problems in the Swedish forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Dick [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden); Roennqvist, M. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematics

    1998-12-31

    In this paper we give an overview of the wood-flow in Sweden including a description of organization and planning. Based on that, we will describe a number of applications or problem areas in the wood-flow chain that are currently considered by the Swedish forest companies to be important and potential in order to improve overall operations. We have focused on applications which are short term planning or operative planning. We do not give any final results as much of the development is currently ongoing or is still in a planning phase. Instead we describe what kind of models and decision support systems that could be applied in order to improve co-operation within and integration of the wood-flow chain 13 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  3. Swedish Taxation in a 150-year Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenkula Mikael

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the development of taxation in Sweden from 1862 to 2010. The examination includes six key aspects of the Swedish tax system, namely the taxation of labor income, capital income, wealth, inheritances and gifts, consumption and real estate. The importance of these taxes varied greatly over time and Sweden increasingly relied on broad-based taxes (such as income taxes and general consumption taxes and taxes that were less visible to the public (such as payroll taxes and social security contributions. The tax-to-GDP ratio was initially low and relatively stable, but from the 1930s, the ratio increased sharply for nearly 50 years. Towards the end of the period, the tax-to-GDP ratio declined significantly.

  4. Gendered portraits of depression in Swedish newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengs, Carita; Johansson, Eva; Danielsson, Ulla; Lehti, Arja; Hammarström, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Mass media are influential mediators of information, knowledge, and narratives of health and illness. In this article, we report on an examination of personal accounts of illness as presented in three Swedish newspapers, focusing on the gendered representation of laypersons' experiences of depression. A database search identified all articles mentioning depression during the year 2002. Twenty six articles focusing on personal experiences of depression were then subjected to a qualitative content analysis. We identified four themes: displaying a successful facade, experiencing a cracking facade, losing and regaining control, and explaining the illness. We found both similarities and differences with regard to gendered experiences. The mediated accounts of depression both upheld and challenged traditional gender stereotypes. The women's stories were more detailed, relational, emotionally oriented, and embodied. The portrayal of men was less emotional and expressive, and described a more dramatic onset of depression, reflecting hegemonic patterns of masculinity.

  5. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES).

  6. Perceived employability trajectories: A Swedish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnroos Née Kirves, Kaisa; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-07-27

    This study identified perceived employability trajectories and their associations with sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms over time. The sample was part of the Swedish Longitudinal Survey on Health from 2008 to 2014 (n=4,583). Two stable trajectories (high and low perceived employability over time) and three trajectories with changes (increasing, decreasing, and V-shaped perceived employability over time) were identified. Workers with stable low perceived employability reported more sleeping difficulties and depressive symptoms than those who perceived high or increasing employability. Perceived employability is a rather stable personal resource, which is associated with well-being over time. However, changes in perceived employability do not seem to be echoed in well-being, at least not as immediately as theoretically expected.

  7. Temporal Trends in Overweight and Obesity, Physical Activity and Screen Time among Czech Adolescents from 2002 to 2014: A National Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Erik; Sigmundová, Dagmar; Badura, Petr; Kalman, Michal; Hamrik, Zdenek; Pavelka, Jan

    2015-09-18

    This study examines trends in overweight and obesity, physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) among Czech adolescents over a recent 12-year study period. Nationally representative samples consisted of 19,940 adolescents (9760 boys and 10,180 girls) aged 10.5-16.5 years from the Czech Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) questionnaire-based surveys conducted in 2002, 2006, 2010 and 2014. Trends in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, meeting the recommendations for moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) (≥60 min per day of MVPA) and excessive ST (>2 h per day) were estimated using logistic regression. Significant increases (p obesity between the years 2002 and 2014 were evident for both adolescent boys (18.3%(2002)-24.8%(2014)) and girls (8.3%(2002)-11.9%(2014)). Compared to 2002, in 2014 significant decreases (p obesity with concomitant decreases in PA provide evidence in support of the current and upcoming efforts of government and commercial organizations in implementing interventions aimed at reducing excessive body weight among Czech adolescents.

  8. Lightning location system supervising Swedish power transmission network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Stefan A.

    1991-01-01

    For electric utilities, the ability to prevent or minimize lightning damage on personnel and power systems is of great importance. Therefore, the Swedish State Power Board, has been using data since 1983 from a nationwide lightning location system (LLS) for accurately locating lightning ground strikes. Lightning data is distributed and presented on color graphic displays at regional power network control centers as well as at the national power system control center for optimal data use. The main objectives for use of LLS data are: supervising the power system for optimal and safe use of the transmission and generating capacity during periods of thunderstorms; warning service to maintenance and service crews at power line and substations to end operations hazardous when lightning; rapid positioning of emergency crews to locate network damage at areas of detected lightning; and post analysis of power outages and transmission faults in relation to lightning, using archived lightning data for determination of appropriate design and insulation levels of equipment. Staff have found LLS data useful and economically justified since the availability of power system has increased as well as level of personnel safety.

  9. The assassination of the Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsgaard, Edvard; Meloy, J Reid

    2011-03-01

    On September 10, 2003, Anna Lindh, the Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs, was assassinated. The offender, a 24-year-old man, was a socially isolated, culturally and familially dislocated, yet academically quite competent young man who became enthralled with the habitual criminality of some of his relatives and their associates, and then psychiatrically decompensated in his early twenties. He had a history of serious violence before the crime, including the gross assault with a knife of his alcoholic and abusive father when he was 17, stalking, and extortion. At least a year prior to the assassination, he confided to a friend his desire to attack someone famous in front of many people. A definitive motive for the crime was not possible to establish. This was an act of intended, yet opportunistic violence toward a national political figure. The dynamics of the case are placed in the context of other attacks on Western European and U.S. politicians. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. The Origins of Intergenerational Associations: Lessons from Swedish Adoption Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bjorklund, A.; Lindahl, M.; Plug, E.J.S.

    2006-01-01

    We use unique Swedish data with information on adopted children's biological and adoptive parents to estimate intergenerational mobility associations in earnings and education. We argue that the impact from biological parents captures broad prebirth factors, including genes and prenatal environment,

  11. Updated Swedish advice on reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennergren, Göran; Nordstrand, Kerstin; Alm, Bernt; Möllborg, Per; Öhman, Anna; Berlin, Anita; Katz-Salamon, Miriam; Lagercrantz, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews updated advice and factual material from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare on reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Issues covered by the guidance for parents and healthcare professionals include sleeping positions, smoking, breastfeeding, bed sharing and using pacifiers. The guidelines conclude that infants under three months of age are safest sleeping in their own cot and that a pacifier can be used when they are going to sleep. ©2015 The Authors. Acta Paediatrica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  12. Validation of the diagnosis canine epilepsy in a Swedish animal insurance database against practice records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heske, Linda; Berendt, Mette; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin

    2014-01-01

    Canine epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions in dogs but the actual incidence of the disease remains unknown. A Swedish animal insurance database has previously been shown useful for the study of disease occurrence in companion animals. The dogs insured by this company......% of the national dog population. Most commonly, dogs are covered by both veterinary care insurance and life insurance. Previous studies have shown that the general data quality is good, but the validity of a specific diagnosis should be examined carefully before using the database for incidence calculations...

  13. Swedish support programme on nuclear non-proliferation in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, P.; Andersson, Sarmite [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Wredberg, L. [ILG Consultant Ltd., Vienna (Austria)

    2000-06-15

    At the request of the Swedish Government, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate has established a support and co-operation programme in the area of nuclear non-proliferation with Russia and several of the republics of the former Soviet Union. The Programme was initiated in 1991 and an overall goal is to accomplish national means and measures for control and protection of nuclear material and facilities, in order to minimise the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons and illicit trafficking of nuclear material and equipment. The objective of the Swedish Support Programme is to help each, so called, recipient State to be able to, independently and without help from outside, take the full responsibility for operating a national non-proliferation system and thereby fulfil the requirements imposed through the international legal instruments. This would include both the development and implementation of a modern nuclear legislation system, and the establishment of the components making up a national system for combating illicit trafficking. The support and co-operation projects are organised in five Project Groups (i.e. nuclear legislation, nuclear material control, physical protection, export/import control, and combating of illicit trafficking), which together cover the entire non-proliferation area. Up till June 2000, support and co-operation projects, completed and on-going, have been carried out in ten States, namely Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. Furthermore, programmes have been initiated during the first part of 2000 with Estonia, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. In addition, assistance has been given to Poland on a specific nuclear material accountancy topic. All projects are done on request by and in co-operation with these States. The total number of projects initiated during the period 1991 to June 2000 is 109, thereof 77 have been completed and 32 are currently on-going. It is the

  14. Breast cancer risk reduction--is it feasible to initiate a randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention programme (ActWell) within a national breast screening programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annie S; Macleod, Maureen; Mutrie, Nanette; Sugden, Jacqueline; Dobson, Hilary; Treweek, Shaun; O'Carroll, Ronan E; Thompson, Alistair; Kirk, Alison; Brennan, Graham; Wyke, Sally

    2014-12-17

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second cause of cancer deaths amongst women in the UK. The incidence of the disease is increasing and is highest in women from least deprived areas. It is estimated that around 42% of the disease in post-menopausal women could be prevented by increased physical activity and reductions in alcohol intake and body fatness. Breast cancer control endeavours focus on national screening programmes but these do not include communications or interventions for risk reduction. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of delivery, indicative effects and acceptability of a lifestyle intervention programme initiated within the NHS Scottish Breast Screening Programme (NHSSBSP). A 1:1 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the 3 month ActWell programme (focussing on body weight, physical activity and alcohol) versus usual care conducted in two NHSSBSP sites between June 2013 and January 2014. Feasibility assessments included recruitment, retention, and fidelity to protocol. Indicative outcomes were measured at baseline and 3 month follow-up (body weight, waist circumference, eating and alcohol habits and physical activity). At study end, a questionnaire assessed participant satisfaction and qualitative interviews elicited women's, coaches, and radiographers' experiences. Statistical analysis used Chi squared tests for comparisons in proportions and paired t tests for comparisons of means. Linear regression analyses were performed, adjusted for baseline values, with group allocation as a fixed effect. A pre-set recruitment target of 80 women was achieved within 12 weeks and 65 (81%) participants (29 intervention, 36 control) completed 3 month assessments. Mean age was 58 ± 5.6 years, mean BMI was 29.2 ± 7.0 kg/m(2) and many (44%) reported a family history of breast cancer. The primary analysis (baseline body weight adjusted) showed a significant between group difference favouring the intervention group of 2.04 kg

  15. About the Alleged Racism among Swedish Police Officers

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Erika

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of the present research was to investigate whether Swedish police officers who often are accused of being racist are more prejudiced toward people with non Swedish-origin than other occupational groups. Three groups (n = 108) – police officers, fire fighters and teachers participated in the study that was carried out using questionnaires and IAT-tests. The study showed that the police officers were not the most prejudiced occupational group in the explicit measurements and were t...

  16. Components of success in academic reading tasks for Swedish students

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Shaw; Alan McMillion

    2011-01-01

    In a parallel-language environment students are often required to read in a language different from the one they use in lectures, seminars, and among themselves. Relatively little research has been done on the overall reading success of such groups or on the componential make up of their L2 reading skills. This paper compares the English-language reading skills of Swedish students of biology with that of equivalent British biology students. Many Swedish readers perform within or above the nor...

  17. Key success factors : The internationalisation of Swedish fashion companies

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Stefan; Knudsen, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Swedish fashion market today quickly becomes too small, even for the new companies, and they are quick to take the step abroad and launch their internationalisation process. With a focus on the four Swed-ish fashion companies Filippa K, Acne Jeans, Nudie Jeans and Whyred, we have analysed how these representatives of the industry have interna-tionalised themselves. The companies have chosen different ways to promote their brand and how to control the perceived image of the bra...

  18. A study of Swedish tourists going on vacation in thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Rong; PANTO, SITTHIPHON

    2010-01-01

    Date: 2010-05-25 Program: International Marketing Course Master Thesis International Marketing (EFO705) Authors Ms. RongPan Mr. Sitthiphon Panto Teacher Tobias Eltebrandt Title A study of Swedish tourist going on vacation in Thailand Research question Which factors affect Swedish travelers’ decision making in choosing Thailand as a traveling destination? Target audience This report could be beneficial for Tourism Authority of Thailand. The target audiences including Government sector who resp...

  19. Oscillometric casual blood pressure normative standards for Swedish children using ABPM to exclude casual hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, Rafael T; Holtbäck, Ulla; Bergh, Anita; Svensson, Eva; Wühl, Elke

    2015-04-01

    Casual blood pressure (CBP) is considered a reliable proxy for cardiovascular health. Although the auscultatory technique is the reference standard method for measuring CBP, oscillometric devices are increasingly being used in children. We sought to establish oscillometric CBP normative standards for Swedish children. Cross-sectional oscillometric CBP readings were obtained by the Welch Allyn Spot Vital Signs 420 monitor and measured according to the International Guidelines' recommendations. Participants with elevated oscillometric CBP levels underwent verification by the auscultatory method. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was used to exclude casual hypertension. Data on 1,470 (772 males) apparently healthy Swedish schoolchildren aged 6-16 years were analyzed and sex-specific reference charts normalized to age or height were constructed. Systolic and diastolic CBP values were significantly higher with age, height, height standard deviation score