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Sample records for swedish deep repository

  1. Siting of the Swedish deep geological repository - experiences and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.; Backblom, G.; Thegerstrom, C.; Ahlbom, K.; Leijon, B.

    1996-01-01

    The paper provides a brief overview of the Swedish siting programme for a deep repository. A stepwise process is a key element in the planning and implementation of deep disposal of long-lived waste in Sweden. The local siting work is made in cooperation with the affected and concerned municipalities. The programs, decisions and results that so far have been reported and ongoing feasibility studies is a solid platform for the continuing siting work. It can be noted that the siting work in some cases has caused heavy opposition and negative opinions. Careful considerations on how to proceed to develop the necessary background material must therefore be made. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process that has started in conjunction with feasibility studies are judged to play an important role in the future. In this process, with extensive local involvement, critical issues can be detected at an early stage and sound ideas on both the process itself and on technical issues can be incorporated. To facilitate information exchange and cooperation between the municipalities involved and to coordinate liaison between the municipalities and county administrative boards affected by the studies, the Swedish government has appointed a National Coordinator for nuclear waste disposal. The government also has decided to provide the concerned municipalities with funding for their participation in the process. (author)

  2. Siting factors for the Swedish deep repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, A.; Ericsson, Lars O.; Svemar, C.; Almen, K.E.; Andersson, Johan

    1998-01-01

    A project entitled Siting factors and criteria for site evaluation was initiated at the SKB in 1997. The project comprises an important part of the work of siting and site selection that is being pursued within SKB. The purpose of the project is to create a logical structure for the continued siting work, and its results should also be able to be used to assist in evaluating sites. The project will thereby also provide a means - in accordance with the Government's decision regarding Research Programme 95 - to obtain more detailed and quantified siting factors and criteria than those previously presented in the supplement to Research Programme 92. The overall goals of the project are to identify and quantify requirements and preferences regarding the properties of the rock and the soil from the perspectives of long-term safety, performance and planning and design of the rock works, and to identify siting factors and criteria. The latter should be able to be used to determine whether requirements and preferences are satisfied, both when screening sites for site investigation and after completed site investigation. Presented requirements, preferences, factors and criteria must be acceptable to national and municipal authorities or others with influence over the siting work. To start with, requirements and preferences regarding the performance of the rock in a deep repository have been clarified. These requirements and preferences are based on many years of experience of safety assessments and construction analyses within SKB. What is new here is the structuring that has been done, where a classification is made into different geoscientific disciplines, and the formalism that has been developed for the concepts requirements, preferences and performance. This is a prerequisite for a consistent and hopefully comprehensive set of requirements from a functional perspective. Work has continued on siting factors with reference to a coming site investigation programme. A

  3. Monitoring during the stepwise implementation of the Swedish deep repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, Goeran; Almen, Karl-Erik

    2004-03-01

    Monitoring in this report is defined as 'Continuous or repeated observations or measurements of parameters to increase the scientific understanding of the site and the repository, to show compliance with requirements or for adaptation of plans in light of the monitoring results.' The international outlook from IAEA, OECD/NEA, CEC and some country-specific reviews presented in the report forms a necessary background to the Swedish monitoring framework. The implementation of the deep repository in Sweden is executed in phases where monitoring is an inherently integrated activity in the programme. The first phase is the site investigations when Primary Baseline conditions are established. During the following construction phase of the repository, detailed site characterisation continues in conjunction with construction of the access to the deposition area, construction of parts of the deposition area and the central service area. Monitoring is then used to track the changes to the previously established Primary Baseline conditions and distinguishing these imposed changes from natural variations or from other man-made influences. During the initial operation phase, around 200-400 canisters of spent fuel is emplaced and deposition tunnels backfilled. After up-dated evaluations, the phase of regular operation begin, where detailed characterisation, construction of the repository and waste emplacement are concurrent activities. The closure of the repository will take place when all spent fuel has been emplaced, i.e. in the latter part of this century. Monitoring during the stepwise implementation of the repository is executed of several reasons mainly to: describe the Primary Baseline conditions of the repository site, develop and demonstrate understanding of the repository site and the behaviour of engineered barriers, assist in the decision-making process, show compliance with international and national guidelines and regulations. Specific rationales for monitoring are

  4. Swedish deep repository siting programme. Guide to the documentation of 25 years of geoscientific research (1976-2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milnes, Alan Geoffrey [GEA Consulting, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-03-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has been carrying out geoscientific research and feasibility studies aimed at identifying suitable sites for deep repositories in the Precambrian basement of the Baltic Shield. The documentation of this research effort forms an extensive body of material which is exceptionally wide-ranging and which is generally little known outside the Swedish nuclear waste community. This has now been compiled in the form of a 'documentation guide' in order to make the research results more easily accessible to the scientific community at large, and to show how they relate to their 'nearest surroundings', i.e. the relevant academic scientific literature and the documentation of similar research by other institutions, in Sweden and in other countries (Finland, Canada). The documentation covers the period 1976-2000 and contains ca. 850 citations, of which about half are technical reports published by SKB and its forerunners. In the main body of the guide (Chapters 2-9), the material is arranged thematically and the scope of the documentation in each theme is described and commented in short texts, showing the interrelationships between the individual reports and scientific papers, with appropriate cross-references. Early chapters (2-5, and 7) cover general themes: bedrock geology, fracturing, glaciation and crustal dynamics, deep groundwater, and geosphere transport, each subdivided into citation groups under headings which are of particular interest to the Swedish deep repository siting programme. Later chapters (6, and 8-9) include thumbnail sketches of the Swedish study sites (Finnsjoen, Fjaellveden, Gideaa, Kamlunge, Klipperaas, Sternoe), the underground laboratory sites of Stripa and Aespoe, and comparable sites in Finland and Canada, as well as the complete documentation to the feasibility studies carried out in eight Swedish municipalities between 1993 and 2000 (Storuman

  5. Swedish deep repository siting programme. Guide to the documentation of 25 years of geoscientific research (1976-2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milnes, Alan Geoffrey

    2002-03-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has been carrying out geoscientific research and feasibility studies aimed at identifying suitable sites for deep repositories in the Precambrian basement of the Baltic Shield. The documentation of this research effort forms an extensive body of material which is exceptionally wide-ranging and which is generally little known outside the Swedish nuclear waste community. This has now been compiled in the form of a 'documentation guide' in order to make the research results more easily accessible to the scientific community at large, and to show how they relate to their 'nearest surroundings', i.e. the relevant academic scientific literature and the documentation of similar research by other institutions, in Sweden and in other countries (Finland, Canada). The documentation covers the period 1976-2000 and contains ca. 850 citations, of which about half are technical reports published by SKB and its forerunners. In the main body of the guide (Chapters 2-9), the material is arranged thematically and the scope of the documentation in each theme is described and commented in short texts, showing the interrelationships between the individual reports and scientific papers, with appropriate cross-references. Early chapters (2-5, and 7) cover general themes: bedrock geology, fracturing, glaciation and crustal dynamics, deep groundwater, and geosphere transport, each subdivided into citation groups under headings which are of particular interest to the Swedish deep repository siting programme. Later chapters (6, and 8-9) include thumbnail sketches of the Swedish study sites (Finnsjoen, Fjaellveden, Gideaa, Kamlunge, Klipperaas, Sternoe), the underground laboratory sites of Stripa and Aespoe, and comparable sites in Finland and Canada, as well as the complete documentation to the feasibility studies carried out in eight Swedish municipalities between 1993 and 2000 (Storuman, Malaa, Nykoeping

  6. Choice of rock excavation methods for the Swedish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran [Conrox, Stockholm (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Lagerstedt, Leif [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    Choice of rock excavation methods will or may have implications for a number of issues like repository layout, long term and operational safety, environmental impact, design of and operation of transport vehicles and methodology for backfilling the repository before closure as well as effects on costs and schedules. To fully analyse the issues at hand related to selection of excavation methods, SKB organized a project with the objectives: To investigate and compare principal technical solutions for rock excavation, both methods that are used at present but also methods that may be feasible 10 years from now; To assess how the selection of excavation method influences the design and operation of the deep repository; To present a definition of the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone and practical methods for measurements of EDZ; To present advantages and disadvantages with different excavation methods for the various tunnels and underground openings as a basis for selection of preferred excavation methods; To present the Design Justification Statement for the selection of particular excavation methods for the different tunnels and openings in the deep repository to underpin a decision on excavation method; and To present background data that may be required for the evaluation of the long term safety of the deep repository. Main alternatives studied are very smooth blasting, excavation with a tunnel-boring machine (TBM) and excavation with horizontal pull-reaming using more or less conventional raise-boring equipment. The detailed studies were carried through in co-operation with major suppliers and end-users of the technology. An observation in this study is that all excavation technologies are mature; no major breakthroughs are foreseen within a 10 year period but it is likely that for any technology selected, SKB would specifically fine-tune the design of the equipment and work procedures in view of requirements and site specific conditions. Excavation methods have

  7. Choice of rock excavation methods for the Swedish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, Goeran; Christiansson, Rolf; Lagerstedt, Leif

    2004-09-01

    Choice of rock excavation methods will or may have implications for a number of issues like repository layout, long term and operational safety, environmental impact, design of and operation of transport vehicles and methodology for backfilling the repository before closure as well as effects on costs and schedules. To fully analyse the issues at hand related to selection of excavation methods, SKB organized a project with the objectives: To investigate and compare principal technical solutions for rock excavation, both methods that are used at present but also methods that may be feasible 10 years from now; To assess how the selection of excavation method influences the design and operation of the deep repository; To present a definition of the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone and practical methods for measurements of EDZ; To present advantages and disadvantages with different excavation methods for the various tunnels and underground openings as a basis for selection of preferred excavation methods; To present the Design Justification Statement for the selection of particular excavation methods for the different tunnels and openings in the deep repository to underpin a decision on excavation method; and To present background data that may be required for the evaluation of the long term safety of the deep repository. Main alternatives studied are very smooth blasting, excavation with a tunnel-boring machine (TBM) and excavation with horizontal pull-reaming using more or less conventional raise-boring equipment. The detailed studies were carried through in co-operation with major suppliers and end-users of the technology. An observation in this study is that all excavation technologies are mature; no major breakthroughs are foreseen within a 10 year period but it is likely that for any technology selected, SKB would specifically fine-tune the design of the equipment and work procedures in view of requirements and site specific conditions. Excavation methods have

  8. Deep ground water microbiology in Swedish granite rock and it's relevance for radio-nuclide migration from a Swedish high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    1989-03-01

    Data on numbers, species and activity of deep ground water microbial populations in Swedish granite rock have been collected. Specific studies are performed on radio-nuclid uptake on bacteria judge to be probable inhabitants in Swedish nuclear waste repositories. An integrated mobile field laboratory was used for water sampling and for the immediate counting and inoculation of the samples from boreholes at levels between 129 and 860 m. A sampler adapted for the collection of undisturbed samples for gas analysis was used to collect samples for bacterial enumerations and enrichments. The sampler can be opened and closed from the surface at the actual sampling depth. The samples can subsequently be brought to the surface without contact with air and with the pressure at the actual sampling depth. The number of bacteria were determined in samples from the gas sampler when this was possible. Else numbers are determined in the water that is pumped up to the field lab. The average total number of bacteria is 3 x 10 5 bacterial ml -1 . The number of bacteria possible to recover with plate count arrays from 0.10 to 21.9%. (author)

  9. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  10. SKI SITE-94, deep repository performance assessment project, summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    SITE-94 is a comprehensive performance assessment exercise for a hypothetical repository for spent nuclear fuel at a real site in Sweden. SITE-94 was carried out to develop the capability and tools to enable Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) to review fully the proposals for a deep repository which are expected to be made by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB (the implementor). Sweden is one of the leading countries in the research and development of geological disposal of radioactive waste. The developed methodology for performance assessment has attracted interests from other countries. The Summary of the main report of the SITE-94 project is translated here into Japanese to allow to make the information on the methodology and the related issues available among Japanese concerned. (author)

  11. Towards a Swedish repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstroem, P.-E.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power is producing electricity for the benefit of society but is also leaving radioactive residues behind. It is our responsibility to handle these residues in a safe and proper manner. The development of a system for handling spent fuel from nuclear power plants has proceeded in steps. The same is true for the actual construction of facilities and will continue to be the case for the final repository for spent fuel and other types of long-lived wastes. The primary objective in constructing the repository will be to isolate and contain the radioactive waste. In case the isolation fails for some reason the multibarrier system should retain and retard the radionuclides that might come into contact with the groundwater. A repository is now planned to be built in two steps where the first step will include deposition of about 400 canisters with spent fuel. This first step should be finished in about 20 years from now and be followed by an extensive evaluation of the results from not only this particular step but also from the development of alternative routes before deciding on how to proceed. A special facility to encapsulate the spent fuel is also required. Such an encapsulation plant is proposed to be constructed as an extension of the existing interim storage CLAB. Finding a site for the repository is a critical issue in the implementation of any repository. The siting process started a few years ago and made some progress but is by no means yet completed. It will go on at least into the early part of the next decade. When the present nuclear power plants begin to be due for retirement there should also be some facilities in place to take permanent care of the long-lived radioactive residues. Progress in siting will be a prerequisite for success in our responsibility to make progress towards a safe permanent solution of the waste issue. (orig.)

  12. Current Status of Deep Geological Repository Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R J

    2005-01-01

    This talk provided an overview of the current status of deep-geological-repository development worldwide. Its principal observation is that a broad consensus exists internationally that deep-geological disposal is the only long-term solution for disposition of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Also, it is now clear that the institutional and political aspects are as important as the technical aspects in achieving overall progress. Different nations have taken different approaches to overall management of their highly radioactive wastes. Some have begun active programs to develop a deep repository for permanent disposal: the most active such programs are in the United States, Sweden, and Finland. Other countries (including France and Russia) are still deciding on whether to proceed quickly to develop such a repository, while still others (including the UK, China, Japan) have affirmatively decided to delay repository development for a long time, typically for a generation of two. In recent years, a major conclusion has been reached around the world that there is very high confidence that deep repositories can be built, operated, and closed safely and can meet whatever safety requirements are imposed by the regulatory agencies. This confidence, which has emerged in the last few years, is based on extensive work around the world in understanding how repositories behave, including both the engineering aspects and the natural-setting aspects, and how they interact together. The construction of repositories is now understood to be technically feasible, and no major barriers have been identified that would stand in the way of a successful project. Another major conclusion around the world is that the overall cost of a deep repository is not as high as some had predicted or feared. While the actual cost will not be known in detail until the costs are incurred, the general consensus is that the total life-cycle cost will not exceed a few percent of the value of the

  13. Future extension of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The existing Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR) is licensed for disposal of short-lived waste originated from operation and maintenance of Swedish nuclear power plants. The repository is foreseen to be extended to accommodate short-lived waste from the future decommissioning of the Nuclear Power Plants. Long-lived waste from operation, maintenance and eventually decommissioning will be stored some years before disposal in a geological repository. This repository can be build either as a further extension of the SFR facility or as a separate repository. This paper discusses the strategy of a step-wise extended repository where the extensions are performed during operation of the existing parts of the repository. It describes the process for licensing new parts of the repository (and re-license of the existing parts). (author)

  14. Repository and deep borehole disposition of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.G.

    1996-02-01

    Control and disposition of excess weapons plutonium is a growing issue as both the US and Russia retire a large number of nuclear weapons> A variety of options are under consideration to ultimately dispose of this material. Permanent disposition includes tow broad categories: direct Pu disposal where the material is considered waste and disposed of, and Pu utilization, where the potential energy content of the material is exploited via fissioning. The primary alternative to a high-level radioactive waste repository for the ultimate disposal of plutonium is development of a custom geologic facility. A variety of geologic facility types have been considered, but the concept currently being assessed is the deep borehole

  15. Repository tunnel construction in deep clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, B.G.; Mair, R.J.; Taylor, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    One of the objects of the Hades project at Mol, Belgium has been to evaluate the feasibility of construction of a deep repository in the Boom clay formation at depth of approximately 225 metres. The main objective of the present project was to analyse and interpret the detailed geotechnical measurements made around the Hades trial shaft and tunnel excavations and evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal in a repository facility in deep clay formations. Plasticity calculations and finite element analyses were used which gave results consistent with the in-situ measurements. It was shown that effective stress analysis could successfully predict the observed field behaviour. Correct modelling of the small-strain stiffness of the Boom clay was essential if reasonable predictions of the pore pressure response due to construction are to be made. The calculations undertaken indicated that, even in the long term, the pressures on the test drift tunnel lining are likely to be significantly lower than the overburden pressure. Larger long-term tunnel lining pressures are predicted for impermeable linings. A series of laboratory stress path tests was undertaken to determine the strength and stiffness characteristics of the Boom clay. The tests were conducted at appropriate effective stress levels on high-quality samples retrieved during construction of the test drift. The apparatus developed for the testing is described and the results discussed. The development of a self boring retracting pressure-meter is described. This novel in-situ testing device was specifically designed to determine from direct measurements the convergence/confinement curve relevant to tunnelling in clay formations. 44 refs., 60 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Encyclopaedia of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) for the Swedish SFR and Spent Fuel Repositories. Preliminary Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Bill; Savage, Dave; McEwen, Tim; White, Matt

    2002-08-01

    dealing with all the FEPs that could occur and which might influence repository safety. A commonly adopted procedure is known as the 'Sandia Methodology' which, in simple terms, involves defining all potential FEPs that may affect the performance of the disposal system, classifying and screening them for relevance, and then combining them into scenarios by means of identifying related groups of FEPs. In 1988, both SKI and SKB embarked on a joint exercise to try to achieve consensus on the principles for scenario selection for a Swedish repository for spent fuel. This joint exercise was built on the Sandia Methodology and began by constructing a list of FEPs considered relevant to a deep spent fuel repository in granitic rocks in Sweden. One of the outcomes of the joint SKB/SKI exercise, was the development of the 'Process System' which is an ordered assembly of those FEPs which might have to be considered, at some level of detail, in PA calculations in all scenarios. In 1994, SKI developed further the Sandia Methodology in the SITE-94 PA and introduced the concept of the 'Process Influence Diagram (PID)' which is a graphical representation of the many FEPs considered relevant to the disposal system together with the potential influences that may occur between them. The use of a PID was found to be a constructive and informative approach to thinking about the evolution of the repository. In particular, it forces consideration of how the action of one FEP may affect the behaviour of the overall disposal system, and specific components of it, through its influence on other FEPs. However, evaluation of these influences requires that the definition and scope of each individual FEP is commonly agreed. There was, therefore, a requirement for definitions to be written for each FEP. This was the original impetus for writing this encyclopaedia.

  17. Earthquakes - a danger to deep-lying repositories?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at geological factors concerning earthquakes and the safety of deep-lying repositories for nuclear waste. The geological processes involved in the occurrence of earthquakes are briefly looked at and the definitions for magnitude and intensity of earthquakes are discussed. Examples of damage caused by earthquakes are given. The earthquake situation in Switzerland is looked at and the effects of earthquakes on sub-surface structures and deep-lying repositories are discussed. Finally, the ideas proposed for deep-lying geological repositories for nuclear wastes are discussed

  18. SKI SITE-94. Deep Repository Performance Assessment Project. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The function of SITE-94 is to provide the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) with the capacity and supporting knowledge needed for reviewing the Swedish nuclear industry`s R and D programs and for reviewing license applications, as stipulated in Swedish legislation. The report is structured as a Performance Assessment exercise needed for input to decisions regarding repository safety, but the SITE-94 is neither a safety assessment nor a model for future assessments to be undertaken by the prospective licensee. The specific project objectives of SITE-94 comprise site evaluation, performance assessment methodology, canister integrity and radionuclide release and transport calculations. The main report (SKI-R--96-36) gives a detailed description of the many inter-related studies undertaken as part of the research project, while the present report presents a condensed summary of the main report. 46 refs.

  19. SR 97: Post-closure safety for a KBS 3 type deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, A.; Kautsky, U.

    2000-03-01

    Prior to coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, SKB has carried out the long-term safety assessment SR 97, requested by the Swedish Government. The repository is of the KBS-3 type, where the fuel is placed in isolating copper canisters with a high-strength cast iron insert. The canisters are surrounded by bentonite clay in individual deposition holes at a depth of 500 m in granitic bedrock. The future evolution of the repository system is analysed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings, including climate, persist. The four other scenarios show the evolution if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, in the event of earthquakes, and in the event of future inadvertent human intrusion. The principal conclusion of the assessment is that the prospects of building a safe deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Swedish granitic bedrock are very good. (author)

  20. Geohydrological simulation of a deep coastal repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin, S.

    1995-12-01

    This conceptual-numerical study treats the dewatering and resaturation phases associated with the construction, use and closure of a coastal nuclear waste repository located at depth in sparsely fractured Baltic Shield rocks. The main objective is to simulate the extent and duration of saline intrusion for a reasonable set of geohydrological assumptions. Long-term changes in the chemical environment associated with saline intrusion may affect the properties of the buffer zone material (bentonite). The first part of the study deals with history matching of a simple model geometry and the second part treats the dewatering and resaturation phases of the simulated repository. The history matching supports the standpoint that the occurrence of saline ground water reflects an ongoing but incomplete Holocene flushing of the Baltic Shield. The drawdown after fifty years of dewatering is highly dependent on the permeability of the excavated damaged zone. If the permeability close the repository is unaltered the entire region between the top side of the model and the repository is more or less partially saturated at the end of the simulation period. The simulations of a fifty year long recovery period suggest that the distribution between fresh and saline ground waters may be quite close to the conditions prior to the dewatering phase already after fifty years of closure despite an incomplete pressure recovery, which is an interesting result considering the objective of the study. 12 refs

  1. Deep geological repository: Starting communication at potentially suitable sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumberova, Vera

    2001-01-01

    The siting of a deep geological repository in the Czech Republic is and will be a complicated process, since it is the first siting process of a nuclear facility designed from the start to be located at non-nuclear sites and to be organised under democratic conditions. This presentation describes the concept of radioactive waste and spent nuclear management in the Czech Republic, Communication activities of Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA) with local representatives and lessons learned

  2. Post-closure resaturation of a deep radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, I.C.S.; Rodwell, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    The post-closure resaturation of a deep radioactive waste repository has been modelled for a number of generic disposal concepts. A combination of numerical ground water flow simulations and analytical calculations has been used to investigate the variation of repository fluid pressure and degree of water saturation with time, and to determine the factors influencing resaturation times. The host rock permeability was found to be the most important determining factor. For geological environments regarded as likely for a waste repository, resaturation is predicted to be a short term process compared with gas generation and contaminant migration timescales. (author)

  3. The undersea location of the Swedish Final Repository for reactor waste, SFR - human intrusion aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Swedish Final Repository for reactor waste, SFR, is built under the Baltic sea close to the Forsmark nuclear power plant. Sixty metres of rock cover the repository caverns under the seabed. The depth of the Baltic sea is about 5-6 m at this location. A human intrusion scenario that in normal inland locations has shown to be of great importance, is a well that is drilled through or in the close vicinity of the repository. Since the land uplift in the SFR area is about 6 mm/year the undersea location of SFR ensures that no well will be drilled at this location for a considerable time while the area is covered by the Baltic sea

  4. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Ltd, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid.

  5. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L.

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  6. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  7. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. Facility description - Layout E. Spiral ramp with one operational area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Stig [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Forsgren, Ebbe [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lange, Fritz [Lange Art AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    This report documents a proposal for the design of the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The proposal is based on the principles that were formulated in the original KBS-3 study, but has been supplemented by investigations and experience to reflect current knowledge. The purpose of the report is to provide an integrated picture of the deep repository, as a basis for SKB's other work, e.g. environmental impact assessments, transport systems, safety issues and alternative locations, and to provide a co-ordinated account of the conditions and requirements concerning all of the necessary functions in the deep repository in order to have a well functioning facility. In addition, it should be possible to use the report as: a tool in the task of achieving a co-ordinated, safe and accepted design for the facility, a basis for further planning and costing, a basis for adaptation to geographic and other conditions for the particular location, a basis for information material, both within SKB and for interested parties outside, such as public authorities, municipalities and the general public. The capacity of the deep repository has been chosen on the basis of 40 years of operation of the Swedish nuclear power reactors, which will produce approximately 9,000 tons of uranium, equivalent to approximately 4,500 canisters. The design outlined is based on theoretical analyses of functions, safety requirements, procedures etc. that can be identified during the various phases of the construction and operation of the repository. In addition, preliminary organisation and staffing plans have been drawn up, for use as the basis for planning the necessary buildings. The report gives a vision of the overall layout and function of the facility, and a proposal for the design of all individual parts of the repository. The relationships between the various parts of the repository are described, both above and below ground, as is the interplay between the part above ground and part

  8. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. Facility description - Layout E. Spiral ramp with one operational area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Stig; Forsgren, Ebbe; Lange, Fritz

    2002-04-01

    This report documents a proposal for the design of the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The proposal is based on the principles that were formulated in the original KBS-3 study, but has been supplemented by investigations and experience to reflect current knowledge. The purpose of the report is to provide an integrated picture of the deep repository, as a basis for SKB's other work, e.g. environmental impact assessments, transport systems, safety issues and alternative locations, and to provide a co-ordinated account of the conditions and requirements concerning all of the necessary functions in the deep repository in order to have a well functioning facility. In addition, it should be possible to use the report as: a tool in the task of achieving a co-ordinated, safe and accepted design for the facility, a basis for further planning and costing, a basis for adaptation to geographic and other conditions for the particular location, a basis for information material, both within SKB and for interested parties outside, such as public authorities, municipalities and the general public. The capacity of the deep repository has been chosen on the basis of 40 years of operation of the Swedish nuclear power reactors, which will produce approximately 9,000 tons of uranium, equivalent to approximately 4,500 canisters. The design outlined is based on theoretical analyses of functions, safety requirements, procedures etc. that can be identified during the various phases of the construction and operation of the repository. In addition, preliminary organisation and staffing plans have been drawn up, for use as the basis for planning the necessary buildings. The report gives a vision of the overall layout and function of the facility, and a proposal for the design of all individual parts of the repository. The relationships between the various parts of the repository are described, both above and below ground, as is the interplay between the part above ground and part below

  9. Source terms; isolation and radiological consequences of carbon-14 waste in the Swedish SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesboel, R.; Puigdomenech, I.; Evans, S.

    1990-01-01

    The source term, isolation capacity, and long-term radiological exposure of 14 C from the Swedish underground repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR) is assessed. The prospective amount of 14 C in the repository is assumed to be 5 TBq. Spent ion exchange resins will be the dominant source of 14 C. The pore water in the concrete repository is expected to maintain a pH of >10.5 for a period of at least 10 6 y. The cement matrix of the repository will retain most of the 14 CO 3 2- initially present. Bacterial production of CO 2 and CH 4 from degradation of ion-exchange resins and bitumen may contribute to 14 C release to the biosphere. However, CH 4 contributes only to a small extent to the overall carbon loss from freshwater ecosystems. The individual doses to local and regional individuals peaked with 5x10 -3 and regional individuals peaked with 5x10 -3 and 8x10 -4 μSv y -1 respectively at about 2.4x10 4 years. A total leakage of 8.4 GBq of 14 C from the repository will cause a total collective dose commitment of 1.1 manSv or 130 manSv TBq -1 . (authors)

  10. Radioactive waste transport to a Nirex deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.; Appleton, P.R.; Eastman, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nirex is addressing the transport of radioactive wastes, repository construction materials, personnel and spoil as part of their development of a deep repository. An integrated transport system will be developed for wastes which may involve, road, rail and sea transport. The possible application and the scale of operation of the transport system is described. Environmental impact assessments will be carried out, and the proposed approach to these is described. A methodology for the assessment of transport safety has been established and the results of a preliminary assessment are given. (author)

  11. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. SR 97 - Post-closure safety. Main Report. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, A.

    1999-11-01

    In preparation for coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Government and nuclear regulatory authorities have requested an assessment of the repository's long-term safety. The purpose is to demonstrate whether the risk of harmful effects in individuals in the vicinity of the repository complies with the acceptance criterion formulated by the Swedish regulatory authorities, i.e. that the risk may not exceed 10 -6 per year. Geological data are taken from three sites in Sweden to shed light on different conditions in Swedish granitic bedrock. The future evolution of the repository system is analyzed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings are postulated to persist. The four other scenarios show how the evolution of the repository differs from that in the base scenario if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, earthquakes, and future inadvertent human intrusion. The time horizon for the analyses is at most one million years, in accordance with preliminary regulations. By means of model studies and calculations, the base scenario analyzes how the radioactivity of the fuel declines with time, the repository's thermal evolution as a result of the decay heat in the fuel, the hydraulic evolution in buffer and backfill when they become saturated with water, and the long-term groundwater flow in the geosphere on the three sites. The overall conclusion of the analyses in the base scenario is that the copper canisters isolating capacity is not threatened by either the mechanical or chemical stresses to which it is subjected. The safety margins are great even in a million-year perspective. The internal evolution in initially defective canisters and the possible resultant migration of radionuclides in buffer, geosphere

  12. From the repository to the deep geological repository - and back to the Terrain surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodynsky, R.

    2011-01-01

    How deep is 'safe'? How long is long-term? How and for how long will something be isolated? Which rock, which formation and which location are suitable? A repository constructed for the safekeeping of radioactive or highly toxic wastes can be erected either on the surface, near the surface or underground. Radioactive waste is currently often stored at near-surface locations. The storage usually takes place nearby of a nuclear power plant in pits or concrete tombs (vaults). However, repositories can also be found in restricted areas, e.g. near nuclear weapon production or reprocessing plants (WAA) or nuclear weapons test sites (including Tomsk, Russia, Hanford and Nevada desert, USA), or in extremely low rainfall regions (South Africa). In addition there are disused mines which are now used as underground repositories. Low-level and medium-active (SMA) but also high-level waste (HAA) are stored at these types of sites (NPP, WAA, test areas, former mines). In Russia (Tomsk, Siberia) liquid radioactive waste has been injected into deep geological formations for some time (Minatom, 2001). However, all these locations are not the result of a systematic, scientific search or a holistic process for finding a location, but the result of political decisions, sometimes ignoring scientific findings. Why underground storage is given preference over high-security landfill sites (HSD) often has economic reasons. While a low safety standard can significantly reduce the cost of an above-ground high-security landfill as a waste disposal depot, spending remains high, especially due to the need for capital formation to cover operating expenses after filling the HSD. In the case of underground storage, on the other hand, no additional expenses are required for the period after backfilling. The assumption of lower costs for a deep repository runs through the past decades and coincides with the assumption that the desired ideal underground conditions actually exist and will

  13. Conceptual model for concrete long time degradation in a deep nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerblad, B.; Traegaardh, J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is mainly a state-of-the-art report of concrete long time durability in the environment expected in a deep site underground nuclear waste repository in Swedish crystalline bedrock. The report treats how the concrete and the surrounding groundwater will interact and how they will be affected by cement chemistry, type of aggregate etc. The different mechanisms for concrete alteration treated include sulphate attack, carbonation, chloride attack, alkali-silica reaction and leaching phenomena. In a long time perspective, the chemical alterations in concrete is mainly governed by the surrounding groundwater composition. After closure the composition of the groundwater will change character from a modified meteoric to a saline composition. Therefore two different simulated groundwater compositions have been used in modelling the chemical interaction between concrete and groundwater. The report also includes a study of old and historical concrete which show observations concerning recrystallization phenomena in concrete. 72 refs, 39 figs

  14. Siting of a deep repository for spent fuel - how are we communicating the risks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammarstroem, Monika

    2000-01-01

    During 1998 the strategy of the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Company for the siting process was refined in order to strengthen the possibilities for implementing deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Our new organisation was formed to meet the demands of the strategy. The strategy implies focused activities in municipalities where we are performing so called feasibility studies. An important milestone for us is to be able to choose two sites for site investigations in 2001. The problem of waste exists and has to be taken care of in Sweden. The work is performed in steps to ensure dialogue and changes and modifications if needed. The method for solution is robust, a repository can be constructed in a reasonable time and ensure safety in a long-term perspective Our attitude shall be characterised by high quality and competence in all aspects.Honesty and openness are key words. The fear that people feels regarding radioactive waste shall be taken seriously. We are proud to be able to show one already existing waste management system and of our knowledge and experiences. The results so far from the various communication activities show that we are going in the right direction. The support we are gaining from various sectors in society together with our own motivation and clear objectives will, I'm sure, lead us to at least two sites for site investigations for a deep repository in Sweden by the end of 2001

  15. Kincardine deep geologic repository proposal and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, T.

    2005-01-01

    'Full text:' In 2002, the Municipality of Kincardine and OPG signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) regarding the long-term management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The purpose of the MOU was for OPG, in consultation with Kincardine, to develop a plan for the long-term management of low and intermediate level waste at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility (WWMF) located on the Bruce site. An independent assessment, which included geotechnical feasibility and safety analyses, a community attitude survey and interviews with local residents, businesses and tourists, and economic modeling to determine the potential benefits and impacts, was completed in February 2004. Ultimately, Kincardine Council endorsed a resolution (Kincardine Council no. 2004-232) to: 'endorse the opinion of the Nuclear Waste Steering Committee and select the 'Deep Rock Vault' option as the preferred course of study in regards to the management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste'. The surrounding municipalities of Saugeen Shores, Brockton, Arran-Elderslie, and Huron-Kinloss expressed their support for the Deep Geologic Repository proposal. This presentation discusses the history, major steps and public processes surrounding the Kincardine Deep Geologic Repository proposal. (author)

  16. SR 97: post-closure safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A major activity of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of radioactive waste management is the organisation of independent, international peer reviews of national studies and projects. The NEA peer reviews help national programmes to assess their achievements. The review reports also provide reference information to be shared with others on what is desirable and what is feasible. This report presents the common views of the International Review Team (IRT) established by the NEA Secretariat on behalf of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) to perform a peer review of a post-closure safety study of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden, Safety Report 97, produced by the Swedish Spent Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The review is based on the main reports of the project and supporting documents, on information exchanged with SKB staff both through the intermediary of SKI and in direct interaction at a week-long workshop in Sweden, on a visit of the SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and Canister Laboratory, as well as on internal discussions within the IRT. (authors)

  17. Scientific basis for a safety case of deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noseck, Ulrich; Becker, Dirk-Alexander; Brasser, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Within this project strategies and methods to build a safety case for deep geological repositories are further developed. This includes also the scientific fundamentals as a basis of the safety case. In the international framework the methodology of the Safety Case is frequently applied and continuously improved. According to definitions from IAEA and NEA the Safety Case is a compilation of arguments and facts, which describe, quantify and support the safety and the degree of confidence in the safety of the geological repository. The safety of the geological repository should be demonstrated by the safety case. The safety case is the basis for essential decisions during a repository programme. It comprises the results of safety assessments in combination with additional information like multiple lines of evidence and a discussion of robustness and quality of the repository, its design and the quality of all safety assessments including the basic assumptions. A crucial element of the Safety Case is the long-term safety analysis, i.e. the systematic analysis of the hazards connected with the facility and the capability of site and repository design to ensure the required safety functions and to fulfill the technical claims. Long-term safety analysis requires a powerful and qualified programme package, which contains appropriate hardware and software as well as well trained and experienced modellers performing the model calculations. The calculation tools used within safety cases need to be checked and verified and continuously adapted to the state-of-the-art science and technology. Especially it needs to be applicable to a real repository system. For the assessment of safety a deep process understanding is necessary. The R and D work performed within this project will contribute to the improvement of process and system understanding as well as to the further development of methods and strategies applied in the safety case. Emphasis was put on the following aspects

  18. Scientific basis for a safety case of deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseck, Ulrich; Becker, Dirk-Alexander; Brasser, Thomas [and others

    2012-11-15

    Within this project strategies and methods to build a safety case for deep geological repositories are further developed. This includes also the scientific fundamentals as a basis of the safety case. In the international framework the methodology of the Safety Case is frequently applied and continuously improved. According to definitions from IAEA and NEA the Safety Case is a compilation of arguments and facts, which describe, quantify and support the safety and the degree of confidence in the safety of the geological repository. The safety of the geological repository should be demonstrated by the safety case. The safety case is the basis for essential decisions during a repository programme. It comprises the results of safety assessments in combination with additional information like multiple lines of evidence and a discussion of robustness and quality of the repository, its design and the quality of all safety assessments including the basic assumptions. A crucial element of the Safety Case is the long-term safety analysis, i.e. the systematic analysis of the hazards connected with the facility and the capability of site and repository design to ensure the required safety functions and to fulfill the technical claims. Long-term safety analysis requires a powerful and qualified programme package, which contains appropriate hardware and software as well as well trained and experienced modellers performing the model calculations. The calculation tools used within safety cases need to be checked and verified and continuously adapted to the state-of-the-art science and technology. Especially it needs to be applicable to a real repository system. For the assessment of safety a deep process understanding is necessary. The R and D work performed within this project will contribute to the improvement of process and system understanding as well as to the further development of methods and strategies applied in the safety case. Emphasis was put on the following aspects

  19. Integrated account of method, site selection and programme prior to the site investigation phase[Planning for a Swedish repository for spent nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    applications and have these applications reviewed by the appropriate authorities. An analysis of conceivable alternatives for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel has confirmed that deep geological disposal according to the KBS-3 method has the best prospects of meeting all requirements. The alternative of putting off a decision until some future time (the zero alternative) does not appear tenable. The assessment of long-term safety shows that the prospects of building a safe deep repository in the Swedish bedrock are good. Independent Swedish and international review of the safety assessment confirm that the body of data in this respect is adequate for the siting process to proceed to the site investigation phase. A fuller summary is given below of the account given in this report of method as well as site selection and programme for the site investigation phase. The point of departure for the account is the review comments made by the regulatory authorities and the Government's decision regarding RD and D-Programme 98. In its decision, the Government stipulated conditions for SKB's continued research and development programme. The analysis of alternative system designs was to be supplemented, mainly with regard to the zero alternative and very deep boreholes. Furthermore, the Government decided that SKB shall submit an integrated evaluation of completed feasibility studies and other background material for selection of sites for site investigations and present a clear programme for site investigations.

  20. Ontario Power Generation's Proposed Deep Geologic Repository, Tiverton, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M.

    2009-05-01

    Ontario Power Generation is proposing to develop a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of its Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW) at the Bruce site located near Tiverton, Ontario, 225 km northwest of Toronto. The shaft accessed repository, as envisioned, would accommodate 200,000 m3 (as packaged) of L&ILW in emplacement rooms excavated at a depth of 680 m within the Ordovician age argillaceous limestone Cobourg Formation. The Bruce site is underlain by an approximate 860 m thick Paleozoic sedimentary sequence comprised of near horizontally bedded carbonates, shales, evaporates and sandstones, Devonian to Cambrian in age, overlying crystalline basement rocks. Regional and site-specific geoscientific studies to verify the suitability of the Bruce site to host the DGR were initiated in 2006. The focus for the geoscientific investigations has been on gathering data to develop and test an understanding of the evolution and stability of the geologic, hydrogeologic, hydrogeochemical and geomechanical environ as it relates to demonstrating repository safety. Scheduled for completion in 2010, the interim results, which have included the drilling, coring and testing of 4 deep boreholes, are providing evidence of a predictable geosphere with a deep seated (>400 m), low permeability (K 250 gm l-1) groundwater regime that is ancient and resilient to external perturbations (e.g. glaciation). Work program activities in this regard have included, among others, detailed studies of rock core lithology, mineralogy and petrophysics, rock matrix pore fluid and groundwater characterisation, in-situ rock mass hydraulic testing, geomechanical rock core testing, 2-D seismic reflection surveys and long-term hydraulic borehole instrumentation. These data, in addition to regional and site-scale hydrogeologic modelling of the sedimentary sequence that among other aspects is examining groundwater system evolution through an understanding of long

  1. Corrosion of high purity copper as engineering barrier in deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, Maité; Rodríguez Martín, A.; Farina Silvia, B.

    2013-01-01

    Pure copper with oxygen content below 5 ppm (to minimize segregation at grain boundaries) and doped with phosphorus (to increase creep resistance) is the chosen material for the corrosion-resistant barrier of the High Level Radioactive 2 Wastecontainers in the Swedish and Finnish repository models. These models include the construction of the repository below the water table, which is a reducing environment in which copper has excellent resistance to general and localized corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. The aim of this work is contribute to determine the durability of the material, given that deep geological repositories of HLW are designed to ensure the protection of the environment for periods of hundreds of thousands years. As a first step in a more general analysis the effects of chloride, one of the main aggressive species of corrosion, are evaluated. To this purpose corrosion potential was determined and anodic polarization curves were performed in deaerated solutions varying the chloride concentration between 0.01 and 1M and the temperature between 30 and 90°C. Several electrochemical techniques were used: the evolution of corrosion potential was measured, anodic polarization curves were obtained and electrochemical impedance tests were performed. The analysis was complemented with microscopic observations of the type of corrosive attack, as well as determinations of the eventual corrosion products formed using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDS). Results show that the corrosion potential decreases with the increase of temperature and with the increase of chloride concentration. A correlation of the corrosion potential as a function of temperature and chloride concentration was obtained, with the purpose of making predictions in variable conditions.The current density increases both with temperature and with chloride concentration. A pitting potential is observed in certain conditions. (author)

  2. Communication on the Safety Case for a Deep Geological Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Lucy; Bernier, Frederik; Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm; Cunado, Miguel; Ilett, Doug; Kwong, Gloria; ); Noseck, Ulrich; Roehlig, Klaus; Van Luik, Abe; Weber, Jan; Weetjens, Eef

    2017-01-01

    Communication has a specific role to play in the development of deep geological repositories. Building trust with the stakeholders involved in this process, particularly within the local community, is key for effective communication between the authorities and the public. There are also clear benefits to having technical experts hone their communication skills and having communication experts integrated into the development process. This report has compiled lessons from both failures and successes in communicating technical information to non-technical audiences. It addresses two key questions in particular: what is the experience base concerning the effectiveness or non-effectiveness of different tools for communicating safety case results to a non-technical audience and how can communication based on this experience be improved and included into a safety case development effort from the beginning? (authors)

  3. Project SAFE. Modelling of long-term concrete degradation processes in the Swedish SFR repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeglund, L.O. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    This study concerns the leaching of concrete barriers, in particular the silo construction, in the Swedish SFR repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. A conceptual model for the leaching of concrete in a saline groundwater has been proposed based on the increased understanding achieved from research studies presented in the literature. The conceptual model has been used to set up a numerical model for the complex chemical interactions between the cement minerals of the concrete with the groundwater. The calculations show that various chemical reactions are expected to occur in the concrete over time. Different cases have been calculated. The results show that the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers will maintain alkaline for long time. In the most exposed parts of the concrete a high degree of leaching can be expected during the considered 10,000 years, whereas only for the most unfavourable assumptions (initially fractured concrete with groundwater flow-through) the inner parts of the concrete will be degraded to any significant degree.

  4. Change of roles and attitudes in the Swedish localisation process for a final repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedberg, Bjoern [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Since the early research activities in the mid seventies related to a final repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, much has changed in a direction that allows a more open and transparent decision-making process. Important changes have been noted in the legal framework - including EIA and financing - and in the roles of the Swedish authorities, local politicians, NGO's, and media. Trust and credibility is of course crucial for all actors in the decision-making process, but the ways to gain trust is different depending on which role to play in the process. A higher degree of trust in the different actors, and in the process itself, could be gained from a better distinction between facts and value judgements, but also if the roles of different actors are better clarified. To understand the roles of the different actors, it is important to define each actor's 'arena' in terms of responsibilities, goals, standpoints etc. in several dimensions. These dimensions could for example be geographic or the base for decisions (scientific - political)

  5. Project SAFE. Modelling of long-term concrete degradation processes in the Swedish SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeglund, L.O.

    2001-04-01

    This study concerns the leaching of concrete barriers, in particular the silo construction, in the Swedish SFR repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. A conceptual model for the leaching of concrete in a saline groundwater has been proposed based on the increased understanding achieved from research studies presented in the literature. The conceptual model has been used to set up a numerical model for the complex chemical interactions between the cement minerals of the concrete with the groundwater. The calculations show that various chemical reactions are expected to occur in the concrete over time. Different cases have been calculated. The results show that the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers will maintain alkaline for long time. In the most exposed parts of the concrete a high degree of leaching can be expected during the considered 10,000 years, whereas only for the most unfavourable assumptions (initially fractured concrete with groundwater flow-through) the inner parts of the concrete will be degraded to any significant degree

  6. Change of roles and attitudes in the Swedish localisation process for a final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedberg, Bjoern

    2001-01-01

    Since the early research activities in the mid seventies related to a final repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, much has changed in a direction that allows a more open and transparent decision-making process. Important changes have been noted in the legal framework - including EIA and financing - and in the roles of the Swedish authorities, local politicians, NGO's, and media. Trust and credibility is of course crucial for all actors in the decision-making process, but the ways to gain trust is different depending on which role to play in the process. A higher degree of trust in the different actors, and in the process itself, could be gained from a better distinction between facts and value judgements, but also if the roles of different actors are better clarified. To understand the roles of the different actors, it is important to define each actor's 'arena' in terms of responsibilities, goals, standpoints etc. in several dimensions. These dimensions could for example be geographic or the base for decisions (scientific - political)

  7. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. SR-97-Post-closure safety. Main Report. Volume I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, A.

    1999-11-01

    In preparation for coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Government and nuclear regulatory authorities have requested an assessment of the repository's long-term safety. The purpose is to demonstrate whether the risk of harmful effects in individuals in the vicinity of the repository complies with the acceptance criterion formulated by the Swedish regulatory authorities, i.e. that the risk may not exceed 10 -6 per year. Geological data are taken from three sites in Sweden to shed light on different conditions in Swedish granitic bedrock. The future evolution of the repository system is analyzed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings are postulated to persist. The four other scenarios show how the evolution of the repository differs from that in the base scenario if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, earthquakes, and future inadvertent human intrusion. The time horizon for the analyses is at most one million years, in accordance with preliminary regulations. By means of model studies and calculations, the base scenario analyzes how the radioactivity of the fuel declines with time, the repository's thermal evolution as a result of the decay heat in the fuel, the hydraulic evolution in buffer and backfill when they become saturated with water, and the long-term groundwater flow in the geosphere on the three sites. The overall conclusion of the analyses in the base scenario is that the copper canisters isolating capacity is not threatened by either the mechanical or chemical stresses to which it is subjected. The safety margins are great even in a million-year perspective. The internal evolution in initially defective canisters and the possible resultant migration of radionuclides in buffer, geosphere

  8. Formulation and evaluation of gas release scenarios for the silo in Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.; Moreno, L.

    1992-01-01

    The Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste (SFR) has been in operation since 1988 and is located in the crystalline rock, 60 m below the Baltic Sea. In the licensing procedure for the SFR the safety assessment has been complemented with a detailed scenario analysis of the performance of the repository. The scenarios include the influence on radionuclide release by gas formation and gas transport processes in the silo. The overall conclusion is that the release of most radionuclides from the silo is only marginally affected by the formation and release of gas, even for scenarios considering unexpected events. The largest effects were found for short-lived radionuclides and radionuclides that have no or low sorption ability. Except for very extreme scenarios for the silo the overall impact from repository on the environment is by far dominated by the release of radionuclides from the rock vaults. 10 refs., 6 figs

  9. Earthquakes - a danger to deep-lying repositories?; erdbeben: eine gefahr fuer tiefenlager?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at geological factors concerning earthquakes and the safety of deep-lying repositories for nuclear waste. The geological processes involved in the occurrence of earthquakes are briefly looked at and the definitions for magnitude and intensity of earthquakes are discussed. Examples of damage caused by earthquakes are given. The earthquake situation in Switzerland is looked at and the effects of earthquakes on sub-surface structures and deep-lying repositories are discussed. Finally, the ideas proposed for deep-lying geological repositories for nuclear wastes are discussed.

  10. Earthquakes: no danger for deep underground nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    On the Earth, the continental plates are steadily moving. Principally at the plate boundaries such shifts produce stresses which are released in form of earthquakes. The highest the built-up energy, the more violent will be the shaking. Earthquakes accompany mankind from very ancient times on and they disturb the population. Till now nobody is able to predict where and when they will take place. But on the Earth there are regions where, due to their geological situation, the occurrence of earthquakes is more probable than elsewhere. The impact of a very strong earthquake on the structures at the Earth surface depends on several factors. Besides the ground structure, the density of buildings, construction style and materials used play an important role. Construction-related technical measures can improve the safety of buildings and, together with a correct behaviour of the people concerned, save many lives. Earthquakes are well known in Switzerland. Here, the stresses are due to the collision of the African and European continental plates that created the Alps. The impact of earthquake is more limited in the underground than at the Earth surface. There is no danger for deep underground repositories

  11. Deep repository. Underground design premises. Edition D1/1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    This report proposes design premises and methodology for application in the preliminary design of underground excavations within the framework of SKB's site investigations. The design premises and supporting instructions for rock mechanical and hydrogeological analyses are a result of planning work carried out between the autumn of 2002 and the spring of 2003. Other overall planning has also been done at the same time for the Deep Repository Project. The first draft underwent revision following a seminar on 30 June 2003 primarily with respect to structure and coordination aspects within the project, as well as certain factual questions. That version served as a basis for an application exercise based on site descriptive model version 1.1 Forsmark. The purpose of the application exercise was to: Test relevant portions of the proposed methodology for rock engineering for the initial site investigations (ISI); Evaluate the application of preliminary design requirements; Identify and develop proposals for collaboration between design and site and site modelling units for the best possible feedback in future work, especially iterations for meeting the needs of design; Identify and develop proposals for collaboration between safety assessment and design for realistic proposals for site adaptation. The design application exercise was evaluated at the end of 2003 and its results serve as an important basis for revisions. The update was commenced with a workshop in February 2004, where the goals were established.

  12. Deep repository. Underground design premises. Edition D1/1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This report proposes design premises and methodology for application in the preliminary design of underground excavations within the framework of SKB's site investigations. The design premises and supporting instructions for rock mechanical and hydrogeological analyses are a result of planning work carried out between the autumn of 2002 and the spring of 2003. Other overall planning has also been done at the same time for the Deep Repository Project. The first draft underwent revision following a seminar on 30 June 2003 primarily with respect to structure and coordination aspects within the project, as well as certain factual questions. That version served as a basis for an application exercise based on site descriptive model version 1.1 Forsmark. The purpose of the application exercise was to: Test relevant portions of the proposed methodology for rock engineering for the initial site investigations (ISI); Evaluate the application of preliminary design requirements; Identify and develop proposals for collaboration between design and site and site modelling units for the best possible feedback in future work, especially iterations for meeting the needs of design; Identify and develop proposals for collaboration between safety assessment and design for realistic proposals for site adaptation. The design application exercise was evaluated at the end of 2003 and its results serve as an important basis for revisions. The update was commenced with a workshop in February 2004, where the goals were established

  13. Site selection for deep geologic repositories - Consequences for society, economy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    In a few years, Switzerland will make the decision regarding site selection for geological underground repositories for the storage of radioactive wastes. Besides the safety issue, many citizens are interested in how such a repository will affect environment, economy and society in the selected site's region. This brochure summarizes the results of many studies on the socio-economic impacts of nuclear waste repositories. Radioactive wastes must be stored in such a way that mankind and environment are safely protected for a long period of time. How this goal may be achieved, is already known: geologic deep repositories warrant long-term safety. For the oncoming years in Switzerland the question is where the repository will be built. The search for an appropriate site for a repository in the proposed regions will launch discussions. Within the participative framework the regions may bring their requests. The demonstration of the safety of potential repository sites has the highest priority in the selection process. In the third procedural step additional rock investigations will be made. The socio-economic studies and the experience with existing plants show that radioactive waste management plants can be built and operated in good agreement with environmental requirements. The radioactive wastes in a deep underground repository are stored many hundred meters below the Earth's surface. There, they are isolated from our vital space. Technical barriers and the surrounding dense rock confinement prevent the release of radioactive materials into the environment. A deep repository has positive consequences for the regional economy. It increases trade and value creation and creates work places. The socio-economic impacts practically extend over one century, but strongly vary with time; they are the largest during the building period. High life quality and a positive population development in the selected site region are compatible with a deep repository. A fair and

  14. Microbial corrosion of metallic materials in a deep nuclear-waste repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoulil J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study summarises current knowledge on microbial corrosion in a deep nuclear-waste repository. The first part evaluates the general impact of microbial activity on corrosion mechanisms. Especially, the impact of microbial metabolism on the environment and the impact of biofilms on the surface of structure materials were evaluated. The next part focuses on microbial corrosion in a deep nuclear-waste repository. The study aims to suggest the development of the repository environment and in that respect the viability of bacteria, depending on the probable conditions of the environment, such as humidity of bentonite, pressure in compact bentonite, the impact of ionizing radiation, etc. The last part is aimed at possible techniques for microbial corrosion mechanism monitoring in the conditions of a deep repository. Namely, electrochemical and microscopic techniques were discussed.

  15. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, A.

    2009-09-01

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes

  16. Deep geologic repository for low and intermediate radioactive level waste in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianqin; Li Honghui; Sun Qinghong; Yang Zhongtian

    2012-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) is undergoing a project for the long-term management of low and intermediate level waste (LILW)-a deep geologic repository (DGR) project for low and intermediate level waste. The waste source term disposed, geologic setting, repository layout and operation, and safety assessment are discussed. It is expected to provide reference for disposal of low and intermediate level waste that contain the higher concentration of long-lived radionuclides in China. (authors)

  17. Effects of heat from high-level waste on performance of deep geological repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report discusses the effects of heat on the deep geological repository systems and its different components. The report is focussed specifically on effects due to thermal energy release solely from high-level waste or spent fuel. It reviews the experimental data and theoretical models of the effects of heat both on the behaviour of engineered and natural barriers. A summary of the current status of research and repository development including underground test facilities is presented

  18. Implementation of hearings in the Swedish process for siting a spent nuclear fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerlind, Magnus; Wiklund, Aasa

    2001-01-01

    treat all types of questions with equal, non-judgmental interest; Working groups to formulate questions gave the participants time for reflection and discussions without dominance by e.g. the implementer or the authorities. It is likely that many participants appreciated the possibility to be anonymous and channel questions through the moderators; Well defined scope of the hearings developed in dialogue with the municipalities; It was clear that the authorities were the owners of the hearings and that the outcome would be included in their review of SKB's programme; The early involvement of the municipalities in the planning process was essential since the hearings were held in the areas proposed for site investigations. In the further development of hearings in the Swedish nuclear waste programme a number of issues will have to be considered. The now completed hearings were essentially based on the public's questions and concerns. In the future it may be considered to also arrange hearings on an 'expert level'. It should however be kept in mind that the municipalities are experts on local conditions and must be involved since the immediate impact of a repository is local. It could also be advantageous to have hearings in two phases. The first phase should then be focussed on the implementer, e.g. on material submitted to the authorities for review. In this phase the authorities should present criteria for the review. Following this hearing the authorities should review the implementers material and present a preliminary review report. The second phase of hearings should then focus on the authorities' review report and possible supplementing submissions from the implementer. It is believed that this could be particular relevant in situations where important municipal decisions are to be made. Another and perhaps the most challenging issue, which is not unique to nuclear waste management, is how to involve the public and concerned citizens in hearings and decision making

  19. Foreign materials in a deep repository for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.; Christiansson, Aa.; Wiborgh, M.

    1999-12-01

    The effects of foreign substances introduced into a spent-fuel repository are reviewed. Possible impacts on processes and barrier-functions are examined, and the following areas are identified: Corrosion of the spent-fuel canister through the presence of sulfur and substances that favor microbial growth; impacts on the bentonite properties through the presence of cations as calcium, potassium and iron; radionuclide transport through the presence of complex-formers and surface-active substances

  20. NAGRA - Long-term safety - The main task of deep repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    This comprehensive brochure published by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) examines the necessity for the safe disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland and discusses the requirements placed on such long-term waste depositories The effects of ionizing radiation on people and the protection provided by the deep repositories are examined. The construction of such deep repositories is looked at, as are the developments expected in the depositories over thousands of years. A comparison with natural occurrences is made and lessons to be learned from nature are discussed. Ideas for the marking of the depository sites are presented. A glossary of relevant terms completes the report

  1. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. SR-97-Post-closure safety. Main Report. Volume I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedin, A. [ed.

    1999-11-01

    In preparation for coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Government and nuclear regulatory authorities have requested an assessment of the repository's long-term safety. The purpose is to demonstrate whether the risk of harmful effects in individuals in the vicinity of the repository complies with the acceptance criterion formulated by the Swedish regulatory authorities, i.e. that the risk may not exceed 10{sup -6} per year. Geological data are taken from three sites in Sweden to shed light on different conditions in Swedish granitic bedrock. The future evolution of the repository system is analyzed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings are postulated to persist. The four other scenarios show how the evolution of the repository differs from that in the base scenario if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, earthquakes, and future inadvertent human intrusion. The time horizon for the analyses is at most one million years, in accordance with preliminary regulations. By means of model studies and calculations, the base scenario analyzes how the radioactivity of the fuel declines with time, the repository's thermal evolution as a result of the decay heat in the fuel, the hydraulic evolution in buffer and backfill when they become saturated with water, and the long-term groundwater flow in the geosphere on the three sites. The overall conclusion of the analyses in the base scenario is that the copper canisters isolating capacity is not threatened by either the mechanical or chemical stresses to which it is subjected. The safety margins are great even in a million-year perspective. The internal evolution in initially defective canisters and the possible resultant migration of radionuclides in

  2. Evaluation of behaviour and Safety in a geologic deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program. This Safety Assessment constitutes a first step within a systematical process that will permit, thorough successive approximations, to predict the performance of the different barriers of the disposal system, and its capability to comply with the assigned safety functions and with the established safety criteria. The primary bases for this Safety Assessment are the following: The disposal concept considers the storage of the fuel assemblies in carbon steel canisters of 10 cm of thickness, emplaced horizontally in galleries excavated in granite of 2,4 m of diameter and 500 m of length, using a bentonite thickness of 75 cm around canisters as buffer material. The repository is located in a granitic site defined with available data about surface characteristics of Spanish granites. The exercise uses a probabilistic approximation in order to cope with the uncertainties associated with the different imputs parameters. (Author)

  3. Albedo Neutron Dosimetry in a Deep Geological Disposal Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bo; Becker, Frank

    2017-04-28

    Albedo neutron dosemeter is the German official personal neutron dosemeter in mixed radiation fields where neutrons contribute to personal dose. In deep geological repositories for high-level nuclear waste, where neutrons can dominate the radiation field, it is of interest to investigate the performance of albedo neutron dosemeter in such facilities. In this study, the deep geological repository is represented by a shielding cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel placed inside a rock salt emplacement drift. Due to the backscattering of neutrons in the drift, issues concerning calibration of the dosemeter arise. Field-specific calibration of the albedo neutron dosemeter was hence performed with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to assess the applicability of the albedo neutron dosemeter in a deep geological repository over a long time scale, spent nuclear fuel with different ages of 50, 100 and 500 years were investigated. It was found out, that the neutron radiation field in a deep geological repository can be assigned to the application area 'N1' of the albedo neutron dosemeter, which is typical in reactors and accelerators with heavy shielding. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Deep geological isolation of nuclear waste: numerical modeling of repository scale hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The Scope of Work undertaken covers three main tasks, described as follows: (Task 1) CDM provided consulting services to the University on modeling aspects of the study having to do with transport processes involving the local groundwater system near the repository and the flow of fluids and vapors through the various porous media making up the repository system. (Task 2) CDM reviewed literature related to repository design, concentrating on effects of the repository geometry, location and other design factors on the flow of fluids within the repository boundaries, drainage from the repository structure, and the eventual transport of radionucldies away from the repository site. (Task 3) CDM, in a joint effort with LLL personnel, identified generic boundary and initial conditions, identified processes to be modeled, and recommended a modeling approach with suggestions for appropriate simplifications and approximations to the problem and identifiying important parameters necessary to model the processes. This report consists of two chapters and an appendix. The first chapter (Chapter III of the LLL report) presents a detailed description and discussion of the modeling approach developed in this project, its merits and weaknesses, and a brief review of the difficulties anticipated in implementing the approach. The second chapter (Chapter IV of the LLL report) presents a summary of a survey of researchers in the field of repository performance analysis and a discussion of that survey in light of the proposed modeling approach. The appendix is a review of the important physical processes involved in the potential hydrologic transport of radionuclides through, around and away from deep geologic nuclear waste repositories

  5. Chemical stability of copper-canisters in deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, L.

    1995-12-01

    The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper-iron canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The copper wall of the canister provides a long-time shield against corrosion, preventing the high-level nuclear fuel from contact with ground water. In the report, stability of metallic copper and its possible corrosion reactions in the conditions of deep bedrock are evaluated by means of thermo-dynamic calculations. (90 refs., 28 figs., 11 tabs.)

  6. Integrated safety case development for deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hideki; McKinley, Ian G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper will illustrate an 'integrated safety case', which involves combining both pre-closure and post-closure safety arguments from the point of view of a repository implementer, who must also ensure that projects are practical, acceptable and economic. The post-closure safety case is based on the performance of a number of barriers, which are established during construction, operation and closure. Such barriers must be confirmed using quality assured methods, supported, as required, by inspection and monitoring. The requirement for integrated assessment means that even the final process to end institutional control and transfer any liabilities from the implementer needs to be considered at present, even though this will undoubtedly be refined and tailored to the site characteristics over the many decades that will pass before this occurs. To illustrate the practical application of this approach, assessment of variants for remote-handled emplacement of the EBS for disposal of HLW in Japan will be discussed. (author)

  7. Radioactive waste disposal programme and siting regions for geological deep repositories. Executive summary. November 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    There are radioactive wastes in Switzerland. Since many decades they are produced by the operation of the five nuclear power plants, by medicine, industry and research. Important steps towards the disposal of these wastes are already realized; the corresponding activities are practised. This particularly concerns handling and packaging of the radioactive wastes, their characterization and inventory, as well as the interim storage and the inferred transportations. Preparatory works in the field of scientific research on deep geological repositories have allowed to acquire high level of technical and scientific expertise in that domain. The feasibility of building long-term safe geological repositories in Switzerland was demonstrated for all types of radioactive wastes; the demonstration was accepted by the Federal Council. There is enough knowledge to propose geological siting regions for further works. The financial funds already accumulated guaranty the financing of the dismantling of the power plants as well as building deep geological repositories for the radioactive wastes. The regulations already exist and the organisational arrangements necessary for the fruitful continuation of the works already done have been taken. The programme of the disposal of radioactive wastes also describes the next stages towards the timely realization of the deep repositories as well as the level of the financial needs. The programme is updated every five years, checked by the regulatory bodies and accepted by the Federal Council who reports to the parliament. The process of choosing a site, which will be completed in the next years, is detailed in the conceptual part of the programme for deep geological repositories. The NAGRA proposals are based exclusively on technical and scientific considerations; the global evaluation taking into account also political considerations has to be performed by the authorities and the Federal Council. The programme states that at the beginning of

  8. 3D numerical modelling of the thermal state of deep geological nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, Yu. N.

    2017-09-01

    One of the important aspects of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in deep geological repositories is ensuring the integrity of the engineered barriers which is, among other phenomena, considerably influenced by the thermal loads. As the HLW produce significant amount of heat, the design of the repository should maintain the balance between the cost-effectiveness of the construction and the sufficiency of the safety margins, including those imposed on the thermal conditions of the barriers. The 3D finite-element computer code FENIA was developed as a tool for simulation of thermal processes in deep geological repositories. Further the models for mechanical phenomena and groundwater hydraulics will be added resulting in a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) solution. The long-term simulations of the thermal state were performed for two possible layouts of the repository. One was based on the proposed project of Russian repository, and another features larger HLW amount within the same space. The obtained results describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature filed inside the repository and in the surrounding rock for 3500 years. These results show that practically all generated heat was ultimately absorbed by the host rock without any significant temperature increase. Still in the short time span even in case of smaller amount of the HLW the temperature maximum exceeds 100 °C, and for larger amount of the HLW the local temperature remains above 100 °C for considerable time. Thus, the substantiation of the long-term stability of the repository would require an extensive study of the materials properties and behaviour in order to remove the excessive conservatism from the simulations and to reduce the uncertainty of the input data.

  9. Assessment of human intrusion and future human actions – Example from the Swedish LILW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Eva; Hjerpe, T.; Smith, G.

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for FHA assessments: • The assumption of only considering inadvertent intrusion and using todays practice and technology is a key tool to make the assessment understandable. • Even after siting has been done, the placement of the repository, should be discussed in FHA scenarios, e.g. placement away from resources, discussion of erosion, and land uplift. • FEPs a good tool, good for constructing relevant scenarios and also for communication of the FHA assessment. • A few stylized scenarios are enough, good to include a drilling scenario as it is often used by different organizations. • Precise probabilities are hard to defend, avoid if possible and instead use the low likelihood in communication of the FHA results. • Communication of FHA scenarios is a tool to build confidence in the robustness of repository systems

  10. SKI SITE-94. Deep Repository Performance Assessment Project Volume I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The function of SITE-94 is to provide the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) with the capacity and supporting knowledge needed for reviewing the Swedish nuclear industry`s R and D programs and for reviewing license applications, as stipulated in Swedish legislation. The report is structured as a Performance Assessment exercise needed for input to decisions regarding repository safety, but the SITE-94 is not a safety assessment or a model for future assessments to be undertaken by the prospective licensee. The specific project objectives of SITE-94 comprise site evaluation, performance assessment methodology, canister integrity and radionuclide release and transport calculations. The report gives a detailed description of the many inter-related studies undertaken as part of the research project. As a general conclusion it is noted that the SITE-94 project has significantly advanced SKI`s capability of reviewing performance assessments and has led to the development of a tool-kit for carrying out assessment calculations, both in terms of numerical and scoping analyses. The study has highlighted a number of key issues for safety assessment (and consequently for disposal system design): Canister performance; Derived parameters of geosphere retention properties; Spatial variability of groundwater flow and geochemistry of migration paths; Time dependency (more emphasis on transient, time-dependent processes); Buffer evolution over long time. 488 refs.

  11. SKI SITE-94. Deep Repository Performance Assessment Project Volume I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The function of SITE-94 is to provide the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) with the capacity and supporting knowledge needed for reviewing the Swedish nuclear industry's R and D programs and for reviewing license applications, as stipulated in Swedish legislation. The report is structured as a Performance Assessment exercise needed for input to decisions regarding repository safety, but the SITE-94 is not a safety assessment or a model for future assessments to be undertaken by the prospective licensee. The specific project objectives of SITE-94 comprise site evaluation, performance assessment methodology, canister integrity and radionuclide release and transport calculations. The report gives a detailed description of the many inter-related studies undertaken as part of the research project. As a general conclusion it is noted that the SITE-94 project has significantly advanced SKI's capability of reviewing performance assessments and has led to the development of a tool-kit for carrying out assessment calculations, both in terms of numerical and scoping analyses. The study has highlighted a number of key issues for safety assessment (and consequently for disposal system design): Canister performance; Derived parameters of geosphere retention properties; Spatial variability of groundwater flow and geochemistry of migration paths; Time dependency (more emphasis on transient, time-dependent processes); Buffer evolution over long time. 488 refs

  12. Repositories for Deep, Dark, and Offline Data - Building Grey Literature Repositories and Discoverability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, C. M.; Tahirkheli, S.

    2017-12-01

    Data repositories, especially in the geosciences, have been focused on the management of large quantities of born-digital data and facilitating its discovery and use. Unfortunately, born-digital data, even with its immense scale today, represents only the most recent data acquisitions, leaving a large proportion of the historical data record of the science "out in the cold." Additionally, the data record in the peer-reviewed literature, whether captured directly in the literature or through the journal data archive, represents only a fraction of the reliable data collected in the geosciences. Federal and state agencies, state surveys, and private companies, collect vast amounts of geoscience information and data that is not only reliable and robust, but often the only data representative of specific spatial and temporal conditions. Likewise, even some academic publications, such as senior theses, are unique sources of data, but generally do not have wide discoverability nor guarantees of longevity. As more of these `grey' sources of information and data are born-digital, they become increasingly at risk for permanent loss, not to mention poor discoverability. Numerous studies have shown that grey literature across all disciplines, including geosciences, disappears at a rate of about 8% per year. AGI has been working to develop systems to both improve the discoverability and the preservation of the geoscience grey literature by coupling several open source platforms from the information science community. We will detail the rationale, the technical and legal frameworks for these systems, and the long-term strategies for improving access, use, and stability of these critical data sources.

  13. Important processes affecting the release and migration of radionuclides from a deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barátová, Dana; Nečas, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    The processes that affect significantly the transport of contaminants through the near field and far field of a deep geological repository of spent nuclear fuel were studied. The processes can be generally divided into (i) processes related to the release of radionuclides from the spent nuclear fuel; (ii) processes related to the radionuclide transport mechanisms (such as advection and diffusion); and (iii) processes affecting the rate of radionuclide migration through the multi-barrier repository system. A near-field and geosphere model of an unspecified geological repository sited in a crystalline rock is also described. Focus of the treatment is on the effects of the different processes on the activity flow of the major safety-relevant radionuclides. The activity flow was simulated for one spent fuel cask by using the GoldSim simulation tool. (orig.)

  14. Deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste. Preliminary safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    A preliminary safety assessment has been performed of a deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5. The purpose of the study is to investigate the capacity of the facility to act as a barrier to the release of radionuclides and toxic pollutants, and to shed light on the importance of the location of the repository site. A safety assessment (SR 97) of a deep repository for spent fuel has been carried out at the same time. In SR 97, three hypothetical repository sites have been selected for study. These sites exhibit fairly different conditions in terms of hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and ecosystems. To make use of information and data from the SR 97 study, we have assumed that SFL 3-5 is co-sited with the deep repository for spent fuel. A conceivable alternative is to site SFL 3-5 as a completely separate repository. The focus of the SFL 3-5 study is a quantitative analysis of the environmental impact for a reference scenario, while other scenarios are discussed and analyzed in more general terms. Migration in the repository's near- and far-field has been taken into account in the reference scenario. Environmental impact on the three sites has also been calculated. The calculations are based on an updated forecast of the waste to be disposed of in SFL 3-5. The forecast includes radionuclide content, toxic metals and other substances that have a bearing on a safety assessment. The safety assessment shows how important the site is for safety. Two factors stand out as being particularly important: the water flow at the depth in the rock where the repository is built, and the ecosystem in the areas on the ground surface where releases may take place in the future. Another conclusion is that radionuclides that are highly mobile and long-lived, such as {sup 36}Cl and {sup 93}Mo , are important to take into consideration. Their being long-lived means that barriers and the ecosystems must be regarded with a very long time horizon.

  15. Deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste. Preliminary safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    A preliminary safety assessment has been performed of a deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5. The purpose of the study is to investigate the capacity of the facility to act as a barrier to the release of radionuclides and toxic pollutants, and to shed light on the importance of the location of the repository site. A safety assessment (SR 97) of a deep repository for spent fuel has been carried out at the same time. In SR 97, three hypothetical repository sites have been selected for study. These sites exhibit fairly different conditions in terms of hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and ecosystems. To make use of information and data from the SR 97 study, we have assumed that SFL 3-5 is co-sited with the deep repository for spent fuel. A conceivable alternative is to site SFL 3-5 as a completely separate repository. The focus of the SFL 3-5 study is a quantitative analysis of the environmental impact for a reference scenario, while other scenarios are discussed and analyzed in more general terms. Migration in the repository's near- and far-field has been taken into account in the reference scenario. Environmental impact on the three sites has also been calculated. The calculations are based on an updated forecast of the waste to be disposed of in SFL 3-5. The forecast includes radionuclide content, toxic metals and other substances that have a bearing on a safety assessment. The safety assessment shows how important the site is for safety. Two factors stand out as being particularly important: the water flow at the depth in the rock where the repository is built, and the ecosystem in the areas on the ground surface where releases may take place in the future. Another conclusion is that radionuclides that are highly mobile and long-lived, such as 36 Cl and 93 Mo , are important to take into consideration. Their being long-lived means that barriers and the ecosystems must be regarded with a very long time horizon

  16. Effects of earthquakes on the deep repository for spent fuel in Sweden based on case studies and preliminary model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, Goeran; Munier, Raymond

    2002-06-01

    their original values within a few months. The density of the buffer around the canister is high enough to prevent liquefaction due to shaking. The predominant brittle deformation of a rock mass will be reactivation of pre- existing fractures. The ata emanating from faults intersecting tunnels show that creation of new fractures is confined to the immediate vicinity of the reactivated faults and that deformation in host rock is rapidly decreasing with the distance from the fault. By selection of appropriate respect distances the probability of canister damage due to faulting is further lowered. Data from deep South African mines show that rocks in a environment with non- existing faults and with low fracture densities and high stresses might generate faults in a previously unfractured rock mass. The Swedish repository will be located in fractured bedrock, at intermediate depth, 400 - 700 m, where stresses are moderate. The conditions to create these peculiar mining-induced features will not prevail in the repository environment. Should these faults anyhow be created, the canister is designed to withstand a shear deformation of at least 0.1 m. This corresponds to a magnitude 6 earthquake along the fault with a length of at least 1 km which is highly unlikely. Respect distance has to be site and fault specific. Field evidence gathered in this study indicates that respect distances may be considerably smaller (tens to hundreds of m) than predicted by numerical modelling (thousands of m). However, the accumulated deformation during repeated, future seismic event has to be accounted for

  17. Site investigations for repositories for solid radioactive wastes in deep continental geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews the earth-science investigations and associated scientific studies that may be needed to select a repository site and confirm that its characteristics are such that it will provide a safe confinement for solidified high-level and alpha-bearing and certain other solid radioactive wastes. Site investigations, as used in this report, cover earth sciences and associated safety analyses. Other site-investigation activities are identified but not otherwise considered here. The repositories under consideration are those consisting of mined cavities in deep continental rocks for accepting wastes in the solid and packaged form. The term deep as used in this report is used solely to emphasize the distinction between the repositories discussed in this report and those for shallow-ground disposal. In general, depths under consideration here are greater than 200 metres. The term continental refers to those geological formations that occur either beneath present-day land masses and adjoining islands or beneath the shallow seas. One of the objectives of site investigations is to collect the site-specific data necessary for the different evaluations, such as modelling required to assess the long-term safety of an underground repository

  18. Feasibility study for siting of a deep repository within the Malaa municipality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Factors of importance for localizing a deep nuclear waste repository at Malaa in northern Sweden are analyzed in this study. The geologic structures of the area have been reviewed, using mostly data from published studies. Existing infrastructure and necessary improvements are discussed, as well as land use, environment, employment and other social effects. (This report is almost identical to the report NEI-SE--222, referred to in INIS 27:12 (AN: 27-040802)). 47 refs, 41 figs, 8 tabs.

  19. Feasibility study for siting of a deep repository within the Malaa municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Factors of importance for localizing a deep nuclear waste repository at Malaa in northern Sweden are analyzed in this study. The geologic structures of the area have been reviewed, using mostly data from published studies. Existing infrastructure and necessary improvements are discussed, as well as land use, environment, employment and other social effects. (This report is almost identical to the report NEI-SE--222, referred to in INIS 27:12 (AN: 27-040802))

  20. Effects of earthquakes on the deep repository for spent fuel in Sweden based on case studies and preliminary model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran [Conrox, Djursholm (Sweden); Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-06-01

    return to their original values within a few months. The density of the buffer around the canister is high enough to prevent liquefaction due to shaking. The predominant brittle deformation of a rock mass will be reactivation of pre- existing fractures. The ata emanating from faults intersecting tunnels show that creation of new fractures is confined to the immediate vicinity of the reactivated faults and that deformation in host rock is rapidly decreasing with the distance from the fault. By selection of appropriate respect distances the probability of canister damage due to faulting is further lowered. Data from deep South African mines show that rocks in a environment with non- existing faults and with low fracture densities and high stresses might generate faults in a previously unfractured rock mass. The Swedish repository will be located in fractured bedrock, at intermediate depth, 400 - 700 m, where stresses are moderate. (abstract truncated)

  1. Production, consumption and transport of gases in deep geological repositories according to the Swiss disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diomidis, N; Cloet, V.; Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Poller, A.; Stein, M.

    2016-12-01

    In a deep geological repository for radioactive waste, in absence of oxygen and in presence of water, corrosion of various metals and alloys will lead to the formation of hydrogen. If present, organic materials may slowly degrade and generate carbon dioxide, methane and other gaseous species. Depending on local conditions, gaseous species can be consumed by chemical reactions and by microbial activity. If the resulting rate of gas generation exceeds the rate of migration of dissolved gas molecules in the pores of the engineered barriers or the host rock, the solubility limit of the gas will eventually be exceeded and the formation of a discrete gas phase will occur. Gases could continue to accumulate until the pressure becomes sufficient to be released in gaseous form. This report deals with the evolution of gas-related processes that can influence the long-term behaviour and safety of low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW) repositories in Opalinus Clay. The main aim is to present a synthesis of processes and phenomena related to repository-produced gases and to assess their influence on repository performance. A current overview of gas sources, reactions and interactions, generation, consumption, and transport is provided. Furthermore, current scientific understanding is used to define safety function indicators and criteria, which are employed to evaluate the potential influence of repository-generated gas on safety-relevant properties of engineered and natural barriers. The assessment of gas generation, consumption and transport is addressed separately for the HLW and the L/ILW deep geological repositories. The employed methodology, which is common for both repository types, consists of the description and quantification of the potential gas sources, which include the waste, barrier components such as disposal canisters and other gas-generating repository components, and of the processes and reactions leading to the generation or

  2. Natural analogues: studies of geological processes relevant to radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, A.W.; Reijonen, H.M.; McKinley, I.G.

    2015-01-01

    The geological disposal of radioactive wastes is generally accepted to be the most practicable approach to handling the waste inventory built up from over 70 years accumulation of power production, research-medical-industrial and military wastes. Here, a brief overview of the approach to geological disposal is presented along with some information on repository design and the assessment of repository post-closure safety. One of the significant challenges for repository safety assessment is how to extrapolate the likely long-term (i.e. ten thousand to a million years) behaviour of the repository from the necessarily short term data from analytical laboratories and underground rock laboratories currently available. One approach, common to all fields of the geosciences, but also in such diverse fields as philosophy, biology, linguistics, law, etc., is to utilise the analogue argumentation methodology. For the specific case of radioactive waste management, the term 'natural analogue' has taken on a particular meaning associated with providing supporting arguments for a repository safety assessment. This approach is discussed here with a brief overview of how the study of natural (and, in particular, geological) systems can provide supporting information on the likely long-term evolution of a deep geological waste repository. The overall approach is discussed and some relevant examples are presented, including the use of uranium ore bodies to assess waste form stability, the investigation of native metals to define the longevity of waste containers and how natural clays can provide information on the stability of waste tunnel backfill material. (authors)

  3. Natural analogues: studies of geological processes relevant to radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russel, A.W. [Bedrock Geosciences, Auenstein (Switzerland); Reijonen, H.M. [Saanio and Rickkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); McKinley, I.G. [MCM Consulting, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    The geological disposal of radioactive wastes is generally accepted to be the most practicable approach to handling the waste inventory built up from over 70 years accumulation of power production, research-medical-industrial and military wastes. Here, a brief overview of the approach to geological disposal is presented along with some information on repository design and the assessment of repository post-closure safety. One of the significant challenges for repository safety assessment is how to extrapolate the likely long-term (i.e. ten thousand to a million years) behaviour of the repository from the necessarily short term data from analytical laboratories and underground rock laboratories currently available. One approach, common to all fields of the geosciences, but also in such diverse fields as philosophy, biology, linguistics, law, etc., is to utilise the analogue argumentation methodology. For the specific case of radioactive waste management, the term 'natural analogue' has taken on a particular meaning associated with providing supporting arguments for a repository safety assessment. This approach is discussed here with a brief overview of how the study of natural (and, in particular, geological) systems can provide supporting information on the likely long-term evolution of a deep geological waste repository. The overall approach is discussed and some relevant examples are presented, including the use of uranium ore bodies to assess waste form stability, the investigation of native metals to define the longevity of waste containers and how natural clays can provide information on the stability of waste tunnel backfill material. (authors)

  4. Deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in the Swedish crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thegerstroem, Claes; Laarouchi Engstroem, Saida

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power companies in Sweden jointly established the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) in the 1970s. SKB's assignment is to manage and dispose of all radioactive waste from Swedish nuclear power plants in such a way as to secure maximum safety for human beings and the environment. Since 1992 a stepwise process has been under way, aiming at finding a site for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. This process was based on our view that a successful work requires that the safety of the site finally selected is met and that the municipality is in favour of the siting. SKB's record of communication related activities includes a wide variety of experiences, and we have learned from all of them. Over time we have identified a number of basic conditions, which are fundamental for a stable and successful siting process. - The siting process shall be transparent and based on voluntary participation. - It's important to maintain a constant dialogue and to express it in comprehensible terms. - A clear division of responsibilities between stakeholders is a key question. - Give the process the time that is needed - try to avoid being in too much of a hurry. - A step-wise and adaptive approach to the implementation of the disposal system. - Despite all non-technical aspects of communication, the continued good performances of operating facilities and of R and D work to guarantee top-quality technical systems are a must. (orig.)

  5. Review. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel SR 97 - Post-closure safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, Ove

    2000-01-01

    SKB states that the chosen scenarios provide good coverage of future evolutionary pathways for the deep repository. This is not the case. SKB has not made full use of the established interaction matrices and the new method of THMC diagrams to generate the relevant and important scenarios and to construct the important pathways of variables and processes, either in the established interaction matrices and the presented THMC diagrams. Hence, SKB is demonstrating in SR 97 that they lack a well thought through, sound and solid method to select and evaluate scenarios for the purpose of demonstrating the safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The evolution of the system is presented for the components of the repository system (fuel, canister, buffer/backfill, geosphere) and the effects of four different scenarios, but time only enters into the system for discrete events or processes, e.g. description of the relative radiotoxicity and heat decay of the fuel, temperature distribution, iron exchange process, pH in buffer, redox capacity and radionuclear release at the three sites. There is a lack of method and way of describing the evolution of the complete repository system, including the major scenarios, as a function of time. It is essential that SKB is able to: - consider the full range of potential scenarios, - grade the scenarios according to their significance for repository design and performance and safety assessment, - consider whether simple engineering actions could be taken to inhibit the development of adverse scenarios. This cannot be done with the system presented in SR 97, and so SKB do not have a full predictive capability - which is required for the engineering design of such an important and costly structure as a repository. Geoscientific investigation material for three selected sites are presented by SKB in the technical report dealing with waste, repository design and sites. Here a general overview is missing of the geological and rock

  6. An overview on the national strategy to implement a deep geological repository in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negut, G.; Ghitescu, P.; Dupleac, D.; Prisecaru, I.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1996 in Romania was started operation Candu 700 MW Unit 1 Cernavoda Nuclear Power Station and in 2007 begun operation of the Candu 700 MW Unit 2. The energy produced by nuclear units is accompanied by radioactive waste production. According with European Union requirements in Romania was created National Agency for Radioactive Waste (ANDRAD) in 2003. ANDRAD business is radioactive waste management. ANDRAD, together with the stakeholders, worked the law of great radioactive waste generators contribution for radioactive waste management, which was approved by Governmental Ordinance in September 2007. ANDRAD is responsible manager of this fund. ANDRAD is responsible, also, with the National Strategy for radioactive waste management. Romania's National Strategy for Energy approved in 2007 by Government Ordinance says that a deep geological repository for spent fuel (SF) and High Level Waste (HLW) is to be put in operation around 2055. IAEA supported ANDRAD in a Technical Cooperation Project for a concept of a geological repository of radioactive waste. A strategy to implement o geological repository in Romania was drafted. There are problems with potential rocks and sites to host a geological repository. There are problems for funding this project and also sensitive and serious problems connected with social and political issues. Paper presents this strategy and all the problems arisen by implantation of this strategy. (authors)

  7. Demonstrating the sealing of a deep geologic repository: the RECAP project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzyk, G.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Martino, J.B.; Kozak, E.T.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Thompson, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has operated an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for twenty-three years (1982-2005). The URL was designed and constructed to carry out in situ geotechnical R and D needed for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program. The facility is now being closed, the final of several phases that have included siting, site evaluation, construction and operation. The closure phase presents a unique opportunity to develop and demonstrate the methodologies needed for closure and site restoration of a deep geologic repository for used nuclear fuel. A wealth of technical background and characterization data, dating back to before the first excavation work was carried out, are available to support closure activities. A number of closure-related activities are being proposed as part of a REpository Closure And Post-closure (RECAP) project. The RECAP project is proposed to include demonstrations of shaft and borehole sealing and monitoring as well as fracture sealing (grouting), room closure and monitoring system decommissioning, all activities that would occur when closing an actual repository. In addition to the closure-related activities, the RECAP project could provide a unique opportunity to conduct intrusion-monitoring demonstrations as part of a repository safeguards demonstration. (author)

  8. OPG's deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level waste - recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a status report on Canada's first project to build a permanent repository for the long-term management of radioactive waste. Ontario Power Generation has initiated a project to construct a deep geologic repository for low- and intermediate-level waste at the Bruce Nuclear Site, at a depth in the range of 600 to 800 m in an Ordovician-age argillaceous limestone formation. The project is currently undergoing an Environmental Assessment and consulting companies in the areas of environmental assessment, geoscientific site characterization, engineering and safety assessment have been hired and technical studies are underway. Seismic surveys and borehole drilling will be initiated in the fall of 2006. The next major milestone for the project is the submission of the Environmental Assessment report, currently scheduled for December 2008. (author)

  9. Hydrogen transfer experiments and modelization in clay rocks for radioactive waste deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulin, P.

    2008-10-01

    Gases will be generated by corrosion of high radioactive waste containers in deep geological repositories. A gas phase will be generated. Gas pressure will build up and penetrated the geological formation. If gases do not penetrate the geological barrier efficiently, the pressure build up may create a risk of fracturing and of creation of preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. The present work focuses on Callovo-Oxfordian argillites characterisation. An experiment, designed to measure very low permeabilities, was used with hydrogen/helium and analysed using the Dusty Gas Model. Argillites close to saturation have an accessible porosity to gas transfer that is lower than 0,1% to 1% of the porosity. Analysis of the Knudsen effect suggests that this accessible network should be made of 50 nm to 200 nm diameter pores. The permeabilities values were integrated to an ANDRA operating model. The model showed that the maximum pressure expected near the repository would be 83 bar. (author)

  10. Potential effects of bacteria on radionuclide transport from a Swedish high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Microorganisms can influence radionuclide migration if their concentration are high in comparison with other organic particles. Data on the numbers of microorganisms in undisturbed ground-water have been collected. The average number of cells in the samples from 17 levels in 5 boreholes was 3.0 x 10 5 cells ml -1 . A biofilm experiment indicated an active microbial rock surface population. Radiographic uptake experiments suggest inactive bulk water populations. The bulk water microbial cells in deep ground water might then be inactive cells detached from active biofilms. Enrichment cultures for anaerobic bacteria demonstrated the presence of anaerobic bacteria capable of growth on C-1 compounds with hydrogen and carbon dioxide, presumably methanogenic bacteria. Further, growth in enrichment cultures with sulphate as electron-acceptor and lactate as carbon source proved dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria to be present. (author)

  11. Feasibility study for siting of a deep repository within the Storuman municipality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    It is SKB`s task to gather a broad body of information for the siting of a deep repository for Sweden`s spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste. The criteria presented by SKB serve as guidelines for the siting studies. Overviews of siting factors are compiled in general siting studies of all or parts of Sweden. Feasibility studies examine the siting prospects in potentially suitable and interested municipalities. SKB plans to carry out feasibility studies in five to ten municipalities in different parts of the country. General studies and feasibility studies are primarily based on existing material. The feasibility study in Storuman is the first to be conducted. It began during the second half of 1993 with the conclusion of an agreement between the municipality and SKB. SKB has been in charge of the execution of the feasibility study. SKB has been responsible for the summary provided in a status report published in June 1994, as well as for the conclusions and evaluations in this final report. Altogether about 30 reports have been published within the framework of the feasibility study. The purpose of the various studies have been to describe, in as much detail as possible, the prospects for siting a deep repository in the municipality of Storuman, and to shed light on the possible positive and negative consequences of such a siting. The feasibility study has led to a discussion within the municipality and the region concerning the siting of a deep repository. In SKB`s opinion, this gives all those concerned ample opportunity to become acquainted with the issues and to assert their interests and present their viewpoints at an early stage. 55 refs.

  12. Feasibility study for siting of a deep repository within the Storuman municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    It is SKB's task to gather a broad body of information for the siting of a deep repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste. The criteria presented by SKB serve as guidelines for the siting studies. Overviews of siting factors are compiled in general siting studies of all or parts of Sweden. Feasibility studies examine the siting prospects in potentially suitable and interested municipalities. SKB plans to carry out feasibility studies in five to ten municipalities in different parts of the country. General studies and feasibility studies are primarily based on existing material. The feasibility study in Storuman is the first to be conducted. It began during the second half of 1993 with the conclusion of an agreement between the municipality and SKB. SKB has been in charge of the execution of the feasibility study. SKB has been responsible for the summary provided in a status report published in June 1994, as well as for the conclusions and evaluations in this final report. Altogether about 30 reports have been published within the framework of the feasibility study. The purpose of the various studies have been to describe, in as much detail as possible, the prospects for siting a deep repository in the municipality of Storuman, and to shed light on the possible positive and negative consequences of such a siting. The feasibility study has led to a discussion within the municipality and the region concerning the siting of a deep repository. In SKB's opinion, this gives all those concerned ample opportunity to become acquainted with the issues and to assert their interests and present their viewpoints at an early stage. 55 refs

  13. Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel - site selection process update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facella, J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the Government of Canada selected Adaptive Phased Management as Canada's plan for the long-term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository, located in an informed and willing host. The process of site selection is an important milestone in this program. The NWMO describes its approach to working collaboratively with communities which expressed interest in exploring the project, as well as Aboriginal communities in the area and other surrounding communities. The project is designed to be implemented through a long-term partnership involving the interested community, Aboriginal communities and surrounding communities working with the NWMO. (author)

  14. Deep geologic repository concepts for isolation of used fuel in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maak, P.; Simmons, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of a deep geologic repository (DGR) for long-term management of CANDU reactor used fuel within the stable plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield was developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) between 1978 and 1996. Since 1996, Ontario Power Generation (OPG), formerly Ontario Hydro, has been leading the development of a modified DGR concept, taking into account the 1998 recommendations of the federal Environmental Assessment and Review Panel. This paper discusses progress to date in the development of modified DGR conceptual designs and technologies. (author)

  15. Annular air space effects on nuclear waste canister temperatures in a deep geologic waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, W.E.; Cheung, H.; Davis, B.W.

    1980-05-13

    Air spaces in a deep geologic repository for nuclear high level waste will have an important effect on the long-term performance of the waste package. The important temperature effects of an annular air gap surrounding a high level waste canister are determined through 3-D numerical modeling. Air gap properties and parameters specifically analyzed and presented are the air gap size, surfaces emissivity, presence of a sleeve, and initial thermal power generation rate; particular emphasis was placed on determining the effect of these variables have on the canister surface temperature. Finally a discussion based on modeling results is presented which specifically relates the results to NRC regulatory considerations.

  16. Annular air space effects on nuclear waste canister temperatures in a deep geologic waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, W.E.; Cheung, H.; Davis, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Air spaces in a deep geologic repository for nuclear high level waste will have an important effect on the long-term performance of the waste package. The important temperature effects of an annular air gap surrounding a high level waste canister are determined through 3-D numerical modeling. Air gap properties and parameters specifically analyzed and presented are the air gap size, surfaces emissivity, presence of a sleeve, and initial thermal power generation rate; particular emphasis was placed on determining the effect of these variables have on the canister surface temperature. Finally a discussion based on modeling results is presented which specifically relates the results to NRC regulatory considerations

  17. Geoscientific programme for investigation and evaluation of sites for the deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    SKB's goal is to be able to commence site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository. This report describes the investigation and evaluation programme, which is focused on a deep repository in accordance with the KBS-3 method for spent nuclear fuel. When areas for site investigations have been chosen, the programmes will be adapted to the site-specific conditions. The geoscientific work during the site investigation phase is supposed to provide the broad knowledge base that is required to evaluate the suitability of investigated sites for a deep repository. The material must be comprehensive enough to: show whether the selected site satisfies fundamental safety requirements; permit comparisons with other investigated sites; and serve as a basis for adaptation of the deep repository to the properties and characteristics of the site with an acceptable impact on society and the environment. The work is being carried out in consultation with municipalities, regulatory authorities and nearby residents. The main product of the investigations is a site description, which presents collected data and interpreted parameters that are of importance both for the overall scientific understanding of the site and for the analyses and assessments that are made of design and safety assessment with respect to the deep repository's layout and construction as well as its long-term performance and radiological safety. The site description should furthermore present an integrated description of the site (geosphere and biosphere) and its regional environs with respect to current state and naturally ongoing processes. A technical risk evaluation is carried out, by which is meant a description of uncertainties in calculations and the environmental impact of the civil engineering work. The main product of the safety assessment is a safety report, which analyzes whether long-term safety

  18. General siting study 95. Siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    General Siting Study 95 is a detailed description of the work carried out to put the siting of a deep repository in a national and regional context. The report is based on SKB`s siting factors, which have been applied on a national scale. Different factors of importance or of possible importance for the long-term radiological safety, technology, land and environment as well as society are described and evaluated. This report is the overall description on general siting studies which the government considered that SKB should report in connection with the RD and D Programme 95. 121 refs, 40 figs.

  19. General siting study 95. Siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    General Siting Study 95 is a detailed description of the work carried out to put the siting of a deep repository in a national and regional context. The report is based on SKB's siting factors, which have been applied on a national scale. Different factors of importance or of possible importance for the long-term radiological safety, technology, land and environment as well as society are described and evaluated. This report is the overall description on general siting studies which the government considered that SKB should report in connection with the RD and D Programme 95. 121 refs, 40 figs

  20. Geoscientific programme for investigation and evaluation of sites for the deep repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    SKB's goal is to be able to commence site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository. This report describes the investigation and evaluation programme, which is focused on a deep repository in accordance with the KBS-3 method for spent nuclear fuel. When areas for site investigations have been chosen, the programmes will be adapted to the site-specific conditions. The geoscientific work during the site investigation phase is supposed to provide the broad knowledge base that is required to evaluate the suitability of investigated sites for a deep repository. The material must be comprehensive enough to: show whether the selected site satisfies fundamental safety requirements; permit comparisons with other investigated sites; and serve as a basis for adaptation of the deep repository to the properties and characteristics of the site with an acceptable impact on society and the environment. The work is being carried out in consultation with municipalities, regulatory authorities and nearby residents. The main product of the investigations is a site description, which presents collected data and interpreted parameters that are of importance both for the overall scientific understanding of the site and for the analyses and assessments that are made of design and safety assessment with respect to the deep repository's layout and construction as well as its long-term performance and radiological safety. The site description should furthermore present an integrated description of the site (geosphere and biosphere) and its regional environs with respect to current state and naturally ongoing processes. A technical risk evaluation is carried out, by which is meant a description of uncertainties in calculations and the environmental impact of the civil engineering work. The main product of the safety assessment is a safety report, which analyzes whether long

  1. Simulating Earthquake Rupture and Off-Fault Fracture Response: Application to the Safety Assessment of the Swedish Nuclear Waste Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Falth, B.

    2014-12-09

    To assess the long-term safety of a deep repository of spent nuclear fuel, upper bound estimates of seismically induced secondary fracture shear displacements are needed. For this purpose, we analyze a model including an earthquake fault, which is surrounded by a number of smaller discontinuities representing fractures on which secondary displacements may be induced. Initial stresses are applied and a rupture is initiated at a predefined hypocenter and propagated at a specified rupture speed. During rupture we monitor shear displacements taking place on the nearby fracture planes in response to static as well as dynamic effects. As a numerical tool, we use the 3Dimensional Distinct Element Code (3DEC) because it has the capability to handle numerous discontinuities with different orientations and at different locations simultaneously. In tests performed to benchmark the capability of our method to generate and propagate seismic waves, 3DEC generates results in good agreement with results from both Stokes solution and the Compsyn code package. In a preliminary application of our method to the nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, southern Sweden, we assume end-glacial stress conditions and rupture on a shallow, gently dipping, highly prestressed fault with low residual strength. The rupture generates nearly complete stress drop and an M-w 5.6 event on the 12 km(2) rupture area. Of the 1584 secondary fractures (150 m radius), with a wide range of orientations and locations relative to the fault, a majority move less than 5 mm. The maximum shear displacement is some tens of millimeters at 200 m fault-fracture distance.

  2. MODELING OF THE GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT AROUND A DEEP BOREHOLE NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Lubchenko; M. Rodríguez-Buño; E.A. Bates; R. Podgorney; E. Baglietto; J. Buongiorno; M.J. Driscoll

    2015-04-01

    The concept of disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock is gaining renewed interest and consideration as a viable mined repository alternative. A large amount of work on conceptual borehole design and preliminary performance assessment has been performed by researchers at MIT, Sandia National Laboratories, SKB (Sweden), and others. Much of this work relied on analytical derivations or, in a few cases, on weakly coupled models of heat, water, and radionuclide transport in the rock. Detailed numerical models are necessary to account for the large heterogeneity of properties (e.g., permeability and salinity vs. depth, diffusion coefficients, etc.) that would be observed at potential borehole disposal sites. A derivation of the FALCON code (Fracturing And Liquid CONvection) was used for the thermal-hydrologic modeling. This code solves the transport equations in porous media in a fully coupled way. The application leverages the flexibility and strengths of the MOOSE framework, developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The current version simulates heat, fluid, and chemical species transport in a fully coupled way allowing the rigorous evaluation of candidate repository site performance. This paper mostly focuses on the modeling of a deep borehole repository under realistic conditions, including modeling of a finite array of boreholes surrounded by undisturbed rock. The decay heat generated by the canisters diffuses into the host rock. Water heating can potentially lead to convection on the scale of thousands of years after the emplacement of the fuel. This convection is tightly coupled to the transport of the dissolved salt, which can suppress convection and reduce the release of the radioactive materials to the aquifer. The purpose of this work has been to evaluate the importance of the borehole array spacing and find the conditions under which convective transport can be ruled out as a radionuclide transport mechanism

  3. The development of a deep repository-progress in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, H.; Mogg, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Ltd, a company jointly owned by the major partners in the UK nuclear industry, is responsible for developing a deep disposal facility for low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. In July 1991 Nirex announced its intention to concentrate geological investigations at Sellafield, where BNFL's existing operations give rise to approximately 60% of the wastes destined for a repository. The main features of the Nirex design process, from early considerations through the main features of a preferred conceptual design and its advantages, are described. Subject to Nirex obtaining planning permission, following a Public Inquiry, the proposed program would allow the UK nuclear industry to fulfill its responsibilities with respect to declared Government policy by providing a safe deep geological disposal facility early in the next century. (author)

  4. Microbial effects on the radionuclide transport in a deep nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spor, H.; Trescinski, M.; Libert, M.F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, St.Paul Lez Durance (France)

    1993-12-31

    This study deals with the effects of microorganisms on the transport of radionuclides under deep nuclear-waste disposal conditions. Metabolism of a cellulolytic microorganism is studied. Cellulose, as a carbon source, is representative of nuclear waste. A pilot device allows the study of the general effect of microrganisms. Bioleaching of radionuclides by a fungal culture is performed on columns of clay and cement used as engineered barriers. Cesium and Uranium had been incorporated into matrices prior to the tests. Operating conditions have been choosen according to realistic conditions of a deep repository. The production of organic acids by microorganisms is qualitatively and quantitatively determined. In addition, direct effects of microorganisms (biosorption, bioaccumulation) and indirect effects (complexing agents issued from the diodegradation of cellulose) on the transport and/or retardation of radionuclides are studied.

  5. Nuclear Waste Facing the Test of Time: The Case of the French Deep Geological Repository Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot-Delpech, Sophie; Raineau, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider the socio-anthropological issues raised by the deep geological repository project for high-level, long-lived nuclear waste. It is based on fieldwork at a candidate site for a deep storage project in eastern France, where an underground laboratory has been studying the feasibility of the project since 1999. A project of this nature, based on the possibility of very long containment (hundreds of thousands of years, if not longer), involves a singular form of time. By linking project performance to geology's very long timescale, the project attempts "jump" in time, focusing on a far distant future, without understanding it in terms of generations. But these future generations remain measurements of time on the surface, where the issue of remembering or forgetting the repository comes to the fore. The nuclear waste geological storage project raises questions that neither politicians nor scientists, nor civil society, have ever confronted before. This project attempts to address a problem that exists on a very long timescale, which involves our responsibility toward generations in the far future.

  6. Long term climate change and a deep geological repository in the Canadian Shield: issues and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    For the past million years of Earth history, the Canadian Shield has experienced a continuous process of glaciation and deglaciation, events that have significantly altered the landscape of the northern half of the North American continent. This sequence of events, ultimately due to small changes in received solar radiation due to the influence of gravitational many body effects upon the earths orbit around the sun, should they continue, constitute an important phenomena with respect to developing an understanding of groundwater flow system evolution in Shield terrain as it may influence the long-term performance of a Deep Geologic Repository for used nuclear fuel. In this paper a description is provided of the University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model, which is being applied to yield geophysically constrained predictions of the last Laurentide (North American) glacial event. In particular, the GSM is providing unique insight into the time rate of change, magnitude and uncertainty of surface boundary conditions and permafrost occurrence at a hypothetical Shield repository site. These predictive estimates of boreal, peri-glacial and ice-sheet history are offering an innovative and reasoned basis to explore flow system characteristics and attributes that govern hydrodynamic and geochemical stability within deep-seated Shield flow domains. (author)

  7. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  8. Status and development of deep geological repository in Slovak republic from geological point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Franzen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the operation of Slovak NPPs, production of approximately 2,300 metric tons of spent fuel expressed as heavy metal (18,654 spent fuel assemblies is expected. In addition, about 5000 metric tons of radioactive waste unfit for near surface repository at Mochovce and destined for a deep geological disposal. The safe and long-term solution of back-end fuel cycle is so highly required.One of the most favorable solutions is Deep Geological Repository (DGR. The site for a DGR, along with repository design and the engineered barrier system must ensure long-term safety of the disposal system.A preliminary set of site-selection criteria for a DGR was proposed in Slovakia, based on worldwide experience and consistent with IAEA recommendations. Main groups of criteria are: 1 geological and tectonic stability of prospective sites; 2 appropriate characteristics of host rock (lithological homogeneity, suitable hydrogeological and geochemical conditions, favourable geotechnical setting, absence of mineral resources, etc.; 3 conflict of interests (natural resources, natural and cultural heritage, protected resources of thermal waters, etc..Based on the previous geological investigations, three distinct areas (five localities were determined as the most prospective sites for construction of a DGR so far. Three of them are built by granitoids rock (Tribeč Mts., Veporske vrchy Mts. and Stolicke vrchy Mts., other consist of sedimentary rock formations (Cerova vrchovina Upland and Rimavska kotlina Basin. Objective for the next investigation stage is to perform more detailed geological characterization of the prospective sites.

  9. SPRAYED CLAY TECHNOLOGY FOR THE DEEP REPOSITORY OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hausmannová

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sealing barrier will play very important role in the Czech disposal concept of high level radioactive waste. It follows Swedish SKB3 design where granitic rock environment will host the repository. Swelling clay based materials as the most favorable for sealing purposes were selected. Such clays must fulfill certain requirements (e.g. on swelling properties, hydraulic conductivity or plasticity and must be stable for thousands of years. Better sealing behavior is obtained when the clay is compacted. Technology of the seal construction can vary according to its target dry density. Very high dry density is needed for buffer (sealing around entire canister with radioactive waste. Less strict requirements are on material backfilling the access galleries. It allows compaction to lower dry density than in case of buffer. One of potential technology for backfilling is to compact clay layers in most of the gallery profile by common compaction machines (rollers etc. and to spray clay into the uppermost part afterwards. The paper introduces the research works on sprayed clay technology performed at the Centre of Experimental Geotechnics of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Large scale in situ demonstration of filling of short drift in the Josef Gallery is also mentioned.

  10. Use of petrophysical data for siting of deep geological repository of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrenko Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to analyzing the petrophysical properties and petrographical characteristics of Volyn region with the view to choosing the least permeable and so the most suitable geological formation for the radioactive waste disposal. On a basis of the petrophysical estimations of the granitoids properties the argumentation of permeability has been developed for the petrotypes of Volyn region. Also method of classification of the petrotypes with their relative rate of suitability for radioactive waste disposal was developed. As a result of studying the perspectives were shown of the zhytomyr and korosten types of the granitoids as host rock for the radioactive waste disposal. According to the results of investigations performed by Swedish researchers a comparative analysis of rocks based on the age of formation, composition, structural features and some petrophysical properties of granitoids as host rocks for repository of radioactive waste was performed. Detail comparison the data of the granitoids of the Forsmark site in Sweden and the data of the granitoids of the Volyn megablock can be one of the next steps in researching the host rocks for the development of the RW disposal system in Ukraine.

  11. Use of petrophysical data for siting of deep geological repository of radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Liliana; Shestopalov, Vyacheslav

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to analyzing the petrophysical properties and petrographical characteristics of Volyn region with the view to choosing the least permeable and so the most suitable geological formation for the radioactive waste disposal. On a basis of the petrophysical estimations of the granitoids properties the argumentation of permeability has been developed for the petrotypes of Volyn region. Also method of classification of the petrotypes with their relative rate of suitability for radioactive waste disposal was developed. As a result of studying the perspectives were shown of the zhytomyr and korosten types of the granitoids as host rock for the radioactive waste disposal. According to the results of investigations performed by Swedish researchers a comparative analysis of rocks based on the age of formation, composition, structural features and some petrophysical properties of granitoids as host rocks for repository of radioactive waste was performed. Detail comparison the data of the granitoids of the Forsmark site in Sweden and the data of the granitoids of the Volyn megablock can be one of the next steps in researching the host rocks for the development of the RW disposal system in Ukraine.

  12. Feasibility studies for a radioactive waste repository in a deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.; Tassoni, E.

    1985-01-01

    This report assesses the feasibility of deep geological disposal of long-lived, heat-emitting radioactive wastes produced from the Italian nuclear power programme. Disposal is envisaged in argillaceous formations of medium plasticity at depths between 200 and 3000 metres. Thermal and geotechnical data, together with information on cost and feasibility of construction techniques are used to devise two conceptual designs (repository or deep borehole disposal) for a facility to contain all the high-level wastes arising from a 10 GWe power programme. Alternative designs and their merits are discussed and assessed. The two reference designs are used to construct a simple model of long-term performance and safety of the proposed disposal system. Recommendations are made for further work required to develop these concepts into an operational facility. It should be borne in mind that since no definite area or site has yet been identified for a disposal facility, all considerations are purely generic. Consequently data on rock properties and geological environment represent average values or best estimates for those likely to be encountered in the regions currently being considered as suitable for deep diposal purposes, and several broad assumptions have had to be made. However, the designs presented could be adapted without difficulty on a site-specific basis when the results of further research become available

  13. Development of emergency arrangements for the transport of radioactive waste to a deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Hutchinson, D.L.; Burgess, M.H.; Higson, J.; Randall, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarises the results of the studies and discussions which have led to the recommendation that Nirex should adopt NIREP as the Emergency Plan for the proposed transport arrangements of radioactive waste to the proposed UK deep repository for the disposal of low level and intermediate level waste. Although NIREP is currently specific to the road transport of radioactive materials, it is in the process of being extended to cover their transport by rail. An extended version of NIREP, covering both road and rail transport, could be operational by the end of 1992. NIREP is an established plan which meets all the current legal requirements and is flexible enough to accommodate any likely changes in legislation in the future. It is compatible with the Planning Basis and meets the requirements of the Emergency Plan Specification. The extended version of NIREP will be subject to an annual full-scale exercise and the Plan should be well-proven by the time that transport of waste packages to the repository commences. (J.P.N.)

  14. The potential significance of permafrost to the behaviour of a deep radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.; Marsily, G.de

    1991-02-01

    Permafrost is one of the scenarios that is being considered as part of the groundwater flow and transport modelling for the Project-90 assessment. It is included as one of the primary Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) which are being kept outside the Process System in the SKB/SKI scenario development project. There is a large amount of evidence that Sweden has suffered several cycles of permafrost development over the Quaternary, approximately the last 2My, and climatic predictions for the next hundred thousand years suggest that similar climatic cycling is likely to occur. The presence of permafrost could have important effects on the hydrogeological regime and could therefore be important in modifying the release and dispersion of radionuclides from a repository. The climatic conditions of permafrost would also influence radionuclide migration and accumulation in the biosphere and the associated radiation exposure of man. These biosphere aspects are not considered here but the implications for discharge into the biosphere are examined, including the abstraction of groundwater by man in permafrost regions. This report reviews the evidence relating to permafrost development and discusses the possible implications for the long-term safety of a deep repository. (78 refs.) (au)

  15. Proposal for the classification of scenarios for deep geological repositories in probability classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The provided report was elaborated in the framework of the project 3609R03210 ''Research and Development for Proof of the long-term Safety of Deep Geological Repositories''. It contains a proposal for a methodology that enables the assignment of developed scenarios in the frame of Safety Cases to defined probability classes. The assignment takes place indirectly through the categorization of the defining relevant factors (so-called FEP: Features, Events and Processes) of the respective scenarios also in probability classes. Therefore, decision trees and criteria were developed for the categorization of relevant factors in classes. Besides the description of the methodology another focal point of the work was the application of the method taking into account a defined scenario. By means of the scenario the different steps of the method and the decision criteria were documented, respectively. In addition, potential subjective influences along the path of decisions regarding the assignment of scenarios in probability classes were identified.

  16. A method of identifying social structures in siting regions for deep geological repositories in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brander, Simone

    2010-09-01

    Acceptance is a key element in the site selection process for deep geological repositories for high-level and low and intermediate-level radioactive waste in Switzerland. Participation requirements such as comprehensive negotiation issues and adequate resources have thus been defined by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). In 2008, on the basis of technical criteria Nagra (National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste) proposed several potential areas for deep geological repositories. The number of potential areas will be narrowed down within the next few years. All municipalities within the planning perimeter (the area in which surface facilities can be realised) are affected and form the siting region. In order to ensure that the local population have their say in the forthcoming discussions, regional participation bodies including all municipalities within a siting region are being set up by the SFOE. Regional participation ensures that local interests, needs and values are taken into account in the site selection process. Assembling the regional participation bodies is therefore of great importance. Before such bodies can be formed, however, the various interests, needs and values have to be identified, and special attention has to be paid to long-term interests of future generations, as well as to non-organised and under-represented interests. According to the concept of proportional representation, the interests, needs and values that are identified and weighted by the local population are to be represented in the regional participation procedure. The aim of this study is to share a method of mapping existing social structures in a defined geographical area. This involves a combination of an analysis of socio-economic statistical data and qualitative and quantitative social research methods

  17. Finite element code FENIA verification and application for 3D modelling of thermal state of radioactive waste deep geological repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    The verification of the FENIA finite element code on some problems and an example of its application are presented in the paper. The code is being developing for 3D modelling of thermal, mechanical and hydrodynamical (THM) problems related to the functioning of deep geological repositories. Verification of the code for two analytical problems has been performed. The first one is point heat source with exponential heat decrease, the second one - linear heat source with similar behavior. Analytical solutions have been obtained by the authors. The problems have been chosen because they reflect the processes influencing the thermal state of deep geological repository of radioactive waste. Verification was performed for several meshes with different resolution. Good convergence between analytical and numerical solutions was achieved. The application of the FENIA code is illustrated by 3D modelling of thermal state of a prototypic deep geological repository of radioactive waste. The repository is designed for disposal of radioactive waste in a rock at depth of several hundred meters with no intention of later retrieval. Vitrified radioactive waste is placed in the containers, which are placed in vertical boreholes. The residual decay heat of radioactive waste leads to containers, engineered safety barriers and host rock heating. Maximum temperatures and corresponding times of their establishment have been determined.

  18. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  19. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  20. Diffusive Transport of Sulphide through an Engineering Barrier System in a Deep Geological Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, S. A.; Sleep, B. E.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Krol, M.

    2015-12-01

    Bentonite is a naturally occurring clay-rich sediment containing montmorillonite, a smectitic clay mineral that has a high cation exchange capacity and swells upon contact with water. Owing to these characteristics, highly compacted bentonite (HCB) is an often included component of engineered barrier systems (EBS) designed to protect used fuel containers (UFCs) in deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level nuclear waste. The low water activity and high swelling pressure of HCB suppresses microbial activity and the related production of sulphide that could cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of UFCs The Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has chosen a UFC that consists of an inner steel core and outer copper coating which is resistant to corrosion. However, under anaerobic conditions, MIC can still contribute to UFC corrosion if sulphides are present in the groundwater. Therefore the EBS consisting of bentonite blocks and pellets has been designed to impede the movement of sulphides to the UFC. In order to examine the effectiveness of the EBS, a 3D numerical model was developed capable of simulating the diffusive transport of sulphide within the NWMO EBS. The model was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element software package and is parametric which allows the impact of different repository layouts to be assessed. The developed model was of the entire NWMO placement room, as well as, a stand-alone UFC and included conservative assumptions such as a fully saturated system and a constant concentration boundary condition. The results showed that the highest sulphide flux occurred at the semi-spherical end caps of the UFC. Further studies examined the effect of sulphide hotspots and fractures, representing possible EBS failure mechanisms. The model results highlight that even with conservative assumptions the chosen EBS will effectively protect the UFC from microbiologically influenced corrosion.

  1. New developments in measurement technology relevant to the studies of deep geological repositories in domed salt and basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Mao, N.H.

    1980-01-01

    This report briefly describes recent geophysical and geotechnical instrumentation developments relevant to the studies of deep geologic repositories. Special emphasis has been placed on techniques that appear to minimize measurement problems associated with repositories constructed in basalt or domed salt. Included in the listing are existing measurement capabilities and deficiencies that have been identified by a few authors and instrumentation workshops that have assessed the capabilities of existing instrumentation with respect to repository applications. These deficiencies have been compared with the reported advantages and limitations of the new developments described. Based on these comparisons, areas that merit further research and development have been identified. The report is based on a thorough literature review and on discussions with several instrumentation specialists involved in instrumentation development

  2. Project SAFE. Microbial features, events and processes in the Swedish final repository for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    The waste disposed of in the Swedish final repository for low and intermediate radioactive waste (SFR) typically contains large amounts of organic substances. This waste thus constitutes a possible source of energy and nutrients for microorganisms. Microbes can degrade the waste to degradation products, which to a varying degree may create problems if the process is significant. The environment for microbial life in the SFR is, however, unique since it cannot be compared to any environment to which microbes have adapted naturally over millions of years. Most similar to the SFR are waste dumps and landfills. In those, microbes degrade the waste and form degradation products. The experience from such 'analogues' and from research performed under repository-like conditions may provide useful clues about the microbial processes which may occur in the repository. Microbes have the ability to degrade bitumen, used to solidify some wastes, but this degradation is very slow under anaerobic conditions. Bitumen degradation will, therefore, not influence the safety of the SFR. However, some microbes can produce acids that could influence concrete stability, particularly in the presence of oxygen. The future SFR environment is anaerobic, which suggests that acid production is a very unlikely problem. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to produce sulphide, which may act as a corrosive on metals. Under specific conditions, with the local groundwater flow close to a metal surface and with dissolved organic material from the repository, pitting corrosion of metal canisters is a potential threat. This process appears to require conditions fairly atypical of the SFR, however. Large groups of microorganisms can use hydrogen as a source of energy, thereby contributing to the decrease of this gas mainly formed from water during the anaerobic corrosion of metals. Cellulose is an excellent substrate for many microorganisms and it will be the dominating carbon and energy

  3. Project SAFE. Microbial features, events and processes in the Swedish final repository for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Karsten [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    The waste disposed of in the Swedish final repository for low and intermediate radioactive waste (SFR) typically contains large amounts of organic substances. This waste thus constitutes a possible source of energy and nutrients for microorganisms. Microbes can degrade the waste to degradation products, which to a varying degree may create problems if the process is significant. The environment for microbial life in the SFR is, however, unique since it cannot be compared to any environment to which microbes have adapted naturally over millions of years. Most similar to the SFR are waste dumps and landfills. In those, microbes degrade the waste and form degradation products. The experience from such 'analogues' and from research performed under repository-like conditions may provide useful clues about the microbial processes which may occur in the repository. Microbes have the ability to degrade bitumen, used to solidify some wastes, but this degradation is very slow under anaerobic conditions. Bitumen degradation will, therefore, not influence the safety of the SFR. However, some microbes can produce acids that could influence concrete stability, particularly in the presence of oxygen. The future SFR environment is anaerobic, which suggests that acid production is a very unlikely problem. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to produce sulphide, which may act as a corrosive on metals. Under specific conditions, with the local groundwater flow close to a metal surface and with dissolved organic material from the repository, pitting corrosion of metal canisters is a potential threat. This process appears to require conditions fairly atypical of the SFR, however. Large groups of microorganisms can use hydrogen as a source of energy, thereby contributing to the decrease of this gas mainly formed from water during the anaerobic corrosion of metals. Cellulose is an excellent substrate for many microorganisms and it will be the dominating carbon and

  4. Near-Field Mechanical Analysis of Radioactive Waste Canister in Deep Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Sadek; Cliffordson, Ola; Saellfors, Goeran [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Geotechnical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel and the radioactive materials formed during the operation of the Swedish nuclear power plants will be enclosed into tight metal canisters. These canisters will then be placed in large disposal boreholes drilled into the floor of the repository tunnels. Bentonite blocks will be placed to fill the space between the canisters and the boreholes. The main purpose with the bentonite is to provide a hydrological barrier. In general the types of analysis required to study the behavior of the canister and the buffer material shall account for mechanical, hydraulic, thermal and chemical effects. In this study, only near field mechanical behavior is investigated. Preliminary analyses are made based on simplified assumptions and on some simple two-dimensional finite element solutions. As a results of the preliminary analysis, limited tectonic movements in the bedrock and unfavorable local swelling are studied and modeled by the finite element code ABAQUS using tree-dimensional models. The bentonite is modeled using two different material models, Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager, while the canister materials are modeled using a Drucker-Prager material model. A certain form of sensitivity analysis for parameters has also been carried out. The analyses of uneven swelling of the bentonite did not give any plastic strains in the canister. Local swelling is therefore not a threat against the canister. This load case is not the critical one. The results from the analyses of movements in the bedrock show that, as a consequence of large deviatoric stresses, plastic strains appear locally in the canister. However, the material properties for the materials in the canister show that the size of the deviatoric stresses is less than half on the failure stress. Thus, there seems to be no risk for local or total failure of the canister in case of movements in the bedrock. The conclusion from the finite element analyses is that the design of the nuclear waste canister

  5. Near-Field Mechanical Analysis of Radioactive Waste Canister in Deep Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Sadek; Cliffordson, Ola; Saellfors, Goeran

    2004-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel and the radioactive materials formed during the operation of the Swedish nuclear power plants will be enclosed into tight metal canisters. These canisters will then be placed in large disposal boreholes drilled into the floor of the repository tunnels. Bentonite blocks will be placed to fill the space between the canisters and the boreholes. The main purpose with the bentonite is to provide a hydrological barrier. In general the types of analysis required to study the behavior of the canister and the buffer material shall account for mechanical, hydraulic, thermal and chemical effects. In this study, only near field mechanical behavior is investigated. Preliminary analyses are made based on simplified assumptions and on some simple two-dimensional finite element solutions. As a results of the preliminary analysis, limited tectonic movements in the bedrock and unfavorable local swelling are studied and modeled by the finite element code ABAQUS using tree-dimensional models. The bentonite is modeled using two different material models, Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager, while the canister materials are modeled using a Drucker-Prager material model. A certain form of sensitivity analysis for parameters has also been carried out. The analyses of uneven swelling of the bentonite did not give any plastic strains in the canister. Local swelling is therefore not a threat against the canister. This load case is not the critical one. The results from the analyses of movements in the bedrock show that, as a consequence of large deviatoric stresses, plastic strains appear locally in the canister. However, the material properties for the materials in the canister show that the size of the deviatoric stresses is less than half on the failure stress. Thus, there seems to be no risk for local or total failure of the canister in case of movements in the bedrock. The conclusion from the finite element analyses is that the design of the nuclear waste canister

  6. Methodology for the biosphere analysis in the evaluation of deep geological repositories for high radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Pinedo, P.; Aguero, A.; Simon, I.; Torres, C.; Robles, B.; Smith, G.M.; Little, R.; Watkings, B.; Brice, A.; Jaen, J.A.; Coronado, S.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done and the achievements reached within the R and D Project that IMA/CIEMAT has had with ENRESA during 1993-1995. The overal R and D Project has a wide radiological protection context, but the work reported here relates only to the development of a Methodology for considering the Biosphere sub-system in the assessments of deep geological repositories for high radioactive wastes (HLW). The main areas concerned within the Methodology have to do with Biosphere structure and morphology in the long-term relevant to deep disposal of HLW: in the contexts of the assessment of these systems, and appropiate modelling of the behaviour of radionuclides released to the biosphere system and with the associated human exposure. This document first provides a review of the past and present international and national concerns about the biosphere modelling and its importance in relation to the definition of safety criteria. A joint ENRESA/ANDRA/IPSN/CIEMAT study about the definition and proactical descriptions of the biosphere systems under different climatic states is then summarized. The Methodology developed by IMA/CIEMAT is outlined with an illustration of the way it works. Different steps and procedures are included for a better proactical understanding of the software tools developed within the project to support the application of the Methologoy. This Methodology is widely based on an international working group on Reference Biospheres part national work for ENRESA has been supported under a collaborative agreement with QuantiSci Ltd. Specific software development have been carried out in collaboration with QuantiSci Ltd and with the Polytechnical University of Madrid. Most of the items included within the Methodology and moreover the Methodology as a whole, follows a continuos progressive development. It is increasinaly recognized that assessment capabilities, establisment of safety criteria and regulatory framework and the steps in a

  7. Ontario Power Generation's proposed L and ILW deep geologic repository: geoscientific assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada); Raven, K. [Geofirma Engineering Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Leech, R. [AECOM Canada Ltd., Markham, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) recently completed geoscientific studies on behalf of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to verify the suitability of the Bruce nuclear site, Municipality of Kincardine, Ontario, to host a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for OPG's Low and Intermediate Level Nuclear Waste (L and ILW). The Bruce nuclear site is underlain by a ≈850 m thick Paleozoic sedimentary sequence comprised of near-horizontally layered Cambrian- to Devonian-age sediments occurring on the eastern flank of the Michigan Basin. As envisioned, the proposed DGR would be excavated at a depth of ≈680 m within the upper Ordovician argillaceous limestone Cobourg Formation. Multi-phase geoscientific studies conducted over 4-years indicate that the upper Ordovician formations proposed to host and enclose the DGR comprise a laterally traceable, stable, saline (TDS ≈200-350 g/L) and low permeability (≤10{sup -13} m/s) groundwater regime in which solute migration has been dominated by diffusive processes. This paper provides an overview of the coordinated site-specific and regional geoscientific studies and how they have provided a basis to understand both the current site conditions and, past and future site evolution as it relates to the assessment of long-term passive DGR safety. (author)

  8. The study of fracture mineralization and relationship with high level radioactive waste of deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Cristina N.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive investigations of the Ordovician, Dinantian and Permo-Triassic rocks of the Sellafield area of northwest England were undertaken by United Kingdom Nirex Ltd. as a possible national site for geological disposal of intermediate and low-level radioactive waste. Very detailed studies of fracture mineralisation at Sellafield were thus put in hand by Nirex Ltd. and the results summarised by the British Geological Survey. Deep (up to 2 km) boreholes were put down with excellent core recovery. It is generally agreed that the most significant pathway for the escape of all but a very few radionuclides is by solution in and advection of groundwater. In this context, rock fracture systems are particularly important because they offer a potentially rapid pathway to the surface and the biosphere. One striking aspect of this work is that the fracture mineralisation seemingly records major and rapid fluctuations in redox conditions -sometimes during apparently continuous precipitation of cements (ferroan and non-ferroan calcites, dolomite). Carbonate cements record variations in Fe 2+ availability. Fe(III) precipitates also as oxide (hematite) and Fe(II) as sulphide (pyrite). This study focuses on these elements and valence states and also on Mn; another element susceptible to redox controls but known to respond differently from Fe. Shallow sub-surface stores or repositories would be more likely to have oxidising or fluctuating redox conditions. The mineralisation sequences documented at Sellafield are potentially promising in this context. Ferroan carbonate cements are sensitive indicators of later movement of oxidising ground waters. (author)

  9. Deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste in Sweden (SFL 3-5): An international peer review of SKB 's preliminary safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.; Apted, M.; Glasser, F.; Voss, C.

    2000-10-01

    The SKB safety assessment of the SFL 3-5 repository (the planned deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate level waste) can be read in two contexts: as a preliminary evaluation of the performance and design options for a repository that will not be required for perhaps forty years; or as an evaluation of a repository that might need to be sited together with the SFL 2 spent fuel repository, and whose nature and performance might thus need to be understood to a level that can be used to make wider programmatic decisions during the next five years. These two 'assessment contexts' are quite different, and an overarching issue is the fact that it was not clear to the review team which view to take. Apparently, SKB would tend towards the first context. However, it is not at all apparent to the reviewers why the second context should not be the predominant driver in the near future. The review team notes that the SFL 3-5 repository, as modelled by SKB, gives rise to potentially perceptible radionuclide releases to the environment on a timescale of hundreds of years after closure. This is in contrast to the SR 97 assessment for the SFL 2 spent fuel repository, which base scenario predicts no releases over a million year timescale. It is clear that according to SKB's SR97 and SFL3-5 analyses, for co-located facilities, it is this repository that has the potential for real radiological impacts in the immediate future. An initial recommendation from the review, is that SKB and the regulatory authorities consider which context is appropriate to the current status of the Swedish programme. This is important, because an overall impression of the reviewers is that the analysis would not be 'fit for purpose' if it were needed to assist with decision-making by SKB or the regulatory agencies. There are too many unanswered questions, and the overall impression of the safety concept is one of some fragility. Because there is no real design basis presented, no thorough

  10. Backfilling and closure of the deep repository. Assessment of backfill concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, David; Boergesson, Lennart; Keto, Paula; Tolppanen, Pasi; Hansen, Johanna

    2004-06-01

    This report presents the results from work made in Phase 1 of the joint SKB-Posiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository' aiming at selecting and developing materials and techniques for backfilling and closure of a KBS-3 type repository for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of phase 1, performed as a desk study, was to describe the potential of the suggested backfill concepts in terms of meeting SKB and Posiva requirements, select the most promising ones for further investigation, and to describe methods that can be used for determining the performance of the concepts. The backfilling concepts described in this report differ from each other with respect to backfill materials and installation techniques. The concepts studied are the following: Concept A: Compaction of a mixture of bentonite and crushed rock in the tunnel. Concept B: Compaction of natural clay with swelling ability in the tunnel. Concept C: Compaction of non-swelling soil type in the tunnel combined with application of pre-compacted bentonite blocks at the roof. Concept D: Placement of pre-compacted blocks; a number of materials are considered. Concept E: Combination of sections consisting of a) crushed rock compacted in the tunnel and b) pre-compacted bentonite blocks. The bentonite sections are installed regularly above every disposal hole. Concept F: Combination of sections consisting of a) crushed rock compacted in the tunnel and b) pre-compacted bentonite blocks. The distance between the bentonite sections is adapted to the local geology and hydrology.The assessment of the concepts is based on performance requirements set for the backfill in the deposition tunnels for providing a stable and safe environment for the bentonite buffer and canister for the repository service time. In order to do this, the backfill should follow certain guidelines, 'design criteria' concerning compressibility, hydraulic conductivity, swelling ability, long-term stability, effects on the barriers and

  11. A Nuclide Release Model for a Deep Well Scenario near a Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Choi, Jong Won

    2010-01-01

    Recently several template programs ready for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste repository (HLW) and a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste repository (LILW) systems, that are conceptually modeled, have been developed by utilizing GoldSim and AMBER at KAERI. During the last few years, such template programs have been utilized for the evaluation of nuclide transports in the nearand far-field of a repository as well as transport through the biosphere under various normal and disruptive release scenarios with assumed data. The GoldSim program, another template program by which influence due to a well located very near to the repository has been modeled and evaluated for an assumed case in order to simulate the worst exposure scenario. This seems very useful to evaluate an accidental event a long time after closure of the repository has been developed and illustrated

  12. Radiological consequences of drilling intrusion into a deep repository for high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, D.; McEwen, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report provides estimates of maximum annual individual doses to personnel for given set of scenarios associated with intrusion by drilling into a deep repository for high level waste (HLW) and recovery to the surface of contaminated material. Geological and engineering judgment has been used to formulate the manner of this intrusion and the parameters which would determine the resulting doses to field workers and to others who might be involved subsequently in procedures carried out in a geotechnical laboratory. Calculations have been performed to quantify the magnitudes of doses resulting from drilling into the HLW spent fuel matrix, the bentonite buffer and the adjacent rock. Doses have been calculated in the basis of the potential for external irradiation, inhalation of suspended contamination, and inadvertent ingestion of small amounts of contaminated material. The results show that intrusion doses into spent fuel within a few decades of disposal could be very high, in the range about 10 to 100 Sv. At this stage all three exposure pathways make a significant contribution to the total dose. Beyond about 100 y, as 137 Cs decays away, the contribution from external irradiation falls off sharply. However the doses from ingestion and inhalation have only fallen by about a factor of 5 after 10 3 y, and the total dose still in the range from about 2 to 25 Sv. Apart form the direct consequences of intrusion discussed above, drilling might influence safety in other ways. Thus, a borehole might modify the groundwater flow system around the waste, and provide a direct permeable flow path to the near surface; it might results in the introduction of drilling fluids which modify groundwater chemistry; it might results in the early failure of a fuel canister, leading to earlier release to groundwater; or, in the extreme, some combination of all three. (au)

  13. Impact of cementitious materials decalcification on transfer properties: application to radioactive waste deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlot, C.

    2005-09-01

    Cementitious materials have been selected to compose the engineering barrier system (EBS) of the French radioactive waste deep repository, because of concrete physico-chemical properties: the hydrates of the cementitious matrix and the pH of the pore solution contribute to radionuclides retention; furthermore the compactness of these materials limits elements transport. The confinement capacity of the system has to be assessed while a period at least equivalent to waste activity (up to 100.000 years). His durability was sustained by the evolution of transfer properties in accordance with cementitious materials decalcification, alteration that expresses structure long-term behavior. Then, two degradation modes were carried out, taking into account the different physical and chemical solicitations imposed by the host formation. The first mode, a static one, was an accelerated decalcification test using nitrate ammonium solution. It replicates the EBS alteration dues to underground water. Degradation kinetic was estimated by the amount of calcium leached and the measurement of the calcium hydroxide dissolution front. To evaluate the decalcification impact, samples were characterized before and after degradation in term of microstructure (porosity, pores size distribution) and of transfer properties (diffusivity, gas and water permeability). The influence of cement nature (ordinary Portland cement, blended cement) and aggregates type (lime or siliceous) was observed: experiments were repeated on different mortars mixes. On this occasion, an essential reflection on this test metrology was led. The second mode, a dynamical degradation, was performed with an environmental permeameter. It recreates the EBS solicitations ensured during the re-saturation period, distinguished by the hydraulic pressure imposed by the geologic layer and the waste exothermicity. This apparatus, based on triaxial cell functioning, allows applying on samples pressure drop between 2 and 10 MPa and

  14. The enhancement of a biosphere code for use in the assessment of deep repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Little, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    A disposal system for radioactive waste is conventionally considered to consist of the engineered barriers of the repository, the geosphere and the surface environment or biosphere. Computer codes have been developed to assist in assessing the impact of radionuclides migrating from the repository through the disposal system. Codes have been developed to represent the repository, the geosphere and the biosphere. The fundamental role of the biosphere codes is, for radionuclide inputs, to estimate the dose, or probability distribution function of dose, to a maximally exposed individual as a function of time. In the United Kingdom, the primary target for long-term radiological impacts from a single disposal facility is that the risk of fatal cancer to an individual in any one year should not exceed one in a million at any time. The recent revival of interest in the UK in the deep disposal of radioactive waste has resulted in the need for the risk to be estimated over timescales up to a million years, since a deep geologic repository might be able to withstand the effects of several future glacial episodes. Biosphere modelling for deep disposal of radioactive waste poses particular problems since the surface environment is expected to evolve as a result of changes in climatic conditions. Consequently the effect of climate induced changes in geomorphology, land use and sea level on the calculated risk have to be considered. This paper outlines the development of a new version of the dynamic biosphere model DECOS, which was developed originally in the context of shallow site assessments. The new version of the code, called DECOS-MG, is capable of simulating the effect of multiple glacial cycles and changes in sea level. (14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  15. The Swedish radiological environmental protection regulations applied in a review of a license application for a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Pål; Stark, Karolina; Xu, Shulan; Nordén, Maria; Dverstorp, Björn

    2017-11-01

    For the first time, a system for specific consideration of radiological environmental protection has been applied in a major license application in Sweden. In 2011 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel & Waste Management Co. (SKB) submitted a license application for construction of a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel at the Forsmark site. The license application is supported by a post-closure safety assessment, which in accordance with regulatory requirements includes an assessment of environmental consequences. SKB's environmental risk assessment uses the freely available ERICA Tool. Environmental media activity concentrations needed as input to the tool are calculated by means of complex biosphere modelling based on site-specific information gathered from site investigations, as well as from supporting modelling studies and projections of future biosphere conditions in response to climate change and land rise due to glacial rebound. SKB's application is currently being reviewed by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). In addition to a traditional document review with an aim to determine whether SKB's models are relevant, correctly implemented and adequately parametrized, SSM has performed independent modelling in order to gain confidence in the robustness of SKB's assessment. Thus, SSM has used alternative stylized reference biosphere models to calculate environmental activity concentrations for use in subsequent exposure calculations. Secondly, an alternative dose model (RESRAD-BIOTA) is used to calculate doses to biota that are compared with SKB's calculations with the ERICA tool. SSM's experience from this review is that existing tools for environmental dose assessment are possible to use in order to show compliance with Swedish legislation. However, care is needed when site representative species are assessed with the aim to contrast them to generic reference organism. The alternative modelling of environmental concentrations resulted in much lower

  16. Development of an Integrated Natural Barrier Database System for Site Evaluation of a Deep Geologic Repository in Korea - 13527

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Haeryong; Lee, Eunyong; Jeong, YiYeong; Lee, Jeong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corporation (KRMC) established in 2009 has started a new project to collect information on long-term stability of deep geological environments on the Korean Peninsula. The information has been built up in the integrated natural barrier database system available on web (www.deepgeodisposal.kr). The database system also includes socially and economically important information, such as land use, mining area, natural conservation area, population density, and industrial complex, because some of this information is used as exclusionary criteria during the site selection process for a deep geological repository for safe and secure containment and isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste in Korea. Although the official site selection process has not been started yet in Korea, current integrated natural barrier database system and socio-economic database is believed that the database system will be effectively utilized to narrow down the number of sites where future investigation is most promising in the site selection process for a deep geological repository and to enhance public acceptance by providing readily-available relevant scientific information on deep geological environments in Korea. (authors)

  17. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders in the development of a deep geological repository in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumberova, Vera

    2004-01-01

    The mission of the Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA) is to ensure the safe disposal of all existing and future radioactive waste. In order to fulfil this task RAWRA, in addition to the operation of radioactive waste repositories in the Czech Republic, coordinates all those activities relating to the construction of a deep geological repository. This long-term goal implies first creating and then building upon the public's confidence in the decision making process and the project as a whole as well as in RAWRA as a competent and efficient implementer since clearly public acceptance is an essential condition for a successful final outcome. Since its establishment in 1997 RAWRA has been looking for ways in which to inform the public about its activities and how to involve the various stakeholders in the development process. The communication tools employed to achieve this goal have, to date, depended on the specific stage of the process but RAWRA has aimed at a continuous improvement in its activities; consequently a large number of changes have been made to RAWRA's policy and approach in recent years. This paper, which aims to describe RAWRA's dialogue with stakeholders (mainly local communities), provides examples of the way in which issues raised by stakeholders concerning a repository are reflected in RAWRA's approach. (author)

  18. Redox processes in the safety case of deep geological repositories of radioactive wastes. Contribution of the European RECOSY Collaborative Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Grivé, M.; Montoya, V.; Kienzler, B.; Altmaier, M.; Buckau, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The RECOSY project produced results relevant for the Safety Case of nuclear disposal. • We classify the safety related features where RECOSY has contributed. • Redox processes effect the retention of radionuclides in all repository subsystems. - Abstract: Redox processes influence key geochemical characteristics controlling radionuclide behaviour in the near and far field of a nuclear waste repository. A sound understanding of redox related processes is therefore of high importance for developing a Safety Case, the collection of scientific, technical, administrative and managerial arguments and evidence in support of the safety of a disposal facility. This manuscript presents the contribution of the specific research on redox processes achieved within the EURATOM Collaborative Project RECOSY (REdox phenomena COntrolling SYstems) to the Safety Case of nuclear waste disposal facilities. Main objectives of RECOSY were related to the improved understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release or retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal and providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment and the Safety Case. The research developed during the project covered aspects of the near-field and the far-field aspects of the repository, including studies relevant for the rock formations considered in Europe as suitable for hosting an underground repository for radioactive wastes. It is the intention of this paper to highlight in which way the results obtained from RECOSY can feed the scientific process understanding needed for the stepwise development of the Safety Case associated with deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

  19. First Workshop on Design and Construction of Deep Repositories - Theme: Excavation through water-conducting major fracture zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, G.; Svemar, C.

    1994-01-01

    Final disposal of high-level nuclear waste has not yet been carried out in any country today. The concepts under development are all based on geological repositories, i.e., disposal at a sufficient depth below the surface to provide stable mechanical, hydrological and chemical conditions during the period the waste needs to be isolated from man. In the cases where crystalline bedrock is considered the proposed repository depths vary between 300-1000 m. The construction, operation and sealing of a deep geological repository must meet various criteria that in many respects are more detailed and more demanding than usual in underground construction projects today. The work shall be done so that occupational safety is ensured. The work also shall conform to whatever restrictions are necessary for ensuring pre-closure operational safety and post-closure long-term safety. March 1993 SKB arranged a two-day international workshop to discuss design and construction of repositories. Close to 40 participants from eight countries shared experiences regarding passage of major water-conducting fracture zones and other matters. This report summarizes the contributions to the workshop

  20. Potential impact of Andrassy bentonite microbial diversity in the long-term performance of a deep nuclear waste repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadza, M. Y. Mohd; Tadza, M. A. Mohd; Bag, R.; Harith, N. S. H.

    2018-01-01

    Copper and steel canning and bentonite buffer are normally forseen as the primary containment component of a deep nuclear waste repository. Distribution of microbes in subsurface environments have been found to be extensive and directly or indirectly may exert influence on waste canister corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The understanding of clays and microbial interaction with radionuclides will be useful in predicting the microbial impacts on the performance of the waste repositories. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of Andrassy bentonite recovered from Tawau clay deposits. The evaluation of microbial populations shows the presence of a number of cultivable microbes (e.g. Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Achromobacter, Bacillus, Paecilomyces, Trichoderma, and Fusarium). Additionally, a pigmented yeast strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from the formation. Both Bacillus and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa have high tolerance towards U radiation and toxicity. The presence of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in Andrassy bentonite might be able to change the speciation of radionuclides (e.g. uranium) in a future deep repository. However, concern over the presence of Fe (III) reduction microbes such as Bacillus also found in the formation could lead to corrosion of copper steel canister and affect the overall performance of the containment system.

  1. Site selection for deep geologic repositories - Consequences for society, economy and environment; was kommt auf die regionen zu? Auswirkungen geologischer tiefenlager auf gesellschaft, wirtschaft und lebensraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-03-15

    In a few years, Switzerland will make the decision regarding site selection for geological underground repositories for the storage of radioactive wastes. Besides the safety issue, many citizens are interested in how such a repository will affect environment, economy and society in the selected site's region. This brochure summarizes the results of many studies on the socio-economic impacts of nuclear waste repositories. Radioactive wastes must be stored in such a way that mankind and environment are safely protected for a long period of time. How this goal may be achieved, is already known: geologic deep repositories warrant long-term safety. For the oncoming years in Switzerland the question is where the repository will be built. The search for an appropriate site for a repository in the proposed regions will launch discussions. Within the participative framework the regions may bring their requests. The demonstration of the safety of potential repository sites has the highest priority in the selection process. In the third procedural step additional rock investigations will be made. The socio-economic studies and the experience with existing plants show that radioactive waste management plants can be built and operated in good agreement with environmental requirements. The radioactive wastes in a deep underground repository are stored many hundred meters below the Earth's surface. There, they are isolated from our vital space. Technical barriers and the surrounding dense rock confinement prevent the release of radioactive materials into the environment. A deep repository has positive consequences for the regional economy. It increases trade and value creation and creates work places. The socio-economic impacts practically extend over one century, but strongly vary with time; they are the largest during the building period. High life quality and a positive population development in the selected site region are compatible with a deep repository. A fair

  2. Source-book of International Activities Related to the Development of Safety Cases for Deep Geological Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    All national radioactive waste management authorities recognise today that a robust safety case is essential in developing disposal facilities for radioactive waste. To improve the robustness of the safety case for the development of a deep geological repository, a wide variety of activities have been carried out by national programs and international organisations over the past years. The Nuclear Energy Agency, since first introducing the modern concept of the 'safety case', has continued to monitor major developments in safety case activities at the international level. This Source-book summarises the activities being undertaken by the Nuclear Energy Agency, the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning the safety case for the operational and post-closure phases of geological repositories for radioactive waste that ranges from low-level to high-level waste and for spent fuel. In doing so, it highlights important differences in focus among the three organisations

  3. Plugs for deposition tunnels in a deep geologic repository in granitic rock. Concepts and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A. (AECL, Chalk River (Canada)); Boergesson, L. (Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)); Gunnarsson, D. (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hansen, J. (Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland))

    2009-11-15

    Regardless of the emplacement geometry selected in a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, there will be a requirement for the access tunnels to remain open while repository operations are ongoing. The period of repository operation will stretch for many years (decades to more than a century depending on disposal concept and number of canisters to be installed). Requirements for extended monitoring of the repository before final closure may further extend the period over which the tunnels must remain open. The intersection of the emplacement rooms/drifts and the access tunnels needs to be physically closed in order to ensure that the canisters remain undisturbed and that no undesirable hydraulic conditions are allowed to develop within the backfilled volume. As a result of these requirements, generic guidelines and design concepts have been developed for 'Plugs' that are intended to provide mechanical restraint, physical security and hydraulic control functions over the short-term (repository operational and pre-closure monitoring periods). This report focuses on the role and requirements of plugs to be installed at emplacement room/ tunnel/drift entrances or in other locations within the repository that may require installation of temporary mechanical or hydraulic control structures. These plugs are not necessarily a permanent feature of the repository and may, if required, be removed for later installation of a permanent seal. Room/Drift plugs are also by their defined function, physically accessible during repository operation so their performance can be monitored and remedial actions taken if necessary (e.g. increased seepage past the plug). A considerable number of sealing demonstrations have been undertaken at several research laboratories that are focussed on development of technologies and materials for use in isolation of spent nuclear fuel and these are briefly reviewed in this report. Additionally, technologies developed for non

  4. Plugs for deposition tunnels in a deep geologic repository in granitic rock. Concepts and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D. A.; Boergesson, L.; Gunnarsson, D.; Hansen, J.

    2009-11-01

    Regardless of the emplacement geometry selected in a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, there will be a requirement for the access tunnels to remain open while repository operations are ongoing. The period of repository operation will stretch for many years (decades to more than a century depending on disposal concept and number of canisters to be installed). Requirements for extended monitoring of the repository before final closure may further extend the period over which the tunnels must remain open. The intersection of the emplacement rooms/drifts and the access tunnels needs to be physically closed in order to ensure that the canisters remain undisturbed and that no undesirable hydraulic conditions are allowed to develop within the backfilled volume. As a result of these requirements, generic guidelines and design concepts have been developed for 'Plugs' that are intended to provide mechanical restraint, physical security and hydraulic control functions over the short-term (repository operational and pre-closure monitoring periods). This report focuses on the role and requirements of plugs to be installed at emplacement room/ tunnel/drift entrances or in other locations within the repository that may require installation of temporary mechanical or hydraulic control structures. These plugs are not necessarily a permanent feature of the repository and may, if required, be removed for later installation of a permanent seal. Room/Drift plugs are also by their defined function, physically accessible during repository operation so their performance can be monitored and remedial actions taken if necessary (e.g. increased seepage past the plug). A considerable number of sealing demonstrations have been undertaken at several research laboratories that are focussed on development of technologies and materials for use in isolation of spent nuclear fuel and these are briefly reviewed in this report. Additionally, technologies developed for non

  5. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE's investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4)

  6. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?; Standortgebiete fuer geologische Tiefenlager. Warum gerade hier?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieser, A

    2009-09-15

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes.

  7. Public involvement in the siting of contentious facilities; Lessons from the radioactive waste repository siting programmes in Canada and the United States, with special reference to the Swedish repository siting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, P.J. [Geosciences for Development and the Environment (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the conclusion of a two-part programme, begun in 1994 with the overall aim of assisting in the development of an acceptable public participation strategy for use in Sweden for the siting of contentious facilities, with particular reference to the ongoing siting programme for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The first part of the work programme, a global review of siting practice, was reported as SSI Rapport 94-15, in November 1994. This recommended further detailed studies of at least two individual programmes, which have now been carried out in Canada and the United States, and are reported on here. They involved face to face meetings with many of the main stake holders in the two programmes and enabled valuable insight to be gained into the potential problems associated with increased public participation, as well as identifying good practice where it exists. The lessons learned have then been applied to the evolving repository siting process in Sweden. 35 refs.

  8. Public involvement in the siting of contentious facilities; Lessons from the radioactive waste repository siting programmes in Canada and the United States, with special reference to the Swedish repository siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the conclusion of a two-part programme, begun in 1994 with the overall aim of assisting in the development of an acceptable public participation strategy for use in Sweden for the siting of contentious facilities, with particular reference to the ongoing siting programme for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The first part of the work programme, a global review of siting practice, was reported as SSI Rapport 94-15, in November 1994. This recommended further detailed studies of at least two individual programmes, which have now been carried out in Canada and the United States, and are reported on here. They involved face to face meetings with many of the main stake holders in the two programmes and enabled valuable insight to be gained into the potential problems associated with increased public participation, as well as identifying good practice where it exists. The lessons learned have then been applied to the evolving repository siting process in Sweden. 35 refs

  9. Concerted action on the retrievability of long lived radioactive waste in deep underground repositories - progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    Within the EURATOM Framework Programme: Nuclear Fission Safety, a Concerted Action on the retrievability of long lived radioactive waste in deep underground repositories is being carried out. This Concerted Action commenced on the 1st of January 1998 and involves experts from nine different European countries. The Concerted Action will be completed by the 31st of December 1999. This paper gives a brief overview of the objectives of the Concerted Action, the work programme that has been defined to meet these objectives, the work performed to date, and the remaining work programme. (author)

  10. Seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaláb, Zdeněk; Šílený, Jan; Lednická, Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2017), s. 486-493 E-ISSN 2391-5471 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015079 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : deep geological repository * earthquake * seismicity * neo-deterministic analysis * probabilistic seismic hazard assessment Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure; DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure (GFU-E) OBOR OECD: Environmental and geological engineering, geotechnics; Environmental and geological engineering, geotechnics (GFU-E) Impact factor: 0.745, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/phys.2017.15.issue-1/phys-2017-0055/phys-2017-0055.pdf

  11. Proposed format and content of environmental reports for deep geologic terminal repositories for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrell, D.J.; Jones, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    As the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has not yet issued a format guide for the preparation of an environmental impact statement for radioactive waste repositories, Rockwell Hanford operations has developed an annotated outline which will serve as the basis for the environmental evaluation activities until replaced by an appropriate NRC regulatory guide. According to the outline, the applicant should summarize the major environmental effects that are expected to occur during the construction, operation, and terminal isolation phases of the radioactive material repository. Compare these environmental effects with the possible effect of continued use of interim storage facilities. Unless unforeseen environmental effects become apparent, the summary should be a positive statement indicating that the short-term environmental effects are outweighed by the long-term benefits of the repository

  12. Heat propagation in and around the deep repository. Thermal calculations applied to three hypothetical sites: Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageskog, L.; Jansson, Patrik

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the modelling of the thermal process in and around the deep repository for spent fuel. The model was developed in the general finite element program ANSYS and applied to the three hypothetical sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg included in the SR 97 analyse system. The canister emplacement in the repository was analysed based on certain criteria regarding the temperature on the canister surface. This was done with consideration to natural deviations in various thermal parameters as well as to the risk of a gap opening up between the canister surface and the bentonite buffer. The consequence of the latter was analysed separately as part of the study. The heat load in the model was applied stepwise, following an assumed time schedule for the actual deposition work. The calculations were extended to 1,000 years after the commencement of the deposition work. The outcome of the calculation is presented as coloured prints of isotherms in and around the repository at certain time intervals

  13. Modelling of processes occurring in deep geological repository - development of new modules in the GoldSim environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vopalka, D.; Lukin, D.; Vokal, A.

    2006-01-01

    Three new modules modelling the processes that occur in a deep geological repository have been prepared in the GoldSim computer code environment (using its Transport Module). These modules help to understand the role of selected parameters in the near-field region of the final repository and to prepare an own complex model of the repository behaviour. The source term module includes radioactive decay and ingrowth in the canister, first order degradation of fuel matrix, solubility limitation of the concentration of the studied nuclides, and diffusive migration through the surrounding bentonite layer controlled by the output boundary condition formulated with respect to the rate of water flow in the rock. The corrosion module describes corrosion of canisters made of carbon steel and transport of corrosion products in the near-field region. This module computes balance equations between dissolving species and species transported by diffusion and/or advection from the surface of a solid material. The diffusion module that includes also non-linear form of the interaction isotherm can be used for an evaluation of small-scale diffusion experiments. (author)

  14. Modelling of processes occurring in deep geological repository - Development of new modules in the GoldSim environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopálka, D.; Lukin, D.; Vokál, A.

    2006-01-01

    Three new modules modelling the processes that occur in a deep geological repository have been prepared in the GoldSim computer code environment (using its Transport Module). These modules help to understand the role of selected parameters in the near-field region of the final repository and to prepare an own complex model of the repository behaviour. The source term module includes radioactive decay and ingrowth in the canister, first order degradation of fuel matrix, solubility limitation of the concentration of the studied nuclides, and diffusive migration through the surrounding bentonite layer controlled by the output boundary condition formulated with respect to the rate of water flow in the rock. The corrosion module describes corrosion of canisters made of carbon steel and transport of corrosion products in the near-field region. This module computes balance equations between dissolving species and species transported by diffusion and/or advection from the surface of a solid material. The diffusion module that includes also non-linear form of the interaction isotherm can be used for an evaluation of small-scale diffusion experiments.

  15. Constructability analysis for a deep repository - some thoughts on possibilities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, G.; Leijon, B.; Stille, H.

    1995-01-01

    Potential site characterization for construction of a repository for geologic disposal of spent fuel in crystalline rock in Sweden is discussed. The present plan requires that the fuel be encapsulated in a composite steel-copper canister, that the repository be situated somewhere in Sweden with municipal approval, and that licensing be preceded by extensive studies and investigations. Important factors are mechanical stability, hydrology, and the suitability of construction materials. Site investigation will require a lot of surface and borehole information regarding rock types, zones, structures, fractures, hydraulic conductivity, stresses, rock strength, and groundwater chemistry. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  16. Long-term degradation of organic polymers under conditions found in deep repositories for low and intermediate-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthmann, R.; Mosberger, L.; Baier, U.

    2013-06-01

    On behalf of Nagra, the Environmental Biotechnology Section of the Zürich University of Applied Sciences in Wädenswil investigated the potential for microbiological degradation of organic polymers under the conditions found in a deep geological repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW). The existing scientific literature on the topic was analysed, some thermodynamic calculations carried out and input was elicited from internationally recognised experts in the field. The study was restricted to a few substances which, in terms of mass, are most significant in the Swiss L/ILW inventory; these are polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), other plastics and bitumen. There were no clear indications in the literature that the polymer structure of synthetic polymers is biodegraded under anoxic conditions. However, functional groups of ion exchangers and plasticizers in plastics are considered to be readily available and biodegradable. The greatest obstacle to biological degradation of synthetic polymers is depolymerisation to produce labile monomers. As energy is generally required for such breakdown, the chances of this process taking place outside the cells are very low. In so far as they are present, monomers are, in principle, anaerobically biodegradable. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that degradation of synthetic polymers under repository conditions is theoretically possible. However, the degradation of polystyrene is very close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the usable energy for microorganisms would barely be sufficient. Under high H2 partial pressures, it is predicted that there will be a thermodynamic inhibition of anaerobic degradation, as certain interim steps in degradation are endergonic. The starting conditions for microbial growth in a deep repository are unfavourable in terms of availability of water and prevailing pH values. Practically no known microorganisms can tolerate the combination of these conditions; most known

  17. Siting, design and construction of a deep geological repository for the disposal of high level and alpha bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The main objective of this document is to summarize the basic principles and approaches to siting, design and construction of a deep geological repository for disposal of high level and alpha bearing radioactive wastes, as commonly agreed upon by Member States. This report is addressed to decision makers and technical managers as well as to specialists planning for siting, design and construction of geological repositories for disposal of high level and alpha bearing wastes. This document is intended to provide Member States of the IAEA with a summary outline for the responsible implementing organizations to use for siting, designing and constructing confinement systems for high level and alpha bearing radioactive waste in accordance with the protection objectives set by national regulating authorities or derived from safety fundamentals and standards of the IAEA. The protection objectives will be achieved by the isolation of the radionuclides from the environment by a repository system, which consists of a series of man made and natural safety barriers. Engineered barriers are used to enhance natural geological containment in a variety of ways. They must complement the natural barriers to provide adequate safety and necessary redundancy to the barrier system to ensure that safety standards are met. Because of the long timescales involved and the important role of the natural barrier formed by the host rock, the site selection process is a key activity in the repository design and development programme. The choice of the site, the investigation of its geological setting, the exploration of the regional hydrogeological setting and the primary underground excavations are all considered to be part of the siting process. 16 refs

  18. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta

    2008-12-01

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and plan to implement similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The investigation described in this report is intended to acquire more knowledge regarding the behavior of some of the candidate backfilling materials. Blocks made of three different materials (Friedland clay, Asha 230 or a bentonite/ballast 30/70 mixture) as well as different bentonite pellets have been examined. The backfill materials will be exposed to an environment simulating that in a tunnel, with high relative humidity and water inflow from the rock. The processes and properties investigated are: 1. Erosion properties of blocks and pellets (Friedland blocks, MX-80 pellets, Cebogel QSE pellets, Minelco and Friedland granules). 2. Displacements of blocks after emplacement in a deposition drift (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 and Mixture 30/70). 3. The ability of these materials to seal a leaking in-situ cast plug cement/rock but also other fractures in the rock (MX-80 pellets). 4. The self healing ability after a piping scenario (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 Mixture 30/70 and also MX-80 pellets). 5. Swelling and cracking of the compacted backfill blocks caused by relative humidity. The erosion properties of Friedland blocks were also investigated in Phase 2 of the joint SKBPosiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository, BACLO, which included laboratory scale experiments. In this phase of the project (3) some completing tests were performed with new blocks produced for different field tests. These blocks had a lower density than intended and this has an influence on the erosion properties measured. The erosion properties of MX-80 pellets were also investigated earlier in the project but an

  19. Proposed format and content of license applications for deep geologic terminal repositories for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Chapters are devoted to the following: introduction and general description; summary safety analysis; site characteristics; principal design criteria; repository design; operations systems; management of onsite generated waste; radiation protection; accident safety analysis; conduct of operations; operating controls and limits; and quality assurance

  20. Setting up a safe deep repository for long-lived HLW and ILW in Russia: Current state of the works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, Yu.D.; Porsov, A.Yu.; Beigul, V.P.; Palenov, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of RW disposal in Russia in accordance with the Federal Law 'On Radioactive Waste Management and Amendments to Specific Legal Acts of the Russian Federation' No. 190-FL dated 11 July 2011, is oriented at the ultimate disposal of waste, without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. The law 190-FL has it as follows: - A radioactive waste repository is a radioactive waste storage facility intended for disposal of the radioactive wastes without an intent for their subsequent retrieval. - Disposal of solid long-lived high-level waste and solid long-lived intermediate-level waste is carried out in deep repositories for radioactive waste. - Import into the Russian Federation of radioactive waste for the purpose of its storage, processing and disposal, except for spent sealed sources of ionising radiation originating from the Russian Federation, is prohibited. For safe final disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW, it is planned to construct a deep repository for radioactive waste (DRRW) in a low-pervious monolith rock massif in the Krasnoyarsk region in the production territory of the Mining and Chemical Combine (FSUE 'Gorno-khimicheskiy kombinat'). According to the IAEA recommendations and in line with the international experience in feasibility studies for setting up of HLW and SNF underground disposal facilities, the first mandatory step is the construction of an underground research laboratory. An underground laboratory serves the following purposes: - itemised research into the characteristics of enclosing rock mass, with verification of massive material suitability for safe disposal of long-lived HLW and ILW; - research into and verification of the isolating properties of an engineering barrier system; - development of engineering solutions and transportation and process flow schemes for construction and running of a future RW ultimate isolation facility. (authors)

  1. Sectoral Plan 'Deep Geological Disposal', Stage 2. Proposed site areas for the surface facilities of the deep geological repositories as well as for their access infrastructure. Annexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    In line with the provisions of the nuclear energy legislation, the sites for deep geological disposal of Swiss radioactive waste are selected in a three-stage Sectoral Plan process (Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Disposal). The disposal sites are specified in Stage 3 of the selection process with the granting of a general licence in accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act. The first stage of the process was completed on 30 th November 2011, with the decision of the Federal Council to incorporate the six geological siting regions proposed by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) into the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Disposal, for further evaluation in Stage 2. The decision also specifies the planning perimeters within which the surface facilities and shaft locations for the repositories will be constructed. In the second stage of the process, at least two geological siting regions each will be specified for the repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and for the high-level waste (HLW) repository and these will undergo detailed geological investigation in Stage 3. For each of these potential siting regions, at least one location for the surface facility and a corridor for the access infrastructure will also be specified. NAGRA is responsible, at the beginning of Stage 2, for submitting proposals for potential locations for the surface facilities and their access infrastructure to the Federal Office of Energy (SFOE); these are then considered by the regional participation bodies in the siting regions. The general report and the present annexes volume document these proposals. In Stage 2, under the lead of the SFOE, socio-economic-ecological studies will also be carried out to investigate the impact of a repository project on the environment, economy and society. The present reports also contain the input data to be provided by NAGRA for the generic (site-independent) part of these impact studies. A meaningful

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiatives: Records management for deep and near surface geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The international scientific community has long had an interest in determining methods by which information regarding nuclear waste repositories, and the inherent danger to humanity, could be passed from generation to generation and society to society. Because nuclear waste will remain radioactive for thousands of years future generations must be warned of the dangers thus eliminating intentional or inadvertent intrusion. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained so that this information remains accessible to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years; thus the retention of information continues beyond current societies, cultures and languages, and must be continually migrated to new retrieval technologies to assure access

  3. Low-pH injection grout for deep repositories. Summary report from a co-operation project between NUMO (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, Anders; Sievaenen, Ursula

    2005-06-01

    The use of standard cementitious material creates pulses of pH in the magnitude of 12-13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental and also unnecessarily complicates the safety analysis of the repository. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis. Also, according to current understanding, the use of low-pH cement (pH = 11) will not disturb the functioning of the bentonite, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. A result of the project is that there are both low-pH cementitious material for grouting larger fractures (= 100 μm) and non-cementitious material for grouting smaller fractures (< 100 μm) that will, after further optimisation work, be recommended for grouting of deep repositories. This project concentrated on the technical development of properties for the low pH grouts. Long-term safety and environmental aspects and durability of materials were preliminarily considered. Continued evaluations have to be carried out. Five systems, e.g. material combinations, were studied in the project: 1. Ordinary Portland Cement + Silica Fume. 'OPC+SF' denotes a binder system that is based mainly on OPC+SF. SF was used in a few commercial forms. The OPC used in this system was mainly UF16 and in some cases Rheocem 900 or white cement. 2. Blast furnace slag. 'Slag' denotes an OPC activated slag based system. Alkali and water glass activation were not examined, because of long-term safety reasons. OPC used in this system was rapid hardening Portland cement. 3. Super sulphate cement. 'SSC' is a slag-based system activated with gypsum and OPC. The OPC used was rapid hardening Portland cement and the gypsum was a very fine grained slurry product. 4. Low-Alkali Cement 'LAC' was introduced to the project by NUMO as a product, ground to fixed fineness by the producer. Neither the mineral composition nor fineness, were modified in the present

  4. Low-pH injection grout for deep repositories. Summary report from a co-operation project between NUMO (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sievaenen, Ursula [JP-Suoraplan Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-06-01

    The use of standard cementitious material creates pulses of pH in the magnitude of 12-13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental and also unnecessarily complicates the safety analysis of the repository. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis. Also, according to current understanding, the use of low-pH cement (pH = 11) will not disturb the functioning of the bentonite, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. A result of the project is that there are both low-pH cementitious material for grouting larger fractures (= 100 {mu}m) and non-cementitious material for grouting smaller fractures (< 100 {mu}m) that will, after further optimisation work, be recommended for grouting of deep repositories. This project concentrated on the technical development of properties for the low pH grouts. Long-term safety and environmental aspects and durability of materials were preliminarily considered. Continued evaluations have to be carried out. Five systems, e.g. material combinations, were studied in the project: 1. Ordinary Portland Cement + Silica Fume. 'OPC+SF' denotes a binder system that is based mainly on OPC+SF. SF was used in a few commercial forms. The OPC used in this system was mainly UF16 and in some cases Rheocem 900 or white cement. 2. Blast furnace slag. 'Slag' denotes an OPC activated slag based system. Alkali and water glass activation were not examined, because of long-term safety reasons. OPC used in this system was rapid hardening Portland cement. 3. Super sulphate cement. 'SSC' is a slag-based system activated with gypsum and OPC. The OPC used was rapid hardening Portland cement and the gypsum was a very fine grained slurry product. 4. Low-Alkali Cement 'LAC' was introduced to the project by NUMO as a product, ground to fixed fineness by the producer. Neither the mineral composition nor

  5. Role of waste packages in the safety of a high level waste repository in a deep geological formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretheau, F.; Lewi, J.

    1990-06-01

    The safety of a radioactive waste disposal facility lays on the three following barriers placed between the radioactive materials and the biosphere: the waste package; the engineered barriers; the geological barrier. The function assigned to each of these barriers in the performance assessment is an option taken by the organization responsible for waste disposal management (ANDRA in France), which must show that: expected performances of each barrier (confinement ability, life-time, etc.) are at least equal to those required to fulfill the assigned function; radiation protection requirements are met in all situations considered as credible, whether they be the normal situation or random event situations. The French waste management strategy is based upon two types of disposal depending on the nature and activity of waste packages: - surface disposal intended for low and medium level wastes having half-lives of about 30 years or less and alpha activity less than 3.7 MBq/kg (0.1 Ci/t), for individual packages and less than 0.37 MBq/kg (0.01 Ci/t) in the average. Deep geological disposal intended for TRU and high level wastes. The conditions of acceptance of packages in a surface disposal site are subject to the two fundamental safety rules no. I.2 and III.2.e. The present paper is only dealing with deep geological disposal. For deep geological repositories, three stages are involved: stage preceding definitive disposal (intermediate storage, transportation, handling, setting up in the disposal cavities); stage subsequent to definitive sealing of the disposal cavities but prior to the end of operation of the repository; stage subsequent to closure of the repository. The role of the geological barrier has been determined as the essential part of long term radioactivity confinement, by a working group, set up by the French safety authorities. Essential technical criteria relating to the choice of a site so defined by this group, are the following: very low permeability

  6. Review of excavation methods and their implications for the near-field barrier of a deep underground repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The report reviews excavation techniques for use in the construction of deep underground radioactive waste repositories, gives a summary of responses of the host rock to excavation and the means of measuring that response and discusses techniques for predicting that response. The review of excavation techniques included technical developments and current practice. To this end an extensive database was developed reviewing major excavations in rock types relevant to disposal and the techniques employed. Creation of an underground opening alters the properties of the rock mass around it. This study identifies stress, displacement, rock mass deformability and permeability as key parameters and reviews how they may be determined. Finally the report discusses the techniques available for predicting the behaviour of the near-field host rock. This concentrates on methods of numerical analysis since existing empirical or analytical methods are not considered suitable. (author)

  7. Ecohydrological Responses to Diversion of Groundwater: Case Study of a Deep-Rock Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Kent; Collinder, Per; Berglund, Sten; Maartensson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Planning and license applications concerning groundwater diversion in areas containing water-dependent or water-favored habitats must take into account both hydrological effects and associated ecological consequences. There is at present no established methodology to assess such ecohydrological responses. Thus, this paper describes a new stepwise methodology to assess ecohydrological responses to groundwater diversion from, e.g., water-drained pits, shafts, tunnels, and caverns in rock below the groundwater table. The methodology is illustrated using the planned deep-rock repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in central Sweden as a case study, offering access to a unique hydrological and ecological dataset. The case study demonstrates that results of ecohydrological assessments can provide useful inputs to planning of monitoring programs and mitigation measures in infrastructure projects. As a result of the assessment, artificial water supply to wetlands is planned in order to preserve biological diversity, nature values, and vulnerable species

  8. Seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaláb Zdeněk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel in the Czech Republic. The basic source of data for historical earthquakes up to 1990 was the seismic website [10]. The most intense earthquake described occurred on September 15, 1590 in the Niederroesterreich region (Austria in the historical period; its reported intensity is Io = 8-9. The source of the contemporary seismic data for the period since 1991 to the end of 2014 was the website [11]. It may be stated based on the databases and literature review that in the period from 1900, no earthquake exceeding magnitude 5.1 originated in the territory of the Czech Republic.

  9. Long term radiological effects on plants and animals of a deep geological repository. SR-Site Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torudd, Jesper

    2010-12-01

    This study is part of the safety assessment of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, called SR-Site. The purpose of the report is to clarify whether the environment is protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiation after a possible future release of radioactive matter from the planned repository. According to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), biological diversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be protected, and the evaluation should pay special attention to threatened and endemic species as well as economically and culturally valuable species. The report shows the approach to, and results of, calculations of dose rates to organisms other than man. The calculations are based on modelled activity concentrations from a potential future radioactive release, provided by a separate modelling project. Calculations were performed with the ERICA Tool, a software programme developed by an EU research project. In the ERICA Tool, dose rates for site specific organisms (i.e., occurring at the site) were calculated using input data such as size dimensions and masses of organisms, ecosystems and habitats, concentration ratios for the studied elements (i.e. the ratio of accumulated element concentration in the body compared with the element concentration in the surrounding environment) and maximum activity concentrations of radionuclides from the modelled future release. The results are provided in terms of final dose rates for each studied organism. In accordance with rationales of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ERICA project, Representative (site-specific) Organisms from the planned site of the future repository were studied. Ideally, the organisms selected would meet the criteria defined by both SSM (species worth protecting) and by ICRP and ERICA (so-called Reference Organisms). Since activity concentrations for a number of radionuclides were missing for some of the studied

  10. Long term radiological effects on plants and animals of a deep geological repository. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torudd, Jesper (Facilia AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This study is part of the safety assessment of the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, called SR-Site. The purpose of the report is to clarify whether the environment is protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiation after a possible future release of radioactive matter from the planned repository. According to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), biological diversity and sustainable use of biological resources must be protected, and the evaluation should pay special attention to threatened and endemic species as well as economically and culturally valuable species. The report shows the approach to, and results of, calculations of dose rates to organisms other than man. The calculations are based on modelled activity concentrations from a potential future radioactive release, provided by a separate modelling project. Calculations were performed with the ERICA Tool, a software programme developed by an EU research project. In the ERICA Tool, dose rates for site specific organisms (i.e., occurring at the site) were calculated using input data such as size dimensions and masses of organisms, ecosystems and habitats, concentration ratios for the studied elements (i.e. the ratio of accumulated element concentration in the body compared with the element concentration in the surrounding environment) and maximum activity concentrations of radionuclides from the modelled future release. The results are provided in terms of final dose rates for each studied organism. In accordance with rationales of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ERICA project, Representative (site-specific) Organisms from the planned site of the future repository were studied. Ideally, the organisms selected would meet the criteria defined by both SSM (species worth protecting) and by ICRP and ERICA (so-called Reference Organisms). Since activity concentrations for a number of radionuclides were missing for some of the studied

  11. Biosphere modelling for a deep radioactive waste repository: site-specific consideration of the groundwater-soil pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grogan, H.A.; Baeyens, B.; Mueller, H.; Dorp, F. van

    1991-07-01

    Scenario evaluations indicate that groundwater is the most probable pathway for released radionuclides to reach the biosphere from a deep underground nuclear waste repository. This report considers a small valley in northern Switzerland where the transport of groundwater to surface soil might be possible. The hydrological situation has been examined to allow a system of compartments and fluxes for modelling this pathway with respect to the release of radionuclides from an underground repository to be produced. Assuming present day conditions the best estimate surface soil concentrations are calculated by dividing the soil into two layers (deep soil, surface soil) and assuming an annual upward flux of 10 mm from the groundwater through the two soil layers. A constant unit activity concentration is assumed for the radionuclides in the groundwater. It is concluded that the resultant best estimate values must still be considered to be biased on the conservative side, in view of the fact that the more typical situation is likely to be that no groundwater reaches the surface soil. Upper and lower estimates for the surface soil radionuclide concentrations are based on the parameter perturbation results which were carried out for three key parameters, i.e. precipitation surplus, upward flux and solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K d ). It is noted that attention must be given to the functional relationships which exist between various model parameters. Upper estimates for the surface soil concentration are determined assuming a higher annual upward flux (100 mm) as well as a more conservative K d value compared with the base case. This gives rise to surface soil concentrations more than two orders of magnitude higher than the best estimate values. The lower estimated are more easily assigned assuming that no activity reaches the surface soil via this pathway. (author) 18 figs., 4 tabs., refs

  12. Thermodynamic stability of actinide pyrochlore minerals in deep geologic repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, YIFENG; Xu, HUIFANG

    2000-01-01

    Crystalline phases of pyrochlore (e.g., CaPuTi 2 O 7 , CaUTi 2 O 7 ) have been proposed as a durable ceramic waste form for disposal of high level radioactive wastes including surplus weapons-usable plutonium. In this paper, the authors use a linear free energy relationship to predict the Gibbs free energies of formation of pyrochlore phases (CaMTi 2 O 7 ). The Pu-pyrochlore phase is predicted to be stable with respect to PuO 2 , CaTiO 3 , and TiO 2 at room temperatures. Pu-pyrochlore is expected to be stable in a geologic repository where silica and carbonate components are absent or limited. The authors suggest that a repository in a salt formation be an ideal environment for disposal of high level, pyrochlore-based ceramic wastes. In such environment, adding CaO as a backfill will make pyrochlore minerals thermodynamically stable and therefore effectively prevent actinide release from these mineral phases

  13. The use of interaction matrices for identification, structuring and ranking of FEPs in a repository system. Application on the far-field of a deep geological repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M.; Stroem, A.

    1995-11-01

    The basic device in the Rock Engineering Systems approach, the interaction matrix, has been used to identify, structure and rank Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) describing barrier performance and radionuclide behaviour in the far-field of a deep geologic repository for spent fuel. The result is a first version of the Process System (PS), for the far-field of a deep repository, structured in an interaction matrix with supporting documentation. The documentation is compiled in databases, one containing matrix specific information and one containing general FEP descriptions. The study has shown that an interaction matrix is feasible to use both for the structuring of the PS and for visualisation of the PS. The developed documentation system increases the transparency of the system description and makes it possible to trace back the judgements made during the construction of the matrix. This will facilitate review work and future revisions as well as consistent treatment of different issues in the system. This study is a first step in the application of a systematic method to establish a structured description of the PS for a deep repository for spent fuel. The work could be seen as a part of the preparation for the forthcoming performance and safety analysis. The next step would be to develop the PS for the remaining parts of the repository system to the same level as has been done for the far-field system. Before the PS is evaluated for different selected system premises, a scientific review of the contents of the PS for the whole repository system would be beneficial. 5 refs

  14. Gas generation in deep radioactive waste repositories: a review of processes, controls and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    Gas generation within radioactive waste repositories may produce two general problems: 1) breaching of engineered and natural barriers due to high gas pressures; 2) enhanced radiological risk due to reduced groundwater travel times and/or greater aqueous or gaseous activities reaching the biosphere. As a result of these concerns, HMIP must be aware of the current status of relevant research, together with any associated deficiencies. This report addresses the current status of published research on near-field gas generation from worldwide sources and documents the important gas generating processes, the factors controlling them and models available to simulate them. In the absence of suitable models, outline technical specifications for corrosion and microbial degradation gas generation models are defined and the deficiencies in the current understanding of gas generation are highlighted; a conceptual research programme to correct these deficiencies is presented. (author)

  15. Radioactive waste disposal programme and siting regions for geological deep repositories. Executive summary. November 2008; Entsorgungsprogramm und Standortgebiete fuer geologische Tiefenlager. Zusammenfassung. November 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-11-15

    There are radioactive wastes in Switzerland. Since many decades they are produced by the operation of the five nuclear power plants, by medicine, industry and research. Important steps towards the disposal of these wastes are already realized; the corresponding activities are practised. This particularly concerns handling and packaging of the radioactive wastes, their characterization and inventory, as well as the interim storage and the inferred transportations. Preparatory works in the field of scientific research on deep geological repositories have allowed to acquire high level of technical and scientific expertise in that domain. The feasibility of building long-term safe geological repositories in Switzerland was demonstrated for all types of radioactive wastes; the demonstration was accepted by the Federal Council. There is enough knowledge to propose geological siting regions for further works. The financial funds already accumulated guaranty the financing of the dismantling of the power plants as well as building deep geological repositories for the radioactive wastes. The regulations already exist and the organisational arrangements necessary for the fruitful continuation of the works already done have been taken. The programme of the disposal of radioactive wastes also describes the next stages towards the timely realization of the deep repositories as well as the level of the financial needs. The programme is updated every five years, checked by the regulatory bodies and accepted by the Federal Council who reports to the parliament. The process of choosing a site, which will be completed in the next years, is detailed in the conceptual part of the programme for deep geological repositories. The NAGRA proposals are based exclusively on technical and scientific considerations; the global evaluation taking into account also political considerations has to be performed by the authorities and the Federal Council. The programme states that at the beginning of

  16. Retrievability from waste repositories in deep geological formation and how it can be guaranteed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.

    2000-01-01

    The paper considers retrievability in the context of a facility type termed deep interim storage, convertible to permanent disposal. Such a facility isolates the waste in a reliable manner while keeping several options open. Options are obtained at cost and cannot be indefinitely left open. Various aspects for pursuing this concept are discussed. (author)

  17. Swedish Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borgvall, Jonathan; Lif, Patrik

    2005-01-01

    .... The military research work presented here includes the three military administrations, FOI -- Swedish Defence Research Agency, FMV -- Swedish Defence Materiel Administration, and SNDC -- Swedish...

  18. Evaluation of engineering aspects of backfill placement for high level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Kleppe, J.; Gonano, L.

    1984-04-01

    This report includes the identification and subjective evaluation of alternative schemes for backfilling around waste packages and within emplacement rooms. The aspects of backfilling specifically considered in this study include construction and testing; costs have not been considered. However, because construction and testing are simply implementation and verification of design, a design basis for backfill is required. A generic basis has been developed for this study by first identifying qualitative performance objectives for backfill and then weighting each with respect to its potential influence on achieving the repository system performance objectives. Alternative backfill materials and additives have been identified and evaluated with respect to the perceived extent to which each combination can be expected to achieve the backfill design basis. Several distinctly different combinations of materials and additives which are perceived to have the highest potential for achieving the backfill design basis have been selected for further study. These combinations include zeolite/clinoptilolite, bentonite, muck, and muck mixed with bentonite. Feasible alternative construction and testing procedures for each selected combination have been discussed. Recommendations have been made regarding appropriate backfill schemes for hard rock (i.e., basalt at Hanford, Washington, tuff at Nevada Test Site, and generic granite) and salt (i.e., domal salt on the Gulf Coast and generic bedded salt). 27 references, 8 figures, 31 tables

  19. Conceptual model for concrete long time degradation in a deep nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerblad, B.; Traegaardh, J.

    1996-04-01

    Cement-based materials are fundamentally unstable in a long time perspective. With time the concrete will change properties both as a consequence of recrystallization and chemical interaction with the environment. One of the main difficulties with a conceptual model for concrete degradation is the change in the geochemical environment with time. During the first period the concrete will alter as a result of contact with atmospheric gases, especially CO 2 which will carbonate the surface. Later the degradation will mainly be governed by the composition of the groundwater with which it will try to equilibrate. Considering the chemical conditions at repository depths (500 m), it is possible that the groundwater will change composition from normal to saline. This may in fact be an advantage because the solubility of cement paste components decreases. However, the concrete will influence the groundwater composition and create an aureole with increased pH around it. Most of the components in both the fresh and saline water will not be harmful to concrete. One of the problems may be the chlorine anions, as this anion may substitute for sulfate in some of the cement phases. This will not degrade the concrete but the sulfates in the cement may be released to the groundwater. The end product of the concrete, after leaching and after the pH buffer capacity has been lost, will be a mix of metastable calcium silicate hydrates, zeolite and clay minerals. 72 refs

  20. Considerations on pressure build-up in deep geological repositories for radioactive waste; Betrachtungen zum Druckaufbau in einem geologischen Tiefenlager fuer radioaktive Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Hans-Frieder [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Gas formation caused by corrosion of metals is a pivotal point with respect to the safety analysis of deep geological repositories. Solid corrosion products are formed unavoidably during the gas formation. The volumes of these solid corrosion products are multiples of the original waste volume. These solid corrosion products are chemically extremely stable and result in a pressure increase inside the repository. This pressure is considerably higher than that of the overlaying rock. The question that arises is, why this aspect is not considered in the consulted documents.

  1. Deep repository and encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel. Consultation and environmental impact assessment according to the Environmental Code and the Nuclear Activities Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    As a part of its programme for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, SKB has recently commenced site investigations at Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality and at Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality. At the same time, SKB has initiated the consultation process prior to application for permits/licences under the Environmental Code and the Nuclear Activities Act. Early consultation has been carried out for both sites, and a consultation report has been submitted to the county administrative boards in Kalmar County and Uppsala County for decisions regarding significant environmental impact. After decisions by the county administrative boards, SKB will commence the work with environmental impact assessment and extended consultation. SKB's main alternative for the encapsulation plant is siting adjacent to CLAB. In the spring of 2003, SKB will convene early consultation on the encapsulation plant. This will be followed by extended consultation up to 2005. This process will be coordinated with the extended consultation for a deep repository in Oskarshamn. An alternative is to locate the encapsulation plant at a deep repository at Forsmark. This alternative is being dealt with completely within the extended consultation for the deep repository at Forsmark. Three different permits/licences are required for both the encapsulation plant and the deep repository: a permit under the Environmental Code, a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act, and a building permit under the Planning and Building Act. Licensing under the Environmental Code and the Nuclear Activities Act takes place in parallel. The applications under both laws must include an environmental impact statement (EIS) prepared according to the rules in Chapter 6 of the Environmental Code. The same EIS is thus used in both applications. Separate EISs are prepared for the encapsulation plant and the deep repository. According to the Environmental Code, the consultation shall relate to the location, scope

  2. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin; Smellie, John; Puigdomenech, Ignasi

    2010-12-01

    performance of spent nuclear fuel repositories, namely ∼1 million years

  3. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin (Hydrafact Ltd, Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Puigdomenech, Ignasi (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    satisfactory performance of spent nuclear fuel repositories, namely approx1 million years

  4. Biosphere modelling for a deep radioactive waste repository: treatment of the groundwater-soil pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeyens, B.; Grogan, H.A.; Dorp, F. van

    1991-07-01

    The effect of radionuclide transfer from near-surface groundwater to the rooting zone soil, via a deep soil layer, is modelled in this report. The possible extent of upward solute movement is evaluated for a region in northern Switzerland. The concentration of 237 Np and 129 I in the deep and top soil, and hence growing crops, are evaluated assuming a constant unit activity concentration in the groundwater. A number of parameter variations are considered, namely variable soil sorption coefficients, reduced infiltration of rain water and decreased groundwater flow. A release to an alternative smaller recipient region in northern Switzerland is also evaluated. For the parameter ranges considered uncertainty in the solid-liquid distribution coefficient has the largest effect on overall uncertainty. These calculations have been presented within the international Biosphere Model Validation Study (BIOMOVS). A description of the test scenario, and the model calculations submitted, have been included in this report for completeness. To place the groundwater-soil-crop-man pathway in context, its contribution to the total dose to man is evaluated for the 237 Np- 233 U- 229 Th decay chain. The results obtained using the two-layer soil model, described in this report, are compared with the single-layer soil model used during Project Gewaehr 1985. The more realistic two-layer soil model indicated an increase in importance of the drinking water pathway. It should be noted, however, that not all the critical pathways have been treated in this study with the same degree of conservatism. (author) 16 figs., 15 tabs., 31 refs

  5. A Methodology to analyze the biosphere in the assessment of deep geological repositories for high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, P.; Smith, G.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the work done and the achievements reached within the R and D Project that IMA/CIEMAT has had with ENRESA during 1993-1995. The overall R and D Project has a wide radiological protection context, but the work reported here relates only to the development of a Methodology for considering the Biosphere sub-system in the assessments of deep geological repositories for high radioactive wastes (HLW). The main areas concerned within the Methodology have to do with the Biosphere structure and morphology in the long-term relevant to deep disposal of HLW: in the contexts of the assessment of these systems, and appropriate modelling of the behaviour of radionuclides released to the biosphere system and with the associated human exposure. This document first provides a review of the past and present international and national concerns about the biosphere modelling and its importance in relation to the definition of safety criteria. A joint ENRESA/ANDRA/IPSN/CIEMAT study about the definition and practical descriptions of the biosphere systems under different climatic states is then summarized. The Methodology developed by IMA/CIEMAT is outlined with an illustration of the way it works. Different steps and procedures are included for a better practical understanding of the software tools developed within the project to support the application of the Methodology. This methodology is widely based on an international working group on ''Reference Biospheres'', part of the BIOMOVS II Project. Specific software developments have been carried out in collaboration with Qunti Sci Itd and with the Polytechnical University of Madrid. (Author)

  6. Does unemployment cause long-term mortality? Selection and causation after the 1992–96 deep Swedish recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcy, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mass unemployment in Europe is endemic, especially among the young. Does it cause mortality? Methods: We analyzed long-term effects of unemployment occurring during the deep Swedish recession 1992–96. Mortality from all and selected causes was examined in the 6-year period after the recession among those employed in 1990 (3.4 million). Direct health selection was analyzed as risk of unemployment by prior medical history based on all hospitalizations 1981–91. Unemployment effects on mortality were estimated with and without adjustment for prior social characteristics and for prior medical history. Results: A prior circulatory disease history did not predict unemployment; a history of alcohol-related disease or suicide attempts did, in men and women. Unemployment predicted excess male, but not female, mortality from circulatory disease, both ischemic heart disease and stroke, and from all causes combined, after full adjustment. Adjustment for prior social characteristics reduced estimates considerably; additional adjustment for prior medical history did not. Mortality from external and alcohol-related causes was raised in men and women experiencing unemployment, after adjustment for social characteristics and medical history. For the youngest birth cohorts fully adjusted alcohol mortality HRs were substantial (male HR = 4.44; female HR = 5.73). The effect of unemployment on mortality was not uniform across the population; men, those with a low education, low income, unmarried or in urban employment were more vulnerable. Conclusions: Direct selection by medical history explains a modest fraction of any increased mortality risk following unemployment. Mass unemployment imposes long-term mortality risk on a sizeable segment of the population. PMID:27085193

  7. Numerical investigation of high level nuclear waste disposal in deep anisotropic geologic repositories

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-11-01

    One of the techniques that have been proposed to dispose high level nuclear waste (HLW) has been to bury them in deep geologic formations, which offer relatively enough space to accommodate the large volume of HLW accumulated over the years since the dawn of nuclear era. Albeit the relatively large number of research works that have been conducted to investigate temperature distribution surrounding waste canisters, they all abide to consider the host formations as homogeneous and isotropic. While this could be the case in some subsurface settings, in most cases, this is not true. In other words, subsurface formations are, in most cases, inherently anisotropic and heterogeneous. In this research, we show that even a slight difference in anisotropy of thermal conductivity of host rock with direction could have interesting effects on temperature fields. We investigate the effect of anisotropy angle (the angle the principal direction of anisotropy is making with the coordinate system) on the temperature field as well as on the maximum temperature attained in different barrier systems. This includes 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90°in addition to the isotropic case as a reference. We also consider the effect of anisotropy ratio (the ratio between the principal direction anisotropies) on the temperature fields and maximum temperature history. This includes ratios ranging between 1.5 and 4. Interesting patterns of temperature fields and profiles are obtained. It is found that the temperature contours are aligned more towards the principal direction of anisotropy. Furthermore the peak temperature in the buffer zone is found to be larger the smaller the anisotropy angle and vice versa. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmental and health impacts of February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, P; Lemons, B G; Ballard, S; Hardy, R

    2015-08-01

    The environmental impact of the February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was assessed using monitoring data from an independent monitoring program conducted by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC). After almost 15 years of safe and efficient operations, the WIPP had one of its waste drums rupture underground resulting in the release of moderate levels of radioactivity into the underground air. A small amount of radioactivity also escaped to the surface through the ventilation system and was detected above ground. It was the first unambiguous release from the WIPP repository. The dominant radionuclides released were americium and plutonium, in a ratio that matches the content of the breached drum. The accelerated air monitoring campaign, which began following the accident, indicates that releases were low and localized, and no radiation-related health effects among local workers or the public would be expected. The highest activity detected was 115.2 μBq/m(3) for (241)Am and 10.2 μBq/m(3) for (239+240)Pu at a sampling station located 91 m away from the underground air exhaust point and 81.4 μBq/m(3) of (241)Am and 5.8 μBq/m(3) of (239+240)Pu at a monitoring station located approximately one kilometer northwest of the WIPP facility. CEMRC's recent monitoring data show that the concentration levels of these radionuclides have returned to normal background levels and in many instances, are not even detectable, demonstrating no long-term environmental impacts of the recent radiation release event at the WIPP. This article presents an evaluation of almost one year of environmental monitoring data that informed the public that the levels of radiation that got out to the environment were very low and did not, and will not harm anyone or have any long-term environmental consequence. In terms of radiological risk at or in the vicinity of the

  9. Mining and engineering aspects and variants for the underground construction of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milchev, M.; Michailov, B.; Nanovska, E.; Harizanov, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present report is to investigate and to describe systematically the foreign experience, scientific and technical achievements and stages of development concerning the mining and engineering aspects and variants for underground construction of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste (RAW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The ideal solution in managing the problems with harmful wastes seems to be either to remove them permanently from Earth (which is related with high risks and high costs) or to transform long-lived radionuclides to short-lived radionuclides using nuclear transmutation processes in a reactor or a particle accelerator. The latter is also a complex and immensely costly process and it can only reduce the quantities of some long-lived radionuclides, which can be then disposed in a geological repository. At present, the deep geological disposal remains the only solution for solving the problem with the hazard of storing radioactive wastes. The report submits a brief description and systematization of the performed investigations, accompanied by analysis of the scientific and technical level on world scale. The analysis is related with the particular geological conditions and the existing scientific studies available so far in Bulgaria. The main conclusions are that the complex scientific-technical and engineering problems related with the construction of a deep geological repository for RAW and SNF require long-term scientific investigations and preliminary complex works and it is high time to launch them in Bulgaria. (authors)

  10. Injection grout for deep repositories - Low-pH cementitious grout for larger fractures. Field testing in Finland, Pilot tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievaeen, U.; Syrjaenen, P.; Ranta-aho, S.

    2005-10-01

    Posiva, SKB and NUMO have cooperated for developing a low pH injection grout for sealing of the deep repositories for spent nuclear fuel. A project 'Injection grout for deep repositories' was divided into four subprojects. The development of low pH cementitious grout for > 100 μm fractures was carried out in Finland. The development of non-cementitious low pH grout for < 100 μm fractures was carried out in Sweden. This report concerns the cementitious grout. Requirements for pH and penetration ability were set for the grouts to be developed. Besides these, the grouts were desired to fulfil certain targets set for viscosity, bleeding, shear strength, yield value, compressive strength and open time. Also durability, availability of the components and known history in practical engineering were given as requirements. The object of the work presented here was to test if the grout properties developed in laboratory can be met in field conditions. Only the most promising binder material combinations, which have fulfilled the main requirements in laboratory, were tested in field. Evaluations of environmental aspects are included in this report. In the pilot test 1, carried out in a multi-purpose tunnel in Helsinki, Portland cement-cilicasystem and blast furnace slag-based system were chosen to be tested. In field conditions, mixed with ordinary mixer, all grout properties achieved in laboratory, were not verified. Penetration ability was typically good, but fluidity and strength development were not satisfying. The main conclusion was that water to dry material ratio should be diminished. In order to get better rheological properties at the same time, superplastizicer was needed in further development of the mixes. Also accurate dosing and mixing seemed to be very important. Blast furnace slag - system was after this pilot test ruled out due to high leaching of sulphide from the product, not due to the bad technical properties. The development work continued with

  11. Deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste in Sweden (SFL 3-5): An international peer review of SKB 's preliminary safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, N. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Apted, M. [Monitor Scientific, Denver, CO (United States); Glasser, F. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Kessler, J. [EPRI, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Voss, C. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The SKB safety assessment of the SFL 3-5 repository (the planned deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate level waste) can be read in two contexts: as a preliminary evaluation of the performance and design options for a repository that will not be required for perhaps forty years; or as an evaluation of a repository that might need to be sited together with the SFL 2 spent fuel repository, and whose nature and performance might thus need to be understood to a level that can be used to make wider programmatic decisions during the next five years. These two 'assessment contexts' are quite different, and an overarching issue is the fact that it was not clear to the review team which view to take. Apparently, SKB would tend towards the first context. However, it is not at all apparent to the reviewers why the second context should not be the predominant driver in the near future. The review team notes that the SFL 3-5 repository, as modelled by SKB, gives rise to potentially perceptible radionuclide releases to the environment on a timescale of hundreds of years after closure. This is in contrast to the SR 97 assessment for the SFL 2 spent fuel repository, which base scenario predicts no releases over a million year timescale. It is clear that according to SKB's SR97 and SFL3-5 analyses, for co-located facilities, it is this repository that has the potential for real radiological impacts in the immediate future. An initial recommendation from the review, is that SKB and the regulatory authorities consider which context is appropriate to the current status of the Swedish programme. This is important, because an overall impression of the reviewers is that the analysis would not be 'fit for purpose' if it were needed to assist with decision-making by SKB or the regulatory agencies. There are too many unanswered questions, and the overall impression of the safety concept is one of some fragility. Because there is no real design basis

  12. Derivation of parameters necessary for the evaluation of performance of sites for deep geological repositories with particular reference to bedded salt, Livermore, California. Volume I. Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J.P.; Rawlings, G.E.; Soto, C.A.; Wood, D.F.; Chorley, D.W.

    1979-12-01

    A survey of parameters to be considered in the evaluation of sites for deep geologic nuclear waste repositories is presented. As yet, no comprehensive site selection procedure or performance evaluation approach has been adopted. A basis is provided for the development of parameters by discussing both site selection and performance evaluation. Three major groups of parameters are considered in this report: geologic, mining/rock mechanics, and hydrogeologic. For each type, the role of the parameter in the evaluation of repository sites is discussed. The derivation of the parameter by measurement, correlation, inference, or other method is discussed. Geologic parameters define the framework of the repository site and can be used in development of conceptual models and the prediction of long-term performance. Methods for deriving geological parameters include mapping, surveying, drilling, geophysical investigation, and historical and regional analysis. Rock mechanics/mining parameters are essential for the prediction of short-term performance and the development of initial conditions for modeling of long-term performance. Rock mechanics/mapping parameters can be derived by field or laboratory investigation, correlation, and theoretically or empirically based inference. Hydrogeologic parameters are the most important for assessment of long-term radionuclide confinement, since transport throughout the regional hydrogeologic system is the most likely mode of radionuclide escape from geologic repositories. Hydrogeologic parameters can be derived by hydrogeologic mapping and interpretation, hydrogeologic system modeling, field measurements, and lab tests. Procedures used in determination and statistical evaluation of geologic and rock mechanics parameters are discussed.

  13. Derivation of parameters necessary for the evaluation of performance of sites for deep geological repositories with particular reference to bedded salt, Livermore, California. Volume I. Main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, J.P.; Rawlings, G.E.; Soto, C.A.; Wood, D.F.; Chorley, D.W.

    1979-12-01

    A survey of parameters to be considered in the evaluation of sites for deep geologic nuclear waste repositories is presented. As yet, no comprehensive site selection procedure or performance evaluation approach has been adopted. A basis is provided for the development of parameters by discussing both site selection and performance evaluation. Three major groups of parameters are considered in this report: geologic, mining/rock mechanics, and hydrogeologic. For each type, the role of the parameter in the evaluation of repository sites is discussed. The derivation of the parameter by measurement, correlation, inference, or other method is discussed. Geologic parameters define the framework of the repository site and can be used in development of conceptual models and the prediction of long-term performance. Methods for deriving geological parameters include mapping, surveying, drilling, geophysical investigation, and historical and regional analysis. Rock mechanics/mining parameters are essential for the prediction of short-term performance and the development of initial conditions for modeling of long-term performance. Rock mechanics/mapping parameters can be derived by field or laboratory investigation, correlation, and theoretically or empirically based inference. Hydrogeologic parameters are the most important for assessment of long-term radionuclide confinement, since transport throughout the regional hydrogeologic system is the most likely mode of radionuclide escape from geologic repositories. Hydrogeologic parameters can be derived by hydrogeologic mapping and interpretation, hydrogeologic system modeling, field measurements, and lab tests. Procedures used in determination and statistical evaluation of geologic and rock mechanics parameters are discussed

  14. Shear-induced Fracture Slip and Permeability Change. Implications for Long-term Performance of a Deep Geological Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Ki-Bok; Stephansson, Ove

    2009-03-01

    Opening of fractures induced by shear dilation or normal deformation can be a significant source of fracture permeability change in jointed rock, which is important for the performance assessment of geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. As the repository generates heat and later cools the fluid-carrying ability of the rocks becomes a dynamic variable during the lifespan of the repository. Heating causes expansion of the rock close to the repository and, at the same time, contraction close to the surface. During the cooling phase of the repository, the opposite takes place. Heating and cooling together with the virgin stress can induce shear dilation of fractures and deformation zones and change the flow field around the repository. The objectives of this project are to examine the contribution of thermal stress to the shear slip of fracture in mid- and far-field around a KBS-3 type of repository and to investigate the effect of evolution of stress on the rock mass permeability. The first part of the study is about the evolution of thermal stresses in the rock during the lifetime of the repository. Critical sections of heat generated stresses around the repository are selected and classified. Fracture data from Forsmark is used to establish fracture network models (DFN) and the models are subjected to the sum of virgin stress and thermal stresses and the shear slip and related permeability change are studied. In the first part of this study, zones of fracture shear slip were examined by conducting a three-dimensional, thermo-mechanical analysis of a spent fuel repository model. Stress evolutions of importance for fracture shear slip are: (1) comparatively high horizontal compressive thermal stress at the repository level, (2) generation of vertical tensile thermal stress right above the repository, (3) horizontal tensile stress near the surface, which can induce tensile failure, and generation of shear stresses at the corners of the repository. In the

  15. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Lilja, Christina (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  16. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada); Lilja, C. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, K. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Molnlycke (Sweden); Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  17. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Pedersen, Karsten; Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut

    2010-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  18. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Lilja, C.; Pedersen, K.; Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  19. Suggestions for locations for the surface installations required for deep-lying repositories; standortareale fuer die oberflaechenanlage von tiefenlagern -- vorschlaege zur diskussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the various factors involved in the selection of locations for surface installations that are required for the operation of deep-lying nuclear waste repositories. The method chosen for the selection of possible locations for surface installations is explained and the necessity for such installations is discussed. The requirements placed on such a location are discussed and the various locations chosen for further consideration are noted. The evaluation phases involved in the selection of sites are described. The proposed surface installations are noted and the proposed structures for both repository types - for highly radioactive wastes and for low and medium active wastes - are described.

  20. Generic description of facilities at the shaft head (auxiliary entrance installations) of deep geological repositories; Generische Beschreibung von Schachtkopfanlagen (Nebenzugangsanlagen) geologischer Tiefenlager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-10-15

    In a deep geological repository, the access structures function as the link between the surface and the installations and structures at the disposal level. In the planned implementation scenarios, at least two access structures will be in operation up to the time of closure of the repository. The radioactive waste will be transported via the main access from the surface to the disposal level during emplacement operations. For the construction and operation of a deep geological repository, additional access structures are required. These auxiliary accesses and the associated surface infrastructure (e.g. shaft head installations) form the subject of this report. To provide as broad and comprehensive a description as possible, seven types of auxiliary access facilities are defined; these are characterised in line with the current status of planning and their functions and impacts are described. During construction, operation and dismantling of auxiliary access facilities, the usual conventional safety measures (inter alia) have to be observed (e.g. groundwater protection, fire prevention, facility security, accident prevention). Regarding the 'Ordinance on Protection against Major Accidents' no large quantities of hazardous materials, i.e. above the corresponding threshold quantities, are to be expected in the auxiliary access facilities. Proper handling and compliance with applicable regulations in all phases will ensure no hazard to humans and the environment. As no handling of radioactive materials is foreseen in the auxiliary access facilities, and because exhaust air and waste water from the controlled zones of a repository will, in principle, be removed via the main access and not the auxiliary accesses, a safety-relevant emission of radioactive substances and transport of contaminated material can be ruled out for the auxiliary access facilities during both normal operation and also in the case of an accident. Based on the information presented in

  1. The Swedish final repository for reactor waste (SFR). A summary of the SFR project with special emphasis on the near-field assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.

    1988-01-01

    The first phase of the final repository for reactor waste (SFR) is scheduled for operation in April 1988. The construction work is finished and preoperational tests are in progress. Impact on the environment from SFR is analysed in a final safety report. This paper gives a summary of the design and performance of SFR. Assessments, made for the analysises of the long term safety, are given with special emphasis on the near-field. As a conclusion from the analysises, the dose commitment to the most affected individual during the post-closure period, has proved to constitute only an insignificant contribution to the natural radioactive environment of the area

  2. Application of Ga-Al discrimination plots in identification of high strength granitic host rocks for deep geological repository of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.; Narayan, P.K.; Trivedi, R.K.; Purohit, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    The permanent disposal of vitrified high level wastes and in some cases even spent fuel, is being planned in specifically designed and built deep geological repository located in the depth range of 500-600m in appropriate host rock at carefully selected sites. Such facilities are expected to provide very long term isolation and confinement to the disposed waste by means of long term mechanical stability of such structures that results from very high strength and homogeneity of the chosen rock, geochemical compatible environment around the disposed waste and general lack of groundwater. In Indian geological repository development programme, granites have been selected as target host rock and large scale characterization studies have been undertaken to develop database of mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry and rock mechanical characteristics. The paper proposes a new approach for demarcation of high strength homogeneous granite rocks from within an area of about 100 square kilometres wherein a cocktail of granites of different origins with varying rock mass characteristics co exists. The study area is characterised by the presence of A, S and I type granites toughly intermixed. The S type granites are derived from sedimentary parent material and therefore carry relics of parent fabric and at times undigested material with resultant reduction in their strength and increased inhomogeneity. On the other hand I type varieties are derived from igneous parents and are more homogeneous with sufficient strength. The A type granites are emplaced as molten mass in a complete non-tectonic setting with resultant homogeneous compositions, absence of tectonic fabric and very high strength. Besides they are silica rich with less vulnerability to alterations with time. Thus A type granites are most suited for construction of Deep Geological Repository. For developing a geochemical approach for establishing relation between chemical compositions and rock strength parameters, a

  3. Technical expertise on the safety of the proposed geological repository sites. Planning for geological deep repositories, step 1; Sicherheitstechnisches Gutachten zum Vorschlag geologischer Standortgebiete. Sachplan geologische Tiefenlager, Etappe 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-01-15

    On October 17, 2010, on request of those Swiss government institutions responsible for the disposal of radioactive wastes, the National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) presented its project concerning geological sites for the foreseen disposal of radioactive wastes to the Federal Authorities. According to the present disposal concept, two types of repository are foreseen: one for highly radioactive wastes (HAA) and the other for low radioactive and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (SMA). If a site fulfils the necessary conditions for both HAA as well as for SMA, a combined site for both types of waste may be chosen. As a qualified control authority in Switzerland, the Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) has to examine the quality of the NAGRA proposals from the point of view of the nuclear safety of the sites. The project for deep underground waste disposal first defines the process and the criteria according to which sites for the geological storage of all types of radioactive wastes in Switzerland have to be chosen. The choice is based on the actual knowledge of Swiss geology. After dividing the wastes into SMA and HAA, some large-scale areas are to be identified according to their suitability from the geological and tectonic points of view. NAGRA's division of waste into SMA and HAA is based on calculations of the long-term safety for a broad range of different rock types and geological situations and takes the different properties of all waste types into account. As a conclusion, a small portion of SMA has to be stored with {alpha}-toxic wastes in the HAA repository. The estimation of the total volume of wastes to be stored is based on 60 years of operation of the actual nuclear power plants, augmented with the wastes from possible replacement plants with a total power of 5 GW{sub e} during a further 60 years. The safety concept of the repository is based on passive systems using technical and natural barriers. The

  4. Literature study on the state-of-the-art for the marking of deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buser, M.

    2010-05-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the results of a literature study on the marking of repositories for radioactive wastes. Knowledge gained and ideas discussed in Switzerland on the subject are collated and discussed. Various associated topics such as safety, risk and marking technologies are examined. 28 topics in six thematic blocks are presented and discussed. Not only marking concepts are discussed, but also questions on human and society-related factors, traditionalising information transfer and susceptibility to wrong interpretation are examined. The author is of the opinion that no reusable materials be used either in the repositories themselves or for their marking in order to help prevent future generations coming into contact with the dangerous wastes

  5. Foreign materials in a deep repository for spent nuclear fuels; Fraemmande material i ett djupfoervar foer anvaent kaernbraensle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.; Christiansson, Aa.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The effects of foreign substances introduced into a spent-fuel repository are reviewed. Possible impacts on processes and barrier-functions are examined, and the following areas are identified: Corrosion of the spent-fuel canister through the presence of sulfur and substances that favor microbial growth; impacts on the bentonite properties through the presence of cations as calcium, potassium and iron; radionuclide transport through the presence of complex-formers and surface-active substances.

  6. Three-dimensional Geological and Geo-mechanical Modelling of Repositories for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Deep Geological Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahland, Sandra; Hofmann, Michael; Bornemann, Otto; Heusermann, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    To prove the suitability and safety of underground structures for the disposal of radioactive waste extensive geo-scientific research and development has been carried out by BGR over the last decades. Basic steps of the safety analysis are the geological modelling of the entire structure including the host rock, the overburden and the repository geometry as well as the geo-mechanical modelling taking into account the 3-D modelling of the underground structure. The geological models are generated using the special-construction openGEO TM code to improve the visualisation an d interpretation of the geological data basis, e.g. borehole, mine, and geophysical data. For the geo-mechanical analysis the new JIFE finite-element code has been used to consider large 3-D structures with complex inelastic material behaviour. To establish the finite-element models needed for stability and integrity calculations, the geological models are simplified with respect to homogenous rock layers with uniform material behaviour. The modelling results are basic values for the evaluation of the stability of the repository mine and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier. As an example of application, the results of geological and geo-mechanical investigations of the Morsleben repository based on 3-D modelling are presented. (authors)

  7. Institutional Repositories as Infrastructures for Long-Term Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Helena; Gamalielsson, Jonas; Lundell, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The study describes the conditions for long-term preservation of the content of the institutional repositories of Swedish higher education institutions based on an investigation of how deposited files are managed with regards to file format and how representatives of the repositories describe the functions of the repositories.…

  8. Final report on uncertainties in the detection, measurement, and analysis of selected features pertinent to deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Uncertainties with regard to many facets of repository site characterization have not yet been quantified. This report summarizes the state of knowledge of uncertainties in the measurement of porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic gradient; uncertainties associated with various geophysical field techniques; and uncertainties associated with the effects of exploration and exploitation activities in bedded salt basins. The potential for seepage through a depository in bedded salt or shale is reviewed and, based upon the available data, generic values for the hydraulic conductivity and porosity of bedded salt and shale are proposed

  9. Finite element modeling of copper coated used fuel containers for long-term storage in a deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, C.; Meguid, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is developing a Used Fuel Container (UFC) optimized for CANDU fuel with an integrally bonded copper coating corrosion barrier. This paper demonstrates a validated finite element coating model, which can accurately predict the response of the UFC's steel-copper coating composite. Tensile, adhesion, and three-point bend tests were conducted for copper cold spray and electrodeposited coatings. The nonlinear finite element model accurately predicted the response of three different coating types, including cracking and delamination failure mechanisms, beyond the design basis loadings. The model will further be utilized to evaluate alternative UFC designs under anticipated repository conditions to assess safety margins. (author)

  10. Specifications for the development of a fully three-dimensional numerical groundwater model for regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prickett, T.A.

    1980-04-01

    Specifications are given which are necessary to develop a three-dimensional numerical model capable of simulating regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository. The model to be developed will include all of the significant mass transport processes including flow, chemical, and thermal advection, mechanical dispersion, molecular diffusion, ion exchange reactions, and radioactive decay. The model specifications also include that density and viscosity fluid properties be functions of pressure, temperature, and concentration and take into account fluid and geologic heterogenieties by allowing possible assignment of individual values to every block of the model. The model specifications furthermore include the repository shape, input/output information, boundary conditions, and the need for documentation and a user's manual. Model code validation can be accomplished with the included known analytical or laboratory solutions. It is recommended that an existing finite-difference model (developed by INTERCOMP and INTERA, Inc.) be used as a starting point either as an acceptable basic code for modification or as a pattern for the development of a completely different numerical scheme. A ten-step plan is given to outline the general procedure for development of the code.

  11. Swiss plans for deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes - Basics for communication at the localities affected; Sachplan geologische Tiefenlager. Forschungsprojekt 'Kommunikation mit der Gesellschaft': Grundlagen fuer die Kommunikation in den Standortregionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego Carrera, D.; Renn, O.; Dreyer, M.

    2009-06-15

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the concept of how information concerning deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes should be presented and communicated to those in the areas which have been designated as potential sites for the repositories. Communication basics based on scientific knowledge in this area are discussed. The importance of a concept for general communication and risk-communication as a particular challenge are discussed. Trust and transparency are quoted as being indispensable in this connection. Ways of dealing with various target audiences and the media are examined. The report is concluded with a check-list that deals with important questions arising from the process of communicating information on deep geological repositories for radioactive wastes

  12. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section for Science and Technology Studies

    2006-09-15

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions

  13. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-09-01

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions have been

  14. Evaluation of heat propagation from a KBS-3 type deep repository for Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg in SKB's SR 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goblet, Patrick; Marsily, Ghislain de

    2000-01-01

    The following conclusions and remarks may be drawn from this review work: The phenomenology of heat propagation in the complex system of a repository is generally well understood, and permits a reliable prediction of temperature evolution. Some simplifications such as the representation of incomplete saturation of the buffer are justified at the present stage of knowledge, and do not seem to impair the reliability of the results. These simplification may become unnecessary in the future as experimental work presently going on leads to a better predicting capacity of these mechanisms. Important parameters (thermal conductivity and heat capacity) are known through a large number of measurements, and furthermore do not span a wide range. The main uncertainty seems to lie in the near field parameters (description of the contact between container and buffer, thermal conductivity of unsaturated bentonite). Generally speaking, the weak point of thermal modelling is generally not in the representation of a particular component, but in the heat transfer between different components. Although no systematic sensitivity analysis was performed in this study, the various situations modelled do give an idea on the effect of varying parameters such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity, initial heat output. The modelling work presented is consistent with the phenomenology described. A powerful computing capacity allows a detailed description of mechanisms at two different scales. However, the transition from one scale (unit cell) to the other (global scale) would deserve a more rigorous analysis. From a reviewers' viewpoint, the description of calculation cases is generally not sufficiently detailed to judge precisely the results, or to try and duplicate them, should this be needed. While this situation is acceptable in a generic exercise such as SR 97, a more detailed description would be required in a real site assessment. Apart from thermal parameters and repository location

  15. Selection of the situations taken into account for the safety demonstration of a repository in deep geological formations - French regulatory guidance and IPSN modelling experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalier des Orres, P.; Greneche, D.

    1993-01-01

    A regulatory guidance has been recently set up in France for the safety assessment of radwaste deep geological disposal: the present paper deals with the methodology related to the safety demonstration of such a disposal, particularly the situations to be taken into account to address the potential evolution of the repository under natural or human induced events. This approach, based on a selection of events considered as reasonably envisageable, relies on a reference scenario characterized by a great stability of the geological formation and on hypothetical situations corresponding to the occurrence of random events of natural origin or of conventional nature. The implementation of this methodology within the framework of the IPSN (Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute, CEA) participation in the CEC EVEREST project is addressed. This programme consists in the evaluation of the sensitivity of the radiological consequences associated to deep radwaste disposal systems to the different elements of the performance assessment (scenario characteristics, phenomena, physico-chemical parameters) in three types of geological formations (granite, salt and clay).(author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  16. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Wetting and homogenization processes in backfill materials. Laboratory tests for evaluating modeling parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann

    2008-12-01

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and implementing similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. A co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The backfill materials investigated where: Asha 230B and Friedland for use as block materials and Cebogel QSE, MX-80, Minelco and Friedland for use as pellets material. The issues investigated were: 1. Homogenization processes of highly compacted backfill blocks and pellet filling during saturation. The influence of different materials and water salinity was studied. 2. Water uptake processes for different materials and different water types. Clay specimens were put in contact with water at one end and after a certain time the tests were terminated and the water content distribution determined. 3. The water retention curve was determined for the two block materials. The results of these investigations will be used for modeling purposes either directly (retention curve) or indirectly by modeling of the tests

  17. Role of Microbes as Biocolloids in the Transport of Actinides from a Deep Underground Radioactive Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, C.J.; Dunn, M.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Mantione, K.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Papenguth, H.W.; Strietelmeier, B.A.

    1998-12-17

    We investigated the interaction of dissolved actinides Th, U, Np Zgpu, and Am, with a pure and a mixed culture of halophilic bactezia isolated from the Waste Isolation H.Iot Plant repository under anaerobic conditions to evaluate their potentiaI transport as biocolloids from the waste site. The sizes of the bacterial cells studied ranged from ().54 x 0.48 pm to 7.7 x 0.67pm Using sequential mimofiltration, we determined the ~~ation of actinides with fi-ee-living (mobile) bacterial cells suspended in a fluid medium containing. NaCl or M=W12 brine, at various phaes of their growth cycIes. The number of suspended kcteria rangy-d born 106 to 109 cells ml-*. Tine amount of actinide associatd with the wspend~ cell fraction (cakzdated & mol cell-*) was very Iow: Th, 10-*2; U, 10-1s - 10-lS; - ~ Np, 1o-15- 10-19; Pu, 10-ls -10-21 ; and h, 10-1* - 10-*9 ; and it varied with the bacteihl - CUIture studied. l%e differe&es in the asswiation are amibuted to the extent of bioamxmdation and biosorption by the bacteria pH, the compo&on of the brine, and the speziation and bioavaiIability of the actinides.

  18. Geophysical investigation for the evaluation of the long-time safety of repositories and underground disposals in deep geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, A.; Salinar Group

    2003-04-01

    The performance assessment of underground disposal facilities is an indispensable premise to ensure that repositories fulfil the requirements for permanent and safe disposal of hazardous waste. The geological barrier is supposed to be a virtually impermeable host formation like rock salt. The efficiency of the barrier is endangered by the presence of risk zones such as faults or fractures particularly with regard to water-bearing host rocks. Thus the evaluation of the long-time safety of the geological barrier has to be carried out with a minimum of invasion of the future host formation and a maximum of spatial coverage and resolution. Especially geophysical methods are suitable to investigate the geological barrier due to their non-destructive character and spatial information content. Three research projects supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) are engaged in the design and enhancement of a complex geophysical measuring and evaluation system for the investigation of problem zones of the geological barrier in rock salt. The benefit of the combination of high-performance geophysical measuring techniques as seismics, DC-geoelectrics, ground penetrating radar (GPR), electromagnetics and sonar together with strong knowledge of regional salt geology is to increase essentially the reliability of the interpretation of underground measurements. The measuring methods and interpretation tools for host rock characterisation were applied, developed and improved in a flat salt seam structure of an inoperative salt mine in the Lower Harz region. The joint interpretation of the underground geophysical measurements revealed a by-then unknown wet zone, which was tectonically affected. With the scope of refining the complex geophysical measuring and evaluation system and transferring the precedingly acquired experiences to another type of host formation, an operating potassium salt mine in the vicinity of Hannover/Germany was chosen as a new

  19. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  20. Thermal dimensioning of the deep repository. Influence of canister spacing, canister power, rock thermal properties and nearfield design on the maximum canister surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Faelth, Billy

    2003-12-01

    The report addresses the problem of the minimum spacing required between neighbouring canisters in the deep repository. That spacing is calculated for a number of assumptions regarding the conditions that govern the temperature in the nearfield and at the surfaces of the canisters. The spacing criterion is that the temperature at the canister surfaces must not exceed 100 deg C .The results are given in the form of nomographic charts, such that it is in principle possible to determine the spacing as soon as site data, i.e. the initial undisturbed rock temperature and the host rock heat transport properties, are available. Results of canister spacing calculations are given for the KBS-3V concept as well as for the KBS-3H concept. A combination of numerical and analytical methods is used for the KBS-3H calculations, while the KBS-3V calculations are purely analytical. Both methods are described in detail. Open gaps are assigned equivalent heat conductivities, calculated such that the conduction across the gaps will include also the heat transferred by radiation. The equivalent heat conductivities are based on the emissivities of the different gap surfaces. For the canister copper surface, the emissivity is determined by back-calculation of temperatures measured in the Prototype experiment at Aespoe HRL. The size of the different gaps and the emissivity values are of great importance for the results and will be investigated further in the future

  1. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E.

    2000-01-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  2. Social transactions with future generations for the management of high level radioactive waste in deep repositories: Reflections on institutional control and retrievability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Schieber, C.; Schneider, T.; Viala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The management of high level radioactive waste and spent fuel is a key issue and one of the most sensitive aspect of radioactive waste management. Recognising that it is the responsibility of our generation to find a way to isolate the waste, deep geological disposals have been envisaged to provide a definitive solution to the problem, in order to avoid 'undue burden on future generations'. However, even if they are buried, the wastes still exist and human intrusion is still possible as well as releases into the environment in the very far future. At the same time, the ongoing reflections on the ethical aspects of disposals show that it is of great worth that we guarantee future generations the same right of control and responsibility that we ourselves enjoy. This paper presents some reflections on the social transactions associated with the management and design of geological repositories. It is focused on the mission of institutional control in the transmission to future generation of a safety patrimony, composed of the know-how and techniques that permit the human community to 'domesticate' and control the risk. As it appears that the efficiency and the confidence in the control system rely mainly on the capability of implementing corrective actions, some considerations on the role, the consequences and the implementation of retrievability are also presented

  3. Swedish subseabed store - phase 1 nears completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, James

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the storage of radioactive waste in the subseabed in Sweden. The wastes are low- and intermediate-level reactor wastes arising from the Swedish nuclear power programme. The repository is a cavern which has been excavated under the seabed in the Baltic Sea, about a kilometre out from shore. The specifications of the repository are given, along with the volume of the radioactive wastes to be stored in it. (UK)

  4. Regional and Site-Scale Hydrogeologic Analyses of a Proposed Canadian Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J. F.; Normani, S. D.; Yin, Y.; Sykes, E. A.

    2009-05-01

    A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level radioactive waste has been proposed by Ontario Power Generation for the eastern edge of the Michigan Basin at the Bruce site, near Tiverton, Ontario, Canada. The DGR is to be constructed within the argillaceous Ordovician limestone of the Cobourg Formation at a depth of about 680 m below ground surface. This paper describes a regional-scale and linked site-scale geologic conceptual model for the DGR site and analyzes flow system evolution using the FRAC3DVS-OPG flow and transport model. The work illustrates the factors that influence the predicted long-term performance of the geosphere barrier and provides a framework for the assembly and integration of site-specific geoscientific data. The structural contours at the regional and site scale of the 31 sedimentary strata that may be present above the Precambrian crystalline basement rock were defined by the Ontario Petroleum Institute's Oil, Gas and Salt Resources Library borehole logs covering Southern Ontario and by site-specific data. The regional- scale domain encompasses an 18,500 km2 region extending from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay. The site- scale spatial domain encompasses an area of approximately 361 km2 with the repository at its centre. Its boundary conditions are determined using both the nested model approach and an embedment approach. The groundwater zone below the Devonian is characterized by units containing pore fluids with high concentrations of total dissolved solids that can exceed 300 g/l. Site-specific data indicate that the Ordovician is under-pressured relative to the surface elevation while the Cambrian is over-pressured. The computational sequence for the analyses involves the calculation of steady-state density independent flow that is used as the initial condition for the determination of pseudo-equilibrium for a density-dependent flow system that has an initial TDS distribution developed from observed data. Sensitivity

  5. Swedish Nuclear Waste Management from Theory to Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, Magnus

    2008-01-01

    The programme has evolved from a project of a few experts drawing up the outline of what today is a comprehensive programme of research, development, demonstration, design, construction and operation of facilities for radioactive waste management. The Swedish programme was greatly influenced at an early stage by political actions, which included placing the responsibility with the reactor owners to demonstrate safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel and also to fund a disposal programme. The response of the reactor owners was to immediately start the KBS project. Its third report in 1983 described the KBS-3 concept, which is still the basis for SKB's deep geological repository system. Thus, this year is the 25th anniversary of the creation of the well-known KBS-3 concept. The SKB programme for nuclear waste management is today divided in two sub programmes; LILW Programme and the Nuclear Fuel Programme. The LILW Programme is entering into a new phase with the imminent site investigations for the expansion of the SFR LILW repository, which is in operation since 1988, to accept also decommissioning waste. The expansion of SFR is driven by a government decision urging SKB to investigate when a licensing of a repository for decommissioning waste can be made

  6. Repository design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogg, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a deep hard rock repository design from an initial generic approach through to a Sellafield site-specific preferred concept. As in the development of any engineering project, certain key requirements have been defined. For the repository these are that the design shall be robust in terms of safety, both during the construction and operational periods, providing maximum protection for the workforce and general public. It shall satisfy the requirements for long-term radiological safety laid down by the Department of the Environment and, as far as possible, incorporate technology and equipment which is already in use elsewhere. This will minimize the risks associated with new developments and provide opportunity to draw on expertise acquired by existing users. The repository project will inevitably involve engineering challenges not encountered in the design of other types of nuclear facility. (Author)

  7. The Swedish concept for disposal of waste arising from the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Swedish nuclear power programme consists of 12 reactors producing 50% of the electricity in Sweden. It is stated by law that a waste producer has to make sure a safe handling and disposal of his radioactive waste. SKB is performing necessary activities on behalf of the waste producers. A system is in operation today that will manage all the radioactive waste produced in the country. The system consists of a transportation system, a final repository for operational waste and an interim storage facility for spent fuel. What remains to be built is an encapsulation plant for the spent fuel and a deep repository for final disposal of spent fuel and other long lived waste. All costs for managing and disposal of radioactive waste is paid by the owners of the nuclear power utilities. (author) 9 figs

  8. Stakeholder Involvement in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. In particular, we concentrate on how the two municipalities of Oskarshamn and Oesthammar have acted as engaged stakeholders, and have gained recognition as such, in the siting process. In general: How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? An effect of the history of nuclear activity in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar is that stakeholder involvement over a final repository can be divided into social and technical issues. Both municipalities have out of tradition, as part of their social acceptance of a new repository, been prepared to surrender extended involvement in key safety issues. They have been prepared to do this because they also see themselves being able to delegate these safety issues to the government authorities SSI and SKI. These two authorities have been acceptable to the two municipalities as their legitimate 'technological guardians'. As physical geology re-enters the siting process for a deep repository, Oskarshamn appear more prepared to break with tradition than Oesthammar. Oskarshamn are currently demanding transparency from SKB in relation to the exact technical and geological criteria they will use to choose between them and Oesthammar as a repository site. In contrast to Oesthammar, Oskarshamn are preparing with the expected help of SKI and SSI to dispute their geology and its relation to nuclear safety with SKB if they consider it necessary. If Oskarshamn act to draw safety issues in relation to alternative methods and sitings into the EIA process where might this lead? As environmental groups now enter the process (three groups were granted funding in the first round - 2005) the character of site

  9. The Radiological and Thermal Characteristics of Fission Waste from a Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LIFE) and Implications for Repository Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, H.F.; Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Latkowski, J.; Kramer, K.

    2009-01-01

    photon transport calculations were performed using MCNP5. Burnup calculations were performed using a modified version of Monteburns 2.0. The nuclear data used were from ENDF/B-VII. Additional details of the burn calculations can be found in. For comparison to spent fuel from light water reactors (LWRs), we use the projected initial inventory of PWR and BWR fuels (current average age of 23 years since discharge) used for the Yucca Mountain Project Final Environmental Impact Statement. The decay of this initial inventory to 1 million years was calculated using ORIGEN2. The hybrid system considered here would have generated ∼44 GWe-yr of energy at 99% FIMA. The energy generated per MT is therefore about 1100 MWe-yr/MT. In contrast, using average burnups of 41.2 GWt-day/MT and 33.6 GWt-day/MT for the PWR and BWR fuel slated for disposal at Yucca Mtn., and assuming a thermal electric conversion efficiency of ∼33%, the total energy generated by the 68,000 MT 'Yucca Mtn. inventory' is ∼2500 GWe-yr, or ∼37 MWe-yr/MT, which is ∼30 times less energy per MT than the waste from the hybrid. Clearly, relative to the current once-through fuel cycle, the use of a deep-burn hybrid to generate electricity would significantly reduce the need for repository capacity.

  10. Investigations on the populations of introduced and resident micro-organisms in deep repositories and their effects on containment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.M.; Arme, S.C.; Christofi, N.; Philp, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The present study has sought to establish basic facts concerning the importance of microbial presence in a radioactive waste repository. These are: (1) establishing the presence of microbes in relevant geological formations; (2) defining the importance of isolated groups to radioactive waste containment; (3) establishing the ability of sampled microbes to tolerate repository environmental conditions; (4) conducting preliminary work on microbial ability to influence radionuclide migration characteristics; (5) attempting basic modelling of the effects of micro-organisms on containment and radionuclide migration. Results have shown that micro-organisms of significance (e.g. sulphur cycle bacteria) are present in relevant formations. These groups can tolerate repository conditions and influence migration studies. Their growth, however, would seem to be limited by the nutrient availability. Simple modelling has concentrated on conservative calculations on the constraints of maximum effects of microbial contamination of a high-level waste repository

  11. The post-closure radiological safety case for a spent fuel repository in Sweden - An international peer review of the SKB license-application study of March 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Sweden is at the forefront among countries developing plans for a deep geological repository of highly radioactive waste. There is no such repository in operation yet worldwide, but Sweden, Finland and France are approaching the licensing stage. At the request of the Swedish government, the NEA organised an international peer review of the post-closure radiological safety case produced by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) in support of the application for a general licence to construct and operate a spent nuclear fuel geological repository in the municipality of Oesthammar. The purpose of the review was to help the Swedish government, the public and relevant organisations by providing an international reference regarding the maturity of SKB's spent fuel disposal programme vis-a-vis best practices in long-term disposal safety and radiological protection. The International Review Team (IRT) consisted of ten international specialists, who were free of conflict of interest with the SKB and brought complementary expertise to the review. This report provides the background and findings of the international peer review. The review's findings are presented at several levels of detail in order to be accessible to both specialist and non-specialist readers

  12. Final disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes. An evaluation based on recent research on the bedrock at great depths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aahaell, Karl-Inge

    2006-05-01

    New knowledge in hydrogeology and boring technology have opened the possibility to use deep boreholes as a repository for the Swedish high-level radioactive wastes. The determining property is that the repository can be housed in the stable bedrock at levels where the ground water has no contact with the biosphere and disposal and sealing can take place without disturbing the ground water stratification outside the disposal area. An advantage compared to a shallow repository of KBS-3 type, that is now being planned in Sweden, is that a borehole repository is likely to be technologically more robust, since the concept 'deep boreholes' seems to admit such a deep disposal that the entire disposal area would be surrounded by stable density-layered ground water, while a KBS-3 repository would be surrounded by moving ground water in contact with level close to the surface. This hydrological difference is of great importance for the safety in scenarios with leaching of radioactive substances. A deep repository is also less vulnerable for effects from natural events such as glaciation and earthquakes as well as from technological mishaps and terrorist actions. A crucial factor is, however, that the radioactive waste can be disposed of, in a secure way, at the intended depth, which will require new research and technology development

  13. Repository exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentz, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses exploration objectives and requirements for a nuclear repository in the U.S.A. The importance of designing the exploration program to meet the system performance objectives is emphasized and some examples of the extent of exploration required before the License Application for Construction Authorization is granted are also discussed

  14. Final deposition of high-level nuclear waste in very deep boreholes. An evaluation based on recent research of bedrock conditions at great depths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aahaell, Karl-Inge

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of high-level nuclear waste, e.g., spent nuclear fuel, in the light of recent technological developments and research on the characteristics of bedrock at extreme depths. The evaluation finds that new knowledge in the field of hydrogeology and technical advances in drilling technology have advanced the possibility of using very deep boreholes (3-5 km) for disposal of the Swedish nuclear waste. Decisive factors are (1) that the repository can be located in stable bedrock at a level where the groundwater is isolated from the biosphere, and (2) that the waste can be deposited and the boreholes permanently sealed without causing long-term disturbances in the density-stratification of the groundwater that surrounds the repository. Very deep borehole disposal might offer important advantage compared to the relatively more shallow KBS approach that is presently planned to be used by the Swedish nuclear industry in Sweden, in that it has the potential of being more robust. The reason for this is that very deep borehole disposal appears to permit emplacement of the waste at depths where the entire repository zone would be surrounded by stable, density-stratified groundwater having no contact with the surface, whereas a KBS-3 repository would be surrounded by upwardly mobile groundwater. This hydro-geological difference is a major safety factor, which is particularly apparent in all scenarios that envisage leakage of radioactive substances. Another advantage of a repository at a depth of 3 to 5 km is that it is less vulnerable to impacts from expected events (e.g., changes in groundwater conditions during future ice ages) as well as undesired events (e.g. such as terrorist actions, technical malfunction and major local earthquakes). Decisive for the feasibility of a repository based on the very deep borehole concept is, however, the ability to emplace the waste without failures. In order to achieve this

  15. Long-term degradation of organic polymers under conditions found in deep repositories for low and intermediate-level wastes; Langzeit-Degradation von organischen Polymeren unter SMA-Tiefenlagerbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warthmann, R.; Mosberger, L.; Baier, U.

    2013-06-15

    On behalf of Nagra, the Environmental Biotechnology Section of the Zürich University of Applied Sciences in Wädenswil investigated the potential for microbiological degradation of organic polymers under the conditions found in a deep geological repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW). The existing scientific literature on the topic was analysed, some thermodynamic calculations carried out and input was elicited from internationally recognised experts in the field. The study was restricted to a few substances which, in terms of mass, are most significant in the Swiss L/ILW inventory; these are polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), other plastics and bitumen. There were no clear indications in the literature that the polymer structure of synthetic polymers is biodegraded under anoxic conditions. However, functional groups of ion exchangers and plasticizers in plastics are considered to be readily available and biodegradable. The greatest obstacle to biological degradation of synthetic polymers is depolymerisation to produce labile monomers. As energy is generally required for such breakdown, the chances of this process taking place outside the cells are very low. In so far as they are present, monomers are, in principle, anaerobically biodegradable. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that degradation of synthetic polymers under repository conditions is theoretically possible. However, the degradation of polystyrene is very close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the usable energy for microorganisms would barely be sufficient. Under high H2 partial pressures, it is predicted that there will be a thermodynamic inhibition of anaerobic degradation, as certain interim steps in degradation are endergonic. The starting conditions for microbial growth in a deep repository are unfavourable in terms of availability of water and prevailing pH values. Practically no known microorganisms can tolerate the combination of these conditions; most known

  16. Probabilistic safety assessment for a generic deep geological repository for high-level waste and long-lived intermediate-level waste in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resele, G.; Holocher, J.; Mayer, G.; Hubschwerlen, N.; Niemeyer, M.; Beushausen, M.; Wollrath, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the selection procedure for the search of a final site location for the disposal of radioactive wastes, the comparison and evaluation of different potentially suitable repository systems in different types of host rocks will be an essential and crucial step. Since internationally accepted guidelines on how to perform such quantitative comparisons between repository systems with regard to their long-term safety behaviour are still lacking, in 2007 the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection launched the project 'VerSi' (Vergleichende Sicherheitsanalysen - Comparing Safety Assessments) that aims at the development of a methodology for the comparison of long-term safety assessments. A vital part of the VerSi project is the performance of long-term safety assessments for the comparison of two repository systems. The comparison focuses on a future repository for heat-generating, i.e. high-level and long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Germany. Rock salt is considered as a potential host rock for such a repository, and one repository system in VerSi is defined similarly to the potential site located in the Gorleben salt dome. Another suitable host rock formation may be clay. A generic location within the lower Cretaceous clays in Northern Germany is therefore chosen for the comparison of safety assessments within the VerSi project. The long-term safety assessment of a repository system for heat-generating radioactive waste at the generic clay location comprises different steps, amongst others: - Identifying the relevant processes in the near-field, in the geosphere and in the biosphere which are relevant for the long-term safety behaviour. - Development of a safety concept for the repository system. - Deduction of scenarios of the long-term evolution of the repository system. - Definition of statistic weights, i. e. the likelihood of occurrence of the scenarios. - Performance of a

  17. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  18. In-situ test programs related to design and construction of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories. Final report (Task 2), June 1981-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Bauhof, F.; Gonano, L.

    1983-03-01

    The media and sites considered include (1) basalt at Hanford, Washington; (2) tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site; (3) domal salt at specific Gulf Coast sites; (4) bedded salt at an unspecified site; and (5) granite at an unspecified site. A licensing perspective is outlined and a defensible rationale developed and utilized for the test selection process. This rationale essentially consists of: establishing the information needs for construction authorization; assessing the relevant capabilities of available tests; and matching the capabilities of specific tests to the perceived information needs. The information needs at any time consist of the additional information (if any) needed in order to predict satisfactory repository system performance with the required level of confidence, and thus are a function of: the significance of the repository engineered components and site characteristics to system performance; the currently available information, which may be supplemented with time; and the acceptable level of confidence in satisfactory performance for each licensing step. Determination of the acceptable levels of confidence and the significance of repository system components is outside the scope of this report. Suitable assumptions have thus been made regarding the development of information needs for construction authorization by the time of initial site submittals. Tests which are available and respond to the perceived media/site specific information needs, either by simulation or assessment of site characteristics, are identified and their capabilities assessed. Specific in situ tests are investigated and described in detail. Research and development which might be effective in improving test capabilities have been recommended

  19. Cigeo. The French deep geological repository for radioactive waste. Excavation techniques and technologies tested in underground laboratory and forecasted for the future construction of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, Francois; Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Cigeo is the French project for the repository of the high activity and intermediate long-lived radioactive waste. It will be situated at a depth of 500 m, In a clayish rock formation. An underground laboratory was built in the year 2000 and numerous tests are performed since 15 years, in order to know in detail the behavior of the rock and its ability to confine radioactive elements. In addition, this underground laboratory has brought and will continue to bring many lessons on the excavation methods to be chosen for the construction of Cigeo.

  20. Swedish encapsulation station review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Sven Olof; Brunzell, P.; Heibel, R.; McCarthy, J.; Pennington, C.; Rusch, C.; Varley, G.

    1998-06-01

    In the Encapsulation Station (ES) Review performed by NAC International, a number of different areas have been studied. The main objectives with the review have been to: Perform an independent review of the cost estimates for the ES presented in SKB's document 'Plan 1996'. This has been made through comparisons between the ES and BNFL's Waste Encapsulation Plant (WEP) at Sellafield as well as with the CLAB facility. Review the location of the ES (at the CLAB site or at the final repository) and its interaction with other parts of the Swedish system for spent fuel management. Review the logistics and plant capacity of the ES. Identify important safety aspects of the ES as a basis for future licensing activities. Based on NAC International's experience of casks for transport and storage of spent fuel, review the basic design of the copper/steel canister and the transport cask. This review insides design, manufacturing, handling and licensing aspects. Perform an overall comparison between the ES project and the CLAB project with the objective to identify major project risks and discuss their mitigation

  1. Swedish encapsulation station review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Sven Olof; Brunzell, P.; Heibel, R.; McCarthy, J.; Pennington, C.; Rusch, C.; Varley, G. [NAC International, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1998-06-01

    In the Encapsulation Station (ES) Review performed by NAC International, a number of different areas have been studied. The main objectives with the review have been to: Perform an independent review of the cost estimates for the ES presented in SKB`s document `Plan 1996`. This has been made through comparisons between the ES and BNFL`s Waste Encapsulation Plant (WEP) at Sellafield as well as with the CLAB facility. Review the location of the ES (at the CLAB site or at the final repository) and its interaction with other parts of the Swedish system for spent fuel management. Review the logistics and plant capacity of the ES. Identify important safety aspects of the ES as a basis for future licensing activities. Based on NAC International`s experience of casks for transport and storage of spent fuel, review the basic design of the copper/steel canister and the transport cask. This review insides design, manufacturing, handling and licensing aspects. Perform an overall comparison between the ES project and the CLAB project with the objective to identify major project risks and discuss their mitigation 19 refs, 9 figs, 35 tabs

  2. Learning Object Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This chapter looks at the development and nature of learning objects, meta-tagging standards and taxonomies, learning object repositories, learning object repository characteristics, and types of learning object repositories, with type examples. (Contains 1 table.)

  3. Evaluation of behaviour and Safety in a geologic deep repository; Evaluacion del comportamiento y de la seguridad de un almacenamiento geologico profundo en granito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program. This Safety Assessment constitutes a first step within a systematical process that will permit, thorough successive approximations, to predict the performance of the different barriers of the disposal system, and its capability to comply with the assigned safety functions and with the established safety criteria. The primary bases for this Safety Assessment are the following: The disposal concept considers the storage of the fuel assemblies in carbon steel canisters of 10 cm of thickness, emplaced horizontally in galleries excavated in granite of 2,4 m of diameter and 500 m of length, using a bentonite thickness of 75 cm around canisters as buffer material. The repository is located in a granitic site defined with available data about surface characteristics of Spanish granites. The exercise uses a probabilistic approximation in order to cope with the uncertainties associated with the different imputs parameters. (Author)

  4. Corrosion of magnesium alloys in disposal drifts of a deep geological repository: modelling of the hydrogen generation and the water consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croise, J.; Mayer, G.; Talandier, J.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Intermediate-level waste packages originated from the reprocessing of ends and hulls of fuel used in former gas cooled reactors, contain magnesium alloys. The corrosion of this metal under reduced chemical conditions will lead to the production of hydrogen gas as well as the consumption of water during the post-closure phase of the repository. According to ANDRA, 2005, the period of concern covers several 1,000 years after closure of the repository. The limited transport efficiency of the host rock (Callovo- Oxfordian Clay) with its low permeability and high capillary resistance might cause, among other things, significant desaturation and significant pressure build-up within the emplacement drifts. On the other hand, the water availability is limited as a result of 1) the low permeability of the host rock and 2) the desaturation due to the ventilation of the drifts during the operational phase of the repository. In former numerical simulations of the two-phase flow and hydrogen transport in the repository system, it was assumed that under the reducing chemical conditions prevailing in the repository, the corrosion rate would be a function of the available metal surface and temperature only. In the simulations presented, the following additional processes were taken into account: i) a saturation dependency of the hydrogen-gas generation rate and ii) the water consumption due to the corrosion process. These features of a simplified 'corrosion-gas generation' model were implemented into the software TOUGH2. A series of 1D radial and 2D vertical simulations of the gas flow in a disposal drift with the waste packages and its concrete backfill, and including the surrounding clay host rock. The simulations provide insight into the system behavior from the construction of the drift, through the operation under ventilated conditions and to post-closure conditions: Evolution of the pressure and the saturation

  5. Final disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes. An evaluation based on recent research on the bedrock at great depths; Slutfoervaring av hoegaktivt kaernavfall i djupa borrhaal. En utvaerdering baserad paa senare aars forskning om berggrunden paa stora djup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aahaell, Karl-Inge [Karlstad Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    New knowledge in hydrogeology and boring technology have opened the possibility to use deep boreholes as a repository for the Swedish high-level radioactive wastes. The determining property is that the repository can be housed in the stable bedrock at levels where the ground water has no contact with the biosphere and disposal and sealing can take place without disturbing the ground water stratification outside the disposal area. An advantage compared to a shallow repository of KBS-3 type, that is now being planned in Sweden, is that a borehole repository is likely to be technologically more robust, since the concept 'deep boreholes' seems to admit such a deep disposal that the entire disposal area would be surrounded by stable density-layered ground water, while a KBS-3 repository would be surrounded by moving ground water in contact with level close to the surface. This hydrological difference is of great importance for the safety in scenarios with leaching of radioactive substances. A deep repository is also less vulnerable for effects from natural events such as glaciation and earthquakes as well as from technological mishaps and terrorist actions. A crucial factor is, however, that the radioactive waste can be disposed of, in a secure way, at the intended depth, which will require new research and technology development.

  6. Collaborative repositories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    in general and the web-dictionary in particular within the Danish health care, pharmaceutical, medical device and translation sectors which technologically have been fused into one collective 'knowledge cluster' and it discusses the opportunities for research and business that spring from fusion of language......Textual and communicative competence lies at the heart of the skills of a professional linguistic mediator in general. Such skills are particularly important in specialized writing, which requires deep conceptual and contextual knowledge. One of the main objectives of the activities undertaken...... of such 'deep' knowledge within interdisciplinary and intersectoral 'knowledge clusters'. This paper presents concepts and systems for multilingual terminological and textual knowledge codification, representation, validation, management and sharing structured around the notion of genre following Bergenkotter...

  7. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory across Generations (RK and M). A Literature Survey on Markers and Memory Preservation for Deep Geological Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buser, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    This study is an English translation and slight update of a previous study originally commissioned by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy between 2008 and 2010. The intention was to investigate the 'state of the art' on marking with a view to learning lessons for geological repositories. This is an edited and slightly updated English translation, published by the NEA as part of the RWMC project 'The Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) across Generations'. The work is conceived as a literature study. It considers over 150 texts, published between 1928 and 2013. Texts published between the 1990 and 2010 form a majority, making the 1990's and 2000's the dominant era. The texts include technical reports, journal articles, conference proceedings, implementation plans, national regulations, and full-length books. Some publications are specifically about the concept, implementation and requirements for Markers. Others consider the geological disposal of radioactive from other points of view - for example, archiving, or intrusion scenarios. Others are publications on history or futurism, including histories of genocide and language, and the possibilities of communication far into the future. Authors of the texts include academies, international organisations, consultants commissioned by national organisations, regulators, implementers, and protest groups. It should be recognised that, whilst care has been taken to provide a wide and representative study, the concept of 'marking' a geological repository was first established in the USA. The available literature on Markers is still dominated by work carried out in the USA in the 1980's, 1990's and 2000's. The conclusions and points of view surveyed are therefore weighted towards this body of work. The study brings together the knowledge and experience from the field of marking and archiving from the last few decades and provides an overview of the present status of discussions on the topic. It is an

  8. Groundwater chemistry around a repository for spent nuclear fuel over a glacial cycle. Evaluation for SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auque, L.F.; Gimeno, M.J.; Gomez, J.B. [University of Zaragoza (Spain); Puigdomenech, I. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Smellie, J. [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, E.L. [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    The chemical composition of groundwater in the rock volume surrounding a spent nuclear fuel repository is of importance to many factors that affect repository performance. The geochemical characteristics of present-day Swedish groundwater systems are governed by successive mixing events of several waters during the post-glacial evolution of the sites. The expected development of groundwaters at two Swedish sites - Forsmark and Laxemar - during a glacial cycle has been evaluated within the SR-Can project, and the results are presented in this report. For the temperate period following repository closure, an approach is proposed here to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater geochemistry by coupling hydrogeological and geochemical models in a sequential way. The procedure combines hydrogeological results obtained with CONNECTFLOW within the SR-Can project with a mixing and reaction path simulation using PHREEQC. The hydrological results contain mixing proportions of four component waters (a deep brine, glacial meltwater, marine water, and meteoric infiltration) at each time step and at every node of the D regional model domain. In this work the mixing fractions are fed into PHREEQC using software developed to build formatted input files and to extract the information from output files for subsequent plotting and analysis. The geochemical calculations included both chemical mixing and equilibrium reactions with selected minerals: calcite, chalcedony and an Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide. Results for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites are graphically presented as histograms and box-and-whisker plots. Cross sections, where each node is colour-coded with respect to an important variable (pH, Eh or concentrations of main elements), are used to visualize the future evolution of the site. Sensitivity analyses are made to evaluate the effects of the different reactions and/or assumptions. The results reflect the progressive inflow of meteoric waters into the sites

  9. Final disposal of high-level nuclear waste in very deep boreholes. An evaluation based on recent research of bedrock conditions at great depths; Slutfoervaring av hoegaktivt kaernavfall i djupa borrhaal. En utvaerdering baserad paa senare aars forskning om berggrunden paa stora djup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aahaell, Karl-Inge [Karlstad Univ. (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    This report evaluates the feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of high-level nuclear waste, e.g., spent nuclear fuel, in the light of recent technological developments and research on the characteristics of bedrock at extreme depths. The evaluation finds that new knowledge in the field of hydrogeology and technical advances in drilling technology have advanced the possibility of using very deep boreholes (3-5 km) for disposal of the Swedish nuclear waste. Decisive factors are (1) that the repository can be located in stable bedrock at a level where the groundwater is isolated from the biosphere, and (2) that the waste can be deposited and the boreholes permanently sealed without causing long-term disturbances in the density-stratification of the groundwater that surrounds the repository. Very deep borehole disposal might offer important advantage compared to the relatively more shallow KBS approach that is presently planned to be used by the Swedish nuclear industry in Sweden, in that it has the potential of being more robust. The reason for this is that very deep borehole disposal appears to permit emplacement of the waste at depths where the entire repository zone would be surrounded by stable, density-stratified groundwater having no contact with the surface, whereas a KBS-3 repository would be surrounded by upwardly mobile groundwater. This hydro-geological difference is a major safety factor, which is particularly apparent in all scenarios that envisage leakage of radioactive substances. Another advantage of a repository at a depth of 3 to 5 km is that it is less vulnerable to impacts from expected events (e.g., changes in groundwater conditions during future ice ages) as well as undesired events (e.g. such as terrorist actions, technical malfunction and major local earthquakes). Decisive for the feasibility of a repository based on the very deep borehole concept is, however, the ability to emplace the waste without failures. In order to achieve this

  10. Fundamentals of the NEA Thermochemical Database and its influence over national nuclear programs on the performance assessment of deep geological repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoussi, Maria-Eleni; Costa, Davide

    2017-03-14

    For the last 30 years, the NEA Thermochemical Database (TDB) Project (www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/) has been developing a chemical thermodynamic database for elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste repositories, providing data that are vital to support the geochemical modeling of such systems. The recommended data are selected on the basis of strict review procedures and are characterized by their consistency. The results of these efforts are freely available, and have become an international point of reference in the field. As a result, a number of important national initiatives with regard to waste management programs have used the NEA TDB as their basis, both in terms of recommended data and guidelines. In this article we describe the fundamentals and achievements of the project together with the characteristics of some databases developed in national nuclear waste disposal programs that have been influenced by the NEA TDB. We also give some insights on how this work could be seen as an approach to be used in broader areas of environmental interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Some reflections on human intrusion into a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerlind, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the Swedish nuclear regulators' requirements and views related to intrusion into a repository for spent nuclear fuel, in the post-closure phase. The focus is however on experiences from the interaction with various stakeholders in the Swedish process for siting a repository. It is recognised that intrusion is not a major concern but that it is regularly raised in the debate, often in connection with issues related to retrievability. It is pointed out that more attention should be paid to the repository performance after an intrusion event, both in safety assessments and in communication with stakeholders, and not only address the immediate impacts to intruders. It is believed that international co-operation would be useful for developing methodologies for defining intrusion scenarios. (author)

  12. Monte-Carlo based comparison of the personal dose for emplacement scenarios of spent nuclear fuel casks in generic deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Hector Sauri; Becker, Franz; Metz, Volker [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Pang, Bo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Shenzhen Univ. (China). College of Physics and Energy

    2017-06-15

    In the operational phase of a deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste, the radiation field in the vicinity of a waste cask is influenced by the backscattered radiation of the surrounding walls of the emplacement drift. For a comparison of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in various host rocks, it is of interest to investigate the influence of the surrounding materials on the radiation field and the personal radiation exposure. In this generic study individual dosimetry of personnel involved in emplacement of casks with spent nuclear fuel in drifts in rock salt and in a clay formation was modelled.

  13. Attitudes and opposition in siting a high level nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeberg, L.; Viklund, M.; Truedsson, J

    1998-09-01

    In Sweden, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) handles all issues concerning nuclear waste, including the siting process, in which the final outcome is intended to be a repository for high level nuclear waste placed deep down in bedrock. The main objective of the siting process is to find a host community fulfilling two important conditions: the safety demands have been met and agreements with the municipality can be accomplished. Only in such municipalities, so-called feasibility studies will be conducted. After conducting general studies in the whole country, SKB, in October 1992, sent letters with information about the intended feasibility studies to all Swedish municipalities. As a result, feasibility studies are or have been considered - and in some cases also been conducted - in eleven Swedish municipalities up until 1998. These are the municipalities where the attitudes and opposition towards a feasibility study, and possibly a final repository, are studied. The discussion can be divided into three main parts: Management of the siting process; Inherent `chaotic` processes and/or factors and risk perception. It is argued that two important problems could have been avoided at least partly: The citizens in many municipalities were uncertain of the relationship between a feasibility study and a final repository, and in many municipalities the citizens were afraid that the Government could overrule the municipal veto. Because of these fears, a common argument among the opponents of a feasibility study was: `to be sure of not receiving a final repository, we say no to a feasibility study`. Some inherent factors, more or less prevalent in the municipalities as well as in society in general, may also partly explain the outcome of the siting process. The municipalities in which the debate has been heated, and where public support has been more difficult to reach, share some common characteristics. Esp. in the municipalities in the north of

  14. Attitudes and opposition in siting a high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeberg, L.; Viklund, M.; Truedsson, J.

    1998-09-01

    In Sweden, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) handles all issues concerning nuclear waste, including the siting process, in which the final outcome is intended to be a repository for high level nuclear waste placed deep down in bedrock. The main objective of the siting process is to find a host community fulfilling two important conditions: the safety demands have been met and agreements with the municipality can be accomplished. Only in such municipalities, so-called feasibility studies will be conducted. After conducting general studies in the whole country, SKB, in October 1992, sent letters with information about the intended feasibility studies to all Swedish municipalities. As a result, feasibility studies are or have been considered - and in some cases also been conducted - in eleven Swedish municipalities up until 1998. These are the municipalities where the attitudes and opposition towards a feasibility study, and possibly a final repository, are studied. The discussion can be divided into three main parts: Management of the siting process; Inherent 'chaotic' processes and/or factors and risk perception. It is argued that two important problems could have been avoided at least partly: The citizens in many municipalities were uncertain of the relationship between a feasibility study and a final repository, and in many municipalities the citizens were afraid that the Government could overrule the municipal veto. Because of these fears, a common argument among the opponents of a feasibility study was: 'to be sure of not receiving a final repository, we say no to a feasibility study'. Some inherent factors, more or less prevalent in the municipalities as well as in society in general, may also partly explain the outcome of the siting process. The municipalities in which the debate has been heated, and where public support has been more difficult to reach, share some common characteristics. Esp. in the municipalities in the north of

  15. SR 97 - Waste, repository design and sites. Background report to SR 97 SKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    SR 97 is a comprehensive analysis of long-term safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The repository is assumed to be designed according to the KBS-3 method. Assessments are performed in SR 97 for three fictitious sites: Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg. One premise is that data used for assessment of the fictitious sites are to be taken from sites that have previously been investigated. The spent nuclear fuel is enclosed in copper canisters with an insert of cast iron. The canisters are emplaced in bored holes in the floor of the deposition tunnels. Around each canister, bentonite blocks are stacked which, after absorbing water and swelling, will isolate the canister from groundwater, hold the canister in place and retard transport of radionuclides from the canister to the surrounding rock. The spent nuclear fuel will emit heat fora long time, due to the decay heat. The maximum permissible temperature on the canister surface has been chosen at 100 deg C. The spacing between the deposition holes and between the deposition tunnels is adjusted site-specifically to meet this requirement. The thermal properties of the rock and the buffer material are of importance for how closely the deposition holes and tunnels can be spaced. After deposition, the deposition tunnels are backfilled with a mixture of bentonite and crushed rock. SR 97 examines above all the consequences of various scenarios and the handling of various types of uncertainties. The different repository sites illustrate normal properties for Swedish bedrock which are of importance for safety. To facilitate the work, the repositories on the three sites are configured as similarly as possible, which means for example that they are located at roughly the same depth and are fitted into the bedrock in a relatively similar fashion. Apart from the siting of a repository for spent nuclear fuel, the site may need to house a separate repository for other long-lived waste. This possibility has been considered in

  16. The Swedish programme for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurstroem, S.; Forsstroem, H.

    1986-10-01

    The following systems and facilities are currently in operation and under implementation: a sea transportation system for all kinds of nuclear waste, a central facility for interim storage of spent fuel (CLAB) and a central underground repository for final disposal of low and medium level reactor waste (SFR). For the remaining steps - final disposal of highly active and longlived radioactive residues - a concept, based on encapsulation of the fuel elements in copper canisters and final storage of the canisters in a repository situated 500 m down in crystalline rock (KBS-3), has been developed and approved by the government in accordance with the Swedish nuclear legislation. Although a feasible method for final disposal of the highly active residues has been shown, the Swedish legislation requires that research be carried out to reach the best possible base for the final decision around the year 2000. In parallel with this a geological investigation programme is carried out to find a suitable site for a final repository. The final site selection is foreseen at the end of the 1990's. All costs for the management of radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants are carried by a fee determined annually. The fee is 0.019 SEK/kWh for 1986

  17. Effect of precipitation, sorption and stable of isotope on maximum release rates of radionuclides from engineered barrier system (EBS) in deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekifarsani, A.; Skachek, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The basic function of the engineered barrier system (EBS) in geological disposal is to prevent or limit the release of radionuclides into the underground environment. For this purpose, the vitrified waste is contained in an overpack to isolate it from contact with groundwater for a certain initial period of time. However, it is impossible to ensure complete containment for all time. Therefore, the eventual release of nuclides must be minimized after the overpack fails (AEC, 1984. Radioactive waste processing and disposal measures; JNC, 2000a. Project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan - first progress report-H3. Geological Environment in Japan, JNC TN1410 2000-002; JNC, 2000b. H12: project to establish the scientific and technical basis for HLW disposal in Japan - repository design and engineering technology, JNC TN1410 2000-003.). Low-permeability buffer material is installed between the overpack and the host rock to ensure that radionuclide release from the vitrified waste is limited by diffusive transport rather than advective transport in groundwater. Nuclides released from the waste form precipitate when their concentrations in the porewater result in their elemental solubility limits being exceeded. This limits the concentrations of many nuclides in the buffer and thus limits the release rates to the surrounding rock. High sorption coefficients act to delay the transport of certain nuclides during their migration through the buffer (PNC, development and management of the technical knowledge base for the geological disposal of HLW. Supporting report 2: repository engineering technology). The presence of isotopes of the same element has the effect of reducing the effective solubility of some nuclides; a lower nuclide concentration is required for precipitation to occur if the presence of any isotopes of the same element is taken into account. The calculated release rates of radionuclides from the EBS (per waste package

  18. SR-CAN - a safety assessment of a repository of spent nuclear fuel: canister performance and effects on the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautsky, U.; Kumblad, L.

    2004-01-01

    During the next few years the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) performs site investigations at two sites in Sweden for a future repository of spent nuclear fuel. Parallel an encapsulation plant is planned to encapsulate the spent fuel in copper canisters according to the KBS-3 method. The purpose of the SR-CAN safety assessment is to show the performance of the canister isolations at different sites for a repository at 500 meters depth in crystalline rock. Moreover, SR-CAN provides an example how the site specific safety assessment of a deep repository will be made in year 2006-2008. To be able to calculate dose and risk for humans and the environment, new assessment methods were developed for the biosphere. These methods were based on a system ecological approach and used knowledge from landscape ecology to provide an integrated approach with hydrology and geology considering the discharges in a watershed and calculating consequences in terrestrial and aquatic (freshwater and marine) ecosystems. A range of methods and tools were developed in GIS and Matlab/Simulink to be able to model and understand the important processes in the landscape today and during the next few thousands of years. In this paper, an overview of the program and the novel methods are presented, as well as some examples from performance calculations from a watershed in the Forsmark area considering effects on humans and ecosystems. (author)

  19. Breast Cancer Tissue Repository

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglehart, J

    1997-01-01

    The Breast Tissue Repository at Duke enters its fourth year of finding. The purpose of the Repository at Duke is to provide substantial quantities of frozen tissue for explorative molecular studies...

  20. Establishment of advanced integration technology for site characterization of deep geological repository. Development of information synthesis and interpretation system. Annual report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Hideaki; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Ota, Kunio; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Maekawa, Keisuke; Kunimaru, Takanori; Niizato, Tadafumi; Asamori, Koichi; Hiraga, Naoto; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Shigehiro, Michiko; Abe, Hironobu; Hama, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shinji; Amano, Kenji; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Toyoda, Gakuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Shimada, Akiomi

    2008-11-01

    This project is planned as a five-year program aiming to develop an advanced integration technology for characterization of a site for radioactive waste geological disposal. It is carried out by the Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency with the fund of Agency for Natural Resources and Energy of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. This report summarizes the outcome of the first year (FY 2007) activities of the project. The site characterization is a dynamic and complex process and needs close linkage with repository design and performance assessment (PA). A geosynthesis methodology has been developed for integrating site characterization information into design and PA, and applied for e.g. on-going JAEA's studies at two generic URLs at Mizunami and Horonobe. This methodology explicitly presents an information flow (often referred to as geosynthesis data flow diagram or data flow diagram, in short) from measurements by site investigation to generating data sets for design and PA. It is a useful tool for guiding the site characterization in a transparent and traceable manner. As site investigation proceeds and information being obtained on geological environments of the site increases, the site characterization plan is iteratively reviewed and modified reflecting the updated information. Such modification would also be needed when changes would occur on socio-political boundary conditions. In fact, the data flow diagrams for two generic URL projects have been revised several times so far due to the increase in the amount of information on geological environments and changes of societal conditions. An advanced technology aimed at in this project is therefore focused on developing flexible approach and tools, which is named as Information Synthesis and Interpretation System (ISIS), to support the stepwise 'optimization' of the site characterization plan. In FY 2007, a basic concept for ISIS has been developed

  1. The implications of soil acidification on a future HLW repository. Pt 2. Influence on deep granitic groundwater. The Klipperaas study site as test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Bruno, J.; Laaksoharju, M.

    1994-05-01

    The effect of acidification on deep groundwater is assessed with a geochemical box model based on the STEADYQL code. The application of the model to the Klipperaas study site shows a remarkable agreement between observed and predicted groundwater composition and offers an adequate description of the geochemical evolution of the aquifer. Proton fluxes are shown to be controlled mainly by calcite weathering and organic carbon degradation processes. The impact of increased acidification is evaluated on the basis of various test cases and by including the soil compartment in the model framework. The results indicate that calcite weathering will be increased by a factor of two to three as a result of increased acidification. Furthermore, the calculations suggest that, once the powerful carbonate buffer is depleted, the buffer capacity is provided mainly by anaerobic respiration and ion exchange processes. Further ongoing acidic loading would lead to neutralization of alkalinity fluxes leaving the system with a very low buffering capacity towards fluctuations in proton fluxes. Estimation of time scales of aquifer acidification was assessed under the focus of calcite depletion with aid of two acidification scenarios. These predict a time range of 12400 to 370000 years for calcite depletion to take place down to 500 meters depth. It is suggested from inherent model assumptions that these estimated time scales are conservative. 53 refs

  2. Research on uranium deposits as analogues of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The disposal of highly radioactive waste deep underground in suitable geological formations is proposed by many countries to protect public health and safety. The study of natural analogues of nuclear waste repositories is one method of validating mathematical models and assuring that a proposed repository site and design will be safe. (author)

  3. GENIUS & the Swedish Fast Reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, Janne

    2012-01-01

    Concluding remarks: Sweden’s growing fast reactor programme focuses on LFR technology, but we also participate in ASTRID. • An innovative facility for UN fabrication, an LBE thermal hydraulics loop and a lead corrosion facility are operational. • A plutonium fuel fabrication lab is is under installation (this week!) • The government is assessing the construction of ELECTRA-FCC, a centre for Gen IV-system R&D, at a tentative cost of ~ 140±20 M€. • Location: Oskarshamn (adjacent to intermediate repository) • Date of criticality: 2023 (best case) • Swedish participation in IAEA TWG-FR should intensify

  4. A Strategy for Describing the Biosphere at Candidate Sites for Repositories of Nuclear Waste: Linking Ecosystem and Landscape Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, Tobias; Loefgren, Anders; Soederbaeck, Bjoern; Kautsky, Ulrik; Lindborg, Regina; Bradshaw, Clare

    2006-01-01

    To provide information necessary for a license application for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. has started site investigations at two sites in Sweden. In this paper, we present a strategy to integrate site-specific ecosystem data into spatially explicit models needed for safety assessment studies and the environmental impact assessment. The site-specific description of ecosystems is developed by building discipline-specific models from primary data and by identifying interactions and stocks and flows of matter among functional units at the sites. The conceptual model is a helpful initial tool for defining properties needed to quantify system processes, which may reveal new interfaces between disciplines, providing a variety of new opportunities to enhance the understanding of the linkages between ecosystem characteristics and the functional properties of landscapes. This type of integrated ecosystem-landscape characterization model has an important role in forming the implementation of a safety assessment for a deep repository

  5. On the role of anisotropy in the perturbation of Boom Clay by a deep disposal repository for high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillen, X.; Li, X.L.; Van Marcke, P.; Chen, G.; Bastiaens, W.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. All along the characterisation programme of the Boom Clay, a potential host rock for geological disposal of long-lived, heat-emitting radioactive waste, evidences of anisotropy of key thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) properties have been collected through direct observations and laboratory measurements. In parallel, evidences of anisotropic THM behaviour of the clay massif were obtained during excavations and in-situ experiments in the underground research laboratory HADES at Mol. Careful analysis of the observations and simple modelling reveal the key role of the anisotropy of the material properties and, to a lesser extent, the in situ stresses in the development of a damaged zone around the galleries and the hydro-mechanical perturbation in the clay massif. As a consequence of the sedimentary deposition process, clay formations often exhibit visible bedding. This is the case for Boom Clay. Like other deep clays, Boom Clay also exhibits pronounced strain anisotropy under certain hydro-mechanical loading. Isotropic compression tests performed in the early nineties have shown that, for Boom Clay at a depth of about 225 m, the increments of deformation perpendicular to the bedding planes, i.e. vertical, are about two times larger than increments of deformation parallel to the bedding planes, i.e. horizontal. Moreover, it was observed that this mechanical anisotropy decreases progressively as the isotropic stress is increased. Drained heating tests under constant isotropic loading also evidenced anisotropic behaviour during thermo-consolidation. Like the mechanical properties, hydraulic and thermal properties of the Boom Clay also show anisotropy: lab and in situ measurements suggest that the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is about twice the vertical one while the ratio between horizontal and vertical thermal conductivities is about 1.4. The anisotropic THM behaviour of the Boom Clay was evidenced during excavations

  6. Impact of cementitious materials decalcification on transfer properties: application to radioactive waste deep repository; Influence de la decalcification de materiaux cimentaires sur les proprietes de transfert: application au stockage profond de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlot, C

    2005-09-15

    Cementitious materials have been selected to compose the engineering barrier system (EBS) of the French radioactive waste deep repository, because of concrete physico-chemical properties: the hydrates of the cementitious matrix and the pH of the pore solution contribute to radionuclides retention; furthermore the compactness of these materials limits elements transport. The confinement capacity of the system has to be assessed while a period at least equivalent to waste activity (up to 100.000 years). His durability was sustained by the evolution of transfer properties in accordance with cementitious materials decalcification, alteration that expresses structure long-term behavior. Then, two degradation modes were carried out, taking into account the different physical and chemical solicitations imposed by the host formation. The first mode, a static one, was an accelerated decalcification test using nitrate ammonium solution. It replicates the EBS alteration dues to underground water. Degradation kinetic was estimated by the amount of calcium leached and the measurement of the calcium hydroxide dissolution front. To evaluate the decalcification impact, samples were characterized before and after degradation in term of microstructure (porosity, pores size distribution) and of transfer properties (diffusivity, gas and water permeability). The influence of cement nature (ordinary Portland cement, blended cement) and aggregates type (lime or siliceous) was observed: experiments were repeated on different mortars mixes. On this occasion, an essential reflection on this test metrology was led. The second mode, a dynamical degradation, was performed with an environmental permeameter. It recreates the EBS solicitations ensured during the re-saturation period, distinguished by the hydraulic pressure imposed by the geologic layer and the waste exothermicity. This apparatus, based on triaxial cell functioning, allows applying on samples pressure drop between 2 and 10 MPa and

  7. Swedish Government Minister at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research recently visited CERN. The Swedish Minister was greeted by Swedish scientists working at CERN. Signing of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding. Pär Omling, Director-General of the Swedish Research Council (left), and Jos Engelen, CERN’s Chief Scientific Officer. Lars Leijonborg, the Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research, was welcomed to CERN by Director-General Robert Aymar on 10 March. After an introduction to the Laboratory’s activities, the Minister was given guided tours of the control room, the ATLAS surface hall and experiment cavern and the adjoining LHC tunnel. Mr Leijonborg was then greeted by Swedish scientists and given an overview of the Swedish research programme at CERN. Five Swedish university groups are taking part in LHC research. Swedish universities are notably involved in the manufacture of parts for the sub-detectors of AT...

  8. Repository Rodeo Redux

    CERN Document Server

    Anez, Melissa; Donohue, Tim; Fyson, Will; Simko, Tibor; Wilcox, David

    2017-01-01

    You’ve got more repository questions and we’ve got more answers! Last year’s Repository Rodeo panel was a huge success, so we’re taking the show on the road to Brisbane for OR2017. Join representatives from the DSpace, Eprints, Fedora, Hydra, and Islandora communities as we (briefly) explain what each of our repositories actually does. We'll also talk about the directions of our respective technical and community developments, and related to the conference theme of Open: Innovation Knowledge Repositories, offer brief observations about the latest, most promising and/or most surprising innovations in our space. This panel will be a great opportunity for newcomers to Open Repositories to get a crash course on the major repository options and meet representatives from each of their communities. After a brief presentation from each representative, we'll open the session up for questions from the audience.

  9. Groundwater flow modelling of an abandoned partially open repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockgaard, Niclas

    2010-12-01

    As a part of the license application, according to the nuclear activities act, for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different hydraulic conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study presented here serves as an input for analyses of so-called future human actions that may affect the repository. The objective of the work was to investigate the hydraulic influence of an abandoned partially open repository. The intention was to illustrate a pessimistic scenario of the effect of open tunnels in comparison to the reference closure of the repository. The effects of open tunnels were studied for two situations with different boundary conditions: A 'temperate' case with present-day boundary conditions and a generic future 'glacial' case with an ice sheet covering the repository. The results were summarized in the form of analyses of flow in and out from open tunnels, the effect on hydraulic head and flow in the surrounding rock volume, and transport performance measures of flow paths from the repository to surface

  10. Status of Proposed Repository for Latin-American Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2004-10-04

    This report compiles preliminary information that supports the premise that a repository is needed in Latin America and analyzes the nuclear situation (mainly in Argentina and Brazil) in terms of nuclear capabilities, inventories, and regional spent-fuel repositories. The report is based on several sources and summarizes (1) the nuclear capabilities in Latin America and establishes the framework for the need of a permanent repository, (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approach for a regional spent-fuel repository and describes the support that international institutions are lending to this issue, (3) the current situation in Argentina in order to analyze the Argentinean willingness to find a location for a deep geological repository, and (4) the issues involved in selecting a location for the repository and identifies a potential location. This report then draws conclusions based on an analysis of this information. The focus of this report is mainly on spent fuel and does not elaborate on other radiological waste sources.

  11. Administrative Data Repository (ADR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Administrative Data Repository (ADR) was established to provide support for the administrative data elements relative to multiple categories of a person entity...

  12. Records Control Schedules Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The Records Control Schedules (RCS) repository provides access to scanned versions of records schedules, or Standard Form 115, Request for Records Disposition...

  13. CAED Document Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division Document Repository (CAEDDOCRESP) provides internal and external access of Inspection Records, Enforcement Actions, and...

  14. Characterization of Discharge Areas of Radionuclides Originating From Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, L.; Xu, S.; Worman, A.

    2009-05-01

    If leakages in nuclear waste repositories located in crystalline bedrock arise, radionuclides will reach the biosphere and cause a risk of radiological impact. The extent of the radiological impact depends on in which landscape elements the radionuclides emerge. In this study, we investigate if there are certain landscape elements that generally will act as discharge areas for radionuclides leaking from subsurface deposits. We also characterize the typical properties that distinguish these areas from others. In humid regions, landscape topography is the most important driving force for groundwater flow. Because groundwater is the main transporting agent for migrating radionuclides, the topography will determine the flowpaths of leaking radionuclides. How topography and heterogeneities in the subsurface affect the discharge distribution of the radionuclides is therefore an important scope of this study. To address these issues, we developed a 3-D transport model. Our analyses are based on site-specific data from two different areas in Sweden, Forsmark, Uppland, and Oskarshamn, Småland. The Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Company (SKB) has selected these two areas as candidate areas for a deep repository of nuclear waste and the areas are currently subject to site investigations. Our results suggest that there are hot-spots in the landscape i.e. areas with high probability of receiving large amounts of radionuclides from a leaking repository of nuclear waste. The hot-spots concentrate in the sea, streams, lakes and wetlands. All these elements are found at lower elevations in the landscape. This pattern is mostly determined by the landscape topography and the locations of fracture zones. There is a relationship between fracture zones and topography, and therefore the importance of the topography for the discharge area distribution is not contradicted by the heterogeneity in the bedrock. The varieties of landscape elements which have potential for receiving

  15. Investigation on repository layouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanai, Kenji [Tokai, Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Iwasa, Kengo; Hasegawa, Hiroshi [Head Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Gouke, Mitsuo; Horita, Masakuni [Shimizu Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Noda, Masaru [Ohbayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    This report consists of three items : (1) Study of the repository configuration, (2) Study of the surface facilities configuration for construction, operation and backfilling, (3) Planning schedule. In the repository configuration, the basic factors influencing the design of the repository configuration are presented, and the results of studies of various possible repository configurations are presented for both hard and soft rock systems. Here, the minimum conditions regarding geological environment required to guide design are assumed, because it is difficult to determine the repository configuration without considering specific conditions of a disposal site. In the surface facility configuration, it is illustrated based on the results of construction, operation, backfilling studies for underground disposal facility and EIS report of CANADA. In the schedule, the overall schedule corresponding to the repository layout is outlined in link with the milestone of disposal schedule set forth in the government's basic policy. The assumptions and the basic conditions are summarized to examine the General Schedule from start of construction to closure of a repository. This summary is based on the technologies to be used for construction, operation and closure of a repository. The basic national policies form the framework for this review of the general schedule. (author)

  16. Nuclear waste repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloman, B.D.; Cameron, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the geopolitics of nuclear waste disposal in the USA. Constitutional choice and social equity perspectives are used to argue for a more open and just repository siting program. The authors assert that every potential repository site inevitably contains geologic, environmental or other imperfections and that the political process is the correct one for determining sites selected

  17. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the second part of a report of a preliminary study for AECL. It considers the requirements for an underground waste repository for the disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. The following topics are discussed with reference to the repository: 1) geotechnical assessment, 2) hydrogeology and waste containment, 3) thermal loading and 4) rock mechanics. (author)

  18. Transportation plan repository and archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This project created a repository and archive for transportation planning documents in Texas within the : established Texas A&M Repository (http://digital.library.tamu.edu). This transportation planning archive : and repository provides ready access ...

  19. Initial design process of the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmanlioglu, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the final disposal of high level wastes is to isolate the waste from the biosphere for extremely long periods of time by emplacement of wastes into deep stable geological formations. Several geological formations have been considered as candidate host environments for high level waste disposal and several techniques have been developed for repository design. In this study, interrelationships of main parameters of a general repository design have been defined and effective parameters are shown at each step. Initial design process is based on the long term stability of underground openings as disposal galleries. For this reason, this design process includes two main analyses: mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. Each of the analysis systems is directly related to each other by technical precautions. As a result of this design process, general information about the acceptable depth of the repository, layout and emplacement pattern can be taken. Final design study can be established on the result of initial design process. (author)

  20. The industrial organization of the repository. Pitfall or logical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frostenson, Magnus

    2010-11-01

    From a systems perspective the organization of the Swedish final repository project for nuclear waste is studied. Different aspects of organization are identified in the report, covering dimensions of geographical, operative, structural, responsibility and contextual organization. Following SKB's site selection for the applications for the final repository for spent nuclear system and the closing of the surplus value agreement, issues concerning operative, structural and contextual organization tend to become particularly pressing, which is reflected in three research questions: - How will the final repository project be organized operatively and structurally over time? - Why is the final repository project organized in this way by SKB? - What kind of contextual organization takes place in the final repository project and what are the consequences of these activities? How the different industrial units of the final repository project should be run and within which structure, for example concerning ownership and integration of units, is established in the report. SKB's reasons for choosing this kind of organization are also highlighted. Apart from legal and safety-related demands that must be met together with the demands of the owners, SKB's strategic preference for insourcing conditions organizational choices. The traditional task centred operative and structural organization of SKB is also reflected in the organizational choices for the present and future units of the final depository system. Contextual organization implies deepened actor relationships between SKB's owners and SKB on the one side and the municipalities Oesthammar and Oskarshamn on the other. Through active organizing, the final repository arena 'narrows down' and the final repository issue turns into an in many respects local issue. There is a clear tendency that the roles of SKB are multiplied in order to handle the demands that central stakeholders - in particular the municipalities - place on

  1. Preliminary design of the repository. Stage 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saanio, T.; Kirkkomaeki, T.; Keto, P.; Kukkola, T.; Raiko, H.

    2007-04-01

    Spent nuclear fuel from Finnish nuclear power plants will be disposed of in deep bedrock in Olkiluoto, Eurajoki. The repository is planned to be excavated at a depth of 400 - 500 metres. Access routes to the repository include a 1:10 inclined access tunnel, and vertical shafts. The fuel is encapsulated in the encapsulation plant above ground and transferred to the repository in the canister lift. Deposition tunnels, central tunnels and technical rooms are excavated at the disposal level. The canisters are deposited in deposition holes that are covered with bentonite blocks. The deposition holes are bored in the floors of the deposition tunnels. The central tunnel system consists of two parallel central tunnels that are inter-connected at certain distances. Two parallel central tunnels improve the fire safety of the rooms and also allow flexible backfilling and closing of the deposition tunnels in stages at the operational phase of the repository. An underground rock characterization facility, ONKALO, is excavated at the disposal level to support and confirm investigations carried out from above ground. ONKALO is designed so that it can later serve as part of the repository. ONKALO excavations were started in 2004. The repository will be excavated in the 2010s and operation will start in 2020. The fifth nuclear power unit makes the operational phase of the repository very long. Parts of the repository will be excavated and closed over the long operational period. The repository can be constructed at one or several levels. The one-storey alternative is the so-called reference alternative in this preliminary design report. The two-storey alternative is also taken into account in the ONKALO designs. The preliminary designs of the repository are presented as located in Olkiluoto. The location of the repository will be revised when more information on the bedrock has been gained. More detailed data of the circumstances will be obtained from above ground investigations

  2. Design process for a repository - KBS-3 case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svemar, C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the design process for the Swedish (generic) repository design KBS-3. The repository may have a spiral access ramp, access shafts, or straight access ramps. Galleries lead from a central service area to a small spent fuel storage area, a larger main spent fuel storage area, and a disposal area for other nuclear waste. This, or any, design has to be planned through three stages of layout and design, viz. feasibility study, preliminary planning, and architectural design, followed by detailed planning, and then planning of excavation and construction. Decisions on final design have to wait until construction is imminent, and all the rock data are available. This means that different sections of the repository may be at different planning stages at any one time. In the last stage, the plan of the disposal holes depends on detailed coring results, because a hole will not be bored where there is a fracture. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  3. Final repository for spent nuclear fuel. Underground design Simpevarp, Layout D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    This report is a compilation of the results of the underground design work carried out in design phase D1 of the Repository Design Project within the Deep Repository Project for the Simpevarp site. Similar reports are also being produced for the Laxemar and Forsmark sites. The design phase coincides with the initial site investigation phase. The main purpose of phase D1 is to answer the question 'Can a final repository be accommodated within the designated site', but also to test the design methodology and provide feedback to the modelling project. Design was carried out in accordance with the methodology described in UDP (Underground Design Premises), SKB R-04-60, and was based on preliminary data from various disciplines in the site modelling project. The preliminary input data used were then cross-checked against data in the final Site Descriptive Model SDM v 1.2 and significant differences were integrated in the design work. The design results from each design topic were presented by the designer at presentation meetings for SKB's design management and the reviewers engaged by SKB for the specific topic. After the presentation meeting the designer wrote up the work reports for the topic in question. The work reports were then reviewed by SKB's review team. The results of the review were compiled in a statement that was submitted to the designer to be dealt with. In the statement the designer documented which comments were dealt with and how. This report is a compilation of the entire design phase D1 for Simpevarp. The 3D layout with coordinate lists for deposition holes and tunnels that was drawn to illustrate a possible layout was used in the Preliminary safety evaluation of the Simpevarp subarea and the hydro modelling of the Open Repository, both activities within the Deep Repository Project. According to current plans for the Swedish nuclear programme, the minimum required number of canister positions in the repository is estimated to be

  4. Gas generation in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.; McGahan, D.; Rushbrook, P.E.

    1987-09-01

    The nature and quantities of gases likely to be produced by various processes in repositories for low level and intermediate level radioactive wastes are examined in this preliminary study. Many simplifying assumptions are made where published or experimental data is unavailable. The corrosion of the canisters and metallic components in wastes is likely to be the major gas production process in both types of repository. A significant contribution from microbiological activity is expected to occur in low level repositories, predominantly where no cement grouting of the cans has been carried out. A number of areas for further research, required before a more comprehensive study could be carried out, have been identified. (author)

  5. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  6. Experiences of risk in connection with site selection for a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biel, A.; Dahlstrand, U.

    1991-03-01

    Describes an investigation of the experiences of risks the the Swedish inhabitants have in connection with site selection for a repository for radioactive waste. The attitudes show a rather complicated picture. It is influenced by such factors as: sex, education and distance to the facility. (KAE)

  7. How Swedish communities organised themselves in reviewing a safety case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soderblom, Anna-Lena

    2014-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In 2009 the Swedish nuclear waste management company, SKB, choose Forsmark in the municipality of Oesthammar as the best place for a repository for spent nuclear fuel. In 2011, as a natural follow-up, SKB presented applications to two Swedish authorities, the Land and Environmental Court and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. The municipality of Oesthammar has together with the municipality of Oskarshamn been an active part in the process since 1994, with different local organisations financed by the Swedish nuclear fund. Three leading themes form the basis for our participation - voluntarism, complete openness of plans and results and participation with the possibility to influence. Site investigations for a repository started in 2002 and were finished when SKB selected Oesthammar municipality in the middle of 2009. To follow and scrutinise both site investigations as well as the applications, the organisation within the municipality has changed over time. As the site selection process got underway, the municipality extended its organisation to three committees (EIA, long-term safety and consultation). The committees have respective objectives: reviewing the health and environmental impact, reviewing the long-term safety and communication about the work that is going on within and around the municipality. These are primarily political committees to which a unit of civil servants is attached. The main goal for the organisation is to build up knowledge skills and prepare both the existing as well as the future municipality council for the decision of whether or not the municipality of Oesthammar will accept a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in our municipality. The absolutely most important issue for the municipality is long term-safety and as the process has progressed the municipality has made several statements to the authorities. (authors)

  8. National Radwaste Repository Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce (Repository) is described. The Mochovce National Radioactive Waste Repository is a surface multi-barrier type storage facility for solid and treated solidified radioactive wastes generated from the Slovak Republic nuclear power plants operation and decommissioning, research institutes, laboratories and hospitals. The Repository comprises a system of single- and double-row storage boxes. The first double-row is enclosed by a steel-structure building. The 18 x 6 x 5.5 m storage boxes are made of reinforced concrete. The wall thickness is 600 mm. Two-double-rows, i.e. 80 storage boxes were built as part of Stage I (1 row = 20 storage boxes). Each storage box has a storage capacity of 90 fibre concrete containers of 3.1 m 3 volume. The total storage capacity is 7200 containers with the overall storage volume of 22320 m 3

  9. National Pesticide Standard Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Pesticide Standards Repository collects and maintains an inventory of analytical “standards” of registered pesticides in the United States, as well as some that are not currently registered for food and product testing and monitoring.

  10. CAED Document Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division Document Repository (CAEDDOCRESP) provides internal and external access of Inspection Records, Enforcement Actions, and National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) documents to all CAED staff. The respository will also include supporting documents, images, etc.

  11. NIDDK Central Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIDDK Central Repository stores biosamples, genetic and other data collected in designated NIDDK-funded clinical studies. The purpose of the NIDDK Central...

  12. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  13. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is used to treat the following conditions:infantile spasms (seizures that usually begin during the first year ... tell how corticotropin repository injection works to treat infantile spasms.

  14. Understanding large scale groundwater flow to aid in repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Brown, A.; Gascoyne, M.; Stevenson, D.R.; Ophori, D.U.

    1996-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) with support from Ontario Hydro has developed a concept for the safe disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a deep (500 to 1000 m) mined repository in plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept involves the use of multiple engineered and natural barriers to ensure long-term safety. The geosphere, comprised of the enclosing rock mass and the groundwater which occurs in cracks and pores in the rock, is expected to serve as an important natural barrier to the release and migration of wastes from the engineered repository. Although knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the groundwater in the rock at potential repository sites is needed to help design the engineered barriers of the repository it can also be used to aid in repository siting, to take greater advantage of natural conditions in the geosphere to enhance its role as a barrier in the overall disposal system

  15. The Swedish Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari

    2012-01-01

    The main characteristics of ‘the Swedish model’ are arguably related to the country's knowledge-intensive industry and its advanced welfare state. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the historical development of these two features of the Swedish economy. The first part looks at industrial...... development, highlighting both the reasons for the rapid industrialization in the late 19th century and the subsequent shift from raw materials to human capital and knowledge as the main competitive advantages. The second part turns to the development of welfare state, stressing the gradual increase...

  16. The Swedish financial system

    OpenAIRE

    Stenfors, Alexis; Clark, Eric; Farahani, Ilia; Hansen, Anders Lund; Passarella, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the evolution of the Swedish financial system since the 1980s. The concept of financialisation, with its different elements and perspectives, is used as a lens through which the key historical developments are analysed. The aim of the study is two-fold. First, by highlighting some unique country-specific features, it addresses the profound changes that have taken place in the Swedish financial system during the last decades in relation to the ‘rise and fall’ of the so-...

  17. Managing and Evaluating Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccala, Alesia; Oppenheim, Charles; Dhiensa, Rajveen

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: We examine the role of the digital repository manager, discuss the future of repository management and evaluation and suggest that library and information science schools develop new repository management curricula. Method: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with managers of five different types of repositories and a Web-based…

  18. MAJOR REPOSITORY DESIGN ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JACK N. BAILEY, DWAYNE CHESTNUT, JAMES COMPTON AND RICHARD D. SNELL

    1997-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is focused on producing a four-part viability assessment in late FY98. Its four components (design, performance assessment, cost estimate, and licensing development plan) must be consistent. As a tool to compare design and performance assessment options, a series of repository pictures were developed for the sequential time phases of a repository. The boundaries of the time phases correspond to evolution in the engineered barrier system (EBS)

  19. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the first part of a report of a preliminary study for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. It considers the requirements for an underground waste repository for the disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. The following topics are discussed with reference to the repository: 1) underground layout, 2) cost estimates, 3) waste handling, 4) retrievability, decommissioning, sealing and monitoring, and 5) research and design engineering requirements. (author)

  20. Geologic environments for nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleologos Evan K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-level radioactive waste (HLW results from spent reactor fuel and reprocessed nuclear material. Since 1957 the scientific consensus is that deep geologic disposal constitutes the safest means for isolating HLW for long timescales. Nuclear power is becoming significant for the Arab Gulf countries as a way to diversify energy sources and drive economic developments. Hence, it is of interest to the UAE to examine the geologic environments currently considered internationally to guide site selection. Sweden and Finland are proceeding with deep underground repositories mined in bedrock at depths of 500m, and 400m, respectively. Equally, Canada’s proposals are deep burial in the plutonic rock masses of the Canadian Shield. Denmark and Switzerland are considering disposal of their relative small quantities of HLW into crystalline basement rocks through boreholes at depths of 5,000m. In USA, the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada lies at a depth of 300m in unsaturated layers of welded volcanic tuffs. Disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, as well as the German HLW repository favour structurally-sound layered salt stata and domes. Our article provides a comprehensive review of the current concepts regarding HLW disposal together with some preliminary analysis of potentially appropriate geologic environments in the UAE.

  1. International perspective on repositories for low level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Pers, Karin; Almen, Ylva (SKB International AB (Sweden))

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear energy production gives rise to different types of radioactive waste. The use of nuclear isotopes within the research, industry and medical sectors also generates radioactive waste. To protect man and the environment from radiation the waste is isolated and contained by deposition in repositories. These repositories may have various designs regarding location, barriers etc depending on the potential danger of the waste. In Sweden, low- and intermediate level waste (LILW) is disposed of in the SFR repository in Forsmark. The repository is located 60 metres down into the bedrock under the bottom of the sea and covered by 6 metres of water. It is planned to extend SFR to accommodate decommissioning waste from the dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power facilities and also for the additional operation waste caused by the planned prolonged operation time. When planning the extension consultations will be carried out with the host municipality, authorities, organisations and general public. In planning the extension, SKB has performed a worldwide compilation of how other countries have, or plan to, handle the final disposal of similar wastes. The aim of this report is to give a brief description of LILW repositories worldwide; including general brief descriptions of many facilities, descriptions of the waste and the barriers as well as safety assessments for a few chosen repositories which represent different designs. The latter is performed, where possible, to compare certain features against the Swedish SFR. To provide a background and context to this study, international organisations and conventions are also presented along with internationally accepted principles regarding the management of radioactive waste. Similar to SFR, suitable locations for the repositories have, in many countries, been found at sites that already have, or used to have nuclear activities, such as reactor sites. Abandoned and disused mines, such as the salt mines in Germany, also

  2. International perspective on repositories for low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Pers, Karin; Almen, Ylva

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear energy production gives rise to different types of radioactive waste. The use of nuclear isotopes within the research, industry and medical sectors also generates radioactive waste. To protect man and the environment from radiation the waste is isolated and contained by deposition in repositories. These repositories may have various designs regarding location, barriers etc depending on the potential danger of the waste. In Sweden, low- and intermediate level waste (LILW) is disposed of in the SFR repository in Forsmark. The repository is located 60 metres down into the bedrock under the bottom of the sea and covered by 6 metres of water. It is planned to extend SFR to accommodate decommissioning waste from the dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power facilities and also for the additional operation waste caused by the planned prolonged operation time. When planning the extension consultations will be carried out with the host municipality, authorities, organisations and general public. In planning the extension, SKB has performed a worldwide compilation of how other countries have, or plan to, handle the final disposal of similar wastes. The aim of this report is to give a brief description of LILW repositories worldwide; including general brief descriptions of many facilities, descriptions of the waste and the barriers as well as safety assessments for a few chosen repositories which represent different designs. The latter is performed, where possible, to compare certain features against the Swedish SFR. To provide a background and context to this study, international organisations and conventions are also presented along with internationally accepted principles regarding the management of radioactive waste. Similar to SFR, suitable locations for the repositories have, in many countries, been found at sites that already have, or used to have nuclear activities, such as reactor sites. Abandoned and disused mines, such as the salt mines in Germany, also

  3. Trust in Digital Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yakel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ISO 16363:2012, Space Data and Information Transfer Systems - Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories (ISO TRAC, outlines actions a repository can take to be considered trustworthy, but research examining whether the repository’s designated community of users associates such actions with trustworthiness has been limited. Drawing from this ISO document and the management and information systems literatures, this paper discusses findings from interviews with 66 archaeologists and quantitative social scientists. We found similarities and differences across the disciplines and among the social scientists. Both disciplinary communities associated trust with a repository’s transparency. However, archaeologists mentioned guarantees of preservation and sustainability more frequently than the social scientists, who talked about institutional reputation. Repository processes were also linked to trust, with archaeologists more frequently citing metadata issues and social scientists discussing data selection and cleaning processes. Among the social scientists, novices mentioned the influence of colleagues on their trust in repositories almost twice as much as the experts. We discuss the implications our findings have for identifying trustworthy repositories and how they extend the models presented in the management and information systems literatures.

  4. Nuclide release calculation in the near-field of a reference HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2004-01-01

    The HLW-relevant R and D program for disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since early 1997 in order to develop a conceptual Korea Reference Repository System for direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel by the end of 2007. A preliminary reference geologic repository concept considering such established criteria and requirements as waste and generic site characteristics in Korea was roughly envisaged in 2003 focusing on the near-field components of the repository system. According to above basic repository concept, which is similar to that of Swedish KBS-3 repository, the spent fuel is first encapsulated in corrosion resistant canisters, even though the material has not yet been determined, and then emplaced into the deposition holes surrounded by high density bentonite clay in tunnels constructed at a depth of about 500 m in a stable plutonic rock body. Not only to demonstrate how much a reference repository is safe in the generic point of view with several possible scenarios and cases associated with a preliminary repository concept by conducting calculations for nuclide release and transport in the near-field components of the repository, even though enough information has not been available that much yet, but also to show a methodology by which a generic safety assessment could be performed for further development of Korea reference repository concept, nuclide release calculation study strongly seems to be necessary

  5. SKB's safety case for a final repository license application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan; Andersson, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The safety assessment SR-Site is a main component in SKB's license application, submitted in March 2011, to construct and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in the municipality of Oesthammar, Sweden. Its role in the application is to demonstrate long-term safety for a repository at Forsmark. The assessment relates to the KBS-3 disposal concept in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. The principal regulatory acceptance criterion, issued by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), requires that the annual risk of harmful effects after closure not exceed 10 -6 for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk. SSM's regulations also imply that the assessment time for a repository of this type is one million years after closure. The licence applied for is one in a stepwise series of permits, each requiring a safety report. The next step concerns a permit to start excavation of the repository and requires a preliminary safety assessment report (PSAR) covering both operational and post-closure safety. Later steps include permission to commence trial operation, to commence regular operation and to close the final repository. (authors)

  6. Influence of climate on landscape characteristics in safety assessments of repositories for radioactive wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J K; Lindborg, T; Thorne, M C

    2014-12-01

    In safety assessments of repositories for radioactive wastes, large spatial and temporal scales have to be considered when developing an approach to risk calculations. A wide range of different types of information may be required. Local to the site of interest, temperature and precipitation data may be used to determine the erosional regime (which may also be conditioned by the vegetation characteristics adopted, based both on climatic and other considerations). However, geomorphological changes may be governed by regional rather than local considerations, e.g. alteration of river base levels, river capture and drainage network reorganisation, or the progression of an ice sheet or valley glacier across the site. The regional climate is in turn governed by the global climate. In this work, a commentary is presented on the types of climate models that can be used to develop projections of climate change for use in post-closure radiological impact assessments of geological repositories for radioactive wastes. These models include both Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models and Earth Models of Intermediate Complexity. The relevant outputs available from these models are identified and consideration is given to how these outputs may be used to inform projections of landscape development. Issues of spatial and temporal downscaling of climate model outputs to meet the requirements of local-scale landscape development modelling are also addressed. An example is given of how climate change and landscape development influence the radiological impact of radionuclides potentially released from the deep geological disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel that SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company) proposes to construct at Forsmark, Sweden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Deep Time Contagion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Weir

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An artist from London researching the effects of deprioritised subjectivity and contemporary art, Weir presents acoustic recordings made in deep geological repository sites. Repurposing these sites from their typical use as storage space for nuclear waste, Weir addresses the extra-human scale of Deep Time through sonic-fiction. Inhumanly enduring and impinging upon humanity largely imperceptibly, what agency—at what scale—is present?

  8. Procedural method for the development of scenarios in the operational phase following closure of final repositories in deep geological formations. Report on the working package 1. Development of the international status of science and technology concerning methods and tools for operational and long-term safety cases; Vorgehensweise bei der Szenarienentwicklung in der Nachverschlussphase von Endlagern in tiefen geologieschen Formationen. Bericht zum Arbeitspaket 1. Weiterentwicklung des internationalen Stands von Wissenschaft und Technik zu Methoden und Werkzeugen fuer Betriebs- und Langzeitsicherheitsnachweise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlmann, Stephan

    2016-09-15

    For the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes the disposal in deep geological formations is internationally favored. The safety cases include the scientific, technical, administrative and operational safety analyses and arguments, including the management system. According to IAEA the safety case includes site qualification, the design of the facility, construction and operation including an accident analysis, the closure phase and the post-closure phase. The safety case includes the evaluation of radiological risks for several scenarios. The report covers the methodology of scenario assumption in the post-closure phase of repositories in deep geological formations.

  9. Safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, A.

    2000-01-01

    Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories is a recognised option for closing nuclear fuel cycles. Geological repositories are at present in stages of development in a number of countries and are expected to be built and operated early next century. A State usually has an obligation to safely store any nuclear material, which is considered unsuitable to re-enter the nuclear fuel cycle, isolated from the biosphere. In conjunction with this, physical protection has to be accounted for to prevent inadvertent access to such material. In addition to these two criteria - which are fully under the State's jurisdiction - a third criterion reflecting international non-proliferation commitments needs to be addressed. Under comprehensive safeguards agreements a State concedes verification of nuclear material for safeguards purposes to the IAEA. The Agency can thus provide assurance to the international community that such nuclear material has been used for peaceful purposes only as declared by the State. It must be emphasised that all three criteria mentioned constitute a 'unit'. None can be sacrificed for the sake of the other, but compromises may have to be sought in order to make their combination as effective as possible. Based on comprehensive safeguards agreements signed and ratified by the State, safeguards can be terminated only when the material has been consumed or diluted in such a way that it can no longer be utilised for any nuclear activities or has become practicably irrecoverable. As such safeguards for nuclear material in geological repositories have to be continued even after the repository has been back-filled and sealed. The effective application of safeguards must assure continuity-of-knowledge that the nuclear material in the repository has not been diverted for an unknown purpose. The nuclear material disposed in a geological repository may eventually have a higher and long term proliferation risk because the inventory is

  10. Swedish electricity market 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The organization of the Swedish electricity market has been in a state of continual change since the electricity market reform was started in the early 1990s. The conditions for the development of the electricity market have changed since the new Electricity Act came into force on 1 January 1996. The purpose of the reform is to introduce greater competition on the electricity market and provide the consumers with greater freedom of choice and, by open trade in electricity, to create the conditions for more efficient pricing. Being the central energy authority, the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development, NUTEK, was entrusted by the Government with the task of following developments on the Swedish electricity market. The Network Authority, which has the supervisory function for the new electricity market, were entrusted by the Government with the task of following developments on the Swedish electricity market and regularly compiling and reporting current market information. The new electricity market has now been operative for ten months. The Network Authority has submitted to the Government a detailed report entitled `Developments on the electricity market`, dealing with the experience gained from the electricity market reform. The purpose of the publication is to provide the players on the electricity market - the decision makers, the media and the general public - with comprehensive and easily accessible information on the market conditions. The publication includes summaries of information on electricity production and use in recent years, the structure of the electricity market from the perspective of a player, electricity trade in Sweden and in northern Europe, electricity prices in Sweden and other countries, and the impact of the electricity sector on the environment

  11. The swedish challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tregouet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Sweden decided to be the first country without petroleum for 2020. The author presents the major energy policy axis implemented by the swedish government to delete the part of the produced energy by the petroleum: development of the renewable energies, research programs of the transportation sector concerning the alternative fuels for the motors, energy efficiency and development of the biomass to replace the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  12. Swedish waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandwall, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sweden has a well-functioning organization for managing various types of radioactive waste. There is an interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, a final repository for low and intermediate level waste, and a specially-built vessel with transport casks and containers for shipping the radioactive waste between the nuclear installations. (author)

  13. Salt repository design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure

  14. CRIS and Institutional Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Asserson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CRIS (Current Research Information Systems provide researchers, research managers, innovators, and others with a view over the research activity of a domain. IRs (institutional repositories provide a mechanism for an organisation to showcase through OA (open access its intellectual property. Increasingly, organizations are mandating that their employed researchers deposit peer-reviewed published material in the IR. Research funders are increasingly mandating that publications be deposited in an open access repository: some mandate a central (or subject-based repository, some an IR. In parallel, publishers are offering OA but replacing subscription-based access with author (or author institution payment for publishing. However, many OA repositories have metadata based on DC (Dublin Core which is inadequate; a CERIF (Common-European Research Information Format CRIS provides metadata describing publications with formal syntax and declared semantics thus facilitating interoperation or homogeneous access over heterogeneous sources. The formality is essential for research output metrics, which are increasingly being used to determine future funding for research organizations.

  15. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the third part of a report of a preliminary study for AECL. It summarizes the topics considered in reports AECL-6188-1 and AECL-6188-2 as requirements for an undergpound repository for disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. (author)

  16. The Computational Materials Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landis, David D.; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Nestorov, Svetlozar

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities for designing new materials based on quantum physics calculations are rapidly growing, but these design efforts lead to a significant increase in the amount of computational data created. The Computational Materials Repository (CMR) addresses this data challenge and provides...... a software infrastructure that supports the collection, storage, retrieval, analysis, and sharing of data produced by many electronic-structure simulators....

  17. Low level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.R.H.; Wilson, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Factors in selecting a site for low-level radioactive waste disposal are discussed. South Australia has used a former tailings dam in a remote, arid location as a llw repository. There are also low-level waste disposal procedures at the Olympic Dam copper/uranium project

  18. WIPP Repository Reconfiguration

    Science.gov (United States)

    On August 30, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided a proposed planned change request that will relocate Panels 9 and 10 from the main north-south access drifts to south of the existing Panels 4 and 5 in the WIPP repository.

  19. Joint Battlespace Infosphere Repository Prototype

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCabe, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    .... The approach was to leverage in-house research and development for repository design and core service definition as points of departure for a far term design. Several repository software packages were evaluated to aid in the definition of the design space for the JBI repository prototype.

  20. In-situ test programs related to design and construction of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories. Appendices. Final report (Task 2), June 1981-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Bauhof, F.; Gonano, L.

    1983-03-01

    The media and sites considered include: (1) basalt at Hanford, Washington; (2) tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site; (3) domal salt at specific Gulf Coast sites; (4) bedded salt at an unspecified site; and (5) granite at an unspecified site. A licensing perspective is outlined and a defensible rationale developed and utilized for the test selection process. This rationale essentially consists of: establishing the information needs for construction authorization; assessing the relevant capabilities of available tests; and matching the capabilities of specific tests to the perceived information needs. The information needs at any time consist of the additional information (if any) needed in order to predict satisfactory repository system performance with the required level of confidence, and thus are a function of: the significance of the repository engineered components and site characteristics to system performance; the currently available information, which may be supplemented with time; and the acceptable level of confidence in satisfactory performance for each licensing step. Determination of the acceptable levels of confidence and the significance of repository system components is outside the scope of this report. Suitable assumptions have thus been made regarding the development of information needs for construction authorization by the time of initial site characterization reports submittals. Tests which are available and respond to the perceived media/site specific information needs, either by simulation or assessment of site characteristics, are identified and their capabilities assessed. Specific in situ tests are investigated and described in detail. Research and development which might be effective in improving tests capabilities have been recommended

  1. Multi criteria decision analysis on a waste repository in Mol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, B.

    2005-01-01

    In Belgium, the management of radioactive waste is taken care of by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials. Local partnerships with stakeholders from municipalities in existing nuclear zones were setup to facilitate the dialogue between the repository designers and the local community. Since the establishment of the partnership in Mol, MONA in February 2000, all aspects of a possible near-surface or a deep geological repository are discussed in 4 working groups by around 50 volunteer members. The outcome of the discussions in the partnership can be a shared project, supported by both local stakeholders and ONDRAF/NIRAS, in which the specifications and the conditions needed for establishing a repository in Mol are elaborated. MONA asked the Decision Strategy Research Department of SCK-CEN to organise a Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) in the context of the deciding between a surface and a deep repository for low level radioactive waste. The objective of the multi criteria analysis is to support a number of representatives of the various working groups within MONA in their selection between two acceptable options for a repository of low level radioactive waste on the territory of Mol. The options are the surface repository developed by the working groups of MONA, and a deep repository in the clay layers underneath the nuclear site of Mol. This study should facilitate the selection between both options, or in case this appears to be difficult, at least to get a well-structured overview of all factors (criteria) of importance to the judgement, and to get insight into the degree in which the various criteria contribute to the selection

  2. What requirements does the KBS-3 repository make on the host rock? Geoscientific suitability indicators and criteria for siting and site evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [Golder Grundteknik AB (Sweden); Stroem, Anders; Svemar, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Almen, Karl-Erik [KEA Geo-Konsult AB, Naessjoe (Sweden); Ericsson, Lars O. [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    This report gives an account of what requirements are made on the rock, what conditions in the rock are advantageous and how the fulfilment of requirements and preferences is to be judged prior to the selection of sites for a site investigation and during a site investigation. The conclusions and results of the report are based on the knowledge and experience acquired by SKB over many years of research and development. The results, and particularly the stipulated criteria, apply to a repository for spent fuel of the KBS-3 type, i.e. a repository where the fuel is contained in copper canisters embedded in bentonite clay at a depth of 400 - 700 m in the Swedish crystalline basement. The report analyzes how the rock's different geological conditions, mechanical, thermal, hydrogeological, chemical and transport properties influence the functions of the deep repository, and whether it is possible to determine requirements and preferences regarding the influence of these properties. Where possible, these requirements or preferences have then been translated into requirements or preferences regarding the individual properties. Criteria are formulated that are based on the quantities that can be measured or estimated at the relevant stage of the investigation. The following requirements are made on the rock: The rock in the repository's deposition zone may not have any ore potential. Regional plastic shear zones shall be avoided if it cannot be demonstrated that the properties of the zone do not deviate from those of the rest of the rock. There may, however, be so-called 'tectonic lenses' near regional plastic shear zones where the bedrock is homogeneous and relatively unaffected. Deposition tunnels and deposition holes for canisters may not pass through or be positioned too close to major regional and major local fracture zones. Deposition holes may not intersect identified local minor fracture zones. The rock's strength, fracture geometry and

  3. Publishers and repositories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The impact of self-archiving on journals and publishers is an important topic for all those involved in scholarly communication. There is some evidence that the physics arXiv has had no impact on physics journals, while 'economic common sense' suggests that some impact is inevitable. I shall review recent studies of librarian attitudes towards repositories and journals, and place this in the context of IOP Publishing's experiences with arXiv. I shall offer some possible reasons for the mis-match between these perspectives and then discuss how IOP has linked with arXiv and experimented with OA publishing. As well as launching OA journals we have co-operated with Cornell and the arXiv on Eprintweb.org, a platform that offers new features to repository users. View Andrew Wray's biography

  4. Safety and ethical aspects on retrievability: A Swedish nuclear regulator's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toverud, Oe.; Wingefors, S.

    2000-01-01

    An important contribution to the discussion on retrieval in Sweden has been the ethical principle of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste (KASAM). ''The KASAM Principle'' means that the present generation, which has reaped the benefits of nuclear energy, must also take care of the waste and not transfer the responsibility to future generations; a repository should be designed and constructed so that monitoring and remedial actions are not necessary in the future. However, future generations, probably with better knowledge and other values, must still have the freedom to make their own decisions; we should therefore not make monitoring and remedial action unnecessarily difficult. SKI generally supports the KASAM principle but its application in the individual case should be based on solid evidence that both aspects have been covered in a suggested repository design. There may be a number of possible reasons for retrieval of spent nuclear fuel from a repository and they range from technical to purely political. SKI supports that the repository shall not be designed so that it unnecessarily impairs future attempts to retrieve the waste, monitor or ''repair'' the repository. However, measures to facilitate any kind of access to the repository must not reduce the long term safety of the repository. SKI concludes that: Future generations may wish to retrieve the spent fuel from a sealed repository. Disposal method and repository design should consider this and not make such retrieval unnecessarily difficult. On the other hand, any measures taken to facilitate retrieval must not significantly impair the long term safety functions of the repository. It must be shown that the safety aspects have been adequately considered. Retrievability must always be discussed with caution, so that it will not give the impression of doubts concerning the safety of the repository. (author)

  5. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T

    2003-01-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the

  6. Repository performance confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the

  7. Evaluation of repository safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, B.; Patrick, W.; Dasgupta, B.; Mohanty, S.

    2002-01-01

    The United States high-level waste program requires evaluation of radiological safety during two distinct time intervals. The first interval, commonly referred to as the preclosure period, deals with receipt of waste at the site, transfer into disposal containers, if needed, emplacement in the underground openings, monitoring and maintenance activities, backfill and closure of the underground openings, and decontamination and decommissioning of the surface facilities of the geologic repository. The preclosure period may extend from a few tens of years to as long as a few hundred of years, depending on repository design and societal norms regarding a final decision to permanently seal the repository. During the preclosure or operational period, performance confirmation studies are conducted to provide a basis for updating and reevaluating estimates of postclosure performance and, finally, to provide a basis for a closure decision. The postclosure period during which expected repository performance must meet certain standards may range from ten thousands years, as it does in the United States, to millions of years, as it does in some European nations. Waste handling operations in the preclosure period are to be evaluated in relation to their potential effect on workers, members of general public, and the general environment. During this period, releases of radioactivity are to be monitored and appropriate actions taken whenever established limits are approached or exceeded. Preclosure safety is highly dependent on facility design, operational hardware and automated systems, operational sequences, and reliability of humans involved in operations. Preclosure safety analyses conducted before operations begin play a major role in the design process, selection of equipment, and development of operational procedures. Because of the complexity, duration, and spatial scales of the operations, analyses are conducted using mathematical models implemented in computer codes

  8. Towards Interoperable Preservation Repositories: TIPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Caplan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Towards Interoperable Preservation Repositories (TIPR is a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to create and test a Repository eXchange Package (RXP. The package will make it possible to transfer complex digital objects between dissimilar preservation repositories.  For reasons of redundancy, succession planning and software migration, repositories must be able to exchange copies of archival information packages with each other. Every different repository application, however, describes and structures its archival packages differently. Therefore each system produces dissemination packages that are rarely understandable or usable as submission packages by other repositories. The RXP is an answer to that mismatch. Other solutions for transferring packages between repositories focus either on transfers between repositories of the same type, such as DSpace-to-DSpace transfers, or on processes that rely on central translation services.  Rather than build translators between many dissimilar repository types, the TIPR project has defined a standards-based package of metadata files that can act as an intermediary information package, the RXP, a lingua franca all repositories can read and write.

  9. Environmental impact statements and public consultations on the repository. An outline of SKB's planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    In December 2000 SKB selected three locations for further investigations as possible sites for the Swedish repository for spent nuclear fuels, Simpevarp at Oskarshamn, Forsmark at Oesthammar and Tierp. Site investigations will be performed during 5-6 years, and will provide data for a site selection. In the application for the repository commission an environmental impact statement should be included, that has been object for consultations with authorities, local communities, other organizations and the public. These consultations will take place during the whole investigation period, and will give ample possibilities for all parties to give their views and to exert an influence on the EIS

  10. General conceptual design study for a high-level radioactive waste repository in a granite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The object of the general conceptual design study for a high level radioactive wastes repository in a deep lying granite formation is to ensure that technology available in 1980 is suitable for building, operating and finally closing such a repository. It is feasible to build and operate a 1000 m deep repository, located in a granite batholith, receiving 30000 AVM canisters (after 30 years surface cooling), the disposal rate being 1000 canisters per year. Cost of the operation amounts to 1,3% of the corresponding amount of electricity. The building, operating and final closing phases will take 81 years

  11. Assessment of the Durability of Cementitious Materials in Repository Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, R.; Marumo, J.T.; Miyamoto, H.; Isiki, V.L.K.; Ferreira, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory of the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute is developing the concept of a borehole repository for disused sealed radioactive sources drilled in a deep granite batholite. In this concept, the annular space between the well steel casing and the geological formation is backfilled with cement paste. The hardened cement paste functions as an additional barrier against the escape of radionuclides from the repository and their migration to the environment. It also functions as an obstacle to the flow of groundwater between different layers of the geological setting crossed by the borehole. The long term behavior of hydrated cement compounds is yet incompletely known and therefore more research is needed to increase the confidence on the performance of the material under the repository conditions as required. For the repository to achieve the required performance, the cement paste must be durable. However, in a deep repository, the cementitious materials is exposed to the deleterious action of high temperatures and pressures, the radiation field created by the radioactive sources and aggressive ion species that may be present in groundwater. Furthermore, it is necessary to consider that the cement paste is unstable in the long term because its microstructure and mineralogy change with time as the cement gel components recrystallize and react chemically with materials of the repository environment. In principle, the lifetime of this material could be determined based on the study of its long-term behavior, which, in turn, could be estimated from the extrapolation of short-term results, by accelerating, under controlled laboratory conditions, the composition changes and the loss of mechanical strength and cohesion induced by any detrimental component of the repository environment. Loss of mechanical strength, dimensional variations, changes in chemical-mineralogical composition, and leaching of hydrate compounds are all possible

  12. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  13. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  14. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin

  15. Repository waste-handling operations, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottam, A.E.; Connell, L.

    1986-04-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan and the Generic Requirements for a Mined Geologic Disposal System state that beginning in 1998, commercial spent fuel not exceeding 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, or a quantity of solidified high-level radioactive waste resulting from the reprocessing of such a quantity of spent fuel, will be shipped to a deep geologic repository for permanent storage. The development of a waste-handling system that can process 3000 metric tons of heavy metal annually will require the adoption of a fully automated approach. The safety and minimum exposure of personnel will be the prime goals of the repository waste handling system. A man-out-of-the-loop approach will be used in all operations including the receipt of spent fuel in shipping casks, the inspection and unloading of the spent fuel into automated hot-cell facilities, the disassembly of spent fuel assemblies, the consolidation of fuel rods, and the packaging of fuel rods into heavy-walled site-specific containers. These containers are designed to contain the radionuclides for up to 1000 years. The ability of a repository to handle more than 6000 pressurized water reactor spent-fuel rods per day on a production basis for approximately a 23-year period will require that a systems approach be adopted that combines space-age technology, robotics, and sophisticated automated computerized equipment. New advanced inspection techniques, maintenance by robots, and safety will be key factors in the design, construction, and licensing of a repository waste-handling facility for 1998

  16. INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY: EMPLOYMENT IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl P. Oleksyuk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article investigated the concept of «institutional repository» and determined the aspects of institutional repositories in higher education. Institutional Repositories are information systems that allow preserving, storing and disseminating scientific knowledge produced in higher education and scientific research institutions. This study presented the main aspects using institutional repositories in educational process (such as storage of scientific and educational information, means of organization activity of students, object of studying. This article produced the structure of communities and collections of the institutional. It is described the experience of implementing of DSpace in the learning process.

  17. Object linking in repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, David (Editor); Beck, Jon; Atkins, John; Bailey, Bill

    1992-01-01

    This topic is covered in three sections. The first section explores some of the architectural ramifications of extending the Eichmann/Atkins lattice-based classification scheme to encompass the assets of the full life cycle of software development. A model is considered that provides explicit links between objects in addition to the edges connecting classification vertices in the standard lattice. The second section gives a description of the efforts to implement the repository architecture using a commercially available object-oriented database management system. Some of the features of this implementation are described, and some of the next steps to be taken to produce a working prototype of the repository are pointed out. In the final section, it is argued that design and instantiation of reusable components have competing criteria (design-for-reuse strives for generality, design-with-reuse strives for specificity) and that providing mechanisms for each can be complementary rather than antagonistic. In particular, it is demonstrated how program slicing techniques can be applied to customization of reusable components.

  18. Strategic analysis of Swedish agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Fogelfors, Håkan; Wivstad, Maria; Eckersten, Henrik; Holstein, Fredrik; Johansson, Susanne; Verwijst, Theo

    2009-01-01

    This strategic analysis of Swedish agriculture – production systems and agricultural landscapes in a time of change – focuses on climate change, future availability of natural resources and economic regulation in a global food market. The background to the project was that the Faculty of Natural Resources and Agriculture of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences identified an urgent need to explore the implications and opportunities of coming changes for agricultural production syste...

  19. Safety analysis in subsurface repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The development of mathematical models to represent the repository-geosphere-biosphere system, and the development of a structure for data acquisition, processing, and use to analyse the safety of subsurface repositories, are presented. To study the behavior of radionuclides in geosphere a laboratory to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient was constructed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Management of digital preservation repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Márdero Arellano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work are the international experiences of implementation of digital preservation practices in repositories. It based on bibliographical survey about the beginning of digital preservation practices in digital repositories, identifying important aspects of how to manage the practices of digital preservation on repositories. Most repositories analyzed showed a double function of access and preservation, but few could be considered to be "dark archives" used only for preservation matters. The application of digital preservation standards showed that large institutions possessed detailed definitions of what stored materials could be filed and used. Repositories managers had some kind of operating budget to carry on preservation activities. Most repositories cited in the bibliography used a combination of commercial tools and free software. As a conclusion, the records analyzed reinforce the need today of the application of digital preservation strategies using the OAIS Reference Model and official audit certification actions  on the design of digital preservation repositories, to keep the integration flexibility of  functions and services that go beyond the repository.

  1. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank; Bellodi, G; Benedetto, E; Dorda, U; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Papaphilippou, Y; Pieloni, T; Ruggiero, F; Rumolo, G; Schmidt, F; Todesco, E; Zotter, Bruno W; Payet, J; Bartolini, R; Farvacque, L; Sen, T; Chin, Y H; Ohmi, K; Oide, K; Furman, M; Qiang, J; Sabbi, G L; Seidl, P A; Vay, J L; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Cousineau, S M; Danilov, V; Holmes, J A; Shishlo, A; Kim, E S; Cai, Y; Pivi, M; Kaltchev, D I; Abell, D T; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Boine-Frankenheim, O; Franchetti, G; Hofmann, I; Machida, S; Wei, J

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic acceleratorphysics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  2. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories.

  3. Technology overview of mined repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimera, R.; Thirumalai, K.

    1982-01-01

    Mined repositories present an environmentally viable option for permanent disposal of nuclear waste. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art mining technologies and identifies technological issues and developments necessary to mine a repository in basalt. The thermal loading, isolation, and retrieval requirements of a repository present unique technological challenges unknown to conventional mining practice. The technology issues and developments required in the areas of excavation, roof and ground support, equipment development, instrumentation development, and sealing are presented. Performance assessment methods must be developed to evaluate the adequacies of technologies developed to design, construct, operate, and decommission a repository. A stepwise test-and-development approach is used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to develop cost-effective technologies for a repository

  4. Computational Materials Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landis, David

    database have to be redesigned for every new project. Sharing intermediate data with collaborators can be cumbersome and when publishing on the Internet specially tailored infrastructure has to be set up. Due to the diverse and changing landscape of electronic structure codes and methods there is no unique......, different abstraction levels and enables users to analyze their own results, and allows to share data with collaborators. The approach of the Computational Materials Repository (CMR) is to convert data to an internal format that maintains the original variable names without insisting on any semantics....... Imported data can be implicitly grouped by user criteria and therefore maintain their natural connection in the database as well. Automatic data analysis is enabled through agents that analyze and group data based on predefined rules. Small projects can be handled without the need of database software...

  5. The INDEPTH Data Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvekar, Sanjay; Bhattacharjee, Tathagata; Bangha, Martin; Patharia, Nidhi; Tei, Titus; Gilbert, Brendan; Sankoh, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) is a global network of research centers that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) currently in 52 health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) field sites situated in sub-Saharan Africa (14 countries), Asia (India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia), and Oceania (Papua New Guinea). Through this network of HDSS field sites, INDEPTH is capable of producing reliable longitudinal data about the lives of people in the research communities as well as how development policies and programs affect those lives. The aim of the INDEPTH Data Repository is to enable INDEPTH member centers and associated researchers to contribute and share fully documented, high-quality datasets with the scientific community and health policy makers. PMID:26297754

  6. The evolution of minor active and toxic gases in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.; Davies, A.A.; McGahan, D.J.; Rushbrook, P.E.

    1988-09-01

    This study has considered a number of toxic and active gases which could potentially form in relatively small amounts in a deep repository for radioactive wastes. It has been concluded that many of these would react under repository conditions or be highly soluble in groundwater. The minor amounts of the inert and relatively insoluble gas krypton-85 would dissolve in a small volume of repository water. The wide range of organic gases and vapours that could form in trace amounts has been shortened to a list of 21 by consideration of their toxicity, volatibility and extent of formation at a landfill site for non-radioactive waste. The amounts of the inert and inactive gas helium formed from α-particles and the decay of tritium will have only a very minor effect on the overall rate of gas production. (author)

  7. The Pangea concept for an international radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeme, M.

    1999-01-01

    Pangea Resources Australia Pty. Ltd. is engaged in a study to investigate the feasibility of constructing and operating an international radioactive waste repository in Australia. Western Australia in particular has a unique combination of geology, topography and climate which makes it eminently suitable for a deep geological repository for the safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste. Australia also has the political, social, legal and financial systems, together with the technical capability to make it acceptable as a host nation for an international repository. This paper reviews the origins of the Pangea concept, describes the high isolation approach to site selection, the Pangea integrated waste management system, together with its potential economic impact on Australia

  8. Review of durability of cementitious engineered barriers in repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, L.J.; Lawrence, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    This report is concerned with the durability of cementitious engineered barriers in a repository for low and intermediate level nuclear waste. Following the introduction the second section of the review identifies the environmental conditions associated with a deep, hard rock repository for ILW and LLW that are relevant to the durability of cementitious barriers. Section three examines the microstructure and macrostructure of cementitious materials and considers the physical and chemical processes of radionuclide immobilization. Potential repository applications and compositions of cementitious materials are reviewed in Section four. The main analysis of durability is dealt with in Section five. The different types of cementitious barrier are considered separately and their most probable modes of degradation are analysed. Concluding remarks that highlight critical technical matters are given in Section six. (author)

  9. The industrial organization of the repository. Pitfall or logical?; Slutfoervarets industriella organisering. Fallgrop eller foeljdriktighet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostenson, Magnus (Dept. of Business Studies, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    From a systems perspective the organization of the Swedish final repository project for nuclear waste is studied. Different aspects of organization are identified in the report, covering dimensions of geographical, operative, structural, responsibility and contextual organization. Following SKB's site selection for the applications for the final repository for spent nuclear system and the closing of the surplus value agreement, issues concerning operative, structural and contextual organization tend to become particularly pressing, which is reflected in three research questions: - How will the final repository project be organized operatively and structurally over time? - Why is the final repository project organized in this way by SKB? - What kind of contextual organization takes place in the final repository project and what are the consequences of these activities? How the different industrial units of the final repository project should be run and within which structure, for example concerning ownership and integration of units, is established in the report. SKB's reasons for choosing this kind of organization are also highlighted. Apart from legal and safety-related demands that must be met together with the demands of the owners, SKB's strategic preference for insourcing conditions organizational choices. The traditional task centred operative and structural organization of SKB is also reflected in the organizational choices for the present and future units of the final depository system. Contextual organization implies deepened actor relationships between SKB's owners and SKB on the one side and the municipalities Oesthammar and Oskarshamn on the other. Through active organizing, the final repository arena 'narrows down' and the final repository issue turns into an in many respects local issue. There is a clear tendency that the roles of SKB are multiplied in order to handle the demands that central stakeholders - in particular

  10. GIS for the needs of the Radioactive Waste Repository Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Mikšová

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA is a state organisation responsible for the management of activities related to the disposal of all existing and future radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel classed as a waste in Czech Republic. Worldwide, a deep geological repository is considered the highest degree of safety for a nuclear waste disposal. Such a repository has to be built in a stable geological environment ensuring the isolation of the stored radioactive waste from the surrounding environment for a long period of time. The selection of suitable site for the deep geological repository construction is a complicated and long term process. Considering this fact and also in respect to an assumed volume of varied datasets the GIS RAWRA was established to ensure convenient management and availability of data containing spatial information.The system is based on ESRI (ArcInfo including extensions, ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Leica Geosystems (Image Analysis and Microsoft software (MS SQL Server. Resulting datasets from six recommended potentially suitable sites for the location of a geological repository have been incorporated into the geodatabase to date. The necessary analysis was made using ESRI software tools and, in addition, custom applications were developed including the metadata editor, etc. This analysis was carried out with respect to existing geological and non-geological criteria defined for a nuclear waste repository. Finally, all six investigated sites with a total area of 240 km2 were reduced in area, each of them resulting in an area of approximately 10km2 for further detailed characterisation.

  11. Swedish vineyards: a utopia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mårtensson A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anna Mårtensson,1 Thord Karlsson,2 Jan-Gunnar Gustafsson31Department of Soil and Environment, 2Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; 3Bio Evaluation AB, Uppsala, SwedenAbstract: As there is an increasing interest for setting up vineyards and wineries in Sweden, a cost analysis is becoming necessary. In this study, we assessed the potential for wine production in Sweden. The estimated annual costs varied from €15.1/per L for production of 1800 L wine per ha to €41.9 for 525 L per ha. For an annual production of 1800 L per ha potentially achieved in an established vineyard, the capital requirement is €730,000. It would take 6 years for the investment to be paid off if the wine was sold for €37.5 per L. The high production costs mean that the only viable option for success is to orientate production towards the exclusive upper segment.Keywords: cold climate conditions, wine production costs, wine quality

  12. Comparison of potential radiological consequences from a spent-fuel repository and natural uranium deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, O.J.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-09-01

    A general criterion has been suggested for deep geological repositories containing spent fuel - the repositories should impose no greater radiological risk than due to naturally occurring uranium deposits. The following analysis investigates the rationale of that suggestion and determines whether current expectations of spent-fuel repository performance are consistent with such a criterion. In this study, reference spent-fuel repositories were compared to natural uranium-ore deposits. Comparisons were based on intrinsic characteristics, such as radionuclide inventory, depth, proximity to aquifers, and regional distribution, and actual and potential radiological consequences that are now occurring from some ore deposits and that may eventually occur from repositories and other ore deposits. The comparison results show that the repositories are quite comparable to the natural ore deposits and, in some cases, present less radiological hazard than their natural counterparts. On the basis of the first comparison, placing spent fuel in a deep geologic repository apparently reduces the hazard from natural radioactive materials occurring in the earth's crust by locating the waste in impermeable strata without access to oxidizing conditions. On the basis of the second comparison, a repository constructed within reasonable constraints presents no greater hazard than a large ore deposit. It is recommended that if the naturally radioactive environment is to be used as a basis for a criterion regarding repositories, then this criterion should be carefully constructed. The criterion should be based on the radiological quality of the waters in the immediate region of a specific repository, and it should be in terms of an acceptable potential increase in the radiological content of those waters due to the existence of the repository.

  13. Comparison of potential radiological consequences from a spent-fuel repository and natural uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, O.J.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-09-01

    A general criterion has been suggested for deep geological repositories containing spent fuel - the repositories should impose no greater radiological risk than due to naturally occurring uranium deposits. The following analysis investigates the rationale of that suggestion and determines whether current expectations of spent-fuel repository performance are consistent with such a criterion. In this study, reference spent-fuel repositories were compared to natural uranium-ore deposits. Comparisons were based on intrinsic characteristics, such as radionuclide inventory, depth, proximity to aquifers, and regional distribution, and actual and potential radiological consequences that are now occurring from some ore deposits and that may eventually occur from repositories and other ore deposits. The comparison results show that the repositories are quite comparable to the natural ore deposits and, in some cases, present less radiological hazard than their natural counterparts. On the basis of the first comparison, placing spent fuel in a deep geologic repository apparently reduces the hazard from natural radioactive materials occurring in the earth's crust by locating the waste in impermeable strata without access to oxidizing conditions. On the basis of the second comparison, a repository constructed within reasonable constraints presents no greater hazard than a large ore deposit. It is recommended that if the naturally radioactive environment is to be used as a basis for a criterion regarding repositories, then this criterion should be carefully constructed. The criterion should be based on the radiological quality of the waters in the immediate region of a specific repository, and it should be in terms of an acceptable potential increase in the radiological content of those waters due to the existence of the repository

  14. A GoldSim Based Biosphere Assessment Model for a HLW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn-Myoung; Hwang, Yong-Soo; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the performance of a repository, the dose exposure to a human being due to nuclide releases from a repository should be evaluated and the results compared to the dose limit presented by the regulatory bodies. To evaluate a dose rate to an individual due to a long-term release of nuclides from a HLW repository, biosphere assessment models and their implemented codes such as ACBIO1 and ACBIO2 have been developed with the aid of AMBER during the last few years. BIOMASS methodology has been adopted for a HLW repository currently being considered in Korea, which has a similar concept to the Swedish KBS-3 HLW repository. Recently, not just only for verifying the purpose for biosphere assessment models but also for varying the possible alternatives to assess the consequences in a biosphere due to a HLW repository, another version of the assessment modesl has been newly developed in the frame of development programs for a total system performance assessment modeling tool by utilizing GoldSim. Through a current study, GoldSim approach for a biosphere modeling is introduced. Unlike AMBER by which a compartment scheme can be rather simply constructed with an appropriate transition rate between compartments, GoldSim was designed to facilitate the object-oriented modules by which specific models can be addressed in an additional manner, like solving jig saw puzzles

  15. Overview of adaptive phased management repository design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is implementing Adaptive Phased Management, Canada's plan for long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The organization is proceeding with the process for selecting a site in partnership with an informed and willing host community to safely and securely container and isolate used nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. Adaptive Phased Management is the culmination of more than 30 years of research, development and demonstration of repository concepts in Canada. Adaptive Phased Management uses a phased and adaptive step-wise approach to the multi-barrier system which is consistent with the long-term waste management approaches being developed in many other countries with nuclear power programs such as Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and France. The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is examining and developing conceptual designs for a deep geological repository and associated facilities for the placement of used nuclear fuel in long-lived containers. This paper will examine two of these generic conceptual designs which have recently been refined and updated. These conceptual designs will be used to support a pre-project review of repository design and safety by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. (author)

  16. The Swedish Energy Market 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    The Swedish Energy Market, 2005 is an annual publication that presents information and statistics on the network based energy markets in Sweden, i.e. the markets for electricity, natural gas and district heating. It also provides an overview of the issues that have arisen on these markets during the second half of 2004 and the first half of 2005. Considerable work is being carried out in the EU on creating a single market for electricity and natural gas. This publication therefore describes expansion of the Swedish market towards a Nordic and a European market. The publication normally includes a theme chapter, describing some event of particular interest for the Swedish energy market during the year. This year, the theme chapter is devoted to the Storm Gudrun, which struck the south of the country at the beginning of January, and its effects on electricity supply throughout the country. The chapter is based on the report submitted to the Government by the Energy Markets Inspectorate in the spring of 2005, and also includes a summary of the Inspectorate's proposals for measures to improve the security of electricity transmission. Energy in Sweden, which is another of the Swedish Energy Agency's annual publications, provides information and statistics on the development of the entire Swedish energy system

  17. The Swedish Energy Market 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-10-01

    The Swedish Energy Market, 2005 is an annual publication that presents information and statistics on the network based energy markets in Sweden, i.e. the markets for electricity, natural gas and district heating. It also provides an overview of the issues that have arisen on these markets during the second half of 2004 and the first half of 2005. Considerable work is being carried out in the EU on creating a single market for electricity and natural gas. This publication therefore describes expansion of the Swedish market towards a Nordic and a European market. The publication normally includes a theme chapter, describing some event of particular interest for the Swedish energy market during the year. This year, the theme chapter is devoted to the Storm Gudrun, which struck the south of the country at the beginning of January, and its effects on electricity supply throughout the country. The chapter is based on the report submitted to the Government by the Energy Markets Inspectorate in the spring of 2005, and also includes a summary of the Inspectorate's proposals for measures to improve the security of electricity transmission. Energy in Sweden, which is another of the Swedish Energy Agency's annual publications, provides information and statistics on the development of the entire Swedish energy system.

  18. Andra's geologic repository monitoring strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschaert, S.; Lesoille, S.; Bertrand, J.; Landais, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. After having concluded a feasibility study of deep geological disposal for high-level and long-lived radioactive waste in 2005, Andra was charged by the Planning Act no. 2006-739 to design and create an industrial site for geological disposal called Cigeo which must be reversible for at least a century-long period. The French Safety Guide recommends that Andra develop a monitoring program to be implemented at repository construction and conducted until closure, and possibly after closure, with the aim to confirming prior expectations and enhancing knowledge of relevant processes. This abstract focuses on underground structure monitoring. The monitoring system is based on a combination of in-situ instrumentation and nondestructive methods to obtain the required level of reliable performance. To optimize the device distribution, we take into account both the repetitive design of disposal cells and the homogeneity of the rock properties. This resulted in distinguishing pilot disposal cells that are highly instrumented and standard disposal cells where the instrumentation density could be reduced; monitoring will rely mostly on robotic nondestructive evaluations. If monitoring technologies do not comply with all monitoring objectives, real withdrawal tests of high level wastes in some pilot disposal cells are also planned to provide the possibility of carrying out visual inspection, destructive analyses and samplings on construction materials. Such cells are planned to be dismantled because of the potential disturbance of their component performances from the testing process. Based on this overall strategy, Andra has analyzed the technical requirements that must be met by its monitoring equipment. First, these must be able to provide information on key THMCR (Thermal- Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical and Radiological) processes, to provide a three-dimensional image of a disposal component's behavior and thus to understand

  19. Is the Swedish FRAX model appropriate for Swedish immigrants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, H; Odén, A; Lorentzon, M; McCloskey, E; Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Karlsson, M K; Mellström, D

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of hip fracture in Sweden is substantially lower in immigrants than in the population born in Sweden. Thus, the use of a FRAX® model in immigrants overestimates the risk of fracture, and the use of country of origin-specific models may be more appropriate. Age-specific fracture and mortality rates vary between countries so that FRAX tools are country-specific. In the case of immigrants, it is not known whether the model for the original or the new country is most appropriate. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of hip fractures in foreign-born and Swedish-born individuals residing in Sweden. We studied the incidence of hip fracture in all men and women aged 50 years or more in Sweden between 1987 and 2002. The population comprised 2.8 million Swedish-born and 270,000 foreign-born individuals. Incident hip fractures occurred in 239,842 Swedish-born and 12,563 foreign-born individuals. The hip fracture incidence rose with age for both groups and was higher for women than men amongst both Swedish-born and foreign-born individuals. The hip fracture incidence for the Swedish-born cohort was approximately twice that of immigrants. For example, at the age of 70 years, the annual hip fracture incidence (per 100,000) was 450 (95 % CI 446-454) for a Swedish-born woman and 239 (95 % CI 223-257) for a foreign-born woman at the time of immigration. The hip fracture incidence rose slowly with time from immigration (0.6 % per annum, 95 % CI 0.5-0.8 %) but remained significantly lower than for Swedish-born individuals even after 40 years of residence. The incidence of hip fracture in Sweden is substantially lower in immigrants than in the population native to Sweden. Although there was a small rise in age- and sex-specific incidence after immigration, the incidence remained markedly lower than that observed in Swedish-born individuals. Thus, the use of a FRAX model for Sweden will overestimate the risk of fracture for foreign-born individuals living

  20. Obstetric Thromboprophylaxis: The Swedish Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelle G. Lindqvist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric thromboprophylaxis is difficult. Since 10 years Swedish obstetricians have used a combined risk estimation model and recommendations concerning to whom, at what dose, when, and for how long thromboprophylaxis is to be administrated based on a weighted risk score. In this paper we describe the background and validation of the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis in women with moderate-high risk of VTE, that is, at similar or higher risk as the antepartum risk among women with history of thrombosis. The risk score is based on major risk factors (i.e., 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolism. We present data on the efficacy of the model, the cost-effectiveness, and the lifestyle advice that is given. We believe that the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis aid clinicians in providing women at increased risk of VTE with effective and appropriate thromboprophylaxis, thus avoiding both over- and under-treatment.

  1. Melodie: A global risk assessment model for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewi, J.; Assouline, M.; Bareau, J.; Raimbault, P.

    1987-03-01

    The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN), which is part of the French Atomic Energy Commission (C.E.A.) develops since 1984 in collaboration with different groups inside and outside the C.E.A. a computer model for risk assessment of nuclear waste repositories in deep geological formations. The main characteristics of the submodels, the data processing structure and some examples of applications are presented

  2. Biospecimen repositories and cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2015-03-01

    Biospecimen repositories are important for the advancement of biomedical research. Literature on the potential for biobanking of fine-needle aspiration, gynecologic, and nongynecologic cytology specimens is very limited. The potential for biobanking of these specimens as valuable additional resources to surgically excised tissues appears to be excellent. The cervicovaginal specimens that can be used for biobanking include Papanicolaou-stained monolayer preparations and residual material from liquid-based cytology preparations. Different types of specimen preparations of fine-needle aspiration and nongynecologic specimens, including Papanicolaou-stained and Diff-Quik-stained smears, cell blocks. and dedicated passes/residual material from fine-needle aspiration stored frozen in a variety of solutions, can be used for biobanking. Because of several gaps in knowledge regarding the standard of operative procedures for the procurement, storage, and quality assessment of cytology specimens, further studies as well as national conferences and workshops are needed not only to create awareness but also to facilitate the use of cytopathology specimens for biobanking. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Climate considerations in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Liljedahl, Lillemor Claesson

    2013-05-01

    For a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel planned in Sweden, the safety assessment covers up to 1 million years. Climate scenarios range from high-end global warming for the coming 100 000 years, through deep permafrost, to large ice sheets during glacial conditions. In contrast, in an existing repository for short-lived waste the activity decays to low levels within a few tens of thousands of years. The shorter assessment period, 100 000 years, requires more focus on climate development over the coming tens of thousands of years, including the earliest possibility for permafrost growth and freezing of the engineered system. The handling of climate and climate change in safety assessments must be tailor-made for each repository concept and waste type. However, due to the uncertain future climate development on these vast time scales, all safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories require a range of possible climate scenarios.

  4. Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste. The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's Review of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's (SKB's) RDandD Programme 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste finds that the RDandD programme 2007 fulfils the requirements set forth in the Nuclear Activities Act. However, the Council has identified a number of questions and deficiencies to which the Council wishes to draw attention. The Council finds that there are many unclear points regarding buffer, backfill and closure at this stage. The most important properties of the buffer material should be specified and limit values should be determined with respect to swelling potential, retention capacity for radionuclides, chemical stability, hydraulic diffusion, resistance to erosion and level of impurities. Mechanical strength and chemical stability must be guaranteed for compacted components in the buffer. Models should be set up for transport of the most important radioactive isotopes through the bentonite. SKB must also be able to show that the buffer and backfill conform to the initial states assumed by the safety assessment. Special research is required on the interfaces between backfill and buffer and between backfill and rock. SKB needs to consider the problems that can arise during the expected climate change, probably already during the construction period. The final design of the closure should be determined by the properties of the rock with respect to e.g. fractures at different depths and salinity. However, this presumes knowledge of what properties different materials - and mixtures of materials - have and how they can interact to best effect. The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste considers it imperative that SKB give a clear account of the judgements underlying site selection. The Council is troubled by the fact that successful rock stress measurements performed so far in Forsmark are too few in number and uncertain at planned repository depth. The Council would also like to emphasize the internal role of safety assessment within SKB as a tool for both following up repository safety during construction

  5. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This repository contains Privacy Impact Assessments (PIA) that have been vetted/approved. Section 208 of the Electronic Government Act of 2002 (E-Gov Act) requires...

  6. VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository serves as a centralized location to collect and report on agreements that share VHA data with entities outside of VA. It...

  7. NIH Common Data Elements Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Common Data Elements (CDE) Repository has been designed to provide access to structured human and machine-readable definitions of data elements that have...

  8. Evaluation of radiological safety assessment of a repository in a clay rock formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program excavated in a clay host rock formation. In this report three scenarios have been analysed in detail. The first scenario represents the normal in detail. The first scenario represents the normal evolution of the repository (Reference Scenario); and includes a set of variants to investigate the relative importance of the various repository components and examine the sensitivity of the performance to parameters variations. Two altered scenarios have also been considered: deep well construction and poor sealing of the repository. This document contains a detailed description of the repository system, the methodology adopted for the scenarios generation, the process modelling approach and the results of the consequences analysis. (Author)

  9. 40 CFR 124.33 - Information repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information repository. 124.33 Section... FOR DECISIONMAKING Specific Procedures Applicable to RCRA Permits § 124.33 Information repository. (a... basis, for an information repository. When assessing the need for an information repository, the...

  10. Tools for Managing Repository Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Banker, Rajiv D.; Isakowitz, Tomas; Kauffman, Robert J.; Kumar, Rachna; Zweig, Dani

    1993-01-01

    working Paper Series: STERN IS-93-46 The past few years have seen the introduction of repository-based computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools which may finally enable us to develop software which is reliable and affordable. With the new tools come new challenges for management: Repository-based CASE changes software development to such an extent that traditional approaches to estimation, performance, and productivity assessment may no longer suffice - if they ever...

  11. Conceptual design of repository facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, H.; Engelmann, H.J.; Souquet, G.; Mayence, M.; Hamstra, J.

    1980-01-01

    As part of the European Economic Communities programme of research into underground disposal of radioactive wastes repository design studies have been carried out for application in salt deposits, argillaceous formations and crystalline rocks. In this paper the design aspects of repositories are reviewed and conceptual designs are presented in relation to the geological formations under consideration. Emphasis has been placed on the disposal of vitrified high level radioactive wastes although consideration has been given to other categories of radioactive waste

  12. Summary report of first and foreign high-level waste repository concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanke, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Reference repository concepts designs adopted by domestic and foreign waste disposal programs are reviewed. Designs fall into three basic categories: deep borehole from the surface; disposal in boreholes drilled from underground excavations; and disposal in horizontal tunnels or drifts. The repository concepts developed in Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Canada, France, Japan, United Kingdom, Belgium, Italy, Holland, Denmark, West Germany and the United States are described. 140 refs., 315 figs., 19 tabs

  13. Waste Disposal: Processes Taking Place (on the way) from the Repository to the Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put, M.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the processes taking place on the way from the repository to the biosphere is to provide reliable and defensible models and parameters on the migration of dissolved radionuclides and gases through the host formation (Boom Clay) and the backfill materials of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste. The programme and main achievements in this topical area in 1999 are summarised

  14. IAEA safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    In September. 1988, the IAEA held its first formal meeting on the safeguards requirements for the final disposal of spent fuel and nuclear material-bearing waste. The consensus recommendation of the 43 participants from 18 countries at this Advisory Group Meeting was that safeguards should not terminate of spent fuel even after emplacement in, and closure of, a geologic repository.' As a result of this recommendation, the IAEA initiated a series of consultants' meetings and the SAGOR Programme (Programme for the Development of Safeguards for the Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geologic Repositories) to develop an approach that would permit IAEA safeguards to verify the non-diversion of spent fuel from a geologic repository. At the end of this process, in December 1997, a second Advisory Group Meeting, endorsed the generic safeguards approach developed by the SAGOR Programme. Using the SAGOR Programme results and consultants' meeting recommendations, the IAEA Department of Safeguards issued a safeguards policy paper stating the requirements for IAEA safeguards at geologic repositories. Following approval of the safeguards policy and the generic safeguards approach, the Geologic Repository Safeguards Experts Group was established to make recommendations on implementing the safeguards approach. This experts' group is currently making recommendations to the IAEA regarding the safeguards activities to be conducted with respect to Finland's repository programme. (author)

  15. A logistic and cost model for the transport of radioactive waste to a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.L.; Gray, I.L.S.; Manville, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    UK Nirex Ltd is planning a deep repository for intermediate level radioactive waste, and also some low level waste. Part of this work is to develop a transport system to bring the packaged waste to the repository from nuclear industry sites across the United Kingdom. To assess the logistics and costs of this transport system and to provide inputs to the repository specification and design, Nirex has commissioned the development of a flexible computer model which can be used on a desktop PC. The requirements for the LOGCOST model are explained, and the solutions adopted, and then examples shown of the graphical and tabular outputs that LOGCOST can provide. (Author)

  16. Radioactive waste repository of high ecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.; Barinov, A.; Prozorov, L.

    2000-01-01

    With the purpose to construct a radioactive waste repository of high ecological safety and reliable containment, MosNPO 'Radon' specialists have developed an advanced type repository - large diameter well (LBD) one. A project is started for the development of a technology for LDW repository construction and pilot operation of the new repository for 25-30 years. The 2 LDW repositories constructed at the 'Radon' site and the developed monitoring system are described

  17. Demystifying the institutional repository for success

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Institutional repositories remain key to data storage on campus, fulfilling the academic needs of various stakeholders. Demystifying the Institutional Repository for Success is a practical guide to creating and sustaining an institutional repository through marketing, partnering, and understanding the academic needs of all stakeholders on campus. This title is divided into seven chapters, covering: traditional scholarly communication and open access publishing; the academic shift towards open access; what the successful institutional repository looks like; institutional repository collaboratio

  18. Virtual patient repositories--a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küfner, Julia; Kononowicz, Andrzej A; Hege, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Patients (VPs) are an important component of medical education. One way to reduce the costs for creating VPs is sharing through repositories. We conducted a literature review to identify existing repositories and analyzed the 17 included repositories in regards to the search functions and metadata they provide. Most repositories provided some metadata such as title or description, whereas other data, such as educational objectives, were less frequent. Future research could, in cooperation with the repository provider, investigate user expectations and usage patterns.

  19. The Swedish Academy Dictionary Project

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    language, heavily influenced by Low German. During the period of Early Modern Swedish (1526–1732), several bilingual or multilingual dictionaries were written to facilitate the learning of other lan- guages, such as Latin, German, English and French. It also brought the first attempt at a descriptive monolingual dictionary of ...

  20. Global nuclear waste repository proposal highlights Australia's nuclear energy vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The Pangea proposal is disscused and considered relevant to Australia. A five-year research program by the company has identified Australia and Argentina as having the appropriate geological, economic and democratic credentials for such a deep repository, with Australia being favoured. A deep repository would be located where the geology has been stable for several hundred million years, so that there need not be total reliance on a robust engineered barrier system to keep the waste securely isolated for thousands of years. It would be a commercial undertaking and would have dedicated port and rail infrastructure. It would take spent fuel and other wastes from commercial reactors, and possibly also waste from weapons disposal programs. Clearly, while the primary ethical and legal principle is that each country is entirely responsible for its own waste, including nuclear waste (polluter pays etc), the big question is whether the concept of an international waste repository is acceptable ethically. Political and economic questions are secondary to this. By taking a fresh look at the reasons for the difficulties which have faced most national repository programs, and discarding the preconception that each country must develop its own disposal facilities, it is possible to define a class of simple, superior high isolation sites which may provide a multi-national basis for solving the nuclear waste disposal problem. The relatively small volumes of high-level wastes or spent fuel which arise from nuclear power production make shared repositories a feasible proposition. For small countries, the economies of scale which can be achieved make the concept attractive. For all countries, objective consideration of the relative merits of national and multi-national solutions is a prudent part of planning the management of long-lived radioactive wastes

  1. Nuclear waste repository in basalt: preconceptual design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The development of the basalt waste isolation program parallels the growing need for permanent, environmentally safe, and secure means to store nuclear wastes. The repository will be located within the Columbia Plateau basalt formations where these ends can be met and radiological waste can be stored. These wastes will be stored such that the wastes may be retrieved from storage for a period after placement. After the retrieval period, the storage locations will be prepared for terminal storage. The terminal storage requirements will include decommissioning provisions. The facility boundaries will encompass no more than several square miles of land which will be above a subsurface area where the geologic makeup is primarily deep basaltic rock. The repository will receive, from an encapsulation site(s), nuclear waste in the form of canisters (not more than 18.5 feet x 16 inches in diameter) and containers (55-gallon drums). Canisters will contain spent fuel (after an interim 5-year storage period), solidified high-level wastes (HLW), or intermediate-level wastes (ILW). The containers (drums) will package the low-level transuranic wastes (LL-TRU). The storage capacity of the repository will be expanded in a time-phased program which will require that subsurface development (repository expansion) be conducted concurrently with waste storage operations. The repository will be designed to store the nuclear waste generated within the predictable future and to allow for reasonable expansion. The development and assurance of safe waste isolation is of paramount importance. All activities will be dedicated to the protection of public health and the environment. The repository will be licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Extensive efforts will be made to assure selection of a suitable site which will provide adequate isolation.

  2. Nuclear waste repository in basalt: preconceptual design guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    The development of the basalt waste isolation program parallels the growing need for permanent, environmentally safe, and secure means to store nuclear wastes. The repository will be located within the Columbia Plateau basalt formations where these ends can be met and radiological waste can be stored. These wastes will be stored such that the wastes may be retrieved from storage for a period after placement. After the retrieval period, the storage locations will be prepared for terminal storage. The terminal storage requirements will include decommissioning provisions. The facility boundaries will encompass no more than several square miles of land which will be above a subsurface area where the geologic makeup is primarily deep basaltic rock. The repository will receive, from an encapsulation site(s), nuclear waste in the form of canisters (not more than 18.5 feet x 16 inches in diameter) and containers (55-gallon drums). Canisters will contain spent fuel (after an interim 5-year storage period), solidified high-level wastes (HLW), or intermediate-level wastes (ILW). The containers (drums) will package the low-level transuranic wastes (LL-TRU). The storage capacity of the repository will be expanded in a time-phased program which will require that subsurface development (repository expansion) be conducted concurrently with waste storage operations. The repository will be designed to store the nuclear waste generated within the predictable future and to allow for reasonable expansion. The development and assurance of safe waste isolation is of paramount importance. All activities will be dedicated to the protection of public health and the environment. The repository will be licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Extensive efforts will be made to assure selection of a suitable site which will provide adequate isolation

  3. Assessment of properties of Swedish reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, R.; Aittola, J.P.; Broden, K.; Andersson, K.; Wingefors, S.

    1984-01-01

    Low- and intermediate-level reactor waste has been produced in Sweden for many years, but only recently have plans for its final disposal been presented. According to these plans the waste will be transported from the nuclear power stations and research facilities to a final repository in hard rock under the Baltic Sea. It is anticipated that a series of waste handling and disposal operations will be commenced within the next ten years. For realization of these operations the waste forms must fulfil certain, as yet not clearly defined, quality requirements. A programme is outlined for the identification and quantification of those properties which are of importance for the safe handling, transportation and intermediate storage of the waste. The programme includes the following steps: (1) Collection of data concerning existing plant inventories (waste), raw material, solidification processes, waste composition, etc.; (2) Categorization of the waste; within each category the properties should be similar and expected to fall within certain intervals; (3) Identification of those properties which are of interest for each category with respect to both normal and abnormal handling situations; (4) Development and evaluation of methods for sampling and testing important properties; (5) Survey of existing R and D and test data, together with supplementary investigations and measurements; (6) Assessment of the properties of relevance for each waste category. This work was initiated by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate in 1981 and is being performed in close cooperation with the nuclear power industry. The results will be used by the concerned parties as a basis for the definition and stipulation of quality requirements for the various categories of waste, and the confirmation and introduction of quality control and quality assurance procedures. (author)

  4. Biological Web Service Repositories Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdidiales-Nieto, David; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2017-05-01

    Web services play a key role in bioinformatics enabling the integration of database access and analysis of algorithms. However, Web service repositories do not usually publish information on the changes made to their registered Web services. Dynamism is directly related to the changes in the repositories (services registered or unregistered) and at service level (annotation changes). Thus, users, software clients or workflow based approaches lack enough relevant information to decide when they should review or re-execute a Web service or workflow to get updated or improved results. The dynamism of the repository could be a measure for workflow developers to re-check service availability and annotation changes in the services of interest to them. This paper presents a review on the most well-known Web service repositories in the life sciences including an analysis of their dynamism. Freshness is introduced in this paper, and has been used as the measure for the dynamism of these repositories. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Impact of repository depth on residence times for leaking radionuclides in land-based surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, Anders; Marklund, Lars; Xu, Shulan; Dverstorp, Björn

    2007-03-01

    The multiple scales of landscape topography produce a wide distribution of groundwater circulation cells that control the hydro-geological environments surrounding geological repositories for nuclear waste. The largest circulation cells tend to discharge water into major river reaches, large freshwater systems or the nearby Baltic Sea. We investigated numerically the release of radionuclides from repositories placed in bedrock with depths between 100 to 2000 meters in a Swedish coastal area and found that leakage from the deeper positions emerges primarily in the major aquatic systems. In effect, radionuclides from the deeper repositories are more rapidly transported towards the Sea by the stream system compared to leakage from more shallow repositories. The release from the shallower repositories is significantly retained in the initial stage of the transport in the (superficial) landscape because the discharge occurs in or near low-order streams with high retention characteristics. This retention and residence time for radioactivity in the landscape control radiological doses to biota and can, thus, be expected to constitute an essential part of an associated risk evaluation.

  6. Swedish plans and experience regarding management of spent fuel and core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, P.H.; Hedin, G.

    2005-01-01

    In Sweden, the duties and responsibilities involved in handling radioactive waste were defined in the seventies. The 1976 Stipulation Law provides for the originator of the waste to be fully responsible for te waste arising in the course of plant operation. SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., was founded by the Swedish operators of nuclear power plants in 1972 to take care of nuclear power plant waste management and radioactive waste treatment. In the eighties, the Finance Act was adopted which provides for the establishment of a fund to finance complete disposal of nuclear power plant waste, including radioactive waste and spent fuel. Over the past few years, there have been various developments in nuclear power plant waste management: - Reprocessing of spent fuel is no longer part of the waste management strategy. The fuel elements are stored in a central interim store, CLAB, which has been in operation since 1985 and now holds approx. 4 000 t of fuel elements. - A transport system for radioactive waste and spent fuel has been in operation successfully since 1985. - A repository for low- and medium-level waste has been in operation since 1985. - Work has been underway for the past twenty years in research, development, and construction of an underground repository for spent fuel. Development has now reached a stage which will allow a decision to be taken within the next five or ten years about the sites of the conditioning plant and the repository. (orig.)

  7. Hard rock excavation at the CSM/OCRD test site using Swedish blast design techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, R.

    1983-09-01

    This report is the third in a series describing research conducted by the Colorado School of Mines for the Office of Crystalline Repository Development (OCRD) to determine the extent of blast damage in rock surrounding an underground opening. A special room, called the CSM/OCRD room, was excavated at the CSM experimental mine for the purpose of assessing blast damage in the rock around the room. Even though this mine is not proposed as a nuclear waste repository site, the instrumentation and methods of blast damage assessment developed in this project are applicable to proposed repository sites. This report describes the application of Swedish blasting technology for the excavation of the test room. The design of the blasting patterns including the selection of explosives, hole sizes and location, explosive loading densities, and delay intervals is based upon the theories of Langefors and Kihlstrom in combination with methods used at the Swedish Detonic Research Foundation for minimizing unwanted rock damage. The practical application of the design procedures to seven rounds and the achieved results is discussed

  8. Chemical and Mineralogical Features of Smectite from the Morron de Mateo Bentonite Deposit (Cabo de Gata, Almeria) in Relation to the Parent Rocks and the Alteration Processes Occurred After the Bentonite Formation: Analogies and Implications for the Engineered Clayey Barrier of a Deep Geological Rad waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelayo, M.; Labajo, M. A.; Garcia Romero, L.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2009-01-01

    The Morron de Mateo bentonite deposit is being studied as a natural analogue of the thermal and geochemical effects on the clayey barrier of a Deep Geological Rad waste Repository (DGRR) after its closure, in relation to the radioactive decay of the fission products and the container corrosion. This bentonite deposit and their host rocks were intruded by a rhyodacitic volcanic dome that induced a hydrothermal metasomatic process affecting the bioclastic calcarenite beds close to the dome. Bentonite from the NE sector of the deposit have been chemically and mineralogically characterized. Pyroclastic rocks (white tuffs), epyclastic rocks (mass flow) and andesitic breccia all of them hydrothermally altered, have been studied at the site. Samples are composed of feldspars, quartz and amphybols, as inherited minerals, and phyllosilicates, zeolites, crystoballite and calcite, as new formed minerals. White tuffs have the highest phyllosilicate contents, mainly dioctahedral smectite of montmorillonite type. Epyclastic rocks and andesitic breccia have a highest proportion of inherited minerals, the new formed phillosilicates being di octahedral smectite of beidellite type and an ordered interlayer chlorite/smectite mineral, of corrensite type. Smectite from the epyclastic rocks have higher Fe and Mg contents and chemical variability, as a consequence of nature of their parent rocks. The presence of corrensite in the epyclastic rocks suggests that in the Morron de Mateo area a propilitic alteration process occurred after bentonite formation, which transformed Fe-Mg-rich smectite into corrensite. This transformation was probably favoured by the sub volcanic intrusion, which also produced a temperature increase in the geological media and a supply of Fe-Mg-rich solutions, which also were the responsible for the metasomatic transformations observed in the calcarenite beds. (Author) 57 refs

  9. Pools and fluxes of organic matter in a boreal landscape: implications for a safety assessment of a repository for nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumblad, Linda; Söderbäck, Björn; Löfgren, Anders; Lindborg, Tobias; Wijnbladh, Erik; Kautsky, Ulrik

    2006-12-01

    To provide information necessary for a license application for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co is carrying out site investigations, including extensive studies of different parts of the surface ecosystems, at two sites in Sweden. Here we use the output from detailed modeling of the carbon dynamics in the terrestrial, limnic and marine ecosystems to describe and compare major pools and fluxes of organic matter in the Simpevarp area, situated on the southeast coast of Sweden. In this study, organic carbon is used as a proxy for radionuclides incorporated into organic matter. The results show that the largest incorporation of carbon into living tissue occurs in terrestrial catchments. Carbon is accumulated in soil or sediments in all ecosystems, but the carbon pool reaches the highest values in shallow near-land marine basins. The marine basins, especially the outer basins, are dominated by large horizontal water fluxes that transport carbon and any associated contaminants into the Baltic Sea. The results suggest that the near-land shallow marine basins have to be regarded as focal points for accumulation of radionuclides in the Simpevarp area, as they receive a comparatively large amount of carbon as discharge from terrestrial catchments, having a high NPP and a high detrital accumulation in sediments. These focal points may constitute a potential risk for exposure to humans in a future landscape as, due to post-glacial land uplift, previous accumulation bottoms are likely to be used for future agricultural purposes.

  10. Gas formation in ILW and HLW repositories, evaluation and modelling of the production rates and consequences on the safety of the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnus, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main gas formation mechanisms in deep radioactive waste repositories. Production rates and overall gas volumes were estimated and showed predominance of hydrogen production by anoxic corrosion and radiolysis for French wastes. Gas evolution in the near field has been modeled. First results issued from a sensitivity analysis showed desaturation of the storage cavities for a wide range of parameter values

  11. Harvesting NASA's Common Metadata Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, D.; Mitchell, A. E.; Durbin, C.; Norton, J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) stores metadata for over 30,000 datasets from both NASA and international providers along with over 300M granules. This metadata enables sub-second discovery and facilitates data access. While the CMR offers a robust temporal, spatial and keyword search functionality to the general public and international community, it is sometimes more desirable for international partners to harvest the CMR metadata and merge the CMR metadata into a partner's existing metadata repository. This poster will focus on best practices to follow when harvesting CMR metadata to ensure that any changes made to the CMR can also be updated in a partner's own repository. Additionally, since each partner has distinct metadata formats they are able to consume, the best practices will also include guidance on retrieving the metadata in the desired metadata format using CMR's Unified Metadata Model translation software.

  12. Removal of groundwater from final repository in Forsmark. Description of consequences for nature values and forest production; Bortledande av grundvatten fraan slutfoervarsanlaeggningen i Forsmark. Beskrivning av konsekvenser foer naturvaerden och skogsproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamren, Ulrika; Collinder, Per; Allmer, Johan (Ekologigruppen AB (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) has chosen Forsmark in the Municipality of Oesthammar as site for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. This report describes consequences for nature values and forestry due to groundwater diversion during construction and operation of the repository. The report concerns nature values that depend on, or are favoured by, a groundwater table close to or above the ground surface

  13. Swedish mines. Underground exploitation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paucard, A.

    1960-01-01

    Between 1949 and 1957, 10 engineers of the Mining research and exploitation department of the CEA visited 17 Swedish mines during 5 field trips. This paper presents a compilation of the information gathered during these field trips concerning the different underground mining techniques used in Swedish iron mines: mining with backfilling (Central Sweden and Boliden mines); mining without backfilling (mines of the polar circle area). The following techniques are described successively: pillar drawing and backfilled slices (Ammeberg, Falun, Garpenberg, Boliden group), sub-level pillar drawing (Grangesberg, Bloettberget, Haeksberg), empty room and sub-level pillar drawing (Bodas, Haksberg, Stripa, Bastkarn), storage chamber pillar drawing (Bodas, Haeksberg, Bastkarn), and pillar drawing by block caving (ldkerberget). Reprint of a paper published in Revue de l'Industrie Minerale, vol. 41, no. 12, 1959 [fr

  14. Swedish minister rebuilds scientists' trust

    CERN Multimedia

    Sylwan, P

    1999-01-01

    Thomas Ostros, Sweden's new science minister is aiming to improve links with the science community, severely strained during the tenure of Carl Tham. Significantly, he confirmed that he will not be making any further changes to the managment of the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research. He also announced a 5 per cent increase in government funding for science which will be used to strengthen basic research and education (1 page).

  15. Swedish earthquakes and acceleration probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slunga, R.

    1979-03-01

    A method to assign probabilities to ground accelerations for Swedish sites is described. As hardly any nearfield instrumental data is available we are left with the problem of interpreting macroseismic data in terms of acceleration. By theoretical wave propagation computations the relation between seismic strength of the earthquake, focal depth, distance and ground accelerations are calculated. We found that most Swedish earthquake of the area, the 1904 earthquake 100 km south of Oslo, is an exception and probably had a focal depth exceeding 25 km. For the nuclear power plant sites an annual probability of 10 -5 has been proposed as interesting. This probability gives ground accelerations in the range 5-20 % for the sites. This acceleration is for a free bedrock site. For consistency all acceleration results in this study are given for bedrock sites. When applicating our model to the 1904 earthquake and assuming the focal zone to be in the lower crust we get the epicentral acceleration of this earthquake to be 5-15 % g. The results above are based on an analyses of macrosismic data as relevant instrumental data is lacking. However, the macroseismic acceleration model deduced in this study gives epicentral ground acceleration of small Swedish earthquakes in agreement with existent distant instrumental data. (author)

  16. Repository operational criteria comparative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the ``Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies`` (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations considering the interfaces among the components of the regulations and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The ROC task addresses regulatory criteria and uncertainties related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. Those parts of 10 CFR Part 60 that require routine guidance or minor changes to the rule were addressed in Hageman and Chowdhury, 1992. The ROC task shows a possible need for further regulatory clarity, by major changes to the rule, related to the design bases and siting of a geologic repository operations area and radiological emergency planning in order to assure defense-in-depth. The analyses, presented in this report, resulted in the development and refinement of regulatory concepts and their supporting rationale for recommendations for potential major changes to 10 CFR Pan 0 regulations.

  17. Semantic repository and ontology mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracia, J.; Trna, M.; Lozano, E.; Nguyen, T.T.; Gómez-Pérez, A.; Montaña, C.; Liem, J.

    2010-01-01

    This document discusses the core Semantic Technologies in DynaLearn: i) The semantic repository, which supports the online storage and access of qualitative reasoning models, ii) the grounding process, which establishes semantic equivalences between the concepts in the models and the concepts in a

  18. Cancer Epidemiology Data Repository (CEDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to broaden access and facilitate efficient data sharing, the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) has created the Cancer Epidemiology Data Repository (CEDR), a centralized, controlled-access database, where Investigators can deposit individual-level de-identified observational cancer datasets.

  19. Preliminary post-closure safety assessment of repository concepts for low level radioactive waste at the Bruce Site, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.H.; Penfold, J.S.S.; Egan, M.J.; Leung, H.

    2005-01-01

    The preliminary post-closure safety assessment of permanent repository concepts for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Bruce Site is described. The study considered the disposal of both short and long-lived LLW. Four geotechnically feasible repository concepts were considered (two near-surface and two deep repositories). An approach consistent with best international practice was used to provide a reasoned and comprehensive analysis of post-closure impacts of the repository concepts. The results demonstrated that the deep repository concepts in shale and in limestone, and the surface repository concept on sand should meet radiological protection criteria. For the surface repository concept on glacial till, it appears that increased engineering such as grouting of waste and voids should be considered to meet the relevant dose constraint. Should the project to develop a permanent repository for LLW proceed, it is expected that this preliminary safety assessment would need to be updated to take account of future site-specific investigations and design updates. (author)

  20. Radiological consequence analysis of a repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, J.; Buchheim, B.; Hoop, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    One of the methods under consideration for the disposal of radioactive wastes is emplacement in a repository within deep, continental formations. This paper presents the experience gained in developing a methodology to make an assessment of the radiological consequences both for normal operation and for possible accident situations for a specific repository design in a salt dome at Gorleben in Germany , designed to accommodate all categories of radioactive waste. Radionuclide release scenarios were derived from a systematic analysis of the facility design and proposed operational procedure. Where necessary simple numerical models for such topics as direct radiation exposure from waste containers, release and transport of radionuclides, radiolysis, heat transfer, creep and impact were developed to give a first estimate of the radiological consequences due to radionuclide releases. (author)

  1. Concerns when designing a safeguards approach for the back-end of the Swedish nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzell, Anni (Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-03-15

    In Sweden, the construction of an encapsulation plant and a geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel is planned to start within the next ten years. Due to Sweden's international agreements on non-proliferation, the Swedish safeguards regime must be extended to include these facilities. The geological repository has some unique features, which present the safeguards system with unprecedented challenges. These features include, inter alia, the long period of time that the facility will contain nuclear material and that the disposed nuclear material will be very difficult to access, implying that physical verification of its presence in the repository is not foreseen. This work presents the available techniques for creating a safeguards system for the backend of the Swedish nuclear fuel cycle. Important issues to consider in the planning and implementation of the safeguards system have been investigated, which in some cases has led to an identification of areas needing further research. The results include three proposed options for a safeguards approach, which have been evaluated on the basis of the safeguards authorities' requirements. Also, the evolution and present situation of the work carried out in connection to safeguards for geological repositories has been compiled

  2. Concerns when designing a safeguards approach for the back-end of the Swedish nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzell, Anni

    2006-03-01

    In Sweden, the construction of an encapsulation plant and a geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel is planned to start within the next ten years. Due to Sweden's international agreements on non-proliferation, the Swedish safeguards regime must be extended to include these facilities. The geological repository has some unique features, which present the safeguards system with unprecedented challenges. These features include, inter alia, the long period of time that the facility will contain nuclear material and that the disposed nuclear material will be very difficult to access, implying that physical verification of its presence in the repository is not foreseen. This work presents the available techniques for creating a safeguards system for the backend of the Swedish nuclear fuel cycle. Important issues to consider in the planning and implementation of the safeguards system have been investigated, which in some cases has led to an identification of areas needing further research. The results include three proposed options for a safeguards approach, which have been evaluated on the basis of the safeguards authorities' requirements. Also, the evolution and present situation of the work carried out in connection to safeguards for geological repositories has been compiled

  3. Nuclear waste and a deep geological disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokal, A.; Laciok, A.; Vasa, I.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a systematic analysis of the individual areas of research into nuclear waste and deep geological disposal with emphasis on the contribution of Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc to such efforts within international projects, specifically the EURATOM 6th Framework Programme. Research in the area of new advanced fuel cycles with focus on waste minimisation is based on EU's REDIMPACT project. The individual fuel cycles, which are currently studied within the EU, are briefly described. Special attention is paid to fast breeders and accelerator-driven reactor concepts associated with new spent fuel reprocessing technologies. Results obtained so far show that none even of the most advanced fuel cycles, currently under consideration, would eliminate the necessity to have a deep geological repository for a safe storage of residual radioactive waste. As regards deep geological repository barriers, the fact is highlighted that the safety of a repository is assured by complementary engineered and natural barriers. In order to demonstrate the safety of a repository, a deep insight must be gained into any and all of the individual processes that occur inside the repository and thus may affect radioactivity releases beyond the repository boundaries. The final section of the paper describes methods of radioactive waste conditioning for its disposal in a repository. Research into waste matrices used for radionuclide immobilisation is also highlighted. (author)

  4. Partitioning and transmutation. Current developments - 2004. A report from the Swedish reference group on P and T-research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstroem, Per-Eric; Andersson, Sofie; Ekberg, Christian; Liljenzin, Jan-Olov; Nilsson, Mikael; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Blomgren, Jan

    2004-05-01

    This report summarises the work reported in the years 1998-2003 and tries to assess the prospects for future development of partitioning and transmutation (P-T) as seen from a Swedish perspective. The R and D efforts on P-T have increased somewhat during the period 1998-2003. Research on P-T has taken a prominent role internationally in the R and D on future nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle systems. Despite the fact that partitioning and transmutation have been on the agenda for quite a few years there are still a number of issues that must be settled before the research and development can be given a clearly focused direction. Studies propose research programmes for about six years at the cost of a couple of hundred million Euros. The construction of a small ADS experimental plant is a necessary step to develop and demonstrate the concept. This experimental plant should then be followed by a demonstration plant in almost full scale. Such a plant can at the earliest be ready in the mid-2030s. A number of circumstances have, however, contributed to slower speed, less intensity and lower funding than proposed in the studies. There is no unanimous view on the objectives for partitioning and transmutation. Many see it as a way to achieve broad acceptance for nuclear power at large. Others promote it as a way to get out of the impasse for a deep repository in several countries. Others again put a strong emphasise on the proliferation aspects. There is no unanimous view on the need to develop ADS or for the role of ADS in a P-T-system. Some advocate that ADS should be used for burning of all transuranium nuclides from the present enriched uranium fuelled light water reactors. Others see the ADS as a supplement particularly suitable for burning minor actinides (americium, curium and neptunium), whereas the major part of the plutonium should be burned in light water reactors (or in fast reactors) There is no consensus among experts on which technical route to follow

  5. Partitioning and transmutation. Current developments - 2004. A report from the Swedish reference group on P and T-research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstroem, Per-Eric (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Sofie; Ekberg, Christian; Liljenzin, Jan-Olov; Nilsson, Mikael; Skarnemark, Gunnar [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Blomgren, Jan [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research; Eriksson, Marcus; Gudowski, Waclaw; Seltborg, Per; Wallenius, Jan; Sehgal, Bal Raj [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    This report summarises the work reported in the years 1998-2003 and tries to assess the prospects for future development of partitioning and transmutation (P-T) as seen from a Swedish perspective. The R and D efforts on P-T have increased somewhat during the period 1998-2003. Research on P-T has taken a prominent role internationally in the R and D on future nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle systems. Despite the fact that partitioning and transmutation have been on the agenda for quite a few years there are still a number of issues that must be settled before the research and development can be given a clearly focused direction. Studies propose research programmes for about six years at the cost of a couple of hundred million Euros. The construction of a small ADS experimental plant is a necessary step to develop and demonstrate the concept. This experimental plant should then be followed by a demonstration plant in almost full scale. Such a plant can at the earliest be ready in the mid-2030s. A number of circumstances have, however, contributed to slower speed, less intensity and lower funding than proposed in the studies. There is no unanimous view on the objectives for partitioning and transmutation. Many see it as a way to achieve broad acceptance for nuclear power at large. Others promote it as a way to get out of the impasse for a deep repository in several countries. Others again put a strong emphasise on the proliferation aspects. There is no unanimous view on the need to develop ADS or for the role of ADS in a P-T-system. Some advocate that ADS should be used for burning of all transuranium nuclides from the present enriched uranium fuelled light water reactors. Others see the ADS as a supplement particularly suitable for burning minor actinides (americium, curium and neptunium), whereas the major part of the plutonium should be burned in light water reactors (or in fast reactors) There is no consensus among experts on which technical route to follow

  6. Repositori Digital Berbasis Oai Dan Rantai Kutipan

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Adi; Lim, Resmana

    2011-01-01

    Sebuah organisasi dapat memiliki sebuah repositori digital. Repositori digital adalah sebuah gudang file digitalyang dilengkapi dengan metadata untuk mendeskripsikan file-file digital tersebut. File digital dapat berasal daridalam organisasi tersebut, dan juga berasal dari organisasi eksternal yang mengijinkan koleksi file digitalnyadigunakan oleh umum. Untuk mengambil file digital dari repositori eksternal digunakan protokol terbuka yaituOpen Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvest...

  7. REPOSITORI DIGITAL BERBASIS OAI DAN RANTAI KUTIPAN

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Adi; Lim, Resmana

    2011-01-01

    Sebuah organisasi dapat memiliki sebuah repositori digital. Repositori digital adalah sebuah gudang file digitalyang dilengkapi dengan metadata untuk mendeskripsikan file-file digital tersebut. File digital dapat berasal daridalam organisasi tersebut, dan juga berasal dari organisasi eksternal yang mengijinkan koleksi file digitalnyadigunakan oleh umum. Untuk mengambil file digital dari repositori eksternal digunakan protokol terbuka yaituOpen Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvest...

  8. Repositori Digital Berbasis Oai dan Rantai Kutipan

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Adi; Lim, Resmana

    2011-01-01

    Sebuah organisasi dapat memiliki sebuah repositori digital. Repositori digital adalah sebuah gudang file digitalyang dilengkapi dengan metadata untuk mendeskripsikan file-file digital tersebut. File digital dapat berasal daridalam organisasi tersebut, dan juga berasal dari organisasi eksternal yang mengijinkan koleksi file digitalnyadigunakan oleh umum. Untuk mengambil file digital dari repositori eksternal digunakan protokol terbuka yaituOpen Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvest...

  9. Consistency analysis of network traffic repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lastdrager, Elmer; Lastdrager, E.E.H.; Pras, Aiko

    Traffic repositories with TCP/IP header information are very important for network analysis. Researchers often assume that such repositories reliably represent all traffic that has been flowing over the network; little thoughts are made regarding the consistency of these repositories. Still, for

  10. Consistency of Network Traffic Repositories: An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lastdrager, E.; Lastdrager, E.E.H.; Pras, Aiko

    2009-01-01

    Traffc repositories with TCP/IP header information are very important for network analysis. Researchers often assume that such repositories reliably represent all traffc that has been flowing over the network; little thoughts are made regarding the consistency of these repositories. Still, for

  11. Natural analogues, paradigm for manmade repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Pavelescu, A.

    2004-01-01

    Natural analogues are given by nature. They show the results of natural processes which have lasted thousands or millions of years. They provide an excellent example of what could happen in an underground site, offering in the same time the opportunity to test by observation and measurement, many of the geochemical processes that are expected to influence in a realistic and appropriate way, the predicted reliability of the radioactive waste repository over long periods of geological time. The natural analogue studies attempt to understand the multiprocessing complexity of the natural system, which contrasts with the limitations of the laboratory experiments and bring arguments to overcome the difficult time scale issue. By this the natural analogues are a useful paradigm for manmade repository for radioactive wastes. The paper discusses the implicit link in the public mind between natural analogues and manmade waste repository with an accent of the positive impact on public acceptance. It is also discussed the decisive qualities of the natural analogues concerning providing valid long term data and increasing the confidence of the public for manmade repositories. The debate is conducting in terms of sustainable development, having at base high-level principles in order to protect humans and their environment, both now and in the future, from potential hazards arising from such wastes. Safe radwaste management involves the application of technology and resources in a regulated manner so that the public, workers and the environment are protected in accordance with the accepted national and international standards. There are at least seven high-level principles which are mentioned in the paper. It is presented the general concept of the deep geological repository, very important for an acceptable solution for the management of nuclear waste, what is a prerequisite for a renewal of nuclear power. Further are introduced natural and archaeological (manufactured) analogue

  12. Design and Evaluation of Public Hearings for Swedish Site Selection. A Report from the RISCOM II Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Wene, Clas-Otto; Drottz Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie

    2003-08-01

    Public hearings were held in the Swedish municipalities of Oesthammar, Tierp, Aelvkarleby, Hultsfred, Oskarshamn and in Nykoeping in February of 2001. The municipalities had taken part in feasibility studies, conducted by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB), in the previous years. The hearings were organised by the Swedish regulatory authorities, i.e. the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI), and aimed at complementing the authorities' reviews of SKB's work and plans, called FUD-K [1]. Central themes of the hearings were SKB's choice of municipalities for the next phase of the programme to build a spent nuclear fuel repository, and their choice of method for this work. Representatives of the municipalities participated in the planning of the hearings, which were guided by the RISCOM Model. In this report we give a background to the hearings, we introduce the RISCOM Model and how it was used to design the hearings, we then analyse the hearing context with a systems analysis approach. Finally, we describe the hearing agenda and evaluate the results with respect to transparency

  13. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betsill J, David; Elkins, Ned Z.; Wu, Chuan-Fu; Mewhinney, James D.; Aamodt, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ''The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic

  14. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    operating deep geologic repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) offers a unique opportunity to serve as an international cooperative test bed for developing and demonstrating technologies and processes in a fully operational repository system setting. To address the substantial national security implications for the US resulting from the lack of integrated, transparent management and disposition of nuclear materials at the back-end of the nuclear fuel and weapons cycles, it is proposed that WIPP be used as a test bed to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable the transparent and proliferation-resistant geologic isolation of nuclear materials. The objectives of this initiative are to: (1) enhance public confidence in safe, secure geologic isolation of nuclear materials; (2) develop, test, and demonstrate transparency measures and technologies for the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle; and (3) foster international collaborations leading to workable, effective, globally-accepted standards for the transparent monitoring of geological repositories for nuclear materials. Test-bed activities include: development and testing of monitoring measures and technologies; international demonstration experiments; transparency workshops; visiting scientist exchanges; and educational outreach. These activities are proposed to be managed by the Department of Energy/Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO) as part of The Center for Applied Repository and Underground Studies (CARUS).

  15. Rock support for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, L.W.; Schmidt, B.

    1984-01-01

    The design of rock support for underground nuclear waste repositories requires consideration of special construction and operation requirements, and of the adverse environmental conditions in which some of the support is placed. While repository layouts resemble mines, design, construction and operation are subject to quality assurance and public scrutiny similar to what is experienced for nuclear power plants. Exploration, design, construction and operation go through phases of review and licensing by government agencies as repositories evolve. This paper discusses (1) the various stages of repository development; (2) the environment that supports must be designed for; (3) the environmental effects on support materials; and (4) alternative types of repository rock support

  16. Copper Corrosion in Nuclear Waste Disposal: A Swedish Case Study on Stakeholder Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the founding principles, work program, and accomplishments of a Reference Group with both expert and layperson stakeholders for the corrosion of copper canisters in a proposed deep repository in Sweden for spent nuclear fuel. The article sets the Reference Group as a participatory effort within a broader context of…

  17. Coupled thermo–hydro–mechanical processes for the Dutch radioactive waste repository

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buragohain, P.; Vardon, P.J.; Hicks, M.A.; Vardon, P.J.; Bykov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of spent nuclear fuel and long lived radioactive waste in deep clay geological formations is one of the promising options worldwide. In this concept of the geological disposal system, the Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock when designing a generic waste repository in the

  18. Recommended versus Certified Repositories: Mind the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Edward Husen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are increasingly required to make research data publicly available in data repositories. Although several organisations propose criteria to recommend and evaluate the quality of data repositories, there is no consensus of what constitutes a good data repository. In this paper, we investigate, first, which data repositories are recommended by various stakeholders (publishers, funders, and community organizations and second, which repositories are certified by a number of organisations. We then compare these two lists of repositories, and the criteria for recommendation and certification. We find that criteria used by organisations recommending and certifying repositories are similar, although the certification criteria are generally more detailed. We distil the lists of criteria into seven main categories: “Mission”, “Community/Recognition”, “Legal and Contractual Compliance”, “Access/Accessibility”, “Technical Structure/Interface”, “Retrievability” and “Preservation”. Although the criteria are similar, the lists of repositories that are recommended by the various agencies are very different. Out of all of the recommended repositories, less than 6% obtained certification. As certification is becoming more important, steps should be taken to decrease this gap between recommended and certified repositories, and ensure that certification standards become applicable, and applied, to the repositories which researchers are currently using.

  19. The Swedish mutant barley collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)

  20. Cadmium exposure in the Swedish environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report gives a thorough description of cadmium in the Swedish environment. It comprises three parts: Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks;, Cadmium in goods - contribution to environmental exposure;, and Cadmium in fertilizers, soil, crops and foods - the Swedish situation. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all three parts

  1. Comments from the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC, and the Swedish NGO office for Nuclear Waste Review, MKG, on the industry's, SKB, research programme Fud-07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation and the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review recommends in response to Fud-07 that: - The Government must in its forthcoming decision regarding the industry's 2007 research and development program set out requirements that are needed to bring order to the ongoing work on nuclear waste disposition - The Government must assure an effective quality control of the industry's work - The Government needs to review the industry's use of resources from the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund and empower the Radiation Safety Authority to ensure their proper use - The Government must make it clear that a permit to establish a final repository for high-level waste will not be given until sufficient evidence is available that supports the chosen method and chosen location, and that provide for guaranteed long-term safety - The Government must instruct the Radiation Safety Authority to develop its own full and independent assessment tools and knowledge base to be able to review the industry's research and development work, with particular emphasis on weaker aspects of the industry's work. - The Government must expand the budget of the Radiation Safety Authority to enable the Authority to perform a thorough examination of the industry's forthcoming application to construct a repository. - The Government must ensure that currently outstanding issues and unsolved problems in the industry's research and development project are thoroughly investigated, and solutions arrived at, before permission to begin construction can be given. - The Government must see to it that work commences on drafting public policy that sets out the objectives and functions that a final repository shall fulfil. - The Government must make it clear that it will not be possible for the industry to neglect or avoid giving alternative methods serious consideration in its environmental impact statement (EIS). - The Government should instruct the Radiation Safety Authority

  2. University digital repositories and authors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Keefer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Open Access movement offers two strategies for making scientific information available without economic, technical or legal obstacles: the publication of articles in OA journals and the deposit by authors of their Works in stable institutional or discipline-based repositories. This article explores the implementation of the second “route” on the part of authors, because it is the strategy that offers the greatest possibility of attaining OA in the short term. However, it does require repositories to exert great effort in informing the authors of the advantages of self-archiving and of the procedures for depositing their work and, even helping them to do so – through services and promotional activities.

  3. Potential role of ABC-assisted repositories in U.S. plutonium and high-level waste disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berwald, D.; Favale, A.; Myers, T. [Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    This paper characterizes the issues involving deep geologic disposal of LWR spent fuel rods, then presents results of an investigation to quantify the potential role of Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) in an integrated national nuclear materials and high level waste disposition strategy. The investigation used the deep geological repository envisioned for Yucca Mt., Nevada as a baseline and considered complementary roles for integrated ABC transmutation systems. The results indicate that although a U.S. geologic waste repository will continue to be required, waste partitioning and accelerator transmutation of plutonium, the minor actinides, and selected long-lived fission products can result in the following substantial benefits: plutonium burndown to near zero levels, a dramatic reduction of the long term hazard associated with geologic repositories, an ability to place several-fold more high level nuclear waste in a single repository, electricity sales to compensate for capital and operating costs.

  4. Endoparasites in some Swedish Amphibians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1988-01-01

    A study was made of the endoparasites in specimens of Rana arvalis and R. temporaria collected on two occasions from a locality of southern Sweden. Some frogs were investigated directly after capture while other frogs were kept hibernating and the composition of the parasites as well...... as the behaviour of the parasites were studied after the termination of hibernation. Twelve species of parasites were found. Six of them, Polystoma integerrimum, Pleurogenes claviger (Trematoda), Rhabdias bufonis, Oswaldocruzia filiformis, Cosmocerca ornata and Oxysomatium brevicauda- tum (Nematoda), have...... not previously been reported from Sweden. The late Prof. O. Nybelin's unpublished records of parasites found in Swedish amphibians are also given....

  5. The challenge of long-term participatory repository governance. Lessons learned for high level radioactive waste and spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landstroem, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    Voluntaristic siting procedures for deep geological repositories are becoming increasingly common; they reconfigure the relationship of repositories and society in ways that have implications for the long-term governance of these facilities. This paper identifies three challenges emerging in relation to this question: principles of monitoring, repository content, and facility closure. This paper discusses them in a comparison with similar challenges being addressed in Belgian partnerships founded to facilitate the siting and design of a low- and intermediate level short lived waste repository. The empirical exploration confirms the importance of securing stakeholder engagement throughout the repository lifecycle, for which there is a need to develop knowledge about how to encourage long-term democratic governance systems.

  6. Repository development status in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Beceiro, Alvaro; Zuloaga, Pablo [ENRESA (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    The paper describes the status of repository development for the different waste categories. Low and Intermediate Waste Disposal facility of El Cabril was commissioned in 1992 and is in normal operation. The major modifications and activities during the last years are the adaptation to waste streams not initially foreseen such as some decommissioning waste or waste from steel industry, and the improvement of its performance assessment, supported by a R and D and refined models. As part of this facility, a new disposal facility specifically intended for very low activity waste has been constructed and commissioned in July 2008. Its design is based on the European Directive for hazardous waste disposal. National policy for Nuclear Spent Fuel and High-Level waste is focused on the development of a centralized storage facility of the vault type, whose site location would be selected through a volunteering process. Meanwhile, with the aim of solving specific problems, three individual storage facilities are in different status at reactor sites. Research on final solution, including some repository aspects as well as separation and transmutation are being carried out in accordance to ENRESA's R and D program. ENRESA has developed conceptual designs for non site specific repositories, both in granite and clay, and has carried out their corresponding performance assessment exercises. (authors)

  7. Siting, design and construction of underground repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Symposium were to provide a forum for exchange of information internationally on the various scientific, technological, engineering and safety bases for the siting, design and construction of underground repositories, and to highlight current important issues and identify possible approaches. Forty-nine papers were presented, covering general approaches and regulatory aspects, disposal in shallow ground and rock cavities, disposal in deep geological formations and safety assessments related to the subject of the Symposium. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these papers

  8. Coupling between water chemistry and thermal output at unsaturated repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.; LeMone, D.; Casey, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes issues in predicting thermohydrology in the near field of a deep geological repository and the implications for performance assessment. Predicted thermohydrology depends on waste package design, and particularly on backfill materials. The coupling between solute concentrations and thermal gradients leads to a prediction of highly variable water chemistry in the near field which is radically different than the initial, undisturbed water chemistry; however, most analyses to date assume that waste package chemistry is approximately the same as initial pore water chemistry. Several alternative, simplified approaches for performance assessment are discussed

  9. Summary report of first and foreign high-level waste repository concepts; Technical report, working draft 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, P.M.

    1987-11-04

    Reference repository concepts designs adopted by domestic and foreign waste disposal programs are reviewed. Designs fall into three basic categories: deep borehole from the surface; disposal in boreholes drilled from underground excavations; and disposal in horizontal tunnels or drifts. The repository concepts developed in Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Canada, France, Japan, United Kingdom, Belgium, Italy, Holland, Denmark, West Germany and the United States are described. 140 refs., 315 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Calibration of antimony-based electrode for pH monitoring into underground components of nuclear repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Betelu , Stéphanie; Ignatiadis , Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear waste repositories are being installed in deep excavated rock formations in some places in Europe to isolate and store radioactive waste. In France, Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) is potential candidate for nuclear waste repository. It is thus necessary to measure in situ the state of a structure's health during its entire life. The monitoring of the near-field rock and the knowledge of the geochemical transformations can be carried out by a set of sensors for a sustainable managem...

  11. Radionuclide Geomicrobiology of the Deep Biosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Craig; Johnsson, Anna; Moll, Henry

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes research into interactions between microorganisms and radionuclides under conditions typical of a repository for high-level radioactive waste in deep hard rock environments at a depth of approximately 500 m. The cell-radionuclide interactions of strains of two bacterial spe...

  12. Conference report: 2012 Repository Symposium. Final storage in Germany. New start - ways and consequences of the site selection procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettler, John

    2012-01-01

    The Aachen Institute for Nuclear Training invited participants to the 3-day '2012 Repository Symposium - Final Storage in Germany' held in Bonn. The subtitle of the event, 'New Start - Ways and Consequences of the Site Selection Procedure,' expressed the organizers' summary that the Repository Finding Act currently under discussion did not give rise to any expectation of a repository for high-level radioactive waste before 2080. The symposium was attended by more than 120 persons from Germany and abroad. They discussed the basic elements of the site selection procedure and its consequences on the basis of the draft so far known to the public. While extensive public participation is envisaged for the stage of finding a repository, this does not apply to the draft legislation in the same way. The legal determinations are negotiated in a small circle by the political parties and the state governments. Michael Sailer (Oeko-Institut e.V.) holds that agreement on a repository finding act is urgent. Prof. Dr. Bruno Thomauske (RWTH Aachen) arrives at the conclusion mentioned above, that no repository for high-level radioactive waste can start operation before 2080 on the basis of the Repository Finding Act. Dr. Bettina Keienburg, attorney at law, in her paper drew attention to the points of dispute in the draft legislation with regard to changes in competency of public authorities. The draft law indicated a clear shift of competency for finding a repository from the Federal Office for Radiation Protection to a federal agency yet to be set up. Prof. Dr. Christoph Moench outlined the deficiencies of the draft legislation in matters of refinancing and the polluter-pays principle. Among the tentative solutions discussed it was above all the Swedish model which was acclaimed most widely. (orig.)

  13. The waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository: A case study in radioactive waste disposal safety and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Leif G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) repository in the United States was certified on the 13 of May 1998 and opened on the 26 of March 1999. Two sets of safety/performance assessment calculations supporting the certification of the WIPP TRUW repository show that the maximum annual individual committed effective dose will be 32 times lower than the regulatory limit and that the cumulative amount of radionuclide releases will be at least 10 times, more likely at least 20 times, lower than the regulatory limits. Yet, perceptions remain among the public that the WIPP TRUW repository imposes an unacceptable risk.

  14. Delegated democracy. Siting selection for the Swedish nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Hanna Sofia

    2008-11-01

    The present study concerns the siting of the Swedish nuclear waste repository. Four cases are examined: the feasibility studies in Nykoeping and Tierp (cases 1 and 2), as well as three public consultation meetings with conservationist and environmental organisations, and two study visits to nuclear facilities in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar, which were held during what is called the site-investigation phase (cases 3 and 4). The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) began the search for a nuclear waste site in the 1970s. Since 1992 SKB has conducted feasibility studies in eight municipalities, including in the four municipalities mentioned above. At the present time more comprehensive site investigations are underway in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar, two municipalities that already host nuclear power plants as well as storages for nuclear waste. In addition to SKB and the municipalities involved in the site-selection process, politicians, opinion groups, concerned members of the public, and oversight bodies are important actors. The analysis of the cases employs the concepts of 'sub-politics', 'boundary work', and 'expertise', together with the four models of democracy 'representative democracy', participatory democracy', 'deliberative democracy', and 'technocracy'. The aim of the study is to describe the characteristics of Swedish democracy in relation to the disposal of Swedish nuclear waste. The main questions of the study are: Which democratic ideals can be found within SKB's siting process during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process during the site investigations? and Which democratic ideals were influential during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process? The study is based on qualitative methods, and the source materials consist of documents, interviews, and participant observations. In summary, the form of democracy that emerges in the four case studies can be described as delegated democracy. This means that a large

  15. MIC evaluation and testing for the Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J.M.; Rivera, A.; Lain, T.; Jones, D.A.

    1997-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential deep geological repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the containment and storage of high-level nuclear waste. There is growing awareness that biotic factors could affect the integrity of the repository directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of waste package (WP) materials and other repository elements. A program to determine the degree that microorganisms, especially bacteria, influence the corrosion of waste package materials has therefore been undertaken. These studies include testing candidate waste package materials for their susceptibility to MIC, and also seek to determine rates of biocorrosion under varying environmental conditions, as well as predict rates of waste package corrosion over the long term. Previous characterization of bacterial isolates derived from YM geologic material showed that many possessed biochemical activities associated with MIC, 2. Various Yucca Mountain microbes demonstrated the abilities to oxidize iron, reduce sulfate to sulfide, produce acids, and generate exopolysaccharides (or `slime`). Table 1 summarizes previously characterized YM organisms and their associated relevant activities. A subset of the characterized YM bacteria were spread on WP alloy coupons in systems designed to collect polarization resistance (Rp) data for corrosion rate calculations, and to determine cathodic and anodic potentiodynamic polarization to assess corrosion mechanisms. Coupons inoculated with bacteria were compared to those that remained sterile, to determine the bacterial contribution to overall corrosion rates.

  16. Coupled process analyses for salt repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Monti, A.M.; Raines, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Salt sites are being investigated as potential candidates for a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To assess the performance of a repository in salt it is necessary to estimate the potential for naturally occurring and/or intrusive fluids to contact the radioactive waste and transport it to the accessible environment. The long-term performance assessment of a salt repository consists of multidisciplinary studies of the coupled physical and chemical interactions in geologic systems involving heat transfer, ground-water hydrology, geomechanics, geochemistry, and radionuclide transport. The coupled process analyses performed or planned to be conducted include coupled thermal, stress, and pressure-induced brine migration; flow, thermal, mechanical, and geomechanical (corrosion and leach rate) analyses for waste package and waste form performance; flow, thermal, and mechanical analyses for shaft seals and near-field performance; flow, thermal, dissolution, and salt creep analyses for borehole scenarios; flow, energy, and solute transport analyses of the groundwater system in the vicinity of site; and coupled analyses of hydrologic, mechanical, geochemical, and radionuclide transport

  17. Coupled process analyses for salt repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Monti, A.M.; Baines, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Salt sites are investigated as potential candidates for a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To assess the performance of a repository in salt it is necessary to estimate the potential for naturally occurring and/or intrusive fluids to contact the radioactive waste and transport it to the accessible environment. The long-term performance assessment of a salt repository consists of multidisciplinary studies of the coupled physical and chemical interactions in geologic systems involving heat transfer, groundwater hydrology, geomechanics, geochemistry, and radionuclide transport. The coupled process analyses performed or planned to be conducted include coupled thermal, stress, and pressure-induced brine migration; flow, thermal, mechanical, and geomechanical (corrosion and leach rate) analyses for waste package and waste form performance; flow, thermal, and mechanical analyses for shaft seals and near-field performance; flow, thermal, dissolution, and salt creep analyses for borehole scenarios; flow, energy, and solute transport analyses of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the site; and coupled analyses of hydrologic, mechanical, geochemical, and radionuclide transport

  18. Training courses on integrated safety assessment modelling for waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallants, D.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface or deep repositories of radioactive waste are being developed and evaluated all over the world. Also, existing repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste often need to be re-evaluated to extend their license or to obtain permission for final closure. The evaluation encompasses both a technical feasibility as well as a safety analysis. The long term safety is usually demonstrated by means of performance or safety assessment. For this purpose computer models are used that calculate the migration of radionuclides from the conditioned radioactive waste, through engineered barriers to the environment (groundwater, surface water, and biosphere). Integrated safety assessment modelling addresses all relevant radionuclide pathways from source to receptor (man), using in combination various computer codes in which the most relevant physical, chemical, mechanical, or even microbiological processes are mathematically described. SCK-CEN organizes training courses in Integrated safety assessment modelling that are intended for individuals who have either a controlling or supervising role within the national radwaste agencies or regulating authorities, or for technical experts that carry out the actual post-closure safety assessment for an existing or new repository. Courses are organised by the Department of Waste and Disposal

  19. Assessment of Savannah River borosilicate glass in the repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-04-01

    Since 1973, borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In 1977, efforts began to develop and test the large-scale equipment necessary to convert the alkaline waste slurries at SRP into a durable borosilicate glass. A process has now been developed for the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which will annually produce approximately 500 canisters of SRP waste glass which will be stored on an interim basis on the Savannah River site. Current national policy calls for the permanent disposal of high-level waste in deep geologic repositories. In the repository environment, SRP waste glass will eventually be exposed to such stresses as lithostatic or hydrostatic pressures, radiation fields, and self-heating due to radioactive decay. In addition, producing and handling each canister of glass will also expose the glass to thermal and mechanical stresses. An important objective of the extensive glass characterization and testing programs of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has been to determine how these stresses affect the performance of SRP waste glass. The results of these programs indicate that: these stresses will not significantly affect the performance of borosilicate glass containing SRP waste; and SRP waste glass will effectively immobilize hazardous radionuclides in the repository environment

  20. NAGRA - Sites for geological repositories - Geological surveys for stage 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This brochure published by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) examines the aims involved in the selection of sites for deep geological repositories for nuclear wastes in Switzerland. Various methods involved in their implementation are described. These include 3D-seismology, deep probe drillings, shallow drillings as well as field studies, gravimetric measurements and the study of the electrical properties of the ground and rock involved. These factors are discussed in detail. Maps are presented of the locations that are to be surveyed and details of the selected perimeters are shown. Also, the layout of a sample drilling site is presented. A timescale for the various surveys and work to be done is presented

  1. Low- and intermediate-level waste repository-induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J.; Smith, P.; Savage, D.; Senger, R.

    2016-10-01

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects arising principally from the heat generated by the waste and the setting of cement. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement caverns and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock. Deep geological repositories are designed to avoid or mitigate the impact of potentially detrimental repository-induced effects on long-term safety. For the repository under consideration in the present report, an assessment of those repository-induced effects that remain shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are minimal and gas effects can be mitigated by appropriate design measures to reduce gas production and provide pathways for gas transport that limit gas pressure build-up (engineered gas transport system, or EGTS). Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The disposal system described in this report provides a system of passive barriers with multiple safety functions. The disposal

  2. Final repository for spent nuclear fuel - the role of the municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden there is a long tradition of local self-government which is enshrined within the Swedish constitution, and the municipalities are responsible for matters relating to its inhabitants and their immediate environment. The municipality of Oesthammar has been engaged in the project of final repository for spent nuclear fuel since 1995 and by that time a consultative committee was established with representatives from all the political parties within the municipality and neighbouring municipalities. Future potentials as well as threats must be considered when making decisions on the most favourable site and the method used for the disposal of nuclear waste, and the application from SKB, as well as the review by the authorities, must stand up to a number of public demands. The work has included several stages of decisions for the municipality, due to the site selection process for SKB. The dialogue between the municipality and SKB as well as between the municipality and the authorities has been of great importance for getting the stepwise decision making process that has become practice in this question. The municipality has intensively followed the process concerning establishment of a final repository through consultation meetings, by being observer on meetings between SKB and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), seminars, statements, etc. The openness and transparency throughout the process has been essential between all actors. However, if the municipalities have a right of absolute veto, the government still can say yes even if the municipality has said no

  3. Hydrothermal conditions around a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunvik, R.; Braester, C.

    1981-12-01

    Numerical solutions for the hydrothermal conditions around a hard rock repository for nuclear fuel waste are presented. The objective of the present investigation is to illustrate in principle the effect of heat released from a hypothetical radioactive waste repository with regard to anisotropy in the rock permeability. Permeability and porosity are assumed to be constant or to decrease exponentially with depth. The hypothetical repository is situated below a horizontal ground surface or below the crest of a hill, and it is assumed that the water table follows the topography. Major interest in the analysis is directed towards the influence of anisotropy in the permeability on the flow patterns and travel times for water particles, being traced from the repository to the ground surface. The presented results show that anisotropy in the permeability may have a significant influence on the flow conditions around the repository and subsequently also on the travel times from the repository. (Authors)

  4. People's perception of LILW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Polic, Marko

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Social acceptability of the radioactive waste repository presents a great problem in every country with such a waste. Even if people agree with the need for its construction, the chosen location should be far from their homes (NIMBY). The reasons for such attitudes were attributed to different causes: uneducated public, differences in understanding of radioactivity and risk by experts and lay public, risk communication problems, lack of credibility and social trust, etc. While in earlier days public was blamed for its irrationality, and need for education and information was emphasized, today it is realized that public trust is extremely important if effective risk communication is to be achieved. It is also recognized that it is not so much the content of the risk message itself, as the lack of trust to those responsible for provision of information that is behind this opposition. Perhaps we could apply here Petty and Caciopo's elaboration likelihood model of persuasion, with credibility as a factor in peripheral route of persuasion. Nevertheless also general lowering of social trust should explain social non-agreement. This lack of trust in experts and political institutions is perhaps caused by outwitting public in earlier years, its bad experiences with responsible officials, dangerous accidents (e.g. TMI, Chernobyl), increased influence that professions have over people's welfare, a greater value placed on equality and better educated public, etc. In 1996 the ARAO re-initiated the search for a LILW repository location with a new, so-called combined approach to the site selection, where the technical, geologically led process is combined with participation of local community. In order to get information on people's perception of the LILW repository construction, their willingness to accept it and factors that influence the acceptability, several surveys have been conducted. Groups of experts and lay persons answered the questionnaires. The results of

  5. Underground repository for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassibba, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    In the feasibility study for an underground repository in Argentina, the conceptual basis for the final disposal of high activity nuclear waste was set, as well as the biosphere isolation, according to the multiple barrier concept or to the engineering barrier system. As design limit, the container shall act as an engineering barrier, granting the isolation of the radionuclides for approximately 1000 years. The container for reprocessed and vitrified wastes shall have three metallic layers: a stainless steel inner layer, an external one of a metal to be selected and a thick intermediate lead layer preselected due to its good radiological protection and corrosion resistance. Therefore, the study of the lead corrosion behaviour in simulated media of an underground repository becomes necessary. Relevant parameters of the repository system such as temperature, pressure, water flux, variation in salt concentrations and oxidants supply shall be considered. At the same time, a study is necessary on the galvanic effect of lead coupled with different candidate metals for external layer of the container in the same experimental conditions. Also temporal evaluation about the engineering barrier system efficiency is presented in this thesis. It was considered the extrapolated results of corrosion rates and literature data about the other engineering barriers. Taking into account that corrosion is of a generalized type, the integrity of the lead shall be maintained for more than 1000 years and according to temporal evaluation, the multiple barrier concept shall retard the radionuclide dispersion to the biosphere for a period of time between 10 4 and 10 6 years. (Author) [es

  6. Knowledge repositories for multiple uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Keith; Riddle, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    In the life cycle of a complex physical device or part, for example, the docking bay door of the Space Station, there are many uses for knowledge about the device or part. The same piece of knowledge might serve several uses. Given the quantity and complexity of the knowledge that must be stored, it is critical to maintain the knowledge in one repository, in one form. At the same time, because of quantity and complexity of knowledge that must be used in life cycle applications such as cost estimation, re-design, and diagnosis, it is critical to automate such knowledge uses. For each specific use, a knowledge base must be available and must be in a from that promotes the efficient performance of that knowledge base. However, without a single source knowledge repository, the cost of maintaining consistent knowledge between multiple knowledge bases increases dramatically; as facts and descriptions change, they must be updated in each individual knowledge base. A use-neutral representation of a hydraulic system for the F-111 aircraft was developed. The ability to derive portions of four different knowledge bases is demonstrated from this use-neutral representation: one knowledge base is for re-design of the device using a model-based reasoning problem solver; two knowledge bases, at different levels of abstraction, are for diagnosis using a model-based reasoning solver; and one knowledge base is for diagnosis using an associational reasoning problem solver. It was shown how updates issued against the single source use-neutral knowledge repository can be propagated to the underlying knowledge bases.

  7. A transport logistic and cost model for use in repository design specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.S.; Manville, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    UK Nirex Ltd (Nirex) is responsible for developing a deep repository for the disposal of the United Kingdom's intermediate level waste and some low level waste. It also needs to be able to predict the total cost of the transport operations, and to compute the costs attributable to different combinations of sites and types of waste packages. This paper draws on work carried out as part of the assessment of Sellafield as a potential repository site, but will also show that many aspects of the transport system are independent of the actual repository location. To analyze the effects of all these possible scenarios and proposed operating practices on the costs and logistics of radioactive waste transport, Nirex commissioned the development of a flexible computer model from a software developer with the appropriate expertise. This paper describes how the LOGCOST model has been used to provide the information required for the repository design specification, and how it can readily be adapted to different potential repository locations and to changing requirements. In conclusion, it can be said that LOGCOST is a very effective transport and logistics model based on the Excel spread-sheet. The examples given have shown how LOGCOST can provide detailed predictions of radioactive waste transport costs, and how LOGCOST can be readily adapted to a new repository site or any other focal point for a transport network. (O.M.)

  8. Development of an object-oriented simulation code for repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Keiichi; Ahn, J.

    1999-01-01

    As understanding for mechanisms of radioactivity confinement by a deep geologic repository improves at the individual process level, it has become imperative to evaluate consequences of individual processes to the performance of the whole repository system. For this goal, the authors have developed a model for radionuclide transport in, and release from, the repository region by incorporating multiple-member decay chains and multiple waste canisters. A computer code has been developed with C++, an object-oriented language. By utilizing the feature that a geologic repository consists of thousands of objects of the same kind, such as the waste canister, the repository region is divided into multiple compartments and objects for simulation of radionuclide transport. Massive computational tasks are distributed over, and executed by, multiple networked workstations, with the help of parallel virtual machine (PVM) technology. Temporal change of the mass distribution of 28 radionuclides in the repository region for the time period of 100 million yr has been successfully obtained by the code

  9. Exploring how to engage Swedish Millennials with pension planning

    OpenAIRE

    LÖVGREN, ANDREAS; MAGNUSSON, MATTIAS

    2016-01-01

    An aging Swedish population is putting an increased pressure on the Swedish pension system. To address this, the Swedish pension system was reformed in the late 1990s. This reformation resulted in an increased individual responsibility for pension investments among the Swedish population. The individual responsibility has shown to be challenging for many since they feel a great uncertainty in this area. Adding to the notion that the Swedish population is aging; young Swedes are also entering ...

  10. National radioactive wasterRepository Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the scheme of the Mochovce National radioactive waste repository for the Slovak Republic is presented. The National radioactive waste repository in Mochovce is a surface type storage facility. It is intended for final disposal of solid and solidified low and intermediate radioactive waste produced during the operation of nuclear power plants and institutions located within the territory of the Slovak Republic. The Repository site is situated about 2 km northwest to the Mochovce NPP

  11. The European Repository Landscape 2008 Inventory of Digital Repositories for Research Output

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Graaf, Maurits

    2009-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that a common knowledge base for European research is necessary. Research repositories are an important innovation to the scientific information infrastructure. In 2006, digital repositories in the 27 countries of the European we

  12. A Single Global Small-User Nuclear Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conca, J.L.; Wright, J.

    2009-01-01

    Global energy partnerships in nuclear power, proposed by France, Russia, U.S. and England, seek to address the proliferation issue by controlling fuel production and nuclear materials, removing the need for each country to develop enrichment, fabrication, recycling or disposal capabilities. Several of the large generator countries such as France, the U.S., Japan, S. Korea, Russia, the U.K., China and India, all have plans for deep geologic repositories because they anticipate sufficient waste over the next century to justify the expense of a repository. However, countries having, or planning, less than five reactors, such as Egypt, Iran, Indonesia, Brazil and about 30 other countries, will not have sufficient waste generation, or a favorable geologic site, to justify the economic and environmental issues of developing their own repository. The Salado salt formation in New Mexico, set aside for nuclear waste disposal within the 16 square-mile area by the Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, is the most optimal geologic formation for the permanent disposal of any nuclear waste and is easily able to host all of the commercial nuclear waste that will be generated in the next thousand years. The U.S. commercial nuclear waste needs presently surpass all others, and will for the foreseeable future. Hosting the relatively small amount of waste from these small-user nations will add little to U.S. waste stream while the cost/benefit analysis from the standpoint of operations, safety, geology, cost and proliferation is overwhelmingly positive for developing such a global repository. Oceanic and overland transportation, high-level disposal logistics and costs from several programs, including WIPP, have demonstrated that the operation would pay for itself from international user fees with no U.S. taxpayer dollars required and still save the world about $400 billion over 100 years. The ethical considerations alone are compelling. (authors)

  13. Center for Leadership Development (CLD) Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Center for Leadership Development Repository stores various data including policies, procedures, governance, guidance, security, and financial documents of the...

  14. Workshop: Creating Your Institutional Research Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Grenz, Daryl M.

    2016-11-08

    In 2002, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) proposed the concept of an institutional repository to simultaneously disrupt and enhance the state of scholarly communications in the academic world. Thirteen years later, thousands of universities and other institutions have answered this call, but many more have not due to gaps in budgets, awareness and, most of all, practical guidance on creating an institutional repository. This workshop provides you with an essential primer on what it takes to establish a fully-functioning institutional repository. Every aspect of the process will be covered, including policies, procedures, staffing guidelines, workflows and repository technologies.

  15. Predominant discourses in Swedish nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Pilhammar-Anderson, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the predominant discourse in the field of Swedish nursing in 2000, 25 years after nursing was introduced as an academic discipline in Sweden. The method used was content analysis and deconstructive analysis of discourses. Laws, statutes, regulations, and examination requirements, including official reports, recruitment campaigns, and media coverage, were analyzed. The findings uncovered competing discourses striving to gain hegemony. In the public sector, official requirements competed against the media fixation on gender stereotypes and the realities of local recruitment campaigns. Media has a major role in disseminating prevailing conceptions and conventions pertaining to the nursing profession. As a result, decision makers, students, patients, and family members could get lower expectations of the professional competence of nursing practitioners than would otherwise have been the case in the absence of media exposure.

  16. Studies in Swedish Energy Opinion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Soeren; Hedberg, Per

    2012-07-01

    the 1970s, energy production was politicized big time in the industrialized world. The birth of the environmental movement, the oil crises in 1973 - 74 and the beginning conflict surrounding civilian nuclear power, put energy issues center stage on the political agenda. Energy policies - especially related to the development of nuclear power - came to dominate election campaigns, like in Sweden in 1976 or be the subject of referendums, like in Austria in 1978 or in Sweden in 1980. Critical voices toward the peaceful use of nuclear power - having started in America before being exported to Europe - gained real strength and public support all over the Western world by the nuclear accident at the Three Mile Island plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1979. The energy genie was out of the bottle and out to stay. Fueled by the nuclear meltdowns in Chernobyl in 1986 and in Fukushima in 2011 and supplemented by conflicts over how to reduce the use of oil and coal, how to sensibly exploit the waste gas reserves, and how to develop renewable energy sources based on sun, wind and waves – have made all kinds of energy issues the focal point of political contentions ever since the early 1970s. In Sweden, as in many other countries, energy policies - often with nuclear power in the center - have been one of the most fought-over policy areas during the last thirty-forty years. And the contentious character of energy policies is not limited to the elite level of politics - to politicians, to media pundits or to lobbyists. It is also manifest among ordinary citizens. Energy issues - nuclear power and wind power in particular - are highly polarizing among voters as well. Given this historic background, starting in the 1970s, it was rather natural that energy questions - featuring most prominently questions related to nuclear power - would be important parts of the voter surveys performed by the Swedish National Elections Studies (SNES) at the Univ. of Gothenburg. The first book

  17. Swedish national plan for the management of all radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Authority has developed. The following four prioritised areas are discussed in the report: the need for safe interim storage and disposal of non-nuclear radioactive waste, shortcomings in the monitoring of radioactive materials in society, the need for a clarification of responsibilities in legislation and the need for a long-term preservation of information regarding repositories of radioactive waste. The report presents an overview regarding what happens with radioactive waste streams from nuclear activities (nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities) and from non-nuclear activities (hospitals, research, education and industry), i.e. where the different categories of radioactive waste arise in society and how they are managed, including disposal. Together with this report, there is a description of the actors involved in the waste streams in one way or other, along with the division of responsibilities among them. In most cases, the action proposals point towards a solution without being too specific. The consequences are difficult to quantify, but the analysis provides the basis for further studies by structuring benefit and cost items and by providing indicators regarding what further knowledge is required in order to develop financial estimates in those cases it has not been done. The total benefit of implementing the action proposals falls primarily on the general public, as the proposals contribute to the environmental work and, by 2020, there will be an all-embracing waste-management system whereby all types of radioactive waste will be managed and disposed of safely. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority expects that more detailed analyses will be carried out when each action proposal is implemented; the precise nature of the proposals can then be determined and it will be easier to provide a more exact estimate of the effects of the proposals

  18. Biomass and Swedish energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt

    2001-01-01

    The use of biomass in Sweden has increased by 44% between 1990 and 1999. In 1999 it was 85 TWh, equivalent to 14% of the total Swedish energy supply. The existence of large forest industry and district heating systems has been an essential condition for this expansion. The tax reform in 1991 seems, however, to have been the most important factor responsible for the rapid bioenergy expansion. Through this reform, the taxation of fossil fuels in district heating systems increased by approximately 30-160%, depending on fuel, whereas bioenergy remained untaxed. Industry is exempted from the energy tax and pays reduced carbon tax. No tax is levied on fossil fuels used for electricity production. Investment grants have existed for biomass-based electricity production but these grants have not been large enough to make biomass-based electricity production economically competitive in a period of falling electricity prices. Despite this, the biomass-based electricity production has increased slightly between 1990 and 1999. A new taxation system aiming at a removal of the tax difference between the industry, district heating and electricity sectors has recently been analysed by the Swedish government. One risk with such a system is that it reduces the competitiveness for biomass in district heating systems as it seems unlikely that the taxes on fossil fuels in the industry and electricity sectors will increase to a level much higher than in other countries. A new system, based on green certificates, for supporting electricity from renewable energy sources has also been proposed by the government.

  19. Scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance of the waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.

    2000-01-01

    The recent successful certification and opening of a first-of-a-kind, deep geological repository for safe disposal of long-lived, transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, New Mexico, United States of America (USA), embody both long-standing local and wide-spread, gradually achieved, scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance. The related historical background and development are outlined and the main contributors to the successful siting, certification, and acceptance of the WIPP TRUW repository, which may also serve as a model to success for other radioactive waste disposal programs, are described. (author)

  20. Long term effects on potential repository sites: occurrence and diagenesis of anhydrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, A.H.; George, I.A.; Milodowski, A.E.; Darling, W.G.

    1985-10-01

    The report deals with the long-term behaviour of anhydrite as a potential host rock for deep disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The principal long-term effect on the integrity of such a repository is the possibility of penetration of groundwater and consequent transformation to gypsum. Therefore, in order to assess the chydrological and geochemical processes of hydration in detail, mineralogical and geochemical analyses have been carried out on anhydrite samples in a drillcore taken near Darlington, United Kingdom. The results are discussed in terms of the long-term integrity of anhydrite as a repository site. (U.K.)

  1. U. S. working draft on repository physical descriptions in a salt formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibbe, R.K.

    1978-05-01

    This preliminary report presents a physical description of a reference deep-geologic repository located in a bedded salt host rock at a depth of about 600 meters. Two reference repository designs are described in this report. One is designed to accept wastes from a light-water reactor (LWR) strategy in which no reprocessing occurs, and the spent fuel itself is considered a waste form. The second is designed to accept wastes from an LWR strategy with reprocessing, in which uranium and plutonium are recycled.

  2. Partitioning and transmutation. Current developments - 2010. A report from the Swedish reference group for PT-research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, Jan; Karlsson, Fred; Pomp, Stephan; Aneheim, Emma; Ekberg, Christian; Fermvik, Anna; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Wallenius, Janne; Zakova, Jitka; Grenthe, Ingemar; Szabo, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    The research and development on methods for partitioning and transmutation (P and T) of long-lived radionuclides in spent nuclear fuel has attracted considerable interest during the last decade. The main objective of P and T is to eliminate or at least substantially reduce the amount of such long-lived radionuclides that has to go to a deep geological repository for final disposal. The objective of current research on partitioning is to find and develop processes suitable for separation of the heavier actinides (and possibly some long-lived fission products) on an industrial scale. The objective of current research on transmutation is to define, investigate and develop facilities that may be suitable for transmutation of the long-lived radionuclides. The research on partitioning has made important progress in recent years. In some cases one has succeeded to separate americium and curium. Many challenges remain however. Within hydrochemistry one has achieved sufficiently good distribution and separation factors. The focus turns now towards development of an operating process. The search for ligands that give sufficiently good extraction and separation will continue but with less intensity. The emphasis will rather be on improving stability against hydrolysis and radiolysis. This may be achieved either by additives to the solvent or by selection of a proper solvent. The development of processes and equipment must be intensified. Pyrochemical research is looking into methods for recovery of uranium and for separating fission products with large neutron cross sections. The objective is to avoid separation of plutonium from other transuranium elements and thus simplify the proliferation issue. The future work is focused on improved selectivity and on technical development. Design of processes and equipment is difficult due to the aggressive properties of the melts and the relatively high temperatures required. The fabrication of fuel for transmutation and the

  3. Partitioning and transmutation. Current developments - 2010. A report from the Swedish reference group for PT-research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, Jan (ed.) (Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology, SKC, Stockholm (Sweden)); Karlsson, Fred (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Pomp, Stephan (Uppsala Univ., Uppsala, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Div. of Applied Nuclear Physics (Sweden)); Aneheim, Emma; Ekberg, Christian; Fermvik, Anna; Skarnemark, Gunnar (Nuclear Chemistry, Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Wallenius, Janne; Zakova, Jitka (Reactor Physics Div., Physics Dept., Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Grenthe, Ingemar; Szabo, Zoltan (School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    The research and development on methods for partitioning and transmutation (P and T) of long-lived radionuclides in spent nuclear fuel has attracted considerable interest during the last decade. The main objective of P and T is to eliminate or at least substantially reduce the amount of such long-lived radionuclides that has to go to a deep geological repository for final disposal. The objective of current research on partitioning is to find and develop processes suitable for separation of the heavier actinides (and possibly some long-lived fission products) on an industrial scale. The objective of current research on transmutation is to define, investigate and develop facilities that may be suitable for transmutation of the long-lived radionuclides. The research on partitioning has made important progress in recent years. In some cases one has succeeded to separate americium and curium. Many challenges remain however. Within hydrochemistry one has achieved sufficiently good distribution and separation factors. The focus turns now towards development of an operating process. The search for ligands that give sufficiently good extraction and separation will continue but with less intensity. The emphasis will rather be on improving stability against hydrolysis and radiolysis. This may be achieved either by additives to the solvent or by selection of a proper solvent. The development of processes and equipment must be intensified. Pyrochemical research is looking into methods for recovery of uranium and for separating fission products with large neutron cross sections. The objective is to avoid separation of plutonium from other transuranium elements and thus simplify the proliferation issue. The future work is focused on improved selectivity and on technical development. Design of processes and equipment is difficult due to the aggressive properties of the melts and the relatively high temperatures required. The fabrication of fuel for transmutation and the

  4. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the spent fuels and other wastes that will be disposed of in a geologic repository. The two major sources of these materials are commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized high-level waste (HLW). Other wastes that may require long-term isolation include non-LWR spent fuels and miscellaneous sources such as activated metals. Detailed characterizations are required for all of these potential repository wastes. These characterizations include physical, chemical, and radiological properties. The latter must take into account decay as a function of time. This information has been extracted from primary data sources, evaluated, and assembled in a Characteristics Data Base which provides data in four formats: hard copy standard reports, menu-driven personal computer (PC) data bases, program-level PC data bases, and mainframe computer files. The Characteristics Data Base provides a standard set of self-consistent data to the various areas of responsibility including systems integration and waste stream analysis, storage, transportation, and geologic disposal. The data will be used for design studies, evaluation of alternatives, and system optimization by OCRWM and supporting contractors. 7 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  5. INIS: Nuclear Grey Literature Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savić, Dobrica

    2016-01-01

    As one of the world's largest collections of published information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology, INIS represents an extraordinary example of world cooperation. Currently, as INIS members, 130 countries and 24 international organizations share and allow access to their valuable nuclear information resources, preserving them for future generations and offering a freely available nuclear knowledge repository. Since its creation in 1970, INIS has collected and provided access to more than 3.8 million bibliographic references to publications, documents, technical reports, non-copyrighted documentation, and other grey literature, as well as over a million full texts. Public interest throughout the years in accessing the INIS Collection has been remarkable. This paper deals with the challenges faced by INIS in its endeavour to increase the use, accessibility, usability and expandability of its on-line repository. It also describes document collection, the features and characteristics of implementing a new search engine, as well as the lessons learned. (author)

  6. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Wieczorek, K.; Feddersen, H.K.; Staupendahl, G.; Coyle, A.J.; Kalia, H.; Eckert, J.

    1986-12-01

    This document is the third joint annual report on the Cooperative German-American 'Brine Migration Tests' that are in progress at the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This Government supported mine serves as an underground test facility for research and development (R and D)-work in the field of nuclear waste repository research and simulation experiments. The tests are designed to simulate a nuclear waste repository to measure the effects of heat and gamma radiation on brine migration, salt decrepitation, disassociation of brine, and gases collected. The thermal mechanical behavior of salt, such as room closure, stresses and changes of the properties of salt are measured and compared with predicted behavior. This document covers the following sections: Issues and test objectives: This section presents issues that are investigated by the Brine Migration Test, and the test objectives derived from these issues; test site: This section describes the test site location and geology in the Asse mine; test description: A description of the test configuration, procedures, equipment, and instrumentation is given in this section; actual test chronology: The actual history of the test, in terms of the dates at which major activities occured, is presented in this section. Test results: This section presents the test results observed to data and the planned future work that is needed to complete the test; conclusions and recommendations: This section summarizes the conclusions derived to date regarding the Brine Migration Test. Additional work that would be useful to resolve the issues is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration - SURAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerka, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Atomic Act specifies, among other things, responsibilities of the government in the field of safe disposal of radioactive wastes. To satisfy this responsibility, the Ministry of Industry and Trade has established the Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration (SURAO). SURAO's major responsibilities include: (a) the preparation, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of radioactive waste repositories and the monitoring of their environmental impacts; (b) radioactive waste management; (c) spent or irradiated nuclear fuel processing into a form suitable for storage/disposal or reuse; (d) record-keeping of received radioactive wastes and their producers; (e) administration of fund transfers as stipulated by the Atomic Act, Article 27; (f) development of proposals for specification of fees to be paid to the Nuclear Account; (g) responsibility for and coordination of research and development in the field of radioactive waste handling and management; (h) supervision of licensees' margin earmarked for the decommissioning of their facilities; (i) providing services in radioactive waste handling and management; (j) handling and management of radioactive wastes that have been transferred to the Czech Republic from abroad and cannot be sent back; (k) interim administration of radioactive wastes that have become state property. The Statute of the Administration is reproduced in full. (P.A.)

  8. Environmental impact assessment of the Swedish high-level radioactive waste disposal system - examples of likely considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Sweden is investigating the feasibility of establishing a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system consisting of three components as follows: (1) Encapsulation facility, (2) system for transporting waste and (3) geologic repository. Swedish law requires that an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) be written for any planned action expected to have a significant impact on the environment. Before embarking on construction and operation of a HLW disposal system, the Swedish government will evaluate the expected environmental impacts to assure that the Swedish people and environmental will not be unduly affected by the disposal system. The EIA process requires that reasonable alternatives to the proposed action, including the 'zero' or 'no action' alternative, be considered so that the final approved plan for disposal will have undergone scrutiny and comparison of alternatives to arrive at a plan which is the best achievable given reasonable physical and monetary constraints. This report has been prepared by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) for use by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI). The purpose of this report is to establish a document which outlines the types of information which would be in an EIA for a three part disposal system like that envisioned by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) for the disposal of Sweden's HLW. Technical information that would normally be included in an EIA is outlined in this document. The SSI's primary interest is in radiological impacts. However, for the sake of completeness and also to evaluate all environmental impacts in a single document, non-radiological impacts are also included. Swedish authorities other than the SSI may have interest in the non-radiological parts of the document. 26 refs

  9. Suicide rate among former Swedish peacekeeping personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Per-Olof; Lundin, Tom; Larsson, Gerry

    2007-03-01

    Increased suicide rates for military personnel suffering from post-traumatic stress disorders have been reported in various countries. Although it is known that some peacekeepers are exposed to potentially traumatic events and are thus at risk of suffering from post-traumatic stress reactions, only a few studies have examined suicide rates in this group. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the suicide rate among former Swedish peacekeeping personnel. We compared 39,768 former Swedish peacekeepers to the general population in the National General Population Registry and the Cause-of-Death Registry. A lower number of suicides was found among former Swedish peacekeepers than in the general population. In conclusion, Swedish personnel serving in international peace-keeping operations do not show a higher suicide rate than the general population. Unique problems associated with this research area are discussed.

  10. Electronic Repository of Russian Historical Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tykhonov, Vyacheslav; Kessler, Gijs; Markevich, Andrei; de Vries, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The Electronic Repository for Russian Historical Statistics brings together data extracted from various published and unpublished sources in one place. Its principal focus is Russian economic and social history of the last three centuries (18th-21st). The repository caters to the needs of the

  11. Towards Content Development For Institutional Digital Repository ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth in Information and Communication Technology has lead to the emergence of Institutional Digital Repository, a digital archive for the preservation and dissemination of institutional research outputs. Institutional Digital Repositories make possible global dissemination of research outputs through the use of the ...

  12. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood

  13. Analisis Konten dan Kebijakan Akses Institutional Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirul Ulum

    2016-07-01

    Abstract; Institutional repository has become a major concern of higher education in Indonesia. The number of institutional respository was increased, one of the reason is the ranking web of repositories has been conducted by the Cybermetrics Lab in 2008. At that time, many institutions started to build institutional repository in order to manage the scientific work and also trying to reach the better ranks. Meanwhile, it is an achievement of institution performance which can be promote and increase visibility for the institution. University of Surabaya has also developed the institutional repository and managed by the library. The aims of this study is to analyze the content availability and access policies defined by the University of Surabaya repository  providing services to the academic community and external users. The method used in this study by using observations of the institutional repository University of Surabaya with a literature review to clarify the analysis of the content and access policies. The results of this study indicate that the library's role is has the authority to manage the scientific work of academic community can be done through the institutional repository. However there is still need for library to be proactive to communicate regulations on mandatory deposit of scientific work and create intensive promotion of the institutional repository.

  14. Asset Reuse of Images from a Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    According to Markus's theory of reuse, when digital repositories are deployed to collect and distribute organizational assets, they supposedly help ensure accountability, extend information exchange, and improve productivity. Such repositories require a large investment due to the continuing costs of hardware, software, user licenses, training,…

  15. Decompression of magma into repository tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; Woods, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    It is nontrivial to find and design safe repository sites for nuclear waste. It appears common sense to drill tunnels as repository sites in a mountain in remote and relatively dry regions. However, erosion of the waste canisters by naturally abundant chemicals in the mountains water cycle remains a

  16. Types of Online Hierarchical Repository Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Azran, Ronit; Hardof-Jaffe, Sharon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an empirical investigation of online hierarchical repositories of items presented to university students in Web-supported course websites, using Web mining methods. To this end, data from 1747 courses were collected, and the use of online repositories of content items in these courses was examined. At a later stage, courses…

  17. ORBi – Open Repository and Bibliography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Iva; Doleželová, Jana; Lhoták, Martin

    -, 1-2 (2011) E-ISSN 1805-2800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70830501 Keywords : repository * open access * ORBi * University of Liege http://www.lib.cas.cz/casopis-informace/orbi-%E2%80%93-open- repository -and-bibliography/

  18. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  19. Swedish programme for disposal of radioactive waste - geological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, G.; Karlsson, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes of different types are generated in the course of electrical production. These wastes, which already exist and will continue to exist irrespective of the future for nuclear power in Sweden, are potential hazards if not properly managed. SKB in close co-operation with Swedish and international scientists and engineers have demonstrated the need to construct and operate a waste management system that will ensure very high safety for a long period of time. SKB has further demonstrated that with presently available technology it is possible to construct a final repository for long-lived wastes in Sweden that meets very high standards with respect to safety and radiation protection. SKB has also presented a programme for the research, development and other measures that are required to achieve an optimized disposal site system in Sweden. This programme is comprehensive and the strong support of national and international experts. Examples of research projects discussed in the present paper are: (a) efforts to describe the major zones in the rock mass, (b) characterization of low-conductive rock masses, (c) studies of post-glacial faulting and (d) the importance of natural analogues. The rationale for one of the most important projects in progress - the Hard Rock Laboratory - is also presented. (authors)

  20. Building didactic content repositories: method and tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Marciniak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the method and tools which allows to build repositories of didactic materials in SCORM using UCTS taxonomic system and Content Repository software. SCORM is a universal specification designed to create reusable materials in digital format. UCTS is a taxonomic model which allows to attribute didactic interpretations to content components. Content Repository is a web software designed to create, store and process didactic content in SCORM. The method was verified while creating E-archeology Content Repository which stores e-learning materials on protection and management of archeological heritage. The repository contains approximately 4500 Learning Objects in 5 languages and about 800 components of didactically useful e-learning components described in UCTS.

  1. Expected repository environments in granite: thermal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osnes, J.D.; Coates, G.K.; DeJong, K.B.; Loken, M.C.; Wagner, R.A.

    1984-10-01

    This report was prepared for the Reference Repository Conditions - Interface Working Group and will be used to formulate a standardized description of repository conditions for use by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. A baseline repository in granite is defined and three waste types are considered: unreprocessed spent fuel, commercial high-level waste, and defense high-level waste. Three different scales of repository environment are described - the very-near field (near the waste canister), the near field (the room and pillar), and the far field (the entire repository and surro