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Sample records for swedish alzheimer amyloid

  1. Cholinergic neurodegeneration in an Alzheimer mouse model overexpressing amyloid-precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foidl, Bettina Maria; Do-Dinh, Patricia; Hutter-Schmid, Bianca; Bliem, Harald R; Humpel, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder that is mainly characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposition, Tau pathology and dysfunction of the cholinergic system causing memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to examine (1) anxiety and cognition, (2) Aβ plaque deposition and (3) degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) and cortical cholinergic innervation in an Alzheimer mouse model (APP_SweDI; overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Swedish K670N/M671L, Dutch E693Q, and Iowa D694N mutations). Our results show that 12-month-old APP_SweDI mice were more anxious and had more memory impairment. A large number of Aβ plaques were already visible at the age of 6 months and increased with age. A significant decrease in cholinergic neurons was seen in the transgenic mouse model in comparison to the wild-type mice, identified by immunohistochemistry against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and p75 neurotrophin receptor as well as by in situ hybridization. Moreover, a significant decrease in cortical cholinergic fiber density was found in the transgenic mice as compared to the wild-type. In the cerebral cortex of APP_SweDI mice, swollen cholinergic varicosities were seen in the vicinity of Aβ plaques. In conclusion, the present study shows that in an AD mouse model (APP_SweDI mice) a high Aβ plaque load in the cortex causes damage to cholinergic axons in the cortex, followed by subsequent retrograde-induced cell death of cholinergic neurons and some forms of compensatory processes. This degeneration was accompanied by enhanced anxiety and impaired cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibitors of cathepsin B improve memory and reduce beta-amyloid in transgenic Alzheimer disease mice expressing the wild-type, but not the Swedish mutant, beta-secretase site of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian Y H; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2008-03-21

    Elucidation of Abeta-lowering agents that inhibit processing of the wild-type (WT) beta-secretase amyloid precursor protein (APP) site, present in most Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, is a logical approach for improving memory deficit in AD. The cysteine protease inhibitors CA074Me and E64d were selected by inhibition of beta-secretase activity in regulated secretory vesicles that produce beta-amyloid (Abeta). The regulated secretory vesicle activity, represented by cathepsin B, selectively cleaves the WT beta-secretase site but not the rare Swedish mutant beta-secretase site. In vivo treatment of London APP mice, expressing the WT beta-secretase site, with these inhibitors resulted in substantial improvement in memory deficit assessed by the Morris water maze test. After inhibitor treatment, the improved memory function was accompanied by reduced amyloid plaque load, decreased Abeta40 and Abeta42, and reduced C-terminal beta-secretase fragment derived from APP by beta-secretase. However, the inhibitors had no effects on any of these parameters in mice expressing the Swedish mutant beta-secretase site of APP. The notable efficacy of these inhibitors to improve memory and reduce Abeta in an AD animal model expressing the WT beta-secretase APP site present in the majority of AD patients provides support for CA074Me and E64d inhibitors as potential AD therapeutic agents.

  3. Alzheimer's disease 2012: the great amyloid gamble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2012-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease threatens to become the scourge of the 21st century. Hundreds of millions of aging people throughout the world are at risk, but it is clear that the disease encompasses more than just the natural aging process. Deposits of amyloid β peptides in the brains of demented individuals are a defining feature of the disease, yet two decades of intensive investigation, focusing on reducing or removing amyloid deposits, have failed to produce any meaningful therapeutic interventions. Some researchers question whether amyloid is the appropriate target. Others maintain that early, presymptomatic intervention would be a more informative test, and propose large-scale clinical trials in patients who are believed to be in the earliest, and potentially reversible, stages of the disease. This review explores the wisdom of that approach. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep in Alzheimer's Disease–Beyond Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrah K. Holth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are prevalent in Alzheimer's disease (AD and a major cause of institutionalization. Like AD pathology, sleep abnormalities can appear years before cognitive decline and may be predictive of dementia. A bidirectional relationship between sleep and amyloid β (Aβ has been well established with disturbed sleep and increased wakefulness leading to increased Aβ production and decreased Aβ clearance; whereas Aβ deposition is associated with increased wakefulness and sleep disturbances. Aβ fluctuates with the sleep-wake cycle and is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. This fluctuation is lost with Aβ deposition, likely due to its sequestration into amyloid plaques. As such, Aβ is believed to play a significant role in the development of sleep disturbances in the preclinical and clinical phases of AD. In addition to Aβ, the influence of tau AD pathology is likely important to the sleep disturbances observed in AD. Abnormal tau is the earliest observable AD-like pathology in the brain with abnormal tau phosphorylation in many sleep regulating regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe, tuberomammillary nucleus, parabrachial nucleus, and basal forebrain prior to the appearance of amyloid or cortical tau pathology. Furthermore, human tau mouse models exhibit AD-like sleep disturbances and sleep changes are common in other tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia and progressive supranuclear palsy. Together these observations suggest that tau pathology can induce sleep disturbances and may play a large role in the sleep disruption seen in AD. To elucidate the relationship between sleep and AD it will be necessary to not only understand the role of amyloid but also tau and how these two pathologies, together with comorbid pathology such as alpha-synuclein, interact and affect sleep regulation in the brain.

  5. Zn2+Interaction with Alzheimer Amyloid β Protein Calcium Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson Arispe; Harvey B. Pollard; Eduardo Rojas

    1996-01-01

    The Alzheimer disease 40-residue amyloid β protein (Aβ P[1-40]) forms cation-selective channels across acidic phospholipid bilayer membranes with spontaneous transitions over a wide range of conductances ranging from 40 to 4000 pS...

  6. Is the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease therapeutically relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Andrew F; Arancio, Ottavio

    2012-09-01

    The conventional view of AD (Alzheimer's disease) is that much of the pathology is driven by an increased load of β-amyloid in the brain of AD patients (the 'Amyloid Hypothesis'). Yet, many therapeutic strategies based on lowering β-amyloid have so far failed in clinical trials. This failure of β-amyloid-lowering agents has caused many to question the Amyloid Hypothesis itself. However, AD is likely to be a complex disease driven by multiple factors. In addition, it is increasingly clear that β-amyloid processing involves many enzymes and signalling pathways that play a role in a diverse array of cellular processes. Thus the clinical failure of β-amyloid-lowering agents does not mean that the hypothesis itself is incorrect; it may simply mean that manipulating β-amyloid directly is an unrealistic strategy for therapeutic intervention, given the complex role of β-amyloid in neuronal physiology. Another possible problem may be that toxic β-amyloid levels have already caused irreversible damage to downstream cellular pathways by the time dementia sets in. We argue in the present review that a more direct (and possibly simpler) approach to AD therapeutics is to rescue synaptic dysfunction directly, by focusing on the mechanisms by which elevated levels of β-amyloid disrupt synaptic physiology.

  7. Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Christian; Ziegler, Christine

    2017-11-01

    For 25 years, the amyloid cascade hypothesis, based on the finding that mutations in the amyloid precursor protein are closely linked to familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), dominated the research on this disease. Recent failures of clinical anti-amyloidogenic trials, however, substantially support the reasoning (i) that the pathomechanisms that trigger familial AD, namely the generation, aggregation, and deposition of amyloid beta, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to sporadic cases and (ii) that amyloid beta represents a prominent histopathological feature in AD but not its exclusive causative factor. In autumn 2016, the Volkswagen Foundation hosted the Herrenhausen Symposium 'Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease' in Hannover, Germany, to bring together current knowledge on cellular and molecular processes that contribute to AD pathogenesis independent of or alongside with the amyloid biochemistry. The following mini review series was authored by key speakers at the meeting, and highlights some of the mechanisms potentially involved in AD etiology that provide alternative viewpoints and mechanisms beyond the amyloid cascade hypothesis. This article is part of the series "Beyond Amyloid". © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-04

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutation screening of patients with Alzheimer disease identifies APP locus duplication in a Swedish patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Missense mutations in three different genes encoding amyloid-β precursor protein, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are recognized to cause familial early-onset Alzheimer disease. Also duplications of the amyloid precursor protein gene have been shown to cause the disease. At the Dept. of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, patients are referred for mutation screening for the identification of nucleotide variations and for determining copy-number of the APP locus. Methods We combined the method of microsatellite marker genotyping with a quantitative real-time PCR analysis to detect duplications in patients with Alzheimer disease. Results In 22 DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer disease, we identified one patient carrying a duplication on chromosome 21 which included the APP locus. Further mapping of the chromosomal region by array-comparative genome hybridization showed that the duplication spanned a maximal region of 1.09 Mb. Conclusions This is the first report of an APP duplication in a Swedish Alzheimer patient and describes the use of quantitative real-time PCR as a tool for determining copy-number of the APP locus. PMID:22044463

  10. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect

    KAUST Repository

    Demetrius, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-14

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events—mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model.

  11. Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities in amyloid-modifying therapeutic trials: Recommendations from the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable Workgroup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperling, R.A.; Jack, C.R.; Black, S.E.; Frosch, M.P.; Greenberg, S.M.; Hyman, B.T.; Scheltens, P.; Carrillo, M.C.; Thies, W.; Bednar, M.M.; Black, R.S.; Brashear, H.R.; Grundman, M.; Siemers, E.R.; Feldman, H.H.; Schindler, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid imaging related abnormalities (ARIA) have now been reported in clinical trials with multiple therapeutic avenues to lower amyloid-β burden in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In response to concerns raised by the Food and Drug Administration, the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened

  12. Amyloid imaging in prodromal Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, R.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Prins, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment are at an increased risk of progression to Alzheimer's disease. However, not all patients with mild cognitive impairment progress, and it is difficult to accurately identify those patients who are in the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease. In a recent

  13. Will PET amyloid imaging lead to overdiagnosis of Alzheimer dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroff, Jacob G; Nasrallah, Ilya M

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes dementia, affects millions of elderly Americans and represents a growing problem with the aging of the population. There has been an increasing effort for improved and earlier diagnosis for AD. Several newly developed radiolabeled compounds targeting β-amyloid plaques, one of the major pathologic biomarkers of AD, have recently become available for clinical use. These radiopharmaceuticals allow for in vivo noninvasive visualization of abnormal β-amyloid deposits in the brain using positron emission tomography (PET). Amyloid PET imaging has demonstrated high sensitivity for pathologic cerebral amyloid deposition in multiple studies. Principal drawbacks to this new diagnostic test are declining specificity in older age groups and uncertain clinical role given lack of disease-modifying therapy for AD. Although there is strong evidence for the utility of amyloid PET in certain situations, detailed in a set of guidelines for appropriate use from the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the question of overdiagnosis, the diagnosis of a disease that would result in neither symptoms nor deaths, using this new medical tool needs to be carefully considered in light of efforts to secure reimbursement for the new technology that is already widely available for use as a clinical tool. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heat shock proteins and amateur chaperones in amyloid-Beta accumulation and clearance in Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The pathologic lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by accumulation of protein aggregates consisting of intracellular or extracellular misfolded proteins. The amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein accumulates extracellularly in senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, whereas the

  15. Myo-inositol changes precede amyloid pathology and relate to APOE genotype in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voevodskaya, Olga; Sundgren, Pia C; Strandberg, Olof; Zetterberg, Henrik; Minthon, Lennart; Blennow, Kaj; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-05-10

    We aimed to test whether in vivo levels of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) metabolites myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and choline are abnormal already during preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD), relating these changes to amyloid or tau pathology, and functional connectivity. In this cross-sectional multicenter study (a subset of the prospective Swedish BioFINDER study), we included 4 groups, representing the different stages of predementia AD: (1) cognitively healthy elderly with normal CSF β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42), (2) cognitively healthy elderly with abnormal CSF Aβ42, (3) patients with subjective cognitive decline and abnormal CSF Aβ42, (4) patients with mild cognitive decline and abnormal CSF Aβ42 (Ntotal = 352). Spectroscopic markers measured in the posterior cingulate/precuneus were considered alongside known disease biomarkers: CSF Aβ42, phosphorylated tau, total tau, [(18)F]-flutemetamol PET, f-MRI, and the genetic risk factor APOE. Amyloid-positive cognitively healthy participants showed a significant increase in mI/creatine and mI/NAA levels compared to amyloid-negative healthy elderly (p functional connectivity within the default mode network (rpearson = -0.16, p = 0.02), independently of amyloid pathology. mI levels are elevated already at asymptomatic stages of AD. Moreover, mI/creatine concentrations were increased in healthy APOE ε4 carriers with normal CSF Aβ42 levels, suggesting that mI levels may reveal regional brain consequences of APOE ε4 before detectable amyloid pathology. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrius, Lloyd A.; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events—mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model. PMID:25642192

  17. Amyloid-beta-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lannfelt, Lars; Relkin, N. R.; Siemers, E.R.

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are limited to medications that reduce dementia symptoms. Given the rapidly ageing populations in most areas of the world, new therapeutic interventions for AD are urgently needed. In recent years, a number of drug candidates targeting the amyloid-ss (A ss) peptide have advanced into clinical trials; however, most have failed because of safety issues or lack of efficacy. The A ss peptide is central to the pathogenesis, and immunotherapy a...

  18. A transgenic rat expressing human APP with the Swedish Alzheimer's disease mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Ronnie; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Kloskowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, transgenic mice have become valuable tools for studying mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the aim of developing an animal model better for memory and neurobehavioural testing, we have generated a transgenic rat model of AD. These animals express human amyloid precursor...... protein (APP) containing the Swedish AD mutation. The highest level of expression in the brain is found in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Starting after the age of 15 months, the rats show increased tau phosphorylation and extracellular Abeta staining. The Abeta is found predominantly...... in cerebrovascular blood vessels with very rare diffuse plaques. We believe that crossing these animals with mutant PS1 transgenic rats will result in accelerated plaque formation similar to that seen in transgenic mice....

  19. Cross-interactions between the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid-β Peptide and Other Amyloid Proteins: A Further Aspect of the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Gräslund, Astrid; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-05

    Many protein folding diseases are intimately associated with accumulation of amyloid aggregates. The amyloid materials formed by different proteins/peptides share many structural similarities, despite sometimes large amino acid sequence differences. Some amyloid diseases constitute risk factors for others, and the progression of one amyloid disease may affect the progression of another. These connections are arguably related to amyloid aggregates of one protein being able to directly nucleate amyloid formation of another, different protein: the amyloid cross-interaction. Here, we discuss such cross-interactions between the Alzheimer disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and other amyloid proteins in the context of what is known from in vitro and in vivo experiments, and of what might be learned from clinical studies. The aim is to clarify potential molecular associations between different amyloid diseases. We argue that the amyloid cascade hypothesis in Alzheimer disease should be expanded to include cross-interactions between Aβ and other amyloid proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Genetic determinants of white matter hyperintensities and amyloid angiopathy in familial Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, Natalie S.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Kim, Lois; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Barber, Philip A.; Walsh, Phoebe; Gami, Priya; Morris, Huw R.; Bastos-Leite, António J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Beck, Jon; Mead, Simon; Chavez-Gutierrez, Lucia; de Strooper, Bart; Rossor, Martin N.; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C.

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) treatment trials raise interest in the variable occurrence of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA); an emerging important factor in amyloid-modifying therapy. Previous pathological studies reported particularly severe CAA with postcodon 200 PSEN1 mutations and amyloid

  1. Vaccinium uliginosum L. Improves Amyloid ? Protein-Induced Learning and Memory Impairment in Alzheimer?s Disease in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Kwon, Hyuck-Se; Shin, Se-Gye; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of Vaccinium uliginosum L. (bilberry) on the learning and memory impairments induced by amyloid-? protein (A?P) 1-42. ICR Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: the control (A?40-1A), control with 5% bilberry group (A?40-1B), amyloid ? protein 1-42 treated group (A?1-42A), and A?1-42 with 5% bilberry group (A?1-42B). The control was treated with amyloid ?-protein 40-1 for placebo effect, and Alzheimer?s disease (AD) group was treated with amyloid ?-p...

  2. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. BETA-AMYLOID AS PATHOGENESIS OF ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Ary Mahendri Pattni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Alzheimer disease is often causing cognitive decline in elder population. The incidence of this disease is increasing by the age, about 0,3% to 0,6% it affects individuals aged 65 to 69 years, and 5,3% - 7,5% affects individuals aged 65 to 69 years. Alzheimer also affects individuals aged less then 65 years and known as early onset of Alzheimer disease that is caused by increasing of Beta-Amyloid aggregation from the mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APP. From the accumulation of this substance may trigger the cascade lost of some synaps in the brain and arising Alzheimer type of Dementia. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. Polymorphic structures of Alzheimer's β-amyloid globulomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolding and self-assembly of Amyloid-β (Aβ peptides into amyloid fibrils is pathologically linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Polymorphic Aβ structures derived from monomers to intermediate oligomers, protofilaments, and mature fibrils have been often observed in solution. Some aggregates are on-pathway species to amyloid fibrils, while the others are off-pathway species that do not evolve into amyloid fibrils. Both on-pathway and off-pathway species could be biologically relevant species. But, the lack of atomic-level structural information for these Aβ species leads to the difficulty in the understanding of their biological roles in amyloid toxicity and amyloid formation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we model a series of molecular structures of Aβ globulomers assembled by monomer and dimer building blocks using our peptide-packing program and explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Structural and energetic analysis shows that although Aβ globulomers could adopt different energetically favorable but structurally heterogeneous conformations in a rugged energy landscape, they are still preferentially organized by dynamic dimeric subunits with a hydrophobic core formed by the C-terminal residues independence of initial peptide packing and organization. Such structural organizations offer high structural stability by maximizing peptide-peptide association and optimizing peptide-water solvation. Moreover, curved surface, compact size, and less populated β-structure in Aβ globulomers make them difficult to convert into other high-order Aβ aggregates and fibrils with dominant β-structure, suggesting that they are likely to be off-pathway species to amyloid fibrils. These Aβ globulomers are compatible with experimental data in overall size, subunit organization, and molecular weight from AFM images and H/D amide exchange NMR. CONCLUSIONS: Our computationally modeled Aβ globulomers provide useful

  5. Glutamate system, amyloid β peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revett, Timothy J.; Baker, Glen B.; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid β and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid β production, but also amyloid β can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness. PMID:22894822

  6. Glutamate system, amyloid ß peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revett, Timothy J; Baker, Glen B; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid ß peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid ß and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid ß production, but also amyloid ß can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness.

  7. Neuroinflammation and common mechanism in Alzheimer's disease and prion amyloidosis: amyloid-associated proteins, neuroinflammation and neurofibrillary degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Jansen, C.; Carrano, A.; van Haastert, E.S.; Hondius, D.; van der Vies, S.M.; Hoozemans, J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In cases with a long (>1 year) clinical duration of prion disease, the prion protein can form amyloid deposits. These cases do not show accumulation of 4-kDa β-amyloid, which is observed in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD, amyloid is associated with inflammation and

  8. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Relevance to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Sasvari, M.; Konya, C.; Penke, B; Luiten, P.G.M.; Nyakas, Csaba

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition arid processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are producedin a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor

  9. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschi, Sarah K; Langer, Franziska; Kaeser, Stephan A; Maia, Luis F; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F; Winkler, David T; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer's disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer's disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P diagnostic group (P Alzheimer's measures supports the theory that these modalities represent partly different aspects of Alzheimer's pathology. The fact that mismatch, with positive cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β but normal

  11. PINK1 signalling rescues amyloid pathology and mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fang; Yu, Qing; Yan, Shijun; Hu, Gang; Lue, Lih-Fen; Walker, Douglas G; Wu, Long; Yan, Shi Fang; Tieu, Kim; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2017-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and synaptic damage are early pathological features of the Alzheimer's disease-affected brain. Memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease is a manifestation of brain pathologies such as accumulation of amyloid-β peptide and mitochondrial damage. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms and effective disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that decreased PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) expression is associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology. Restoring neuronal PINK1 function strikingly reduces amyloid-β levels, amyloid-associated pathology, oxidative stress, as well as mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction. In contrast, PINK1-deficient mAPP mice augmented cerebral amyloid-β accumulation, mitochondrial abnormalities, impairments in learning and memory, as well as synaptic plasticity at an earlier age than mAPP mice. Notably, gene therapy-mediated PINK1 overexpression promotes the clearance of damaged mitochondria by augmenting autophagy signalling via activation of autophagy receptors (OPTN and NDP52), thereby alleviating amyloid-β-induced loss of synapses and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease mice. Loss of PINK1 activity or blockade of PINK1-mediated signalling (OPTN or NDP52) fails to reverse amyloid-β-induced detrimental effects. Our findings highlight a novel mechanism by which PINK1-dependent signalling promotes the rescue of amyloid pathology and amyloid-β-mediated mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunctions in a manner requiring activation of autophagy receptor OPTN or NDP52. Thus, activation of PINK1 may represent a new therapeutic avenue for combating Alzheimer's disease. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Dimerization of the transmembrane domain of amyloid precursor proteins and familial Alzheimer's disease mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid precursor protein (APP is enzymatically cleaved by γ-secretase to form two peptide products, either Aβ40 or the more neurotoxic Aβ42. The Aβ42/40 ratio is increased in many cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. The transmembrane domain (TM of APP contains the known dimerization motif GXXXA. We have investigated the dimerization of both wild type and FAD mutant APP transmembrane domains. Results Using synthetic peptides derived from the APP-TM domain, we show that this segment is capable of forming stable transmembrane dimers. A model of a dimeric APP-TM domain reveals a putative dimerization interface, and interestingly, majority of FAD mutations in APP are localized to this interface region. We find that FAD-APP mutations destabilize the APP-TM dimer and increase the population of APP peptide monomers. Conclusion The dissociation constants are correlated to both the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio and the mean age of disease onset in AD patients. We also show that these TM-peptides reduce Aβ production and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios when added to HEK293 cells overexpressing the Swedish FAD mutation and γ-secretase components, potentially revealing a new class of γ-secretase inhibitors.

  13. Identification of Inhibitors of CD36-Amyloid Beta Binding as Potential Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doens, Deborah; Valiente, Pedro A; Mfuh, Adelphe M; X T Vo, Anh; Tristan, Adilia; Carreño, Lizmar; Quijada, Mario; Nguyen, Vu T; Perry, George; Larionov, Oleg V; Lleonart, Ricardo; Fernández, Patricia L

    2017-06-21

    Neuroinflammation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid β has a central role in microglia activation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory mediators that are associated with neuronal toxicity. The recognition of amyloid β by microglia depends on the expression of several receptors implicated in the clearance of amyloid and in cell activation. CD36 receptor expressed on microglia interacts with fibrils of amyloid inducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and amyloid internalization. The interruption of the interaction CD36-amyloid β compromises the activation of microglia cells. We have developed and validated a new colorimetric assay to identify potential inhibitors of the binding of amyloid β to CD36. We have found seven molecules, structural analogues of the Trichodermamide family of natural products that interfere with the interaction CD36-amyloid β. By combining molecular docking and dynamics simulations, we suggested the second fatty acids binding site within the large luminal hydrophobic tunnel, present in the extracellular domain of CD36, as the binding pocket of these compounds. Free energy calculations predicted the nonpolar component as the driving force for the binding of these inhibitors. These molecules also inhibited the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with fibrils of amyloid β. This work serves as a platform for the identification of new potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared...

  15. The cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/40 ratio in the differentiation of Alzheimer's disease from non-Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, P E; Slats, D; Sjögren, J M C; Kremer, B P H; Verhey, F R J; Rikkert, M G M Olde; Verbeek, M M

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid beta(40) (Abeta(40)) is the most abundant Abeta peptide in the brain. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of Abeta(40) might therefore be considered to most closely reflect the total Abeta load in the brain. Both in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in normal aging the Abeta load in

  16. Amyloid-β Annular Protofibrils Evade Fibrillar Fate in Alzheimer Disease Brain*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A.; Glabe, Charles G.; Kayed, Rakez

    2011-01-01

    Annular protofibrils (APFs) represent a new and distinct class of amyloid structures formed by disease-associated proteins. In vitro, these pore-like structures have been implicated in membrane permeabilization and ion homeostasis via pore formation. Still, evidence for their formation and relevance in vivo is lacking. Herein, we report that APFs are in a distinct pathway from fibril formation in vitro and in vivo. In human Alzheimer disease brain samples, amyloid-β APFs were associated with diffuse plaques, but not compact plaques; moreover, we show the formation of intracellular APFs. Our results together with previous studies suggest that the prevention of amyloid-β annular protofibril formation could be a relevant target for the prevention of amyloid-β toxicity in Alzheimer disease. PMID:21507938

  17. Amyloid-β annular protofibrils evade fibrillar fate in Alzheimer disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; Glabe, Charles G; Kayed, Rakez

    2011-06-24

    Annular protofibrils (APFs) represent a new and distinct class of amyloid structures formed by disease-associated proteins. In vitro, these pore-like structures have been implicated in membrane permeabilization and ion homeostasis via pore formation. Still, evidence for their formation and relevance in vivo is lacking. Herein, we report that APFs are in a distinct pathway from fibril formation in vitro and in vivo. In human Alzheimer disease brain samples, amyloid-β APFs were associated with diffuse plaques, but not compact plaques; moreover, we show the formation of intracellular APFs. Our results together with previous studies suggest that the prevention of amyloid-β annular protofibril formation could be a relevant target for the prevention of amyloid-β toxicity in Alzheimer disease.

  18. Astrocytes contain amyloid-β annular protofibrils in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; Kayed, Rakez

    2011-10-03

    Annular protofibrils (APFs) represent a newly described and distinct class of amyloid structures formed by disease-associated proteins. In vitro, these pore-like structures have been implicated in membrane permeabilization and ion homeostasis via pore formation. Still, their formation and relevance in vivo are poorly understood. Herein, we report that APFs are in human Alzheimer's disease brain samples and that amyloid-β APFs were associated with activated astrocytes. Moreover, we show that amyloid-β APFs in astrocytes adopt a conformation in which the N-terminal region is buried inside the wall of the pore. Our results together with previous studies suggest that the formation of amyloid-β APFs in astrocytes could be a relevant event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and validate this amyloidogenic structure as a target for the prevention of the disease. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Imbalance in Fatty-Acid-Chain Length of Gangliosides Triggers Alzheimer Amyloid Deposition in the Precuneus

    OpenAIRE

    Naoto Oikawa; Teruhiko Matsubara; Ryoto Fukuda; Hanaki Yasumori; Hiroyuki Hatsuta; Shigeo Murayama; Toshinori Sato; Akemi Suzuki; Katsuhiko Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition, a crucial event of Alzheimer's disease (AD), emerges in distinct brain regions. A key question is what triggers the assembly of the monomeric amyloid ß-protein (Aß) into fibrils in the regions. On the basis of our previous findings that gangliosides facilitate the initiation of Aß assembly at presynaptic neuritic terminals, we investigated how lipids, including gangliosides, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, extracted from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) isolated from autops...

  20. Amyloid-β Annular Protofibrils Evade Fibrillar Fate in Alzheimer Disease Brain*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; Charles G Glabe; Kayed, Rakez

    2011-01-01

    Annular protofibrils (APFs) represent a new and distinct class of amyloid structures formed by disease-associated proteins. In vitro, these pore-like structures have been implicated in membrane permeabilization and ion homeostasis via pore formation. Still, evidence for their formation and relevance in vivo is lacking. Herein, we report that APFs are in a distinct pathway from fibril formation in vitro and in vivo. In human Alzheimer disease brain samples, amyloid-β APFs were associated with ...

  1. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies Inhibit in vitro Fibrillar Aggregation of the Alzheimer β -Amyloid Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Beka; Koppel, Rela; Hanan, Eilat; Katzav, Tamar

    1996-01-01

    The β -amyloid peptide, the hallmark of Alzheimer disease, forms fibrillar toxic aggregates in brain tissue that can be dissolved only by strong denaturing agents. To study β -amyloid formation and its inhibition, we prepared immune complexes with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), AMY-33 and 6F/3D, raised against β -amyloid fragments spanning amino acid residues 1-28 and 8-17 of the β -amyloid peptide chain, respectively. In vitro aggregation of β -amyloid peptide was induced by incubation for 3 h at 37 degrees C and monitored by ELISA, negative staining electron microscopy, and fluorimetric studies. We found that the mAbs prevent the aggregation of β -amyloid peptide and that the inhibitory effect appears to be related to the localization of the antibody-binding sites and the nature of the aggregating agents. Preparation of mAbs against ``aggregating epitopes,'' defined as sequences related to the sites where protein aggregation is initiated, may lead to the understanding and prevention of protein aggregation. The results of this study may provide a foundation for using mAbs in vivo to prevent the β -amyloid peptide aggregation that is associated with Alzheimer disease.

  3. Spectroscopic study of Alzheimer's amyloid fibrils using terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Euna; Kim, Jeonghoi; Han, Younho; Moon, Kiwon; Lim, Meehyun; Han, Haewook; Park, Joonhyuck; Kim, Sungjee [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease, one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, is characterized by extensive amyloid deposition. Amyloid deposits contain the abundant fibrils formed by amyloid β protein (Aβ). Because amyloid fibrils are associated with amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, prion disease, Parkinson's disease, senile systemic amyloidosis and Huntington's disease, there has been considerable interest within the biomedical and biochemical research communities. In transmission electron microscopic (TEM)images, amyloid firils are 0.1∼10μm long and approximately 10nm wide. Amyloid fibrils commonly exhibit self assembled filaments, often described as twisted or parallel assemblies of finer protofilaments. They are formed by the spontaneous aggregation of a wide variety of peptides and proteins. Structural studies of amyloid fibrils have revealed that the common structural motif of virtually all amyloid fibrils consists of cross β sheets in which the peptide strands are arranged perpendicular to the long axis of the fiber. But little was known until recently about the molecular level structures of amyloid fibils. Therefore, spectroscopic investigation of both amyloid fibrils and Aβ at the molecular level can provide the significant evidence for the molecular understanding of amyloidogenesis and for the development of innovative therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. We used terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz TDS)to investigate both Aβ and amyloid fibril. THz TDS, developed over the last two decades, is a powerful tool to extract the properties of biomaterials and provides unique spectral signatures of biomolecules within 0.1∼10THz, which exists between microwave and infrared frequency range. Current interest in THz radiation arises from its capability of probing the delocalized collective vibrational modes in proteins. Studying the collective modes of proteins in THz frequency range can play an

  4. The ACAT inhibitor CP-113,818 markedly reduces amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Huttunen, Henri J; Puglielli, Luigi; Eckman, Christopher B; Kim, Doo Yeon; Hofmeister, Alexander; Moir, Robert D; Domnitz, Sarah B; Frosch, Matthew P; Windisch, Manfred; Kovacs, Dora M

    2004-10-14

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) accumulation in specific brain regions is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously reported that a well-characterized acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, CP-113,818, inhibits Abeta production in cell-based experiments. Here, we assessed the efficacy of CP-113,818 in reducing AD-like pathology in the brains of transgenic mice expressing human APP(751) containing the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations. Two months of treatment with CP-113,818 reduced the accumulation of amyloid plaques by 88%-99% and membrane/insoluble Abeta levels by 83%-96%, while also decreasing brain cholesteryl-esters by 86%. Additionally, soluble Abeta(42) was reduced by 34% in brain homogenates. Spatial learning was slightly improved and correlated with decreased Abeta levels. In nontransgenic littermates, CP-113,818 also reduced ectodomain shedding of endogenous APP in the brain. Our results suggest that ACAT inhibition may be effective in the prevention and treatment of AD by inhibiting generation of the Abeta peptide.

  5. Caspase-6 Activation in Familial Alzheimer Disease Brains Carrying Amyloid Precursor Protein, Presenilin I or Presenilin II Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Steffen; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Ghetti, Bernardino; Winblad, Bengt; LeBlanc, Andréa C.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the activation of Caspase-6 in the hippocampus and cortex in cases of mild, moderate, severe and very severe Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether Caspase-6 is also activated in familial AD, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis of active Caspase-6 and Tau cleaved by Caspase-6 in temporal cortex and hippocampal tissue sections from cases of familial AD. The cases included 5 carrying the amyloid precursor protein K670N, M671L Swedish mutation, 1 carrying the amyloid precursor protein E693G Arctic mutation, 2 each carrying the Presenilin I M146V, F105L, A431E, V261F, Y115C mutations, and 1 with the Presenilin II N141I mutation. Active Caspase-6 immunoreactivity was found in all cases. Caspase-6 immunoreactivity was observed in neuritic plaques or cotton wool plaques in some cases, neuropil threads and neurofibrillary tangles. These results indicate that Caspase-6 is activated in familial forms of AD, as previously observed in sporadic forms. Since sporadic and familial AD cases have similar pathological features, these results support a fundamental role of Caspase-6 in the pathophysiology of both familial and sporadic AD. PMID:19915487

  6. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Amyloid protein-mediated differential DNA methylation status regulates gene expression in Alzheimer's disease model cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, 911-1 Mok-6-dong, Yangcheon-ku, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn Jo, Sangmee [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, San 29 Anseo-dong, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan-si, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seikwan [Department of Neuroscience and TIDRC, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, 911-1 Mok-6-dong, Yangcheon-ku, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jung-Hyuck, E-mail: ahnj@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, 911-1 Mok-6-dong, Yangcheon-ku, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in Alzheimer's disease model cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify three Swedish mutant target genes; CTIF, NXT2 and DDR2 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Swedish mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and gene expression. -- Abstract: The Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APP-sw) has been reported to dramatically increase beta amyloid production through aberrant cleavage at the beta secretase site, causing early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). DNA methylation has been reported to be associated with AD pathogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism of APP-sw-mediated epigenetic alterations in AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We analyzed genome-wide interplay between promoter CpG DNA methylation and gene expression in an APP-sw-expressing AD model cell line. To identify genes whose expression was regulated by DNA methylation status, we performed integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles, and identified three target genes of the APP-sw mutant; hypomethylated CTIF (CBP80/CBP20-dependent translation initiation factor) and NXT2 (nuclear exporting factor 2), and hypermethylated DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2). Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine restored mRNA expression of these three genes, implying methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation. The profound alteration in the methylation status was detected at the -435, -295, and -271 CpG sites of CTIF, and at the -505 to -341 region in the promoter of DDR2. In the promoter region of NXT2, only one CpG site located at -432 was differentially unmethylated in APP-sw cells. Thus, we demonstrated the effect of the APP-sw mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and subsequent gene expression. This epigenetic regulatory

  8. Amyloid-beta Oligomers Relate to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, W.; Bruggink, K.A.; Kester, M.I.; Visser, P.J.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amyloid-β (Aβ)-oligomers are neurotoxic isoforms of Aβ and are a potential diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objectives: 1) Analyze the potential of Aβ-oligomer concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose and predict progression to AD in a large clinical

  9. Amyloid-beta Oligomers Relate to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, W.; Bruggink, K.A.; Kester, M.I.; Visser, P.J.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid-beta (Abeta)-oligomers are neurotoxic isoforms of Abeta and are a potential diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). OBJECTIVES: 1) Analyze the potential of Abeta-oligomer concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose and predict progression to AD in a large

  10. Amyloid burden and metabolic function in early-onset Alzheimer's disease: parietal lobe involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, R.; Zwan, M.D.; Tolboom, N.; van Assema, D.M.E.; Adriaanse, S.F.; Kloet, R.W.; Boellaard, R.; Windhorst, A.D.; Barkhof, F.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.; van Berckel, B.N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease with early onset often presents with a distinct cognitive profile, potentially reflecting a different distribution of underlying neuropathology. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between age and both in vivo fibrillary amyloid deposition and glucose

  11. Amyloid and its association with default network integrity in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, S.M.; Sanz-Arigita, E.J.; Binnewijzend, M.A.A.; Ossenkoppele, R.; Tolboom, N.; van Assema, D.M.E.; Wink, A.M.; Boellaard, R.; Yaqub, M.M.; Windhorst, A.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Barkhof, F.; van Berckel, B.N.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between functional connectivity and β-amyloid depositions in the default mode network (DMN) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy elderly. Twenty-five patients with AD, 12 patients with

  12. Neuroinflammation and Complexes of 17 beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase type 10-Amyloid beta in Alzheimer's Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Řípová, D.; Bartoš, A.; Bocková, Markéta; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Říčný, J.; Čechová, L.; Vrajová, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 165-173 ISSN 1567-2050 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11225 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Amyloid beta * mitochondrial enzyme * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.796, year: 2013

  13. Amyloid tracers binding sites in autosomal dominant and sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ruiqing; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Viitanen, Matti; Myllykangas, Liisa; Nennesmo, Inger; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid imaging has been integrated into diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). How amyloid tracers binding differ for different tracer structures and amyloid-β aggregates in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) and sporadic AD is unclear. Binding properties of different amyloid tracers were examined in brain homogenates from six ADAD with APPswe, PS1 M146V, and PS1 EΔ9 mutations, 13 sporadic AD, and 14 control cases. 3H-PIB, 3H-florbetaben, 3H-AZD2184, and BTA-1 shared a high- and a varying low-affinity binding site in the frontal cortex of sporadic AD. AZD2184 detected another binding site (affinity 33 nM) in the frontal cortex of ADAD. The 3H-AZD2184 and 3H-PIB binding were significantly higher in the striatum of ADAD compared to sporadic AD and control. Polyphenol resveratrol showed strongest inhibition on 3H-AZD84 binding followed by 3H-florbetaben and minimal on 3H-PIB. This study implies amyloid tracers of different structures detect different sites on amyloid-β fibrils or conformations. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Halima, Saoussen; Mishra, Sabyashachi; Raja, K Muruga Poopathi; Willem, Michael; Baici, Antonio; Simons, Kai; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Haass, Christian; Caflisch, Amedeo; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2016-03-08

    Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Presence of Striatal Amyloid Plaques in Parkinson's Disease Dementia Predicts Concomitant Alzheimer's Disease: Usefulness for Amyloid Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Brittany N; Serrano, Geidy E; Sue, Lucia I; Walker, Douglas G; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Caviness, John N; Hidalgo, Jose; Saxon-Labelle, Megan; Chiarolanza, Glenn; Mariner, Monica; Henry-Watson, Jonette; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer's disease. Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically-confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N =40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III-VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p<0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80% sensitive and 80% specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100%) but had poor specificity (48% to 55%). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD.

  16. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN, an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor 1 deficiency in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease leads to enhanced cognitive impairment despite of a reduction in amyloid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumm, Christoph; Hiebel, Christof; Hanstein, Regina; Purrio, Martin; Nagel, Heike; Conrad, Andrea; Lutz, Beat; Behl, Christian; Clement, Angela B

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β deposition in amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation, neuronal loss, and cognitive deficits. Cannabinoids display neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects and affect memory acquisition. Here, we studied the impact of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) deficiency on the development of AD pathology by breeding amyloid precursor protein (APP) Swedish mutant mice (APP23), an AD animal model, with CB1-deficient mice. In addition to the lower body weight of APP23/CB1(-/-) mice, most of these mice died at an age before typical AD-associated changes become apparent. The surviving mice showed a reduced amount of APP and its fragments suggesting a regulatory influence of CB1 on APP processing, which was confirmed by modulating CB1 expression in vitro. Reduced APP levels were accompanied by a reduced plaque load and less inflammation in APP23/CB1(-/-) mice. Nevertheless, compared to APP23 mice with an intact CB1, APP23/CB1(-/-) mice showed impaired learning and memory deficits. These data argue against a direct correlation of amyloid plaque load with cognitive abilities in this AD mouse model lacking CB1. Furthermore, the findings indicate that CB1 deficiency can worsen AD-related cognitive deficits and support a potential role of CB1 as a pharmacologic target. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physiopathological modulators of amyloid aggregation and novel pharmacological approaches in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEFELICE FERNANDA G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD are complex, as several factors likely contribute to the development of the disease. Therefore, it is not surprising that a number of different possible therapeutic approaches addressing distinct aspects of this disease are currently being investigated. Among these are ways to prevent amyloid aggregation and/or deposition, to prevent neuronal degeneration, and to increase brain neurotransmitter levels. Here, we discuss possible roles of endogenous modulators of Abeta aggregation in the physiopathology of AD and some of the strategies currently under consideration to interfere with brain levels of beta-amyloid, its aggregation and neurotoxicity.

  19. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease......-implicated proteins can induce antigen-specific anti-inflammatory immune responses in mucosal lymphoid tissue which then act systemically. We hypothesized that chronic mucosal administration of Abeta peptide might induce an anti-inflammatory process in AD brain tissue that could beneficially affect......-Abeta antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG2b classes, and mononuclear cells in the brain expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and tumor growth factor-beta. Our results demonstrate that chronic nasal administration of Abeta peptide can induce an immune response to Abeta that decreases...

  20. The Beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease: communication breakdown by modifying the neuronal cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Sara H; Bakhuraysah, Maha M; Cram, David S; Petratos, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent severe neurological disorders afflicting our aged population. Cognitive decline, a major symptom exhibited by AD patients, is associated with neuritic dystrophy, a degenerative growth state of neurites. The molecular mechanisms governing neuritic dystrophy remain unclear. Mounting evidence indicates that the AD-causative agent, β -amyloid protein (A β ), induces neuritic dystrophy. Indeed, neuritic dystrophy is commonly found decorating A β -rich amyloid plaques (APs) in the AD brain. Furthermore, disruption and degeneration of the neuronal microtubule system in neurons forming dystrophic neurites may occur as a consequence of A β -mediated downstream signaling. This review defines potential molecular pathways, which may be modulated subsequent to A β -dependent interactions with the neuronal membrane as a consequence of increasing amyloid burden in the brain.

  1. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  2. A qualitative model for aggregation and diffusion of β-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achdou, Yves; Franchi, Bruno; Marcello, Norina; Tesi, Maria Carla

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model for the aggregation and diffusion of Aβ amyloid in the brain affected by Alzheimer's disease, at the early stage of the disease. The model is based on a classical discrete Smoluchowski aggregation equation modified to take diffusion into account. We also describe a numerical scheme and discuss the results of the simulations in the light of the recent biomedical literature.

  3. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid beta (A beta) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjuga...

  4. Does oxybutynin alter plaques, amyloid beta peptides and behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausner, Adam P; Sharma, Seema; Fletcher, Sophie; Neff, Pamela; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Son, Hwancheol; Tuttle, Jeremy B; Steers, William D

    2008-03-01

    In elderly patients oxybutynin (Sigma-Aldrich) is commonly used to treat overactive bladder despite increased prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in this population. We determined whether oxybutynin altered plaque formation, amyloid beta peptide expression and behavior in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease expressing the mutant human presenilin 1 (deltaE9) and a chimeric mouse/human amyloid precursor protein (APPswe). Mice were treated for 30 days in an acute experiment or 5 months in a chronic experiment with oxybutynin (30 mg/kg) or vehicle. Behavioral testing was performed monthly with the elevated plus maze (Med Associates, St. Albans, Vermont) in the chronic experiment. Brains were tested for plaque burden using Hirano silver and thioflavin-S (Sigma-Aldrich) staining. Amyloid beta peptide expression was tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for amyloid beta peptides 1-40 and 1-42. Animals treated with chronic oxybutynin had a decreased plaque burden in the hippocampus (mean +/- SEM 2.2 +/- 0.4 vs 4.1 +/- 0.9 plaques, p etag/ml vs 105.6 +/- 5.5 etag/ml, p = 0.05) compared to animals treated with vehicle. Female Alzheimer's disease mice treated with oxybutynin but not males showed improved behavior with a greater percent of time spent in the closed arm or elevated plus maze (95.9% +/- 1.6% vs 35.6% +/- 18.9%, p <0.05). The greatest difference was noted at 3 months of treatment compared to vehicle. These results suggest that oxybutynin may slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease in this model.

  5. Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum.

    OpenAIRE

    Arispe, N.; Rojas, E.; Pollard, H B

    1993-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein (A beta P) is the 40- to 42-residue polypeptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have incorporated this peptide into phosphatidylserine liposomes and then fused the liposomes with a planar bilayer. When incorporated into bilayers the A beta P forms channels, which generate linear current-voltage relationships in symmetrical solutions. A permeability ratio, PK/PCl, of 11 for the open A beta P channel was estimated from the reversal potential of the c...

  6. Ten Challenges of the Amyloid Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    The inability to effectively halt or cure Alzheimer's disease (AD), exacerbated by the recent failures of high-profile clinical trials, emphasizes the urgent need to understand the complex biochemistry of this major neurodegenerative disease. In this paper, ten central, current challenges...

  7. Modeling familial Danish dementia in mice supports the concept of the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomaraswamy, Janaky; Kilger, Ellen; Wölfing, Heidrun; Schäfer, Claudia; Kaeser, Stephan A.; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M.; Hefendehl, Jasmin K.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mazzella, Matthew; Ghiso, Jorge; Goedert, Michel; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Wolfer, David P.; Mathews, Paul M.; Jucker, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with cerebral deposition of Dan-amyloid (ADan), neuroinflammation, and neurofibrillary tangles, hallmark characteristics remarkably similar to those in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have generated transgenic (tg) mouse models of familial Danish dementia that exhibit the age-dependent deposition of ADan throughout the brain with associated amyloid angiopathy, microhemorrhage, neuritic dystrophy, and neuroinflammation. Tg mice are impaired in the Morris water maze and exhibit increased anxiety in the open field. When crossed with TauP301S tg mice, ADan accumulation promotes neurofibrillary lesions, in all aspects similar to the Tau lesions observed in crosses between β-amyloid (Aβ)-depositing tg mice and TauP301S tg mice. Although these observations argue for shared mechanisms of downstream pathophysiology for the sequence-unrelated ADan and Aβ peptides, the lack of codeposition of the two peptides in crosses between ADan- and Aβ-depositing mice points also to distinguishing properties of the peptides. Our results support the concept of the amyloid hypothesis for AD and related dementias, and suggest that different proteins prone to amyloid formation can drive strikingly similar pathogenic pathways in the brain. PMID:20385796

  8. Amyloid-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease: therapeutic progress and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Meaghan C; Milgram, Norton W

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia, affecting an estimated 4.8 million people in North America. For the past decade, the amyloid cascade hypothesis has dominated the field of AD research. This theory posits that the deposition of amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) in the brain is the key pathologic event in AD, which induces a series of neuropathological changes that manifest as cognitive decline and eventual dementia. Based on this theory, interventions that reduce Abeta burden in the brain would be expected to alleviate both the neuropathological changes and dementia, which characterize AD. Several diverse pharmacological strategies have been developed to accomplish this. These include inhibiting the formation of Abeta, preventing the aggregation of Abeta into insoluble aggregates, preventing the entry of Abeta into the brain from the periphery and enhancing the clearance of Abeta from the central nervous system. To date, no amyloid-modifying therapy has yet been successful in phase 3 clinical trials; however, several trials are currently underway. This article provides a review of the status of amyloid-modifying therapies and the implications for the amyloid cascade hypothesis.

  9. Small heat shock protein HspB8: its distribution in Alzheimer's disease brains and its inhibition of amyloid-beta protein aggregation and cerebrovascular amyloid-beta toxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.; Boelens, W.C.; Otte-Holler, I.; Kamps, B.; Kusters, B.; Maat-Schieman, M.L.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by pathological lesions, such as senile plaques (SPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), both predominantly consisting of a proteolytic cleavage product of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP), the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). CAA is also the major

  10. Clinicopathologic and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B implications of Thal amyloid phase across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Melissa E; Lowe, Val J; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Liesinger, Amanda M; Cannon, Ashley; Przybelski, Scott A; Rawal, Bhupendra; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Kantarci, Kejal; Ross, Owen A; Duara, Ranjan; Knopman, David S; Jack, Clifford R; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-05-01

    Thal amyloid phase, which describes the pattern of progressive amyloid-β plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease, was incorporated into the latest National Institute of Ageing - Alzheimer's Association neuropathologic assessment guidelines. Amyloid biomarkers (positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid) were included in clinical diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease dementia published by the National Institute of Ageing - Alzheimer's Association and the International Work group. Our first goal was to evaluate the correspondence of Thal amyloid phase to Braak tangle stage and ante-mortem clinical characteristics in a large autopsy cohort. Second, we examined the relevance of Thal amyloid phase in a prospectively-followed autopsied cohort who underwent ante-mortem (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B imaging; using the large autopsy cohort to broaden our perspective of (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B results. The Mayo Clinic Jacksonville Brain Bank case series (n = 3618) was selected regardless of ante-mortem clinical diagnosis and neuropathologic co-morbidities, and all assigned Thal amyloid phase and Braak tangle stage using thioflavin-S fluorescent microscopy. (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B studies from Mayo Clinic Rochester were available for 35 participants scanned within 2 years of death. Cortical (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B values were calculated as a standard uptake value ratio normalized to cerebellum grey/white matter. In the high likelihood Alzheimer's disease brain bank cohort (n = 1375), cases with lower Thal amyloid phases were older at death, had a lower Braak tangle stage, and were less frequently APOE-ε4 positive. Regression modelling in these Alzheimer's disease cases, showed that Braak tangle stage, but not Thal amyloid phase predicted age at onset, disease duration, and final Mini-Mental State Examination score. In contrast, Thal amyloid phase, but not Braak tangle stage or cerebral amyloid angiopathy predicted (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B

  11. Reduced CSF Water Influx in Alzheimer's Disease Supporting the β-Amyloid Clearance Hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available To investigate whether water influx into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space is reduced in Alzheimer's patients as previously shown in the transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.Ten normal young volunteers (young control, 21-30 years old, ten normal senior volunteers (senior control, 60-78 years old, MMSE ≥ 29, and ten Alzheimer's disease (AD patients (study group, 59-84 years old, MMSE: 13-19 participated in this study. All AD patients were diagnosed by neurologists specializing in dementia based on DSM-IV criteria. CSF dynamics were analyzed using positron emission tomography (PET following an intravenous injection of 1,000 MBq [15O]H2O synthesized on-line.Water influx into CSF space in AD patients, expressed as influx ratio, (0.755 ± 0.089 was significantly reduced compared to young controls (1.357 ± 0.185; p < 0.001 and also compared to normal senior controls (0.981 ± 0.253, p < 0.05. Influx ratio in normal senior controls was significantly reduced compared to young controls (p < 0.01.Water influx into the CSF is significantly reduced in AD patients. β-amyloid clearance has been shown to be dependent on interstitial flow and CSF production. The current study indicates that reduction in water influx into the CSF may disturb the clearance rate of β-amyloid, and therefore be linked to the pathogenesis of AD.UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000011939.

  12. Beta-amyloid and Cortical Thickness Reveal Racial Disparities in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. McDonough

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available African Americans are two to four times more likely to develop dementia as Non-Hispanic Whites. This increased risk among African Americans represents a critical health disparity that affects nearly 43 million Americans. The present study tested the hypothesis that older African Americans with elevated beta-amyloid would show greater neurodegeneration (smaller hippocampal volumes and decreased cortical thickness than older Non-Hispanic Whites with elevated beta-amyloid. Data from the Harvard Aging Brain Study (HABS were used to form a group of older African Americans and two matched groups of Non-Hispanic White adults. Amyloid-positive African Americans had decreased cortical thickness in most of the Alzheimer's disease (AD signature regions compared with amyloid-positive Non-Hispanic Whites. This factor was negatively correlated with age and white matter hypointensities. Using support vector regression, we also found some evidence that African Americans have an older “brain age” than Non-Hispanic Whites. These findings suggest that African Americans might be more susceptible to factors causing neurodegeneration, which then might accelerate the rate of a diagnosis of AD.

  13. Iron Biochemistry is Correlated with Amyloid Plaque Morphology in an Established Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, Neil D; Everett, James; Collingwood, Joanna F; Dobson, Jon; van der Laan, Gerrit; Gallagher, Joseph J; Wang, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2017-10-19

    A signature characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils in the brain. Nevertheless, the links between Aβ and AD pathology remain incompletely understood. It has been proposed that neurotoxicity arising from aggregation of the Aβ 1-42 peptide can in part be explained by metal ion binding interactions. Using advanced X-ray microscopy techniques at sub-micron resolution, we investigated relationships between iron biochemistry and AD pathology in intact cortex from an established mouse model over-producing Aβ. We found a direct correlation of amyloid plaque morphology with iron, and evidence for the formation of an iron-amyloid complex. We also show that iron biomineral deposits in the cortical tissue contain the mineral magnetite, and provide evidence that Aβ-induced chemical reduction of iron could occur in vivo. Our observations point to the specific role of iron in amyloid deposition and AD pathology, and may impact development of iron-modifying therapeutics for AD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with A2V variants of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-02-11

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics.

  15. The Alzheimer's Amyloid-Degrading Peptidase, Neprilysin: Can We Control It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Nalivaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD postulates that accumulation in the brain of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is the primary trigger for neuronal loss specific to this pathology. In healthy brain, Aβ levels are regulated by a dynamic equilibrium between Aβ release from the amyloid precursor protein (APP and its removal by perivascular drainage or by amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs. During the last decade, the ADE family was fast growing, and currently it embraces more than 20 members. There are solid data supporting involvement of each of them in Aβ clearance but a zinc metallopeptidase neprilysin (NEP is considered as a major ADE. NEP plays an important role in brain function due to its role in terminating neuropeptide signalling and its decrease during ageing or after such pathologies as hypoxia or ischemia contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP by the APP intracellular domain (AICD opens new avenues for its therapeutic manipulation and raises hope for developing preventive strategies in AD. However, consideration needs to be given to the diverse physiological roles of NEP. This paper critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of NEP and their therapeutic relevance.

  16. Copper in Alzheimer's disease: Implications in amyloid aggregation and neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Patrick; Caballero, Ana B.

    2015-09-01

    The relationship of copper dyshomeostasis with neurodegenerative diseases has become evident in the last years. Because of the major role that this metal ion plays in biological processes, most of which being located in the brain, it is not surprising that changes in its distribution are closely related with the advent of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). An increasing number of works have dealt with this subject in the last years, and opened an intense debate in some points while raising new questions that still remain unanswered. This revision work puts together and discusses the latest findings and insights on how copper ions are involved in AD progression, including its interaction with Aβ and its consequently induced aggregation.

  17. Amyloid-beta immunotherapy: the hope for Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Lopera, Francisco

    2016-12-30

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia of adult-onset, characterized by progressive impairment in cognition and memory. There is no cure for the disease and the current treatments are only symptomatic. Drug discovery is an expensive and time-consuming process; in the last decade no new drugs have been found for AD despite the efforts of the scientific community and pharmaceutical companies. The Aβ immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches to modify the course of AD. This therapeutic strategy uses synthetic peptides or monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to decrease the Aβ load in the brain and slow the progression of the disease. Therefore, this article will discuss the main aspects of AD neuropathogenesis, the classical pharmacologic treatment, as well as the active and passive immunization describing drug prototypes evaluated in different clinical trials.

  18. IS BRAIN AMYLOID PRODUCTION A CAUSE OR A RESULT OF DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMER TYPE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Tom; Patrylo, Peter R.; Brewer, Gregory J.; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis has guided much of research into Alzheimer disease (AD) over the last 25 years. We argue that the hypothesis of beta amyloid (Aβ) as the primary cause of dementia may not be fully correct. Rather, we propose that decline in brain metabolic activity, which is tightly linked to synaptic activity, actually underlies both the cognitive decline and the deposition of Aβ. Aβ may further exacerbate metabolic decline and result in a downward spiral of cognitive function, leading to dementia. This novel interpretation can tie the disparate risk factors for dementia to a unifying hypothesis and present a roadmap for interventions to decrease the prevalence of dementia in the elderly population. PMID:20847431

  19. Neurobiological pathways to Alzheimer's disease: Amyloid-beta, TAU protein or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Jesus R. de Paula

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive cognitive decline, including memory loss, behavioral and psychological symptoms and personality changes. The neuropathological hallmarks of AD are the presence of neuritic (senile plaques (NP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, along with neuronal loss, dystrophic neurites, and gliosis. Neuritic plaques are extracellular lesions and their main constituent is the amyloid-b42 peptide (Ab42. Neurofibrillary tangles are intracellular lesions that are mainly composed of hyperphosphorylated TAU protein. In this article, we review the major hypotheses concerning the physiopathology of AD, focusing on the b-amyloid cascade as primary events (supported by the "baptists" and cytoskeletal abnormalities secondary to the hyperphosphorylation of protein TAU (as advocated by the "Tauists". We further provide an integrative view of the physiopathology of AD.

  20. Chronic sleep fragmentation exacerbates amyloid β deposition in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Eiko N; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Maruo, Kazushi; Yagihara, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiromi; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2017-07-13

    Sleep fragmentation due to intermittent nocturnal arousal resulting in a reduction of total sleep time and sleep efficiency is a common symptom among people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly people with normal cognitive function. Although epidemiological studies have indicated an association between sleep fragmentation and elevated risk of AD, a relevant disease model to elucidate the underlying mechanisms was lacking owing to technical limitations. Here we successfully induced chronic sleep fragmentation in AD model mice using a recently developed running-wheel-based device and demonstrate that chronic sleep fragmentation increases amyloid β deposition. Notably, the severity of amyloid β deposition exhibited a significant positive correlation with the extent of sleep fragmentation. These findings provide a useful contribution to the development of novel treatments that decelerate the disease course of AD in the patients, or decrease the risk of developing AD in healthy elderly people through the improvement of sleep quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphorylated amyloid-beta: the toxic intermediate in alzheimer's disease neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Nathaniel G N

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorylated Amyloid-beta (Abeta) was identified in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Using an anti-sense peptide approach the human cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK-1) was identified as being responsible for Abeta phosphorylation. The phosphorylated Abeta peptide showed increased neurotoxicity and reduced ability to form Congo red-positive fibrils. Mutation of the serine 26 residue and inhibition of Abeta phosphorylation by the CDK-1 inhibitor olomoucine prevented Abeta toxicity, suggesting that the phosphorylated Abeta peptide represents a toxic intermediate. Cannabinoids prevented phosphorylated Abeta toxicity. The results from this study suggest that Abeta phosphorylation could play a role in AD pathology and represent a novel therapeutic target.

  2. Amyloid-β induced signaling by cellular prion protein and Fyn kinase in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Ji Won; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most prevalent cause of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are potent synaptotoxins thought to mediate AD-related phenotypes. Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been identified as a high-affinity receptor for Aβ oligomers. Herein, we review the functional consequences of Aβ oligomer binding to PrP(C) on the neuronal surface. We highlight recent evidence that Fyn kinase mediates signal transduction downstream of the PrP(C)-Aβ oligomer complex. These studies suggest that PrP(C) has a central role in AD pathogenesis and may provide a target for therapeutic intervention in AD.

  3. Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta peptides in vitro electrochemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2017-04-01

    The oxidative behaviour of the human amyloid beta (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42) peptides and a group of similar peptides: control inverse (Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1), mutants (Aβ1-40Phe10 and Aβ1-40Nle35), rat Aβ1-40Rat, and fragments (Aβ1-28, Aβ1-16, Aβ10-20, Aβ12-28, and Aβ17-42), in solution or adsorbed, at a glassy carbon electrode, by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry, were investigated and compared. Structurally the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 sequences contain five electroactive amino acid residues, one tyrosine (Tyr10), three histidines (His6, His13 and His14) and one methionine (Met35). The Aβ peptide 3D structure influenced the exposure of the redox residues to the electrode surface and their oxidation peak currents. Depending on the amino acid sequence length and content, the Aβ peptides gave one or two oxidation peaks. The first electron transfer reaction corresponded to the tyrosine amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to both histidines and methionine amino acid residues. The highest contribution to the second oxidation peak current was from His13, followed by His14 and His6 residues, and Met35 residue had the lowest contribution. The Aβ peptides electron transfer depended on peptide hydrophobicity and 3D structure, the redox residues position in the sequence, the redox residues close to N-termini giving the highest oxidation peak currents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Kakimi, Shigeo; Ohsaki, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer's brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues.

  5. Amyloid PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease: a comparison of three radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, S.M.; Jagust, W.J. [University of California, Berkeley, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Thomas, B.A. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Thurfjell, L. [GE Healthcare, Uppsala (Sweden); Schmidt, M. [Janssen Pharmaceutica, NV, Beerse (Belgium); Margolin, R. [Janssen Alzheimer Immunotherapy, South San Francisco, CA (United States); Mintun, M.; Pontecorvo, M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Baker, S.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Collaboration: The Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2014-07-15

    The increasing use of amyloid PET in Alzheimer's disease research and clinical trials has motivated efforts to standardize methodology. We compared retention of the {sup 11}C radiotracer Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) and that of two {sup 18}F amyloid radiotracers (florbetapir and flutemetamol) using two study populations. We also examined the feasibility of converting between tracer-specific measures, using PiB as the common link between the two {sup 18}F tracers. One group of 40 subjects underwent PiB and flutemetamol imaging sessions and a separate group of 32 subjects underwent PiB and florbetapir imaging sessions. We compared cortical and white matter retention for each {sup 18}F tracer relative to that of PiB, as well as retention in several reference regions and image analysis methods. Correlations between tracer pairs were used to convert tracer-specific threshold values for amyloid positivity between tracers. Cortical retention for each pair of tracers was strongly correlated regardless of reference region (PiB-flutemetamol, ρ = 0.84-0.99; PiB-florbetapir, ρ = 0.83-0.97) and analysis method (ρ = 0.90-0.99). Compared to PiB, flutemetamol had higher white matter retention, while florbetapir had lower cortical retention. Two previously established independent thresholds for amyloid positivity were highly consistent when values were converted between tracer pairs. Despite differing white and grey matter retention characteristics, cortical retention for each {sup 18}F tracer was highly correlated with that of PiB, enabling conversion of thresholds across tracer measurement scales with a high level of internal consistency. Standardization of analysis methods and measurement scales may facilitate the comparison of amyloid PET data obtained using different tracers. (orig.)

  6. Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta links lens and brain pathology in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet A Moncaster

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21 encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD amyloid precursor protein (APP. Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta, early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Abeta pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Abeta aggregates (approximately 5 to 50 nm identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Abeta in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Abeta with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Abeta

  7. How heritable is Alzheimer's disease late in life? Findings from Swedish twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Nancy L; Gatz, Margaret; Berg, Stig; Johansson, Boo

    2004-02-01

    Although genetic effects are known to be important for early onset Alzheimer's disease, little is known about the importance of genetic effects for late-onset disease. Furthermore, previous studies are based on prevalent cases. Our purpose was to characterize the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors for incident Alzheimer's disease late in life, and to test for differences in the importance of genetic effects at different ages. A cohort of 662 pairs of Swedish twins 52 to 98 years of age who were without symptoms of dementia was followed up for an average of 5 years. Incident dementia cases were detected through follow-up at 2 to 3-year intervals using either cognitive testing or telephone screening followed by dementia workups. A physician, psychologist, and nurse gave consensus diagnoses. During the follow-up period, 5.8% of the sample was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Average age of onset was 83.9 years (standard deviation, 6.3). Of the 26 monozygotic pairs in which at least one twin developed Alzheimer's disease, 5 were concordant (probandwise concordance, 32.2%). The concordance rate for dizygotic pairs was 8.7% (2 of 44 pairs). Structural model fitting indicated that 48% of the variation in liability to Alzheimer's disease could be attributed to genetic variation. Estimates did not differ significantly between twins younger than age 80 years and those older than age 80 years at baseline. Although these genetic estimates for incident disease are lower than those for prevalent disease, the importance of genetic factors for liability to Alzheimer's disease is considerable even late in life.

  8. A novel function for proSAAS as an amyloid anti-aggregant in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Akina; Helwig, Michael; Rezaei, Sina; Berridge, Casey; Eriksen, Jason L; Lindberg, Iris

    2014-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by an abnormal aggregation of misfolded beta-sheet rich proteins such as β-amyloid (Aβ). Various ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperones control the correct folding of cellular proteins and prevent the accumulation of harmful species. We here describe a novel anti-aggregant chaperone function for the neuroendocrine protein proSAAS, an abundant secretory polypeptide that is widely expressed within neural and endocrine tissues and which has previously been associated with neurodegenerative disease in various proteomics studies. In the brains of 12-month-old APdE9 mice, and in the cortex of a human AD-affected brain, proSAAS immunoreactivity was highly colocalized with amyloid pathology. Immunoreactive proSAAS co-immunoprecipitated with Aβ immunoreactivity in lysates from APdE9 mouse brains. In vitro, proSAAS efficiently prevented the fibrillation of Aβ(1-42) at molar ratios of 1 : 10, and this anti-aggregation effect was dose dependent. Structure-function studies showed that residues 97-180 were sufficient for the anti-aggregation function against Aβ. Finally, inclusion of recombinant proSAAS in the medium of Neuro2a cells, as well as lentiviral-mediated proSAAS over-expression, blocked the neurocytotoxic effect of Aβ(1-42) in Neuro2a cells. Taken together, our results suggest that proSAAS may play a role in Alzheimer's disease pathology. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Neurogenic effects of β-amyloid in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolos, Marta; Spuch, Carlos; Ordoñez-Gutierrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Ferrer, Isidro; Carro, Eva

    2013-08-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) can promote neurogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing neural progenitor cells to differentiate into neurons. The choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is burdened with amyloid deposits and hosts neuronal progenitor cells. However, neurogenesis in this brain tissue is not firmly established. To investigate this issue further, we examined the effect of Aβ on the neuronal differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells in several experimental models of AD. Here we show that Aβ regulates neurogenesis in vitro in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells as well as in vivo in the choroid plexus of APP/Ps1 mice. Treatment with oligomeric Aβ increased proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells, but decreased survival of newly born neurons. These Aβ-induced neurogenic effects were also observed in choroid plexus of APP/PS1 mice, and detected also in autopsy tissue from AD patients. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that pre-treating the choroid plexus epithelial cells with specific inhibitors of TyrK or MAPK diminished Aβ-induced neuronal proliferation. Taken together, our results support a role of Aβ in proliferation and differentiation in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Nanoparticulate Radiolabelled Quinolines Detect Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste A. Roney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting aggregated amyloid peptides (Aβ plaques presents targets for developing biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Polymeric n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (PBCA nanoparticles (NPs were encapsulated with radiolabelled amyloid affinity I125-clioquinol (CQ, 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline as in vivo probes. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs crossed the BBB (2.3±0.9 ID/g (P<.05 in the WT mouse (N = 210, compared to I125-CQ (1.0±0.4 ID/g. I125-CQ-PBCA NP brain uptake increased in AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1 versus WT (N = 38; 2.54×105±5.31×104 DLU/mm2; versus 1.98×105±2.22×104 DLU/mm2 and in APP/PS1/Tau. Brain increases were in mice intracranially injected with aggregated Aβ42 peptide (N = 17; 7.19×105±1.25×105 DLU/mm2, versus WT (6.07×105±7.47×104 DLU/mm2. Storage phosphor imaging and histopathological staining of the plaques, Fe2+ and Cu2+, validated results. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs have specificity for Aβ in vitro and in vivo and are promising as in vivo SPECT (I123, or PET (I124 amyloid imaging agents.

  11. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  12. Differential Relationships of Reactive Astrocytes and Microglia to Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ). Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core Thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm), and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed; larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques appears to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of Aβ. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage. PMID:23656989

  13. Stable Size Distribution of Amyloid Plaques Over the Course of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L.; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-β plaques are a key pathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavine-S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of AD and plaque-bearing age-matched non-demented subjects to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid-β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups whereas dense-core plaques from the AD group were slightly larger than those in the non-demented group (~25%–30%, p = 0.01). Within the AD group, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOEε4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease. PMID:22805771

  14. A mutation protective against Alzheimer's disease renders amyloid β precursor protein incapable of mediating neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2014-07-01

    Expression of a familial Alzheimer's disease (AD)-linked mutant of amyloid β precursor protein (APP) or the binding of transforming growth factor β2 to wild-type (wt)-APP causes neuronal death by activating an intracellular death signal (a APP-mediated intracellular death signal) in the absence of the involvement of amyloid β (Aβ) toxicity in vitro. These neuronal death models may therefore be regarded as Aβ-independent neuronal death models related to AD. A recent study has shown that the A673T mutation in the APP isoform APP770 , corresponding to the A598T mutation in the most prevalent neuronal APP isoform APP695 (an AD-protective mutant of APP), is linked to a reduction in the incidence rate of AD. Consistent with this, cells expressing the AD-protective mutant of APP produce less Aβ than cells expressing wt-APP. In this study, transforming growth factor β2 caused death in cultured neuronal cells expressing wt-APP, but not in those expressing the AD-protective mutant of APP. This result suggests that the AD-protective mutation of APP reduces the incidence rate of AD by attenuating the APP-mediated intracellular death signal. In addition, a mutation that causes hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type also attenuated the APP-mediated intracellular death signal. The A598T mutation of amyloid precursor protein APP is linked to a reduction in the incidence rate of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study shows that TGFβ2 causes death in neuronal cells expressing wild-type APP, but not in those expressing the AD-protective mutant of APP, suggesting that the AD-protective mutation of APP reduces the incidence rate of AD by attenuating the APP-mediated intracellular death signal. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Exploring the role of Alzheimer's amyloid-β precursor protein APP and its relative APLP2 in Xenopus intermediate pituitary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collin, R.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid-precursor protein APP is involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Its normal physiological function however still remains elusive. We decided to study the role of APP and its relative APLP2 in the intermediate pituitary melanotrope cells of the South-African claw-toed frog

  16. Amyloid precursor protein metabolism and inflammation markers in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea, Daniel; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; Olazarán, Javier; Antúnez, Carmen; Izagirre, Andrea; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Estanga, Ainara; Clerigué, Montserrat; Guisasola, Maria Concepción; Sánchez Ruiz, Domingo; Marín Muñoz, Juan; Calero, Miguel; Blesa, Rafael; Clarimón, Jordi; Carmona-Iragui, María; Morenas-Rodríguez, Estrella; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Eloy; Vázquez Higuera, José Luis; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto

    2015-08-18

    To investigate CSF markers involved in amyloid precursor protein processing, neuronal damage, and neuroinflammation in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer disease (AD) and participants with suspected non-Alzheimer pathology (SNAP). We collected CSF from 266 cognitively normal volunteers participating in a cross-sectional multicenter study (the SIGNAL study) to investigate markers involved in amyloid precursor protein processing (Aβ42, sAPPβ, β-secretase activity), neuronal damage (total-tau [t-tau], phospho-tau [p-tau]), and neuroinflammation (YKL-40). We analyzed the relationship among biomarkers, clinical variables, and the APOE genotype, and compared biomarker levels across the preclinical stages of the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association classification: stage 0, 1, 2, 3, and SNAP. The median age in the whole cohort was 58.8 years (range 39.8-81.6). Participants in stages 2-3 and SNAP had higher levels of YKL-40 than those in stages 0 and 1. Participants with SNAP had higher levels of sAPPβ than participants in stage 0 and 1. No differences were found between stages 0, 1, and 2-3 in sAPPβ and β-secretase activity in CSF. Age correlated with t-tau, p-tau, and YKL-40. It also correlated with Aβ42, but only in APOE ε4 carriers. Aβ42 correlated positively with t-tau, sAPPβ, and YKL-40 in participants with normal Aβ42. Our findings suggest that inflammation in the CNS increases in normal aging and is intimately related to markers of neurodegeneration in the preclinical stages of AD and SNAP. sAPPβ and β-secretase activity are not useful diagnostic or staging markers in preclinical AD. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Tau, Amyloid Beta and Deep Brain Stimulation: Aiming to Restore Cognitive Deficit in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, Siddhartha; Perry, George; Pena-Ortega, Fernando; Williams, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a great advance in the data that supports the two current hypotheses in Alzheimer`s disease field, the amyloid beta hypothesis and the tau hypothesis. Not surprisingly, Aβ and tau proteins are currently the major therapeutic research targets for AD treatment. Unfortunately, nothing but moderate success has emerged from such therapeutic approaches. With this in mind, we will discuss deep brain stimulation as a promising therapeutic strategy that aims to restore brain activity. Lastly, in the scope of cognitive deficit restoration, we will discuss the relevance of the limbic formation as a promising neuroanatomical target for deep brain stimulation. Immunohistochemistry for modified tau (phosphorylated at Ser199-202-Thr205 labelled by the antibody AT8) was performed on paraffin-embedded human brain sections providing a detailed characterization of NFT pathology. Abnormally phosphorylated tau protein is the key common marker in several brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson`s disease, Pick Disease, Down syndrome and frontotemporal dementia and is capable of affecting synaptic events that are critical for memory formation. With this in mind, therapeutic strategies aiming to restore synaptic events could offer better outcomes. The humble success of current therapeutic strategies along with the lack of basic knowledge of the brain disease mechanisms calls for alternatives that benefit patients in the present moment. One of particular interest is the neurostimulation strategy that is already a well-established treatment for several movement disorders and when compared to current Alzheimer`s therapeutic strategies, deep brain stimulation does not directly interfere with the normal protein function, therefore increasing the probability of success.

  18. Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, George S

    2014-04-01

    The defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD) include conspicuous changes in both brain histology and behavior. The AD brain is characterized microscopically by the combined presence of 2 classes of abnormal structures, extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, both of which comprise highly insoluble, densely packed filaments. The soluble building blocks of these structures are amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides for plaques and tau for tangles. Amyloid-β peptides are proteolytic fragments of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein, whereas tau is a brain-specific, axon-enriched microtubule-associated protein. The behavioral symptoms of AD correlate with the accumulation of plaques and tangles, and they are a direct consequence of the damage and destruction of synapses that mediate memory and cognition. Synapse loss can be caused by the failure of live neurons to maintain functional axons and dendrites or by neuron death. During the past dozen years, a steadily accumulating body of evidence has indicated that soluble forms of Aβ and tau work together, independently of their accumulation into plaques and tangles, to drive healthy neurons into the diseased state and that hallmark toxic properties of Aβ require tau. For instance, acute neuron death, delayed neuron death following ectopic cell cycle reentry, and synaptic dysfunction are triggered by soluble, extracellular Aβ species and depend on soluble, cytoplasmic tau. Therefore, Aβ is upstream of tau in AD pathogenesis and triggers the conversion of tau from a normal to a toxic state, but there is also evidence that toxic tau enhances Aβ toxicity via a feedback loop. Because soluble toxic aggregates of both Aβ and tau can self-propagate and spread throughout the brain by prionlike mechanisms, successful therapeutic intervention for AD would benefit from detecting these species before plaques, tangles, and cognitive impairment become evident and from interfering with the destructive

  19. Thal Amyloid Stages Do Not Significantly Impact the Correlation Between Neuropathological Change and Cognition in the Alzheimer Disease Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Qian, Jing; Muzikansky, Alona; Monsell, Sarah E; Montine, Thomas J; Frosch, Matthew P; Betensky, Rebecca A; Hyman, Bradley T

    2016-06-01

    The 2012 neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) summarize the extent of AD neuropathological change with an ABC score, which is a composite of the Thal stage of amyloid deposition (A), the Braak stage of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) (B), and the CERAD neuritic plaque score (C). NFTs and neuritic plaques are well-established contributors to cognitive impairment, but whether the Thal amyloid stage independently predicts antemortem cognition remains unknown. We used the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center autopsy data set to build adjacent-categories logit regression models with CDR-SOB and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores as cognitive outcome variables. Increasing CERAD scores were independently associated with higher CDR-SOB scores, whereas increasing Braak NFT stages predicted both higher CDR-SOB and lower MMSE scores. Increasing Thal amyloid stages were not significantly independently associated with either outcome measure. Increasing ABC scores predicted higher CDR-SOB and lower MMSE scores. These results raise the possibility that Thal amyloid stages do not substantially contribute to predicting antemortem cognition compared to CERAD neuritic plaque scores and Braak NFT stages, and suggest that the diffuse amyloid deposits participating in the assignment of Thal amyloid stages are neutral with respect to clinically detectable cognitive and functional changes. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of Amyloid Pathology With Myelin Alteration in Preclinical Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Douglas C; Hurley, Samuel A; Kecskemeti, Steven R; O'Grady, J Patrick; Canda, Cristybelle; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Alexander, Andrew L; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated β-amyloid and tau proteins into plaques and tangles is a central feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). While plaque and tangle accumulation likely contributes to neuron and synapse loss, disease-related changes to oligodendrocytes and myelin are also suspected of playing a role in development of AD dementia. Still, to our knowledge, little is known about AD-related myelin changes, and even when present, they are often regarded as secondary to concomitant arteriosclerosis or related to aging. To assess associations between hallmark AD pathology and novel quantitative neuroimaging markers while being sensitive to white matter myelin content. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at an academic research neuroimaging center on a cohort of 71 cognitively asymptomatic adults enriched for AD risk. Lumbar punctures were performed and assayed for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, including β-amyloid 42, total tau protein, phosphorylated tau 181, and soluble amyloid precursor protein. We measured whole-brain longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates as well as the myelin water fraction from each of these individuals. Automated brain mapping algorithms and statistical models were used to evaluate the relationships between age, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging relaxometry measures, including the longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the myelin water fraction. The mean (SD) age for the 19 male participants and 52 female participants in the study was 61.6 (6.4) years. Widespread age-related changes to myelin were observed across the brain, particularly in late myelinating brain regions such as frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum. Quantitative relaxometry measures were negatively associated with levels of CSF biomarkers across brain white matter and in areas preferentially affected in AD. Furthermore, significant age-by-biomarker interactions were

  1. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  2. Oligonol improves memory and cognition under an amyloid β(25-35)-induced Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Maeda, Takahiro; Fujii, Hajime; Yokozawa, Takako; Kim, Hyun Young; Cho, Eun Ju; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-dependent progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in impairments of memory and cognitive function. It is hypothesized that oligonol has ameliorative effects on memory impairment and reduced cognitive functions in mice with Alzheimer's disease induced by amyloid β(25-35) (Aβ(25-35)) injection. The protective effect of an oligonol against Aβ(25-35)-induced memory impairment was investigated in an in vivo Alzheimer's mouse model. The aggregation of Aβ25-35 was induced by incubation at 37°C for 3 days before injection into mice brains (5 nmol/mouse), and then oligonol was orally administered at 100 and 200 mg/kg of body weight for 2 weeks. Memory and cognition were observed in T-maze, object recognition, and Morris water maze tests. The group injected with Aβ(25-35) showed impairments in both recognition and memory. However, novel object recognition and new route awareness abilities were dose dependently improved by the oral administration of oligonol. In addition, the results of the Morris water maze test indicated that oligonol exerted protective activity against cognitive impairment induced by Aβ(25-35). Furthermore, nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation were significantly elevated by Aβ(25-35), whereas oligonol treatment significantly decreased nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation in the brain, liver, and kidneys. The present results suggest that oligonol improves Aβ(25-35)-induced memory deficit and cognition impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Additive toxicity of β-amyloid by a novel bioactive peptide in vitro: possible implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Garcia-Ratés

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-amyloid is regarded as a significant factor in Alzheimer's disease: but inefficient therapies based on this rationale suggests that additional signalling molecules or intermediary mechanisms must be involved in the actual initiation of the characteristic degeneration of neurons. One clue could be that acetylcholinesterase, also present in amyloid plaques, is aberrant in peripheral tissues such as blood and adrenal medulla that can be implicated in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to assess the bioactivity of a fragment of acetylcholinesterase responsible for its non-enzymatic functions, a thirty amino acid peptide ("T30" which has homologies with β-amyloid. METHODS: Cell viability was measured by sulforhodamine B assay and also lactate dehydrogenase assay: meanwhile, changes in the status of living cells was monitored by measuring release of acetylcholinesterase in cell perfusates using the Ellman reagent. FINDINGS: T30 peptide and β-amyloid each have toxic effects on PC12 cells, comparable to hydrogen peroxide(. However only the two peptides selectively then evoke a subsequent, enhanced release in acetylcholinesterase that could only be derived from the extant cells. Moreover, unlike hydrogen peroxide, the T30 peptide selectively shifted a sub-threshold dose of β-amyloid to a toxic effect, which also resulted in a comparable enhanced release of acetylcholinesterase. INTERPRETATION: This is the first study comparing directly the bioactivity of β-amyloid with a peptide derived from acetylcholinesterase: the similarity in action suggests that the sequence homology between the two compounds might have a functional and/or pathological relevance. The subsequent enhanced release of acetylcholinesterase from the extant cells could reflect a primary 'compensatory' response of cells prone to degeneration, paradoxically providing further availability of the toxic C-terminal peptide to modulate the potency of β-amyloid

  4. Vaccinium uliginosum L. Improves Amyloid β Protein-Induced Learning and Memory Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Kwon, Hyuck-Se; Shin, Se-Gye; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of Vaccinium uliginosum L. (bilberry) on the learning and memory impairments induced by amyloid-β protein (AβP) 1-42. ICR Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: the control (Aβ40-1A), control with 5% bilberry group (Aβ40-1B), amyloid β protein 1-42 treated group (Aβ1-42A), and Aβ1-42 with 5% bilberry group (Aβ1-42B). The control was treated with amyloid β-protein 40-1 for placebo effect, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) group was treated with amyloid β-protein 1-42. Amyloid β-protein 1-42 was intracerebroventricular (ICV) micro injected into the hippocampus in 35% acetonitrile and 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. Although bilberry added groups tended to decrease the finding time of hidden platform, no statistical significance was found. On the other hand, escape latencies of AβP injected mice were extended compared to that of Aβ40-1. In the Probe test, bilberry added Aβ1-42B group showed a significant (Pworking memory compared to Aβ40-1 control group. In passive avoidance test, bilberry significantly (Pmemory and learning capability in chemically induced Alzheimer's disease in experimental animal models.

  5. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-08-21

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene :  peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Anti-amyloid-beta to tau-based immunization: developments in immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambracht-Washington D

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Doris Lambracht-Washington, Roger N Rosenberg Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, Alzheimer's Disease Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Immunotherapy might provide an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD. A unique feature of AD immunotherapies is that an immune response against a self-antigen needs to be elicited without causing adverse autoimmune reactions. Current research is focused on two possible targets in this regard. One is the inhibition of accumulation and deposition of amyloid beta 1–42 (Aβ42, which is one of the major peptides found in senile plaques, and the second target is hyperphosphorylated tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles inside the nerve cell and shows association with the progression of dementia. Mouse models have shown that immunotherapy targeting Aβ42 as well as tau with the respective anti-Aβ or anti-tau antibodies can provide significant improvements in these mice. While anti-Aβ immunotherapy (active and passive immunizations is already in several stages of clinical trials, tau-based immunizations have been analyzed only in mouse models. Recently, as a significant correlation of progression of dementia and levels of phosphorylated tau have been found, high interest has again focused on further development of tau-based therapies. While Aβ immunotherapy might delay the onset of AD, immunotherapy targeting tau might provide benefits in later stages of this disease. Last but not least, targeting Aβ and tau simultaneously with immunotherapy might provide additional therapeutic effects, as these two pathologies are likely synergistic; this is an approach that has not been tested yet. In this review, we will summarize animal models used to test possible therapies for AD, some of the facts about Aβ42 and tau biology, and present an overview on halted, ongoing, and upcoming clinical trials together with ongoing preclinical studies targeting tau

  7. Novel strategies for Alzheimer's disease treatment: An overview of anti-amyloid beta monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygiel, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a poor prognosis, and thus, novel therapies for AD are certainly needed in a growing population of elderly patients or asymptomatic individuals, who are at risk for AD, worldwide. It has been established that some AD biomarkers such as amyloid-beta load in the brain, precede the onset of the disease, by approximately 20 years. Therefore, the therapy to prevent or effectively treat AD has to be initiated before the emergence of symptoms. A goal of this review is to present the results of recent clinical trials on monoclonal antibodies against amyloid beta, used for the treatment of AD and also to address some of the current challenges and emerging strategies to prevent AD. In recent trials, a monoclonal antibody, i.e. solanezumab has shown some beneficial cognitive effects among mild AD patients. Ongoing studies with gantenerumab and crenezumab will examine when exactly the AD treatment, aimed at modifying the disease course has to be started. This review was based on Medline database search for trials on passive anti-AD immunotherapy, for which the main timeframe was set from 2012 to 2015.

  8. Trans-crocetin improves amyloid-β degradation in monocytes from Alzheimer's Disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiribuzi, Roberto; Crispoltoni, Lucia; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Casella, Antonella; Montecchiani, Celeste; Del Pino, Alberto Marco; Maccarrone, Mauro; Palmerini, Carlo Alberto; Caltagirone, Carlo; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Aldo; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2017-01-15

    Herbal medicines have been recently employed in research and clinical studies for the potential treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other types of dementia. The present study investigates the effect of trans-crocetin, an active constituent of Crocus sativus L., to restore in vitro the reduced ability of AD patients' monocytes to degrade amyloid-β(1-42) (Aβ42). CD14(+) monocytes from 22 sporadic AD patients with moderate cognitive impairment were isolated; then, the role of trans-crocetin, purified from saffron extracts, was evaluated in terms of Aβ42 degradation rate through flow cytometry, as well as expression of cathepsin B by Western blotting. We observed that low micromolar doses of trans-crocetin enhanced Aβ42 degradation in AD monocytes through the upregulation of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. CA074Me, a potent and selective cathepsin B inhibitor, counteracted such trans-crocetin-induced effect. These data suggest that the carotenoid trans-crocetin improves in vitro the clearance of Aβ42 through the involvement of cathepsin B, and this could be of value in developing a new anti-amyloid strategy in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alzheimer's disease cybrids replicate beta-amyloid abnormalities through cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S M; Cassarino, D S; Abramova, N N; Keeney, P M; Borland, M K; Trimmer, P A; Krebs, C T; Bennett, J C; Parks, J K; Swerdlow, R H; Parker, W D; Bennett, J P

    2000-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition in brain of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, elevated brain caspase-3, and systemic deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase. Although increased Abeta deposition can result from mutations in amyloid precursor protein or presenilin genes, the cause of increased Abeta deposition in sporadic AD is unknown. Cytoplasmic hybrid ("cybrid") cells made from mitochondrial DNA of nonfamilial AD subjects show antioxidant-reversible lowering of mitochondrial membrane potential (delta(gYm), secrete twice as much Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42), have increased intracellular Abeta(1-40) (1.7-fold), and develop Congo red-positive Abeta deposits. Also elevated are cytoplasmic cytochrome c (threefold) and caspase-3 activity (twofold). Increased AD cybrid Abeta(1-40) secretion was normalized by inhibition of caspase-3 or secretase and reduced by treatment with the antioxidant S(-)pramipexole. Expression of AD mitochondrial genes in cybrid cells depresses cytochrome c oxidase activity and increases oxidative stress, which, in turn, lowers delta(psi)m. Under stress, cells with AD mitochondrial genes are more likely to activate cell death pathways, which drive caspase 3-mediated Abeta peptide secretion and may account for increased Abeta deposition in the AD brain. Therapeutic strategies for reducing neurodegeneration in sporadic AD can address restoration of delta(psi)m and reduction of elevated Abeta secretion.

  10. Clearance of amyloid-β peptide across the choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvira-Botero, Ximena; Carro, Eva M

    2010-12-01

    Aging and several neurodegenerative diseases bring about changes in the anatomy and physiology of the choroid plexus. The identification of specific membrane receptors that bind and internalize extracellular ligands has revolutionized the traditional roles of this tissue. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to contribute to disease neuropathology and progression. Recent emphasis on comorbidity of AD and a deficient clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier have highlighted the importance of brain Aβ clearance in AD. The megalin receptor has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. Faulty Aβ clearance from the brain across the choroid plexus epithelium by megalin appears to mediate focal Aβ accumulation in AD. Patients with AD have reduced levels of megalin at the choroid plexus, which in turn seem to increase brain levels of Aβ through a decreased efflux of brain Aβ. Therapies that increase megalin expression at the choroid plexus could potentially control accumulation of brain Aβ. This review covers in depth the anatomy and function of the choroid plexus, focusing on the brain barrier at the choroid plexus, as it actively participates in Aβ clearance. In addition, we describe the role of the choroid plexus in brain functions, aging and AD, as well as the role of megalin in the process of Aβ clearance. Finally, we present current data on the use of choroid plexus cells to repair the damaged brain.

  11. Acat1 knockdown gene therapy decreases amyloid-β in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Stephanie R; Chang, Catherine Cy; Dogbevia, Godwin; Bryleva, Elena Y; Bowen, Zachary; Hasan, Mazahir T; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Both genetic inactivation and pharmacological inhibition of the cholesteryl ester synthetic enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) have shown benefit in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to test the potential therapeutic applications of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Acat1 gene knockdown in AD mice. We constructed recombinant AAVs expressing artificial microRNA (miRNA) sequences, which targeted Acat1 for knockdown. We demonstrated that our AAVs could infect cultured mouse neurons and glia and effectively knockdown ACAT activity in vitro. We next delivered the AAVs to mouse brains neurosurgically, and demonstrated that Acat1-targeting AAVs could express viral proteins and effectively diminish ACAT activity in vivo, without inducing appreciable inflammation. We delivered the AAVs to the brains of 10-month-old AD mice and analyzed the effects on the AD phenotype at 12 months of age. Acat1-targeting AAV delivered to the brains of AD mice decreased the levels of brain amyloid-β and full-length human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), to levels similar to complete genetic ablation of Acat1. This study provides support for the potential therapeutic use of Acat1 knockdown gene therapy in AD.

  12. The Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: A Reevaluation of the “Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Armstrong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most influential theory to explain the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD has been the “Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis” (ACH first formulated in 1992. The ACH proposes that the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ is the initial pathological event in AD leading to the formation of senile plaques (SPs and then to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs death of neurons, and ultimately dementia. This paper examines two questions regarding the ACH: (1 is there a relationship between the pathogenesis of SPs and NFTs, and (2 what is the relationship of these lesions to disease pathogenesis? These questions are examined in relation to studies of the morphology and molecular determinants of SPs and NFTs, the effects of gene mutation, degeneration induced by head injury, the effects of experimentally induced brain lesions, transgenic studies, and the degeneration of anatomical pathways. It was concluded that SPs and NFTs develop independently and may be the products rather than the causes of neurodegeneration in AD. A modification to the ACH is proposed which may better explain the pathogenesis of AD, especially of late-onset cases of the disease.

  13. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  14. Extracellular matrix modulator lysyl oxidase colocalizes with amyloid-beta pathology in Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.M.; Bol, J.G.J.M.; van Duinen, S.G.; Drukarch, B.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in brain vessel walls and parenchyma, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and senile plaques (SPs), respectively, plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D) pathogenesis.

  15. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  16. Hybrid FMT-CT imaging of amyloid-beta plaques in a murine Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Damon; de Kleine, Ruben; MacLaurin, Sarah A; Miller, Eric; Brooks, Dana H; Krucker, Thomas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-02-15

    The need to study molecular and functional parameters of Alzheimer's disease progression in animal models has led to the development of disease-specific fluorescent markers. However, curved optical interfaces and a highly heterogeneous internal structure make quantitative fluorescence imaging of the murine brain a particularly challenging tomographic problem. We investigated the integration of X-ray computed tomography (CT) information into a state-of-the-art fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) scheme and establish that the dual-modality approach is essential for high fidelity reconstructions of distributed fluorescence within the murine brain, as compared to conventional fluorescence tomography. We employ this method in vivo using a fluorescent oxazine dye to quantify amyloid-beta plaque burden in transgenic APP23 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease. Multi-modal imaging allows for accurate signal localization and correlation of in vivo findings to ex vivo studies. The results point to FMT-CT as an essential tool for in vivo study of neurodegenerative disease in animal models and potentially humans.

  17. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  18. Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arispe, N; Rojas, E; Pollard, H B

    1993-01-15

    Amyloid beta protein (A beta P) is the 40- to 42-residue polypeptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have incorporated this peptide into phosphatidylserine liposomes and then fused the liposomes with a planar bilayer. When incorporated into bilayers the A beta P forms channels, which generate linear current-voltage relationships in symmetrical solutions. A permeability ratio, PK/PCl, of 11 for the open A beta P channel was estimated from the reversal potential of the channel current in asymmetrical KCl solutions. The permeability sequence for different cations, estimated from the reversal potential of the A beta P-channel current for each system of asymmetrical solutions, is Pcs > PLi > PCa > or = PK > PNa. A beta P-channel current (either CS+ or Ca2+ as charge carriers) is blocked reversibly by tromethamine (millimolar range) and irreversibly by Al3+ (micromolar range). The inhibition of the A beta P-channel current by these two substances depends on transmembrane potential, suggesting that the mechanism of blockade involves direct interaction between tromethamine (or Al3+) and sites within the A beta P channel. Hitherto, A beta P has been presumed to be neurotoxic. On the basis of the present data we suggest that the channel activity of the polypeptide may be responsible for some or all of its neurotoxic effects. We further propose that a useful strategy for drug discovery for treatment of Alzheimer disease may include screening compounds for their ability to block or otherwise modify A beta P channels.

  19. Effects of Huanglian-Jie-Du-Tang and its modified formula on the modulation of amyloid-β precursor protein processing in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Sundara Kumar Durairajan

    Full Text Available Huanglian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT is a famous traditional Chinese herbal formula that has been widely used clinically to treat cerebral ischemia. Recently, we found that berberine, a major alkaloid compound in HLJDT, reduced amyloid-β (Aβ accumulation in an Alzheimer's disease (AD mouse model. In this study, we compared the effects of HLJDT, four single component herbs of HLJDT (Rhizoma coptidis (RC, Radix scutellariae (RS, Cortex phellodendri (CP and Fructus gardenia (FG and the modified formula of HLJDT (HLJDT-M, which is free of RS on the regulatory processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP in an in vitro model of AD. Here we show that treatment with HLJDT-M and its components RC, CP, and the main compound berberine on N2a mouse neuroblastoma cells stably expressing human APP with the Swedish mutation (N2a-SwedAPP significantly decreased the levels of full-length APP, phosphorylated APP at threonine 668, C-terminal fragments of APP, soluble APP (sAPP-α and sAPPβ-Swedish and reduced the generation of Aβ peptide in the cell lysates of N2a-SwedAPP. HLJDT-M showed more significant APP- and Aβ- reducing effects than berberine, RC or CP treatment alone. In contrast, HLJDT, its component RS and the main active compound of RS, baicalein, strongly increased the levels of all the metabolic products of APP in the cell lysates. The extract from FG, however, did not influence APP modulation. Interestingly, regular treatment of TgCRND8 APP transgenic mice with baicalein exacerbated the amyloid plaque burden, APP metabolism and Aβ production. Taken together, these data provide convincing evidence that HLJDT and baicalein treatment can increase the amyloidogenic metabolism of APP which is at least partly responsible for the baicalein-mediated Aβ plaque increase in the brains of TgCRND8 mice. On the other hand, HLJDT-M significantly decreased all the APP metabolic products including Aβ. Further study of HLJDT-M for therapeutic use in treating AD is

  20. Neurofibrillary tangles in some cases of dementia pugilistica share antigens with amyloid beta-protein of Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Allsop, D; Haga, S; Bruton, C; Ishii, T.; Roberts, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded temporal lobe sections from eight former boxers' brains were examined using an immunohistochemical method with antibodies to amyloid beta protein. In accord with recent observations in Alzheimer's disease, significant numbers of beta-protein immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) were observed in three cases. Most of these immunoreactive NFTs appeared to be tombstone tangles, although not all such tangles were stained. This immunoreaction was completely...

  1. Link between Aluminum and the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The Integration of the Aluminum and Amyloid Cascade Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst being environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life. On the contrary, aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin that inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and causes various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. The relationship between aluminum exposure and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, and Alzheimer's disease (AD has been suggested. In particular, the link between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease has been the subject of scientific debate for several decades. However, the complex characteristics of aluminum bioavailability make it difficult to evaluate its toxicity and therefore, the relationship remains to be established. Mounting evidence has suggested that significance of oligomerization of β-amyloid protein and neurotoxicity in the molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis. Aluminum may play crucial roles as a cross-linker in β-amyloid oligomerization. Here, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity based on our own studies and the recent literatures. Our aim is to revisit the link between aluminum and AD and to integrate aluminum and amyloid cascade hypotheses in the context of β-amyloid oligomerization and the interactions with other metals.

  2. Link between Aluminum and the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The Integration of the Aluminum and Amyloid Cascade Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Kato-Negishi, Midori

    2011-01-01

    Whilst being environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life. On the contrary, aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin that inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and causes various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. The relationship between aluminum exposure and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been suggested. In particular, the link between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease has been the subject of scientific debate for several decades. However, the complex characteristics of aluminum bioavailability make it difficult to evaluate its toxicity and therefore, the relationship remains to be established. Mounting evidence has suggested that significance of oligomerization of β-amyloid protein and neurotoxicity in the molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis. Aluminum may play crucial roles as a cross-linker in β-amyloid oligomerization. Here, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity based on our own studies and the recent literatures. Our aim is to revisit the link between aluminum and AD and to integrate aluminum and amyloid cascade hypotheses in the context of β-amyloid oligomerization and the interactions with other metals. PMID:21423554

  3. Preserved Fronto-Striatal Plasticity and Enhanced Procedural Learning in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Overexpressing Mutant "hAPPswe"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middei, Silvia; Geracitano, Raffaella; Caprioli, Antonio; Mercuri, Nicola; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene inducing abnormal processing and deposition of [beta]-amyloid protein in the brain have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Tg2576 mice with the Swedish mutation ("hAPPswe") exhibit age-related [Alpha][beta]-plaque formation in brain regions like the…

  4. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  5. Cortical Amyloid β Deposition and Current Depressive Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jun Ku; Plitman, Eric; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Caravaggio, Fernando; Gerretsen, Philip; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequently seen in patients with dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Evidence suggests that there may be a link between current depressive symptoms and Alzheimer disease (AD)-associated pathological changes, such as an increase in cortical amyloid-β (Aβ). However, limited in vivo studies have explored the relationship between current depressive symptoms and cortical Aβ in patients with MCI and AD. Our study, using a large sample of 455 patients with MCI and 153 patients with AD from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiatives, investigated whether current depressive symptoms are related to cortical Aβ deposition. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale and Neuropsychiatric Inventory-depression/dysphoria. Cortical Aβ was quantified using positron emission tomography with the Aβ probe(18)F-florbetapir (AV-45).(18)F-florbetapir standardized uptake value ratio (AV-45 SUVR) from the frontal, cingulate, parietal, and temporal regions was estimated. A global AV-45 SUVR, defined as the average of frontal, cingulate, precuneus, and parietal cortex, was also used. We observed that current depressive symptoms were not related to cortical Aβ, after controlling for potential confounds, including history of major depression. We also observed that there was no difference in cortical Aβ between matched participants with high and low depressive symptoms, as well as no difference between matched participants with the presence and absence of depressive symptoms. The association between depression and cortical Aβ deposition does not exist, but the relationship is highly influenced by stressful events in the past, such as previous depressive episodes, and complex interactions of different pathways underlying both depression and dementia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  7. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-04-01

    Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues. Since these modifications may affect folding and turnover, they reduce protein functionality over time and may be linked to pathological conditions. The present mini-review describes evidence of AAR and AAI involvement in the misfolding and brain accumulation of Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide), a central event in AD (Alzheimer's disease) synaptic dysfunctions. Structural alterations introduced by site-specific modifications linked to protein aging may affect Abeta production, polymerization and clearance, and therefore play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sporadic and genetic forms of AD. Early changes associated with molecular aging also have significant long-term consequences for Abeta folding and turnover. New fast, reproducible and accurate methods for the screening of protein aging markers in biological samples may contribute to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in AD.

  8. Amyloid-β diurnal pattern: possible role of sleep in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Bateman, Randall J

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline that is a growing public health crisis with a prevalence projected to more than double in the next 20 years. Sleep is frequently impaired in individuals with AD. Further, recent studies have linked numerous age-related sleep disturbances such as poor sleep efficiency and sleep apnea, to future risk of cognitive impairment. Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) into extracellular plaques in the brain is a key step in AD pathogenesis and likely begins 20 years before the onset of dementia. Aβ concentrations in both humans and mouse models show Aβ concentrations rise during wakefulness and fall during sleep, that is, an Aβ diurnal pattern. There is evidence in animal models that changes in sleep time alter Aβ deposition, suggesting that sleep may play a role in AD pathogenesis. A hypothetical model for the role of sleep and the Aβ diurnal pattern in AD pathogenesis is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Choroid plexus implants rescue Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies by modulating amyloid-β degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolos, Marta; Antequera, Desireé; Aldudo, Jesús; Kristen, Henrike; Bullido, María Jesús; Carro, Eva

    2014-08-01

    The choroid plexuses (CP) release numerous biologically active enzymes and neurotrophic factors, and contain a subpopulation of neural progenitor cells providing the capacity to proliferate and differentiate into other types of cells. These characteristics make CP epithelial cells (CPECs) excellent candidates for cell therapy aiming at restoring brain tissue in neurodegenerative illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, using in vitro approaches, we demonstrated that CP were able to diminish amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in cell cultures, reducing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. For in vivo studies, CPECs were transplanted into the brain of the APP/PS1 murine model of AD that exhibits advanced Aβ accumulation and memory impairment. Brain examination after cell implantation revealed a significant reduction in brain Aβ deposits, hyperphosphorylation of tau, and astrocytic reactivity. Remarkably, the transplantation of CPECs was accompanied by a total behavioral recovery in APP/PS1 mice, improving spatial and non-spatial memory. These findings reinforce the neuroprotective potential of CPECs and the use of cell therapies as useful tools in AD.

  10. Distinct prion-like strains of amyloid beta implicated in phenotypic diversity of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark; Appleby, Brian; Safar, Jiri G

    2016-01-01

    Vast evidence on human prions demonstrates that variable disease phenotypes, rates of propagation, and targeting of distinct brain structures are determined by unique conformers (strains) of pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Recent progress in the development of advanced biophysical tools that inventory structural characteristics of amyloid beta (Aβ) in the brain cortex of phenotypically diverse Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, revealed unique spectrum of oligomeric particles in the cortex of rapidly progressive cases, implicating these structures in variable rates of propagation in the brain, and in distict disease manifestation. Since only ∼30% of phenotypic diversity of AD can be explained by polymorphisms in risk genes, these and transgenic bioassay data argue that structurally distinct Aβ particles play a major role in the diverse pathogenesis of AD, and may behave as distinct prion-like strains encoding diverse phenotypes. From these observations and our growing understanding of prions, there is a critical need for new strain-specific diagnostic strategies for misfolded proteins causing these elusive disorders. Since targeted drug therapy can induce mutation and evolution of prions into new strains, effective treatments of AD will require drugs that enhance clearance of pathogenic conformers, reduce the precursor protein, or inhibit the conversion of precursors into prion-like states.

  11. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Murariu, Manuela; Ion, Laura; Habasescu, Laura

    2014-10-01

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1-3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloid-β peptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  12. Computed tomography of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease using diffraction enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, D.M.; Miller, L.; Benveniste, H.; Dilmanian, A.; Kritzer, M.; Zhong, Z.

    2009-03-19

    Our understanding of early development in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clouded by the scale at which the disease progresses; amyloid beta (A{beta}) plaques, a hallmark feature of AD, are small ({approx} 50 {micro}m) and low contrast in diagnostic clinical imaging techniques. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), a phase contrast x-ray imaging technique, has greater soft tissue contrast than conventional radiography and generates higher resolution images than magnetic resonance microimaging. Thus, in this proof of principle study, DEI in micro-CT mode was performed on the brains of AD-model mice to determine if DEI can visualize A{beta} plaques. Results revealed small nodules in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain. Histology confirmed that the features seen in the DEI images of the brain were A{beta} plaques. Several anatomical structures, including hippocampal subregions and white matter tracks, were also observed. Thus, DEI has strong promise in early diagnosis of AD, as well as general studies of the mouse brain.

  13. The Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta-protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Soscia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta is believed to be the key mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Abeta is most often characterized as an incidental catabolic byproduct that lacks a normal physiological role. However, Abeta has been shown to be a specific ligand for a number of different receptors and other molecules, transported by complex trafficking pathways, modulated in response to a variety of environmental stressors, and able to induce pro-inflammatory activities.Here, we provide data supporting an in vivo function for Abeta as an antimicrobial peptide (AMP. Experiments used established in vitro assays to compare antimicrobial activities of Abeta and LL-37, an archetypical human AMP. Findings reveal that Abeta exerts antimicrobial activity against eight common and clinically relevant microorganisms with a potency equivalent to, and in some cases greater than, LL-37. Furthermore, we show that AD whole brain homogenates have significantly higher antimicrobial activity than aged matched non-AD samples and that AMP action correlates with tissue Abeta levels. Consistent with Abeta-mediated activity, the increased antimicrobial action was ablated by immunodepletion of AD brain homogenates with anti-Abeta antibodies.Our findings suggest Abeta is a hitherto unrecognized AMP that may normally function in the innate immune system. This finding stands in stark contrast to current models of Abeta-mediated pathology and has important implications for ongoing and future AD treatment strategies.

  14. Amyloid β-interacting partners in Alzheimer's disease: From accomplices to possible therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sun-Ho; Park, Jong-Chan; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases in modern society because of insurmountable difficulties in early diagnosis and lack of therapeutic treatments. AD pathogenesis is tightly linked to the abnormal accumulation and aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ), seemingly the main causative factor of AD; however, intensive research on Aβ has not yet explained the complexity of AD pathogenesis. Consequently, the role of other supportive partners of Aβ have been elucidated and evaluated in the etiology of AD, and their potential molecular mechanisms have emerged as possible therapeutic targets. In this review, we compile information regarding Aβ-interacting partners in normal conditions and AD pathology, and analyze their etiological roles in diverse areas. Furthermore, we integrate this information into suggestions for probable clinical applications for AD diagnosis and therapeutics. We include Aβ-interacting partners localized to the cell surface and intracellular and extracellular compartments of different cell types ranging from the central nervous system to peripheral regions. Additionally, we expand the range of Aβ-interacting partners by including not only proteins, but also inorganic substances like metals, expecting that one of these partners may yield a critical breakthrough in the field of AD diagnostics and therapeutic drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel mutations in the amyloid precursor protein gene within Moroccan patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kadmiri, Nadia; Zaid, Nabil; Hachem, Ahmed; Zaid, Younes; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Hamzi, Khalil; El Moutawakil, Bouchra; Slassi, Ilham; Nadifi, Sellama

    2014-06-01

    In Morocco, Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects almost 30,000 individuals, and this number could increase to 75,000 by 2020. To our knowledge, the genes predisposing individuals to AD and predicting disease incidence remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the genetic contribution of mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene exons 16 and 17 to familial and sporadic AD cases. Seventeen sporadic cases and eight family cases were seen at the memory clinic of the University of Casablanca Neurology Department. These patients underwent standard somatic neurological examination, cognitive function assessment, brain imaging, and laboratory tests. Direct sequencing of exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene was performed on genomic DNA of AD patients. In this original Moroccan study, we identified seven novel frameshift mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene. Interestingly, only one novel splice mutation was detected in a family case. There is a strong correlation between clinical symptoms and genetic factors in Moroccan patients with a family history of AD. Therefore, mutations in APP gene exons 16 and 17 may eventually become genetic markers for AD predisposition.

  16. Scanning ultrasound removes amyloid-β and restores memory in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinenga, Gerhard; Götz, Jürgen

    2015-03-11

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We present a nonpharmacological approach for removing Aβ and restoring memory function in a mouse model of AD in which Aβ is deposited in the brain. We used repeated scanning ultrasound (SUS) treatments of the mouse brain to remove Aβ, without the need for any additional therapeutic agent such as anti-Aβ antibody. Spinning disk confocal microscopy and high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction revealed extensive internalization of Aβ into the lysosomes of activated microglia in mouse brains subjected to SUS, with no concomitant increase observed in the number of microglia. Plaque burden was reduced in SUS-treated AD mice compared to sham-treated animals, and cleared plaques were observed in 75% of SUS-treated mice. Treated AD mice also displayed improved performance on three memory tasks: the Y-maze, the novel object recognition test, and the active place avoidance task. Our findings suggest that repeated SUS is useful for removing Aβ in the mouse brain without causing overt damage, and should be explored further as a noninvasive method with therapeutic potential in AD. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...... in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42...

  18. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  19. Nano-biosensors to detect beta-amyloid for Alzheimer's disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Tiwari, Sneham; Vashist, Arti; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-06-15

    Beta-amyloid (β-A) peptides are potential biomarkers to monitor Alzheimer's diseases (AD) for diagnostic purposes. Increased β-A level is neurotoxic and induces oxidative stress in brain resulting in neurodegeneration and causes dementia. As of now, no sensitive and inexpensive method is available for β-A detection under physiological and pathological conditions. Although, available methods such as neuroimaging, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detect β-A, but they are not yet extended at point-of-care (POC) due to sophisticated equipments, need of high expertize, complicated operations, and challenge of low detection limit. Recently, β-A antibody based electrochemical immuno-sensing approach has been explored to detect β-A at pM levels within 30-40 min compared to 6-8h of ELISA test. The introduction of nano-enabling electrochemical sensing technology could enable rapid detection of β-A at POC and may facilitate fast personalized health care delivery. This review explores recent advancements in nano-enabling electrochemical β-A sensing technologies towards POC application to AD management. These analytical tools can serve as an analytical tool for AD management program to obtain bio-informatics needed to optimize therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases diagnosis management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Amyloid beta-mediated epigenetic alteration of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 controls cell survival in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Sung

    Full Text Available Swedish double mutation (KM670/671NL of amyloid precursor protein (APP is reported to increase toxic amyloid β (Aβ production via aberrant cleavage at the β-secretase site and thereby cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Previously, our transcriptome sequence analyses revealed global expressional modifications of over 600 genes in APP-Swedish mutant-expressing H4 (H4-sw cells compared to wild type H4 cells. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3 is one gene that showed significantly decreased mRNA expression in H4-sw cells. In this study, we investigated the functional role of IGFBP3 in AD pathogenesis and elucidated the mechanisms regulating its expression. We observed decreased IGFBP3 expression in the H4-sw cell line as well as the hippocampus of AD model transgenic mice. Treatment with exogenous IGFBP3 protein inhibited Aβ1-42- induced cell death and caspase-3 activity, whereas siRNA-mediated suppression of IGFBP3 expression induced cell death and caspase-3 cleavage. In primary hippocampal neurons, administration of IGFBP3 protein blocked apoptotic cell death due to Aβ1-42 toxicity. These data implicate a protective role for IGFBP3 against Aβ1-42-mediated apoptosis. Next, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP3 expression in AD pathogenesis. We observed abnormal IGFBP3 hypermethylation within the promoter CpG island in H4-sw cells. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored IGFBP3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Chronic exposure to Aβ1-42 induced IGFBP3 hypermethylation at CpGs, particularly at loci -164 and -173, and subsequently suppressed IGFBP3 expression. Therefore, we demonstrate that expression of anti-apoptotic IGFBP3 is regulated by epigenetic DNA methylation, suggesting a mechanism that contributes to AD pathogenesis.

  1. The effects of white matter hyperintensities and amyloid deposition on Alzheimer dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The amount of amyloid deposition and white matter damage independently predicts cognitive impairment. This suggests a diagnostic utility of qualitative white matter scales in addition to measuring amyloid levels.

  2. Immunotherapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid-β or tau, which is the right target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Carranza DL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diana L Castillo-Carranza,1,2 Marcos J Guerrero-Muñoz,1,2 Rakez Kayed1–31Mitchell Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, 2Departments of Neurology, Neuroscience, and Cell Biology, 3Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques composed mainly of amyloid-β (Aβ protein. Overproduction or slow clearance of Aβ initiates a cascade of pathologic events that may lead to formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal cell death, and dementia. Although immunotherapy in animal models has been demonstrated to be successful at removing plaques or prefibrillar forms of Aβ, clinical trials have yielded disappointing results. The lack of substantial cognitive improvement obtained by targeting Aβ raises the question of whether or not this is the correct target. Another important pathologic process in the AD brain is tau aggregation, which seems to become independent once initiated. Recent studies targeting tau in AD mouse models have displayed evidence of cognitive improvement, providing a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. In this review, we describe new advances in immunotherapy targeting Aβ peptide and tau protein, as well as future directions.Keywords: immunotherapy, Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid, tau

  3. Detection of amyloid plaques targeted by bifunctional USPIO in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice using magnetic resonance microimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Zaim Wadghiri

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaques are a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The detection of amyloid plaques in the brain is important for the diagnosis of AD, as well as for following potential amyloid targeting therapeutic interventions. Our group has developed several contrast agents to detect amyloid plaques in vivo using magnetic resonance microimaging (µMRI in AD transgenic mice, where we used mannitol to enhance blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. In the present study, we used bifunctional ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles, chemically coupled with Aβ1-42 peptide to image amyloid plaque deposition in the mouse brain. We coupled the nanoparticles to polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to improve BBB permeability. These USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 nanoparticles were injected intravenously in AD model transgenic mice followed by initial in vivo and subsequent ex vivo μMRI. A 3D gradient multi-echo sequence was used for imaging with a 100 µm isotropic resolution. The amyloid plaques detected by T2*-weighted μMRI were confirmed with matched histological sections. The region of interest-based quantitative measurement of T2* values obtained from the in vivo μMRI showed contrast injected AD Tg mice had significantly reduced T2* values compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the ex vivo scans were examined with voxel-based analysis (VBA using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for comparison of USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic and USPIO alone injected AD transgenic mice. The regional differences seen by VBA in the USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic correlated with the amyloid plaque distribution histologically. Our results indicate that USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 can be used for amyloid plaque detection in vivo by intravenous injection without the need to co-inject an agent which increases permeability of the BBB. This technique could aid the development of novel amyloid targeting drugs by allowing therapeutic effects

  4. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Dijk, Koene R.A. [Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Zwan, Marissa D.; Barkhof, Frederik; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reuter, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [{sup 11}C]PIB to assess amyloid-β plaque load and [{sup 18}F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [{sup 11}C]PIB binding and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloid-β plaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). The present study shows that in a group of AD patients amyloid-β plaque load as measured by [{sup 11}C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  5. Amyloid Beta annular protofibrils in cell processes and synapses accumulate with aging and Alzheimer-associated genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Hideko; Kayed, Rakez; Glabe, Charles G; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Saido, Takaomi C; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2009-07-14

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) annular protofibrils (APFs) have been described where the structure is related to that of beta barrel pore-forming bacterial toxins and exhibits cellular toxicity. To investigate the relationship of Abeta APFs to disease and their ultrastructural localization in brain tissue, we conducted a pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopic study using anti-annular protofibril antiserum. We examined brain tissues of young- and old-aged amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice (APP23), neprilysin knockout APP23 mice, and nontransgenic littermates. alphaAPF-immunoreactions tended to be found (1) on plasma membranes and vesicles inside of cell processes, but not on amyloid fibrils, (2) with higher density due to aging, APP transgene, and neprilysin deficiency, and (3) with higher positive rate at synaptic compartments in aged APP23, especially in neprilysin knockout APP23 mice. These findings imply that APFs are distinct from amyloid fibrils, interact with biological membranes, and might be related to synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer model mouse brains.

  6. Amyloid Beta Annular Protofibrils in Cell Processes and Synapses Accumulate with Aging and Alzheimer-Associated Genetic Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideko Kokubo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid β (Aβ annular protofibrils (APFs have been described where the structure is related to that of β barrel pore-forming bacterial toxins and exhibits cellular toxicity. To investigate the relationship of Aβ APFs to disease and their ultrastructural localization in brain tissue, we conducted a pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopic study using anti-annular protofibril antiserum. We examined brain tissues of young- and old-aged amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice (APP23, neprilysin knockout APP23 mice, and nontransgenic littermates. αAPF-immunoreactions tended to be found (1 on plasma membranes and vesicles inside of cell processes, but not on amyloid fibrils, (2 with higher density due to aging, APP transgene, and neprilysin deficiency, and (3 with higher positive rate at synaptic compartments in aged APP23, especially in neprilysin knockout APP23 mice. These findings imply that APFs are distinct from amyloid fibrils, interact with biological membranes, and might be related to synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer model mouse brains.

  7. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  8. Differences between amyloid-β aggregation in solution and on the membrane: insights into elucidation of the mechanistic details of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Samuel A; Walsh, Patrick; Brender, Jeffrey R; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-10-07

    The association of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide with cellular membranes is hypothesized to be the underlying phenomenon of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease. Misfolding of proteins and peptides, as is the case with Aβ, follows a progression from a monomeric state, through intermediates, ending at long, unbranched amyloid fibers. This tutorial review offers a perspective on the association of toxic Aβ structures with membranes as well as details of membrane-associated mechanisms of toxicity.

  9. Dual induction of TREM2 and tolerance-related transcript, Tmem176b, in amyloid transgenic mice: implications for vaccine-based therapies for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit Melchior; Garcia, Angie E.; Bor-Kai Hsiung; Katherine M Lo; Doose, Jonathan M; J. Cameron Thrash; Stalder, Anna K.; Matthias Staufenbiel; Harald Neumann; Carson, Monica J.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine-based autoimmune (anti-amyloid) treatments are currently being examined for their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease. In the present study we examined, in a transgenic model of amyloid pathology, the expression of two molecules previously implicated in decreasing the severity of autoimmune responses: TREM2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2) and the intracellular tolerance-associated transcript, Tmem176b (transmembrane domain protein 176b). In situ hybridizati...

  10. Roles of Amyloid β-Peptide-Associated Oxidative Stress and Brain Protein Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Reed, Tanea; Newman, Shelley F.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and ischemia just to name a few. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is recognized as the most common form of dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and ...

  11. A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Leuven Fred

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily strikes the elderly. Studies in both humans and animal models have linked the consumption of cholesterol and saturated fats with amyloid-β (Aβ deposition and development of AD. Yet, these studies did not examine high fat diets in combination with reduced carbohydrate intake. Here we tested the effect of a high saturated fat/low carbohydrate diet on a transgenic mouse model of AD. Results Starting at three months of age, two groups of female transgenic mice carrying the "London" APP mutation (APP/V717I were fed either, a standard diet (SD composed of high carbohydrate/low fat chow, or a ketogenic diet (KD composed of very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat chow for 43 days. Animals fed the KD exhibited greatly elevated serum ketone body levels, as measured by β-hydroxybutyrate (3.85 ± 2.6 mM, compared to SD fed animals (0.29 ± 0.06 mM. In addition, animals fed the KD lost body weight (SD 22.2 ± 0.6 g vs. KD 17.5 ± 1.4 g, p = 0.0067. In contrast to earlier studies, the brief KD feeding regime significantly reduced total brain Aβ levels by approximately 25%. Despite changes in ketone levels, body weight, and Aβ levels, the KD diet did not alter behavioral measures. Conclusion Previous studies have suggested that diets rich in cholesterol and saturated fats increased the deposition of Aβ and the risk of developing AD. Here we demonstrate that a diet rich in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates can actually reduce levels of Aβ. Therefore, dietary strategies aimed at reducing Aβ levels should take into account interactions of dietary components and the metabolic outcomes, in particular, levels of carbohydrates, total calories, and presence of ketone bodies should be considered.

  12. Amino acids variations in amyloid-beta peptides, mitochondrial dysfunction, and new therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamna, Hani

    2009-10-01

    Soluble oligomers and/or aggregates of Amyloid-beta (Abeta) are viewed by many as the principal cause for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism by which Abeta and its aggregates cause neurodegeneration is not clear. The toxicity of Abeta has been attributed to its hydrophobicity. However, many specific mitochondrial cytopathologies e.g., loss of complex IV, loss of iron homeostasis, or oxidative damage cannot be explained by Abeta's hydrophobicity. In order to understand the role of Abeta in these cytopathologies we hypothesized that Abeta impairs specific metabolic pathways. We focused on heme metabolism because it links iron, mitochondria, and Abeta. We generated experimental evidence showing that Abeta alters heme metabolism in neuronal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Abeta binds to and depletes intracellular regulatory heme (forming an Abeta-heme complex), which provides a strong molecular connection between Abeta and heme metabolism. We showed that heme depletion leads to key cytopathologies identical to those seen in AD including loss of iron homeostasis and loss of mitochondrial complex IV. Abeta-heme exhibits a peroxidase-like catalytic activity, which catalytically accelerates oxidative damage. Interestingly, the amino acids sequence of rodent Abeta (roAbeta) and human Abeta (huAbeta) is identical except for three amino acids within the hydrophilic region, which is also the heme-binding motif that we identified. We found that huAbeta, unlike roAbeta, binds heme tightly and forms a peroxidase. Although, roAbeta and huAbeta equally form fibrils and aggregates, rodents do not develop AD-like neuropathology. These findings led us to propose a new mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction and huAbeta's neurotoxicity. This mechanism prompted the development of methylene blue (MB), which increased heme synthesis, complex IV, and mitochondrial function. Thus, MB may delay the onset and progression of AD and serve as a lead to

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta and tau protein: Biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Gorana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Introduction of acetylcholine esterase inhibitors as a symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD has additionally highlighted the importance of diagnostic markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for early AD diagnosis: low level of 42 amino acid form of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42, and levels of tau protein (T-tau and phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau. The aim of this study was to diagnostic potential of CSF biomarkers T-tau, P-tau and Aβ42 as biochemical markers for AD. Methods. Lumbar puncture was performed in 63 patients with AD and 26 control subjects who passed orthopedic surgery. The Innotest, ELISA sandwich test (Innogenetics - Belgium was used for measuring the levels of T-tau, P-tau and Aβ42. Results. The patients and the control group did not differ in age, education and sex. Mean levels of CSF T-tau and P-tau were significantly higher in the patients with AD (p < 0.001 compared to the control group, in contrast to significantely lower CSF Aβ42 in AD group (p < 0.001. A significant progressive decrease of Aβ42, as well as significant progressive increase of T-tau and P-tau was found among AD subgroups (according to MMSE staging and controls. Conclusion. The obtained results suggest that these biomarkers may be supportive in the diagnosis of AD, especially in the early course of the disease and could be used in the routine clinical practice considering the approaching target therapeutics.

  14. Predominant loss of glutamatergic terminal markers in a β-amyloid peptide model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Paula M; Simões, Ana Patrícia; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized phenotypically by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (such as Aβ1-42) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals in cortical and hippocampal regions. However, it is not known what nerve terminals are mostly affected in early AD. We now used a mouse model of AD, based on the intra-cerebral administration of soluble Aβ1-42, that leads to memory impairment and loss of nerve terminal markers within 2 weeks, to investigate which type of hippocampal nerve terminals was mostly affected in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of the density of vesicular glutamate transporters type 1 (vGluT1, a marker of glutamatergic terminals; -20.1 ± 3.6%) and of vesicular acetylcholine transporters (vAChT, a marker of cholinergic terminals; -27.2 ± 0.9%) but not of vesicular GABA transporters (vGAT, a marker of GABAergic terminals) in the hippocampus of Aβ-injected mice. Immunocytochemical analysis of single hippocampal nerve terminals revealed that the decrease of the density of vGluT1 reflects a reduction of the number of vGluT1-immunopositive nerve terminals (-10.6 ± 3.6%), while no significant changes in the number of vAChT- or vGAT-immunopositive nerve terminals were observed. This pilot study shows that, in this Aβ-based model of AD, there is an asymmetric loss of different synaptic markers with a predominant susceptibility of glutamatergic synapses. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês; Tsolaki, Magda; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Sermin, Genc; Yener, Görsev G; Simonsen, Anja; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Mara, Bourbouli; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mendes, Vera M; Manadas, Bruno; de Mendon, Alexandreça

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42 in the CSF. However, a significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of theobromine, both in the CSF and in the plasma, with Aβ42 in the CSF. Theobromine in the CSF was positively correlated with the levels of other xanthines in the CSF, but not in the plasma, suggesting that it may be formed by central metabolic pathways. In conclusion, caffeine consumption does not modify the levels of CSF biomarkers, and does not require to be controlled for when measuring CSF biomarkers in a clinical setting. Since theobromine is associated with a favorable Aβ profile in the CSF, the possibility that it might have a protective role in AD should be further investigated.

  16. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele distributions in late-onset Alzheimer's disease and in other amyloid-forming diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, A M; Schmader, K; Breitner, J C; Benson, M D; Brown, W T; Goldfarb, L; Goldgaber, D; Manwaring, M G; Szymanski, M H; McCown, N

    1993-09-18

    The frequency of the allele for apolipoprotein E type 4 (epsilon 4) is increased in late-onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have examined epsilon 4 frequencies in four distinct, normal, elderly control groups and, most importantly, in patients with amyloid-forming diseases whose epsilon 4 distributions were not previously known (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, Down's syndrome). There were no differences between any of these controls and published control series, cementing the relevance of epsilon 4 for late-onset AD. The increase in late-onset AD was confirmed in two new series.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropathologic Estimates of Fibrillar Amyloid-β in a Patient With Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Fleisher, Adam; Chen, Kewei; Rogers, Joseph; Berk, Camryn; Reiman, Eric; Pontecorvo, Michael; Mintun, Mark; Skovronsky, Daniel; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sue, Lucia I.; Liebsack, Carolyn; Charney, Albert S.; Cole, Lauren; Belden, Christine; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Down syndrome appears to be associated with a virtually certain risk of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology by the age of 40 and a very high risk of dementia at older ages. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand florbetapir F18 has been shown to characterize fibrillar Aβ in the living human brain and to provide a close correlation with subsequent Aβ neuropathology in individuals proximate to and after the end of life. The extent to which the most frequently used PET ligands can be used to detect fibrillar Aβ in patients with Down syndrome remains to be determined. Objectives To characterize PET estimates of fibrillar Aβ burden in a Down syndrome patient very close to the end of life and to compare them with neuropathologic assessment made after his death. Design/Methods With the family’s informed consent, florbetapir PET was used to study a 55-year-old Down syndrome patient with Alzheimer disease near the end of life; his brain was donated for neuropathologic assessment when he died 14 days later. Visual ratings of cerebral florbetapir uptake were performed by trained readers who were masked to the patient’s diagnosis as part of a larger study, and an automated algorithm was used to characterize regional-to-cerebellar standard uptake value ratios in 6 cerebral regions of interest. Neuropathologic assessments were performed masked to the patient’s diagnosis or PET measurements. Results Visual ratings and automated analyses of the PET image revealed a heavy fibrillar Aβ burden in cortical, striatal, and thalamic regions, similar to that reported for patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. This matched neuropathologic findings of frequent neuritic and diffuse plaques, as well as frequent amyloid angiopathy, except for neuropathologically demonstrated frequent cerebellar diffuse plaques and amyloid angiopathy that were not detected by the PET scan. Conclusions Florbetapir PET can be used to detect increased cerebral

  18. Absence of A673T amyloid-β precursor protein variant in Alzheimer's disease and other neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Chong, Mei-Sian; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Hameed, Shahul; Tan, Louis; Au, Wing-Lok; Prakash, Kumar M; Pavanni, Ratnagopal; Lee, Tih-Shih; Foo, Jia-Nee; Bei, Jin-Xin; Yu, Xue-Qing; Liu, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Yi; Lee, Wei-Ling; Tan, Eng-King

    2013-10-01

    The rare variant A673T in the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) gene has been shown to reduce the risk of cognitive impairment. We genotyped the variant in 8721 Asian individuals comprising 552 with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, 790 with Parkinson's disease, and 7379 controls. The A673T variant was absent in all of the subjects. Our finding suggests that the A673T protective variant is not relevant in our Asian population. Studies in other ethnic populations would clarify whether this variant is specific to specific races/ethnicities. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Steen; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical...... of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients...

  1. Hippocampal Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Pathway Deregulation Profiles at Early and Late Stages in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's-Like Amyloid Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Crynen, Gogce; Paradis, Tiffany; Reed, Jon; Iulita, M Florencia; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Crawford, Fiona; Cuello, A Claudio

    2017-05-13

    The cerebral accumulation and cytotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ) is central to Alzheimer's pathogenesis. However, little is known about how the amyloid pathology affects the global expression of brain proteins at different disease stages. In order to identify genotype and time-dependent significant changes in protein expression, we employed quantitative proteomics analysis of hippocampal tissue from the McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat model of Alzheimer-like amyloid pathology. McGill transgenic rats were compared to wild-type rats at early and late pathology stages, i.e., when intraneuronal Aβ amyloid burden is conspicuous and when extracellular amyloid plaques are abundant with more pronounced cognitive deficits. After correction for multiple testing, the expression levels of 64 proteins were found to be considerably different in transgenic versus wild-type rats at the pre-plaque stage (3 months), and 86 proteins in the post-plaque group (12 months), with only 9 differentially regulated proteins common to the 2 time-points. This minimal overlap supports the hypothesis that different molecular pathways are affected in the hippocampus at early and late stages of the amyloid pathology throughout its continuum. At early stages, disturbances in pathways related to cellular responses to stress, protein homeostasis, and neuronal structure are predominant, while disturbances in metabolic energy generation dominate at later stages. These results shed new light on the molecular pathways affected by the early accumulation of Aβ and how the evolving amyloid pathology impacts other complex metabolic pathways.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of human FE65, a ligand of Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein, by Sp1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yu, Hoi-Tin

    2010-03-01

    FE65 is a neuronal-enriched adaptor protein that binds to the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). FE65 forms a transcriptionally active complex with the APP intracellular domain (AICD). The precise gene targets for this complex are unclear but several Alzheimer\\'s disease-linked genes have been proposed. Additionally, evidence suggests that FE65 influences APP metabolism. The mechanism by which FE65 expression is regulated is as yet unknown. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanism, we cloned a 1.6 kb fragment upstream of the human FE65 gene and found that it possesses particularly strong promoter activity in neurones. To delineate essential regions in the human FE65 promoter, a series of deletion mutants were generated. The minimal FE65 promoter was located between -100 and +5, which contains a functional Sp1 site. Overexpression of the transcription factor Sp1 potentiates the FE65 promoter activity. Conversely, suppression of the FE65 promoter was observed in cells either treated with an Sp1 inhibitor or in which Sp1 was knocked down. Furthermore, reduced levels of Sp1 resulted in downregulation of endogenous FE65 mRNA and protein. These findings reveal that Sp1 plays a crucial role in transcriptional control of the human FE65 gene.

  3. Luteolin Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Elsholtzia rugulosa (Labiatae Prevents Copper-Mediated Toxicity in β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Swedish Mutation Overexpressing SH-SY5Y Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Luteolin, a 3’,4’,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that has been isolated from several plant species. In the present study, the effects of luteolin obtained from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa and the related mechanisms were examined in an Alzheimer's disease (AD cell model. In this model, copper was used to exacerbate the neurotoxicity in β-amyloid precursor protein Swedish mutation stably overexpressed SH-SY5Y cells (named “APPsw cells” for short. Based on this model, we demonstrated that luteolin increased cell viability, reduced intracellular ROS generation, enhanced the activity of SOD and reversed mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation. Inhibition of caspase-related apoptosis was consistently involved in the neuroprotection afforded by luteolin. Furthermore, it down-regulated the expression of AβPP and lowered the secretion of Aβ1-42. These results indicated that luteolin from the Elsholtzia rugulosa exerted neroprotective effects through mechanisms that decrease AβPP expression, lower Aβ secretion, regulate the redox imbalance, preserve mitochondrial function, and depress the caspase family-related apoptosis.

  4. Passage of amyloid beta protein antibody across the blood-brain barrier in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A; Terrell, Brie; Farr, Susan A; Robinson, Sandra M; Nonaka, Naoko; Morley, John E

    2002-12-01

    Vaccinations against amyloid beta protein (A beta P) reduce amyloid deposition and reverse learning and memory deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. This has raised the question of whether circulating antibodies, normally restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), can enter the brain [Nat. Med. 7 (2001) 369-372]. Here, we show that antibody directed against A beta P does cross the BBB at a very low rate. Entry is by way of the extracellular pathways with about 0.11% of an intravenous (i.v.) dose entering the brain by 1h. Clearance of antibody from brain increasingly dominates over time, but antibody is still detectable in brain 72 h after i.v. injection. Uptake and clearance is not altered in mice overexpressing A beta P. This ability to enter and exit the brain even in the presence of increased brain ligand supports the use of antibody in the treatment of Alzheimer's and other diseases of the brain.

  5. Delineating Amyloid Plaque Associated Neuronal Sphingolipids in Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mice (tgArcSwe) Using MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ibrahim; Brinet, Dimitri; Michno, Wojciech; Syvänen, Stina; Sehlin, Dag; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-02-15

    The major pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the progressive aggregation and accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau protein into neurotoxic deposits. Aβ aggregation has been suggested as the critical early inducer, driving the disease progression. However, the factors that promote neurotoxic Aβ aggregation remain elusive. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique to comprehensively elucidate the spatial distribution patterns of lipids, peptides, and proteins in biological tissue sections. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based imaging was used on transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse (tgArcSwe) brain tissue to investigate the sphingolipid microenvironment of individual Aβ plaques and elucidate plaque-associated sphingolipid alterations. Multivariate data analysis was used to interrogate the IMS data for identifying pathologically relevant, anatomical features based on their lipid chemical profile. This approach revealed sphingolipid species that distinctly located to cortical and hippocampal deposits, whose Aβ identity was further verified using fluorescent amyloid staining and immunohistochemistry. Subsequent multivariate statistical analysis of the spectral data revealed significant localization of gangliosides and ceramides species to Aβ positive plaques, which was accompanied by distinct local reduction of sulfatides. These plaque-associated changes in sphingolipid levels implicate a functional role of sphingolipid metabolism in Aβ plaque pathology and AD pathogenesis. Taken together, the presented data highlight the potential of imaging mass spectrometry as a powerful approach for probing Aβ plaque-associated lipid changes underlying AD pathology.

  6. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Alzheimer Disease Protective Mutation A2T Modulates Kinetic and Thermodynamic Properties of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Aggregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilova, Iryna; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Castillo Cano, Virginia; Snellinx, An; Ramakers, Meine; Bartic, Carmen; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; De Strooper, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Missense mutations in alanine 673 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which corresponds to the second alanine of the amyloid β (Aβ) sequence, have dramatic impact on the risk for Alzheimer disease; A2V is causative, and A2T is protective. Assuming a crucial role of amyloid-Aβ in neurodegeneration, we hypothesized that both A2V and A2T mutations cause distinct changes in Aβ properties that may at least partially explain these completely different phenotypes. Using human APP-overexpressing primary neurons, we observed significantly decreased Aβ production in the A2T mutant along with an enhanced Aβ generation in the A2V mutant confirming earlier data from non-neuronal cell lines. More importantly, thioflavin T fluorescence assays revealed that the mutations, while having little effect on Aβ42 peptide aggregation, dramatically change the properties of the Aβ40 pool with A2V accelerating and A2T delaying aggregation of the Aβ peptides. In line with the kinetic data, Aβ A2T demonstrated an increase in the solubility at equilibrium, an effect that was also observed in all mixtures of the A2T mutant with the wild type Aβ40. We propose that in addition to the reduced β-secretase cleavage of APP, the impaired propensity to aggregate may be part of the protective effect conferred by A2T substitution. The interpretation of the protective effect of this mutation is thus much more complicated than proposed previously. PMID:25253695

  8. Down's Syndrome with Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology: What Can It Teach Us about the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Bakkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 represents a complex genetic abnormality that leads to pathology in later life that is similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD. We compared two cases of DS with APOE 3/3 genotypes, a similar age at death, and comparable amyloid-beta 42 peptide (A42 burdens in the brain but that differed markedly in the severity of AD-like pathology. One exhibited extensive neurofibrillary pathology whereas the other showed minimal features of this type. Comparable loads of A42 could relate to the cases' similar life-time accumulation of A due to trisomy 21-enhanced metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP. The cases' significant difference in AD-like pathology, however, suggests that parenchymal deposition of A42, even when extensive, may not inevitably trigger AD-like tau pathology (though it may be necessary. Thus, these observations of a natural experiment may contribute to understanding the nuances of the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD pathogenesis.

  9. Amyloid precursor protein selective gamma-secretase inhibitors for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basi, Guriqbal S; Hemphill, Susanna; Brigham, Elizabeth F; Liao, Anna; Aubele, Danielle L; Baker, Jeanne; Barbour, Robin; Bova, Michael; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Dappen, Michael S; Eichenbaum, Tovah; Goldbach, Erich; Hawkinson, Jon; Lawler-Herbold, Rose; Hu, Kang; Hui, Terence; Jagodzinski, Jacek J; Keim, Pamela S; Kholodenko, Dora; Latimer, Lee H; Lee, Mike; Marugg, Jennifer; Mattson, Matthew N; McCauley, Scott; Miller, James L; Motter, Ruth; Mutter, Linda; Neitzel, Martin L; Ni, Huifang; Nguyen, Lan; Quinn, Kevin; Ruslim, Lany; Semko, Christopher M; Shapiro, Paul; Smith, Jenifer; Soriano, Ferdie; Szoke, Balazs; Tanaka, Kevin; Tang, Pearl; Tucker, John A; Ye, Xiacong Michael; Yu, Mei; Wu, Jing; Xu, Ying-Zi; Garofalo, Albert W; Sauer, John Michael; Konradi, Andrei W; Ness, Daniel; Shopp, George; Pleiss, Michael A; Freedman, Stephen B; Schenk, Dale

    2010-12-29

    Inhibition of gamma-secretase presents a direct target for lowering Aβ production in the brain as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, gamma-secretase is known to process multiple substrates in addition to amyloid precursor protein (APP), most notably Notch, which has limited clinical development of inhibitors targeting this enzyme. It has been postulated that APP substrate selective inhibitors of gamma-secretase would be preferable to non-selective inhibitors from a safety perspective for AD therapy. In vitro assays monitoring inhibitor potencies at APP γ-site cleavage (equivalent to Aβ40), and Notch ε-site cleavage, in conjunction with a single cell assay to simultaneously monitor selectivity for inhibition of Aβ production vs. Notch signaling were developed to discover APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors. In vivo efficacy for acute reduction of brain Aβ was determined in the PDAPP transgene model of AD, as well as in wild-type FVB strain mice. In vivo selectivity was determined following seven days x twice per day (b.i.d.) treatment with 15 mg/kg/dose to 1,000 mg/kg/dose ELN475516, and monitoring brain Aβ reduction vs. Notch signaling endpoints in periphery. The APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors ELN318463 and ELN475516 reported here behave as classic gamma-secretase inhibitors, demonstrate 75- to 120-fold selectivity for inhibiting Aβ production compared with Notch signaling in cells, and displace an active site directed inhibitor at very high concentrations only in the presence of substrate. ELN318463 demonstrated discordant efficacy for reduction of brain Aβ in the PDAPP compared with wild-type FVB, not observed with ELN475516. Improved in vivo safety of ELN475516 was demonstrated in the 7d repeat dose study in wild-type mice, where a 33% reduction of brain Aβ was observed in mice terminated three hours post last dose at the lowest dose of inhibitor tested. No overt in-life or post-mortem indications of systemic toxicity, nor

  10. Adhesion molecule L1 binds to amyloid beta and reduces Alzheimer's disease pathology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djogo, Nevena; Jakovcevski, Igor; Müller, Christian; Lee, Hyun Joon; Xu, Jin-Chong; Jakovcevski, Mira; Kügler, Sebastian; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of elderly dementia. In an effort to contribute to the potential of molecular approaches to reduce degenerative processes we have tested the possibility that the neural adhesion molecule L1 ameliorates some characteristic cellular and molecular parameters associated with the disease in a mouse model of AD. Three-month-old mice overexpressing mutated forms of amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 under the control of a neuron-specific promoter received an injection of adeno-associated virus encoding the neuronal isoform of full-length L1 (AAV-L1) or, as negative control, green fluorescent protein (AAV-GFP) into the hippocampus and occipital cortex. Four months after virus injection, the mice were analyzed for histological and biochemical parameters of AD. AAV-L1 injection decreased the Aβ plaque load, levels of Aβ42, Aβ42/40 ratio and astrogliosis compared with AAV-GFP controls. AAV-L1 injected mice also had increased densities of inhibitory synaptic terminals on pyramidal cells in the hippocampus when compared with AAV-GFP controls. Numbers of microglial cells/macrophages were similar in both groups, but numbers of microglial cells/macrophages per plaque were increased in AAV-L1 injected mice. To probe for a molecular mechanism that may underlie these effects, we analyzed whether L1 would directly and specifically interact with Aβ. In a label-free binding assay, concentration dependent binding of the extracellular domain of L1, but not of the close homolog of L1 to Aβ40 and Aβ42 was seen, with the fibronectin type III homologous repeats 1-3 of L1 mediating this effect. Aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro was reduced in the presence of the extracellular domain of L1. The combined observations indicate that L1, when overexpressed in neurons and glia, reduces several histopathological hallmarks of AD in mice, possibly by reduction of Aβ aggregation. L1 thus appears to

  11. beta-amyloid excitotoxicity in rat magnocellular nucleus basalis - Effect of cortical deafferentation on cerebral blood flow regulation and implications for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Penke, B; Luiten, P.G.M.; Kalaria, RN; Ince, P

    2000-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia with a still largely unclear etiopathology, One of the factors that may directly contribute to the development and progression of the disorder Is the abundant accumulation of beta-amyloid peptides (A beta) in senile plaques. In the present

  12. [In vitroearly detection of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease by Pittsburgh compound B-modified magnetic nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, J Q; Wu, J Q; Li, M H; Wang, P J

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To construct magnetic nanoparticles targeting β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, the pathological biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to study their binding capability in vitro . Methods: Superparamagnetic nanoparticles Mn(0.6)Zn(0.4)Fe(2)O(4) (MZF) were coated with amphiphilic star-block copolymeric micelles and modified with Aβ-specific probe Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to construct a novel magnetic nanoparticle MZF-PiB, which specifically targeted amyloid plaques. Transmission electron microscope was used to study the morphological features of MZF-PiB. Superparamagnetism of MZF-PiB was assessed by its r(2) relaxation rate by using 3.0 T MRI scanner. Cytotoxic test was applied to determine biosafety of MZF-PiB nanoparticles in differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). In vitro binding tests were conducted via immunohistochemistry on 6-month old AD mice brain sections. Differences of cell viability between groups were compared with one-way analysis of variance. Results: MZF-PiB nanoparticles were successfully constructed. Transmission electron microscope images showed that the nanoparticles were about 100 nm in size. The r(2) relaxation rate was 163.11 mMS(-1). No differences were found in cell viability of SH-SY5Y and MDCK incubated with MZF-PiB suspension for 24 h or 48 h when compared with those of untreated cells ( F =2.336, 2.539, 0.293, 1.493, all P >0.05). In vitro binding tests indicated that the MZF-PiB were specifically bound to amyloid plaques. The smallest size of detected plaques was 27 μm. Conclusion: PiB-modified nanoparticles targeting Aβ are biologically safe and highly superparamagnetic, possessing the capability to detect amyloid plaques early in vitro and the potential for early diagnosis of AD.

  13. Alzheimer's amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ. Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R and Tottori (D7N mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD.

  14. Intracellular amyloid-β accumulation in calcium-binding protein-deficient neurons leads to amyloid-β plaque formation in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Minho; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Nam, Dong Woo; Baik, Sung Hoon; Song, Hyundong; Kook, Sun-Young; Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Jeewoo; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    One of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the extracellular deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) as senile plaques in specific brain regions. Clearly, an understanding of the cellular processes underlying Aβ deposition is a crucial issue in the field of AD research. Recent studies have found that accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ (iAβ) is associated with synaptic deficits, neuronal death, and cognitive dysfunction in AD patients. In this study, we found that Aβ deposits had several shapes and sizes, and that iAβ occurred before the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques in the subiculum of 5XFAD mice, an animal model of AD. We also observed pyroglutamate-modified Aβ (N3pE-Aβ), which has been suggested to be a seeding molecule for senile plaques, inside the Aβ plaques only after iAβ accumulation, which argues against its seeding role. In addition, we found that iAβ accumulates in calcium-binding protein (CBP)-free neurons, induces neuronal death, and then develops into senile plaques in 2-4-month-old 5XFAD mice. These findings suggest that N3pE-Aβ-independent accumulation of Aβ in CBP-free neurons might be an early process that triggers neuronal damage and senile plaque formation in AD patients. Our results provide new insights into several long-standing gaps in AD research, namely how Aβ plaques are formed, what happens to iAβ and how Aβ causes selective neuronal loss in AD patients.

  15. Peptides of presenilin-1 bind the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain and offer a novel and specific therapeutic approach to reduce ß-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazneen N Dewji

    Full Text Available β-Amyloid (Aβ accumulation in the brain is widely accepted to be critical to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Current efforts at reducing toxic Aβ40 or 42 have largely focused on modulating γ-secretase activity to produce shorter, less toxic Aβ, while attempting to spare other secretase functions. In this paper we provide data that offer the potential for a new approach for the treatment of AD. The method is based on our previous findings that the production of Aβ from the interaction between the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP and Presenilin (PS, as part of the γ-secretase complex, in cell culture is largely inhibited if the entire water-soluble NH2-terminal domain of PS is first added to the culture. Here we demonstrate that two small, non-overlapping water-soluble peptides from the PS-1 NH2-terminal domain can substantially and specifically inhibit the production of total Aβ as well as Aβ40 and 42 in vitro and in vivo in the brains of APP transgenic mice. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of the entire amino terminal domain of PS-1 on Aβ production is largely focused in a few smaller sequences within that domain. Using biolayer interferometry and confocal microscopy we provide evidence that peptides effective in reducing Aβ give a strong, specific and biologically relevant binding with the purified ectodomain of APP 695. Finally, we demonstrate that the reduction of Aβ by the peptides does not affect the catalytic activities of β- or γ-secretase, or the level of APP. P4 and P8 are the first reported protein site-specific small peptides to reduce Aβ production in model systems of AD. These peptides and their derivatives offer new potential drug candidates for the treatment of AD.

  16. <Symposium IV>Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiso, Jorge; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Revez, Tamas; Frangione, Blas; Rostagno, Agueda

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is increasingly recognized as a major contributor of Alzheimer’sdisease( AD) pathogenesis. To date, vascular deposits and not parenchymal plaques appear more sensitive predictorsof dementia. Amyloid deposition in and around cerebral blood vessels plays a central role in a series of responsemechanisms that lead to changes in the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, extravasations of plasma proteins,edema formation, release of inflammatory mediators and matrix...

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 18}F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, B. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.neumaier@nf.mpg.de; Deisenhofer, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Sommer, C. [Department of Neuropathology, University of Mainz (Germany); Solbach, C.; Reske, S.N. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of {sup 11}C, longer lived {sup 18}F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [{sup 18}F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [{sup 18}F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  18. Rescue of Early bace-1 and Global DNA Demethylation by S-Adenosylmethionine Reduces Amyloid Pathology and Improves Cognition in an Alzheimer's Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Hanzel, Cecilia E; Jacobs, Marie L; Machnes, Ziv; Iulita, M Florencia; Yang, Jingyun; Yu, Lei; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Danik, Marc; Breuillaud, Lionel S; Bennett, David A; Szyf, Moshe; Cuello, A Claudio

    2016-09-29

    General DNA hypomethylation is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it is unclear when DNA hypomethylation starts or plays a role in AD pathology or whether DNA re-methylation would rescue early amyloid-related cognitive impairments. In an APP transgenic mouse model of AD-like amyloid pathology we found that early intraneuronal amyloid beta build-up is sufficient to unleash a global and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (bace-1) DNA demethylation in AD-vulnerable brain regions. S-adenosylmethionine administration at these early stages abolished this hypomethylation, diminished the amyloid pathology and restored cognitive capabilities. To assess a possible human significance of findings, we examined the methylation at 12 CpGs sites in the bace-1 promoter, using genome-wide DNA methylation data from 740 postmortem human brains. Thus, we found significant associations of bace-1 promoter methylation with β-amyloid load among persons with AD dementia, and PHFtau tangle density. Our results support a plausible causal role for the earliest amyloid beta accumulation to provoke DNA hypomethylation, influencing AD pathological outcomes.

  19. Absence of amyloid-beta in lenses of Alzheimer patients: A confocal Raman microspectroscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michael, R.; Otto, Cornelis; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Gelpi, E.; Montenegro, G.A.; Rosandic, J.; Tresssera, F.; Barraquer, R.I.; Vrensen, G.F.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We have compared the protein profiles in plaques and tangles in the hippocampus of post-mortem Alzheimer brains and in opaque and clear regions in the deep cortex of eye lenses of the same donors. From the 7 Alzheimer donors studied, 1 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities, 1 moderate and

  20. Mechanisms of U87 astrocytoma cell uptake and trafficking of monomeric versus protofibril Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Li

    Full Text Available A significant hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the formation of senile plaques in the brain due to the unbalanced levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ. However, although how Aβ is produced from amyloid precursor proteins is well understood, little is known regarding the clearance and metabolism of various Aβ aggregates from the brain. Similarly, little is known regarding how astrocytes internalize and degrade Aβ, although astrocytes are known to play an important role in plaque maintenance and Aβ clearance. The objective of this study is to investigate the cellular mechanisms that mediate the internalization of soluble monomeric versus oligomeric Aβ by astrocytes. We used a combination of laser confocal microscopy and genetic and pharmacological experiments to dissect the internalization of sAβ42 and oAβ42 and their postendocytic transport by U87 human brain astrocytoma cell line. Both Aβ42 species were internalized by U87 cells through fluid phase macropinocytosis, which required dynamin 2. Depleting LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 decreased sAβ42 uptake more significantly than that of oAβ42. We finally show that both Aβ42 species were rapidly transported to lysosomes through an endolytic pathway and subjected to proteolysis after internalization, which had no significant toxic effects to the U87 cells under relatively low concentrations. We propose that macropinocytic sAβ42 and oAβ42 uptake and their subsequent proteolytic degradation in astroglial cells is a significant mechanism underlying Aβ clearance from the extracellular milieu. Understanding the molecular events involved in astrocytic Aβ internalization may identify potential therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Anti-Amyloid-β Immunotherapy in Alzheimer's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninkilampi, Ross; Brothers, Holly M; Eslick, Guy D

    2017-03-01

    Immunotherapeutics targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) have had mixed results in clinical trials. The present study aims to evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of immunotherapeutic agents targeting Aβ in Alzheimer's disease. Randomised controlled trials of at least two weeks duration were included in the review. Fourteen randomised controlled trials (n = 5554) were identified in a systematic search of eight electronic databases. Upon pooling of data, there was no increased risk of any adverse event, serious adverse events, or death with the exception of a near fivefold increase in amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA; OR 4.79, 95% CI 1.24-18.55; p = 0.02). Of the cognitive indicators, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed a small statistically significant improvement (diff in means =0.44; p = 0.02), while the others (ADAS-cog, ADCS-ADL, and CDR-sb) showed no change. Therefore, immunotherapeutic agents have been relatively well tolerated, with some promise for cognitive improvements if the occurrence of ARIA can be mitigated.

  2. Crude caffeine reduces memory impairment and amyloid β(1-42) levels in an Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Wen-Han; Black, Richard M; Liu, Jia-Ren; Sompol, Pradoldej; Chen, Yumin; Wei, Huilin; Zhao, Qiuyan; Cheng, Irene H

    2012-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a chronic neurodegenerative disorder associated with the abnormal accumulations of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide and oxidative stress in the brain, is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. Crude caffeine (CC), a major by-product of the decaffeination of coffee, has potent hydrophilic antioxidant activity and may reduce inflammatory processes. Here, we showed that CC and pure caffeine intake had beneficial effects in a mouse model of AD. Administration of CC or pure caffeine for 2months partially prevented memory impairment in AD mice, with CC having greater effects than pure caffeine. Furthermore, consumption of CC, but not pure caffeine, reduced the Aβ(1-42) levels and the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus. Moreover, CC and caffeine protected primary neurons from Aβ-induced cell death and suppressed Aβ-induced caspase-3 activity. Our data indicate that CC may contain prophylactic agents against the cell death and the memory impairment in AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Becn1 mutation mediates hyperactive autophagic sequestration of amyloid oligomers and improved cognition in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altea Rocchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the autophagy pathway has been observed during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal deposition of extracellular and intracellular amyloid β (Aβ peptides. Yet the role of autophagy in Aβ production and AD progression is complex. To study whether increased basal autophagy plays a beneficial role in Aβ clearance and cognitive improvement, we developed a novel genetic model to hyperactivate autophagy in vivo. We found that knock-in of a point mutation F121A in the essential autophagy gene Beclin 1/Becn1 in mice significantly reduces the interaction of BECN1 with its inhibitor BCL2, and thus leads to constitutively active autophagy even under non-autophagy-inducing conditions in multiple tissues, including brain. Becn1F121A-mediated autophagy hyperactivation significantly decreases amyloid accumulation, prevents cognitive decline, and restores survival in AD mouse models. Using an immunoisolation method, we found biochemically that Aβ oligomers are autophagic substrates and sequestered inside autophagosomes in the brain of autophagy-hyperactive AD mice. In addition to genetic activation of autophagy by Becn1 gain-of-function, we also found that ML246, a small-molecule autophagy inducer, as well as voluntary exercise, a physiological autophagy inducer, exert similar Becn1-dependent protective effects on Aβ removal and memory in AD mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that genetically disrupting BECN1-BCL2 binding hyperactivates autophagy in vivo, which sequestrates amyloid oligomers and prevents AD progression. The study establishes new approaches to activate autophagy in the brain, and reveals the important function of Becn1-mediated autophagy hyperactivation in the prevention of AD.

  4. Disaggregation of amyloid plaque in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice with daily subcutaneous administration of a tetravalent bispecific antibody that targets the transferrin receptor and the Abeta amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbria, Rachita K; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2013-09-03

    Anti-amyloid antibodies (AAA) are under development as new therapeutics that disaggregate the amyloid plaque in brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the AAAs are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in the absence of BBB disruption. In the present study, an AAA was re-engineered for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB via the endogenous BBB transferrin receptor (TfR). A single chain Fv (ScFv) antibody form of an AAA was fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TfR, and this produced a tetravalent bispecific antibody designated the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein. Unlike a conventional AAA, which has a plasma half-time of weeks, the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein is cleared from plasma in mice with a mean residence time of about 3 h. Therefore, a novel protocol was developed for the treatment of one year old presenilin (PS)-1/amyloid precursor protein (APP) AD double transgenic PSAPP mice, which were administered daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein for 12 consecutive weeks. At the end of the treatment, brain amyloid plaques were quantified with confocal microscopy using both Thioflavin-S staining and immunostaining with the 6E10 antibody against Abeta amyloid fibrils. Fusion protein treatment caused a 57% and 61% reduction in amyloid plaque in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. No increase in plasma immunoreactive Abeta amyloid peptide, and no cerebral microhemorrhage, was observed. Chronic daily sc treatment of the mice with the fusion protein caused no immune reactions and only a low titer antidrug antibody response. In conclusion, re-engineering AAAs for receptor-mediated BBB transport allows for reduction in brain amyloid plaque without cerebral microhemorrhage following daily sc treatment for 12 weeks.

  5. Inactivation of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Exacerbates the Development of Alzheimer Disease Pathology in APPPS1 Mice (Amyloid Precursor Protein/Presenilin-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Bonnin, Philippe; Ngkelo, Anta; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2017-07-31

    The epidemiological link between hypertension and Alzheimer disease is established. We previously reported that hypertension aggravates the Alzheimer-like pathology in APPPS1 mice (amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1, mouse model of Alzheimer disease) with angiotensin II-induced hypertension, in relation with hypertension and nitric oxide deficiency. To provide further insights into the role of nitric oxide in the hypertension-Alzheimer disease cross-talk, we studied the effects of nitric oxide blockade in APPPS1 mice using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) alone or in combination with hydralazine, to normalize blood pressure. Compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice, those with l-NAME-induced hypertension had greater amyloid burden (Pmicrovascular density (Phypertension-induced arterial wall remodeling. By testing the cerebrovascular response to hypercapnic breathing, we evidenced early functional impairment of cerebral vasomotor activity in APPPS1 mice. Whereas in control wild-type normotensive mice, carbon dioxide breathing resulted in 15±1.3% increase in the mean blood flow velocity (Phypertensive APPPS1 mice (2.5±1.2%) and partly reversed to mild vasodilation by hydralazine (3.2±1.5%, Phypertension. Only cerebral amyloid angiopathy seems to be dependent on hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  7. Neurons derived from sporadic Alzheimer's disease iPSCs reveal elevated TAU hyperphosphorylation, increased amyloid levels, and GSK3B activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochalek, Anna; Mihalik, Balázs; Avci, Hasan X.

    2017-01-01

    , our aim was to establish an in vitro cell model based on patient-specific human neurons to study the pathomechanism of sporadic AD. Methods: We compared neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines of patients with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (fAD), all caused......, a physiological kinase of TAU, in neurons derived from AD iPSCs, as well as significant upregulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) synthesis and APP carboxy-terminal fragment cleavage. Moreover, elevated sensitivity to oxidative stress, as induced by amyloid oligomers or peroxide, was detected in both f...

  8. Amyloid precursor protein, presenilins, and alpha-synuclein: molecular pathogenesis and pharmacological applications in Alzheimer's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suh, Yoo-Hun; Checler, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    ...). APP is processed by several different proteases such as secretases and/or caspases to yield A beta and carboxyl-terminal fragments, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's...

  9. Microglial phagocytosis induced by fibrillar β-amyloid is attenuated by oligomeric β-amyloid: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Nan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive microglia are associated with β-amyloid (Aβ deposit and clearance in Alzhiemer's Disease (AD. Paradoxically, entocranial resident microglia fail to trigger an effective phagocytic response to clear Aβ deposits although they mainly exist in an "activated" state. Oligomeric Aβ (oAβ, a recent target in the pathogenesis of AD, can induce more potent neurotoxicity when compared with fibrillar Aβ (fAβ. However, the role of the different Aβ forms in microglial phagocytosis, induction of inflammation and oxidation, and subsequent regulation of phagocytic receptor system, remain unclear. Results We demonstrated that Aβ(1-42 fibrils, not Aβ(1-42 oligomers, increased the microglial phagocytosis. Intriguingly, the pretreatment of microglia with oAβ(1-42 not only attenuated fAβ(1-42-triggered classical phagocytic response to fluorescent microspheres but also significantly inhibited phagocytosis of fluorescent labeled fAβ(1-42. Compared with the fAβ(1-42 treatment, the oAβ(1-42 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β level and produced higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and intracellular superoxide anion (SOA. The further results demonstrated that microglial phagocytosis was negatively correlated with inflammatory mediators in this process and that the capacity of phagocytosis in fAβ(1-42-induced microglia was decreased by IL-1β, lippolysaccharide (LPS and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The decreased phagocytosis could be relieved by pyrrolidone dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB inhibitor, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a free radical scavenger. These results suggest that the oAβ-impaired phagocytosis is mediated through inflammation and oxidative stress-mediated mechanism in microglial cells. Furthermore, oAβ(1-42 stimulation reduced the mRNA expression of CD36, integrin β1 (Itgb1, and Ig

  10. Amyloid-β peptide-specific DARPins as a novel class of potential therapeutics for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanenberg, Michael; McAfoose, Jordan; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Wirth, Fabian; Parizek, Petra; Strobel, Lisa; Cattepoel, Susann; Späni, Claudia; Derungs, Rebecca; Maier, Marcel; Plückthun, Andreas; Nitsch, Roger M

    2014-09-26

    Passive immunization with anti-amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) antibodies is effective in animal models of Alzheimer disease. With the advent of efficient in vitro selection technologies, the novel class of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) presents an attractive alternative to the immunoglobulin scaffold. DARPins are small and highly stable proteins with a compact modular architecture ideal for high affinity protein-protein interactions. In this report, we describe the selection, binding profile, and epitope analysis of Aβ-specific DARPins. We further showed their ability to delay Aβ aggregation and prevent Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity in vitro. To demonstrate their therapeutic potential in vivo, mono- and trivalent Aβ-specific DARPins (D23 and 3×D23) were infused intracerebroventricularly into the brains of 11-month-old Tg2576 mice over 4 weeks. Both D23 and 3×D23 treatments were shown to result in improved cognitive performance and reduced soluble Aβ levels. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Aβ-specific DARPins for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The emerging role of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase chaperones in tau oligomerization, amyloid processing, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Laura J; Baker, Jeremy D; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases), a unique family of molecular chaperones, regulate protein folding at proline residues. These residues are abundant within intrinsically disordered proteins, like the microtubule-associated protein tau. Tau has been shown to become hyperphosphorylated and accumulate as one of the two main pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease, the other being amyloid beta (Ab). PPIases, including Pin1, FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 52, FKBP51, and FKBP12, have been shown to interact with and regulate tau biology. This interaction is particularly important given the numerous proline-directed phosphorylation sites found on tau and the role phosphorylation has been found to play in pathogenesis. This regulation then affects downstream aggregation and oligomerization of tau. However, many PPIases have yet to be explored for their effects on tau biology, despite the high likelihood of interaction based on proline content. Moreover, Pin1, FKBP12, FKBP52, cyclophilin (Cyp) A, CypB, and CypD have been shown to also regulate Ab production or the toxicity associated with Ab pathology. Therefore, PPIases directly and indirectly regulate pathogenic protein multimerization in Alzheimer's disease and represent a family rich in targets for modulating the accumulation and toxicity. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. An immunohistochemical study on cerebral vascular and senile plaque amyloid in Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Stam, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Senile cerebral amyloidosis has been investigated using immunoperoxidase and enzyme histochemical techniques in six unfixed brains. Our findings do not support the opinion that vascular and senile plaque amyloid are immunoglobulin-derived. In contrast with recent reports we did not detect prealbumin

  13. Multifunctional liposomes reduce brain β-amyloid burden and ameliorate memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Claudia; Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; La Vitola, Pietro; Zotti, Margherita; Sancini, Giulio; Mauri, Mario; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Colombo, Laura; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Grigoli, Emanuele; Salmona, Mario; Snellman, Anniina; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Forloni, Gianluigi; Masserini, Massimo; Re, Francesca

    2014-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation and deposition of plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain. Given its pivotal role, new therapies targeting Aβ are in demand. We rationally designed liposomes targeting the brain and promoting the disaggregation of Aβ assemblies and evaluated their efficiency in reducing the Aβ burden in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. Liposomes were bifunctionalized with a peptide derived from the apolipoprotein-E receptor-binding domain for blood-brain barrier targeting and with phosphatidic acid for Aβ binding. Bifunctionalized liposomes display the unique ability to hinder the formation of, and disaggregate, Aβ assemblies in vitro (EM experiments). Administration of bifunctionalized liposomes to APP/presenilin 1 transgenic mice (aged 10 months) for 3 weeks (three injections per week) decreased total brain-insoluble Aβ1-42 (-33%), assessed by ELISA, and the number and total area of plaques (-34%) detected histologically. Also, brain Aβ oligomers were reduced (-70.5%), as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Plaque reduction was confirmed in APP23 transgenic mice (aged 15 months) either histologically or by PET imaging with [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). The reduction of brain Aβ was associated with its increase in liver (+18%) and spleen (+20%). Notably, the novel-object recognition test showed that the treatment ameliorated mouse impaired memory. Finally, liposomes reached the brain in an intact form, as determined by confocal microscopy experiments with fluorescently labeled liposomes. These data suggest that bifunctionalized liposomes destabilize brain Aβ aggregates and promote peptide removal across the blood-brain barrier and its peripheral clearance. This all-in-one multitask therapeutic device can be considered as a candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414013-09$15.00/0.

  14. Deciphering the glycolipid code of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's amyloid proteins allowed the creation of a universal ganglioside-binding peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouara Yahi

    Full Text Available A broad range of microbial and amyloid proteins interact with cell surface glycolipids which behave as infectivity and/or toxicity cofactors in human pathologies. Here we have deciphered the biochemical code that determines the glycolipid-binding specificity of two major amyloid proteins, Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide (Aβ and Parkinson's disease associated protein α-synuclein. We showed that both proteins interact with selected glycolipids through a common loop-shaped motif exhibiting little sequence homology. This 12-residue domain corresponded to fragments 34-45 of α-synuclein and 5-16 of Aβ. By modulating the amino acid sequence of α-synuclein at only two positions in which we introduced a pair of histidine residues found in Aβ, we created a chimeric α-synuclein/Aβ peptide with extended ganglioside-binding properties. This chimeric peptide retained the property of α-synuclein to recognize GM3, and acquired the capacity to recognize GM1 (an Aβ-inherited characteristic. Free histidine (but not tryptophan or asparagine and Zn2+ (but not Na+ prevented this interaction, confirming the key role of His-13 and His-14 in ganglioside binding. Molecular dynamics studies suggested that the chimeric peptide recognized cholesterol-constrained conformers of GM1, including typical chalice-shaped dimers, that are representative of the condensed cholesterol-ganglioside complexes found in lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane of neural cells. Correspondingly, the peptide had a particular affinity for raft-like membranes containing both GM1 and cholesterol. The chimeric peptide also interacted with several other gangliosides, including major brain gangliosides (GM4, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b but not with neutral glycolipids such as GlcCer, LacCer or asialo-GM1. It could inhibit the binding of Aβ1-42 onto neural SH-SY5Y cells and did not induce toxicity in these cells. In conclusion, deciphering the glycolipid code of amyloid proteins allowed us to

  15. Nonlinear Association Between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Florbetapir F-18 β-Amyloid Measures Across the Spectrum of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Jon B.; Bjerke, Maria; Da, Xiao; Landau, Susan M.; Foster, Norman L; Jagust, William; Jack, Clifford; Weiner, Michael; Davatzikos, Christos; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and positron emission tomographic (PET) amyloid biomarkers have been proposed for the detection of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in living patients and for the tracking of longitudinal changes, but the relation between biomarkers needs further study. OBJECTIVE To determine the association between CSF and PET amyloid biomarkers (cross-sectional and longitudinal measures) and compare the cutoffs for these measures. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal clinical cohort study from 2005 to 2014 including 820 participants with at least 1 florbetapir F-18 (hereafter referred to as simply florbetapir)–PET scan and at least 1 CSF β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42) sample obtained within 30 days of each other (501 participants had a second PET scan after 2 years, including 150 participants with CSF Aβ1–42 measurements). Data were obtained from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Four different PET scans processing pipelines from 2 different laboratories were compared. The PET cutoff values were established using a mixture-modeling approach, and different mathematical models were applied to define the association between CSF and PET amyloid measures. RESULTS The values of the CSF Aβ1–42 samples and florbetapir-PET scans showed a nonlinear association (R2 = 0.48–0.66), with the strongest association for values in the middle range. The presence of a larger dynamic range of florbetapir-PET scan values in the higher range compared with the CSF Aβ1–42 plateau explained the differences in correlation with cognition (R2 = 0.36 and R2 = 0.25, respectively). The APOE genotype significantly modified the association between both biomarkers. The PET cutoff values derived from an unsupervised classifier converged with previous PET cutoff values and the established CSF Aβ1–42 cutoff levels. There was no association between longitudinal Aβ1–42 levels and standardized uptake

  16. Dual Induction of TREM2 and Tolerance-Related Transcript, Tmem176b, in Amyloid Transgenic Mice: Implications for Vaccine-Based Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Melchior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine-based autoimmune (anti-amyloid treatments are currently being examined for their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease. In the present study we examined, in a transgenic model of amyloid pathology, the expression of two molecules previously implicated in decreasing the severity of autoimmune responses: TREM2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 and the intracellular tolerance-associated transcript, Tmem176b (transmembrane domain protein 176b. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that both molecules were highly expressed in plaque-associated microglia, but their expression defined two different zones of plaque-associated activation. Tmem176b expression was highest in the inner zone of amyloid plaques, whereas TREM2 expression was highest in the outer zone. Induced expression of TREM2 occurred coincident with detection of thioflavine-S-positive amyloid deposits. Transfection studies revealed that expression of TREM2 correlated negatively with motility, but correlated positively with the ability of microglia to stimulate CD4+ T-cell proliferation, TNF (tumour necrosis factor and CCL2 (chemokine ligand 2 production, but not IFNγ (interferon γ production. TREM2 expression also showed a positive correlation with amyloid phagocytosis in unactivated cells. However, activating cells with LPS (lipopolysaccharide, but not IFNγ, reduced the correlation between TREM2 expression and phagocytosis. Transfection of Tmem176b into both microglial and macrophage cell lines increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that, in vivo, Tmem176b+ cells in closest apposition to amyloid may be the least able to clear amyloid. Conversely, the phagocytic TREM2+ microglia on the plaque outer zones are positioned to capture and present self-antigens to CNS (central nervous system-infiltrating lymphocytes without promoting pro-inflammatory lymphocyte responses. Instead, plaque-associated TREM2+ microglia have the potential to evoke

  17. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Agnes Staniszewski; Lillian To; Mauro Fa; Teich, Andrew F.; Faisal Saeed; Harrison Wostein; Thomas Walko; Anisha Vaswani; Meghan Wardius; Zanobia Syed; Jessica Ravenscroft; Kelsie Mozzoni; Colleen Silky; Courtney Rehak

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures o...

  18. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 Receptors Mediate Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding and Synaptotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Jinbin Xu; Chenbo Zeng; Kirk, Molly J.; Kelsie Mozzoni; Colleen Silky; Courtney Rehak; Raymond Yurko; Gary Look; Gilbert Rishton; Hank Safferstein; Carlos Cruchaga; Alison Goate; Cahill, Michael A.; Ottavio Arancio

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease ...

  19. Clinical and cost implications of amyloid beta detection with amyloid beta positron emission tomography imaging in early Alzheimer's disease - the case of florbetapir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, John; Bae, Jay; Watson, Ian; Johnston, Joe; Happich, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging helps estimate Aβ neuritic plaque density in patients with cognitive impairment who are under evaluation for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the Aβ-PET scan as an adjunct to standard diagnostic assessment for diagnosis of AD in France, using florbetapir as an example. A state-transition probability analysis was developed adopting the French Health Technology Assessment (HTA) perspective per guidance. Parameters included test characteristics, rate of cognitive decline, treatment effect, costs, and quality of life. Additional scenarios assessed the validity of the analytical framework, including: (1) earlier evaluation/treatment; (2) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a comparator; and (3) use of other diagnostic procedures. Outputs included differences in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). All benefits and costs were discounted for time preferences. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of findings and key influencers of outcomes. Aβ-PET used as an adjunct to standard diagnostic assessment increased QALYs by 0.021 years and 10 year costs by €470 per patient. The ICER was €21,888 per QALY gained compared to standard diagnostic assessment alone. When compared with CSF, Aβ-PET costs €24,084 per QALY gained. In other scenarios, Aβ-PET was consistently cost-effective relative to the commonly used affordability threshold (€40,000 per QALY). Over 95% of simulations in the sensitivity analysis were cost-effective. Aβ-PET is projected to affordably increase QALYs from the French HTA perspective per guidance over a range of clinical scenarios, comparators, and input parameters.

  20. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferretti Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. Methods and results To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Conclusions Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology.

  1. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. Methods and results To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Conclusions Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology. PMID:22472085

  2. Titration of biologically active amyloid-β seeds in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rodrigo; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Soto, Claudio

    2015-03-23

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that misfolded Amyloid-β (Aβ) spreads in disease following a prion-like mechanism. Several properties characteristics of infectious prions have been shown for the induction of Aβ aggregates. However, a detailed titration of Aβ misfolding transmissibility and estimation of the minimum concentration of biologically active Aβ seeds able to accelerate pathological changes has not yet been performed. In this study, brain extracts from old tg2576 animals were serially diluted and intra-cerebrally injected into young subjects from the same transgenic line. Animals were sacrificed several months after treatment and brain slices were analyzed for amyloid pathology. We observed that administration of misfolded Aβ was able to significantly accelerate amyloid deposition in young mice, even when the original sample was diluted a million times. The titration curve obtained in this experiment was compared to the natural Aβ load spontaneously accumulated by these mice overtime. Our findings suggest that administration of the largest dose of Aβ seeds led to an acceleration of pathology equivalent to over a year. These results show that active Aβ seeds present in the brain can seed amyloidosis in a titratable manner, similarly as observed for infectious prions.

  3. Role of amyloid peptides in vascular dysfunction and platelet dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eCanobbio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia in the elderly. AD is accompanied by the accumulation of amyloid peptides in the brain parenchyma and in the cerebral vessels. The sporadic form of the AD accounts for about 95% of all cases. It is characterized by a late onset, typically after the age of 65, with a complex and still poorly understood aetiology. Several observations point towards a central role of cerebrovascular dysfunction in the onset of sporadic AD. According to the vascular hypothesis, AD may be initiated by vascular dysfunctions that precede and promote the neurodegenerative process. In accordance to this, AD patients show increased hemorragic or ischemic stroke risks. It is now clear that multiple bidirectional connections exist between AD and cerebrovascular disease, and in this new scenario, the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular cells and blood platelets appear to be central to AD. In this review we analyse the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular function and platelet activation and its contribution to the cerebrovascular pathology associated with AD and the progression of this disease.

  4. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/phosphorylated tau ratio discriminates between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Daniëlle; Jansen, René W M M; Kremer, H P H; Verbeek, Marcel M

    BACKGROUND: The differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from vascular dementia (VaD) is hampered by clinical diagnostic criteria with disappointing sensitivity and specificity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau protein (t-tau),

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/phosphorylated tau ratio discriminates between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, D. de; Jansen, R.W.M.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from vascular dementia (VaD) is hampered by clinical diagnostic criteria with disappointing sensitivity and specificity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau protein (t-tau),

  7. Cerebral serotonin 4 receptors and amyloid-β in early Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients in relation to cortical Aß burden. Eleven newly diagnosed untreated AD patients (mean MMSE 24, range 19–27) and twelve age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent a two-hour dynamic [11C]SB207145 PET scan to measure the binding potential of the 5-HT4 receptor. All AD...

  8. In vivo changes in microglial activation and amyloid deposits in brain regions with hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokokura, Masamichi; Mori, Norio; Yoshihara, Yujiro; Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yagi, Shunsuke; Ouchi, Yasuomi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Laboratory of Human Imaging Research, Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yoshikawa, Etsuji [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu (Japan); Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Kanazawa University, Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Sugihara, Genichi; Suda, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Suzuki, Katsuaki [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Research Center for Child Mental Development, Hamamatsu (Japan); Ueki, Takatoshi [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) is known as a pathological substance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is assumed to coexist with a degree of activated microglia in the brain. However, it remains unclear whether these two events occur in parallel with characteristic hypometabolism in AD in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the in vivo relationship between A{beta} accumulation and neuroinflammation in those specific brain regions in early AD. Eleven nootropic drug-naive AD patients underwent a series of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements with [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195, [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDG and a battery of cognitive tests within the same day. The binding potentials (BPs) of [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 were directly compared with those of [{sup 11}C]PIB in the brain regions with reduced glucose metabolism. BPs of [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 and [{sup 11}C]PIB were significantly higher in the parietotemporal regions of AD patients than in ten healthy controls. In AD patients, there was a negative correlation between dementia score and [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 BPs, but not [{sup 11}C]PIB, in the limbic, precuneus and prefrontal regions. Direct comparisons showed a significant negative correlation between [{sup 11}C](R)PK11195 and [{sup 11}C]PIB BPs in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) (p < 0.05, corrected) that manifested the most severe reduction in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. A lack of coupling between microglial activation and amyloid deposits may indicate that A{beta} accumulation shown by [{sup 11}C]PIB is not always the primary cause of microglial activation, but rather the negative correlation present in the PCC suggests that microglia can show higher activation during the production of A{beta} in early AD. (orig.)

  9. Generation of Clickable Pittsburgh Compound B for the Detection and Capture of β-Amyloid in Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Ian; Dooyema, Jeromy; Gearing, Marla; Walker, Lary C; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2017-10-18

    The benzothiazole-aniline derivative Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) is the prototypical amyloid affinity probe developed for the in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) detection of amyloid beta (Aβ) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Specific high-affinity binding sites for PiB have been found to vary among AD cases with comparable Aβ load, and they are virtually absent on human-sequence Aβ deposits in animal models, none of which develop the full phenotype of AD. PiB thus could be an informative probe for studying the pathobiology of Aβ, but little is known about the localization of PiB binding at the molecular or structural level. By functionalizing the 6-hydroxy position of PiB with a PEG 3 spacer and a terminal alkyne (propargyl) moiety, we have developed a clickable PiB compound that was derivatized with commercially available azide-labeled fluorophores or affinity-tags using copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions, commonly referred to as "click" chemistry. We have determined that both the clickable PiB derivative and its fluorescently labeled conjugate have low nanomolar binding affinities for synthetic Aβ aggregates. Furthermore, the fluorescent-PiB conjugate can effectively bind Aβ aggregates in human AD brain homogenates and tissue sections. By covalently coupling PiB to magnetic beads, Aβ aggregates were also affinity-captured from AD brain extracts. Thus, the clickable PiB derivative described herein can be used to generate a wide variety of covalent conjugates, with applications including the fluorescence detection of Aβ, the ultrastructural localization of PiB binding, and the affinity capture and structural characterization of Aβ and other cofactors from AD brains.

  10. APOE allele frequencies in suspected non-amyloid pathophysiology (SNAP and the prodromal stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Hohman

    Full Text Available Biomarker definitions for preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD have identified individuals with neurodegeneration (ND+ without β-amyloidosis (Aβ- and labeled them with suspected non-AD pathophysiology (SNAP. We evaluated Apolipoprotein E (APOE ε2 and ε4 allele frequencies across biomarker definitions-Aβ-/ND- (n = 268, Aβ+/ND- (n = 236, Aβ-/ND+ or SNAP (n = 78, Aβ+/ND+ (n = 204-hypothesizing that SNAP would have an APOE profile comparable to Aβ-/ND-. Using AD Neuroimaging Initiative data (n = 786, 72±7 years, 48% female, amyloid status (Aβ+ or Aβ- was defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Aβ-42 levels, and neurodegeneration status (ND+ or ND- was defined by hippocampal volume from MRI. Binary logistic regression related biomarker status to APOE ε2 and ε4 allele carrier status, adjusting for age, sex, education, and cognitive diagnosis. Compared to the biomarker negative (Aβ-/ND- participants, higher proportions of ε4 and lower proportions of ε2 carriers were observed among Aβ+/ND- (ε4: OR = 6.23, p0.30. In supplemental analyses, comparable results were observed when coding SNAP using amyloid imaging and when using CSF tau levels. In contrast to APOE, a polygenic risk score for AD that excluded APOE did not show an association with amyloidosis or neurodegeneration (p-values>0.15, but did show an association with SNAP defined using CSF tau (β = 0.004, p = 0.02. Thus, in a population with low levels of cerebrovascular disease and a lower prevalence of SNAP than the general population, APOE and known genetic drivers of AD do not appear to contribute to the neurodegeneration observed in SNAP. Additional work in population based samples is needed to better elucidate the genetic contributors to various etiological drivers of SNAP.

  11. CB2 receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2014-03-14

    The endocannabinoid CB2 receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB2 receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB2 receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB2 receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2(-/-) (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2(+/+) and J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2(+/+) mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2(-/-) mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to CNR2(+/+) mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to J20 CNR2(+/+) mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB2 receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB2 to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  12. Soluble amyloid beta levels are elevated in the white matter of Alzheimer's patients, independent of cortical plaque severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Francis, Yitshak I; Griffith, Erica Y; Wiegman, Anne F; Urbach, Jonathan; Lawton, Arlene; Honig, Lawrence S; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Canoll, Peter D; Goldman, James E; Brickman, Adam M

    2014-08-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia. In addition to grey matter pathology, white matter changes are now recognized as an important pathological feature in the emergence of the disease. Despite growing recognition of the importance of white matter abnormalities in the pathogenesis of AD, the causes of white matter degeneration are still unknown. While multiple studies propose Wallerian-like degeneration as the source of white matter change, others suggest that primary white matter pathology may be due, at least in part, to other mechanisms, including local effects of toxic Aβ peptides. In the current study, we investigated levels of soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) in white matter of AD patients (n=12) compared with controls (n=10). Fresh frozen white matter samples were obtained from anterior (Brodmann area 9) and posterior (Brodmann area 1, 2 and 3) areas of post-mortem AD and control brains. ELISA was used to examine levels of soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40. Total cortical neuritic plaque severity rating was derived from individual ratings in the following areas of cortex: mid-frontal, superior temporal, pre-central, inferior parietal, hippocampus (CA1), subiculum, entorhinal cortex, transentorhinal cortex, inferior temporal, amygdala and basal forebrain. Compared with controls, AD samples had higher white matter levels of both soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40. While no regional white matter differences were found in Aβ -40, Aβ -42 levels were higher in anterior regions than in posterior regions across both groups. After statistically controlling for total cortical neuritic plaque severity, differences in both soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40 between the groups remained, suggesting that white matter Aβ peptides accumulate independent of overall grey matter fibrillar amyloid pathology and are not simply a reflection of overall amyloid burden. These results shed light on one potential mechanism through which

  13. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Arendash

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF

  14. Intracerebral adeno-associated virus gene delivery of apolipoprotein E2 markedly reduces brain amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingzhi; Gottesdiener, Andrew J; Parmar, Mayur; Li, Mingjie; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Sondhi, Dolan; Sullivan, Patrick M; Holtzman, David M; Crystal, Ronald G; Paul, Steven M

    2016-08-01

    The common apolipoprotein E alleles (ε4, ε3, and ε2) are important genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease, with the ε4 allele increasing risk and reducing the age of onset and the ε2 allele decreasing risk and markedly delaying the age of onset. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype also predicts the timing and amount of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and amyloid burden (ε4 >ε3 >ε2). Using several administration protocols, we now report that direct intracerebral adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of APOE2 markedly reduces brain soluble (including oligomeric) and insoluble Aβ levels as well as amyloid burden in 2 mouse models of brain amyloidosis whose pathology is dependent on either the expression of murine Apoe or more importantly on human APOE4. The efficacy of APOE2 to reduce brain Aβ burden in either model, however, was highly dependent on brain APOE2 levels and the amount of pre-existing Aβ and amyloid deposition. We further demonstrate that a widespread reduction of brain Aβ burden can be achieved through a single injection of vector via intrathalamic delivery of AAV expressing APOE2 gene. Our results demonstrate that AAV gene delivery of APOE2 using an AAV vector rescues the detrimental effects of APOE4 on brain amyloid pathology and may represent a viable therapeutic approach for treating or preventing Alzheimer's disease especially if sufficient brain APOE2 levels can be achieved early in the course of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Factor V activator from Daboia russelli russelli venom destabilizes β-amyloid aggregate, the hallmark of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Payel; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-10-18

    Formation of plaque by fibrils of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain is the characteristic feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Inhibition of the process of aggregate formation from Aβ-monomer and destabilization of the aggregate could be useful for prevention and propagation of the disease respectively. Russell's viper venom (RVV) contains protein(s) that destabilize Aβ aggregates as revealed from the thioflavin T assay. The active component was identified as factor V activator (RVV-V). Among the possible mechanisms of destabilization, RVV-V-mediated proteolysis was ruled out from mass spectrometric data and the thioflavin T assay. The alternate hypothesis that small peptides derived from RVV-V destabilize the aggregate is better supported by experimental results. Six small peptides were synthesized using RVV-V as the template, and three unrelated peptides were synthesized to serve as controls. Destabilization of Aβ aggregate by these peptides was studied using spectrofluorometric assays, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. Among the peptides, CTNIF and the mixture of the six peptides were most potent in converting the aggregates to the monomeric state and thus, preventing cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The control peptides failed to show similar effects. Moreover, some of these peptides are stable in blood for 24 h. Therefore, these venom-derived peptides offer an encouraging opportunity to prevent amyloidosis and may provide information to combat AD.

  16. Factor V Activator from Daboia russelli russelli Venom Destabilizes β-Amyloid Aggregate, the Hallmark of Alzheimer Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Payel; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    Formation of plaque by fibrils of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain is the characteristic feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Inhibition of the process of aggregate formation from Aβ-monomer and destabilization of the aggregate could be useful for prevention and propagation of the disease respectively. Russell's viper venom (RVV) contains protein(s) that destabilize Aβ aggregates as revealed from the thioflavin T assay. The active component was identified as factor V activator (RVV-V). Among the possible mechanisms of destabilization, RVV-V-mediated proteolysis was ruled out from mass spectrometric data and the thioflavin T assay. The alternate hypothesis that small peptides derived from RVV-V destabilize the aggregate is better supported by experimental results. Six small peptides were synthesized using RVV-V as the template, and three unrelated peptides were synthesized to serve as controls. Destabilization of Aβ aggregate by these peptides was studied using spectrofluorometric assays, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. Among the peptides, CTNIF and the mixture of the six peptides were most potent in converting the aggregates to the monomeric state and thus, preventing cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The control peptides failed to show similar effects. Moreover, some of these peptides are stable in blood for 24 h. Therefore, these venom-derived peptides offer an encouraging opportunity to prevent amyloidosis and may provide information to combat AD. PMID:23986449

  17. Cysteine protease inhibitors effectively reduce in vivo levels of brain beta-amyloid related to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2007-02-01

    Abnormal accumulation of neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) in brain represents a key factor in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Identification of small molecules that effectively reduce brain levels of Abeta is important for development of Abeta-lowering agents for AD. In this study, we demonstrate that in vivo Abeta levels in brain are significantly reduced by the cysteine protease inhibitor E64d and the related CA074Me inhibitor, which inhibits cathepsin B. Direct infusion of these inhibitors into brains of guinea pigs resulted in reduced levels of Abeta by 50-70% after 30 days of treatment. Substantial decreases in Abeta also occurred after only 7 days of inhibitor infusion, with a reduction in both Abeta40 and Abeta42 peptide forms. A prominent decrease in Abeta peptides was observed in brain synaptosomal nerve terminal preparations after CA074Me treatment. Analyses of APP-derived proteolytic fragments showed that CA074Me reduced brain levels of the CTFbeta fragment, and increased amounts of the sAPPalpha fragment. These results suggest that CA074Me inhibits Abeta production by modulating APP processing. Animals appeared healthy after treatment with these inhibitors. These results, showing highly effective in vivo decreases in brain Abeta levels by these cysteine protease inhibitors, indicate the feasibility of using related compounds for lowering Abeta in AD.

  18. Tartary buckwheat improves cognition and memory function in an in vivo amyloid-β-induced Alzheimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Yeon; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Hae Song; Lee, Jeong Min; Yoon, Young-Ho; Lee, Sanghyun

    2013-03-01

    Protective effects of Tartary buckwheat (TB) and common buckwheat (CB) on amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced impairment of cognition and memory function were investigated in vivo in order to identify potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its associated progressive memory deficits, cognitive impairment, and personality changes. An in vivo mouse model of AD was created by injecting the brains of ICR mice with Aβ(25-35), a fragment of the full-length Aβ protein. Damage of mice recognition ability through following Aβ(25-35) brain injections was confirmed using the T-maze test, the object recognition test, and the Morris water maze test. Results of behavior tests in AD model showed that oral administration of the methanol (MeOH) extracts of TB and CB improved cognition and memory function following Aβ(25-35) injections. Furthermore, in groups receiving the MeOH extracts of TB and CB, lipid peroxidation was significantly inhibited, and nitric oxide levels in tissue, which are elevated by injection of Aβ(25-35), were also decrease. In particular, the MeOH extract of TB exerted a stronger protective activity than CB against Aβ(25-35)-induced memory and cognition impairment. The results indicate that TB may play a promising role in preventing or reversing memory and cognition loss associated with Aβ(25-35)-induced AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Frydman-Marom

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt, which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.

  20. Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman-Marom, Anat; Levin, Aviad; Farfara, Dorit; Benromano, Tali; Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Peled, Sivan; Vassar, Robert; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud; Frenkel, Dan; Ovadia, Michael

    2011-01-28

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ) play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt), which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.

  1. Genomic mosaicism with increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number in single neurons from sporadic Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Diane M; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Siddoway, Benjamin; Westra, Jurgen W; Rivera, Richard R; Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-04

    Previous reports have shown that individual neurons of the brain can display somatic genomic mosaicism of unknown function. In this study, we report altered genomic mosaicism in single, sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons characterized by increases in DNA content and amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number. AD cortical nuclei displayed large variability with average DNA content increases of ~8% over non-diseased controls that were unrelated to trisomy 21. Two independent single-cell copy number analyses identified amplifications at the APP locus. The use of single-cell qPCR identified up to 12 copies of APP in sampled neurons. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting APP, combined with super-resolution microscopy detected primarily single fluorescent signals of variable intensity that paralleled single-cell qPCR analyses. These data identify somatic genomic changes in single neurons, affecting known and unknown loci, which are increased in sporadic AD, and further indicate functionality for genomic mosaicism in the CNS.

  2. Using Multifunctional Peptide Conjugated Au Nanorods for Monitoring β-amyloid Aggregation and Chemo-Photothermal Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Guan, Yijia; Zhao, Andong; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    Development of sensitive detectors of Aβ aggregates and effective inhibitors of Aβ aggregation are of diagnostic importance and therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment. Herein, a novel strategy has been presented by self-assembly of peptide conjugated Au nanorods (AuP) as multifunctional Aβ fibrillization detectors and inhibitors. Our design combines the unique high NIR absorption property of AuNRs with two known Aβ inhibitors, Aβ15-20 and polyoxometalates (POMs). The synthesized AuP can effectively inhibit Aβ aggregation and dissociate amyloid deposits with NIR irradiation both in buffer and in mice cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and protect cells from Aβ-related toxicity upon NIR irradiation. In addition, with the shape and size-dependent optical properties, the nanorods can also act as effective diagnostic probes to sensitively detect the Aβ aggregates. This is the first report to integrate 3 segments, an Aβ-targeting element, a reporter and inhibitors, in one drug delivery system for AD treatment. PMID:28839459

  3. Gadolinium-based contrast agents targeted to amyloid aggregates for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bort, Guillaume; Catoen, Sarah; Borderies, Hélène; Kebsi, Adel; Ballet, Sébastien; Louin, Gaëlle; Port, Marc; Ferroud, Clotilde

    2014-11-24

    While important efforts were made in the development of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the in vivo molecular diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, very few investigations to develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes were performed. Here, a new generation of Gd(III)-based contrast agents (CAs) is proposed to detect the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) aggregates by MRI, one of the earliest biological hallmarks of the pathology. A building block strategy was used to synthesize a library of 16 CAs to investigate structure-activity relationships (SARs) on physicochemical properties and binding affinity for the Aβ aggregates. Three types of blocks were used to modulate the CA structures: (i) the Gd(III) chelates (Gd(III)-DOTA and Gd(III)-PCTA), (ii) the biovectors (2-arylbenzothiazole, 2-arylbenzoxazole and stilbene derivatives) and (iii) the linkers (neutrals, positives and negatives with several lengths). These investigations revealed unexpected SARs and a difficulty of these probes to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). General insights for the development of Gd(III)-based CAs to detect the Aβ aggregates are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Disruption of the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of β-amyloid in mice with Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jee Hoon; Huang, Yafei; Bero, Adam W; Kasten, Tom; Stewart, Floy R; Bateman, Randall J; Holtzman, David M

    2012-09-05

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain begins to occur years before the clinical onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Before Aβ aggregation, concentrations of extracellular soluble Aβ in the interstitial fluid (ISF) space of the brain, which are regulated by neuronal activity and the sleep-wake cycle, correlate with the amount of Aβ deposition in the brain seen later. The amount and quality of sleep decline with normal aging and to a greater extent in AD patients. How sleep quality as well as the diurnal fluctuation in Aβ change with age and Aβ aggregation is not well understood. We report a normal sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation in ISF Aβ in the brain of the APPswe/PS1δE9 mouse model of AD before Aβ plaque formation. After plaque formation, the sleep-wake cycle markedly deteriorated and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ dissipated. As in mice, diurnal fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ in young adult humans with presenilin mutations was also markedly attenuated after Aβ plaque formation. Virtual elimination of Aβ deposits in the mouse brain by active immunization with Aβ(42) normalized the sleep-wake cycle and the diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ. These data suggest that Aβ aggregation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ. Sleep-wake behavior and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ in the central nervous system may be functional and biochemical indicators, respectively, of Aβ-associated pathology.

  5. Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease via X-ray Phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    12 10. References…………………………………………………………… 13 1 1. INTRODUCTION: As the elderly population increases, dementia due to Alzheimer’s...termed in the literature) and image presentation or display.20, 27, 28 Such a separation is straightforward in digital imaging modal- ities, e.g., the...optional imaging method may degrade with decreasing detector cell dimension. Inclusively , all the imaging mech- anisms existing in the x-ray phase contrast

  6. White matter lesion load is associated with resting state functional MRI activity and amyloid PET but not FDG in mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongxia; Yu, Fang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-01-01

    To quantify and investigate the interactions between multimodal MRI/positron emission tomography (PET) imaging metrics in elderly patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls. Thirteen early AD, 17 MCI patients, and 14 age-matched healthy aging controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database were selected based on availability of data. Default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) were obtained for resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI). White matter lesion load (WMLL) was quantified from MRI T2-weighted FLAIR images. Amyloid deposition with PET [(18)F]-Florbetapir tracer and metabolism of glucose by means of [(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) images were quantified using ratio of standard uptake values (rSUV). Whole-brain WMLL and amyloid deposition were significantly higher (P functional activity and PET amyloid load suggest the potential of MRI and PET-based biomarkers for early detection of AD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A new brain metalloendopeptidase which degrades the Alzheimer ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide producing soluble fragments without neurotoxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M. Carvalho

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A new metalloendopeptidase was purified to apparent homogeneity from a homogenate of normal human brain using successive steps of chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl, hydroxylapatite and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme cleaved the Gly33-Leu34 bond of the 25-35 neurotoxic sequence of the Alzheimer ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide producing soluble fragments without neurotoxic effects. This enzyme activity was only inhibited by divalent cation chelators such as EDTA, EGTA and o-phenanthroline (1 mM and was insensitive to phosphoramidon and captopril (1 µM concentration, specific inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11 and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1, respectively. The high affinity of this human brain endopeptidase for ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide (Km = 5 µM suggests that it may play a physiological role in the degradation of this substance produced by normal cellular metabolism. It may also be hypothesized that the abnormal accumulation of the amyloid ß-protein in Alzheimer's disease may be initiated by a defect or an inactivation of this enzyme.

  8. In Alzheimer's disease, hypometabolism in low-amyloid brain regions may be a functional consequence of pathologies in connected brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupp, Elisabeth; Förster, Stefan; Grimmer, Timo; Tahmasian, Masoud; Yakushev, Igor; Sorg, Christian; Yousefi, Behrooz H; Drzezga, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), prominent hypometabolism has been observed in brain regions with minor amyloid load. These hypometabolism-only (HO) areas cannot be explained merely as a consequence of local amyloid toxicity. The aim of this multimodal imaging study was to explore whether such HO phenomenon may be related to pathologies in functionally connected, remote brain regions. Nineteen AD patients and 15 matched controls underwent examinations with [(11)C]PiB-PET and [(18)F]FDG-PET. Voxel-based statistical group comparisons were performed to obtain maps of significantly elevated amyloid burden and reduced cerebral glucose metabolism, respectively, in patients. An HO area was identified by subtraction of equally thresholded result maps (hypometabolism minus amyloid burden). To identify the network typically functionally connected to this HO area, it was used as a seed region for a functional connectivity analysis in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 17 elderly healthy controls. The resulting intrinsic connectivity network (HO-ICN) was retransferred into the brains of AD patients to be able to analyze pathologies within this network in the positron emission tomography (PET) datasets. The most prominent HO area was detected in the left middle frontal gyrus of AD patients. The HO-ICN in healthy controls showed a major overlap with brain areas significantly affected by both amyloid deposition and hypometabolism in patients. This association was substantiated by the results of region-of-interest-based and voxel-wise correlation analyses, which revealed strong correlations between the degree of hypometabolism within the HO region and within the HO-ICN. These results support the notion that hypometabolism in brain regions not strongly affected by locoregional amyloid pathology may be related to ongoing pathologies in remote but functionally connected regions, that is, by reduced neuronal input from these regions.

  9. Interleukin-1β mediated amyloid plaque clearance is independent of CCR2 signaling in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Escalera, Fátima; Matousek, Sarah B; Ghosh, Simantini; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Particularly, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is upregulated in human AD and believed to promote amyloid plaque deposition. However, studies from our laboratory have shown that chronic IL-1β overexpression in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD ameliorates amyloid pathology, increases plaque-associated microglia, and induces recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain parenchyma. To investigate the contribution of CCR2 signaling in IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance, seven month-old APP/PS1/CCR2(-/-) mice were intrahippocampally transduced with a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 containing the cleaved form of human IL-1β (rAAV2-IL-1β). Four weeks after rAAV2-IL-1β transduction, we found significant reductions in 6E10 and Congo red staining of amyloid plaques that was confirmed by decreased levels of insoluble Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the inflamed hippocampus. Bone marrow chimeric studies confirmed the presence of infiltrating immune cells following IL-1β overexpression and revealed that dramatic reduction of CCR2(+) peripheral mononuclear cell recruitment to the inflamed hippocampus did not prevent the ability of IL-1β to induce amyloid plaque clearance. These results suggest that infiltrating CCR2(+) monocytes do not contribute to IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H Hansen

    Full Text Available One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP and presenilin-1 (PS1 are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c., or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.. In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  11. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  12. 7.0T nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of the amyloid beta (1-40) animal model of Alzheimer's disease: comparison of cytology verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Shuai; Zhao, Guixiang; Ma, Yu

    2014-02-15

    3.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is a commonly used method in the research of brain function in Alzheimer's disease. However, the role of 7.0T high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in brain function of Alzheimer's disease remains unclear. In this study, 7.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease rats, the N-acetylaspartate wave crest was reduced, and the creatine and choline wave crest was elevated. This finding was further supported by hematoxylin-eosin staining, which showed a loss of hippocampal neurons and more glial cells. Moreover, electron microscopy showed neuronal shrinkage and mitochondrial rupture, and scanning electron microscopy revealed small size hippocampal synaptic vesicles, incomplete synaptic structure, and reduced number. Overall, the results revealed that 7.0T high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy detected the lesions and functional changes in hippocampal neurons of Alzheimer's disease rats in vivo, allowing the possibility for assessing the success rate and grading of the amyloid beta (1-40) animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Computational design of new Peptide inhibitors for amyloid Beta (aβ aggregation in Alzheimer's disease: application of a novel methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Eskici

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. It is a neurodegenerative and incurable disease that is associated with the tight packing of amyloid fibrils. This packing is facilitated by the compatibility of the ridges and grooves on the amyloid surface. The GxMxG motif is the major factor creating the compatibility between two amyloid surfaces, making it an important target for the design of amyloid aggregation inhibitors. In this study, a peptide, experimentally proven to bind Aβ40 fibrils at the GxMxG motif, was mutated by a novel methodology that systematically replaces amino acids with residues that share similar chemical characteristics and subsequently assesses the energetic favorability of these mutations by docking. Successive mutations are combined and reassessed via docking to a desired level of refinement. This methodology is both fast and efficient in providing potential inhibitors. Its efficiency lies in the fact that it does not perform all possible combinations of mutations, therefore decreasing the computational time drastically. The binding free energies of the experimentally studied reference peptide and its three top scoring derivatives were evaluated as a final assessment/valuation. The potential of mean forces (PMFs were calculated by applying the Jarzynski's equality to results of steered molecular dynamics simulations. For all of the top scoring derivatives, the PMFs showed higher binding free energies than the reference peptide substantiating the usage of the introduced methodology to drug design.

  14. Diet rich in date palm fruits improves memory, learning and reduces beta amyloid in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Braidy, Nady; Awlad-Thani, Kathyia; Vaishnav, Ragini; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    At present, the treatment options available to delay the onset or slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not effective. Recent studies have suggested that diet and lifestyle factors may represent protective strategies to minimize the risk of developing AD. Date palm fruits are a good source of dietary fiber and are rich in total phenolics and natural antioxidants, such as anthocyanins, ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. These polyphenolic compounds have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. We investigated whether dietary supplementation with 2% and 4% date palm fruits (grown in Oman) could reduce cognitive and behavioral deficits in a transgenic mouse model for AD (amyloid precursor protein [APPsw]/Tg2576). The experimental groups of APP-transgenic mice from the age of 4 months were fed custom-mix diets (pellets) containing 2% and 4% date fruits. We assessed spatial memory and learning ability, psychomotor coordination, and anxiety-related behavior in all the animals at the age of 4 months and after 14 months of treatment using the Morris water maze test, rota-rod test, elevated plus maze test, and open-field test. We have also analyzed the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) protein (1-40 and 1-42) in plasma of control and experimental animals. Standard diet-fed Tg mice showed significant memory deficits, increased anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability and motor coordination when compared to wild-type on the same diet and Tg mice fed 2% and 4% date supplementation at the age of 18 months. The levels of both Aβ proteins were significantly lowered in date fruits supplemented groups than the Tg mice without the diet supplement. The neuroprotective effect offered by 4% date fruits diet to AD mice is higher than 2% date fruits diet. Our results suggest that date fruits dietary supplementation may have beneficial effects in lowering the

  15. Imaging noradrenergic influence on amyloid pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkeler, A.; Waerzeggers, Y.; Klose, A.; Monfared, P.; Thomas, A.V.; Jacobs, A.H. [Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch-Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Schubert, M. [Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Heneka, M.T. [Centre for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); University of Muenster, Department of Neurology, Muenster (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims towards the non-invasive characterization of disease-specific molecular alterations in the living organism in vivo. In that, molecular imaging opens a new dimension in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, as it allows the non-invasive determination of the dynamics of changes on the molecular level. The imaging technology being employed includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging as well as optical-based imaging technologies. These imaging modalities are employed together or alone for disease phenotyping, development of imaging-guided therapeutic strategies and in basic and translational research. In this study, we review recent investigations employing positron emission tomography and MRI for phenotyping mouse models of Alzheimers' disease by imaging. We demonstrate that imaging has an important role in the characterization of mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. (orig.)

  16. Icariin improves memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice (5xFAD) and attenuates amyloid β-induced neurite atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Takuya; Tohda, Chihiro

    2010-11-01

    Essential therapeutic drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been developed. Since the neuritic atrophy leading to synaptic losses is one of the critical causes of memory impairment in AD, the effects of several constituents in tonic herbal medicines on neuritic atrophy and memory deficits have been studied. The present study investigated the effects of icariin, a main constituent in Epimedii Herba, a well known tonic crude drug, in an in vitro AD model and transgenic mouse AD model (5xFAD). Amyloid β(1-42)-induced atrophies of axons and dendrites were restored by post-treatment with icariin in rat cortical neurons. Administration of icariin for 8 days (p.o.) improved spatial memory impairment in 5xFAD mice. These novel findings suggest that icariin may improve memory dysfunction in AD and have a potential to extend neurites even when amyloid β-induced neurite atrophy has already occurred. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Hematite-Based Photoelectrode Materials for Photoelectrocatalytic Inhibition of Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kayoung; Lee, Byung Il; Chung, You Jung; Choi, Woo Seok; Park, Chan Beum

    2017-04-01

    A visible light-active, hematite-based photoelectrode platform for suppressing β-amyloid (Aβ) self-assembly in vitro is reported. Upon illumination of a light-emitting diode with an anodic bias, the hematite photoanode generates reactive radical species, such as superoxide ions and hydroxyl radicals, via photoelectrocatalytic process. According to our analyses, the hematite photoanode exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on Aβ aggregation under visible light illumination and anodic bias. We found that hole-derived radicals played a significant role of oxidizing Aβ peptides, which effectively blocked further aggregation. The efficacy of photoelectrocatalytic inhibition on Aβ aggregation was enhanced by introducing cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi) as a co-catalyst on the hematite photoanode, which facilitated the separation of electron-hole pairs. We verified that both bare and Co-Pi@hematite photoanodes are biocompatible and effective in reducing Aβ aggregation-induced cytotoxicity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. How cholesterol constrains glycolipid conformation for optimal recognition of Alzheimer's beta amyloid peptide (Abeta1-40.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouara Yahi

    Full Text Available Membrane lipids play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, which is associated with conformational changes, oligomerization and/or aggregation of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta peptides. Yet conflicting data have been reported on the respective effect of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids (GSLs on the supramolecular assembly of Abeta peptides. The aim of the present study was to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol modulates the interaction between Abeta(1-40 and chemically defined GSLs (GalCer, LacCer, GM1, GM3. Using the Langmuir monolayer technique, we show that Abeta(1-40 selectively binds to GSLs containing a 2-OH group in the acyl chain of the ceramide backbone (HFA-GSLs. In contrast, Abeta(1-40 did not interact with GSLs containing a nonhydroxylated fatty acid (NFA-GSLs. Cholesterol inhibited the interaction of Abeta(1-40 with HFA-GSLs, through dilution of the GSL in the monolayer, but rendered the initially inactive NFA-GSLs competent for Abeta(1-40 binding. Both crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the active conformation of HFA-GSL involves a H-bond network that restricts the orientation of the sugar group of GSLs in a parallel orientation with respect to the membrane. This particular conformation is stabilized by the 2-OH group of the GSL. Correspondingly, the interaction of Abeta(1-40 with HFA-GSLs is strongly inhibited by NaF, an efficient competitor of H-bond formation. For NFA-GSLs, this is the OH group of cholesterol that constrains the glycolipid to adopt the active L-shape conformation compatible with sugar-aromatic CH-pi stacking interactions involving residue Y10 of Abeta(1-40. We conclude that cholesterol can either inhibit or facilitate membrane-Abeta interactions through fine tuning of glycosphingolipid conformation. These data shed some light on the complex molecular interplay between cell surface GSLs, cholesterol and Abeta peptides, and on the

  19. Repeated novel cage exposure-induced improvement of early Alzheimer's-like cognitive and amyloid changes in TASTPM mice is unrelated to changes in brain endocannabinoids levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Sarmad, Sarir; Rattray, Ivan; Bates, Timothy E; Scullion, Gillian A; Marsden, Charles A; Barrett, David A; Lowe, James; Kendall, David A

    2009-07-01

    Environmental factors (e.g. stress, exercise, enrichment) are thought to play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease later in life. We investigated the influence of repeated novel cage exposure on the development of early Alzheimer's-like pathology in adult (4 months old) double transgenic mice over-expressing the amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 genes (TASTPM mouse line). The procedure involves the repeated placement of the animal into a novel clean cage, a manipulation which induces a stress response and exploratory activity and, as such, can also be seen as a mild form of enrichment. Before and after exposure to the novel cage procedure, separate groups of mice were evaluated for locomotor performance and short-term contextual memory in the fear-conditioning test. Repeated novel cage exposure prevented the onset of a short-term memory deficit that was apparent in 5.5- but not 4-month-old TASTPM mice, without reversing the deficit in extinction already evident at 4 months of age. Brain regional levels of soluble and insoluble amyloid and of endocannabinoids were quantified. Novel cage exposure attenuated soluble and insoluble amyloid accumulation in the hippocampus and frontal cortex, without affecting the age-related increases in regional brain endocannabinoids levels. These beneficial effects are likely to be the consequence of the increase in physical and exploratory activity induced by novel cage exposure and suggest that the impact of environmental factors on Alzheimer's-like changes may be dependent on the degree of activation of stress pathways.

  20. Dietary composition modulates brain mass and solubilizable Aβ levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Recently, an increased interest in the role diet plays in the pathology of AD has resulted in a focus on the detrimental effects of diets high in cholesterol and fat and the beneficial effects of caloric restriction. The current study examines how dietary composition modulates cerebral amyloidosis and neuronal integrity in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD. Methods From 4 wks until 18 wks of age, male and female TgCRND8 mice were maintained on one of four diets: (1 reference (regular commercial chow; (2 high fat/low carbohydrate custom chow (60 kcal% fat/30 kcal% protein/10 kcal% carbohydrate; (3 high protein/low carbohydrate custom chow (60 kcal% protein/30 kcal% fat/10 kcal% carbohydrate; or (4 high carbohydrate/low fat custom chow (60 kcal% carbohydrate/30 kcal% protein/10 kcal% fat. At age 18 wks, mice were sacrificed, and brains studied for (a wet weight; (b solubilizable Aβ content by ELISA; (c amyloid plaque burden; (d stereologic analysis of selected hippocampal subregions. Results Animals receiving a high fat diet showed increased brain levels of solubilizable Aβ, although we detected no effect on plaque burden. Unexpectedly, brains of mice fed a high protein/low carbohydrate diet were 5% lower in weight than brains from all other mice. In an effort to identify regions that might link loss of brain mass to cognitive function, we studied neuronal density and volume in hippocampal subregions. Neuronal density and volume in the hippocampal CA3 region of TgCRND8 mice tended to be lower in TgCRND8 mice receiving the high protein/low carbohydrate diet than in those receiving the regular chow. Neuronal density and volume were preserved in CA1 and in the dentate gyrus. Interpretation Dissociation of Aβ changes from brain mass changes raises the possibility that diet plays a role not only in modulating amyloidosis but also in

  1. Distinct inflammatory phenotypes of microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages in Alzheimer's disease models: effects of aging and amyloid pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elodie; Boucher, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Delarasse, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, activated microglia, and neuronal cell death leading to progressive dementia. Recent data indicate that microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) are key players in the initiation and progression of AD, yet their respective roles remain to be clarified. As AD occurs mostly in the elderly and aging impairs myeloid functions, we addressed the inflammatory profile of microglia and MDM during aging in TgAPP/PS1 and TgAPP/PS1dE9, two transgenic AD mouse models, compared to WT littermates. We only found MDM infiltration in very aged mice. We determined that MDM highly expressed activation markers at basal state. In contrast, microglia exhibited an activated phenotype only with normal aging and Aβ pathology. Our study showed that CD14 and CD36, two receptors involved in phagocytosis, were upregulated during Aβ pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed, at the protein levels in AD models, higher production of pro-inflammatory mediators: IL-1β, p40, iNOS, CCL-3, CCL-4, and CXCL-1. Taken together, our data indicate that microglia and MDM display distinct phenotypes in AD models and highlight the specific effects of normal aging vs Aβ peptides on inflammatory processes that occur during the disease progression. These precise phenotypes of different subpopulations of myeloid cells in normal and pathologic conditions may allow the design of pertinent therapeutic strategy for AD. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fibrillar amyloid-β burden in cognitively normal people at 3 levels of genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Liu, Xiaofen; Bandy, Daniel; Yu, Meixiang; Lee, Wendy; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Keppler, Jennifer; Reeder, Stephanie A.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Alexander, Gene E.; Klunk, William E.; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Caselli, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrillar amyloid-beta (Aβ) is found in the brains of many cognitively normal older people. Whether or not this reflects a predisposition to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. We used Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET to characterize the relationship between fibrillar Aβ burden and this predisposition in cognitively normal older people at 3 mean levels of genetic risk for AD. Dynamic PiB PET scans, the Logan method, statistical parametric mapping, and automatically labeled regions of interest (ROIs) were used to characterize and compare cerebral-to-cerebellar PIB distribution volume ratios, reflecting fibrillar Aβ burden, in 28 cognitively normal persons (mean age, 64 years) with a reported family history of AD and 2 copies, 1 copy, and no copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele. The 8 ε4 homozygotes, 8 heterozygotes, and 12 noncarriers did not differ significantly in terms of age, sex, or cognitive scores. Fibrillar Aβ was significantly associated with APOE ε4 carrier status and ε4 gene dose in AD-affected mean cortical, frontal, temporal, posterior cingulate-precuneus, parietal, and basal ganglia ROIs, and was highest in an additional homozygote who had recently developed mild cognitive impairment. These findings suggest that fibrillar Aβ burden in cognitively normal older people is associated with APOE ε4 gene dose, the major genetic risk factor for AD. Additional studies are needed to track fibrillar Aβ accumulation in persons with different kinds and levels of AD risk; to determine the extent to which fibrillar Aβ, alone or in combination with other biomarkers and risk factors, predicts rates of cognitive decline and conversion to clinical AD; and to establish the role of fibrillar Aβ imaging in primary prevention trials. PMID:19346482

  3. Human and rodent amyloid-beta peptides differentially bind heme: relevance to the human susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamna, Hani; Frey, William H; Ko, Novie

    2009-07-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides are implicated in the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously investigated the mechanism of neurotoxicity of Abeta and found that human Abeta (huAbeta) binds and depletes heme, forming an Abeta-heme complex with peroxidase activity. Rodent Abeta (roAbeta) is identical to huAbeta, except for three amino acids within the proposed heme-binding motif (Site-H). We studied and compared heme-binding between roAbeta and huAbeta. Unlike roAbeta, huAbeta binds heme tightly (K(d)=140+/-60 nM) and forms a peroxidase. The plot of bound (huAbeta-heme) vs. unbound heme fits best to a two site binding hyperbola, suggesting huAbeta possesses two heme-binding sites. Consistently, a second high affinity heme-binding site was identified in the lipophilic region (site-L) of huAbeta (K(d)=210+/-80 nM). The plot of (roAbeta-heme) vs. unbound heme, on the other hand, was different as it fits best to a sigmoidal binding curve, indicating different binding and lower affinity of roAbeta for heme (K(d)=1 microM). The effect of heme-binding to site-H on heme-binding to site-L in roAbeta and huAbeta is discussed. While both roAbeta and huAbeta form aggregates equally, rodents lack AD-like neuropathology. High huAbeta/heme ratio increases the peroxidase activity. These findings suggest that depletion of regulatory heme and formation of Abeta-heme peroxidase contribute to huAbeta's neurotoxicity in the early stages of AD. Phylogenic variations in the amino acid sequence of Abeta explain tight heme-binding to huAbeta and likely contribute to the increased human susceptibility to AD.

  4. DNA beta-amyloid(1-42) trimer immunization for Alzheimer disease in a wild-type mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Qu, Bao-Xi; Fu, Min; Eagar, Todd N; Stüve, Olaf; Rosenberg, Roger N

    2009-10-28

    DNA beta-amyloid(1-42) (Abeta42) trimer immunization was developed to produce specific T helper 2 cell (T(H)2)-type antibodies to provide an effective and safe therapy for Alzheimer disease (AD) by reducing elevated levels of Abeta42 peptide that occur in the brain of patients with AD. To compare the immune response in wild-type mice after immunization with DNA Abeta42 trimer and Abeta42 peptide. Wild-type mice received either 4 microg of DNA Abeta42 trimer immunization administered with gene gun (n = 8) or intraperitoneal injection of 100 microg of human Abeta42 peptide with the adjuvant Quil A (n = 8). Titers, epitope mapping, and isotypes of the Abeta42-specific antibodies were analyzed. Antibody titers, mapping of binding sites (epitopes), isotype profiles of the Abeta42-specific antibodies, and T-cell activation. DNA Abeta42 trimer immunization resulted in antibody titers with a mean of 15 microg per milliliter of plasma. The isotype profile of the antibodies differed markedly. A predominant IgG1 antibody response was found in the DNA-immunized mice, indicating a T(H)2 type of immune response (IgG1/IgG2a ratio of 10). The peptide-immunized mice showed a mixed T(H)1/T(H)2 immune response (IgG1/IgG2a ratio of 1) (P < .001). No increased T-cell proliferation was observed in the DNA-immunized mice (P = .03). In this preliminary study in a wild-type mouse model, DNA Abeta42 trimer immunization protocol produced a T(H)2 immune response and appeared to have low potential to cause an inflammatory T-cell response.

  5. The absence of ABCA1 decreases soluble ApoE levels but does not diminish amyloid deposition in two murine models of Alzheimer disease.

    OpenAIRE

    HIRSCH‐REINSHAGEN, V.; MAIA, L.F.; BURGESS, B.L.; BLAIN, J.F.; NAUS, K.E.; MCISAAC, S.A.; PARKINSON, P.F.; Chan, J. Y.; TANSLEY, G.H.; Hayden, M R; Poirier, J.; VAN NOSTRAND, W.; WELLINGTON, C.L.

    2005-01-01

    J Biol Chem. 2005 Dec 30;280(52):43243-56. Epub 2005 Oct 5. The absence of ABCA1 decreases soluble ApoE levels but does not diminish amyloid deposition in two murine models of Alzheimer disease. Hirsch-Reinshagen V, Maia LF, Burgess BL, Blain JF, Naus KE, McIsaac SA, Parkinson PF, Chan JY, Tansley GH, Hayden MR, Poirier J, Van Nostrand W, Wellington CL. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V4Z 5H5, Canada. ...

  6. Cryogenic solid state NMR studies of fibrils of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-{beta} peptide: perspectives for DNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel [CIC Energigune (Spain); Schneider, Dennis [Bruker BioSpin (Germany); Loquet, Antoine; Lange, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie (Germany); Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.de [Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt, Helmholtz-Zentrum Muenchen (HMGU) (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization solid-state NMR holds the potential to enable a dramatic increase in sensitivity by exploiting the large magnetic moment of the electron. However, applications to biological solids are hampered in uniformly isotopically enriched biomacromolecules due to line broadening which yields a limited spectral resolution at cryogenic temperatures. We show here that high magnetic fields allow to overcome the broadening of resonance lines often experienced at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For a fibril sample of the Alzheimer's disease {beta}-amyloid peptide, we find similar line widths at low temperature and at room temperature. The presented results open new perspectives for structural investigations in the solid-state.

  7. ImmunoPEGliposome-mediated reduction of blood and brain amyloid levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease is restricted to aged animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Posado-Fernández, Adrián; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (hyper-phosphorylated Tau) in the brain are two major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Active and passive immunotherapy may limit cerebral Aβ deposition and/or accelerate its...... clearance. With the aid of a newly characterized monoclonal anti-Aβ antibody we constructed immunoPEGliposomes with high avidity for capturing Aβ in the periphery. The functionality of these vesicles in modulating Aβ uptake by both human brain capillary endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells (suppressing uptake...

  8. Extravascular CD3+ T Cells in Brains of Alzheimer Disease Patients Correlate with Tau but Not with Amyloid Pathology: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Mario; Kirabali, Tunahan; Kulic, Luka; Nitsch, Roger M; Ferretti, Maria Teresa

    2018-02-07

    Strong genetic and epidemiological evidence points to a crucial role of the immune system in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). CD3+ T lymphocytes have been described in brains of postmortem AD patients and in transgenic models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis and tau pathology. However, the occurrence of T cells in AD brains is still controversial; furthermore, the relationship between T cells and hallmarks of AD pathology (amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) remains to be established. We have studied the occurrence of T cells in postmortem hippocampi and mid frontal gyrus (MFG) samples of AD patients (Braak stage V-VI) and nondemented control subjects and correlated it with amyloid and tau pathology burden. Confocal microscopy and bright-field immunohistochemistry were used to identify brain-associated T cells. Extravascular CD3+ T cells were quantified and compared to nondemented controls. In addition, numbers of extravascular CD3+ T cells were correlated with amyloid (6E10 staining) and tau pathology (AT8 staining) in the same sections. Several CD3+, extravascular T cells were observed in the brains of AD patients, mostly of the CD8+ subtype. AD hippocampi harbored significantly increased numbers of extravascular CD3+ T cells compared to nondemented controls. CD3+ T cells significantly correlated with tau pathology but not with amyloid plaques in AD samples. Our data support the notion of T-cell occurrence in AD brains and suggest that, in advanced stages of AD, T-cell extravasation is driven by tau-related neurodegenerative changes rather than by cerebral amyloidosis. T cells could be crucial for driving the amyloid-independent phase of the AD pathology. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation reduces amyloid burden and mitigates memory deficits in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robert J; Fernandez, Celia G; Stanley, Molly; Jiang, Hong; Nguyen, Phuong; Rice, Richard C; Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; De Rossi, Pierre; Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S; Lamb, Raza; Argemi, Arnau; Allaert, Emilie S; Rathbun, Elle M; Krause, Sofia V; Wagner, Steven L; Parent, Angèle T; Holtzman, David M; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2017-11-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by pathological brain lesions and a decline in cognitive function. β-Amyloid peptides (Aβ), derived from proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), play a central role in AD pathogenesis. β-Site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the transmembrane aspartyl protease which initiates Aβ production, is axonally transported in neurons and accumulates in dystrophic neurites near cerebral amyloid deposits in AD. BACE1 is modified by S-palmitoylation at four juxtamembrane cysteine residues. S-palmitoylation is a dynamic posttranslational modification that is important for trafficking and function of several synaptic proteins. Here, we investigated the in vivo significance of BACE1 S-palmitoylation through the analysis of knock-in mice with cysteine-to-alanine substitution at the palmitoylated residues (4CA mice). BACE1 expression, as well as processing of APP and other neuronal substrates, was unaltered in 4CA mice despite the lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation and reduced lipid raft association. Whereas steady-state Aβ levels were similar, synaptic activity-induced endogenous Aβ production was not observed in 4CA mice. Furthermore, we report a significant reduction of cerebral amyloid burden and BACE1 accumulation in dystrophic neurites in the absence of BACE1 S-palmitoylation in mouse models of AD amyloidosis. Studies in cultured neurons suggest that S-palmitoylation is required for dendritic spine localization and axonal targeting of BACE1. Finally, the lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation mitigates cognitive deficits in 5XFAD mice. Using transgenic mouse models, these results demonstrate that intrinsic posttranslational S-palmitoylation of BACE1 has a significant impact on amyloid pathogenesis and the consequent cognitive decline. Published under the PNAS license.

  10. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  11. Losartan improves cerebrovascular function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with combined overproduction of amyloid-β and transforming growth factor-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Tong, Xin-Kang; Imboden, Hans; Hamel, Edith

    2017-06-01

    Alterations of the renin-angiotensin system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We tested the efficacy of losartan (10 mg/kg/day for three months), a selective angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, in alleviating cerebrovascular and cognitive deficits in double-transgenic mice (six months at endpoint) that overexpress a mutated form of the human amyloid precursor protein (APPSwe,Ind) and a constitutively active form of the transforming growth factor-β1, thereafter named A/T mice. Losartan rescued cerebrovascular reactivity, particularly the dilatory responses, but failed to attenuate astroglial activation and to normalize the neurovascular uncoupling response to sensory stimulation. The cognitive deficits of A/T mice were not restored by losartan nor were the increased brain levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides normalized. Our results are the first to demonstrate the capacity of losartan to improve cerebrovascular reactivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model of combined Aβ-induced vascular oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-β1-mediated vascular fibrosis. These data suggest that losartan may be promising for restoring cerebrovascular function in patients with vascular diseases at risk for vascular dementia or Alzheimer's disease. However, a combined therapy may be warranted for rescuing both vascular and cognitive deficits in a multifaceted pathology like Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Quantitative longitudinal interrelationships between brain metabolism and amyloid deposition during a 2-year follow-up in patients with early Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Klupp, Elisabeth [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Grimmer, Timo [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Similar regional anatomical distributions were reported for fibrillary amyloid deposition [measured by {sup 11}C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET)] and brain hypometabolism [measured by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET] in numerous Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies evaluating the interrelationships of these two different pathological markers in the same AD population. Our most recent AD study suggested that the longitudinal pattern of hypometabolism anatomically follows the pattern of amyloid deposition with temporal delay, which indicates that neuronal dysfunction may spread within the anatomical pattern of amyloid pathology. Based on this finding we now hypothesize that in early AD patients quantitative longitudinal decline in hypometabolism may be related to the amount of baseline amyloid deposition during a follow-up period of 2 years. Fifteen patients with mild probable AD underwent baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2) examination after 24 {+-} 2.1 months with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 11}C]PIB PET, structural T1-weighted MRI and neuropsychological testing [Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery]. Longitudinal cognitive measures and quantitative PET measures of amyloid deposition and metabolism [standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs)] were obtained using volume of interest (VOI)-based approaches in the frontal-lateral-retrosplenial (FLR) network and in predefined bihemispheric brain regions after partial volume effect (PVE) correction of PET data. Statistical group comparisons (SUVRs and cognitive measures) between patients and 15 well-matched elderly controls who had undergone identical imaging procedures once as well as Pearson's correlation analyses within patients were performed. Group comparison revealed significant cognitive decline and increased mean PIB/decreased FDG SUVRs in the FLR network as well as

  13. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattsson, Niklas; Bremell, Daniel; Anckarsäter, Rolf; Blennow, Kaj; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Abeta deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis...

  14. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  15. Alzheimer's dementia begins as a disease of small blood vessels, damaged by oxidative-induced inflammation and dysregulated amyloid metabolism: implications for early detection and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2011-01-01

    There is a widely shared view among Alzheimer's disease (AD) investigators that the amyloid hypothesis best describes the pathogenic cascade that leads, ultimately, to neuronal degeneration and irreversible dementia. The most persuasive evidence comes from studies of damaged brains of patients in the late stages of AD and from animal studies that attempt to mimic the hereditary forms of early-onset dementia. Despite this impressive body of knowledge, we still lack the means to either arrest or prevent this horrible contagion. This essay attempts to describe what we know, and do not know, about the earliest stages of the disease, focusing on the possibility that the initial pathological changes involve oxidative-induced inflammatory damage to small blood vessels. The resulting ischemia activates amyloid-processing enzymes and other proinflammatory factors that eventually compromise neuronal functions, leading, over time, to the complex lesions that characterize advanced disease. The idea that blood vessel damage is primary has a long history and many prior advocates. The novel addition offered here is the speculation that low-abundance, gain-of-function somatic mutations of the amyloid precursor protein may be part of the triggering mechanism.

  16. Effect of Four Weeks Exercise Prior Preparation before Alzheimer's Induction on the Levels of Nerve Growth Factor and Beta Amyloid in the Hippocampus of Wistar Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atabak Shahed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of four weeks exercise prior preparation before Alzheimer's induction on the levels of nerve growth factor and beta amyloid in the hippocampus of Wistar male rats Materials and Methods: 84 male Wistar rats (8 weeks old with a weighing average of 20 ± 195 grams from Pasteur Institute of Iran were prepared, and rats were randomly divided to two exercise (4 weeks aerobic training on a treadmill with a gradient of 0 degrees, 5 days a week for 4 weeks and rest groups. Then, the rats of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub groups of 14 numbers, injection Aβ1-42, control, and non-injected. 48 hours after the last exercise session, injections into the hippocampus amyloid beta or Dimethyl sulfoxide were performed. Seven days after surgery, the rats of each group were randomly sacrificed or subjected to behavioral testing. To determine the levels of of nerve growth factor and beta amyloid Sampling was performed from the hippocampus and plasma of animals, a Morris water maze test was used for spatial memory test. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS and analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results: The results of one-way analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference between the levels of amylohyd of hippocampus and NGF in different groups. Also, the results of the probe test for spatial memory showed that the time spent on the target circle in the Aβ1-42 injection group was significantly lower than the other groups (p≤ 0.01. Also, the exercise and exercise + sham groups had a significantly better performance than control group. Conclusion: It seems that performing physical activity before induction of Alzheimer's in rats is a kind of countermeasures and preeclampsia with physiological disorders and progression of the disease.

  17. {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-chrysamine G, a probe for beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezutter, N.A.; Groot, T.J. de; Bormans, G.M. [K.U. Leuven (Belgium). Lab. of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry; Dom, R.J. [Department of Neuropathology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Verbruggen, A.M. [K.U. Leuven (Belgium). Lab. of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry; U.Z. Gasthuisberg, Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium)

    1999-11-01

    Chrysamine G (CG), an analogue of Congo red, is known to bind in vitro to the {beta}-amyloid protein (A{beta} 10-43) and to homogenates of several regions of the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We synthesised a conjugate of 2-(acetamido)-CG with a bis-S-trityl protected monoamide-monoaminedithiol (MAMA-Tr{sub 2}) tetraligand, which was efficiently deprotected and labelled with a 75% yield with technetium-99m, to obtain {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG. In mice, {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG was cleared mainly by the hepatobiliary system, resulting in a fast blood clearance. Brain uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG was low. Co-injection with the blood pool tracer iodine-125 human serum albumin ({sup 125}I-HSA) demonstrated a brain/blood activity ratio for {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG that was significantly higher than that for {sup 125}I-HSA (t test for dependent samples, P<0.02), indicating the ability of {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG to cross the blood-brain barrier. In vitro autoradiography demonstrated pronounced binding of {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG to {beta}-amyloid deposits in autopsy sections of the parietal and occipital cortex of an AD patient as compared with controls. Adding 10 {mu}M Congo red during incubation displaced the binding of {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG. Congo red staining and autoradiography identified the same lesions. {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA-CG seems to bind selectively to {beta}-amyloid deposition in human brain parenchyma and blood vessels in vitro and thus might be a lead compound for further development of a useful tracer agent for the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  18. Distribution of beta/A4 protein and amyloid precursor protein in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemuller, A J; Roos, R A; Bots, G T; Kamphorst, W; Eikelenboom, P; Van Nostrand, W E

    1993-05-01

    Brain amyloidosis with abundant beta/A4 protein deposition in plaques and cortical and meningeal vessels is found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). In contrast to AD, no neuritic pathology or classical congophilic plaques are found in HCHWA-D. Unlike most AD cases, the congophilic angiopathy in HCHWA-D is very severe. It is still unknown whether beta/A4 deposits in plaques and vessels have the same origin. In this study, we have used frozen cortical tissue of HCHWA-D and AD patients to investigate the beta/A4 amyloid protein and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in different types of plaques and congophilic angiopathy. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies against synthetic beta/A4 proteins and antibodies against APP including MAbP2-1, a monoclonal antibody against purified protease nexin-2, which is the secreted form of APP. In contrast to immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, frozen tissue of HCHWA-D patients revealed a very high number of beta/A4 plaques resembling AD. All plaques were of the diffuse type. Double-staining with MabP2-1 and beta/A4 antisera revealed: 1) the presence of APP immunoreactivity in classical plaques and transitional forms; 2) the absence of APP immunoreactivity in diffuse plaques in HCHWA-D and AD; and 3) pronounced APP immunoreactivity in congophilic vessels in HCHWA-D in contrast to weak APP staining in congophilic vessels in AD. Together these findings suggest that: a) the presence of APP in plaques is related to neuritic changes; b) different processes occur in amyloid formation in plaques and vessels; and c) differences exist between the process of amyloid formation in HCHWA-D and AD.

  19. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: ferreira@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g{sup -1}). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  20. SET translocation is associated with increase in caspase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in CA1 of Alzheimer and Down syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Patricia; Dorard, Emilie; Contremoulins, Vincent; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Déglon, Nicole; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Guihenneuc-Jouyaux, Chantal; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Allinquant, Bernadette

    2014-05-01

    Caspase cleaved amyloid precursor protein (APPcc) and SET are increased and mislocalized in the neuronal cytoplasm in Alzheimer Disease (AD) brains. Translocated SET to the cytoplasm can induce tau hyperphosphorylation. To elucidate the putative relationships between mislocalized APPcc and SET, we studied their level and distribution in the hippocampus of 5 controls, 3 Down syndrome and 10 Alzheimer patients. In Down syndrome and Alzheimer patients, APPcc and SET levels were increased in CA1 and the frequency of both localizations in the neuronal cytoplasm was high in CA1, and low in CA4. As the increase of APPcc is already present at early stages of AD, we overexpressed APPcc in CA1 and the dentate gyrus neurons of adult mice with a lentiviral construct. APPcc overexpression in CA1 and not in the dentate gyrus induced endogenous SET translocation and tau hyperphosphorylation. These data suggest that increase in APPcc in CA1 neurons could be an early event leading to the translocation of SET and the progression of AD through tau hyperphosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-10-16

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Green-fluorescent protein+ Astrocytes Attach to beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model and GFPare Sensitive for Clasmatodendrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is pathologically characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques and Tau pathology. It is well-established that Aβ plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes, highly expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. In order to study the cellular interaction of reactive astrocytes with Aβ plaques, we crossbred mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations (APP-SweDI with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the GFAP-promotor. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy revealed a tight association and intense sprouting of astrocytic fine branched processes towards Aβ plaques in 12 month old mice. In order to study phagocytosis, 110 µm thick brain slices from 12 month old crossbred mice were cultured overnight, however, we found that the GFP fluorescence faded away, distal processes degenerated and a complete loss of astrocytic morphology was seen (clasmatodendrosis. In summary, our data show that GFP+ reactive astrocytes make intense contact with Aβ plaques but these cells are highly vulnerable for degeneration.

  3. Genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 alzheimer's disease candidate proteins: significant associations with proteins involved in amyloid processing and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S K Kauwe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 42 amino acid species of amyloid beta (Aβ42 and tau levels are strongly correlated with the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD neuropathology including amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration and have been successfully used as endophenotypes for genetic studies of AD. Additional CSF analytes may also serve as useful endophenotypes that capture other aspects of AD pathophysiology. Here we have conducted a genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 AD-related analytes. All analytes were measured using the Rules Based Medicine Human DiscoveryMAP Panel, which includes analytes relevant to several disease-related processes. Data from two independently collected and measured datasets, the Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI, were analyzed separately, and combined results were obtained using meta-analysis. We identified genetic associations with CSF levels of 5 proteins (Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 4 (CCL4, Interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R and Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3 with study-wide significant p-values (p<1.46×10-10 and significant, consistent evidence for association in both the Knight ADRC and the ADNI samples. These proteins are involved in amyloid processing and pro-inflammatory signaling. SNPs associated with ACE, IL6R and MMP3 protein levels are located within the coding regions of the corresponding structural gene. The SNPs associated with CSF levels of CCL4 and CCL2 are located in known chemokine binding proteins. The genetic associations reported here are novel and suggest mechanisms for genetic control of CSF and plasma levels of these disease-related proteins. Significant SNPs in ACE and MMP3 also showed association with AD risk. Our findings suggest that these proteins/pathways may be valuable therapeutic targets for AD. Robust associations in cognitively normal

  4. Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Anckarsäter Henrik; Blennow Kaj; Bremell Daniel; Anckarsäter Rolf; Mattsson Niklas; Zetterberg Henrik; Hagberg Lars

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-amyloid (Aβ) is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Ly...

  6. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  7. Dual Targeting of Amyloid-beta Clearance and Neuroinflammation as a Novel Therapeutic Approach against Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) cascade hypothesis suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to an imbalance between the production and clearance of Abeta peptide. Sporadic AD has been related to faulty clearance of Abeta. Accumulation of Abeta oligomers (Abetao) has been linked to several downstream toxic effects including neuroinflammation, synaptic loss, and cellular death. Abeta transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the primary pathways for reducing Abeta load in the brain, which work hand in hand with other parenchymal mechanisms to reduce Abeta levels including intra and extracellular degradation by a family of Abeta degrading enzymes. Established AD drugs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, have been reported to have several additional non-cholinergic effects that alter Abeta pathology; reduce Abeta load, anti-inflammatory response, and attenuate synaptic loss. However, their limited effect only lead to minor improvements in AD symptoms without improving the prognosis of the disease. The lack of effective medical treatment for AD led to several studies focusing on establishing new therapeutic approaches to reduce Abeta pathology. We aimed to identify and characterize natural products that are capable of enhancing the BBB clearance of Abeta in addition to reducing neuroinflammation. Our first project was to investigate the role of oleocanthal (one of the active ingredients in extra-virgin olive oil; EVOO) on attenuating Abeta toxic effects on neurons and astrocytes. We developed Abeta oligomers (Abetao) induced inflammatory environment by exposing neurons and astrocytes to accumulative doses of Abetao to investigate oleocanthal effect on modulating Abetao pathological changes in neurons and astrocytes. Our findings demonstrated oleocanthal prevented Abetao-induced synaptic proteins, SNAP-25 and PSD-95, down-regulation in neurons, attenuated Abetao-induced inflammation, and restored glutamine transporter (GLT1) and glucose

  8. Discrepancy in Expression of β-Secretase and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor in Alzheimer-Related Genes in the Rat Medial Temporal Lobe Cortex Following Transient Global Brain Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Ryszard; Kocki, Janusz; Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Petniak, Alicja; Gil-Kulik, Paulina; Januszewski, Sławomir; Bogucki, Jacek; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Brzozowska, Judyta; Furmaga-Jabłońska, Wanda; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-01-01

    Brain ischemia may be causally related with Alzheimer's disease. Presumably, β-secretase and amyloid-β protein precursor gene expression changes may be associated with Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. Consequently, we have examined quantitative changes in both β-secretase and amyloid-β protein precursor genes in the medial temporal lobe cortex with the use of quantitative rtPCR analysis following 10-min global brain ischemia in rats with survival of 2, 7, and 30 days. The greatest significant overexpression of β-secretase gene was noted on the 2nd day, while on days 7-30 the expression of this gene was only modestly downregulated. Amyloid-β protein precursor gene was downregulated on the 2nd day, but on days 7-30 postischemia, there was a significant reverse tendency. Thus, the demonstrated alterations indicate that the considerable changes of expression of β-secretase and amyloid-β protein precursor genes may be connected with a response of neurons in medial temporal lobe cortex to transient global brain ischemia. Finally, the ischemia-induced gene changes may play a key role in a late and slow onset of Alzheimer-type pathology.

  9. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of Trolox-conjugated amyloid-β C-terminal peptides for therapeutic intervention in an in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Takuya; Ohno, Akiko; Kazunori, Mori; Kakizawa, Taeko; Kuwata, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Shibanuma, Motoko; Hara, Shuntaro; Ishida, Seiichi; Kurihara, Masaaki; Miyata, Naoki; Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-15

    Two hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) observed in the brains of patients with the disease include oxidative injury and deposition of protein aggregates comprised of amyloid-β (Aβ) variants. To inhibit these toxic processes, we synthesized antioxidant-conjugated peptides comprised of Trolox and various C-terminal motifs of Aβ variants, TxAβx-n (x=34, 36, 38, 40; n=40, 42, 43). Most of these compounds were found to exhibit anti-aggregation activities. Among them, TxAβ36-42 significantly inhibited Aβ1-42 aggregation, showed potent antioxidant activity, and protected SH-SY5Y cells from Aβ1-42-induced cytotoxicity. Thus, this method represents a promising strategy for developing multifunctional AD therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The n-Butanol Fraction and Rutin from Tartary Buckwheat Improve Cognition and Memory in an In Vivo Model of Amyloid-β-Induced Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Dong Gu; Cho, Sunghun; Yoon, Young-Ho; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Sanghyun

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the beneficial effects of the n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from tartary buckwheat (TB) on learning and memory deficits in a mouse model of amyloid β (Aβ)-induced Alzheimer's disease (AD). Learning and memory were assessed using the T-maze, object recognition, and Morris water maze tests. Animals administered Aβ showed impaired cognition and memory, which were alleviated by oral administration of an n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from TB. Similarly, Aβ-induced increases in nitric oxide formation and lipid peroxidation in the brain, liver, and kidneys were attenuated by treatment with n-butanol fraction and rutin from TB in addition to antioxidant effects observed in control (nonAβ-treated) animals. The results of the present study suggest that the n-butanol fraction and rutin extracted from TB are protective against and have possible therapeutic applications for the treatment of AD.

  11. Serotonin augmentation therapy by escitalopram has minimal effects on amyloid-β levels in early-stage Alzheimer's-like disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Christian Ulrich; Waider, Jonas; Grebing, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysfunction of the serotonergic (5-HTergic) system has been implicated in the cognitive and behavioural symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulation of toxic amyloid-β (Aβ) species is a hallmark of AD and an instigator of pathology. Serotonin (5-HT) augmentation therapy...... by treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with AD has had mixed success in improving cognitive function, whereas SSRI administration to mice with AD-like disease has been shown to reduce Aβ pathology. The objective of this study was to investigate whether an increase...... in extracellular levels of 5-HT induced by chronic SSRI treatment reduces Aβ pathology and whether 5-HTergic deafferentation of the cerebral cortex could worsen Aβ pathology in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD. METHODS: We administered a therapeutic dose of the SSRI escitalopram (5 mg...

  12. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD. PMID:27068745

  13. Chronic Noise Exposure Acts Cumulatively to Exacerbate Alzheimer's Disease-Like Amyloid-β Pathology and Neuroinflammation in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bo; Li, Kang; Gai, Zhihui; She, Xiaojun; Zhang, Na; Xu, Chuanxiang; Chen, Xuewei; An, Gaihong; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2015-08-07

    A putative etiological association exists between noise exposure and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is thought to be one of the primary initiating factors in AD. It has been further suggested that subsequent dysregulation of Aβ may play a mechanistic role in the AD-like pathophysiology associated with noise exposure. Here, we used ELISA, immunoblotting, cytokine arrays, and RT-PCR, to examine both hippocampal Aβ pathology and neuroinflammation in rats at different time points after noise exposure. We found that chronic noise exposure significantly accelerated the progressive overproduction of Aβ, which persisted for 7 to 14 days after the cessation of exposure. This effect was accompanied by up-regulated expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage enzymes, β- and γ-secretases. Cytokine analysis revealed that chronic noise exposure increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and the receptor for advanced glycation end products, while decreasing the expression of activin A and platelet-derived growth factor-AA. Furthermore, we found persistent elevations of glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 expression that closely corresponded to the noise-induced increases in Aβ and neuroinflammation. These studies suggest that lifelong environmental noise exposure may have cumulative effects on the onset and development of AD.

  14. Pioglitazone improves reversal learning and exerts mixed cerebrovascular effects in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with combined amyloid-β and cerebrovascular pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayiota Papadopoulos

    Full Text Available Animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD are invaluable in dissecting the pathogenic mechanisms and assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies. Here, we used the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone in an attempt to rescue the pathogenic phenotype in adult (12 months and aged (>18 months bitransgenic A/T mice that overexpress a mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APPSwe,Ind and a constitutively active form of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. A/T mice recapitulate the AD-related cognitive deficits, amyloid beta (Aβ and cerebrovascular pathologies, as well as the altered metabolic and vascular coupling responses to increased neuronal activity. Pioglitazone normalized neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling responses to sensory stimulation, and reduced cortical astroglial and hippocampal microglial activation in both age groups. Spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze were not rescued by pioglitazone, but reversal learning was improved in the adult cohort notwithstanding a progressing Aβ pathology. While pioglitazone preserved the constitutive nitric oxide synthesis in the vessel wall, it unexpectedly failed to restore cerebrovascular reactivity in A/T mice and even exacerbated the dilatory deficits. These data demonstrate pioglitazone's efficacy on selective AD hallmarks in a complex AD mouse model of comorbid amyloidosis and cerebrovascular pathology. They further suggest a potential benefit of pioglitazone in managing neuroinflammation, cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism in AD patients devoid of cerebrovascular pathology.

  15. Different Populations of Human Locus Ceruleus Neurons Contain Heavy Metals or Hyperphosphorylated Tau: Implications for Amyloid-β and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A marked loss of locus ceruleus (LC) neurons is a striking pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). LC neurons are particularly prone to taking up circulating toxicants such as heavy metals, and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau(HYP)) appears early in these neurons. In an attempt to find out if both heavy metals and tau(HYP) could be damaging LC neurons, we looked in the LC neurons of 21 sporadic AD patients and 43 non-demented controls for the heavy metals mercury, bismuth, and silver using autometallography, and for tau(HYP) using AT8 immunostaining. Heavy metals or tau(HYP) were usually seen in separate LC neurons, and rarely co-existed within the same neuron. The number of heavy metal-containing LC neurons did not correlate with the number containing tau(HYP). Heavy metals therefore appear to occupy a mostly different population of LC neurons to those containing tau(HYP), indicating that the LC in AD is vulnerable to two different assaults. Reduced brain noradrenaline from LC damage is linked to amyloid-β deposition, and tau(HYP) in the LC may seed neurofibrillary tangles in other neurons. A model is described, incorporating the present findings, that proposes that the LC plays a part in both the amyloid-β and tau pathologies of AD.

  16. Dependence pH and proposed mechanism for aggregation of Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid-β(1-42) protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yhuki; Kiyono, Mituhiro; Chino, Masahiro; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Hoshi, Keiko; Ikeshima, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that the aggregation and oligomerization of β-amyloid protein (Aβ1-42) are strongly dependent on solution pH. Ionic forms of the side bands of Aβ1-42 were generated by adjusting the pH using different buffer solutions. As a result, it was possible to establish a relationship between the aggregation of Aβ1-42 and the pH. In addition, to gain insight into the mechanism of Aβ1-42 aggregation, aggregation models for Aβ17-42 (2-13 mer prepared at pH 7-8) were computed using a MMFF (molecular mechanics) method. When the pH was greater than the isoelectric point (IP) of Aβ17-42, the aggregation of Aβ17-42 was accelerated by intermolecular ion bridge relay binding of Asp23 with Lys28. Such binding of Asp23 with Lys28 can explain the high level of stability of Aβ fibrils and oligomers (plastic-like biopolymers found in the amyloid plaques observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease) produced as the result of Aβ aggregation. At pH 9.5, Aβ1-42 aggregation was not observed experimentally, because the side chain of Lys28 contained unprotonated amino groups (-NH2, not -NH3+). This result was also confirmed using the MMFF method.

  17. Protective effect of Nelumbo nucifera extracts on beta amyloid protein induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaganandam Kumaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. β-Amyloid (Aβ has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Deposits of insoluble Aβ are found in the brains of patients with AD and are one of the pathological hallmarks of the disease, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop antidementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the inhibitory effect of the Nelumbo nucifera seed embryo extracts on to the aggregated amyloid β peptide (agg Aβ1–40-induced damage of differentiated PC-12 cells (dPC-12, a well-known cell model for AD. In the present study, seed embryos of N. nucifera were extracted with 70% methanol in water and then separated into hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water layers. Among them, only the n-butanol layer showed strong activity and was therefore subjected to separation on Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. Two fractions showing potent activity were found to significantly inhibit Aβ1–40 toxicity on dPC-12 cells in increasing order of concentration (10–50 μg/mL. Further purification and characterization of these active fractions identified them to be flavonoids such as rutin, orientin, isoorientin, isoquercetrin, and hyperoside. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate scavenging activity of the extracts was also carried out to ascertain the possible mechanism of the activity.

  18. Candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Jenkins, Edmund C; Luchsinger, José A; Zigman, Warren B; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H

    2015-10-01

    We examined the contribution of candidates genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to individual differences in levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrom, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30-78 years of age. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race and/or ethnicity, and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels, the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence amyloid precursor protein processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-06-03

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Anxiolytic and antidepressant profile of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Postu, Paula; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-03-29

    Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) is employed in traditional medicine of many countries as analgesic, antiinflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antidepressant and cognitive-enhancing agent. This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant properties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of the methanolic extract were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the amygdala was assessed using superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase specific activities, the total content of the reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde levels. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Significant differences were determined by Tukey's post hoc test. F values for which p < 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Pearson's correlation coefficient and regression analysis were used in order to evaluate the connection between behavioral measures, the antioxidant defence and lipid peroxidation. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. Administration of the methanolic extract significantly exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects and also antioxidant potential. Taken together, our results suggest that the methanolic extract ameliorates beta-amyloid (1-42)-induced anxiety and depression by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat amygdala.

  1. The nootropic and neuroprotective proline-containing dipeptide noopept restores spatial memory and increases immunoreactivity to amyloid in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, Rita U; Gruden, Marina A; Bobkova, Natalya A; Sewell, Robert D E; Gudasheva, Tatyana A; Samokhin, Alexander N; Seredinin, Sergey B; Noppe, Wim; Sherstnev, Vladimir V; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide, noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were investigated in NMRI mice following olfactory bulbectomy. We have shown previously that these animals developed Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like behaviour, morphology and biochemistry including impairment of spatial memory, regional neuronal degeneration and elevated Abeta peptide brain levels. In the current investigation, spatial memory was assessed using the Morris water maze and serum antibodies to in vitro morphologically characterized amyloid structures of both Abeta((25-35)) peptide and equine lysozyme, as well as to neurotrophic glial factor S100b, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Noopept (administered at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg for a period of 21 days and during a further 5 days training) restored spatial memory and increased serum antibody levels to oligomers of Abeta((25-35)) peptide but not to equine lysozyme amyloid or S100b protein in bulbectomized animals. The positive immunotropic effect of noopept to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrillar aggregates was more marked in sham-operated compared to the bulbectomized subjects which were characterized by an overall suppression of immunoreactivity. Enhancement of the immune response to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrils caused by noopept may attenuate the neurotoxic consequences of amyloid fibrillization and also be associated with an improvement in spatial memory in bulbectomized mice. These actions of noopept, combined with its previously reported neuroprotective and cholinomimetic properties, suggests that this dipeptide may well be useful for improving cognitive deficits induced by neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Long-term treatment of thalidomide ameliorates amyloid-like pathology through inhibition of β-secretase in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping He

    Full Text Available Thalidomide is a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα inhibitor which has been found to have abilities against tumor growth, angiogenesis and inflammation. Recently, it has been applied in clinic for the treatment of multiple myeloma as well as some inflammatory diseases. However, whether thalidomide has any therapeutic effects on neurodegenerative disorders, i.e. Alzheimer's disease (AD is not clear. AD is characterized by excessive amount of amyloid β peptides (Aβ, which results in a significant release of inflammatory factors, including TNFα in the brain. Studies have shown that inhibition of TNFα reduces amyloid-associated pathology, prevents neuron loss and improves cognition. Our recent report showed that genetic inhibition of TNFα/TNF receptor signal transduction down-regulates β amyloid cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1 activity, reduces Aβ generation and improves learning and memory deficits. However, the mechanism of thalidomide involving in the mitigation of AD neuropathological features remains unclear. Here, we chronically administrated thalidomide on human APPswedish mutation transgenic (APP23 mice from 9 months old (an onset of Aβ deposits and early stage of AD-like changes to 12 months old. We found that, in addition of dramatic decrease in the activation of both astrocytes and microglia, thalidomide significantly reduces Aβ load and plaque formation. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in BACE1 level and activity with long-term thalidomide application. Interestingly, these findings cannot be observed in the brains of 12-month-old APP23 mice with short-term treatment of thalidomide (3 days. These results suggest that chronic thalidomide administration is an alternative approach for AD prevention and therapeutics.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of regulators of the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta signaling pathway in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease are associated with reduced amyloid precursor protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenstein, Edward; Torrance, Magdalena; Adame, Anthony; Mante, Michael; Bar-on, Pazit; Rose, John B; Crews, Leslie; Masliah, Eliezer

    2007-02-21

    The glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) pathway plays an important role in mediating neuronal fate and synaptic plasticity. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), abnormal activation of this pathway might play an important role in neurodegeneration, and compounds such as lithium that modulate GSK3beta activity have been shown to reduce amyloid production and tau phosphorylation in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic (tg) mice. However, it is unclear whether regulation of GSK3beta is neuroprotective in APP tg mice. In this context, the main objective of the present study was to determine whether pharmacological or genetic manipulations that block the GSK3beta pathway might ameliorate the neurodegenerative alterations in APP tg mice and to better understand the mechanisms involved. For this purpose, two sets of experiments were performed. First, tg mice expressing mutant human APP under the Thy1 promoter (hAPP tg) were treated with either lithium chloride or saline alone. Second, hAPP tg mice were crossed with GSK3beta tg mice, in which overexpression of this signaling molecule results in a dominant-negative (DN) effect with inhibition of activity. hAPP tg mice that were treated with lithium or that were crossed with DN-GSK3beta tg mice displayed improved performance in the water maze, preservation of the dendritic structure in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, and decreased tau phosphorylation. Moreover, reduced activation of GSK3beta was associated with decreased levels of APP phosphorylation that resulted in decreased amyloid-beta production. In conclusion, the present study showed that modulation of the GSK3beta signaling pathway might also have neuroprotective effects in tg mice by regulating APP maturation and processing and further supports the notion that GSK3beta might be a suitable target for the treatment of AD.

  4. BACE1 elevation is involved in amyloid plaque development in the triple transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: differential Aβ antibody labeling of early-onset axon terminal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Macklin, Lauren N; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Oddo, Salvatore; Laferla, Frank M; Struble, Robert G; Rose, Gregory M; Patrylo, Peter R; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2012-02-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins mutations cause early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Some FAD-based mouse models produce amyloid plaques, others do not. β-Amyloid (Aβ) deposition can manifest as compact and diffuse plaques; it is unclear why the same Aβ molecules aggregate in different patterns. Is there a basic cellular process governing Aβ plaque pathogenesis? We showed in some FAD mouse models that compact plaque formation is associated with a progressive axonal pathology inherent with increased expression of β-secretase (BACE1), the enzyme initiating the amyloidogenic processing of APP. A monoclonal Aβ antibody, 3D6, visualized distinct axon terminal labeling before plaque onset. The present study was set to understand BACE1 and axonal changes relative to diffuse plaque development and to further characterize the novel axonal Aβ antibody immunoreactivity (IR), using triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice as experimental model. Diffuse-like plaques existed in the forebrain in aged transgenics and were regionally associated with increased BACE1 labeled swollen/sprouting axon terminals. Increased BACE1/3D6 IR at axon terminals occurred in young animals before plaque onset. These axonal elements were also co-labeled by other antibodies targeting the N-terminal and mid-region of Aβ domain and the C-terminal of APP, but not co-labeled by antibodies against the Aβ C-terminal and APP N-terminal. The results suggest that amyloidogenic axonal pathology precedes diffuse plaque formation in the 3xTg-AD mice, and that the early-onset axonal Aβ antibody IR in transgenic models of AD might relate to a cross-reactivity of putative APP β-carboxyl terminal fragments.

  5. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1-M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca(2+) levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. Significance statement: A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the synaptic

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  7. A Food and Drug Administration-approved asthma therapeutic agent impacts amyloid β in the brain in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yukiko; Takeda, Shuko; Cho, Hansang; Wegmann, Susanne; Shoup, Timothy M; Takahashi, Kazue; Irimia, Daniel; Elmaleh, David R; Hyman, Bradley T; Hudry, Eloise

    2015-01-23

    Interfering with the assembly of Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from monomer to oligomeric species and fibrils or promoting their clearance from the brain are targets of anti-Aβ-directed therapies in Alzheimer disease. Here we demonstrate that cromolyn sodium (disodium cromoglycate), a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug already in use for the treatment of asthma, efficiently inhibits the aggregation of Aβ monomers into higher-order oligomers and fibrils in vitro without affecting Aβ production. In vivo, the levels of soluble Aβ are decreased by over 50% after only 1 week of daily intraperitoneally administered cromolyn sodium. Additional in vivo microdialysis studies also show that this compound decreases the half-life of soluble Aβ in the brain. These data suggest a clear effect of a peripherally administered, Food and Drug Administration-approved medication on Aβ economy, supporting further investigation of the potential long-term efficacy of cromolyn sodium in Alzheimer disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. First evidence for helical transitions in supercoiled DNA by amyloid Beta Peptide (1-42) and aluminum: a new insight in understanding Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Anitha, Suram; Latha, Kallur S; Mustak, Mohammed S; Stein, Reuven; Ravid, Rivka; Rao, K S Jagannatha

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we evidenced a B --> Z helical change in Alzheimer's brain genomic DNA, leading to a hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease (AD) etiological factors such as aluminum (Al), amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, and Tau might play a role in modulating DNA topology. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of Al and Abeta with DNA. Our results show that Abeta(1-42) could induce a B --> Psi (Psi) conformational change in pUC 18 supercoiled DNA (scDNA), Abeta(1-16) caused an altered B-form, whereas Al induced a complex B-C-A mixed conformation. Ethidium bromide binding and agarose gel electrophoresis studies revealed that Al uncoiled the DNAto a fully relaxed form, whereas Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-16) effected a partial uncoiling and also showed differential sensitivity toward chloroquine-induced topoisomer separation. Our findings show for the first time that Abeta and Al modulate both helicity and superhelicity in scDNA. A new hypothetical model explaining the potential toxicity of Abeta and Al in terms of their DNA binding properties leading to DNA conformational alteration is proposed.

  9. 18F-flutemetamol amyloid imaging in Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment: a phase 2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Laere, Koen; Ivanoiu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo beta-amyloid imaging is (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site cyclotron. Validation of the (18)F-labeled PIB derivative (18)F-flutemetamol could significantly...

  10. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    -beta concentrations change over time and are associated with cognition as well as affective symptomatology, future research should include prospective, longitudinal studies, implemented in large study populations, where peripheral and central amyloid-p ratios are quantified concomitantly and continuously across...

  11. 18F-flutemetamol amyloid imaging in Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment: a phase 2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Laere, Koen; Ivanoiu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo beta-amyloid imaging is (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site cyclotron. Validation of the (18)F-labeled PIB derivative (18)F-flutemetamol could significantl...

  12. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  13. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  14. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  15. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6 modulates endosomal pH to control processing of amyloid precursor protein in a cell culture model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Hari; Rao, Rajini

    2015-02-27

    Early intervention may be key to safe and effective therapies in patients with Alzheimer disease. Endosomal dysfunction is an early step in neurodegeneration. Endosomes are a major site of production of Aβ peptide from the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by clipping enzymes (β- and γ-secretases). The β-secretase enzyme BACE1 requires acidic lumen pH for optimum function, and acid pH promotes Aβ aggregation. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE6 provides a leak pathway for protons, limiting luminal acidification by proton pumps. Like APP, NHE6 expression was induced upon differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and localized to an endosomal compartment. Therefore, we investigated whether NHE6 expression altered APP localization and processing in a stably transfected cell culture model of human APP expression. We show that co-expression with NHE6 or treatment with the Na(+)/H(+) ionophore monensin shifted APP away from the trans-Golgi network into early and recycling endosomes in HEK293 cells. NHE6 alkalinized the endosomal lumen, similar to monensin, and significantly attenuated APP processing and Aβ secretion. In contrast, Aβ production was elevated upon NHE6 knockdown. We show that NHE6 transcript and protein levels are lowered in Alzheimer brains relative to control. These findings, taken together with emerging genetic evidence linking endosomal Na(+)/H(+) exchangers with Alzheimer disease, suggest that proton leak pathways may regulate Aβ generation and contribute to disease etiology. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Oligomers of Amyloid β Prevent Physiological Activation of the Cellular Prion Protein-Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Complex by Glutamate in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Laura T; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-08-12

    The dysfunction and loss of synapses in Alzheimer disease are central to dementia symptoms. We have recently demonstrated that pathological Amyloid β oligomer (Aβo) regulates the association between intracellular protein mediators and the synaptic receptor complex composed of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Here we sought to determine whether Aβo alters the physiological signaling of the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex upon glutamate activation. We provide evidence that acute exposure to Aβo as well as chronic expression of familial Alzheimer disease mutant transgenes in model mice prevents protein-protein interaction changes of the complex induced by the glutamate analog 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. We further show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine triggers the phosphorylation and activation of protein-tyrosine kinase 2-β (PTK2B, also referred to as Pyk2) and of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in wild-type brain slices but not in Alzheimer disease transgenic brain slices or wild-type slices incubated with Aβo. This study further distinguishes two separate Aβo-dependent signaling cascades, one dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and Fyn kinase activation and the other dependent on the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Thus, Aβo triggers multiple distinct PrP(C)-mGluR5-dependent events implicated in neurodegeneration and dementia. We propose that targeting the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex will reverse aberrant Aβo-triggered states of the complex to allow physiological fluctuations of glutamate signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of Rosa damascena extract on learning and memory in a rat model of amyloid-β-induced Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Karimipour, Mohammad; Mardani, Mohammad; Ghanadian, Mustafa; Alaei, Hojjat Allah; Mohammadnejad, Daryoush; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized clinically by serious impairment in memory and cognition. Current medications only slow down the dementia progression and the present treatment one-drug one-target paradigm for anti-AD treatment appears to be clinically unsuccessful. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. With respect to multifunctional and multitargeted characteristics of Rosa damascena via its effective flavonoids, we investigated the effects of R. damascena extract on behavioral functions in a rat model of amyloid-β (A-β)-induced Alzheimer's disease. After preparation of the methanolic extract of the R. damascena, HPLC analysis and toxicity studies, median lethal dose (LD50) and dose levels were determined. For evaluation of baseline training behavioral performance, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used. A-β was injected bilaterally into CA1 area of the hippocampus. Twenty-one days after injection of A-β, the first probe trial of the behavioral tests were used to confirm learning and memory impairment. To examine the potential effects of the extract on behavioral tasks, the second probe trials were performed after one month administration of R. damasena extract. Results showed that the R. damascena extract significantly improved the spatial and long-term memories in the extract- treated groups in a dose-dependent manner, as in the middle and high doses it had significant effect. According to these results, we concluded that R. damascena can reverse behavioral deficits caused by A-β, and may provide a new potential option for prevention and treatment of the cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Swedish Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borgvall, Jonathan; Lif, Patrik

    2005-01-01

    .... The military research work presented here includes the three military administrations, FOI -- Swedish Defence Research Agency, FMV -- Swedish Defence Materiel Administration, and SNDC -- Swedish...

  19. The 5XFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Exhibits an Age-Dependent Increase in Anti-Ceramide IgG and Exogenous Administration of Ceramide Further Increases Anti-Ceramide Titers and Amyloid Plaque Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Michael B; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Wang, Guanghu; Zhu, Gu; He, Qian; Kong, Ji Na; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that 5XFAD Alzheimer's disease model mice develop an age-dependent increase in antibodies against ceramide, suggesting involvement of autoimmunity against ceramide in Alzheimer's disease pathology. To test this, we increased serum anti-ceramide IgG (2-fold) by ceramide administration and analyzed amyloid plaque formation in 5XFAD mice. There were no differences in soluble or total amyloid-β levels. However, females receiving ceramide had increased plaque burden (number, area, and size) compared to controls. Ceramide-treated mice showed an increase of serum exosomes (up to 3-fold using Alix as marker), suggesting that systemic anti-ceramide IgG and exosome levels are correlated with enhanced plaque formation.

  20. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Craig; Smailagic, Nadja; Noel-Storr, Anna H; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Flicker, Leon; Mason, Sam E; McShane, Rupert

    2014-06-10

    According to the latest revised National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (now known as the Alzheimer's Association) (NINCDS-ADRDA) diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease dementia of the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer Association, the confidence in diagnosing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease dementia is raised with the application of biomarkers based on measures in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or imaging. These tests, added to core clinical criteria, might increase the sensitivity or specificity of a testing strategy. However, the accuracy of biomarkers in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias has not yet been systematically evaluated. A formal systematic evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, and other properties of plasma and CSF amyloid beta (Aß) biomarkers was performed. To determine the accuracy of plasma and CSF Aß levels for detecting those patients with MCI who would convert to Alzheimer's disease dementia or other forms of dementia over time. The most recent search for this review was performed on 3 December 2012. We searched MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), BIOSIS Previews (ISI Web of Knowledge), Web of Science and Conference Proceedings (ISI Web of Knowledge), PsycINFO (OvidSP), and LILACS (BIREME). We also requested a search of the Cochrane Register of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies (managed by the Cochrane Renal Group).No language or date restrictions were applied to the electronic searches and methodological filters were not used so as to maximise sensitivity. We selected those studies that had prospectively well defined cohorts with any accepted definition of cognitive decline, but no dementia, with baseline CSF or plasma Aß levels, or both, documented at or around the time the above diagnoses were made. We also included studies which looked at data from those cohorts

  1. Proliferation in the Alzheimer Hippocampus Is due to Microglia, Not Astroglia, and Occurs at Sites of Amyloid Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Marlatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia and astrocytes contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD etiology and may mediate early neuroinflammatory responses. Despite their possible role in disease progression and despite the fact that they can respond to amyloid deposition in model systems, little is known about whether astro- or microglia can undergo proliferation in AD and whether this is related to the clinical symptoms or to local neuropathological changes. Previously, proliferation was found to be increased in glia-rich regions of the presenile hippocampus. Since their phenotype was unknown, we here used two novel triple-immunohistochemical protocols to study proliferation in astro- or microglia in relation to amyloid pathology. We selected different age-matched cohorts to study whether proliferative changes relate to clinical severity or to neuropathological changes. Proliferating cells were found across the hippocampus but never in mature neurons or astrocytes. Almost all proliferating cells were colabeled with Iba1+, indicating that particularly microglia contribute to proliferation in AD. Proliferating Iba1+ cells was specifically seen within the borders of amyloid plaques, indicative of an active involvement in, or response to, plaque accumulation. Thus, consistent with animal studies, proliferation in the AD hippocampus is due to microglia, occurs in close proximity of plaque pathology, and may contribute to the neuroinflammation common in AD.

  2. Early-life stress lastingly alters the neuroinflammatory response to amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeijmakers, L.; Ruigrok, S.R.; Amelianchik, A.; Ivan, D.; van Dam, A.-M.; Lucassen, P.J.; Korosi, A.

    Exposure to stress during the sensitive period of early-life increases the risk to develop cognitive impairments and psychopathology later in life. In addition, early-life stress (ES) exposure, next to genetic causes, has been proposed to modulate the development and progression of Alzheimer's

  3. Injury Markers but not Amyloid Markers are Associated with Rapid Progression from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, I.A.; Visser, P.J.; Knol, D.L.; van der Flier, W.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Barkhof, F.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Scheltens, P.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common cause of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the time between the diagnosis of MCI and the diagnosis of dementia is highly variable. In this study we investigated which known risk factors and biomarkers of AD pathology were associated with rapid progression

  4. Effects of ketone bodies in Alzheimer's disease in relation to neural hypometabolism, β-amyloid toxicity, and astrocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-01-01

    Diet supplementation with ketone bodies (acetoacetate and β-hydroxybuturate) or medium-length fatty acids generating ketone bodies has consistently been found to cause modest improvement of mental function in Alzheimer's patients. It was suggested that the therapeutic effect might be more...

  5. Common Pesticide, Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), Increases Amyloid-β Levels by Impairing the Function of ABCA1 and IDE: Implication for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongbo; Kim, Chaeyoung; Kim, Jaekwang; Yoon, Hyejin; Zhou, Huadong; Kim, Jungsu

    2015-01-01

    While early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by a genetic mutation, the vast majority of late-onset AD is likely caused by the combination of genetic and environmental factors. Unlike genetic studies, potential environmental factors affecting AD pathogenesis have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Among environmental factors, pesticides seem to be one of critical environmental contributors to late-onset AD. Recent studies reported that the serum and brains of AD patients have dramatically higher levels of a metabolite of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). While these epidemiological studies provided initial clues to the environmental risks potentially contributing to disease pathogenesis, a functional approach is required to determine whether they actually have a causal role in disease development. In our study, we addressed this critical knowledge gap by investigating possible mechanisms by which DDT affects amyloid-β (Aβ) levels. We treated H4-AβPPswe or H4 cells with DDT to analyze its effect on Aβ metabolism using Aβ production, clearance, and degradation assays. We found that DDT significantly increased the levels of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and β-site AβPP-cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1), affecting Aβ synthesis pathway in H4-AβPPswe cells. Additionally, DDT impaired the clearance and extracellular degradation of Aβ peptides. Most importantly, we identified for the first time that ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) are the downstream target genes adversely affected by DDT. Our findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms by which DDT exposure may increase the risk of AD, and it further supports that ABCA1 and IDE may be potential therapeutic targets.

  6. Lycopene mitigates β-amyloid induced inflammatory response and inhibits NF-κB signaling at the choroid plexus in early stages of Alzheimer's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong-Bin; Wang, Rui; Yi, Yan-Feng; Gao, Zhen; Chen, Yi-Zhu

    2017-11-28

    The choroid plexus is able to modulate the cognitive function, through changes in the neuroinflammatory response and in brain immune surveillance. However, whether lycopene is involved in inflammatory responses at the choroid plexus in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, and its molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this rat study, lycopene was used to investigate its protective effects on inflammation caused by β-amyloid. We characterized the learning and memory abilities, cytokine profiles of circulating TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6β in the serum and the expressions of Toll like receptor 4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 mRNA and protein at the choroid plexus. The results showed that functional deficits of learning and memory in lycopene treatment groups were significantly improved compared to the control group without lycopene treatment in water maze test. The levels of serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6β were significantly increased, and the expressions of TLR4 and NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein at the choroid plexus were up-regulated, indicating inflammation response was initiated following administration of Aβ1-42. After intragastric pretreatment with lycopene, inflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced and lycopene also reversed the Aβ1-42 induced up-regulation of TLR4 and NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein expressions at the choroid plexus. These results provided a novel evidence that lycopene significantly improved cognitive deficits and were accompanied by the attenuation of inflammatory injury via blocking the activation of NF-κB p65 and TLR4 expressions and production of cytokines, thereby endorsing its usefulness for diminishing β-amyloid deposition in the hippocampus tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F amyloid PET tracers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Elizabeth; Chalkidou, Anastasia [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Technology Evaluation Centre, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hammers, Alexander [St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Peacock, Janet; Summers, Jennifer [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Technology Evaluation Centre, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Health and Social Care Research, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Technology Evaluation Centre, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Imaging or tissue biomarker evidence has been introduced into the core diagnostic pathway for Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET using {sup 18}F-labelled beta-amyloid PET tracers has shown promise for the early diagnosis of AD. However, most studies included only small numbers of participants and no consensus has been reached as to which radiotracer has the highest diagnostic accuracy. First, we performed a systematic review of the literature published between 1990 and 2014 for studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of florbetaben, florbetapir and flutemetamol in AD. The included studies were analysed using the QUADAS assessment of methodological quality. A meta-analysis of the sensitivity and specificity reported within each study was performed. Pooled values were calculated for each radiotracer and for visual or quantitative analysis by population included. The systematic review identified nine studies eligible for inclusion. There were limited variations in the methods between studies reporting the same radiotracer. The meta-analysis results showed that pooled sensitivity and specificity values were in general high for all tracers. This was confirmed by calculating likelihood ratios. A patient with a positive ratio is much more likely to have AD than a patient with a negative ratio, and vice versa. However, specificity was higher when only patients with AD were compared with healthy controls. This systematic review and meta-analysis found no marked differences in the diagnostic accuracy of the three beta-amyloid radiotracers. All tracers perform better when used to discriminate between patients with AD and healthy controls. The sensitivity and specificity for quantitative and visual analysis are comparable to those of other imaging or biomarker techniques used to diagnose AD. Further research is required to identify the combination of tests that provides the highest sensitivity and specificity, and to identify the most suitable position for the tracer in the

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of (18)F amyloid PET tracers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Elizabeth; Chalkidou, Anastasia; Hammers, Alexander; Peacock, Janet; Summers, Jennifer; Keevil, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Imaging or tissue biomarker evidence has been introduced into the core diagnostic pathway for Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET using (18)F-labelled beta-amyloid PET tracers has shown promise for the early diagnosis of AD. However, most studies included only small numbers of participants and no consensus has been reached as to which radiotracer has the highest diagnostic accuracy. First, we performed a systematic review of the literature published between 1990 and 2014 for studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of florbetaben, florbetapir and flutemetamol in AD. The included studies were analysed using the QUADAS assessment of methodological quality. A meta-analysis of the sensitivity and specificity reported within each study was performed. Pooled values were calculated for each radiotracer and for visual or quantitative analysis by population included. The systematic review identified nine studies eligible for inclusion. There were limited variations in the methods between studies reporting the same radiotracer. The meta-analysis results showed that pooled sensitivity and specificity values were in general high for all tracers. This was confirmed by calculating likelihood ratios. A patient with a positive ratio is much more likely to have AD than a patient with a negative ratio, and vice versa. However, specificity was higher when only patients with AD were compared with healthy controls. This systematic review and meta-analysis found no marked differences in the diagnostic accuracy of the three beta-amyloid radiotracers. All tracers perform better when used to discriminate between patients with AD and healthy controls. The sensitivity and specificity for quantitative and visual analysis are comparable to those of other imaging or biomarker techniques used to diagnose AD. Further research is required to identify the combination of tests that provides the highest sensitivity and specificity, and to identify the most suitable position for the tracer in the clinical

  9. Amyloid β-Exposed Human Astrocytes Overproduce Phospho-Tau and Overrelease It within Exosomes, Effects Suppressed by Calcilytic NPS 2143—Further Implications for Alzheimer's Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chiarini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The two main drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD, amyloid-β (Aβ and hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau oligomers, cooperatively accelerate AD progression, but a hot debate is still ongoing about which of the two appears first. Here we present preliminary evidence showing that Tau and p-Tau are expressed by untransformed cortical adult human astrocytes in culture and that exposure of such cells to an Aβ42 proxy, Aβ25−35, which binds the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR and activates its signaling, significantly increases intracellular p-Tau levels, an effect CaSR antagonist (calcilytic NPS 2143 wholly hinders. The astrocytes also release both Tau and p-Tau by means of exosomes into the extracellular medium, an activity that could mediate p-Tau diffusion within the brain. Preliminary data also indicate that exosomal levels of p-Tau increase after Aβ25−35 exposure, but remain unchanged in cells pre-treated for 30-min with NPS 2143 before adding Aβ25−35. Thus, our previous and present findings raise the unifying prospect that Aβ•CaSR signaling plays a crucial role in AD development and progression by simultaneously activating (i the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor holoprotein, whose upshot is a surplus production and secretion of Aβ42 oligomers, and (ii the GSK-3β-mediated increased production of p-Tau oligomers which are next released extracellularly inside exosomes. Therefore, as calcilytics suppress both effects on Aβ42 and p-Tau metabolic handling, these highly selective antagonists of pathological Aβ•CaSR signaling would effectively halt AD's progressive spread preserving patients' cognition and life quality.

  10. Alzheimer's disease related markers, cellular toxicity and behavioral deficits induced six weeks after oligomeric amyloid-β peptide injection in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charleine Zussy

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative pathology associated with aging characterized by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that finally result in synaptic and neuronal loss. The major component of senile plaques is an amyloid-β protein (Aβ. Recently, we characterized the effects of a single intracerebroventricular (icv injection of Aβ fragment (25-35 oligomers (oAβ(25-35 for up to 3 weeks in rats and established a clear parallel with numerous relevant signs of AD. To clarify the long-term effects of oAβ(25-35 and its potential role in the pathogenesis of AD, we determined its physiological, behavioral, biochemical and morphological impacts 6 weeks after injection in rats. oAβ(25-35 was still present in the brain after 6 weeks. oAβ(25-35 injection did not affect general activity and temperature rhythms after 6 weeks, but decreased body weight, induced short- and long-term memory impairments, increased corticosterone plasma levels, brain oxidative (lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial (caspase-9 levels and reticulum stress (caspase-12 levels, astroglial and microglial activation. It provoked cholinergic neuron loss and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. It induced cell loss in the hippocampic CA subdivisions and decreased hippocampic neurogenesis. Moreover, oAβ(25-35 injection resulted in increased APP expression, Aβ(1-42 generation, and increased Tau phosphorylation. In conclusion, this in vivo study evidenced that the soluble oligomeric forms of short fragments of Aβ, endogenously identified in AD patient brains, not only provoked long-lasting pathological alterations comparable to the human disease, but may also directly contribute to the progressive increase in amyloid load and Tau pathology, involved in the AD physiopathology.

  11. Evaluation of software tools for automated identification of neuroanatomical structures in quantitative β-amyloid PET imaging to diagnose Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszynski, Tobias; Luthardt, Julia; Butzke, Daniel; Tiepolt, Solveig; Seese, Anita; Barthel, Henryk [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Rullmann, Michael; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    For regional quantification of nuclear brain imaging data, defining volumes of interest (VOIs) by hand is still the gold standard. As this procedure is time-consuming and operator-dependent, a variety of software tools for automated identification of neuroanatomical structures were developed. As the quality and performance of those tools are poorly investigated so far in analyzing amyloid PET data, we compared in this project four algorithms for automated VOI definition (HERMES Brass, two PMOD approaches, and FreeSurfer) against the conventional method. We systematically analyzed florbetaben brain PET and MRI data of ten patients with probable Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and ten age-matched healthy controls (HCs) collected in a previous clinical study. VOIs were manually defined on the data as well as through the four automated workflows. Standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) with the cerebellar cortex as a reference region were obtained for each VOI. SUVR comparisons between ADs and HCs were carried out using Mann-Whitney-U tests, and effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated. SUVRs of automatically generated VOIs were correlated with SUVRs of conventionally derived VOIs (Pearson's tests). The composite neocortex SUVRs obtained by manually defined VOIs were significantly higher for ADs vs. HCs (p=0.010, d=1.53). This was also the case for the four tested automated approaches which achieved effect sizes of d=1.38 to d=1.62. SUVRs of automatically generated VOIs correlated significantly with those of the hand-drawn VOIs in a number of brain regions, with regional differences in the degree of these correlations. Best overall correlation was observed in the lateral temporal VOI for all tested software tools (r=0.82 to r=0.95, p<0.001). Automated VOI definition by the software tools tested has a great potential to substitute for the current standard procedure to manually define VOIs in β-amyloid PET data analysis. (orig.)

  12. Novel 5' untranslated region directed blockers of iron-regulatory protein-1 dependent amyloid precursor protein translation: implications for down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

    Full Text Available We reported that iron influx drives the translational expression of the neuronal amyloid precursor protein (APP, which has a role in iron efflux. This is via a classic release of repressor interaction of APP mRNA with iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1 whereas IRP2 controls the mRNAs encoding the L- and H-subunits of the iron storage protein, ferritin. Here, we identified thirteen potent APP translation blockers that acted selectively towards the uniquely configured iron-responsive element (IRE RNA stem loop in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of APP mRNA. These agents were 10-fold less inhibitory of 5'UTR sequences of the related prion protein (PrP mRNA. Western blotting confirmed that the 'ninth' small molecule in the series selectively reduced neural APP production in SH-SY5Y cells at picomolar concentrations without affecting viability or the expression of α-synuclein and ferritin. APP blocker-9 (JTR-009, a benzimidazole, reduced the production of toxic Aβ in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells to a greater extent than other well tolerated APP 5'UTR-directed translation blockers, including posiphen, that were shown to limit amyloid burden in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. RNA binding assays demonstrated that JTR-009 operated by preventing IRP1 from binding to the IRE in APP mRNA, while maintaining IRP1 interaction with the H-ferritin IRE RNA stem loop. Thus, JTR-009 constitutively repressed translation driven by APP 5'UTR sequences. Calcein staining showed that JTR-009 did not indirectly change iron uptake in neuronal cells suggesting a direct interaction with the APP 5'UTR. These studies provide key data to develop small molecules that selectively reduce neural APP and Aβ production at 10-fold lower concentrations than related previously characterized translation blockers. Our data evidenced a novel therapeutic strategy of potential impact for people with trisomy of the APP gene on chromosome 21, which is a phenotype long associated with Down

  13. Bidirectional Regulation of Amyloid Precursor Protein-Induced Memory Defects by Nebula/DSCR1: A Protein Upregulated in Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jillian L; Zhang, Shixing; Chang, Karen T

    2015-08-12

    Aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impaired memory. Memory problems in both DS and AD individuals usually develop slowly and progressively get worse with age, but the cause of this age-dependent memory impairment is not well understood. This study examines the functional interactions between Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. Using Drosophila as a model, we find that overexpression of nebula (fly homolog of DSCR1) initially protects against APP-induced memory defects by correcting calcineurin and cAMP signaling pathways but accelerates the rate of memory loss and exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction in older animals. We report that transient upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 or acute pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin in aged flies protected against APP-induced memory loss. Our data suggest that calcineurin dyshomeostasis underlies age-dependent memory impairments and further imply that chronic Nebula/DSCR1 upregulation may contribute to age-dependent memory impairments in AD in DS. Most Down syndrome (DS) individuals eventually develop Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like dementia, but mechanisms underlying this age-dependent memory impairment remain poorly understood. This study examines Nebula/Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. We uncover a previously unidentified role for Nebula/DSCR1 in modulating APP-induced memory defects during aging. We show that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1, an inhibitor of calcineurin, rescues APP-induced memory defects in young flies but enhances memory loss of older flies. Excitingly, transient Nebula/DSCR1 overexpression or calcineurin inhibition in aged flies ameliorates APP-mediated memory problems. These results

  14. Novel 5' untranslated region directed blockers of iron-regulatory protein-1 dependent amyloid precursor protein translation: implications for down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Cahill, Catherine; Balleidier, Amelie; Huang, Conan; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2013-01-01

    We reported that iron influx drives the translational expression of the neuronal amyloid precursor protein (APP), which has a role in iron efflux. This is via a classic release of repressor interaction of APP mRNA with iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) whereas IRP2 controls the mRNAs encoding the L- and H-subunits of the iron storage protein, ferritin. Here, we identified thirteen potent APP translation blockers that acted selectively towards the uniquely configured iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of APP mRNA. These agents were 10-fold less inhibitory of 5'UTR sequences of the related prion protein (PrP) mRNA. Western blotting confirmed that the 'ninth' small molecule in the series selectively reduced neural APP production in SH-SY5Y cells at picomolar concentrations without affecting viability or the expression of α-synuclein and ferritin. APP blocker-9 (JTR-009), a benzimidazole, reduced the production of toxic Aβ in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells to a greater extent than other well tolerated APP 5'UTR-directed translation blockers, including posiphen, that were shown to limit amyloid burden in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). RNA binding assays demonstrated that JTR-009 operated by preventing IRP1 from binding to the IRE in APP mRNA, while maintaining IRP1 interaction with the H-ferritin IRE RNA stem loop. Thus, JTR-009 constitutively repressed translation driven by APP 5'UTR sequences. Calcein staining showed that JTR-009 did not indirectly change iron uptake in neuronal cells suggesting a direct interaction with the APP 5'UTR. These studies provide key data to develop small molecules that selectively reduce neural APP and Aβ production at 10-fold lower concentrations than related previously characterized translation blockers. Our data evidenced a novel therapeutic strategy of potential impact for people with trisomy of the APP gene on chromosome 21, which is a phenotype long associated with Down syndrome (DS

  15. Brain pyroglutamate amyloid-β is produced by cathepsin B and is reduced by the cysteine protease inhibitor E64d, representing a potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Gregory; Yu, Jin; Toneff, Thomas; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Pyroglutamate amyloid-β peptides (pGlu-Aβ) are particularly pernicious forms of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. pGlu-Aβ peptides are N-terminally truncated forms of full-length Aβ peptides (flAβ(1-40/42)) in which the N-terminal glutamate is cyclized to pyroglutamate to generate pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42). β-secretase cleavage of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) produces flAβ(1-40/42), but it is not yet known whether the β-secretase BACE1 or the alternative β-secretase cathepsin B (CatB) participate in the production of pGlu-Aβ. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gene knockout of these proteases on brain pGlu-Aβ levels in transgenic AβPPLon mice, which express AβPP isoform 695 and have the wild-type (wt) β-secretase activity found in most AD patients. Knockout or overexpression of the CatB gene reduced or increased, respectively, pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load, but knockout of the BACE1 gene had no effect on those parameters in the transgenic mice. Treatment of AβPPLon mice with E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor of CatB, also reduced brain pGlu-Aβ(3-42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load. Treatment of neuronal-like chromaffin cells with CA074Me, an inhibitor of CatB, resulted in reduced levels of pGlu-Aβ(3-40) released from the activity-dependent, regulated secretory pathway. Moreover, CatB knockout and E64d treatment has been previously shown to improve memory deficits in the AβPPLon mice. These data illustrate the role of CatB in producing pGlu-Aβ and flAβ that participate as key factors in the development of AD. The advantages of CatB inhibitors, especially E64d and its derivatives, as alternatives to BACE1 inhibitors in treating AD patients are discussed.

  16. A new model for the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Aluminium toxicity is exacerbated by hydrogen peroxide and attenuated by an amyloid protein fragment and melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, S J; Daniels, W M; Potocnik, F C; van Zyl, J M; Taljaard, J J; Emsley, R A

    1997-09-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in developed countries, there is an as yet unexplained lower prevalence of the disease in parts of Africa. AD is characterised by a catastrophic loss of neurons; free radicals (oxidative toxins) have been implicated in the destruction of the cells through the process of lipid peroxidative damage of cell membranes. Previously aluminium (Al) and a fragment of beta amyloid (A beta 25-35) were shown to exacerbate free-radical damage, while melatonin reduced this effect. The aim of the present study was: (i) to investigate the conditions determining the toxicity of Al and A beta 25-35; and (ii) to assess whether melatonin could attenuate the damage done by both aluminium and the amyloid fragment, thus suggesting a pathway for the aetiology of AD. An in vitro model system was used in which free radicals were generated, causing lipid peroxidation of platelet membranes, thus simulating the disease process found in the brain. 1. Al and A beta 25-35 caused lipid peroxidation in the presence of the iron (II) ion (Pe2+), Al being more toxic than A beta 25-35. 2. A beta 25-35 attenuated the lipid peroxidation promoted by Al. 3. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) greatly exacerbated the toxicity of Al and A beta 25-35. 4. Melatonin prevented lipid peroxidation by Al and A beta 25-35 in the absence of H2O2, but only reduced the process when H2O2 was present. In the light of the results obtained from the present study, the following hypotheses are formulated. 1. In AD, excessive quantities of Al are taken up into the brain, where the Al exacerbates iron-induced lipid peroxidation in the lysosomes. 2. In response, the normal synthetic pathway of amyloid protein is altered to produce A beta fragments which attenuate the toxicity of Al. In the process of sequestering the Al and iron, immature plaques are formed in the brain. 3. Microglia are activated, in an attempt to destroy the plaques by secreting reactive oxygen species

  17. [Protective effect of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated expression of human brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat neurons against beta-amyloid-induced Alzheimer's disease in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-hui; Ma, Dong-liang; Jin, Hui; Ma, Yan-bing; Hu, Hai-tao

    2006-10-01

    To achieve expression of human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) and explore the mechanism of its neuroprotective effects in rat neurons against beta-amyloid-induced Alzheimer's disease. Using molecular cloning technique, rAAV vector containing hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed to transfect SD rat hippocampal neurons exposed to beta-amyloid treatment. The changes in cell apoptosis were observed by MTT assay and flow cytometry, and the expression of hBDNF and Bcl-2 protein were determined by immunocytochemical staining. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to observe the changes of [Ca(2+)](i). The cultured rat hippocampal neurons were effectively transfected with AAV-hBDNF and expression of BDNF protein was obviously increased. hBNDF expression showed significant protective effects against beta-amyloid-induced neuronal damage, and the expression of Bcl-2 protein was increased significantly and the balance of [Ca(2+)](i) was maintained in BDNF-treated cells with beta-amyloid exposure. hBDNF expression can effectively protect cultured rat hippocampal cells from beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis through inhibiting the intracellular calcium overload and increasing the expression of Bcl-2 protein.

  18. The effect of simvastatin treatment on the amyloid precursor protein and brain cholesterol metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoglund, K; Thelen, K M; Syversen, S

    2005-01-01

    as on cognitive decline in patients with AD. Despite biochemical data suggesting that treatment with 20 mg/day of simvastatin for 12 months does affect the brain cholesterol metabolism, we did not find any change in CSF or plasma levels of beta-amyloid (Abeta)(1-42). However, by analysis of APP isoforms, we found...... with AD have been treated with simvastatin (20 mg/day) for 12 months. The aim was to further investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of APP processing, AD biomarkers as total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181, brain cholesterol metabolism as well...

  19. Early long-term administration of the CSF1R inhibitor PLX3397 ablates microglia and reduces accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid, neuritic plaque deposition and pre-fibrillar oligomers in 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosna, Justyna; Philipp, Stephan; Albay, Ricardo; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M; Glabe, Charles G

    2018-03-01

    Besides the two main classical features of amyloid beta aggregation and tau-containing neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation plays an important yet unclear role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia are believed to be key mediators of neuroinflammation during AD and responsible for the regulation of brain homeostasis by balancing neurotoxicity and neuroprotective events. We have previously reported evidence that neuritic plaques are derived from dead neurons that have accumulated intraneuronal amyloid and further recruit Iba1-positive cells, which play a role in either neuronal demise or neuritic plaque maturation or both. To study the impact of microglia on neuritic plaque development, we treated two-month-old 5XFAD mice with a selective colony stimulation factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibitor, PLX3397, for a period of 3 months, resulting in a significant ablation of microglia. Directly after this treatment, we analyzed the amount of intraneuronal amyloid and neuritic plaques and performed behavioral studies including Y-maze, fear conditioning and elevated plus maze. We found that early long-term PLX3397 administration results in a dramatic reduction of both intraneuronal amyloid as well as neuritic plaque deposition. PLX3397 treated young 5XFAD mice also displayed a significant decrease of soluble fibrillar amyloid oligomers in brain lysates, a depletion of soluble pre-fibrillar oligomers in plasma and an improvement in cognitive function measured by fear conditioning tests. Our findings demonstrate that CSF1R signaling, either directly on neurons or mediated by microglia, is crucial for the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid and formation of neuritic plaques, suggesting that these two events are serially linked in a causal pathway leading to neurodegeneration and neuritic plaque formation. CSF1R inhibitors represent potential preventative or therapeutic approach that target the very earliest stages of the formation of

  20. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  1. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  2. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 Receptors Mediate Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding and Synaptotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J.; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A.; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H.; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L.; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  3. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  4. Cross Talk Between Brain Innate Immunity and Serotonin Signaling Underlies Depressive-Like Behavior Induced by Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Oligomers in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo, Jose Henrique; Azevedo, Estefania P; Beckman, Danielle; Ribeiro, Felipe C; Santos, Luis E; Razolli, Daniela S; Kincheski, Grasielle C; Melo, Helen M; Bellio, Maria; Teixeira, Antonio L; Velloso, Licio A; Foguel, Debora; De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2016-11-30

    Considerable clinical and epidemiological evidence links Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this connection are largely unknown. We reported recently that soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins that accumulate in AD brains and are thought to instigate synapse damage and memory loss, induce depressive-like behavior in mice. Here, we report that the mechanism underlying this action involves AβO-induced microglial activation, aberrant TNF-α signaling, and decreased brain serotonin levels. Inactivation or ablation of microglia blocked the increase in brain TNF-α and abolished depressive-like behavior induced by AβOs. Significantly, we identified serotonin as a negative regulator of microglial activation. Finally, AβOs failed to induce depressive-like behavior in Toll-like receptor 4-deficient mice and in mice harboring a nonfunctional TLR4 variant in myeloid cells. Results establish that AβOs trigger depressive-like behavior via a double impact on brain serotonin levels and microglial activation, unveiling a cross talk between brain innate immunity and serotonergic signaling as a key player in mood alterations in AD. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the main cause of dementia in the world. Brain accumulation of amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs) is a major feature in the pathogenesis of AD. Although clinical and epidemiological data suggest a strong connection between AD and depression, the underlying mechanisms linking these two disorders remain largely unknown. Here, we report that aberrant activation of the brain innate immunity and decreased serotonergic tonus in the brain are key players in AβO-induced depressive-like behavior in mice. Our findings may open up new possibilities for the development of effective therapeutics for AD and depression aimed at modulating microglial function. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3612106-11$15.00/0.

  5. Optimized statistical parametric mapping for partial-volume-corrected amyloid positron emission tomography in patients with Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungsu S.; Kim, Jae Seung; Chae, Sun Young; Oh, Minyoung; Oh, Seung Jun; Cha, Seung Nam; Chang, Ho-Jong; Lee, Chong Sik; Lee, Jae Hong

    2017-03-01

    We present an optimized voxelwise statistical parametric mapping (SPM) of partial-volume (PV)-corrected positron emission tomography (PET) of 11C Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB), incorporating the anatomical precision of magnetic resonance image (MRI) and amyloid β (A β) burden-specificity of PiB PET. First, we applied region-based partial-volume correction (PVC), termed the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method, to PiB PET, creating MRI-based lobar parcels filled with mean PiB uptakes. Then, we conducted a voxelwise PVC by multiplying the original PET by the ratio of a GTM-based PV-corrected PET to a 6-mm-smoothed PV-corrected PET. Finally, we conducted spatial normalizations of the PV-corrected PETs onto the study-specific template. As such, we increased the accuracy of the SPM normalization and the tissue specificity of SPM results. Moreover, lobar smoothing (instead of whole-brain smoothing) was applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the image without degrading the tissue specificity. Thereby, we could optimize a voxelwise group comparison between subjects with high and normal A β burdens (from 10 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 30 patients with Lewy body dementia, and 9 normal controls). Our SPM framework outperformed than the conventional one in terms of the accuracy of the spatial normalization (85% of maximum likelihood tissue classification volume) and the tissue specificity (larger gray matter, and smaller cerebrospinal fluid volume fraction from the SPM results). Our SPM framework optimized the SPM of a PV-corrected A β PET in terms of anatomical precision, normalization accuracy, and tissue specificity, resulting in better detection and localization of A β burdens in patients with Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia.

  6. Blood amyloid beta levels in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease individuals: replication of diastolic blood pressure correlations and analysis of critical covariates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ruiz

    Full Text Available Plasma amyloid beta (Aβ levels are being investigated as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In AB128 cross-sectional study, a number of medical relevant correlates of blood Aβ40 or Aβ42 were analyzed in 140 subjects (51 Alzheimer's disease patients, 53 healthy controls and 36 individuals diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. We determined the association between multiple variables with Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels measured in three different blood compartments called i Aβ directly accessible (DA in the plasma, ii Aβ recovered from the plasma matrix (RP after diluting the plasma sample in a formulated buffer, and iii associated with the remaining cellular pellet (CP. We confirmed that diastolic blood pressure (DBP is consistently correlated with blood DA Aβ40 levels (r=-0.19, P=0.032. These results were consistent in the three phenotypic groups studied. Importantly, the observation resisted covariation with age, gender or creatinine levels. Observed effect size and direction of Aβ40 levels/DBP correlation are in accordance with previous reports. Of note, DA Aβ40 and the RP Aβ40 were also strongly associated with creatinine levels (r=0.599, P<<0.001 and to a lesser extent to urea, age, hematocrit, uric acid and homocysteine (p<0.001. DBP and the rest of statistical significant correlates identified should be considered as potential confounder factors in studies investigating blood Aβ levels as potential AD biomarker. Remarkably, the factors affecting Aβ levels in plasma (DA, RP and blood cell compartments (CP seem completely different.

  7. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  8. Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor: A new perspective on amyloid-beta mediated pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Garry; Regan, Philip; Whitcomb, Daniel J; Cho, Kwangwook

    2017-01-01

    α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are the primary conduits of excitatory synaptic transmission. AMPARs are predominantly Ca2+-impermeable in the matured excitatory synapse, except under certain circumstances. Growing evidence implicates the Ca2+ permeability of AMPARs in the regulation of long-term synaptic plasticity and in the pathophysiology of several neurological disorders. Therefore, the Ca2+ conductance of AMPARs may have both physiological and pathological roles at synapses. However, our understanding of the role of Ca2+ permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) in Alzheimer's disease is limited. Here we discuss insights into the potential CP-AMPAR mediated pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, including: 1. Ca2+-mediated aberrant regulation of synapse weakening mechanisms, and 2. neuronal network dysfunction in the brain. Consideration of CP-AMPARs as primary drivers of pathophysiology could help in understanding synaptopathologies, and highlights the potential of CP-AMPARs as therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interneurons and beta-amyloid in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory tubercle in APPxPS1 transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; De La Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2013-09-01

    Impaired olfaction has been described as an early symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuroanatomical changes underlying this deficit in the olfactory system are largely unknown. Given that interneuron populations are crucial in olfactory information processing, we have quantitatively analyzed somatostatin- (SOM), parvalbumin- (PV), and calretinin-expressing (CR) cells in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and olfactory tubercle in PS1 x APP double transgenic mice model of AD. The experiments were performed in wild type and double transgenic homozygous animal groups of 2, 4, 6, and 8 months of age to analyze early stages of the pathology. In addition, beta-amyloid (Aβ) expression and its correlation with SOM cells have been quantified under confocal microscopy. The results indicate increasing expressions of Aβ with aging as well as an early fall of SOM and CR expression, whereas PV was decreased later in the disease progression. These observations evidence an early, preferential vulnerability of SOM and CR cells in rostral olfactory structures during AD that may be useful to unravel neural basis of olfactory deficits associated to this neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Protective effects of gingerol on streptozotocin-induced sporadic Alzheimer's disease: emphasis on inhibition of β-amyloid, COX-2, alpha-, beta - secretases and APH1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawany, Ali M El; Sayed, Nesrine S El; Abdallah, Hossam M; Dine, Riham Salah El

    2017-06-06

    Gingerol is a major dietary compound that occurs in several plants belonging to the Zingiberaceae family. In the current study, the protective effect of gingerol on STZ-induced sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD) was determined. Gingerol was isolated from the seeds of Aframomum melegueta K. Schum and tested at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kgbwt for its possible effect on the SAD model in mice, using celecoxib (30 mg/kg bwt) as a reference standard. The curative effects of gingerol were assessed through measurement of β-amyloid (Aβ-42), α-, β- secretases, APH1a and COX-2 levels. In addition, improvement in the cognitive deficit in mice after treatment was confirmed using the water maze and Y-maze with intra-maze cues. Gingerol improved the cognitive and behavioral impairment and AD-like pathology in streptozotocin model mice. These beneficial effects occurred with an increase in α-secretase activity and a decrease in cerebral Aβ-42, β- secretase, APH1a activity and COX-2-linked neuro-inflammation.

  11. Brilliant Blue G improves cognition in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease and inhibits amyloid-β-induced loss of filopodia and dendrite spines in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Hu, J; Jiang, L; Xu, S; Zheng, B; Wang, C; Zhang, J; Wei, X; Chang, L; Wang, Q

    2014-10-24

    Deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous studies report that the Aβ peptide, especially in the oligomeric form, causes memory decline and other cognitive deficits. However, there have been very few effective interventions for termination or even delay of AD progression. Brilliant Blue G (BBG), a safe triphenylmethane dye and P2X7 antagonist, has been reported to have protective effects on neuroinflammation, ischemia, spinal injury and neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report that systematic administration of BBG diminishes spatial memory impairment and cognitive deficits in a mouse AD model produced by injecting soluble Aβ peptide into the hippocampal CA1 region. In addition, we show that Aβ-induced loss of filopodia and spine density in cultured hippocampal neurons was prevented by administration of BBG. We conclude that BBG prevents the learning and memory impairment and cognitive deficits induced by the toxicity of soluble Aβ, and improves the development of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons in an AD model mouse. Considering the safety and blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-permeability of BBG, our data suggest a potential for BBG as a new therapy for AD. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of encapsulated VEGF-secreting cells on brain amyloid load and behavioral impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desiree; Portero, Aitziber; Orive, Gorka; Hernández, Rosa Ma; Molina, Jose A; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Pedraz, José L; Carro, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenic protein with important neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions, is under investigation as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study was to generate encapsulated VEGF-secreting cells and implant them in a transgenic mouse model of AD, the double mutant amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/Ps1) mice, which shows a disturbed vessel homeostasis. We report that, after implantation of VEGF microcapsules, brain Abeta burden, hyperphosphorylated-tau and cognitive impairment attenuated in APP/Ps1 mice. Based on the neurovascular hypothesis, our findings suggest a new potential therapeutic approach that could be developed for AD, to enhance Abeta clearance and neurovascular repair, and to protect the cognitive behavior. Stereologically-implanted encapsulated VEGF-secreting cells could offer an alternative strategy in the treatment of AD. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Aluminum modulates effects of beta amyloid(1-42) on neuronal calcium homeostasis and mitochondria functioning and is altered in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Denise; Cavaliere, Alessandra; Mascetra, Nicola; Ciavardelli, Domenico; di Ilio, Carmine; Zatta, Paolo; Sensi, Stefano L

    2008-10-01

    Recent findings suggest that beta-amyloid (A beta) is more neurotoxic when present in its oligomeric configuration rather than as monomers or fibrils. Previous work from our laboratories has shown that A beta aggregation is strongly influenced by the conjugation of the peptide with metal ions (aluminum A, copper [Cu], zinc [Zn], and iron [Fe]) that are found in high concentrations in the core of senile plaques. Disruption of Ca++ signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are potent triggers of neuronal death and have been implicated in the neuronal loss that is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we explored whether A beta-metal complexes can have detrimental effects on intraneuronal Ca++ ([Ca++]i) homeostasis and mitochondrial function in vitro. Results from our experiments indicate that, when conjugated with Al, A beta perturbs neuronal [Ca++]i homeostasis and inhibits mitochondrial respiration. Finally, we analyzed the content of the four metals in the brain of a triple transgenic animal model of AD and found that Al is the only one to be increased in the cortex of these mice.

  14. Eicosanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamide (EHT prevents Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive and electrophysiological impairments in mice exposed to elevated concentrations of oligomeric beta-amyloid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Asam

    Full Text Available Soluble forms of oligomeric beta-amyloid (Aβ are thought to play a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Transgenic manipulation of methylation of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase, PP2A, was recently shown to alter the sensitivity of mice to AD-related impairments resulting from acute exposure to elevated levels of Aβ. In addition, eicosanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamide (EHT, a naturally occurring component from coffee beans that modulates PP2A methylation, was shown to confer therapeutic benefits in rodent models of AD and Parkinson's disease. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHT protects animals from the pathological effects of exposure to elevated levels of soluble oligomeric Aβ. We treated mice with EHT-containing food at two different doses and assessed the sensitivity of these animals to Aβ-induced behavioral and electrophysiological impairments. We found that EHT administration protected animals from Aβ-induced cognitive impairments in both a radial-arm water maze and contextual fear conditioning task. We also found that both chronic and acute EHT administration prevented Aβ-induced impairments in long-term potentiation. These data add to the accumulating evidence suggesting that interventions with pharmacological agents, such as EHT, that target PP2A activity may be therapeutically beneficial for AD and other neurological conditions.

  15. A multimodal RAGE-specific inhibitor reduces amyloid β–mediated brain disorder in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Rashid; Singh, Itender; Sagare, Abhay P.; Bell, Robert D.; Ross, Nathan T.; LaRue, Barbra; Love, Rachal; Perry, Sheldon; Paquette, Nicole; Deane, Richard J.; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram; Zarcone, Troy; Fritz, Gunter; Friedman, Alan E.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), amyloid β peptide (Aβ) accumulates in plaques in the brain. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates Aβ-induced perturbations in cerebral vessels, neurons, and microglia in AD. Here, we identified a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor (FPS-ZM1) that blocked Aβ binding to the V domain of RAGE and inhibited Aβ40- and Aβ42-induced cellular stress in RAGE-expressing cells in vitro and in the mouse brain in vivo. FPS-ZM1 was nontoxic to mice and readily crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In aged APPsw/0 mice overexpressing human Aβ-precursor protein, a transgenic mouse model of AD with established Aβ pathology, FPS-ZM1 inhibited RAGE-mediated influx of circulating Aβ40 and Aβ42 into the brain. In brain, FPS-ZM1 bound exclusively to RAGE, which inhibited β-secretase activity and Aβ production and suppressed microglia activation and the neuroinflammatory response. Blockade of RAGE actions at the BBB and in the brain reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in brain markedly and normalized cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow responses in aged APPsw/0 mice. Our data suggest that FPS-ZM1 is a potent multimodal RAGE blocker that effectively controls progression of Aβ-mediated brain disorder and that it may have the potential to be a disease-modifying agent for AD. PMID:22406537

  16. A highly sensitive resonance light scattering probe for Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide based on Fe3O4@Au composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Zhang, Yintang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Danhua; Wei, Xiuhua; Chen, Fang; Wang, Jianxiu; Xu, Maotian

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of Fe3O4@Au composites as a novel resonance light scattering (RLS) probe for the sensitive detection of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) was demonstrated. Amino groups coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were covered with gold shell by the classical Frens method. The resultant colloids were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-visible spectra. The results indicated that the composite particles with core/shell structure and an average diameter of ~ 320 nm were stable and biocompatible. The RLS intensity of Fe3O4@Au composites was significantly enhanced by interacting with Aβ. Under optimal conditions, good linear relationship between the ratio of RLS intensity I/I0 at 463.0 nm and the logarithmic value of Aβ concentration in the range of 5.0 × 10(-15)-5.56 × 10(-9)M was found. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.2 × 10(-15)M. The proposed method is simple, sensitive and cost-effective and complementary to other existing methods for protein analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Modulates the Sorting of Testican-1 and Contributes to Its Accumulation in Brain Tissue and Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Arlt, Sönke; Matschke, Jakob; Hartmann, Ursula; Puig, Berta; Ferrer, Isidre; Zürbig, Petra; Glatzel, Markus; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Jahn, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) are unknown but both increased production or impaired clearance likely contribute to aggregation. To understand the potential roles of the extracellular matrix proteoglycan Testican-1 in the pathophysiology of AD, we used samples from AD patients and controls and an in vitro approach. Protein expression analysis showed increased levels of Testican-1 in frontal and temporal cortex of AD patients; histological analysis showed that Testican-1 accumulates and co-aggregates with Aβ plaques in the frontal, temporal and entorhinal cortices of AD patients. Proteomic analysis identified 10 fragments of Testican-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients. HEK293T cells expressing human wild type or mutant Aβ precursor protein (APP) were transfected with Testican-1. The co-expression of both proteins modified the sorting of Testican-1 into the endocytic pathway leading to its transient accumulation in Golgi, which seemed to affect APP processing, as indicated by reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in APP mutant cells. In conclusion, patient data reflect a clearance impairment that may favor Aβ accumulation in AD brains and our in vitro model supports the notion that the interaction between APP and Testican-1 may be a key step in the production and aggregation of Aβ species. © 2016 Oxford University Press OR American Association of Neuropathologists.

  18. Inhibition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase-Abeta interaction reduces Abeta accumulation and improves mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Chaodong; Lue, Lih-Fen; Guo, Lan; Chen, Doris; Stern, David M; Gunn Moore, Frank J; Xi Chen, John; Arancio, Ottavio; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2011-02-09

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD), an enzyme present in neuronal mitochondria, exacerbates Aβ-induced cell stress. The interaction of ABAD with Aβ exacerbates Aβ-induced mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. Here, we show that inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction, using a decoy peptide (DP) in vitro and in vivo, protects against aberrant mitochondrial and neuronal function and improves spatial learning/memory. Intraperitoneal administration of ABAD-DP [fused to the transduction of human immunodeficiency virus 1-transactivator (Tat) protein and linked to the mitochondrial targeting sequence (Mito) (TAT-mito-DP) to transgenic APP mice (Tg mAPP)] blocked formation of ABAD-Aβ complex in mitochondria, increased oxygen consumption and enzyme activity associated with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress, and improved spatial memory. Similar protective effects were observed in Tg mAPP mice overexpressing neuronal ABAD decoy peptide (Tg mAPP/mito-ABAD). Notably, inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction significantly reduced mitochondrial Aβ accumulation. In parallel, the activity of mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme PreP (presequence peptidase) was enhanced in Tg mAPP mitochondria expressing the ABAD decoy peptide. These data indicate that segregating ABAD from Aβ protects mitochondria/neurons from Aβ toxicity; thus, ABAD-Aβ interaction is an important mechanism underlying Aβ-mediated mitochondrial and neuronal perturbation. Inhibitors of ABAD-Aβ interaction may hold promise as targets for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Inhibition of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Peptide-Binding Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Aβ Interaction Reduces Aβ Accumulation and Improves Mitochondrial Function in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Chaodong; Lue, Lih-Fen; Guo, Lan; Chen, Doris; Stern, David M.; Gunn Moore, Frank J.; Xi Chen, John; Arancio, Ottavio

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD), an enzyme present in neuronal mitochondria, exacerbates Aβ-induced cell stress. The interaction of ABAD with Aβ exacerbates Aβ-induced mitochondrial and neuronal dysfunction. Here, we show that inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction, using a decoy peptide (DP) in vitro and in vivo, protects against aberrant mitochondrial and neuronal function and improves spatial learning/memory. Intraperitoneal administration of ABAD-DP [fused to the transduction of human immunodeficiency virus 1-transactivator (Tat) protein and linked to the mitochondrial targeting sequence (Mito) (TAT-mito-DP) to transgenic APP mice (Tg mAPP)] blocked formation of ABAD-Aβ complex in mitochondria, increased oxygen consumption and enzyme activity associated with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress, and improved spatial memory. Similar protective effects were observed in Tg mAPP mice overexpressing neuronal ABAD decoy peptide (Tg mAPP/mito-ABAD). Notably, inhibition of the ABAD-Aβ interaction significantly reduced mitochondrial Aβ accumulation. In parallel, the activity of mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme PreP (presequence peptidase) was enhanced in Tg mAPP mitochondria expressing the ABAD decoy peptide. These data indicate that segregating ABAD from Aβ protects mitochondria/neurons from Aβ toxicity; thus, ABAD-Aβ interaction is an important mechanism underlying Aβ-mediated mitochondrial and neuronal perturbation. Inhibitors of ABAD-Aβ interaction may hold promise as targets for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21307267

  20. Differences in diagnostic process, treatment and social Support for Alzheimer's dementia between primary and specialist care: resultss from the Swedish Dementia Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Modéer, Ingrid Nilsson; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Farahmand, Bahman; Religa, Dorota; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2017-03-01

    the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's dementia (AD) has shifted the burden of management towards primary care (PC). Our aim is to compare diagnostic process and management of AD in PC and specialist care (SC). cross-sectional study. a total of, 9,625 patients diagnosed with AD registered 2011-14 in SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry. descriptive statistics are shown. Odds ratios are presented for test performance and treatment in PC compared to SC, adjusted for age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and number of medication. a total of, 5,734 (60%) AD patients from SC and 3,891 (40%) from PC. In both, 64% of patients were women. PC patients were older (mean age 81 vs. 76; P care (31% vs. 20%; P care (5% vs. 3%; P patients received less antipsychotic medication and more anxiolytics and hypnotics, but there were no significant differences in use of cholinesterase inhibitors between PC and SC. primary and specialist AD patients differ in background characteristics, and this can influence diagnostic work-up and treatment. PC excels in restriction of antipsychotic use. Use of head CT and clock test in PC are areas for improvement in Sweden.

  1. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta - a predictor for synaptic dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Bayer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of long-standing evidence that beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides have detrimental effects on synaptic function, the relationship between Aβ, synaptic and neuron loss is largely unclear. During the last years there is growing evidence that early intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides is one of the key events leading to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction. Many studies have been carried out using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which have been proven to be valuable model system in modern AD research. The present review discusses the impact of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation on synaptic impairment and neuron loss and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  2. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  3. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  4. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nanyang Technological University, NTU - Imperial College, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore (Singapore); Toth, Miklos; Haeggkvist, Jenny [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-04-17

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer {sup 11}C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ({sup 11}C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using {sup 3}H-AZD2184, {sup 3}H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ{sub 42} and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. {sup 11}C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal {sup 11}C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography {sup 3}H-AZD2184 and {sup 3}H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ{sub 42} deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more

  5. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Gulyás, Balázs; Tóth, Miklós; Häggkvist, Jenny; Halldin, Christer; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer (11)C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ((11)C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using (3)H-AZD2184, (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and (3)H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. (11)C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal (11)C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography (3)H-AZD2184 and (3)H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with (11)C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in (3)H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ42 deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more GFAP(+) reactive astrocytes in the hippocampus at 18-24 months than

  6. The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP δ is differently regulated by fibrillar and oligomeric forms of the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lars NG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP α, β and δ have been shown to be expressed in brain and to be involved in regulation of inflammatory genes in concert with nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. In general, C/EBPα is down-regulated, whereas both C/EBPβ and δ are up-regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. In Alzheimer's disease (AD one of the hallmarks is chronic neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes and microglial cells, most likely induced by the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ deposits. The inflammatory response in AD has been ascribed both beneficial and detrimental roles. It is therefore important to delineate the inflammatory mediators and signaling pathways affected by Aβ deposits with the aim of defining new therapeutic targets. Methods Here we have investigated the effects of Aβ on expression of C/EBP family members with a focus on C/EBPδ in rat primary astro-microglial cultures and in a transgenic mouse model with high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits (tg-ArcSwe by western blot analysis. Effects on DNA binding activity were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cross-talk between C/EBPδ and NF-κB was investigated by analyzing binding to a κB site using a biotin streptavidin-agarose pull-down assay. Results We show that exposure to fibril-enriched, but not oligomer-enriched, preparations of Aβ inhibit up-regulation of C/EBPδ expression in interleukin-1β-activated glial cultures. Furthermore, we observed that, in aged transgenic mice, C/EBPα was significantly down-regulated and C/EBPβ was significantly up-regulated. C/EBPδ, on the other hand, was selectively down-regulated in the forebrain, a part of the brain showing high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits. In contrast, no difference in expression levels of C/EBPδ between wild type and transgenic mice was detected in the relatively spared hindbrain. Finally, we show that interleukin-1β-induced C/EBPδ DNA

  7. The Metalloprotease Meprin β Generates Amino Terminal-truncated Amyloid β Peptide Species*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Jessica; Jefferson, Tamara; Čaušević, Mirsada; Jumpertz, Thorsten; Munter, Lisa; Multhaup, Gerd; Weggen, Sascha; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, which is abundantly found in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimer disease, is central in the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, to understand the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is of critical importance. Recently, we demonstrated that the metalloprotease meprin β cleaves APP and liberates soluble N-terminal APP (N-APP) fragments. In this work, we present evidence that meprin β can also process APP in a manner reminiscent of β-secretase. We identified cleavage sites of meprin β in the amyloid β sequence of the wild type and Swedish mutant of APP at positions p1 and p2, thereby generating Aβ variants starting at the first or second amino acid residue. We observed even higher kinetic values for meprin β than BACE1 for both the wild type and the Swedish mutant APP form. This enzymatic activity of meprin β on APP and Aβ generation was also observed in the absence of BACE1/2 activity using a β-secretase inhibitor and BACE knock-out cells, indicating that meprin β acts independently of β-secretase. PMID:22879596

  8. The metalloprotease meprin β generates amino terminal-truncated amyloid β peptide species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Jessica; Jefferson, Tamara; Causević, Mirsada; Jumpertz, Thorsten; Munter, Lisa; Multhaup, Gerd; Weggen, Sascha; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2012-09-28

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, which is abundantly found in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimer disease, is central in the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, to understand the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is of critical importance. Recently, we demonstrated that the metalloprotease meprin β cleaves APP and liberates soluble N-terminal APP (N-APP) fragments. In this work, we present evidence that meprin β can also process APP in a manner reminiscent of β-secretase. We identified cleavage sites of meprin β in the amyloid β sequence of the wild type and Swedish mutant of APP at positions p1 and p2, thereby generating Aβ variants starting at the first or second amino acid residue. We observed even higher kinetic values for meprin β than BACE1 for both the wild type and the Swedish mutant APP form. This enzymatic activity of meprin β on APP and Aβ generation was also observed in the absence of BACE1/2 activity using a β-secretase inhibitor and BACE knock-out cells, indicating that meprin β acts independently of β-secretase.

  9. Predictive accuracy of amyloid imaging for progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease with different lengths of follow-up: a meta-analysis. [Corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jing; Zheng, Dong-Ming; Guo, Yang; Feng, Juan; Ren, Wei-Dong

    2014-12-01

    In the past decade, amyloid deposition has been shown to begin many years before the clinical symptoms of dementia in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Longitudinal studies with different follow-up durations have suggested that C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (C-PIB-PET) may play a role in stratifying patients with MCI into risk levels for developing AD. However, the predictive accuracy of amyloid imaging for the progression from MCI to AD with different follow-up durations has not yet been systematically evaluated. A formal systematic evaluation of the sensitivity, specificity, and other properties of C-PIB-PET was performed.This study aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze published data on the diagnostic performance of C-PIB-PET for predicting conversion to AD in patients with MCI and to determine whether long-term follow-up has a positive effect on predictive accuracy. Relevant studies were systematically identified through electronic searches, which were performed in MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), BIOSIS Previews (ISI Web of Knowledge), Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Knowledge), PsycINFO (Ovid SP), and LILACS (Bireme). The methodological quality of each study was assessed by QUADAS-2. Sensitivities and specificities of C-PIB-PET in individual studies were calculated, and the studies underwent meta-analysis with a random-effects model. A summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed with the Moses-Shapiro-Littenberg method. Pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR-), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and the SROC curve of each subgroup were determined. Heterogeneity was tested, and potential sources for heterogeneity were explored by assessing whether certain covariates significantly influenced the relative DOR.Eleven eligible studies consisting of a total of 352 patients with MCI at baseline were included

  10. Effect of flavonoids rich extract of Capparis spinosa on inflammatory involved genes in amyloid-beta peptide injected rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebali, Nazanin; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Ghafoori, Hossein; Farahmand, Zeinab; MohammadKhani, Elham; Vakhshiteh, Faezeh; Ghamarian, Abdolreza; Farhangniya, Mansoureh; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein

    2018-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common forms of neurodegenerative diseases. Despite vast ongoing researches focusing on the area, little is known about novel treatments. In this study, we aimed to survey the effects of Capparis spinosa (C. spinosa) extract on amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ)-injected rat. For this purpose, hydroalcoholic extracts of caper leaf and fruit were prepared. Total phenolic content, DPPH, and FRAP assay were accomplished to determine antioxidant activity of C. spinosa. HPLC analysis was conducted to measure rutin and quercetin content of selected parts of the plant. Higher levels of flavonoids were observed in leaves of the plant. Twelve male Wistar Aβ-induced rats were randomly divided in four groups of (1) Aβ-/DW+: Sham-operated group (2) Aβ+/DW+: Aβ-injected group (3) Aβ+/RU+: Standard rutin treatment (4) Aβ+/CS+: C. spinosa extract treatment. After 6 weeks of oral administration, real-time qPCR were conducted to determine APP, BACE-1, PSEN-1, and PSEN-2 genes expression in the hippocampus of rats. HPLC analysis showed high levels of rutin and quercetin in leaves of Capparis. Rutin was 16939.2 ± 0.01 and quercetin was 908.93 ± 0.01 µg/g fresh weight. In fruit, 1019.52 ± 0.01 rutin and 97.86 ± 0.01 µg/g FW quercetin were measured. Expression of BACE-1, APP, PSEN-1, and PSEN-2 genes in comparison with the control group showed significant down regulation. Results of the study demonstrated that C. spinosa has the potential to down regulate inflammation-involved genes in AD, due to its high levels of flavonoids and could be beneficial as a dietary complement in AD patients.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of hydrated fullerene C60: cortical and hippocampal EEG interplay in an amyloid-infused rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Vasily; Kaptsov, Vladimir; Gordon, Rita; Makarova, Ekaterina; Podolski, Igor; Sengpiel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of fullerene C60 nanoparticles, namely hydrated fullerene C60 (C60HyFn), on interrelations between EEG frequency spectra from the frontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on an amyloid-β (Aβ) rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Infusion of Aβ1-42 protein (1.5 μl) into the CA1 region two weeks before EEG testing diminished hippocampal theta (3.8-8.4 Hz) predominance and eliminated cortical beta (12.9-26.2 Hz) predominance observed in baseline EEG of rats infused with saline (control) or with C60HyFn alone. In contrast, these Aβ1-42 effects were abolished in rats pretreated with C60HyFn, 30 min apart. Dopaminergic mediation in AD has been shown to be involved in neuronal plasticity and Aβ transformation in different ways. To clarify its role in the cortex-hippocampus interplay in the Aβ model of AD, we used peripheral injection of a dopamine agonist, apomorphine (APO), at a low dose (0.1 mg/kg). In rats infused with C60HyFn or Aβ1-42 alone, APO attenuated the cortical beta predominance, with immediate and delayed phases evident in the Aβ1-42-rats. Pretreatment with C60HyFn diminished the APO effect in the Aβ1-42-treated rats. Thus, we show that intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 dramatically disrupts cortical versus hippocampal EEG interrelations and that pretreatment with the fullerene eliminates this abnormality. We suggest that some effects of C60HyFn may be mediated through presynaptic dopamine receptors and that water-soluble C60 fullerenes have a neuroprotective potential.

  12. Tannoid principles of Emblica officinalis renovate cognitive deficits and attenuate amyloid pathologies against aluminum chloride induced rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Dhivyabharathi, Mathiyazahan; William Raja, Tharsius Raja; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Emblica officinalis is mentioned as a maharasayana in many Ayurvedic texts and promotes intelligence, memory, freedom from disease, longevity, and strength of the senses. The present study has been designed to explore the memory-enhancing effect of the tannoid principles of E. officinalis (EoT) at the biochemical, anatomical, behavioral, and molecular levels against aluminum chloride (AlCl3) induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rats. Aluminum is reported to have an important role in the etiology, pathogenesis, and development of AD. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, AlCl3 treated, AlCl3 and EoT (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg bw) co-treated, and EoT (200 mg/kg bw) alone treated groups. In control and experimental rats, behavior tests including water maze and open field test, estimation of aluminum, assay of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and expression of amyloidogenic proteins were performed. Intraperitonial injection of AlCl3 (100 mg/kg bw) for 60 days significantly elevated the concentration of aluminum (Al), activity of AChE and protein expressions of amyloid precursor protein, A-beta1-42, beta-, and gamma-secretases as compared to control group in hippocampus and cortex. Co-administration of EoT orally to AlCl3 rats for 60 days significantly revert back the Al concentration, AChE activity, and A-beta synthesis-related molecules in the studied brain regions. The spatial learning, memory, and locomotor impairments observed in AlCl3 treated rats were significantly attenuated by EoT. Therefore, EoT may be a promising therapy in ameliorating neurotoxicity of aluminum, however further studies are warranted to elucidate the exact mechanism of action of EoT.

  13. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer's Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25-35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Shanmuganathan

    Full Text Available Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD. Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25-35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml with Aβ 25-35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  14. Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hajime; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi

    2016-08-26

    Several pathological and epidemiological studies have demonstrated a possible relationship between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the exact contribution of TBI to AD onset and progression is unclear. Hence, we examined AD-related histopathological changes and cognitive impairment after TBI in triple transgenic (3×Tg)-AD model mice. Five- to seven-month-old 3×Tg-AD model mice were subjected to either TBI by the weight-drop method or a sham treatment. In the 3×Tg-AD mice subjected to TBI, the spatial learning was not significantly different 7 days after TBI compared to that of the sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice. However, 28 days after TBI, the 3×Tg-AD mice exhibited significantly lower spatial learning than the sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice. Correspondingly, while a few amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques were observed in both sham-treated and TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD mouse hippocampus 7 days after TBI, the Aβ deposition was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. Thus, we demonstrated that TBI induced a significant increase in hippocampal Aβ deposition 28 days after TBI compared to that of the control animals, which was associated with worse spatial learning ability in 3×Tg-AD mice. The present study suggests that TBI could be a risk factor for accelerated AD progression, particularly when genetic and hereditary predispositions are involved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting Apolipoprotein E/Amyloid β Binding by Peptoid CPO_Aβ17-21 P Ameliorates Alzheimer's Disease Related Pathology and Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Park, Shinae; Allington, Grant; Prelli, Frances; Sun, Yanjie; Martá-Ariza, Mitchell; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Biswas, Goutam; Brown, Bernard; Verghese, Philip B; Mehta, Pankaj D; Kwon, Yong-Uk; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-08-14

    Inheritance of the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) genotype has been identified as the major genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Studies have shown that apoE, apoE4 in particular, binds to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides at residues 12-28 of Aβ and this binding modulates Aβ accumulation and disease progression. We have previously shown in several AD transgenic mice lines that blocking the apoE/Aβ interaction with Aβ12-28 P reduced Aβ and tau-related pathology, leading to cognitive improvements in treated AD mice. Recently, we have designed a small peptoid library derived from the Aβ12-28 P sequence to screen for new apoE/Aβ binding inhibitors with higher efficacy and safety. Peptoids are better drug candidates than peptides due to their inherently more favorable pharmacokinetic properties. One of the lead peptoid compounds, CPO_Aβ17-21 P, diminished the apoE/Aβ interaction and attenuated the apoE4 pro-fibrillogenic effects on Aβ aggregation in vitro as well as apoE4 potentiation of Aβ cytotoxicity. CPO_Aβ17-21 P reduced Aβ-related pathology coupled with cognitive improvements in an AD APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model. Our study suggests the non-toxic, non-fibrillogenic peptoid CPO_Aβ17-21 P has significant promise as a new AD therapeutic agent which targets the Aβ related apoE pathway, with improved efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties.

  16. DNA immunization against amyloid beta 42 has high potential as safe therapy for Alzheimer's disease as it diminishes antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Qu, Bao-Xi; Fu, Min; Anderson, Larry D; Stüve, Olaf; Eagar, Todd N; Rosenberg, Roger N

    2011-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been strongly associated with the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in brain, and immunotherapy targeting Aβ provides potential for AD prevention. A clinical trial in which AD patients were immunized with Aβ42 peptide was stopped when 6% of participants showed meningoencephalitis, apparently due to an inflammatory Th1 immune response. Previously, we and other have shown that Aβ42 DNA vaccination via gene gun generates a Th2 cellular immune response, which was shown by analyses of the respective antibody isotype profiles. We also determined that in vitro T cell proliferation in response to Aβ42 peptide re-stimulation was absent in DNA Aβ42 trimer-immunized mice when compared to Aβ42 peptide-immunized mice. To further characterize this observation prospectively and longitudinally, we analyzed the immune response in wild-type mice after vaccination with Aβ42 trimer DNA and Aβ42 peptide with Quil A adjuvant. Wild-type mice were immunized with short-term (1-3× vaccinations) or long-term (6× vacinations) immunization strategies. Antibody titers and isotype profiles of the Aβ42 specific antibodies, as well as cytokine profiles and cell proliferation studies from this longitudinal study were determined. Sufficient antibody titers to effectively reduce Aβ42, but an absent T cell proliferative response and no IFNγ or IL-17 secretion after Aβ42 DNA trimer immunization minimizes the risk of inflammatory activities of the immune system towards the self antigen Aβ42 in brain. Therefore, Aβ42 DNA trimer immunization has a high probability to be effective and safe to treat patients with early AD.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATED SOFTWARE PROGRAM FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE BETA-AMYLOID SCANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, Jack; Zubal, George

    2013-12-18

    Study goal: A Phase 1 evaluation of the kinetics, clearance and cerebral distribution of one novel peripheral benzodiazepine receptors(PBR)positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent, 18F-PBR-111 following intravenous administration in healthy volunteers and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Short title: Evaluation of PET imaging with PBR-111 in HV and AD subjects Proof of Mechanism. Primary Objective: To evaluate the cerebral distribution of PBR-111 positron emission tomography (PET) for detection/exclusion of microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer's disease subjects compared to healthy volunteers. Secondary objectives: - To assess the dynamic uptake and washout of [18F]PBR-111, a potential imaging bio-marker for inflammatory changes in brain, using positron emission tomography in subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy volunteers (HV). - To perform blood metabolite characterization of [18F]PBR-111 in subjects with AD and HV to determine the nature of metabolites in assessment of [18F]-PBR-111 as a PET brain imaging agent. Name of radioactive drug substance: PBR-111 Dose(s): The applied PBR-111 radioactive dose will be up to 5.0 mCi, diluted in a maximum of 10 ml of saline. The radioligand will be administered as a slow intravenous bolus injection (i.e., 6 sec/ml) into a large vein (e.g., antecubital vein). Route of administration: Intravenous injection Duration of treatment: Single administration of a diagnostic agent Indication: PBR-111 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has the potential to detect microglial activation. In the presence of PBR-111 uptake (representative of microglial activation), inflammation in the brain can be detected. Diagnosis and main criteria for inclusion: Study participants will be HVs and patients diagnosed with probable AD. HVs must be 18 years of age (at least four subjects 50 years of age) and have no evidence of cognitive impairment or other neurologic disease by medical history

  18. Assessment of Novel Curcumin Derivatives as Potent Inhibitors of Inflammation and Amyloid-β Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey-Beitia, Johant; González, Yisett; Doens, Deborah; Stephens, David E; Santamaría, Ricardo; Murillo, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Fernández, Patricia L; Rao, K S; Larionov, Oleg V; Durant-Archibold, Armando A

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder affecting the elderly population worldwide. Brain inflammation plays a key role in the progression of AD. Deposition of senile plaques in the brain stimulates an inflammatory response with the overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as the neuroinflammatory cytokine. interleukin-6. Curcumin has been revealed to be a potential agent for treating AD following different neuroprotective mechanisms, such as inhibition of aggregation and decrease in brain inflammation. We synthesized new curcumin derivatives with the aim of providing good anti-aggregation capacity but also improved anti-inflammatory activity. Nine curcumin derivatives were synthesized by etherification and esterification of the aromatic region. From these derivatives, compound 8 exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect similar to curcumin, while compounds 3, 4, and 10 were more potent. Moreover, when the anti-aggregation activity is considered, compounds 3, 4, 5, 6, and 10 showed biological activity in vitro. Compound 4 exhibited a strong anti-aggregation effect higher than curcumin. Monofunctionalized curcumin derivatives showed better bioactivity than difunctionalized compounds. Moreover, the presence of bulky groups in the chemical structure of curcumin derivatives decreased bioactivity.

  19. Apolipoprotein E: isoform specific differences in tertiary structure and interaction with amyloid-β in human Alzheimer brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip B Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied a novel application of FLIM-FRET to in situ measurement and quantification of protein interactions to explore isoform specific differences in Aβ-ApoE interaction and ApoE tertiary conformation in senile plaques in human Alzheimer brain. ApoE3 interacts more closely with Aβ than ApoE4, but a greater proportion of Aβ molecules within plaques are decorated with ApoE4 than ApoE3, lending strong support to the hypothesis that isoform specific differences in ApoE are linked with Aβ deposition. We found an increased number of ApoE N-terminal fragments in ApoE4 plaques, consistent with the observation that ApoE4 is more easily cleaved than ApoE3. In addition, we measured a small but significant isoform specific difference in ApoE domain interaction. Based on our in situ data, supported by traditional biochemical data, we propose a pathway by which isoform specific conformational differences increase the level of cleavage at the hinge region of ApoE4, leading to a loss of ApoE function to mediate clearance of Aβ and thereby increase the risk of AD for carriers of the APOEε4 allele.

  20. Alzheimer-specific variants in the 3'UTR of Amyloid precursor protein affect microRNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Charlotte; Calon, Frédéric; Mathews, Paul; Hébert, Sébastien S

    2011-10-07

    APP expression misregulation can cause genetic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidences support the hypothesis that polymorphisms located in microRNA (miRNA) target sites could influence the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and frontotemporal dementia. Recently, a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the 3'UTR of APP have been found in AD patients with family history of dementia. Because miRNAs have previously been implicated in APP expression regulation, we set out to determine whether these polymorphisms could affect miRNA function and therefore APP levels. Bioinformatics analysis identified twelve putative miRNA bindings sites located in or near the APP 3'UTR variants T117C, A454G and A833C. Among those candidates, seven miRNAs, including miR-20a, miR-17, miR-147, miR-655, miR-323-3p, miR-644, and miR-153 could regulate APP expression in vitro and under physiological conditions in cells. Using luciferase-based assays, we could show that the T117C variant inhibited miR-147 binding, whereas the A454G variant increased miR-20a binding, consequently having opposite effects on APP expression. Taken together, our results provide proof-of-principle that APP 3'UTR polymorphisms could affect AD risk through modulation of APP expression regulation, and set the stage for further association studies in genetic and sporadic AD.

  1. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  2. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences and Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Jung-Lung [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Section of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-07-15

    We investigated dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase {sup 18}F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and {sup 18}F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately

  3. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloid-β plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However...

  4. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  5. Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolova, Liana G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose of Review: This article discusses the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent Findings: In recent years, significant advances have been made in the fields of genetics, neuroimaging, clinical diagnosis, and staging of AD. One of the most important recent advances in AD is our ability to visualize amyloid pathology in the living human brain. The newly revised criteria for diagnosis of AD dementia embrace the use for biomarkers as supportive evidence for the underlying pathology. Guidelines for the responsible use of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed, and the clinical and economic implications of amyloid PET imaging are actively being explored. Summary: Our improved understanding of the clinical onset, progression, neuroimaging, pathologic features, genetics, and other risk factors for AD impacts the approaches to clinical diagnosis and future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27042902

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid β-amyloid1-42 levels in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease--systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-A Mo

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to carry out systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of the 42 amino acid form of amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 as a biomarker for differentiating Alzheimer's disease (AD from non-AD dementia.Design. Systematic literature review was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Aβ for the diagnosis of AD. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN tool was used to evaluate independently the quality of the studies. Data sources. The literature review covered from January 1, 2004, to October 22, 2013, and searched eight domestic databases including Korea Med and international databases including Ovid-MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. Data Extraction and Synthesis. Primary criteria for inclusion were valid studies on (i patients with mild cognitive impairment with confirmed or suspected AD and non-AD dementia, and (ii assessment of Aβ1-42 levels using appropriate comparative tests.A total of 17 diagnostic evaluation studies were identified in which levels of CSF Aβ1-42 were assessed. Meta-analysis was performed on 11 robust studies that compared confirmed AD (n = 2211 with healthy individuals (n = 1030, 10 studies that compared AD with non-AD dementias (n = 627, and 5 studies that compared amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 1133 with non-amnestic type subjects (n = 1276. Overall, the CSF Aβ1-42 levels were reduced in AD compared to controls or non-AD dementia. The effectiveness of test was evaluated for diagnostic accuracy (pooled sensitivity, 0.80 (95% CI 0.78-0.82; pooled specificity, 0.76 (95% CI 0.74-0.78.Reduced CSF Aβ1-42 levels are of potential utility in the differential diagnosis of AD versus non-AD dementias and controls. Diagnostic accuracy was high in AD versus healthy controls. However, differential diagnosis for MCI or non-AD might be evaluated by other biomarkers.

  7. The effect of focal brain injury on beta-amyloid plaque deposition, inflammation and synapses in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jessica M; King, Anna E; Woodhouse, Adele; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Vickers, James C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), however the effect of such neural damage on the onset and progression of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque pathology is not well understood. This study utilized an in vivo model of focal brain injury to examine how localized damage may acutely affect the onset and progression of Aβ plaque deposition as well as inflammatory and synaptic changes, in the APP/PS1 (APPSWE, PSEN1dE9) transgenic model of AD relative to wild-type (Wt) mice. Acute focal brain injury in 3- and 9-month-old APP/PS1 and Wt mice was induced by insertion of a needle into the somatosensory neocortex, as compared to sham surgery, and examined at 24h and 7d post-injury (PI). Focal brain injury did not induce thioflavine-S stained or (pan-Aβ antibody) MOAB-2-labeled plaques at either 24h or 7d PI in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice or Wt mice. Nine-month-old APP/PS1 mice demonstrate cortical Aβ plaques but focal injury had no statistically significant (p>0.05) effect on thioflavine-S or MOAB-2 plaque load surrounding the injury site at 24h PI or 7d PI. There was a significant (p0.05). For both Wt and APP/PS1 mice alike, synaptophysin puncta near the injury site were significantly reduced 24h PI (compared to sites distant to the injury and the corresponding area in sham mice; p0.05). There was no significant effect of genotype on this response (p>0.05). These results indicate that focal brain injury and the associated microglial response do not acutely alter Aβ plaque deposition in the APP/PS1 mouse model. Furthermore the current study demonstrated that the brains of both Wt and APP/PS1 mice are capable of recovering lost synaptophysin immunoreactivity post-injury, the latter in the presence of Aβ plaque pathology that causes synaptic degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo imaging of amyloid deposition in Alzheimer disease using the radioligand 18F-AV-45 (florbetapir [corrected] F 18).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dean F; Rosenberg, Paul B; Zhou, Yun; Kumar, Anil; Raymont, Vanessa; Ravert, Hayden T; Dannals, Robert F; Nandi, Ayon; Brasić, James R; Ye, Weiguo; Hilton, John; Lyketsos, Constantine; Kung, Hank F; Joshi, Abhinay D; Skovronsky, Daniel M; Pontecorvo, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    An (18)F-labeled PET amyloid-beta (Abeta) imaging agent could facilitate the clinical evaluation of late-life cognitive impairment by providing an objective measure for Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Here we present the results of a clinical trial with (E)-4-(2-(6-(2-(2-(2-(18)F-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)pyridin-3-yl)vinyl)-N-methyl benzenamine ((18)F-AV-45 or florbetapir [corrected] F 18). An open-label, multicenter brain imaging, metabolism, and safety study of (18)F-AV-45 was performed on 16 patients with AD (Mini-Mental State Examination score, 19.3 +/- 3.1; mean age +/- SD, 75.8 +/- 9.2 y) and 16 cognitively healthy controls (HCs) (Mini-Mental State Examination score, 29.8 +/- 0.45; mean age +/- SD, 72.5 +/- 11.6 y). Dynamic PET was performed over a period of approximately 90 min after injection of the tracer (370 MBq [10 mCi]). Standardized uptake values and cortical-to-cerebellum standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were calculated. A simplified reference tissue method was used to generate distribution volume ratio (DVR) parametric maps for a subset of subjects. Valid PET data were available for 11 AD patients and 15 HCs. (18)F-AV-45 accumulated in cortical regions expected to be high in Abeta deposition (e.g., precuneus and frontal and temporal cortices) in AD patients; minimal accumulation of the tracer was seen in cortical regions of HCs. The cortical-to-cerebellar SUVRs in AD patients showed continual substantial increases through 30 min after administration, reaching a plateau within 50 min. The 10-min period from 50 to 60 min after administration was taken as a representative sample for further analysis. The cortical average SUVR for this period was 1.67 +/- 0.175 for patients with AD versus 1.25 +/- 0.177 for HCs. Spatially normalized DVRs generated from PET dynamic scans were highly correlated with SUVR (r = 0.58-0.88, P < 0.005) and were significantly greater for AD patients than for HCs in cortical regions but not in subcortical white

  9. Toward the treatment for Alzheimer's disease: adsorption is primary mechanism of removing amyloid β protein with hollow-fiber dialyzers of the suitable materials, polysulfone and polymethyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Saigusa, Akira; Yamada, Shinji; Gotoh, Takehiro; Nakai, Shigeru; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Hasegawa, Midori; Yuzawa, Yukio; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of amyloid β protein (Aβ) in the brain reflects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that the rapid removal of Aβ from the blood by an extracorporeal system may act as a peripheral Aβ sink from the brain. The present study aimed to determine the optimal materials and modality for Aβ removal by hemodialyzers. In a batch analysis, hollow-fiber fragments of polysulfone (PSf) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) showed greater removal efficiency of Aβ than did other materials, such as cellulose-triacetates and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (PSf:PMMA at 30 min, 98.6 ± 2.4 %:97.8 ± 0.4 % for Aβ1-40 and 96.6 ± 0.3 %:99.0 ± 1.0 % for Aβ1-42). In a modality study, the Aβ solution was applied to PSf dialyzers and circulated in the dialysis and Air-filled adsorption-mode (i.e., the outer space of the hollow fibers was filled with air) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-filled adsorption modes. The Aβ1-40 removal efficiency of the pre/post dialyzer in the Air-filled adsorption-mode was the highest (62.4 ± 12.6 %, p = 0.007). In a flow rate study in the Air-filled adsorption-mode, 200 mL/min showed the highest Aβ1-40 reduction rate of pool solution (97.3 ± 0.8 % at 15 min) compared with 20 mL/min (p = 0.00001) and 50 mL/min (p = 0.00382). PMMA dialyzers showed similar high reduction rates. Thus, the optimal modality for Aβ removal was the adsorption-mode with PSf or PMMA hollow fibers at around 50 mL/min flow rate, which seems to be suitable for clinical use.

  10. An early dysregulation of FAK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways precedes the β-amyloid deposition in the olfactory bulb of APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachén-Montes, Mercedes; González-Morales, Andrea; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Pérez-Valderrama, Estela; Ausín, Karina; Zelaya, María Victoria; Serna, Antonio; Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-10-04

    Olfactory dysfunction is an early event of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms associated to AD neurodegeneration in olfactory areas are unknown. Here we used double-transgenic amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APPswe/PS1dE9) mice and label-free quantitative proteomics to analyze early pathological effects on the olfactory bulb (OB) during AD progression. Prior to β-amyloid plaque formation, 9 modulated proteins were detected on 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice while 16 differential expressed proteins were detected at 6months, when β-amyloid plaques appear, indicating a moderate imbalance in cytoskeletal rearrangement, and synaptic plasticity in APP/PS1 OBs. Moreover, β-amyloid induced an inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) together with a transient activation of MEK1/2, leading to inactivation of ERK1/2 in 6-months APP/PS1 OBs. In contrast, the analysis of human OBs revealed a late activation of FAK in advanced AD stages, whereas ERK1/2 activation was enhanced across AD staging respect to controls. This survival potential was accompanied by the inhibition of the proapototic factor BAD in the OB across AD phenotypes. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the early molecular mechanisms that are modulated in AD neurodegeneration, highlighting significant differences in the regulation of survival pathways between APP/PS1 mice and sporadic human AD. Loss of smell is involved in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), usually preceding classic disease symptoms. However, the mechanisms governing this dysfunction are still poorly understood, losing its potential as a useful tool for clinical diagnosis. Our study characterizes potential AD-associated molecular changes in APP/PS1 mice olfactory bulb (OB) using MS-quantitative proteomics, revealing early cytoskeletal disruption and synaptic plasticity impairment. Moreover, an opposite pattern was found when comparing the activation status of specific survival pathways between APP/PS1 OBs

  11. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  12. Genetic inhibition of phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α does not block Aβ-dependent elevation of BACE1 and APP levels or reduce amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R Sadleir

    Full Text Available β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ, the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD. BACE1 is elevated ∼2-3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ-dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1 a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2 a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3 a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and

  13. Genetic inhibition of phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α does not block Aβ-dependent elevation of BACE1 and APP levels or reduce amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Kaufman, Randal J; Osten, Pavel; Vassar, Robert

    2014-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ), the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 is elevated ∼2-3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ-dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1) a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV) system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2) a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3) a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and APP elevation

  14. Changes in amyloid-β and Tau in the cerebrospinal fluid of transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Luis F; Kaeser, Stephan A; Reichwald, Julia; Hruscha, Michael; Martus, Peter; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2013-07-17

    Altered concentrations of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and Tau protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are thought to be predictive markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Transgenic mice overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) have been used to model Aβ pathology, but concomitant changes in Aβ and Tau in CSF have been less well studied. We measured Aβ and Tau in the brains and CSF of two well-characterized transgenic mouse models of AD: one expressing human APP carrying the Swedish mutation (APP23) and the other expressing mutant human APP and mutant human presenilin-1 (APPPS1). Both mouse models exhibit Aβ deposition in the brain, but with different onset and progression trajectories. We found an age-related 50 to 80% decrease in Aβ42 peptide in mouse CSF and a smaller decrease in Aβ40, both inversely correlated with the brain Aβ load. Surprisingly, the same mice showed a threefold increase in total endogenous murine Tau in CSF at the stages when Aβ pathology became prominent. The results mirror the temporal sequence and magnitude of Aβ and Tau changes in the CSF of patients with sporadic and dominantly inherited AD. This observation indicates that APP transgenic mice may be useful as a translational tool for predicting changes in Aβ and Tau markers in the CSF of AD patients. These findings also suggest that APP transgenic mouse models may be useful in the search for new disease markers for AD.

  15. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  16. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  17. Patient and caregiver reactions to clinical amyloid imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Joshua D; Cox, Chelsea G; Kremen, Sarah; Mendez, Mario F; Teng, Edmond; Shapira, Jill; Ringman, John M; Apostolova, Liana G

    2017-08-01

    Amyloid imaging is a tool that has recently become available to dementia specialists evaluating patients with possible Alzheimer's disease. Studies have assessed the impact of amyloid imaging on diagnostic and treatment decisions, but patient and family perspectives have received less attention. To examine how amyloid imaging affects the diagnostic experience of patients and families, we interviewed members of 26 patient-caregiver dyads with whom a neurologist discussed the option of amyloid positron emission tomography. Most participants who chose to undergo amyloid imaging would choose to do so again. Regardless of the scan outcome, patients and caregivers commonly expressed relief on learning the scan results. Some participants expressed expectations that were beyond scan capabilities. Amyloid imaging may provide information that patients and their families find useful. Clinicians must set correct expectations and ensure that families understand the limitations of amyloid imaging. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of Soluble Amyloid-β Oligomers and Insoluble High-Molecular-Weight Particles in CSF: Development of Methods with Potential for Diagnosis and Therapy Monitoring of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Aileen Funke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD can be established premortem based on clinical criteria like neuropsychological tests. Post mortem, specific neuropathological changes like amyloid plaques define AD. However, the standard criteria based on medical history and mental status examinations do not take into account the long preclinical features of the disease, and a biomarker for improved diagnosis of AD is urgently needed. In a large number of studies, amyloid-β (Aβ monomer concentrations in CSF of AD patients are consistently and significantly reduced when compared to healthy controls. Therefore, monomeric Aβ in CSF was suggested to be a helpful biomarker for the diagnosis of preclinical AD. However, not the monomeric form, but Aβ oligomers have been shown to be the toxic species in AD pathology, and their quantification and characterization could facilitate AD diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we review the current status of assay development to reliably and routinely detect Aβ oligomers and high-molecular-weight particles in CSF.

  19. Neuropep-1 ameliorates learning and memory deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the brain, and causes reduction of amyloid beta plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Kyoo; Kim, Hong-Gi; Baek, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Woo-Ram; Park, Dong-Ik; Park, Jong-Sung; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Kil-Lyong

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by amyloid beta (Aβ) deposits, hyperphosphorylated tau deposition, and cognitive dysfunction. Abnormalities in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays an important role in learning and memory formation, have been reported in the brains of AD patients. A BDNF modulating peptide (Neuropep-1) was previously identified by positional-scanning synthetic peptide combinatorial library. Here we examine the neuroprotective effects of Neuropep-1 on several in vitro neurotoxic insults, and triple-transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD). Neuropep-1 protects cultured neurons against oligomeric Aβ1-42, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Neuropep-1 injection also significantly rescues the spatial learning and memory deficits of 3xTg-AD mice compared with vehicle-treated control group. Neuropep-1 treatment markedly increases hippocampal and cortical BDNF levels. Furthermore, we found that Neuropep-1-injected 3xTg-AD mice exhibit dramatically reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ levels without affecting tau pathology. Neuropep-1 treatment does not alter the expression or activity of full-length amyloid precursor protein, α-, β-, or γ-secretase, but levels of insulin degrading enzyme, an Aβ degrading enzyme, were increased. These findings suggest Neuropep-1 may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human ApoE Isoforms Differentially Modulate Glucose and Amyloid Metabolic Pathways in Female Brain: Evidence of the Mechanism of Neuroprotection by ApoE2 and Implications for Alzheimer's Disease Prevention and Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Jeriel Thomas-Richard; Ibrahimi, Shaher; Zhao, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Three major genetic isoforms of apolipoprotein E (ApoE), ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4, exist in humans and lead to differences in susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated the impact of human ApoE isoforms on brain metabolic pathways involved in glucose utilization and amyloid-β (Aβ) degradation, two major areas that are significantly perturbed in preclinical AD. Hippocampal RNA samples from middle-aged female mice with targeted human ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4 gene replacement were comparatively analyzed with a qRT-PCR custom array for the expression of 85 genes involved in insulin/insulin-like growth factor (Igf) signaling. Consistent with its protective role against AD, ApoE2 brain exhibited the most metabolically robust profile among the three ApoE genotypes. When compared to ApoE2 brain, both ApoE3 and ApoE4 brains exhibited markedly reduced levels of Igf1, insulin receptor substrates (Irs), and facilitated glucose transporter 4 (Glut4), indicating reduced glucose uptake. Additionally, ApoE4 brain exhibited significantly decreased Pparg and insulin-degrading enzyme (Ide), indicating further compromised glucose metabolism and Aβ dysregulation associated with ApoE4. Protein analysis showed significantly decreased Igf1, Irs, and Glut4 in ApoE3 brain, and Igf1, Irs, Glut4, Pparg, and Ide in ApoE4 brain compared to ApoE2 brain. These data provide the first documented evidence that human ApoE isoforms differentially affect brain insulin/Igf signaling and downstream glucose and amyloid metabolic pathways, illustrating a potential mechanism for their differential risk in AD. A therapeutic strategy that enhances brain insulin/Igf1 signaling activity to a more robust ApoE2-like phenotype favoring both energy production and amyloid homeostasis holds promise for AD prevention and early intervention.

  1. Expression of human amyloid precursor protein in Drosophila melanogaster nerve cells causes a decrease in presynaptic gene mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, D I; Schwarzman, A L; Sarantseva, S V

    2015-08-10

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a key player in Alzheimer's disease. The proteolytic cleavage of APP results in various short peptide fragments including the toxic amyloid-beta peptide, which is a main component of senile plaques. However, the functions of APP and its processed fragments are not yet well understood. Here, using real-time polymerase chain reaction, we demonstrate that exogenous expression of APP, its mutant form APP-Swedish, or two truncated forms in Drosophila melanogaster causes a significant (P ≤ 0.05) drop in the mRNA levels of the presynaptic proteins synaptotagmin-1 and neuronal synaptobrevin. The results obtained from this study suggest a potential role of APP or its fragments in the regulation of synaptic gene transcription.

  2. 7.0T nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of the amyloid beta (1–40) animal model of Alzheimer's disease: comparison of cytology verification

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Shuai; Zhao, Guixiang; Ma, Yu

    2014-01-01

    3.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is a commonly used method in the research of brain function in Alzheimer's disease. However, the role of 7.0T high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in brain function of Alzheimer's disease remains unclear. In this study, 7.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease rats, the N-acetylaspartate wave crest was reduced, and the creatine and choline wave crest was elevated. This finding was fu...

  3. Plant-based chimeric HPV-virus-like particles bearing amyloid-β epitopes elicit antibodies able to recognize amyloid plaques in APP-tg mouse and Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castro, R; Acero Galindo, G; García Salcedo, Y; Uribe Campero, L; Vazquez Perez, V; Carrillo-Tripp, M; Gevorkian, G; Gomez Lim, M A

    2017-11-01

    The main amyloid-beta (Aβ) variants detected in the human brain are full-length Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides; however, a significant proportion of AD brain Aβ consists also of N-terminal truncated/modified species. The majority of the previous immunotherapeutic strategies targeted the N-terminal immunodominant epitope of the full-length Aβ; however, most of the pathological N-truncated forms of Aβ lack this critical B cell epitope. Recently, virus-like particles (VLPs), self-assembled structures with highly ordered repetitive patterns on their surface and capable of inducing robust immune responses, were applied as a promising platform for various antigen expressions. In this study, we expressed in plants two chimeric HPV16 L1 capsid proteins obtained by introduction of the β-amyloid 11-28 epitope (Aβ 11-28) into the h4 helix or into the coil regions of the L1 protein. The Aβ 11-28 epitope was chosen because it is present in the full-length Aβ 1-42 as well as in the truncated/modified amyloid peptide species. After expression, we assembled the chimerical L1/Aβ 11-28 into a VLP in which the Aβ 11-28 epitope is exposed at very high density (360 times) on the surface of the VLP. The chimeric VLPs elicited in mice Aβ-specific antibodies binding to β-amyloid plaques in APP-tg mouse and AD brains. Our study is the first to demonstrate a successful production in plants and immunogenic properties in mice of chimeric HPV16 L1 VLPs bearing Aβ epitope that may be of potential relevance for the development of multivalent vaccines for a multifactorial disease such as AD.

  4. Prototype Alzheimer's disease vaccine using the immunodominant B cell epitope from beta-amyloid and promiscuous T cell epitope pan HLA DR-binding peptide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agadjanyan, Michael G; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Petrushina, Irina; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Movsesyan, Nina; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Saing, Tommy; Cribbs, David H

    2005-01-01

    ...) prevents Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology. The first immunotherapy clinical trial used fibrillar Abeta, containing the B and T cell self epitopes of Abeta, as the immunogen formulated with QS21 as the adjuvant in the vaccine...

  5. ABCG1 and ABCG4 Suppress γ-Secretase Activity and Amyloid β Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Sano

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1 and ABCG4, expressed in neurons and glia in the central nervous system, mediate cholesterol efflux to lipid acceptors. The relationship between cholesterol level in the central nervous system and Alzheimer's disease has been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of ABCG1 and ABCG4 on amyloid precursor protein (APP processing, the product of which, amyloid β (Aβ, is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Expression of ABCG1 or ABCG4 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells that stably expressed Swedish-type mutant APP increased cellular and cell surface APP levels. Products of cleavage from APP by α-secretase and by β-secretase also increased. The levels of secreted Aβ, however, decreased in the presence of ABCG1 and ABCG4, but not ABCG4-KM, a nonfunctional Walker-A lysine mutant. In contrast, secreted Aβ levels increased in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuron-like cells in which ABCG1 and ABCG4 were suppressed. Furthermore, Aβ42 peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid from Abcg1 null mice significantly increased compared to the wild type mice. To examine the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the activity and distribution of γ-secretase. ABCG1 and ABCG4 suppressed γ-secretase activity and disturbed γ-secretase localization in the raft domains where γ-secretase functions. These results suggest that ABCG1 and ABCG4 alter the distribution of γ-secretase on the plasma membrane, leading to the decreased γ-secretase activity and suppressed Aβ secretion. ABCG1 and ABCG4 may inhibit the development of Alzheimer's disease and can be targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  7. Attenuation of lysozyme amyloid cytotoxicity by SPION-mediated modulation of amyloid aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Aafreen; Kambli, Priyanka; Borana, Mohanish; Mohanpuria, Neha; Ahmad, Basir; Kelkar-Mane, Varsha; Ladiwala, Uma

    2015-03-01

    The formation and deposition of proteinaceous aggregates of amyloid fibrils characterize diverse degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and systemic amyloidosis. The presence of these aggregates is associated with clinical manifestations, and various forms of amyloid aggregates have been identified to be cytotoxic. Although the exact mechanism of amyloid toxicity remains to be elucidated, prevention of amyloid fibril formation and aggregation forms a possible therapeutic approach. Nanomaterials possess the potential for such a strategy. Using hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) as a prototypic amyloid-forming protein, we found a reduction in the aggregation rate of HEWL in the presence of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with slowing of nucleation and amyloid fibril elongation. HEWL-amyloid had a predominantly fibrillar structure and was toxic to various cells. A significant attenuation of cytotoxicity was observed when cells were treated with SPION-interacted HEWL-amyloid. Ultra-structural differences were observed between the native and SPION-interacted HEWL-amyloids by SEM and TEM imaging. Our findings confirm that SPIONs perturb amyloid fibrillation, thereby reducing the cytotoxicity of amyloid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  9. Presence of non-fibrillar amyloid beta protein in skin biopsies of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Down's syndrome and non-AD normal persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, G Y; Wisniewski, H M; Blondal, H

    1994-01-01

    A total of 66 skin biopsies from persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Down's syndrome (DS) and from persons without AD were used in this study. The age range was from 7 to 89 years. Positive immunoreactivity of skin biopsies to monoclonal antibody 4G8, which is reactive to amino acid residue 17...

  10. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  11. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  12. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To us...

  13. Immunterapi mod Alzheimers sygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, Alexander Christian; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2016-01-01

    Passive anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has been shown to clear brain Aß deposits. Results from phase III clinical trials in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with two monoclonal antibodies bapineuzumab and solanezumab and intravenous immunoglobulin have been disappointing...

  14. Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jesse S.; Adriaanse, Bryan A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2017-01-01

    Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged...

  15. Janus faces of amyloid proteins in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Kurnellas, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid forming molecules are generally considered harmful. In Alzheimer's Disease two amyloid molecules Aβ A4 and tau vie for consideration as the main pathogenic culprit. But molecules obey the laws of chemistry and defy the way we categorize them as humans with our well-known proclivities to bias in our reasoning. We have been exploring the brains of multiple sclerosis patients to identify molecules that are associated with protection from inflammation and degeneration. In 2001 we noted that aB crystallin (cryab) was the most abundant transcript found in MS lesions, but not in healthy brains. Cryab can reverse paralysis and attenuate inflammation in several models of inflammation including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and various models of ischemia. Cryab is an amyloid forming molecule. We have identified a core structure common to many amyloids including amyloid protein Aβ A4, tau, amylin, prion protein, serum amyloid protein P, and cryab. The core hexapeptide structure is highly immune suppressive and can reverse paralysis in EAE when administered systemically. Administration of this amyloid forming hexapeptide quickly lowers inflammatory cytokines in plasma like IL-6 and IL-2. The hexapeptide bind a set of proinflammatory mediators in plasma, including acute phase reactants and complement components. The beneficial properties of amyloid forming hexapeptides provide a potential new therapeutic direction. These experiments indicate that amyloid forming molecules have Janus faces, providing unexpected benefit for neuroinflammatory conditions.

  16. Inter-rater variability of visual interpretation and comparison with quantitative evaluation of {sup 11}C-PiB PET amyloid images of the Japanese Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (J-ADNI) multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Tomohiko [Saitama Medical University Saitama International Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hidaka (Japan); Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Team for Neuroimaging Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Kenji; Sakata, Muneyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Team for Neuroimaging Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ikari, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Tomoyuki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Research Association for Biotechnology, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Kazunari [Kinki University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka, Sayama (Japan); Kato, Takashi; Ito, Kengo [National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Brain Science and Molecular Imaging, Obu (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Collaboration: J-ADNI Study Group

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the inter-rater variability of the visual interpretation of {sup 11}C-PiB PET images regarding the positivity/negativity of amyloid deposition that were obtained in a multicenter clinical research project, Japanese Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (J-ADNI). The results of visual interpretation were also compared with a semi-automatic quantitative analysis using mean cortical standardized uptake value ratio to the cerebellar cortex (mcSUVR). A total of 162 {sup 11}C-PiB PET scans, including 45 mild Alzheimer's disease, 60 mild cognitive impairment, and 57 normal cognitive control cases that had been acquired as J-ADNI baseline scans were analyzed. Based on visual interpretation by three independent raters followed by consensus read, each case was classified into positive, equivocal, and negative deposition (ternary criteria) and further dichotomized by merging the former two (binary criteria). Complete agreement of visual interpretation by the three raters was observed for 91.3% of the cases (Cohen κ = 0.88 on average) in ternary criteria and for 92.3% (κ = 0.89) in binary criteria. Cases that were interpreted as visually positive in the consensus read showed significantly higher mcSUVR than those visually negative (2.21 ± 0.37 vs. 1.27 ± 0.09, p < 0.001), and positive or negative decision by visual interpretation was dichotomized by a cut-off value of mcSUVR = 1.5. Significant positive/negative associations were observed between mcSUVR and the number of raters who evaluated as positive (ρ = 0.87, p < 0.0001) and negative (ρ = -0.85, p < 0.0001) interpretation. Cases of disagreement among raters showed generally low mcSUVR. Inter-rater agreement was almost perfect in {sup 11}C-PiB PET scans. Positive or negative decision by visual interpretation was dichotomized by a cut-off value of mcSUVR = 1.5. As some cases of disagreement among raters tended to show low mcSUVR, referring to quantitative method may

  17. Improvements in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease through Sod2 Overexpression Are Due to Functional and Not Structural Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany R. Bitner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We and others have shown that over expression of the mitochondrial antioxidant superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2 can improve many of the pathologies in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease that harbors the Swedish mutation in the amyloid precursor protein. However, it is not clear if these improvements are due to functional improvements or structural/anatomical changes. To answer this question, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to assess the structural integrity of white matter tracts in the control mice, Tg2576 mouse and Tg2576 mice over expressing SOD-2. We observed minimal differences in diffusion parameters with SOD-2 over expression in this model indicating that the improvements we previously reported are due to functional changes and not any alterations to the white matter tractography.

  18. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  19. Sensitivity of composite scores to amyloid burden in preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Introducing the Z-scores of Attention, Verbal fluency, and Episodic memory for Nondemented older adults composite score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yen Ying; Snyder, Peter J; Pietrzak, Robert H; Ukiqi, Albulene; Villemagne, Victor L; Ames, David; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Martins, Ralph N; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Maruff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive composite scores developed for preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) often consist of multiple cognitive domains as they may provide greater sensitivity to detect β-amyloid (Aβ)-related cognitive decline than episodic memory (EM) composite scores alone. However, this has never been empirically tested. We compared the rate of cognitive decline associated with high Aβ (Aβ+) and very high Aβ (Aβ++) in cognitively normal (CN) older adults on three multidomain cognitive composite scores and one single-domain (EM) composite score. CN older adults (n = 423) underwent Aβ neuroimaging and completed neuropsychological assessments at baseline, and at 18-, 36-, 54-, and 72-month follow-ups. Four cognitive composite scores were computed: the ADCS-PACC (ADCS-Preclinical Alzheimer Cognitive Composite), ADCS-PACC without the inclusion of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), an EM composite, and the Z-scores of Attention, Verbal fluency, and Episodic memory for Nondemented older adults (ZAVEN) composite. Compared with Aβ+ CN older adults, Aβ++ CN older adults showed faster rates of decline across all cognitive composites, with the largest decline observed for ZAVEN composite (d = 1.07). Similarly, compared with Aβ- CN older adults, Aβ+ CN older adults also showed faster rates of cognitive decline, but only for the ADCS-PACC no MMSE (d = 0.43), EM (d = 0.53), and ZAVEN (d = 0.50) composites. Aβ-related cognitive decline is best detected using validated neuropsychological instruments. Removal of the MMSE from the ADCS-PACC and replacing it with a test of executive function (verbal fluency; i.e., the ZAVEN) rendered this composite more sensitive even in detecting Aβ-related cognitive decline between Aβ+ and Aβ++ CN older adults.

  20. Genetic aspects of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia and represents a major public health problem. The neuropathologic findings of amyloid-beta plaques and tau containing neurofibrillary tangles represent important molecular clues to the underlying pathogenesis. Genetic factors are well recognized, but complicated. Three rare forms of autosomal-dominant early-onset familial Alzheimer disease have been identified and are associated with mutations in amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, and presenilin 2 genes. The more common late-onset form of Alzheimer disease is assumed to be polygenic/multifactorial. However, thus far the only clearly identified genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease is Apo lipoprotein E. The epsilon4 allele of Apo lipoprotein E influences age at onset of Alzheimer disease, but is neither necessary nor sufficient for the disease. The search continues for the discovery of additional genetic influences.

  1. Alterations in Cerebral Cortical Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism Precedes Amyloid Plaques in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Aldana, Blanca I

    2017-01-01

    in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque formation. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of 3-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 and wild-type control mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]glutamine, and tissue extracts were analyzed...... slices of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose. No changes in glial [1,2-(13)C]acetate metabolism were observed. Cerebral cortical slices from APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice exhibited a reduced capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamine. Furthermore, the ATP synthesis...... rate tended to be decreased in isolated whole-brain mitochondria of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Thus, several cerebral metabolic changes are evident in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque deposition, including altered glucose metabolism, hampered glutamine processing and mitochondrial...

  2. Immunocytochemical Characterization of Alzheimer Disease Hallmarks in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Treated with a New Anti-Amyloid-β Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Carrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available APP/PS1 double-transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, which overexpress mutated forms of the gene for human amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin 1 (PS1, have provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of AD-like pattern at early ages. This study characterizes immunocytochemical patterns of AD mouse brain as a model for human AD treated with the EB101 vaccine. In this novel vaccine, a new approach has been taken to circumvent past failures by judiciously selecting an adjuvant consisting of a physiological matrix embedded in liposomes, composed of naturally occurring phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cholesterol. Our findings showed that administration of amyloid-β1−42 (Aβ and sphingosine-1-phosphate emulsified in liposome complex (EB101 to APP/PS1 mice before onset of Aβ deposition (7 weeks of age and/or at an older age (35 weeks of age is effective in halting the progression and clearing the AD-like neuropathological hallmarks. Passive immunization with EB101 did not activate inflammatory responses from the immune system and astrocytes. Consistent with a decreased inflammatory background, the basal immunological interaction between the T cells and the affected areas (hippocampus in the brain of treated mice was notably reduced. These results demonstrate that immunization with EB101 vaccine prevents and attenuates AD neuropathology in this type of double-transgenic mice.

  3. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sections: Find your local Alzheimer's Association What is Alzheimer's Disease Brain Tour Caring for Alzheimer's Become an Alzheimer ... Get the facts 10 warning signs What is dementia What is Alzheimer's Stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Virtual ...

  4. Inhibition of cathepsin B reduces beta-amyloid production in regulated secretory vesicles of neuronal chromaffin cells: evidence for cathepsin B as a candidate beta-secretase of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Toneff, Thomas; Bogyo, Matthew; Greenbaum, Doron; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Neveu, John; Lane, William; Hook, Gregory; Reisine, Terry

    2005-09-01

    The regulated secretory pathway of neurons is the major source of extracellular A beta that accumulates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Extracellular A beta secreted from that pathway is generated by beta-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Previously, cysteine protease activity was demonstrated as the major beta-secretase activity in regulated secretory vesicles of neuronal chromaffin cells. In this study, the representative cysteine protease activity in these secretory vesicles was purified and identified as cathepsin B by peptide sequencing. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated colocalization of cathepsin B with A beta in these vesicles. The selective cathepsin B inhibitor, CA074, blocked the conversion of endogenous APP to A beta in isolated regulated secretory vesicles. In chromaffin cells, CA074Me (a cell permeable form of CA074) reduced by about 50% the extracellular A beta released by the regulated secretory pathway, but CA074Me had no effect on A beta released by the constitutive pathway. Furthermore, CA074Me inhibited processing of APP into the COOH-terminal beta-secretase-like cleavage product. These results provide evidence for cathepsin B as a candidate beta-secretase in regulated secretory vesicles of neuronal chromaffin cells. These findings implicate cathepsin B as beta-secretase in the regulated secretory pathway of brain neurons, suggesting that inhibitors of cathepsin B may be considered as therapeutic agents to reduce A beta in AD.

  5. Polymorphisms at the paraoxonase 1 L55M and Q192R loci affect the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease: emphasis on the cholinergic system and beta-amyloid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Valerie; Poirier, Judes

    2008-01-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) functions to protect the cholinergic system against nerve gases and the organophosphate family of pesticides. Recent studies have shown that polymorphisms at the PON1 L55M and Q192R loci might affect individual susceptibility to experience-derived and environmental events such as the exposure to inhibitors of cholinesterase (ChEIs). ChEI therapy being the treatment of choice for mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, we determined whether genetic variations in the PON1 loci are associated with AD risk and whether they affect brain choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) activity, nicotinic receptor density, and beta-amyloid (Abeta) levels in different regions of AD and age-matched control subjects. This pilot genetic study used a small cohort of brains from autopsy-confirmed AD patients and age-matched controls from the Douglas Hospital Brain Bank, Quebec, Canada. The frequency of the M55M genotype at the PON1 L55M locus was found to be significantly increased in AD patients relative to age-matched controls (p < 0.05). Significant associations were observed between the PON1 L55M and Q192R polymorphisms and frontal cortex Abeta levels as well as CHAT activity and nicotinic receptor density in the temporal cortex. Our results suggest a prominent role for PON1 in the pathophysiology of common AD with a marked impact on the cholinergic system and Abeta levels in the brain. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Subcutaneous administration of liraglutide ameliorates learning and memory impairment by modulating tau hyperphosphorylation via the glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway in an amyloid β protein induced alzheimer disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liqin; Ke, Linfang; Liu, Xiaohong; Liao, Lianming; Ke, Sujie; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Yanping; Lin, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Libin

    2016-07-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The glucagon-like peptide-1 analog liraglutide, a novel long-lasting incretin hormone, has been used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, liraglutide has been shown to be neurotrophic and neuroprotective. Here, we investigated the effects of liraglutide on amyloid β protein (Aβ)-induced AD in mice and explored its mechanism of action. The results showed that subcutaneous administration of liraglutide (25nmol/day), once daily for 8 weeks, prevented memory impairments in the Y Maze and Morris Water Maze following Aβ1-42 intracerebroventricular injection, and alleviated the ultra-structural changes of pyramidal neurons and chemical synapses in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, liraglutide reduced Aβ1-42-induced tau phosphorylation via the protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathways. Thus liraglutide may alleviate cognitive impairment in AD by at least decreasing the phosphorylation of tau. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Maysin and Its Flavonoid Derivative from Centipedegrass Attenuates Amyloid Plaques by Inducting Humoral Immune Response with Th2 Skewed Cytokine Response in the Tg (APPswe, PS1dE9 Alzheimer's Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Song

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a slow, progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia in the elderly. The etiology of AD and its underlying mechanism are still not clear. In a previous study, we found that an ethyl acetate extract of Centipedegrass (CG (i.e., EA-CG contained 4 types of Maysin derivatives, including Luteolin, Isoorientin, Rhamnosylisoorientin, and Derhamnosylmaysin, and showed protective effects against Amyloid beta (Aβ by inhibiting oligomeric Aβ in cellular and in vitro models. Here, we examined the preventative effects of EA-CG treatment on the Aβ burden in the Tg (Mo/Hu APPswe PS1dE9 AD mouse model. We have investigated the EA-CG efficacy as novel anti-AD likely preventing amyloid plaques using immunofluorescence staining to visually analyze Aβ40/42 and fibril formation with Thioflavin-S or 6E10 which are the profile of immunoreactivity against epitope Aβ1-16 or neuritic plaque, the quantitation of humoral immune response against Aβ, and the inflammatory cytokine responses (Th1 and Th2 using ELISA and QRT-PCR. To minimize the toxicity of the extracted CG, we addressed the liver toxicity in response to the CG extract treatment in Tg mice using relevant markers, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST/ alanine aminotransferase (ALT measurements in serum. The EA-CG extract significantly reduced the Aβ burden, the concentration of soluble Aβ40/42 protein, and fibril formation in the hippocampus and cortex of the Tg mice treated with EA-CG (50 mg/kg BW/day for 6 months compared with the Tg mice treated with a normal diet. Additionally, the profile of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed that the levels of Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-10 cytokines are more significantly increased than Th1 (interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin-2(IL-2 in the sera. These results suggest that the EA-CG fraction induces IL-4/IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory cytokines (Th2 rather than pro

  8. SPECT imaging of peripheral amyloid in mice by targeting hyper-sulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans with specific scFv antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wall, J.S.; Richey, T.; Stuckey, A.; Donnell, R.; Oosterhof, A.; Kuppevelt, T. van; Smits, N.C.; Kennel, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Amyloid deposits are associated with a broad spectrum of disorders including monoclonal gammopathies, chronic inflammation, and Alzheimer's disease. In all cases, the amyloid pathology contains, in addition to protein fibrils, a plethora of associated molecules, including high

  9. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  10. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  11. A dual vaccine against influenza & Alzheimer's disease failed to enhance anti-β-amyloid antibody responses in mice with pre-existing virus specific memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Cadagan, Richard; Marleau, Annette M; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-12-15

    Novel dual vaccine, WSN-Aβ(1-10), based on the recombinant influenza virus, expressing immunodominant B-cell epitope of β-amyloid, simultaneously induced therapeutically potent anti-Aβ and anti-influenza antibodies. In this study we showed that boosting of WSN-WT primed mice with WSN-Aβ(1-10) enhances anti-viral, but fails to induce anti-Aβ antibody responses. This inhibition is associated with expression of Aβ(1-10) within the context of an inactivated influenza virus vaccine. These results demonstrate that the use of an inactivated influenza virus as a carrier for AD vaccine may not be applicable due to the possible inhibition of anti-Aβ antibody response in individuals previously vaccinated or infected with influenza. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Progress in the study of near-infrared fluorescent probes for the detection of β-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Feng, Hai-wei; Li, Yu-yan

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of cognitive impairment in older people. With the aging of society is more and more serious, AD caused great burden to patients and society. A β is a classical biomarker of AD, which has been widely used in clinical diagnosis of AD patients. Compared with positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), near infrared fluorescence imaging has many advantages including highly sensitive, non-invasive, safety and inexpensive. Therefore, many research groups have focused on developing the molecular probes of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. In this article, we will review the progress of the probes of NIRF.

  13. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gella, Alejandro; Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques ...

  14. A digital enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for ultrasensitive measurement of amyloid-β 1-42 peptide in human plasma with utility for studies of Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linan; Lachno, D Richard; Hanlon, David; Shepro, Adam; Jeromin, Andreas; Gemani, Dipika; Talbot, Jayne A; Racke, Margaret M; Dage, Jeffrey L; Dean, Robert A

    2016-12-15

    Amyloid-β 1-42 peptide (Aβ1-42) is associated with plaque formation in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Pharmacodynamic studies of AD therapeutics that lower the concentrations of Aβ1-42 in peripheral blood require highly sensitive assays for its measurement. A digital enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using single molecule array (Simoa) technology has been developed that provides improved sensitivity compared with conventional ELISA methods using the same antibody reagents. A sensitive digital ELISA for measurement of Aβ1-42 using antibodies 3D6 and 21F12 was developed. Assay performance was evaluated by repeated testing of pooled human plasma and buffer diluent quality control samples to determine relative accuracy, intra- and inter-assay precision, limit of detection (LOD), lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), dilutional linearity, and spike recovery. The optimized assay was used to quantify Aβ1-42 in clinical samples from patients treated with the β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitor LY2886721. The prototype assay measured Aβ1-42 with an LOD of 0.3 pg/ml and an LLOQ of 2.8 pg/ml in plasma, calibrated using an Aβ1-42 peptide standard from Fujirebio. Assay precision was acceptable with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation both being ≤10%. Dilutional linearity was demonstrated in sample diluent and immunodepleted human plasma. Analyte spike recovery ranged from 51% to 93% with a mean of 80%. This assay was able to quantify Aβ1-42 in all of the 84 clinical samples tested. A rapid reduction in levels of Aβ1-42 was detected within 1 h after drug treatment, and a dose-dependent decrease of Aβ1-42 levels was also observed over the time course of sample collection. This digital ELISA has potential utility in clinical applications for quantification of Aβ1-42 in plasma where high sensitivity and precision are required.

  15. PET imaging of brain with the {beta}-amyloid probe, [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1, in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan); National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ye, Daniel; Cohen, Robert M. [National Institutes of Health, Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Cai, Lisheng; Musachio, John L.; Hong, Jinsoo; Crescenzo, Mathew; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Zoghbi, Sami; Vines, Douglass C.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Jacobowitz, David [USUHS, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V. [National Institutes of Health, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Katada, Kazuhiro [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 and positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET imaging was performed with the NIH ATLAS small animal scanner in six elderly transgenic mice (Tg2576; age 22.0{+-}1.8 months; 23.6{+-}2.6 g) overexpressing a mutated form of human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) known to result in the production of A{beta} plaques, and in six elderly wild-type litter mates (age 21.8{+-}1.6 months; 29.5{+-}4.7 g). Dynamic PET scans were performed for 30 min in each mouse under 1% isoflurane inhalation anesthesia after a bolus injection of 13-46 MBq of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1. PET data were reconstructed with 3D OSEM. On the coronal PET image, irregular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on frontal cortex (FR), parietal cortex (PA), striatum (ST), thalamus (TH), pons (PO), and cerebellum (CE), guided by a mouse stereotaxic atlas. Time-activity curves (TACs) (expressed as percent injected dose per gram normalized to body weight: % ID-kg/g) were obtained for FR, PA, ST, TH, PO, and CE. ROI-to-CE radioactivity ratios were also calculated. Following PET scans, sections of mouse brain prepared from anesthetized and fixative-perfused mice were stained with thioflavin-S. TACs for [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 in all ROIs peaked early (at 30-55 s), with radioactivity washing out quickly thereafter in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Peak uptake in all regions was significantly lower in transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. During the later part of the washout phase (12-30 min), the mean FR/CE and PA/CE ratios were higher in transgenic than in wild-type mice (1.06{+-}0.04 vs 0.98{+-}0.07, p=0.04; 1.06{+-}0.09 vs 0.93{+-}0.08 p=0.02) while ST/CE, TH/CE, and PO/CE ratios were not. Ex vivo staining revealed widespread A{beta} plaques in cortex, but not in cerebellum of transgenic mice or in any brain regions of wild

  16. A Cross-Validation of FDG- and Amyloid-PET Biomarkers in Mild Cognitive Impairment for the Risk Prediction to Dementia due to Alzheimer's Disease in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccarino, Leonardo; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Alongi, Pierpaolo; Almkvist, Ove; Wall, Anders; Cerami, Chiara; Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi; Nordberg, Agneta; Perani, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Assessments of brain glucose metabolism (18F-FDG-PET) and cerebral amyloid burden (11C-PiB-PET) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have shown highly variable performances when adopted to predict progression to dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (ADD). This study investigates, in a clinical setting, the separate and combined values of 18F-FDG-PET and 11C-PiB-PET in ADD conversion prediction with optimized data analysis procedures. Respectively, we investigate the accuracy of an optimized SPM analysis for 18F-FDG-PET and of standardized uptake value ratio semiquantification for 11C-PiB-PET in predicting ADD conversion in 30 MCI subjects (age 63.57±7.78 years). Fourteen subjects converted to ADD during the follow-up (median 26.5 months, inter-quartile range 30 months). Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89 and of 0.81 for, respectively, 18F-FDG-PET and 11C-PiB-PET. 18F-FDG-PET, compared to 11C-PiB-PET, showed higher specificity (1.00 versus 0.62, respectively), but lower sensitivity (0.79 versus 1.00). Combining the biomarkers improved classification accuracy (AUC = 0.96). During the follow-up time, all the MCI subjects positive for both PET biomarkers converted to ADD, whereas all the subjects negative for both remained stable. The difference in survival distributions was confirmed by a log-rank test (p = 0.002). These results indicate a very high accuracy in predicting MCI to ADD conversion of both 18F-FDG-PET and 11C-PiB-PET imaging, the former showing optimal performance based on the SPM optimized parametric assessment. Measures of brain glucose metabolism and amyloid load represent extremely powerful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers with complementary roles in prodromal dementia phase, particularly when tailored to individual cases in clinical settings.

  17. Mapping correlations between ventricular expansion and CSF amyloid and tau biomarkers in 240 subjects with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and elderly controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Yu; Leporé, Natasha; Avedissian, Christina; Madsen, Sarah K; Parikshak, Neelroop; Hua, Xue; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to improve on the single-atlas ventricular segmentation method of (Carmichael, O.T., Thompson, P.M., Dutton, R.A., Lu, A., Lee, S.E., Lee, J.Y., Kuller, L.H., Lopez, O.L., Aizenstein, H.J., Meltzer, C.C., Liu, Y., Toga, A.W., Becker, J.T., 2006. Mapping ventricular changes related to dementia and mild cognitive impairment in a large community-based cohort. IEEE ISBI. 315-318) by using multi-atlas segmentation, which has been shown to lead to more accurate segmentations (Chou, Y., Leporé, N., de Zubicaray, G., Carmichael, O., Becker, J., Toga, A., Thompson, P., 2008. Automated ventricular mapping with multi-atlas fluid image alignment reveals genetic effects in Alzheimer's disease, NeuroImage 40(2): 615-630); with this method, we calculated minimal numbers of subjects needed to detect correlations between clinical scores and ventricular maps. We also assessed correlations between emerging CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease pathology and localizable deficits in the brain, in 80 AD, 80 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 80 healthy controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Six expertly segmented images and their embedded parametric mesh surfaces were fluidly registered to each brain; segmentations were averaged within subjects to reduce errors. Surface-based statistical maps revealed powerful correlations between surface morphology and 4 variables: (1) diagnosis, (2) depression severity, (3) cognitive function at baseline, and (4) future cognitive decline over the following year. Cognitive function was assessed using the mini-mental state exam (MMSE), global and sum-of-boxes clinical dementia rating (CDR) scores, at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Lower CSF Abeta(1-42) protein levels, a biomarker of AD pathology assessed in 138 of the 240 subjects, were correlated with lateral ventricular expansion. Using false discovery rate (FDR) methods, 40 and 120 subjects, respectively, were needed to discriminate AD and MCI from normal groups

  18. Sporadic Alzheimer's disease begins as episodes of brain ischemia and ischemically dysregulated Alzheimer's disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Ryszard; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Kocki, Janusz; Brzozowska, Judyta; Januszewski, Sławomir; Furmaga-Jabłońska, Wanda; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2013-12-01

    The study of sporadic Alzheimer's disease etiology, now more than ever, needs an infusion of new concepts. Despite ongoing interest in Alzheimer's disease, the basis of this entity is not yet clear. At present, the best-established and accepted "culprit" in Alzheimer's disease pathology by most scientists is the amyloid, as the main molecular factor responsible for neurodegeneration in this disease. Abnormal upregulation of amyloid production or a disturbed clearance mechanism may lead to pathological accumulation of amyloid in brain according to the "amyloid hypothesis." We will critically review these observations and highlight inconsistencies between the predictions of the "amyloid hypothesis" and the published data. There is still controversy over the role of amyloid in the pathological process. A question arises whether amyloid is responsible for the neurodegeneration or if it accumulates because of the neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests that the pathophysiology and neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease comprises more than amyloid accumulation, tau protein pathology and finally brain atrophy with dementia. Nowadays, a handful of researchers share a newly emerged view that the ischemic episodes of brain best describe the pathogenic cascade, which eventually leads to neuronal loss, especially in hippocampus, with amyloid accumulation, tau protein pathology and irreversible dementia of Alzheimer type. The most persuasive evidences come from investigations of ischemically damaged brains of patients and from experimental ischemic brain studies that mimic Alzheimer-type dementia. This review attempts to depict what we know and do not know about the triggering factor of the Alzheimer's disease, focusing on the possibility that the initial pathological trigger involves ischemic episodes and ischemia-induced gene dysregulation. The resulting brain ischemia dysregulates additionally expression of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-processing enzyme genes

  19. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  20. Neuropathological Alterations in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Matthew P.; Masliah, Eliezer; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) include “positive” lesions such as amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neurofibrillary tangles, and glial responses, and “negative” lesions such as neuronal and synaptic loss. Despite their inherently cross-sectional nature, postmortem studies have enabled the staging of the progression of both amyloid and tangle pathologies, and, consequently, the development of diagnostic criteria that are now used worldwide. In addition, clinicopathological correlation studies have been crucial to generate hypotheses about the pathophysiology of the disease, by establishing that there is a continuum between “normal” aging and AD dementia, and that the amyloid plaque build-up occurs primarily before the onset of cognitive deficits, while neurofibrillary tangles, neuron loss, and particularly synaptic loss, parallel the progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, these cross-sectional neuropathological data have been largely validated by longitudinal in vivo studies using modern imaging biomarkers such as amyloid PET and volumetric MRI. PMID:22229116

  1. Nonpathological extracellular amyloid is present during normal epididymal sperm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Whelly

    Full Text Available Amyloids are aggregated proteins characterized by a specific cross-β-sheet structure and are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Recently, however, several nonpathological amyloids have been found in intracellular organelles of normal mammalian tissues suggesting that amyloid may also carry out biological functions. We previously have shown that the epididymal cystatin CRES (cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic, cst8, a reproductive-specific member of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors, forms amyloid in vitro suggesting that CRES amyloid may also form in vivo within the epididymal lumen. Here we show that amyloid structures containing CRES are a component of the normal mouse epididymal lumen without any apparent cytotoxic effects on spermatozoa and that these structures change along the length of the tubule. These studies suggest the presence of a functional amyloid structure that may carry out roles in sperm maturation or maintenance of the luminal milieu and which itself may undergo maturational changes along the epididymis. In contrast to previous examples of functional amyloid which were intracellular, our studies now show that nonpathological/functional amyloid can also be extracellular. The presence of an extracellular and nonpathological amyloid in the epididymis suggests that similar amyloid structures may be present in other organ systems and may carry out distinctive tissue-specific functions.

  2. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  3. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's Project," produced with help from the Alzheimer's Association and others, won Creative Arts Emmy awards. "The ... in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S ...

  4. Ethosuximide Induces Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Reverses Cognitive Deficits in an Amyloid-β Toxin-induced Alzheimer Rat Model via the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Agarwal, Swati; Yadav, Anuradha; Karmakar, Madhumita; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Sharma, Abhay; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-11-20

    Neurogenesis involves generation of new neurons through finely tuned multistep processes, such as neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, migration, differentiation, and integration into existing neuronal circuitry in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and subventricular zone. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is involved in cognitive functions and altered in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease (AD). Ethosuximide (ETH), an anticonvulsant drug is used for the treatment of epileptic seizures. However, the effects of ETH on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism(s) are yet unexplored. Herein, we studied the effects of ETH on rat multipotent NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in an amyloid β (Aβ) toxin-induced rat model of AD-like phenotypes. ETH potently induced NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the hippocampus-derived NSC in vitro. ETH enhanced NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation and reduced Aβ toxin-mediated toxicity and neurodegeneration, leading to behavioral recovery in the rat AD model. ETH inhibited Aβ-mediated suppression of neurogenic and Akt/Wnt/β-catenin pathway gene expression in the hippocampus. ETH activated the PI3K·Akt and Wnt·β-catenin transduction pathways that are known to be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis. Inhibition of the PI3K·Akt and Wnt·β-catenin pathways effectively blocked the mitogenic and neurogenic effects of ETH. In silico molecular target prediction docking studies suggest that ETH interacts with Akt, Dkk-1, and GSK-3β. Our findings suggest that ETH stimulates NSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro and adult hippocampal neurogenesis via the PI3K·Akt and Wnt·β-catenin signaling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. [Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlit, P; Keyvani, K; Krämer, M; Weber, R

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is one of the most frequent causes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The deposition of beta amyloid leads to vascular fragility due to degeneration of vessel walls, formation of microaneurysms particularly in cortical blood vessels and fibrinoid vessel wall necrosis. The Congo red positive amyloid deposits are biochemically similar to the material comprising senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Recurrent or multiple simultaneous hemorrhages particularly in older patients should raise the suspicion of CAA. Gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive technique for identifying even very small hemorrhages and superficial siderosis, which may cause transient symptoms in CAA. There is also a correlation between CAA, microbleeding and cognitive decline. Inflammatory variants of CAA must be suspected whenever patients present with progressive dementia, headache and multifocal symptoms in association with CAA findings in MRI. Histopathologically, a distinction is made between CAA-related inflammation (CAA-ri) with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates and amyloid beta-related angiitis (ABRA) with histological detection of transmural vasculitis. Inflammatory variants should be treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants.

  6. Acyl peptide hydrolase degrades monomeric and oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Peter B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-beta peptide is believed to cause malfunctioning of neurons in the Alzheimer's disease brain. Amyloid-beta exists in different assembly forms in the aging mammalian brain including monomers, oligomers, and aggregates, and in senile plaques, fibrils. Recent findings suggest that soluble amyloid-beta oligomers may represent the primary pathological species in Alzheimer's disease and the most toxic form that impairs synaptic and thus neuronal function. We previously reported the isolation of a novel amyloid-beta-degrading enzyme, acyl peptide hydrolase, a serine protease that degrades amyloid-beta, and is different in structure and activity from other amyloid-beta-degrading enzymes. Results Here we report the further characterization of acyl peptide hydrolase activity using mass spectrometry. Acyl peptide hydrolase cleaves the amyloid-beta peptide at amino acids 13, 14 and 19. In addition, by real-time PCR we found elevated acyl peptide hydrolase expression in brain areas rich in amyloid plaques suggesting that this enzyme's levels are responsive to increases in amyloid-beta levels. Lastly, tissue culture experiments using transfected CHO cells expressing APP751 bearing the V717F mutation indicate that acyl peptide hydrolase preferentially degrades dimeric and trimeric forms of amyloid-beta. Conclusion These data suggest that acyl peptide hydrolase is involved in the degradation of oligomeric amyloid-beta, an activity that, if induced, might present a new tool for therapy aimed at reducing neurodegeneration in the Alzheimer's brain.

  7. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  8. Cranberry Extract Standardized for Proanthocyanidins Alleviates β-Amyloid Peptide Toxicity by Improving Proteostasis Through HSF-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Cao, Min; Zou, Sige; Ye, Boping; Dong, Yuqing

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that nutraceuticals with prolongevity properties may delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We recently demonstrated that a proanthocyanidins-standardized cranberry extract has properties that prolong life span and promote innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans In this article, we report that supplementation of this cranberry extract delayed Aβ toxicity-triggered body paralysis in the C elegans AD model. Genetic analyses indicated that the cranberry-mediated Aβ toxicity alleviation required heat shock transcription factor (HSF)-1 rather than DAF-16 and SKN-1. Moreover, cranberry supplementation increased the transactivity of HSF-1 in an IIS-dependent manner. Further studies found that the cranberry extract relies on HSF-1 to significantly enhance the solubility of proteins in aged worms, implying an improved proteostasis in AD worms. Considering that HSF-1 plays a pivotal role in maintaining proteostasis, our results suggest that cranberry maintains the function of proteostasis through HSF-1, thereby protecting C elegans against Aβ toxicity. Together, our findings elucidated the mechanism whereby cranberry attenuated Aβ toxicity in C elegans and stressed the significance of proteostasis in the prevention of age-related diseases from a practical point of view. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Deletion of exons 9 and 10 of the Presenilin 1 gene in a patient with Early-onset Alzheimer Disease generates longer amyloid seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guennec, Kilan; Veugelen, Sarah; Quenez, Olivier; Szaruga, Maria; Rousseau, Stéphane; Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Fluchere, Frédérique; Frébourg, Thierry; De Strooper, Bart; Campion, Dominique; Chávez-Gutiérrez, Lucía; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of autosomal dominant Early-onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD). Among them, deletions of exon 9 have been reported to be associated with a phenotype of spastic paraparesis. Using exome data from a large sample of 522 EOAD cases and 584 controls to search for genomic copy-number variations (CNVs), we report here a novel partial, in-frame deletion of PSEN1, removing both exons 9 and 10. The patient presented with memory impairment associated with spastic paraparesis, both starting from the age of 56years. He presented a positive family history of EOAD. We performed functional analysis to elucidate the impact of this novel deletion on PSEN1 activity as part of the γ-secretase complex. The deletion does not affect the assembly of a mature protease complex but has an extreme impact on its global endopeptidase activity. The mutant carboxypeptidase-like activity is also strongly impaired and the deleterious mutant effect leads to an incomplete digestion of long Aβ peptides and enhances the production of Aβ43, which has been shown to be potently amyloidogenic and neurotoxic in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  11. Evaluación de la expresión de la proteína precursora de amiloide en células sanguíneas de pacientes con la mutación E280A en el gen de la presenilina 1 Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor protein e280a mutation flow cytometry presenilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lopera Restrepo

    2005-01-01

    development of an aggressive form of familial Alzheimer's disease. In order to define the role of such mutation on the expression of Amyloid Precursor Protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and B lymphocytes we carried out a study in three groups of people, namely: healthy carriers of the mutation, affected carriers and healthy non-carriers as controls. Flow cytometry was used for the detection of Amyloid Presursor Protein in cell membranes and intracellulary; HeLa and CHO cells were used as positive controls. Expression level of Amyloid Precursor Protein was higher in the intracellular compartment than in the cell membrane. The levels of expression in the intracellular compartment of HeLa and CHO cells were variable in contrast with those of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in which they were lower but stable. Contrariwise to the results of other authors, who have detected higher levels of Amyloid Precursor Protein in Alzheimer's disease patients, our results revealed no difference between healthy controls and carriers of the E280A mutation in the presenilin-1 gene, either diseased or healthy. Our results show that this mutation does not directly change the expression of Amyloid Precursor Protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  12. Differential Effects of Structural Modifications on the Competition of Chalcones for the PIB Amyloid Imaging Ligand-Binding Site in Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Synthetic Aβ Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Marina Y; McCarty, Katie; Head, Elizabeth; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; LeVine, Harry

    2016-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex brain disorder that still remains ill defined. In order to understand the significance of binding of different clinical in vivo imaging ligands to the polymorphic pathological features of AD brain, the molecular characteristics of the ligand interacting with its specific binding site need to be defined. Herein, we observed that tritiated Pittsburgh Compound B ((3)H-PIB) can be displaced from synthetic Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) fibrils and from the PIB binding complex purified from human AD brain (ADPBC) by molecules containing a chalcone structural scaffold. We evaluated how substitution on the chalcone scaffold alters its ability to displace (3)H-PIB from the synthetic fibrils and ADPBC. By comparing unsubstituted core chalcone scaffolds along with the effects of bromine and methyl substitution at various positions, we found that attaching a hydroxyl group on the ring adjacent to the carbonyl group (ring I) of the parent member of the chalcone family generally improved the binding affinity of chalcones toward ADPBC and synthetic fibrils F40 and F42. Furthermore, any substitution on ring I at the ortho-position of the carbonyl group greatly decreases the binding affinity of the chalcones, potentially as a result of steric hindrance. Together with the finding that neither our chalcones nor PIB interact with the Congo Red/X-34 binding site, these molecules provide new tools to selectively probe the PIB binding site that is found in human AD brain, but not in brains of AD pathology animal models. Our chalcone derivatives also provide important information on the effects of fibril polymorphism on ligand binding.

  13. What can we learn from study of Alzheimer's disease in patients with Down syndrome for early-onset Alzheimer's disease in the general population?

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Robyn A; Dalton, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical and scientific study of dementia in adults with Down syndrome led to the development of the amyloid hypothesis as a fundamental concept in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The journey started with the discovery of the structure and metabolic processing of ?-amyloid brain deposits associated with Alzheimer's dementia in adults with Down syndrome, and then the prediction and confirmation of the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21. The processes and genes responsible fo...

  14. The effect of amyloid associated proteins on the expression of genes involved in amyloid-beta clearance by adult human astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Veerhuis, R.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Nielsen, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes appear to be important mediators in the clearance of amyloid beta1-42 (Aβ), the key component of senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, we found the amyloid associated proteins (AAPs) α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT), apolipoprotein J and E (ApoJ and ApoE) and a

  15. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Bremell, Daniel; Anckarsäter, Rolf; Blennow, Kaj; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars

    2010-06-22

    The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Abeta deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB). The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy) and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the beta-amyloid peptides Abeta38, Abeta40 and Abeta42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) isoforms alpha-sAPP and beta-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau), phosphorylated tau (P-tau) and neurofilament protein (NFL) were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF alpha-sAPP, beta-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF alpha-sAPP, beta-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of alpha-sAPP, beta-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  16. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  17. Accumulation of amyloid-? by astrocytes result in enlarged endosomes and microvesicle-induced apoptosis of neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Söllvander, Sofia; Nikitidou, Elisabeth; Brolin, Robin; Soderberg, Linda; Sehlin, Dag; Lannfelt, Lars; Erlandsson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the clear physical association between activated astrocytes and amyloid-? (A?) plaques, the importance of astrocytes and their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer?s disease remain elusive. Soluble A? aggregates, such as protofibrils, have been suggested to be responsible for the widespread neuronal cell death in Alzheimer?s disease, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Moreover, ineffective degradation is of great interest when it comes to the development and progr...

  18. Exercise alters the immune profile in Tg2576 Alzheimer mice toward a response coincident with improved cognitive performance and decreased amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribbs David H

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is associated with Aβ pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD and transgenic AD models. Previously, it has been demonstrated that chronic stimulation of the immune response induces pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α which contribute to neurodegeneration. However, recent evidence has shown that inducing the adaptive immune response reduces Aβ pathology and is neuroprotective. Low concentrations of IFN-γ modulate the adaptive immune response by directing microglia to differentiate to antigen presenting cells. Our objective was to determine if exercise could induce a shift from the immune profile in aged (17–19 months Tg2576 mice to a response that reduces Aβ pathology. Methods TG (n = 29 and WT (n = 27 mice were divided into sedentary (SED and exercised (RUN groups. RUN animals were provided an in-cage running wheel for 3 weeks. Tissue was harvested and hippocampus and cortex dissected out. Quantitative data was analyzed using 2 × 2 ANOVA and student's t-tests. Results IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly greater in hippocampi from sedentary Tg2576 (TGSED mice than in wildtype (WTSED (p = 0.04, p = 0.006. Immune response proteins IFN-γ and MIP-1α are lower in TGSED mice than in WTSED (p = 0.03, p = 0.07. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running, IL-1β and TNF-α decreased to levels indistinguishable from WT. Concurrently, IFN-γ and MIP-1α increased in TGRUN. Increased CD40 and MHCII, markers of antigen presentation, were observed in TGRUN animals compared to TGSED, as well as CD11c staining in and around plaques and vasculature. Additional vascular reactivity observed in TGRUN is consistent with an alternative activation immune pathway, involving perivascular macrophages. Significant decreases in soluble Aβ40 (p = 0.01 and soluble fibrillar Aβ (p = 0.01 were observed in the exercised transgenic animals. Conclusion Exercise shifts the immune response from innate to an adaptive or

  19. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Autosomal dominant, familial AD (fAD) is very rare and caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN-2) genes. The pathogenesis...

  20. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT," ... (48 minutes) "Momentum ...

  1. Generation of amyloid-β is reduced by the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein, presenilin and nicastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca(2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330-344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330-344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of

  2. The role of amyloid-beta in the regulation of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E; Farr, Susan A

    2014-04-15

    In this review there is evidence that amyloid-beta peptide is a memory enhancer at physiological (picomolar) concentrations. Pathological overproduction of amyloid-beta leads to impaired memory, oxidative damage, damage to the blood brain barrier, neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. Antisenses to amyloid precursor protein (APP) can reverse these effects in mice when they lower amyloid-beta protein to physiological levels. Data suggests that overproduction of APP leads to oxidative stress producing a vicious cycle of neuronal damage. For these reasons we have revised the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" removing emphasis from the plaque to amyloid-beta overproduction and suggest that an "amyloid-beta mitochondrial vicious cycle" hypothesis may be a better pathophysiological model for understanding Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuner, K.; Schutt, T.; Kurz, C.; Eckert, S.H.; Schiller, C.; Occhipinti, A.; Mai, S.; Jendrach, M.; Eckert, G.P.; Kruse, S.E.; Palmiter, R.D.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.; Wittig, I.; Willem, M.; Haass, C.; Reichert, A.S.; Muller, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and extracellular Abeta plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Abeta production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species

  4. Ras signal triggers β-Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) expression

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Natalia; Santa Bárbara Ruiz, Paula; Ferreira, Nuno; Serras, Florenci

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that the Drosophila β-amyloid protein precursor like (Appl) gene, the ortholog of the human β-Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene, is transcriptionally activated by receptor tyrosine kinase activity that involves Ras/MAPK signaling in vivo. This regulation is specifically controlled in photoreceptor neurons of the Drosophila retina. This suggests that some cases of Alzheimer disease, those which have been associated with high expression of the APP gene, may in...

  5. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of our most popular sections: Find your local Alzheimer's Association What is Alzheimer's Disease Brain Tour Caring for Alzheimer's Become an Alzheimer Champion on our sister Web ...

  6. Alzheimer's Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not share your information. * Required. View archives. Alzheimer's impact is growing Alzheimer's disease is the sixth- ... Last Updated: Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association advances research ...

  7. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leading us to find a cure. This multi-platform series reveals groundbreaking Alzheimer's discoveries and the effects ... dementia What is Alzheimer's Stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Virtual Library Interactive Brain Tour Learn how Alzheimer's affects ...

  8. Alzheimer's Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer’s Project In the News Walk to End Alzheimer's Upcoming Events AAIC Advocacy Forum Rita Hayworth Gala - New York Rita Hayworth Gala - Chicago National Alzheimer's Gala A Night at Sardi's Alzheimer's Disease Awareness ...

  9. Ischemia signalling to Alzheimer-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Ryszard; Kocki, Janusz; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review the hard-earned data, which present ischemic induction of amyloid precursor protein, presenilins, apolipoproteins and secretases genes, playing key roles in β-amyloid peptide generation. Presented data are strongly supporting a hypothesis that brain ischemia may be involved in the aetiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Potential contribution and impact of ischemically activated genes on the development of sporadic Alzheimer's disease remain to be established at both genetic and functional levels. The identification of the genes involved in sporadic Alzheimer's disease induced by ischemia will enable to further define the events leading to Alzheimer's disease-related abnormalities. Additionally, knowledge gained from the reviewed studies should facilitate the elaboration of effective treatment and/or prevention of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol in wild-type rodents and its binding to beta amyloid deposits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snellman, Anniina; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R.; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja [University of Turku, MediCity/PET Preclinical Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Rokka, Johanna; Eskola, Olli [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Wilson, Ian; Farrar, Gill [GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire (United Kingdom); Scheinin, Mika [University of Turku, Department of Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Turku (Finland); Solin, Olof [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Aabo Akademi University, Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol as a preclinical PET tracer for imaging {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) deposition by comparing its pharmacokinetics to those of [{sup 11}C]Pittsburgh compound B ([{sup 11}C]PIB) in wild-type Sprague Dawley rats and C57Bl/6N mice. In addition, binding of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to A{beta} deposits was studied in the Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol biodistribution was evaluated using ex vivo PET methods and in vivo PET imaging in wild-type rats and mice. Metabolism and binding of [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to plasma proteins were analysed using thin-layer chromatography and ultrafiltration methods, respectively. Radiation dose estimates were calculated from rat ex vivo biodistribution data. The binding of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to A{beta} deposits was also studied using ex vivo and in vitro autoradiography. The location of A{beta} deposits in the brain was determined with thioflavine S staining and immunohistochemistry. The pharmacokinetics of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol resembled that of [{sup 11}C]PIB in rats and mice. In vivo studies showed that both tracers readily entered the brain, and were excreted via the hepatobiliary pathway in both rats and mice. The metabolism of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol into radioactive metabolites was faster than that of [{sup 11}C]PIB. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol cleared more slowly from the brain than [{sup 11}C]PIB, particularly from white matter, in line with its higher lipophilicity. Effective dose estimates for [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol were 2.28 and 6.65 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Autoradiographs showed [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol binding to fibrillar A{beta} deposits in the brain of Tg2576 mice. Based on its pharmacokinetic profile, [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol showed potential as a PET tracer for preclinical imaging. It showed good brain uptake and was bound to A{beta} deposits in the

  11. Vitamin k3 inhibits protein aggregation: Implication in the treatment of amyloid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Parvez Alam; Sumit Kumar Chaturvedi; Mohammad Khursheed Siddiqi; Ravi Kant Rajpoot; Mohd Rehan Ajmal; Masihuz Zaman; Rizwan Hasan Khan

    2016-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human diseases such as Alzheimer?s, Parkinson?s and familial amyloid polyneuropathy etc. In this study, anti-fibrillation activity of vitamin k3 and its effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and A?-42 peptide were investigated. Here, in combination with Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), transmission electron microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay, we demons...

  12. Amyloid β production is regulated by β2-adrenergic signaling-mediated post-translational modifications of the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussiere, Renaud; Lacampagne, Alain; Reiken, Steven; Liu, Xiaoping; Scheuerman, Valerie; Zalk, Ran; Martin, Cécile; Checler, Frederic; Marks, Andrew R; Chami, Mounia

    2017-06-16

    Alteration of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling has been reported in Alzheimer disease (AD) models. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered RyR-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) release in AD remain to be fully elucidated. We report here that RyR2 undergoes post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, oxidation, and nitrosylation) in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) harboring the familial double Swedish mutations (APPswe). RyR2 macromolecular complex remodeling, characterized by depletion of the regulatory protein calstabin2, resulted in increased cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and mitochondrial oxidative stress. We also report a functional interplay between amyloid β (Aβ), β-adrenergic signaling, and altered Ca(2+) signaling via leaky RyR2 channels. Thus, post-translational modifications of RyR occur downstream of Aβ through a β2-adrenergic signaling cascade that activates PKA. RyR2 remodeling in turn enhances βAPP processing. Importantly, pharmacological stabilization of the binding of calstabin2 to RyR2 channels, which prevents Ca(2+) leakage, or blocking the β2-adrenergic signaling cascade reduced βAPP processing and the production of Aβ in APPswe-expressing SH-SY5Y cells. We conclude that targeting RyR-mediated Ca(2+) leakage may be a therapeutic approach to treat AD. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Epidemiology of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease. PMID:22908189

  14. Late age increase in soluble amyloid-beta levels in the APP23 mouse model despite steady-state levels of amyloid-beta-producing proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Leen; Keppens, Cleo; De Deyn, Peter P.; Van Dam, Debby

    Age is considered the most important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Soluble amyloid-beta (A beta) has been implicated as the primary neurotoxic agent in Alzheimer's disease pathology. The link between aging and A beta, however, remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the

  15. Minocycline does not affect amyloid beta phagocytosis by human microglial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Familian, Atoosa; Eikelenboom, Piet; Veerhuis, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Activated microglia accumulate in amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques containing amyloid associated factors SAP and C1q in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by promoting Abeta plaque formation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand,

  16. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A.; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W.; Saradha, A.; Abdi, Herve; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abeliovich, Asa; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Abner, Erin; Acharya, Deepa; Agrusti, Antonella; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahn, Jae Eun; Aisen, Paul; Aksu, Yaman; Al-Akhras, Mousa; Alarcon, Marcelo; Alberca, Roman; Alexander, Gene; Alexander, Daniel; Alin, Aylin; Almeida, Fabio; Amlien, Inge; Anand, Shyam; Anderson, Dallas; Andrew, Marilee; Angersbach, Steve; Anjum, Ayesha; Aoyama, Eiji; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armor, Tom; Arnold, Steven; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Asatryan, Albert; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashiga, Hirokazu; Assareh, Arezoo; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Avinash, Gopal; Aviv, Richard; Awasthi, Sukrati; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Babic, Tomislav; Baek, Young; Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Shuyang; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Banks, Sarah; Bard, Jonathan; Barnes, Josephine; Bartlett, Jonathan; Bartzokis, George; Barua, Neil; Bauer, Corinna; Bayley, Peter; Beck, Irene; Becker, James; Becker, J. Alex; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bek, Stephan; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Belmokhtar, Nabil; Bernard, Charlotte; Bertram, Lars; Bhaskar, Uday; Biffi, Alessandro; Bigler, Erin; Bilgic, Basar; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Black, Ronald; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Bokde, Arun; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Boppana, Madhu; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bowes, Mike; Bowman, DuBois; Bowman, Gene; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Bresell, Anders; Brewer, James; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brogren, Jacob; Brooks, David; Browndyke, Jeffrey; Brunton, Simon; Buchert, Ralph; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buckley, Chris; Buerger, Katharina; Burger, Cyrill; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burton, David; Butman, John; Cabeza, Rafael; Cairns, Nigel; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Cantillon, Marc; Capella, Heraldo; Carbotti, Angela; Cardona-Sanclemente, Luis Eduardo; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Jeremy; Carranza-Ath, Fredy; Casabianca, Jodi; Casanova, Ramon; Cash, David; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Cella, Massimo; Celsis, Pierre; Chanu, Pascal; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Chemali, Zeina; Chen, Rong; Chen, Jake; Chen, Gennan; Chen, Wei; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Shuzhong; Chen, Minhua; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Charlton; Cheung, Vinci; Chiang, Gloria; Chiba, Koji; Chin, Simon; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Youngsang; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Chowbina, Sudhir; Christensen, Anette Luther; Clark, David; Clark, Chris; Clarkson, Matt; Clayton, David; Clunie, David; Coen, Michael; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coppola, Giovanni; Coulin, Samuel; Cover, Keith S.; Crane, Paul; Crans, Gerald; Croop, Robert; Crowther, Daniel; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Curry, Charles; Curtis, Steven; Cutter, Gary; Daiello, Lori; Dake, Michael; Dale, Anders; Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Damato, Vito Domenico; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Davatzikos, Christos; Dave, Jay; David, Renaud; DavidPrakash, Bhaskaran; Davidson, Julie; de Bruijne, Marleen; de Meyer, Geert; de Nunzio, Giorgio; Decarli, Charles; Dechairo, Bryan; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Dejkam, Arsalan; Delfino, Manuel; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Dellavedova, Luca; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Delrieu, Julien; DeOrchis, Vincent; Depy Carron, Delphine; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; DeVous, Michael; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Bradford, Dickerson; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Duan, Xujun; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Duk