WorldWideScience

Sample records for sweden ages 6-16

  1. Ageing management requirements in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.

    2007-01-01

    Since the adoption of the 1997 act of parliament concerning the abolishment of nuclear power in Sweden plant lives are no longer limited until 2010 as they were following the referendum in 1980. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) has therefore in its most recent general regulations from 2004 introduced requirements for plants to develop ageing management programmes which should have been in place by the end of 2005. An ageing management programme for a nuclear power plant can be viewed as a high level coordinated programme consisting of several other programmes including maintenance and inspection programmes, and as such it should be an integrated part of the quality assurance system of the plant. The goals of the programme are to ensure that there is long term management of ageing and avoidance of the unexpected. For the Swedish regulator the safety aspects and not the economic aspects of ageing management are of primary importance. But there are clear advantages to utilities if large surprises which result in unplanned outages can be avoided. (author)

  2. The Effect of Mixed-Age Classes in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Elly-Ann; Lindahl, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Mixed-aged (MA) classes are a common phenomenon around the world. In Sweden, these types of classes increased rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s, despite the fact that existing empirical support for MA classes is weak. In this paper, the effect of attending an MA class during grades 4-6 on students' cognitive skills is estimated. Using a unique…

  3. Overview of plant reliability and aging in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckered, T.

    1985-01-01

    In a wide sense aging includes all the phenomena that cause properties of a system to deviate from those existing at the time of start of operation of the system. Such phenomena are of course those well known ones as corrosion, erosion, fatigue and wear. But other phenomena can be included like technological development making original designs obsolete or the learning or forgetting of operators. In this presentation the Swedish nuclear power programme will be briefly described, especially as concerns different generations of nuclear reactors and their operation history. Operating experience, including scram statistics and trends, will be covered as well as availability and reliability as functions of plant age and plant generation. Specific aging phenomena which have been experienced in Sweden, will be described as well as the actions taken or planned for coping with them. The means and tools used in Sweden for tracking aging phenomena will also be covered. The question is posed whether we need an international data bank for aging, maintenance and repair information similar to the already existing, successful incident data banks

  4. Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Swedish nuclear industry is - like in many countries - in a state of rejuvenation. During the coming ten years, 6000 new staff will be employed, which in volume corresponds to the entire present industry. These numbers are based on retirements (easy to estimate), increased needs due to new-build, and to increased mobility of the new staff to be employed (more difficult to estimate). Until now, employment in nuclear power have often lasted very long. We anticipate, however, that the young people that will be recruited will be less prone to stay at the same place for long. Until now, Sweden has never had a dedicated bachelor level nuclear engineering programme. This will, however, change. A new programme will start at Uppsala University in autumn 2010. An existing 3-year bachelor-level mechanics engineering education programme will get a third-year specialization in nuclear engineering. This specialization has been designed to allow students from any technical college or university in Sweden with mechanical or electric engineering in the curriculum. The studies will be in Swedish. Industry is involved both as sponsors and as contributors. The industry educational company (KSU) is closely involved, e.g. with simulator training. The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, has offered an international MSc in nuclear engineering since 2008. The programme has attracted 10-15 students per year. In addition, students at other programmes participate in some courses, resulting in about 25 students in an average course. Chalmers Institute of Technology, Gothenburg, has started a new nuclear engineering MSc programme in autumn 2009. The programme has equal shares of reactor physics/technology and nuclear chemistry, reflecting the competence profile at Chalmers. This special curriculum is highly appreciated by the Ringhals nuclear power plant nearby, that houses three PWRs, and needs staff with combined reactor physics and nuclear chemistry competence. Uppsala

  5. Trends in occupational mortality among middle-aged men in Sweden 1961-1990

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diderichsen, Finn; Hallqvist, J

    1997-01-01

    Many European countries have in recent decades reported growing socioeconomic differentials in mortality. While these trends have usually paralleled high unemployment and increasing income disparities, Sweden had low unemployment and narrowing income differences. This study describes trends, 1961......-1990, in total and cardiovascular mortality among men, 45-69 years of age, in major occupational classes in Sweden....

  6. 31 CFR 6.16 - Judicial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Judicial review. 6.16 Section 6.16... EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Procedures for Considering Applications § 6.16 Judicial review. Judicial review of final agency decisions on awards may be sought as provided in 5 U.S.C. 504(c)(2). ...

  7. Senior housing in Sweden: a new concept for aging in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Cecilia; Ahnby, Ulla; Osterstrom, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Demographic projections of elder care in Sweden necessitate new and creative approaches to accommodate this rapidly growing population. This article describes a unique aging-in-place care and housing policy initiative for the elderly. Using a case example in Eksjo, Sweden, the authors used a future workshop (FW) method to help seniors plan their future housing in the community. The FW is based on a collective democratic process involving full participation, open communication, organizational development, and leadership. The process steps of the three-stage FW method are described. Results indicated that empowerment, collaboration, autonomy, social education, and decision making can be achieved in a community-network-based policy model. This demonstrates the devolution of national policy and how, at the grass roots level, local participation and public accountability can take root. Devolution created an opportunity for creatively addressing local needs.

  8. Does the breast cancer age at diagnosis differ by ethnicity? A study on immigrants to Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sundquist, Jan; Brandt, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Age-specific incidence rates for breast cancer in low-risk and high-risk ethnic populations differ by age at which the incidence maximum is reached: around 50 years in low-risk populations and over 60 years in high-risk populations. The interpretation of these differences remains unsettled, one line primarily referring to biological differences, the second one to cohort effects of rapidly increasing rates in young populations, and the third one to incomplete registration of cancer in the elderly. The nationwide Family-Cancer Database was used to analyze standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and age at diagnosis of breast cancer in female immigrants to Sweden by their region of origin compared with women native to Sweden matched on birth year and other relevant factors. We showed first that the SIRs for breast cancer were lower in many immigrant groups compared with natives of Sweden; women from Turkey had the lowest SIR of 0.45, followed by those from Chile (0.54) and Southeast Asia (0.57). Women from nine regions showed an earlier mean age at diagnosis than their matched Swedish controls, the largest differences being 5.5 years for women from Turkey, 5.1 years for those from Asian Arab and "Other African" countries, 4.3 years for those from Iran, and 4.0 years for those from Iraq. The results show that in many immigrant groups, the diagnostic age is earlier (50 years), suggesting that true biological factors underlie the differences. These factors may explain much of the international variation in breast cancer incidence. Identifying these factors should advance understanding of breast cancer etiology and prevention.

  9. Induced abortion ratio in modern Sweden falls with age, but rises again before menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullberg, B S.; Lummaa, V

    2001-01-01

    A woman's reproductive value decreases over her reproductive life span and it is therefore predicted that the likelihood of termination of investment in a child decreases with increasing age. An eventual increase in termination ratio in the oldest age groups, as is often found in abortion statistics, could depend on older women on average having larger families rather than on age per se. We used data on abortions and births in Sweden during 1994 to investigate how abortion ratio is related to age and parity of women. We found that age-specific abortion ratio is U-shaped (i.e. that it is highest for the youngest and for the oldest age groups) in each parity class from zero to four children but that age-dependence breaks down in higher parity classes (5, >/=6). Thus, for each of the parity classes 0-4, the incidence of abortion decreases with age up to a point, but increases again as women approach menopause. This late increase in induced abortion ratio seems to depend on age per se. The data indicate that abortion ratio is an inverse function of fertility, and that investment in new reproduction gradually decreases as a woman approaches menopause. Assuming grandmothering as an important driving force in human life history evolution, such a pattern might indicate that the transition from behavioural investment in one's own children to one's grandchildren is a gradual process similar to the decline in ovarian function.

  10. Age Homogamy and Modernization: Evidence From Turn-of-the-Twentieth Century Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dribe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is a fundamental institution with implications for economic and social development. The age difference between spouses reflects social relations across time and space. It has decreased with modernization, presumably because marriage for sentimental, rather than instrumental, reasons has become widespread. This study investigates age differences between spouses and how they changed at the time of the industrial revolution in Sweden. We analyze spatial differences in age homogamy by linking them to indicators of industrialization and modernization at the individual and community level. We use full- count census data of about 600,000 couples in 1880-1900. The results show socioeconomic and spatial differences between different measures of age homogamy, but do not support a link between cultural change and change in age homogamy. Instead they are more consistent with explanations focusing on how industrialization and urbanization relaxed the old Malthusian marriage pattern, weakening the link between property and wealth, and, by extension, that to marriage and smaller age differences between spouses.

  11. Targeting modifiable risk factors in age-related macular degeneration in optometric practice in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lene Martin1,2 1School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; 2School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, London, UK Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which ophthalmologists and optometrists in Sweden recommend the use of nutritional supplements, changes in diet, or smoking cessation to patients who are at risk of or with signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. In addition, this study also examined how these practitioners rate the strength of evidence for nutritional supplements in AMD management and which sources of information they consult to determine supplement recommendations for the prevention or treatment of AMD. Methods: This study implemented a cross-sectional design using data from a questionnaire. All Swedish optometrists and ophthalmologists who were registered in the membership databases of their respective professional organizations were invited to participate. The questionnaire contained 18 forced choice questions and one free text question and was organized into the following four sections: use of nutritional supplements, dietary advice, smoking and eye diseases, and strength of evidence and the sources of information regarding nutritional supplement interventions. Results: The response rate was 40.3% for optometrists and 5% for ophthalmologists. Optometrists were more likely than ophthalmologists to recommend nutritional supplements in AMD and provided significantly more advice about diet than did the ophthalmologists for both patients at risk for AMD and those with established disease. The ophthalmologists were more likely than the optometrists to rely on the findings from the age-related eye disease studies of AMD regarding treatment with and selection of supplements and to recommend smoking cessation. Conclusion: Common evidence-based strategies for AMD management among eye care professionals would presumably be beneficial for AMD

  12. Age-specific familial risks of depression: a nation-wide epidemiological study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    Familial risks of depression have been assessed in small case-control studies, usually based on reported, but not medically verified, depressions in family members; thus the degree of familial clustering of these diseases remains to be established. The Multigeneration Register, in which all men and women born in Sweden from 1932 onward are registered together with their parents, was linked to hospital admission data. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of the observed to the expected number of cases in men and women with mothers or fathers affected by depression, compared with men and women whose mothers or fathers were not affected by depression. A total of respectively 60,477 and 79,969 depressions were recorded in offspring and parents. In 6.44% of all families, an offspring and a parent were affected, giving a population-attributable proportion of 4.04% and a familial SIR of 2.68. The parental transmission of depression was similar for both men and women (2.72 and 2.66). This study has provided the first data on age-specific familial clustering of depressions, based on medically confirmed records. The risks were so high that hereditary factors were considered to be likely to contribute to depression, possibly modified by environmental factors. Age-specific risk tables would be helpful for clinical counseling.

  13. Determining the age of CO2 Released From Mountain Birch Forest and Heath in Arctic Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, I. P.; Garnett, M. H.; Hopkins, D. W.; Sommerkorn, M.; Wookey, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    Nuclear weapons testing released a large amount of 14C into the atmosphere during the mid 20th Century. This radiocarbon pulse provides a tracer that can be used to determine the age of C released from plants and soils. Such information is critical for predicting how terrestrial C storage will respond to global change. If respired CO2 is mainly modern, then respiration and photosynthesis are tightly coupled. In contrast, if older C is being mineralized then there is more potential for climate change to induce C loss. We carried out one of the first studies to measure seasonal variations in the 14C content of CO2 released from arctic ecosystems. Using molecular sieves, we trapped CO2 respired from a mountain birch forest and heath near Abisko, northern Sweden and measured 14C contents by accelerator mass spectrometry. CO2 was collected from both vegetated plots (control) and clipped and trenched plots (CT) on three occasions during the 2007 growing season. In addition, we used a new passive sampling technique to collect CO2 from the CT plots during winter 2007-2008. Assuming that the respired C was derived from post bomb sources (justifiable as the majority of each soil profile was enriched with bomb C), we estimated the age of the CO2 and how it changed during the year in response to changes in plant activity and key environmental drivers. On the heath, the mean age of the CO2 respired from the control plots increased from 4 to 6 years old during the growing season. The CO2 respired from the CT plots increased from 5 years old in early June to 11 years old by July, but then declined to 8 years old in September. The C released during winter was also 8 years old. In the Birch forest, the mean age of CO2 respired from the CT plots increased from 4 years old in late May to 8-9 years old during July and September. However, during winter, the CO2 released was >10 years old. In the control plots, the age of respired CO2 increased from being 1 year old in late May to 6

  14. Recent hip fracture trends in Sweden and Denmark with age-period-cohort effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, B E; Björk, J; Cooper, C

    2017-01-01

    This study used nationwide hip fracture data from Denmark and Sweden during 1987-2010 to examine effects of (birth) cohort and period. We found that time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in the two countries. Results also indicated that hip fracture rates may increase in the not ...

  15. The comparison of dairy performance and some reproductive parameters of holstein cows imported from Sweden and their Polish age mates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Czerniawska-Piątkowska

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The general aim of the present work was to compare dairy performance and some reproductive parameters of Holstein-Friesian (HF cows imported from Sweden as an in-calf heifers, and their age mates in Poland. The animals were kept freely on the deep litter on the farm owned by Agro-company “Witkowo” and feeding was based on TMR (total mixed ration system during whole year. All ration’s ingredients (bulky feed, concentrate, miscellaneous additives were mixed and fed as all-mash. The feed ration depended from the physiological condition of a cow and it was composed of corn and grass ensilage, mash concentrate, crushed corn meal, brewer’s grains and beet pulp.Cows imported from Sweden as in-calf heifers obtained higher milk, fat and protein yield in both lactations comparing to home cows. Significant statistical differences were observed for kg of milk, kg of protein, for FCM (P<0.01 and for kg of fat (P<0.05 in 2nd lactation. Fat and protein content in milk was in average higher for home cows (P<0.01. Big differences (P<0.01 were observed in SBT (proportion of protein to fat content and RTB (difference between concentration of fat and protein at imported cows in 2nd lactation. As far as reproduction parameters (gestation interval, calving interval, insemination index are concerned was cows from Sweden better too. Heifers from Sweden calved earlier. The usage of high genetic potential of imported cows is possible only with providing them optimum living conditions suitable to their needs.

  16. Who Lives Alone During Old Age? Trends in the Social and Functional Disadvantages of Sweden's Solitary Living Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Benjamin A; Fors, Stefan; Fritzell, Johan; Lennartsoon, Carin; Agahi, Neda

    2017-01-01

    This study identifies specific social and functional disadvantages associated with living alone during old age in Sweden and assesses whether these associations have changed during recent decades. Data came from repeated cross-sectional surveys of Swedish adults aged 77+ during 1992-2014. Findings indicate that several types of disadvantage are consistently associated with the probability of living alone including financial insecurity and having never married for women and having never married and mobility impairment for men. Also for older men, low education has become an increasing strong determinant of living alone. These findings suggest that older adults who live alone are a subgroup that is particularly, and in some cases increasingly, vulnerable with respect to social and functional status. This has important policy implications related to addressing the needs of this growing subgroup as well as methodological implications for studies on the health effects of living alone.

  17. The influence of participation on mortality in very old age among community-living people in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Maria; Löfqvist, Charlotte; Ullén, Susann; Horstmann, Vibeke; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2018-04-20

    Participation in everyday life and society is generally seen as essential for health-related outcomes and acknowledged to affect older people's well-being. To investigate if aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation influence on mortality among very old single living people in Sweden. ENABLE-AGE Survey Study data involving single-living participants in Sweden (N = 314, aged 81-91 years), followed over 10 years were used. Multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for demographic and health-related variables were used to analyse specific items influencing mortality. Participation in performance- or togetherness-oriented activities was found to significantly influence mortality [HR 0.62 (0.44-0.88), P value 0.006, and HR 0.72 (0.53-0.97), P value 0.031, respectively]. Talking to neighbours and following local politics had a protective effect on mortality, speaking to relatives on the phone (CI 1.10-2.02) and performing leisure activities together with others (CI 1.10-2.00) had the opposite influence. That is, those performing the latter activities were significantly more likely to die earlier. The main contribution of this study is the facet of the results showing that aspects of performance- and togetherness-related participation have a protective effect on mortality in very old age. This is important knowledge for designing health promotion and preventive efforts for the ageing population. Moreover, it constitutes a contribution to the development of instruments capturing aspects of participation influencing on mortality. In the development of health promotion and preventive efforts the inclusion of participation facets could be considered in favour of potential positive influences on longevity.

  18. Association of Seasonal Climate Variability and Age-Specific Mortality in Northern Sweden before the Onset of Industrialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joacim Rocklöv

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Little is known about health impacts of climate in pre-industrial societies. We used historical data to investigate the association of temperature and precipitation with total and age-specific mortality in Skellefteå, northern Sweden, between 1749 and 1859. Methods: We retrieved digitized aggregated population data of the Skellefteå parish, and monthly temperature and precipitation measures. A generalized linear model was established for year to year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal average temperature and cumulative precipitation using a negative binomial function, accounting for long-term trends in population size. The final full model included temperature and precipitation of all four seasons simultaneously. Relative risks (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated for total, sex- and age-specific mortality. Results: In the full model, only autumn precipitation proved statistically significant (RR 1.02; CI 1.00–1.03, per 1cm increase of autumn precipitation, while winter temperature (RR 0.98; CI 0.95–1.00, per 1 °C increase in temperature and spring precipitation (RR 0.98; CI 0.97–1.00 per 1 cm increase in precipitation approached significance. Similar effects were observed for men and women. The impact of climate variability on mortality was strongest in children aged 3–9, and partly also in older children. Infants, on the other hand, appeared to be less affected by unfavourable climate conditions. Conclusions: In this pre-industrial rural region in northern Sweden, higher levels of rain during the autumn increased the annual number of deaths. Harvest quality might be one critical factor in the causal pathway, affecting nutritional status and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Autumn rain probably also contributed to the spread of air-borne diseases in crowded living conditions. Children beyond infancy appeared most vulnerable to climate impacts.

  19. Sweden - Physics in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-11-15

    In its continual monitoring of physics in its Member States, the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) recently visited Sweden, where it met at the University of Lund in September. Physics in Sweden is flourishing, with both a long CERN tradition and excellent prospects for future collaboration. On the experimental side, about 80 researchers, including about 30 graduate students, out of a total of 110 (including 50 graduate students), concentrate on CERN for their work. The main centres of experimental activity are: Chalmers- Goteborg; Lund (particle physics and relativistic heavy ion groups), the Royal Institute of Technology - KTH - Stockholm, the University of Stockholm, and Uppsala. Engineering support staff in particle and highenergy nuclear physics number about 25. There is a strong Swedish participation (34 researchers from Lund, Stockholm, and Uppsala) in the Delphi experiment at LEP with a full commitment to higher energy running at LEP2, in the CP-LEAR experiment, JETSET studies at the LEAR low energy antiproton ring and in a LEAR hyperon experiment. Sweden is also well represented in CERN's extensive programme of nuclear and heavy ion physics, with 12 researchers active in the heavy ion programme, and a contingent in the SMC muon beam experiment. The strong Swedish interest in CERN's heavy ion programme was underlined by a special national contribution of 1.5M Swiss francs to the new lead ion injector. At lower energies, there is also good Swedish participation (mainly from the Chalmers Institute) in the Isolde online isotope separator. The national physics community has always appreciated CERN's diversified programmes and has greatly benefited as a result. For the future, there is an important involvement (some 40 physicists) in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's LHC collider. Swedish groups have been active in 11 research and development project for LHC physics. Sweden's heavy ion activity will continue at the RHIC heavy ion collider being

  20. Sweden - Physics in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In its continual monitoring of physics in its Member States, the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) recently visited Sweden, where it met at the University of Lund in September. Physics in Sweden is flourishing, with both a long CERN tradition and excellent prospects for future collaboration. On the experimental side, about 80 researchers, including about 30 graduate students, out of a total of 110 (including 50 graduate students), concentrate on CERN for their work. The main centres of experimental activity are: Chalmers- Goteborg; Lund (particle physics and relativistic heavy ion groups), the Royal Institute of Technology - KTH - Stockholm, the University of Stockholm, and Uppsala. Engineering support staff in particle and highenergy nuclear physics number about 25. There is a strong Swedish participation (34 researchers from Lund, Stockholm, and Uppsala) in the Delphi experiment at LEP with a full commitment to higher energy running at LEP2, in the CP-LEAR experiment, JETSET studies at the LEAR low energy antiproton ring and in a LEAR hyperon experiment. Sweden is also well represented in CERN's extensive programme of nuclear and heavy ion physics, with 12 researchers active in the heavy ion programme, and a contingent in the SMC muon beam experiment. The strong Swedish interest in CERN's heavy ion programme was underlined by a special national contribution of 1.5M Swiss francs to the new lead ion injector. At lower energies, there is also good Swedish participation (mainly from the Chalmers Institute) in the Isolde online isotope separator. The national physics community has always appreciated CERN's diversified programmes and has greatly benefited as a result. For the future, there is an important involvement (some 40 physicists) in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's LHC collider. Swedish groups have been active in 11 research and development project for LHC physics. Sweden's heavy ion activity will continue at the RHIC

  1. Analysis and interpretation of a unique Arabic finger ring from the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Wåhlander, Linda; Saage, Ragnar; Rezakhani, Khodadad; Hamid Hassan, Saied A; Neiß, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this work we used non-destructive SEM imaging and EDS analysis to characterize the material composition of an Arabic finger ring, which was found in a 9(th) c. woman's grave at the Viking Age (A.D. 793-1066) trading center of Birka, Sweden. The ring is set with a violet stone inscribed with Arabic Kufic writing, here interpreted as reading "il-la-lah", i.e. "For/to Allah". The stone was previously thought to be an amethyst, but the current results show it to be coloured glass. The ring has been cast in a high-grade silver alloy (94.5/5.5 Ag/Cu) and retains the post-casting marks from the filing done to remove flash and mold lines. Thus, the ring has rarely been worn, and likely passed from the silversmith to the woman buried at Birka with few owners in between. The ring may therefore constitute material evidence for direct interactions between Viking Age Scandinavia and the Islamic world. Being the only ring with an Arabic inscription found at a Scandinavian archaeological site, it is a unique object among Swedish Viking Age material. The technical analysis presented here provides a better understanding of the properties and background of this intriguing piece of jewelry. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The obesity epidemic slows among the middle-aged population in Sweden while the socioeconomic gap widens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernt Lindahl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity prevalence has continuously increased in Northern Sweden as elsewhere. A cohort effect has been shown and an increasing proportion of the middle-aged population is maintaining body weight. Objective: To test the hypothesis that the obesity epidemic continues but at different speeds that are dependent on socioeconomic status. Design: Cross-sectional (103,940 adults and longitudinal (26,872 adults data from the Västerbotten Intervention Program 1990–2007 were included. All adults in Västerbotten County are invited to a health examination at the ages of 40, 50, and 60 years. Body mass index (BMI and socioeconomic status, assessed by residence location, marital status, and education were evaluated. Results: BMI increased in all groups but was greater among men. During 1990–1995 and 2002–2007, mean BMIs were 25.9 and 26.8 among men and 25.2 and 25.9 among women. The trend of increasing BMI slowed around the year 2000 (p<0.001, but this was only observed among the highly educated adults in the most urbanized area. The difference between educational groups increased throughout the study period (men p=0.014, women p=0.002. Longitudinal data for both sexes showed a twofold higher baseline prevalence of obesity among individuals with basic compared to high education and it nearly doubled in all groups during the 10-year follow-up. Low education, living in a rural environment, and living alone were independent predictors of obesity development. The overall cumulative 10-year incidence was 9.4% in men, 9.1% in women, and twofold higher among those with basic and mid-level education who live in rural areas compared to those with high education who live in cities. Conclusion: The trend of increasing obesity has slowed in this middle-aged Northern Sweden population, but this trend shift occurred primarily among those with high education who live in an urban environment. Greater efforts to combat obesogenic environments are needed

  3. Housing for ageing LGBTQ people in Sweden: a descriptive study of needs, preferences, and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottorp, A; Johansson, K; Aase, P; Rosenberg, L

    2016-09-01

    With an increasing number of ageing people who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ), there is a risk that traditional housing for older people fails to meet the needs of these people. The aim of this study was to describe LGBTQ people's needs, preferences, and concerns according to ageing and housing. Based on a survey (n = 487), and six focus-group discussions (n = 30), with LGBTQ persons, quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to analyse the findings. When comparing the ranking of preferences (in terms of activity options, environmental features, and staff competence) in a senior housing setting between the LGBTQ people (n = 200) and heterosexual matched controls (n = 198), only minor differences were detected. The findings from the focus groups included: (1) a dilemma between segregation and openness, (2) the importance of safety associated with ageing together with persons with similar experiences, and (3) networks of persons at different ages connected through close friendship supported participation in activities in LGBTQ-profiled senior housing. The findings provide knowledge to improve awareness of sexual orientation when it comes to needs and preferences in relation to ageing and housing in a Swedish context.

  4. Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Vigild, Merete; Nitschke, Ina

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In additi...... in Europe as well as in the United States....... dentistry discourage dentists from seeking opportunities to treat geriatric patients? Overall, the availability of dental services, the organization of the dental health care delivery system, and price subsidy for dental treatment are important factors influencing access to dental care among older people...

  5. The mineralogy and genesis of uranium in rhyolitic ignimbrites of Precambrian age from Duobblon, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.A.T.

    1982-01-01

    The Duobblon rhyolitic ignimbrites, of middle Precambrian age are 60 m thick. They consist of at least three flows with varying degrees of welding and have undergone devitrification, producing lithophysal and spherulitic textures. They are overlain by thick fluviatile red-bed-type conglomerates and sandstones, which in turn are capped by terrestrial acid volcanics. Uranium enrichments of up to 3000 ppm U occur within two or three peneconcordant tabular horizons which are mostly lithophysae-bearing. Fission-track investigations of the ignimbrites and overlying conglomerates and sandstones, which supplement earlier mineralogical studies, show that U occurs as fine pitchblende disseminations; as complex uranotitanates associated with Fe-Ti-Mn oxides; and as coatings associated with matrix sericite. Small amounts of U are present in such primary accessory minerals as sphene, apatite, and zircon. It is suggested that oxidizing U-bearing solutions, generated partly during devitrification of the ignimbrites and partly from the overlying volcano-sedimentary pile, produced the U enrichments with later sulphide deposition, along the more permeable lithophysal horizons in the ignimbrites. (author)

  6. Tic disorders in children aged 6-16 years in Daxing district of Beijing: a cross-sectional study%北京市大兴区6~16岁中小学生抽动障碍的现况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永翼; 郑毅; 韩书文; 崔永华

    2009-01-01

    目的 了解大兴区中小学生抽动障碍(TD)的流行病学分布及就医、治疗状况.方法 采用分层整群随机抽样法,从大兴区6~16岁中小学生中抽取部分学生进行TD的横断面调查.根据TD国内外研究现况,制定TD初筛问卷,收集学生临床资料,对筛查阳性者及学校教师或同学报告有类似症状者进行面谈及临床评估.采用美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第4版中TD标准进行诊断和分类.结果 TD总患病率为2.26%.其中短暂性抽动障碍(TT)、慢性运动性抽动或发声抽动(CMVT)、发声与多种运动联合抽动障碍(TS)的患病率分别为1.05%、0.73%和0.47%.男生TD患病率3.39%,女生1.04%,差异有统计学意义(χ~2=23.883,P<0.001),患病率比3.27:1(95%可信区问为2.00~5.60).TD的3种临床亚型的患病率均表现为男生高于女生(TTχ~2=12.808,P<0.001;CMVT χ~2=6.042,P=0.014;TSχ~2=4.861,P=0.027);平均发病年龄(8.0±2.0)岁,发病高峰年龄为5.5~12.0岁;各年龄组患病率以8~9岁组最高.86例TD患者仅16例(19%)因抽动症状就医,就医者中仅5例得到正确诊治.结论 TD在大兴区中小学生中较多见,男生患病率高于女生.疾病早期就医率低,正确治疗率低.%Objective To study the epidemiological distribution and treatment of tic disorders (TD)among children in primary and secondary school of Daxing district.Methods Using stratified-cluster random sampling techniques,4020 children aged 6-16 years were selected from 61 836 primary or secondary schoolchildren in Daxing district.The children and their parents were asked to fill in a selfdesigned questionnaire including both motor and vocal tics and general demographic data.The children who reported with tic symptoms as well as those who were reported by their teachers or classmates were surveyed,and the diagnosis of TD was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition criteria.Results The prevalence rate

  7. Zircon, titanite, and apatite (U-Th)/He ages and age-eU correlations from the Fennoscandian Shield, southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenthner, William R.; Reiners, Peter W.; Drake, Henrik; Tillberg, Mikael

    2017-07-01

    Craton cores far from plate boundaries have traditionally been viewed as stable features that experience minimal vertical motion over 100-1000 Ma time scales. Here we show that the Fennoscandian Shield in southeastern Sweden experienced several episodes of burial and exhumation from 1800 Ma to the present. Apatite, titanite, and zircon (U-Th)/He ages from surface samples and drill cores constrain the long-term, low-temperature history of the Laxemar region. Single grain titanite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages are negatively correlated (104-838 Ma for zircon and 160-945 Ma for titanite) with effective uranium (eU = U + 0.235 × Th), a measurement proportional to radiation damage. Apatite ages are 102-258 Ma and are positively correlated with eU. These correlations are interpreted with damage-diffusivity models, and the modeled zircon He age-eU correlations constrain multiple episodes of heating and cooling from 1800 Ma to the present, which we interpret in the context of foreland basin systems related to the Neoproterozoic Sveconorwegian and Paleozoic Caledonian orogens. Inverse time-temperature models constrain an average burial temperature of 217°C during the Sveconorwegian, achieved between 944 Ma and 851 Ma, and 154°C during the Caledonian, achieved between 366 Ma and 224 Ma. Subsequent cooling to near-surface temperatures in both cases could be related to long-term exhumation caused by either postorogenic collapse or mantle dynamics related to the final assembly of Rodinia and Pangaea. Our titanite He age-eU correlations cannot currently be interpreted in the same fashion; however, this study represents one of the first examples of a damage-diffusivity relationship in this system, which deserves further research attention.

  8. Kabbalah in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Karlsson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the history of Kabbalah in Sweden. The reader is presented with an overall view to Kabbalah in Sweden: first, the Johannes Bureus and the Nordic Kabbalah, Kabbalah after Bureus, Kabbalistic literature, and last, Kabbalah in Sweden today. When the Kabbalah reached Sweden it was mainly the non-Jewish Kabbalah that gained influence, even if its Jewish roots were acknowledged. Johannes Bureus unites, in a similar fashion as do the Christian Kabbalists in continental Europe, Christian motifs with the symbolic world of the Kabbalah. Bureus, however, adds runes, ancient Norse gods and Gothic ideas in his own unique manner. The Kabbalah invites speculation and the search for correspondences which has caused the Kabbalah in Sweden to be united with a number of other traditions. Bureus combined the Kabbalah with runes and Gothicism; in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we can find the Kabbalah in Freemasonry and Esoteric societies, while the Kabbalah in the twentieth century and onwards has been associated with New Age, Parapsychology and Indian Mysticism. Apart from Bureus, most Kabbalists in Sweden have followed the trends that flourished in the rest of the world. Bureus was the first to create a specifically Swedish interpretation of the Kabbalah.

  9. Neighborhood socioeconomic status at the age of 40 years and ischemic stroke before the age of 50 years: A nationwide cohort study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Axel C; Li, Xinjun; Holzmann, Martin J; Ärnlöv, Johan; Wändell, Per; Gasevic, Danijela; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Objective We aimed to study the association between neighborhood socioeconomic status at the age of 40 years and risk of ischemic stroke before the age of 50 years. Methods All individuals in Sweden were included if their 40th birthday occurred between 1998 and 2010. National registers were used to categorize neighborhood socioeconomic status into high, middle, and low and to retrieve information on incident ischemic strokes. Hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were estimated. Results A total of 1,153,451 adults (women 48.9%) were followed for a mean of 5.5 years (SD 3.5 years), during which 1777 (0.30%) strokes among men and 1374 (0.24%) strokes among women were recorded. After adjustment for sex, marital status, education level, immigrant status, region of residence, and neighborhood services, there was a lower risk of stroke in residents from high-socioeconomic status neighborhoods (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.78-0.96), and an increased risk of stroke in adults from low-socioeconomic status neighborhoods (hazard ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.27), compared to their counterparts living in middle-socioeconomic status neighborhoods. After further adjustment for hospital diagnoses of hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation prior to the age of 40, the higher risk in neighborhoods with low socioeconomic status was attenuated, but remained significant (hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.23). Conclusions In a nationwide study of individuals between 40 and 50 years, we found that the risk of ischemic stroke differed depending on neighborhood socioeconomic status, which calls for increased efforts to prevent cardiovascular diseases in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods.

  10. Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dribe, Martin; Lundh, Christer

    2009-10-01

    This article studies partner selection according to three dimensions: social origin, age, and place of birth. The authors use micro-level data from local population registers in five parishes in southern Sweden from 1815 to 1895. The results confirm that all three aspects were important but that socioeconomic status was the most important characteristic, structuring much of the selection process. The importance of social and age homogamy remained stable over the period, while geographic exogamy became more frequent, which could be interpreted in terms of an increasing openness of rural society. The authors also find some indications of exchange of characteristics in the partner selection process.

  11. Atrial fibrillation in immigrant groups: a cohort study of all adults 45 years of age and older in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wändell, Per; Carlsson, Axel C; Li, Xinjun; Gasevic, Danijela; Ärnlöv, Johan; Holzmann, Martin J; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-09-01

    To study the association between country of birth and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) in several immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included all adults (n = 3,226,752) aged 45 years and older in Sweden. AF was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis of AF in the National Patient Register. The incidence of AF in different immigrant groups, using Swedish-born as referents, was assessed by Cox regression, expressed in hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All models were stratified by sex and adjusted for age, geographical residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, and neighbourhood socioeconomic status. Compared to their Swedish-born counterparts, higher incidence of AF [HR (95% CI)] was observed among men from Bosnia 1.74 (1.56-1.94) and Latvia 1.29 (1.09-1.54), and among women from Iraq 1.96 (1.67-2.31), Bosnia 1.88 (1.61-1.94), Finland 1.14 (1.11-1.17), Estonia 1.14 (1.05-1.24) and Germany 1.08 (1.03-1.14). Lower incidence of AF was noted among men (HRs ≤ 0.60) from Iceland, Southern Europe (especially Greece, Italy and Spain), Latin America (especially Chile), Africa, Asia (including Iraq, Turkey, Lebanon and Iran), and among women from Nordic countries (except Finland), Southern Europe, Western Europe (except Germany), Africa, North America, Latin America, Iran, Lebanon and other Asian countries (except Turkey and Iraq). In conclusion, we observed substantial differences in incidence of AF between immigrant groups and the Swedish-born population. A greater awareness of the increased risk of AF development in some immigrant groups may enable for a timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention of its debilitating complications, such as stroke.

  12. Sick leave before and after the age of 65 years among those in paid work in Sweden in 2000 or 2005: a register-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrants, Kristin; Kjeldgård, Linnea; Marklund, Staffan; Head, Jenny; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2018-02-01

    Objective With pressure for older people to remain in work, research is needed on how people aged over 65 years fare in the labour market. However, few studies have focused on sick leave among older workers, especially those over the standard retirement age. This study investigated changes in sick-leave patterns among people aged over 65 years still in work. Methods All individuals in Sweden who turned 65 years old in 2000 or 2005 were followed from 1995 to 2010. The mean number of sick-leave days per year was measured for those who remained in paid work past the age of 65 years. Results Those over 65 years still working had fewer sick-leave days before the age of 65 years than those who retired. They also had fewer sick-leave days after 65 years than before. There were fewer socioeconomic differences after 65 years than before, but these differences were greater for workers over 65 years in the 2005 cohort. Conclusions Although there were more people over 65 years in paid work in 2005, sick-leave days and socioeconomic differences in sick leave were lower in this age group. Sick-leave days and socioeconomic differences in sick leave were greater in the 2005 cohort.

  13. Sweden's help

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Government of Sweden has decided to provide funds for the Agency to use for agreed projects in developing countries, and the Board of Governors has authorized the Director General to conclude an agreement to bring the scheme into effect. The Agency will administer the funds and will select and process requests to be considered for their use; it will also be responsible for project supervision and control. Responsibility for implementing the agreement on behalf of the Swedish Government is entrusted to the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA) which functions under the auspices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and administers Swedish bilateral technical, financial and humanitarian assistance. SIDA has already provided, or has agreed to provide, assistance for a number of Agency technical co-operation programmes and for the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste. (author)

  14. Exploring the association of dental care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) - a prospective study of ageing people in Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülcan, Ferda; Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven; Klock, Kristin S; Lie, Stein Atle; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2018-01-01

    To explore the association of dental health care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) across time focusing ageing Norwegian and Swedish adults adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need related-factors as defined by Andersen's model. Data were based on Norwegian and Swedish 1942 birth-cohorts conducted in 2007 (age 65) and 2012 (age 70). In Norway, the response rates ranged from 54% to 58%. Corresponding figures in Sweden were from 72% to 73%. Self-administered questionnaires assessed OIDP, dental care utilization and predisposing, enabling and need related factors. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation was used to adjust for clustering in repeated data. Significant covariates of OIDP were satisfaction with dental services, dental care avoidance due to financial constraints, frightening experience with dental care during childhood and patient initiated dental visiting. Frequency and regularity of dental attendance were associated with OIDP in the Swedish cohort, only. In spite of country differences in the public co-financing of dental care, dental care utilization indicators were associated with OIDP across time in both cohorts. Encouraging regular and dentist initiated visiting patterns and strengthening beliefs in keeping own teeth could be useful in attempts to reduce poor oral health related quality of life in ageing people.

  15. Ageing Cattle: The Use of Radiographic Examinations on Cattle Metapodials from Eketorp Ringfort on the Island of Öland in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telldahl, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    In this paper conventional X-ray analysis of cattle metapodials is used to study the age structure of slaughtered cattle at Eketorp ringfort on the island of Öland, Sweden. The X-ray analyses suggest that several animals in both phases were slaughtered aged 4–8 years. More oxen/bulls than cows reached the advanced age of over 8 years, yet in phase III more oxen/bulls seem to have been slaughtered between the ages of 2 and 8 years. These differences may reflect a change in demand for meat related to the character of the site. The results also show a correlation between metapodials with a pathology connected to biomechanical stress and older animals. This suggests that male cattle were used both in meat production and as draught animals. Asymmetry in male metatarsals such as distal broadening of the lateral part of the medial trochlea was visible on the X-ray images. The bone element also indicates a denser outer cortex of the medial diaphysis in comparison to the inner medulla. This could be the result of repetitive mechanical stress. Two metatarsals from cows were documented with distal asymmetry indicating that cows were also used as working animals. Bone elements with changes in the articular surfaces were more common in metapodials from cows with an X-ray age of over 3–4 years. These results highlighted the slaughter age difference between oxen/bulls and cows, enabling a better understanding of animal husbandry and the selection of draught cattle at Eketorp ringfort. PMID:26336086

  16. Ageing Cattle: The Use of Radiographic Examinations on Cattle Metapodials from Eketorp Ringfort on the Island of Öland in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylva Telldahl

    Full Text Available In this paper conventional X-ray analysis of cattle metapodials is used to study the age structure of slaughtered cattle at Eketorp ringfort on the island of Öland, Sweden. The X-ray analyses suggest that several animals in both phases were slaughtered aged 4-8 years. More oxen/bulls than cows reached the advanced age of over 8 years, yet in phase III more oxen/bulls seem to have been slaughtered between the ages of 2 and 8 years. These differences may reflect a change in demand for meat related to the character of the site. The results also show a correlation between metapodials with a pathology connected to biomechanical stress and older animals. This suggests that male cattle were used both in meat production and as draught animals. Asymmetry in male metatarsals such as distal broadening of the lateral part of the medial trochlea was visible on the X-ray images. The bone element also indicates a denser outer cortex of the medial diaphysis in comparison to the inner medulla. This could be the result of repetitive mechanical stress. Two metatarsals from cows were documented with distal asymmetry indicating that cows were also used as working animals. Bone elements with changes in the articular surfaces were more common in metapodials from cows with an X-ray age of over 3-4 years. These results highlighted the slaughter age difference between oxen/bulls and cows, enabling a better understanding of animal husbandry and the selection of draught cattle at Eketorp ringfort.

  17. Ageing Cattle: The Use of Radiographic Examinations on Cattle Metapodials from Eketorp Ringfort on the Island of Öland in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telldahl, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    In this paper conventional X-ray analysis of cattle metapodials is used to study the age structure of slaughtered cattle at Eketorp ringfort on the island of Öland, Sweden. The X-ray analyses suggest that several animals in both phases were slaughtered aged 4-8 years. More oxen/bulls than cows reached the advanced age of over 8 years, yet in phase III more oxen/bulls seem to have been slaughtered between the ages of 2 and 8 years. These differences may reflect a change in demand for meat related to the character of the site. The results also show a correlation between metapodials with a pathology connected to biomechanical stress and older animals. This suggests that male cattle were used both in meat production and as draught animals. Asymmetry in male metatarsals such as distal broadening of the lateral part of the medial trochlea was visible on the X-ray images. The bone element also indicates a denser outer cortex of the medial diaphysis in comparison to the inner medulla. This could be the result of repetitive mechanical stress. Two metatarsals from cows were documented with distal asymmetry indicating that cows were also used as working animals. Bone elements with changes in the articular surfaces were more common in metapodials from cows with an X-ray age of over 3-4 years. These results highlighted the slaughter age difference between oxen/bulls and cows, enabling a better understanding of animal husbandry and the selection of draught cattle at Eketorp ringfort.

  18. Age but not Philadelphia positivity impairs outcome in older/elderly patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Lennmyr, Emma; Ahlberg, Lucia; Bernell, Per; Hulegårdh, Erik; Karbach, Holger; Karlsson, Karin; Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata; Åström, Maria; Hallböök, Heléne

    2017-08-01

    Older/elderly patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are poorly represented in clinical trials. Using Swedish national leukemia registries, we investigated disease/patient characteristics, treatment choices, outcome, and the impact of an age-adapted protocol (introduced in 2009) in this population-based study of patients aged 55-85 years, diagnosed with ALL 2005-2012. Of 174 patients, 82% had B-phenotype, 11% Burkitt leukemia (excluded), and 7% T-phenotype. Philadelphia chromosome positivity (Ph+) occurred in 35%. Of the 155 B- and T-ALL patients, 80% were treated with intensive protocols, and 20% with a palliative approach. Higher age and WHO performance status ≥2 influenced the choice of palliation. Intensive, palliative, and both approaches resulted in complete remission rate 83/16/70% and 3-year overall survival (OS) 32/3/26%. The age-adapted protocol did not improve outcome. With intensive treatment, platelet count ≤35×10 9 /L and age ≥75 years were adverse prognostic factors for OS, Ph+ was not. Male sex was an adverse prognostic factor in the 55-64 year age-group. We report a high frequency of Ph+ in older/elderly patients, with no evidence of poorer outcome compared to Ph-negative disease. Overall prognosis for elderly patients with ALL remains dismal, despite the use of age-adapted treatment. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ‘Successful Ageing’ in Practice: Reflections on Health, Activity and Normality in Old Age in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Alftberg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the critical examination of the notions of health and activity, and to discuss how these cultural and social constructs have impact on elderly people’s lives. An ethnographic perspective gives fruitful inputs to explore how old people deal with the image of old age as one of decay and decline, while they simultaneously relate to the normative idea of so-called successful ageing. The focus is thus on how elderly people create meaning, and how they manage and make use of the contradictory cultural beliefs that are both understood as normality: old age as a passive period of life involving decline and disease, and activity as an individual responsibility in order to stay healthy. The study sample is created with two different methods, qualitative interviews and two different questionnaires, and the majority of the respondents are 65+ years old. The article demonstrates the intersection between old age and a health-promoting active lifestyle. The notion of activity includes moral values, which shape the beliefs and narratives of being old. This forms part of the concept of self-care management, which in old age is also called successful ageing. The idea that activities are health promoting is the framework in which activities are performed, but significance and meaning are rather created from practice.

  20. Why is the gender gap in life expectancy decreasing? The impact of age- and cause-specific mortality in Sweden 1997-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Louise; Agahi, Neda; Fritzell, Johan; Fors, Stefan

    2018-04-13

    To enhance the understanding of the current increase in life expectancy and decreasing gender gap in life expectancy. We obtained data on underlying cause of death from the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden for 1997 and 2014 and used Arriaga's method to decompose life expectancy by age group and 24 causes of death. Decreased mortality from ischemic heart disease had the largest impact on the increased life expectancy of both men and women and on the decreased gender gap in life expectancy. Increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease negatively influenced overall life expectancy, but because of higher female mortality, it also served to decrease the gender gap in life expectancy. The impact of other causes of death, particularly smoking-related causes, decreased in men but increased in women, also reducing the gap in life expectancy. This study shows that a focus on overall changes in life expectancies may hide important differences in age- and cause-specific mortality. It also emphasizes the importance of addressing modifiable lifestyle factors to reduce avoidable mortality.

  1. Dental caries in persons over the age of 80 living in Kungsholmen, Sweden: findings from the KEOHS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morse, Douglas E; Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Holm-Pedersen, Jytte

    2002-01-01

    The Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study (KEOHS) evaluated the oral health status of generally healthy, community-dwelling persons over the age of 80 living in Kungsholmen, an area in central Stockholm. This paper reports findings regarding the prevalence and severity of dental caries among...

  2. Children's Sexual Thinking: A Comparative Study of Children Aged 5 to 15 Years in Australia, North America, Britain and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ronald; Goldman, Juliette

    The purpose of this cross-national descriptive study is to measure the extent of children's sexual knowledge and sexual understanding at various ages and to identify what processes of thought children use in trying to explain biological functions and the phenomena of their own bodies as they grow and change. Sexual thinking is defined as thinking…

  3. Child Care in Sweden. Fact Sheets on Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedish Inst., Stockholm.

    This fact sheet outlines Sweden's policies of government-supported child care and parental insurance provisions. Swedish families receive: (1) free maternity and child health care; (2) child allowances for each child of 9,000 krona per year through age 16; (3) up to 450 days of paid parental leave for the birth of a child, with 360 days paid at 90…

  4. Risk of disability pension in first and second generation immigrants: the role of age and region of birth in a prospective population-based study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Thiene, D; Helgesson, M; Alexanderson, K; La Torre, G; Tiihonen, J; Mittendorfer-Rutz, E

    2017-12-04

    In several countries, immigrants have higher disability pension (DP) rates than natives. Reasons for this are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate if the risk of diagnosis-specific DP differed in first, second, and second/intermediate generation immigrants compared to natives, in general and across regions of birth, and stratified by age. A population-based prospective cohort study of all 3,507,055 individuals aged 19-50 years and living in Sweden in 2004 with a 6-year follow-up period. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for mental and somatic DP were estimated by Cox regression for first, second, and second/intermediate generation immigrants compared to natives, across regions of birth and stratified by age. After multivariate adjustment, HRs for both mental and somatic DP were higher at follow-up in the first generation compared to natives: mental HR 1.17 (CI 1.12-1.22) and somatic 1.15 (1.09-1.22) for individuals Immigrants born in Europe outside EU25, and countries outside Europe had particularly elevated HRs. Also in the second generation, HRs were higher in mental 1.29 (1.21-1.37) and somatic DP: 1.30 (1.19-1.42) in those immigrants there were no strong differences in HRs between regions of birth. Compared to natives, the risk of DP was higher in first and second generation immigrants. Higher estimates were seen for immigrants from Europe outside EU25 and from the rest of the world in the first generation. No considerable differences in estimates regarding mental or somatic DP diagnoses were found.

  5. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in middle-aged men and women in Gothenburg, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Saga

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random samples of 50-year-old men living in Gothenburg have been examined every 10th year since 1963 with a focus on cardiovascular risk factors. The aims of the study were to acquire up-to-date information about risk factors in the fifth cohort of 50-year-old men and women, to re-examine those who were 50 years of age in 1993, and to analyse the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn using different definitions. Methods A random sample of men and women born in 1953 were examined in 2003–2004 for cardiovascular risk factors. Men born in 1943 and that participated in the examination in 1993 were also invited. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results The participation rate among men and women born in 1953 was 60 and 67% respectively. Among men born in 1943, the participation rate was 87%. The prevalence of obesity was from 15 to 17% (body mass index, BMI ≥ 30 in the three samples. The prevalence of known diabetes was 4% among the 50-year-old men and 6% among the 60-year-old men, and 2% among the women. Increased fasting plasma glucose varied substantially from 4 to 33% depending on cut-off level and gender. Mean cholesterol was 5.4 to 5.5 mmol/l. Smoking was more common among women aged 50 (26% than among men aged 50 (22% and 60 years (15%. The prevalence of the MetSyn varied with the definition used: from 10 to 15.8% among the women, from 16.1 to 26% among 50-year-old men, and from 19.9 to 35% among the 60-year-old men. Only 5% of the men and women had no risk factors. Conclusion This study provides up-to-date information about the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the MetSyn in middle-aged Swedish men and women. Different definitions of the MetSyn create confusion regarding which definition to use.

  6. Policing football in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, Clifford; Havelund, Jonas; Lundberg, Filip

    2016-01-01

    of football policing in Sweden. Central to these is the empowerment and coordination of dialogue based approaches to the policing of football supporters in Sweden. The report points out that this is an area of crowd policing where Sweden are global leaders having influenced how policing is conducted in other...

  7. Treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Sweden: outcomes at seven years in the Swedish Macula Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westborg, Inger; Granstam, Elisabet; Rosso, Aldana; Albrecht, Susanne; Karlsson, Niklas; Lövestam-Adrian, Monica

    2017-12-01

    To present Swedish Macula Register (SMR) data regarding treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in clinical practice since 2008. A retrospective register-based study was conducted. Evaluation of baseline demographics, visual outcome and number of injections during this period is presented. Mean age at diagnosis was 79 ± (SD) 8 years; 65% were female. The proportion of patients with <2 months' duration of symptoms increased from 26% in 2008 to 41% in 2014 (p = 0.001). Mean visual acuity (VA) at baseline increased from 54.3 ± 15.0 early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) letters in 2008 to 57.8 ± 15.6 letters in 2014 (CI 95 2.6; 4.3; p < 0.001). Mean VA after 1 year of treatment increased from 57.8 ± 17.7 ETDRS letters for patients who started the treatment in 2008 to 62.8 ± 16.4 ETDRS letters in patients starting treatment in 2014 (CI 95 2.67; 4.64; p < 0.001). During all study years, the proportion of patients with an improvement in VA of between 5 and 15 letters was around 30%, while 14% had VA improvement of more than 15 letters. The mean number of injections during the first treatment year increased from 4.3 ± 1.9 in 2008 to 5.9 ± 2.9 in 2014 (CI 95 1.40; 1.67; p < 0.001). Seven-year follow-up of 322 eyes showed a mean change of -1 letters from baseline, with a mean of 21 injections for the entire period. The duration of symptoms before treatment decreased, while VA at baseline and after 1 year of treatment increased over the years and so did the number of injections. Long-term follow-up demonstrated stable VA. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. 38 CFR 6.16 - Payment of cash value in monthly installments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... selected by the insured. If no designated beneficiary survives, the present value of any remaining unpaid... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of cash value in... AFFAIRS UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE Cash Value § 6.16 Payment of cash value in monthly...

  9. Trends in risk of recurrence after the first ischemic stroke in adults younger than 55 years of age in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Kok Wai; Björck, Lena; Ståhl, Christina H; Nielsen, Susanne; Sandström, Tatiana Z; Jern, Christina; Torén, Kjell; Rosengren, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on stroke recurrence in younger adults often contain small sample size which makes it difficult to study trends in stroke recurrence over a long period of time. The aim of the present study was to investigate temporal trends in the risk of recurrence in younger patients with a first ischemic stroke. All men and women aged 18-54 years who had survived at least 28 days after a first ischemic stroke from 1987 to 2006 were identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register. The patients were stratified into four 5-year periods according to their admission period and were followed up for a total of four years after the index event with regard to recurrent ischemic stroke. A Cox regression model was used to analyze the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke. Of the 17,149 ischemic stroke patients who were identified, 2432 (14.2%) had a recurrent ischemic stroke event within four years. From the first to the last periods (1987-1991 versus 2002-2006), the four-year risk of recurrent ischemic stroke decreased by 55% (hazard ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.53) in men and 59% (hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.50) in women. The cumulative four-year risk was 11.8% (95% CI 10.55-13.25) in men and 9.8% (95% CI 8.40-11.46) in women during the last five-year period (2002-2006). The risk of recurrence among younger ischemic stroke patients has decreased over the past 20 years. Despite these improvements, younger patients are still at a high risk for recurrent ischemic stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  10. Early life factors and being overweight at 4 years of age among children in Malmö, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Martin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rising rates of obesity and overweight is an increasing public health problem all over the world. Recent research has shown the importance of early life factors in the development of child overweight. However, to the best of our knowledge there are no studies investigating the potential synergistic effect of early life factors and presence of parental overweight on the development of child overweight. Methods The study was population-based and cross-sectional. The study population consisted of children who visited the Child Health Care (CHC centers in Malmö for their 4-year health check during 2003-2008 and whose parents answered a self-administered questionnaire (n = 9009 children. Results The results showed that having overweight/obese parents was strongly associated with the child being overweight or obese. Furthermore, there was an association between unfavorable early life factors (i.e., mother smoking during pregnancy, presence of secondhand tobacco smoke early in life, high birth weight and the development of child overweight/obesity at four years of age, while breastfeeding seemed to have a protective role. For example, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with an odds ratio (OR of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.76 for overweight and 2.31 (95% CI: 1.68, 3.17 for obesity. The results further showed synergistic effects between parental overweight and exposure to unfavourable early life factors in the development of child overweight. Conclusions The present study shows the importance of early life factors in the development of child overweight and obesity, and thus puts focus on the importance of early targeted interventions.

  11. Are job strain and sleep disturbances prognostic factors for neck/shoulder/arm pain? A cohort study of a general population of working age in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, E; Grooten, W J A; Hallqvist, J; Holm, L W; Skillgate, E

    2014-07-08

    To study whether job strain, that is, psychological job demands and decision latitude, and sleep disturbances among persons with occasional neck/shoulder/arm pain (NSAP) are prognostic factors for having experienced at least one episode of troublesome NSAP, and to determine whether sleep disturbances modify the association between job strain and troublesome NSAP. Prospective cohort study. Stockholm, Sweden. A population-based cohort of individuals with occasional NSAP (n=6979) who answered surveys in 2006 and 2010. Report of at least one episode of troublesome NSAP in 2010. The ORs for troublesome NSAP at follow-up were in individuals exposed to passive jobs 1.2 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.4); to active jobs 1.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.5); to high strain 1.5 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.4); to mild sleep disturbances 1.4 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.6) and to severe sleep disturbances 2.2 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.0). High strain and active jobs were associated with having experienced at least one episode of troublesome NSAP during the previous 6 months in persons with sleep disturbances, but not in individuals without sleep disturbances. Our results indicate that high strain, active jobs and sleep disturbances are prognostic factors that should be taken into account when implementing preventive measures to minimise the risk of troublesome NSAP among people of working age. We suggest that sleep disturbances may modify the association between high strain and troublesome NSAP. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Country report: Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Sweden has twelve nuclear power reactors with a combined capacity of 9900 MW net electric power. According to a resolution passed by parliament in 1980, Sweden will terminate its use of nuclear power in the year 2010, at the latest. According to generally accepted guidelines, the spent nuclear fuel will be kept in interim storage for approximately 40 years after which, according to present plans, it will be deposited in geological formations in Sweden

  13. Change in Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) with increasing age: testing the evaluative properties of the OIDP frequency inventory using prospective data from Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülcan, Ferda; Nasir, Elwalid; Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2014-05-31

    Oral health-related quality of life, OHRQoL, among elderly is an important concern for the health and welfare policy in Norway and Sweden. The aim of the study was to assess reproducibility, longitudinal validity and responsiveness of the OIDP frequency score. Whether the temporal relationship between tooth loss and OIDP varied by country of residence was also investigated. In 2007 and 2012, all inhabitants born in 1942 in three and two counties of Norway and Sweden were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey. In Norway the response rates were 58.0% (4211/7248) and 54.5% (3733/6841) in 2007 and 2012. Corresponding figures in Sweden were 73.1% (6078/8313) and 72.2% (5697/7889), respectively. Reproducibility of the OIDP in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.73 in Norway and 0.77 in Sweden. The mean change scores for OIDP were predominantly negative among those who worsened, zero in those who did not change and positive in participants who improved change scores of the reference variables; self-reported oral health and tooth loss. General Linear Models (GLM) repeated measures revealed significant interactions between OIDP and change scores of the reference variables (p Norway and Sweden. This suggests that the OIDP instrument is able to detect change in the oral health status that occurred over the 5 year period investigated. Norwegian elderly were more likely to report worsening in OIDP than their Swedish counterparts. Disease prevention should be at focus when formulating the health policy for older people.

  14. Lone mothers in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burström, B; Diderichsen, Finn; Shouls, S

    1999-01-01

    To study trends in the health and socioeconomic circumstances of lone mothers in Sweden over the years 1979-1995, and to make comparisons with couple mothers over the same period.......To study trends in the health and socioeconomic circumstances of lone mothers in Sweden over the years 1979-1995, and to make comparisons with couple mothers over the same period....

  15. Energy in Sweden 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-15

    The annual Energy in Sweden report, and its sister publication, Energy in Sweden - Facts and Figures 2010 (STEM-ET--2010-46), are intended to provide decision makers, journalists, companies, teachers and the public with coherent and easily available information on developments in the energy sector. Most of the publication is based on official statistics up to and including 2009, complemented where possible by input reflecting current events and decisions up to the middle of 2010. Energy in Sweden presents facts about the use and supply of energy, present energy- and climate policy and policy measures, energy prices and energy markets, the impact of energy systems on the environment and an international outlook etc. See also the publication Energy in Sweden - Facts and Figures 2010 where the tabular data behind most of the diagrams in Energy in Sweden are presented

  16. Energy in Sweden 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-12-15

    The annual Energy in Sweden report, and its sister publication, Energy in Sweden: Facts and Figures (STEM-ET--2009-29), are intended to provide decision makers, journalists, companies, teachers and the public with coherent and easily available information on developments in the energy sector. Most of the publication is based on official statistics up to and including 2008, complemented where possible by input reflecting current events and decisions up to the middle of 2009. Energy in Sweden presents facts about the use and supply of energy, present energy- and climate policy and policy measures, energy prices and energy markets, the impact of energy systems on the environment and an international outlook etc. See also the publication Energy in Sweden - Facts and Figures 2009 where the tabular data behind most of the diagrams in Energy in Sweden are presented

  17. Leaving Sweden behind: Gains in life expectancy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Nathalie; Le Serbon, Emilie; Rostila, Mikael

    2015-06-01

    Sweden and Canada are known for quality of living and exceedingly high life expectancy, but recent data on how these countries compare are lacking. We measured life expectancy in Canada and Sweden during the past decade, and identified factors responsible for changes over time. We calculated life expectancy at birth for Canada and Sweden annually from 2000 to 2010, and determined the ages and causes of death responsible for the gap between the two countries using Arriaga's method. We determined how population growth, ageing, and mortality influenced the number of deaths over time. During 2000-2010, life expectancy in Canada caught up with Sweden for men, and surpassed Sweden by 0.4 years for women. Sweden lost ground owing to a slower reduction in circulatory and tumour mortality after age 65 years compared with Canada. Nonetheless, population ageing increased the number of deaths in Canada, especially for mental and nervous system disorders. In Sweden, the number of deaths decreased. In only one decade, life expectancy in Canada caught up and surpassed Sweden due to rapid improvements in circulatory and tumour mortality. Population ageing increased the number of deaths in Canada, potentially stressing the health care system more than in Sweden. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  18. The incidence and survival of acute de novo leukaemias in Estonia and in a well-defined region of western Sweden during 1982-1996: a survey of patients aged > or =65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luik, E; Palk, K; Everaus, H; Varik, M; Aareleid, T; Wennström, L; Juntikka, E-L; Safai-Kutti, S; Stockelberg, D; Holmberg, E; Kutti, J

    2004-07-01

    To compare the incidence and survival of acute de novo leukaemias with particular reference to political/socio-economic and environmental factors in two neighbouring countries over the three 5-year periods (1982-1996). The present report covers only patients diagnosed when aged > or =65 years. A well-defined area of Sweden, the so-called Western Swedish Health Care Region and Estonia. Population-wise, the western Swedish Region and Estonia are very similar; area-wise they are also well comparable. The number of acute de novo leukaemias was quite dissimilar in the two countries (Estonia, n = 137, Sweden, n = 354). The age standardized incidence rates regarding the total number of acute de novo leukaemias was 5.31 per 100,000 inhabitants/year for Estonia and 7.99 for Sweden, this difference being statistically significant. However, the difference was merely attributable to incidence rates as regards acute myeloblastic leukaemias (AML); on the contrary, differences as regards acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (ALL) and non-classifiable, undifferentiated or biphenotypic acute leukaemias (uAL) were negligible. The relative survival for the total material of patients was significantly higher for Swedish when compared with Estonian patients (P or =65 years in Estonia at 1 year was 8.5% and at 3 years 3.5% respectively. The corresponding figures for the Swedish patients were considerably higher, 22.7 and 7.7% respectively. This difference, however, applied only for patients with AML (P acute leukemia patients in two neighbouring countries.

  19. Linnaeus in Uppsala, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul; Cohen, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Presents a brief life history of Carl Linnaeus, a professor of medicine and botany in Uppsala, Sweden. Highlights his work in developing a classification system for plants and animals, and his botanical lectures and demonstrations. (JRH)

  20. Radiological physics in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstam, Rune

    1980-01-01

    Development of radiological or radiation physics as a separate discipline in Sweden is outlined. Growth in number of hospital physicists is compared with that of some other countries for the period 1950-1975. The main duties of hospital physicists are described. Undergraduate and postgraduate courses in radiation physics in Sweden are discussed. A microtron and a multi-source cobalt-60 unit are described. (M.G.B.)

  1. Energy in Sweden 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    Energy in Sweden is published annually and is intended to provide decision-makers, journalists, companies, teachers and the general public with a coherent and easily available source of information on developments in the energy sector. Statistics are presented up to and including year 2007, when possible. Energy in Sweden presents facts about the use and supply of energy, present energy- and climate policy and policy measures, energy prices and energy markets, the impact of energy systems on the environment, and an international outlook. A new chapter for this year is Secure energy supply. There is also a chapter on Sweden's share of renewable energy calculated with the definition by the European commission. See also the publication Energy in Sweden - Facts and Figures 2008 where the tabular data behind most of the diagrams in Energy in Sweden are presented. Most of the publication is based on official statistics up to and including 2007, complemented where possible by input reflecting current events and decisions up to the middle of 2008

  2. Energy in Sweden 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-15

    Energy in Sweden is published annually, and is intended to provide decision-makers, journalists and the public with coherent and easily available information on developments in the energy sector. Most of the publication is based on official statistics up to and including 2006, complemented where possible by input reflecting current events and decisions up to the middle of 2007. The publication consists of eight chapters: Current energy and climate policy areas; Policy measures and incentives; Sweden's energy balance; Energy use; Energy markets; An international perspective; The environmental situation; and, Energy facts

  3. Energy in Sweden 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-15

    Energy in Sweden is published annually, and is intended to provide decision-makers, journalists and the public with coherent and easily available information on developments in the energy sector. Most of the publication is based on official statistics up to and including 2006, complemented where possible by input reflecting current events and decisions up to the middle of 2007. The publication consists of eight chapters: Current energy and climate policy areas; Policy measures and incentives; Sweden's energy balance; Energy use; Energy markets; An international perspective; The environmental situation; and, Energy facts

  4. Sweden - energy situation 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The energy situation of Sweden is reviewed on the basis of relevant data. Data on the country's national and international energy policy are followed by an outline of trends in energy sources and electric power generation. Key figures are presented on the country's external trade and balance of payments. (UA) [de

  5. Endemic Tularemia, Sweden, 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Lara; Arneborn, Malin; Tegnell, Anders; Giesecke, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Tularemia cases have been reported in Sweden since 1931, but no cyclical patterns can be identified. In 2003, the largest outbreak of tularemia since 1967 occurred, involving 698 cases. Increased reports were received from tularemia-nonendemic areas. Causal factors for an outbreak year and associated geographic distribution are not yet understood.

  6. Sweden after the referendum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnarson, P.

    1981-01-01

    Interest in the nuclear programme has slumped in the public and political arenas since the referendum in March 1980. How Sweden is now preparing for the implementation of the limited 12-reactor programme, and the associated fuel cycle, in particular the world's first away from reactor irradiated fuel storage, is discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Individual- and Family-Level Determinants of Risky Sexual Behavior Among Swedish- and Foreign-Born Young Adults 18-30 Years of Age, Residing in Skåne, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Benedict Oppong; Agardh, Anette

    2018-02-01

    In Sweden, various public health interventions have been performed to reduce risky sexual behaviors among young people and promote safer and positive approaches to sexuality, while attempting to bridge the gap between the less privileged or more vulnerable young people and their more privileged peers. This study aimed to compare the individual- and familial-level determinants of risky sexual behavior among foreign-born and Swedish-born young adults 18-30 years of age residing in Skåne, the south of Sweden. This was a cross-sectional study that used a questionnaire to collect data from 2968 randomly selected respondents between 18 and 30 years between January and March 2013. The associations were analyzed using chi-square tests, and simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Younger age, i.e., individual-level factor, and living with only one parent or another person while growing up, i.e., familial-level factor, increased the risk of engaging in sexual risk taking for both Swedish- and foreign-born youth. Male gender was related to a higher risk of engaging in sexual risk-taking behaviors among foreign-born youth but was not as important as influence on sexual risk taking among Swedish-born youth. Parental education level, on the other hand, was significantly associated with sexual intercourse on the "first night" and early sexual debut solely among Swedish-born youth. Condom use was not associated with any family-level factor among both Swedish-born and foreign-born youth. The design of sexual reproductive health and rights messages and interventions to target risky sexual behavior among Swedish youth should take into consideration immigration status (for example, being Swedish-born or foreign-born), individual- and family-level characteristics, as well as the type of behavioral change or outcome desired.

  8. Visual-motor integration and fine motor skills at 6½ years of age and associations with neonatal brain volumes in children born extremely preterm in Sweden: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolk, Jenny; Padilla, Nelly; Forsman, Lea; Broström, Lina; Hellgren, Kerstin; Åden, Ulrika

    2018-02-17

    This exploratory study aimed to investigate associations between neonatal brain volumes and visual-motor integration (VMI) and fine motor skills in children born extremely preterm (EPT) when they reached 6½ years of age. Prospective population-based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden, during 3 years. All children born before gestational age, 27 weeks, during 2004-2007 in Stockholm, without major morbidities and impairments, and who underwent MRI at term-equivalent age. Brain volumes were calculated using morphometric analyses in regions known to be involved in VMI and fine motor functions. VMI was assessed with The Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration-sixth edition and fine motor skills were assessed with the manual dexterity subtest from the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-second edition, at 6½ years. Associations between the brain volumes and VMI and fine motor skills were evaluated using partial correlation, adjusted for total cerebral parenchyma and sex. Out of 107 children born at gestational age skills (r=0.54, P=0.01). Associations were also seen between fine motor skills and the volume of the cerebellum (r=0.42, P=0.02), brainstem (r=0.47, P=0.008) and grey matter (r=-0.38, P=0.04). Neonatal brain volumes in areas known to be involved in VMI and fine motor skills were associated with scores for these two functions when children born EPT without major brain lesions or cerebral palsy were evaluated at 6½ years of age. Establishing clear associations between early brain volume alterations and later VMI and/or fine motor skills could make early interventions possible. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Visual–motor integration and fine motor skills at 6½ years of age and associations with neonatal brain volumes in children born extremely preterm in Sweden: a population-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nelly; Forsman, Lea; Broström, Lina; Hellgren, Kerstin; Åden, Ulrika

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This exploratory study aimed to investigate associations between neonatal brain volumes and visual–motor integration (VMI) and fine motor skills in children born extremely preterm (EPT) when they reached 6½ years of age. Setting Prospective population-based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden, during 3 years. Participants All children born before gestational age, 27 weeks, during 2004–2007 in Stockholm, without major morbidities and impairments, and who underwent MRI at term-equivalent age. Main outcome measures Brain volumes were calculated using morphometric analyses in regions known to be involved in VMI and fine motor functions. VMI was assessed with The Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual–Motor Integration—sixth edition and fine motor skills were assessed with the manual dexterity subtest from the Movement Assessment Battery for Children—second edition, at 6½ years. Associations between the brain volumes and VMI and fine motor skills were evaluated using partial correlation, adjusted for total cerebral parenchyma and sex. Results Out of 107 children born at gestational age motor skills (r=0.54, P=0.01). Associations were also seen between fine motor skills and the volume of the cerebellum (r=0.42, P=0.02), brainstem (r=0.47, P=0.008) and grey matter (r=−0.38, P=0.04). Conclusions Neonatal brain volumes in areas known to be involved in VMI and fine motor skills were associated with scores for these two functions when children born EPT without major brain lesions or cerebral palsy were evaluated at 6½ years of age. Establishing clear associations between early brain volume alterations and later VMI and/or fine motor skills could make early interventions possible. PMID:29455171

  10. Prevalence of mental disorders in 6-16-year-old students in Sichuan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuan; Jiang, Hongyun; Zhang, Ni; Wang, Dahai; Guo, Lanting

    2015-05-13

    To investigate the point prevalence of mental disorders in school students, multistage cluster stratified random sampling and two-phase survey methods were used to identify 40 primary and middle schools. The students were screened using the Chinese version of the Child Behavior Checklist and diagnosed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The prevalence of behavioral problems was 19.13%. The prevalence of behavioral problems significantly differed by sex, age, city of residence, and caretaker. The six-month prevalence of any mental disorder was 15.24% (95% CI: 15.49%-16.97%). Psychiatric disorders were more prevalent in boys (17.33%) relative to girls (13.11%; p mental disorders significantly differed by community and caretaker, and 36.46% of students exhibited comorbidity. Results demonstrated important mental health issues, with a high incidence of comorbidities, in this population. Students' mental health requires increased attention, particularly in poverty-stricken areas and left-behind children and adolescents.

  11. Sickness presenteeism in Norway and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard Johansen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sickness presenteeism (SP refers to the practice of going to work despite illness. This article describes the distribution of SP in Norway and Sweden. It also discusses relations between SP and various work characteristics and personal factors in the two countries. Methods: More than 2500 Norwegian and Swedish workers between 20 and 60 years of age answered a postal questionnaire. The Norwegian and Swedish samples are weighed and representative with regard to both variables of regional background and demography, but the response rate was low. The distribution of SP is measured by frequency (episodes in the previous year and by length (total days of SP in the previous year. This study employed binary and multinomial logistic regression to detect which factors influence the frequency of SP. Results: Fifty-five per cent of the respondents in Norway and Sweden practised SP in the previous year. The frequency of SP episodes is similar in the two countries. Further, respondents with low/medium income, physical work, and managerial responsibilities report SP more often in both countries. Non-western immigrants, the less educated, and those employed by others are overrepresented with SP in Norway. Neither gender nor age had any particular influence. Discussion: In accordance with previous studies, this study among Norwegian and Swedish workers suggests that some SP during a working year may be more common than no SP. Our analyses of determinants of SP present some previously undocumented differences. Divisions between sedentary versus physical work and management versus non-management were important for SP in Norway and Sweden. Moreover, non-western immigrants are overrepresented with SP in Norway, but this pattern does not prevail in Sweden. Some possible causes for non-western immigrants to report more SP are suggested in the article, but we need more research to follow up on the missing correlation between ethnic background and SP in

  12. Energy in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-11-01

    Energy in Sweden is published annually by the Swedish Energy Agency. Energy in Sweden 2004, together with its statistics supplement, Energy in Sweden: Facts and Figures 2004, is intended to provide decision-makers, journalists and the public with a single source of easily available information on conditions and developments in the energy sector. In recent years, Swedish energy and environmental policy has been increasingly concentrated on establishing or improving the long-term conditions for efficient energy markets and efficient use of energy. Restructuring of the Swedish electricity market, greater internationalisation and the effects of the energy system on the wider environment and on climate are important factors that influence the direction of energy policy and so also development of the energy markets. The line that was started by the 2002 Energy Policy Agreement, under the name of Working Together for a Reliable, Efficient and Environmentally Aware Energy Supply (Bill no. 2001/02:143), continues. The shift in taxation policy to encourage the move towards a sustainable energy system and reduced environmental impact continues, as exemplified by the introduction of the electricity certificate system on 1st May 2003. The negotiations that were started in 2003 with a view to progressive shut-down of nuclear power generation were broken off in October 2004 without having reached agreement with the nuclear power companies. As soon as the breakdown of the negotiations was announced, the Government, together with the Left Party and the Centre Party, stated that Barsebaeck 2 will be closed in 2005. Sweden's climate policy is based on the Climate Strategy Act (Bill no. 2001/02:55), which was adopted by Parliament in March 2002. It is expected that trading in emission rights, in accordance with the EU Emissions Trading Directive, will start in January 2005, with publication of national emission rights allocations on 30th September 2004. One of the more important

  13. Energy in Sweden 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    Energy in Sweden is published annually by the Swedish Energy Agency. Energy in Sweden 2004, together with its statistics supplement, Energy in Sweden: Facts and Figures 2004, is intended to provide decision-makers, journalists and the public with a single source of easily available information on conditions and developments in the energy sector. In recent years, Swedish energy and environmental policy has been increasingly concentrated on establishing or improving the long-term conditions for efficient energy markets and efficient use of energy. Restructuring of the Swedish electricity market, greater internationalisation and the effects of the energy system on the wider environment and on climate are important factors that influence the direction of energy policy and so also development of the energy markets. The line that was started by the 2002 Energy Policy Agreement, under the name of Working Together for a Reliable, Efficient and Environmentally Aware Energy Supply (Bill no. 2001/02:143), continues. The shift in taxation policy to encourage the move towards a sustainable energy system and reduced environmental impact continues, as exemplified by the introduction of the electricity certificate system on 1st May 2003. The negotiations that were started in 2003 with a view to progressive shut-down of nuclear power generation were broken off in October 2004 without having reached agreement with the nuclear power companies. As soon as the breakdown of the negotiations was announced, the Government, together with the Left Party and the Centre Party, stated that Barsebaeck 2 will be closed in 2005. Sweden's climate policy is based on the Climate Strategy Act (Bill no. 2001/02:55), which was adopted by Parliament in March 2002. It is expected that trading in emission rights, in accordance with the EU Emissions Trading Directive, will start in January 2005, with publication of national emission rights allocations on 30th September 2004. One of the more important tasks

  14. Decommissioning policy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, C.; Boge, R.; Snihs, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    In Sweden the nuclear power program is, according to a parliamentary decision, limited to twelve power producing reactors. The last reactor shall be taken out of service no later than the year 2010. As a result of the Chernobyl accident the program for taking the reactors out of service will be accelerated. This report is the first approach by the Swedish authorities to formulate a decommissioning policy. It is not the final policy document but it discusses the principal questions from the special Swedish viewpoint. (orig.)

  15. Sweden's largest Facebook study

    OpenAIRE

    Denti, Leif; Barbopoulus, Isak; Nilsson, Ida; Holmberg, Linda; Thulin, Magdalena; Wendeblad, Malin; Andén, Lisa; Davidsson, Emelie

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet has made it easier for people to socially interact than ever before. Today, the most popular channel is Facebook with over 845 million users world wide. In Sweden, the number of users amount to approximately half of the population. We had two aims with this study. First, we investigate which areas of Facebook usage that Swedish Facebook users consider more important vis-a-vis less important. We were also interested in how users convey their persona through t... m...

  16. Decommissioning policy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, C.; Boge, R.; Snihs, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    In Sweden the nuclear power program is, according to a parliamentary decision, limited to twelve power producing reactors. The last reactor shall be taken out of service no later than the year 2010. As a result of the Chernobyl accident the program for taking the reactors out of service will be accelerated. The first approach by the Swedish authorities to formulate a decommissioning policy is discussed. It is not the final policy document but it discusses the principal questions from the special Swedish viewpoint

  17. Domestic work and self-rated health among women and men aged 25-64 years: results from a population-based survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molarius, Anu; Granström, Fredrik; Lindén-Boström, Margareta; Elo, Sirkka

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the association between domestic work and self-rated health among women and men in the general population. The study is based on women (N = 12,910) and men (N = 9784) aged 25-64 years, who responded to a survey questionnaire in 2008 (response rate 56%). Logistic regression models were used to assess the association adjusting for age, educational level, employment status, family status and longstanding illness. Population attributable risks (PAR) were calculated to assess the contribution of domestic work to the prevalence of suboptimal self-rated health. More women (29%) than men (12%) spent more than 20 hours per week in domestic work. Women also experienced domestic work more often as burdensome. Disability pensioners and single mothers reported highest levels of burdensome domestic work. There was a strong independent association between burdensome domestic work and suboptimal self-rated health both in women and men. The PAR for burdensome domestic work was 21% in women and 12% in men and comparable to other major risk factors. The results suggest that domestic work should not be omitted when considering factors that affect self-rated health in the general population.

  18. Feminist Language Planning in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milles, Karin

    2011-01-01

    The international literature has often described linguistic authorities as being opposed to the idea of changing language in the name of feminism. However, in Sweden, many linguistic authorities have been active agents in adopting feminist language reforms. This is probably due to Sweden's long tradition of political feminist efforts and to the…

  19. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0.6--16 {mu}eV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Moltz, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.S.; Tanner, D.B. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Bluele, A.I.; Geraskin, E.V.; Golubev, N.A.; Ishkin, V.V.; Kazachenko, O.V.; Kuzmin, V.; Polushkin, V.G. [AN SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij; Anthony, P.L.; van Bibber, K.; Patrick, R.E.; Shen, S.; Slack, D.S.; Steele, J.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Villa, F. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark-matter axions in the mass range 0.6--16 {mu}eV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet. This proposal capitalized on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the MFTF-B fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark-matter density in axions of {rho}{sub a}= 0.3 GeV/cm{sup 3}, the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97% c.1. in the above mass range in 48 months.

  20. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0. 6--16. mu. eV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics); Moltz, D.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.S.; Tanner, D.B. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics); Bluele, A.I

    1991-11-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark-matter axions in the mass range 0.6--16 {mu}eV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet. This proposal capitalized on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the MFTF-B fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark-matter density in axions of {rho}{sub a}= 0.3 GeV/cm{sup 3}, the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97% c.1. in the above mass range in 48 months.

  1. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0.6--16 μeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, C.; Turner, M.S.; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.S.; Tanner, D.B.; Villa, F.

    1991-11-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark-matter axions in the mass range 0.6--16 μeV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet. This proposal capitalized on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the MFTF-B fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark-matter density in axions of ρ a = 0.3 GeV/cm 3 , the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97% c.1. in the above mass range in 48 months

  2. Acidification research in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staaf, H.; Bertills, U.

    1992-01-01

    A number of acid rain research programmes have been conducted in Sweden since 1978. The total cost for these programmes has amounted to about 250 million SEK, and during this period an additional 950 million SEK has been used to finance practical countermeasures, mainly lake liming. Acid deposition has caused damage to soil, lakes, groundwater, flora and fauna, buildings and materials. The role of acid rain in causing forest damage is not yet fully elucidated. However, there is strong evidence suggesting that ongoing soil acidification and nutrient imbalances associated with it pose the major threat to Swedish forests. Current ozone levels are damaging trees on the physiological level, but the effects of ozone on forest production in unknown. Liming is an efficient means of counteracting the negative effects of acidic deposition on forest soil, lakes and watercourses. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  3. Radwaste management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstroem, P.E.; Ungermark, S.

    1987-01-01

    The waste management system planned for handling the radioactive residues from Sweden's 12 nuclear power units is based on the operation of all the units up to the year 2010 in accordance with Parliament's decision to abolish nuclear power by that time. The main strategy for handling spent nuclear fuel is direct disposal without reprocessing. In the design of the radwaste management system the following fundamental principles have been applied. Short-lived waste will be disposed of as soon as possible after it has been generated. Spent fuel will be intermediately stored for about 40 years before final disposal, thereby reducing heat generation in the repository. Other long-lived waste will be disposed of jointly with the final disposal of spent fuel. 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Trajectories of disposable income among people of working ages diagnosed with multiple sclerosis: a nationwide register-based cohort study in Sweden 7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis with a population-based reference group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murley, Chantelle; Mogard, Olof; Wiberg, Michael; Alexanderson, Kristina; Karampampa, Korinna; Friberg, Emilie; Tinghög, Petter

    2018-05-09

    To describe how disposable income (DI) and three main components changed, and analyse whether DI development differed from working-aged people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to a reference group from 7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis in Sweden. Population-based cohort study, 12-year follow-up (7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis). Swedish working-age population with microdata linked from two nationwide registers. Residents diagnosed with MS in 2009 aged 25-59 years (n=785), and references without MS (n=7847) randomly selected with stratified matching (sex, age, education and country of birth). DI was defined as the annual after tax sum of incomes (earnings and benefits) to measure individual economic welfare. Three main components of DI were analysed as annual sums: earnings, sickness absence benefits and disability pension benefits. We found no differences in mean annual DI between people with and without MS by independent t-tests (p values between 0.15 and 0.96). Differences were found for all studied components of DI from diagnosis year by independent t-tests, for example, in the final study year (2013): earnings (-64 867 Swedish Krona (SEK); 95% CI-79 203 to -50 528); sickness absence benefits (13 330 SEK; 95% CI 10 042 to 16 500); and disability pension benefits (21 360 SEK; 95% CI 17 380 to 25 350). A generalised estimating equation evaluated DI trajectory development between people with and without MS to find both trajectories developed in parallel, both before (-4039 SEK; 95% CI -10 536 to 2458) and after (-781 SEK; 95% CI -6988 to 5360) diagnosis. The key finding of parallel DI trajectory development between working-aged MS and references suggests minimal economic impact within the first 4 years of diagnosis. The Swedish welfare system was responsive to the observed reductions in earnings around MS diagnosis through balancing DI with morbidity-related benefits. Future decreases in economic welfare may be experienced as the

  5. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  6. Conversion program in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, E.B. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  7. Uranium production in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    The history of uranium production in Sweden is reviewed in the article. The World War II led to an exploitation of the Swedish alum shale on a large scale. In the last phase of the war it also became obvious that the shale might be used for energy production of quite another kind than oil. In 1947 AB Atom energy was founded, an enterprise with one of its purposes to extract uranium for peaceful use. A plant with a yearly capacity of 120 tons of uranium was erected at Ranstad and ready for production by 1965. From the start in Ranstad and for many years to come there was hardly any interest in an immediate large uranium production. It was decided to use the plant for studies on its more effective exploitation in case of an expansion in the future, bearing in mind the reactor programme. In the course of time economical reasons began to speak against the project. The shale seemed to have a future neither as oil nor as uranium resource. The complete termination of the work on uranium production from shale occurred in 1989

  8. Dieselization in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kågeson, Per

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden the market share of diesel cars grew from below 10 per cent in 2005 to 62 per cent in 2011 despite a closing gap between pump prices on diesel oil and gasoline, and diesel cars being less favored than ethanol and biogas cars in terms of tax cuts and other subsidies offered to “environment cars”. The most important factor behind the dieselization was probably the market entrance of a number of low-consuming models. Towards the end of the period a growing number of diesel models were able to meet the 120 g CO 2 threshold applicable to “environment cars” that cannot use ethanol or biogas. This helped such models increase their share of the diesel car market from zero to 41 per cent. Dieselization appears to have had only a minor effect on annual distances driven. The higher average annual mileage of diesel cars is probably to a large extent a result of a self-selection bias. However, the Swedish diesel car fleet is young, and the direct rebound effect stemming from a lower variable driving cost may show up more clearly as the fleet gets older based on the assumption that second owners are more fuel price sensitive than first owners. - Highlights: ► This paper tries to explain the fast dieselization of the new Swedish car fleet. ► It identifies changes in supply and the impact of tax benefits. ► Finally it studies the impact on the annual average mileage

  9. Nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikdahl, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    Sweden uses 16,000 kWh of electricity per person, by far the highest consumption in EU. The reason is a well-developed electricity intensive industry and a cold climate with high share of electric heating. The annual power consumption has for several years been about 140 TWh and a normal year almost 50 per cent is produced by hydro and 50 percent by nuclear. A new legislation, giving the Government the right to ordering the closure nuclear power plants of political reasons without any reference to safety, has been accepted by the Parliament. The new act, in force since January 1, 1998, is a specially tailored expropriation act. Certain rules for the economical compensation to the owner of a plant to be closed are defined in the new act. The common view in the Swedish industry is that the energy conservation methods proposed by the Government are unrealistic. During the first period of about five years the import from coal fired plants in Denmark and Germany is the only realistic alternative. Later natural gas combi units and new bioenergy plants for co-production of heat and power (CHP) might be available. (orig.) [de

  10. A measurement of the radiative widths of the 16.6-16.9 MeV doublet in 8Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, Alan Marc

    1975-01-01

    The isovector M1 decay rates of the 16.6-16.9 MeV 2+ doublet in 8 Be to the 2.9 MeV 2+ first excited state have been measured. The total rate summed over both levels is found to be Γ mi = 4.94+0.80 eV. This allows a determination of the weak magnetism form factor b which is proportional to Γ mi 1/2 . If this result is compared with the result of a recent teta-alpha angular correlation measurement in the beta decays of the analogue 8 Li and 8 B ground states to the same final state, a model independent test of the Conserved Vector Current theory is possible. It is shown that the existing data are consistent with both CVC and the nonexistence of a 2. class induced tensor form factor. (author)

  11. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0.6--16 μeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Bibber, K.; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.S.; Tanner, D.B.; Moltz, D.M.

    1991-03-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark-matter axions in the mass range 0.6--16 μeV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet, as described by Sikivie. This proposal capitalizes on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the decommissioned MFTF-B fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark-matter density in axions of ρ = 0.3 GeV/cm 3 , the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97% c.l. in the above mass range in 48 months. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Time trends in human fecundability in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H; Rylander, Lars; Carstensen, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    ,000 primiparous women 20 years of age and older in the nationwide Swedish Medical Birth Registry from 1983 through 2002. This age restriction led to an exclusion of 10% of primiparous pregnancies. Subfertility (TTP > or =1 year) was analyzed as a function of maternal age, calendar time at initiation of attempt...... increased with age, except that for women in their late 1930s, an apparent decrease was observed, particularly among the early cohorts. CONCLUSION: We found decreasing subfertility over time. We speculate that these patterns might be related to a Sweden-specific decrease over time in sexually transmitted...... diseases, to changes in sexual behavior induced by socioeconomic conditions, or to broader biologic or educational trends....

  13. Subarachnoid haemorrhage in Sweden 1987-2002 : regional incidence and case fatality rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.; Buskens, E.; Granath, F.; Adami, J.; Ekbom, A.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Blomqvist, P.

    Background: Incidence estimates of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Sweden vary, which may be caused by regional variations. Reliable estimates of age-specific case fatality rates are lacking. We analysed regional incidence rates and case fatality rates of SAH in Sweden. Methods: The Swedish

  14. Women and energy in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rising, Agneta [Vattenfall - Swedish State Power Board (Sweden)

    1989-07-01

    Sweden is currently facing a new situation In energy politics. Nuclear power is to be phased out nd replaced by new energy sources and by more effective use of electricity. This will be a great change for the whole society as nuclear power today is giving half of electricity. And Sweden is a high-consumption- country, in fact looking at the top list of electricity consumption per capita in the world, you will find Sweden on the fourth plate. In general- women know less than men about the relation between energy, technology, environment and economy. This knowledge is required If women re to Influence the choice of future energy supplies of Sweden. It is with this background the project 'Women and Energy' has been started. Important decisions are to be made within their fairly immediate future with major consequences for Sweden's coming development. These decisions have until now often been made by men, but now it Is the hope of Vattenfall that women will be able to influence these decisions. So that all of 'nuclear people' may share responsibility the path that has been chosen.

  15. Women and energy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising, Agneta

    1989-01-01

    Sweden is currently facing a new situation In energy politics. Nuclear power is to be phased out nd replaced by new energy sources and by more effective use of electricity. This will be a great change for the whole society as nuclear power today is giving half of electricity. And Sweden is a high-consumption- country, in fact looking at the top list of electricity consumption per capita in the world, you will find Sweden on the fourth plate. In general- women know less than men about the relation between energy, technology, environment and economy. This knowledge is required If women re to Influence the choice of future energy supplies of Sweden. It is with this background the project 'Women and Energy' has been started. Important decisions are to be made within their fairly immediate future with major consequences for Sweden's coming development. These decisions have until now often been made by men, but now it Is the hope of Vattenfall that women will be able to influence these decisions. So that all of 'nuclear people' may share responsibility the path that has been chosen

  16. Policies promoting Biofuels in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, Kristina [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Div. of Heat and Power Technology., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    This report was written as part of a course in Environmental Economics and Policy Instruments at the University of Gothenburg. It aims at summarizing the policy instruments introduced to directly affect the production and use of biofuels in Sweden. Since Sweden is part of the EU also EU policies were included. There are additional policy instruments which affect the production and utilization of biofuels in a more indirect way that are not presented here. The economic analysis in this paper is limited and could be developed from the information presented in order to draw further conclusions on necessary changes in order to reach set targets.

  17. Parental Divorce and Union Disruption among Young Adults in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahler, Michael; Hong, Ying; Bernhardt, Eva

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the impact of parental divorce on the disruption of marital and nonmarital unions among young adults in Sweden, using longitudinal data from repeated mail questionnaire surveys (1999 and 2003) with 1,321 respondents (aged 26, 30, and 34 in 2003). The study takes into account several possible mechanisms governing the…

  18. English Language Teaching Profile: Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Sweden discusses the role of English within Swedish society and within the Swedish educational system. The status of English as the principal foreign language since 1945 for use in business, the media and tourism is pointed out. The system of English instruction in the…

  19. Foreign Language Learning in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpet, Brian R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a visit made to Sweden to ascertain why Swedish citizens speak such excellent English. Motivation was a key factor. Describes observations of the methods of teaching English as a second language in Swedish schools. Makes recommendations for foreign language teaching in Great Britain based on these observations. (SED)

  20. The energy transition in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruciani, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Sweden has the distinction of having started several major changes to its energy supply at an early stage. The country has no fossil reserves, and so was importing increasing volumes of oil products in the years following World War II. Yet it rapidly perceived the geopolitical risks generated by such oil dependency, and so developed its nuclear capacity, enabling it to reduce quickly the role of oil in its economy after the shocks of the 1970's. Sweden has also managed to exploit its natural resources. Until the 2000's, hydropower was able to enter the market without public assistance. By contrast, wood could not have gained its current market share without a policy combining public aid for investment and penalties for competing energies. The severe economic crisis which hit the country between 1991 and 1993 led such penalties being converted into taxes, notably a tax on CO_2 emissions that came into force in 1991. This helped Sweden reconstruct its tax system, to finance its social model. The challenge highlighted the country's ability to generate consensus policy guidelines. One of these guidelines was to react immediately after initial warnings about climate change. Sweden first strengthened its energy efficiency policy, structuring field actions through a national agency backed up by partner organizations in local communities to help consumers - individuals or industries - technically and economically. Sweden then adopted an unusual instrument to promote renewable electricity, namely its system of green certificates. Implemented in 2003, this system has spurred the development of the cheapest sources of renewable energy, two-thirds coming from onshore wind and one third from biomass. The cost of this support still remains remarkably moderate today. At the end of 2014, Sweden thus only used fossil fuels to provide 30% of its primary energy supplies, while renewables accounted for 52% of final energy consumption. Energy consumption per capita remains high, but

  1. Cult sites in northern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Brink

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The pagan cult in northern Sweden, i.e, Norrland, has for some decades been a neglected chapter in our history, a situation which unfortunately applies to Sweden as a whole, at least where onomastics are concerned. The aim is thus to deliver an overview of the evidence that we have of pre-Christian religious activities in these northern parts — in this aspect, onomastic material is nearly almost all we have got — and some general remarks about the conversion to the new Christian religion. The area of investigation is what in the (Swedish medieval period was known as Norrland. In other words, the part of Sweden considered here is modern Central Norrland. With our state of knowledge of today it is not so easy to pick out the place-names that have denoted some kind of pagan cult activity. The place-name material can be divided into: 1. Theoforic place-names 2. place-names denoting the site of a pagan cult, which do not however contain theoforic elements 3. place-names with a possible pagan cultic element.

  2. Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The IVA-project 'Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe' deals with possibilities and problems associated with our energy future. We take it for granted that various forms of energy will always be available for a multitude of purposes and at acceptable prices. Sweden also places high demands on health and environmental protection issues when it comes to the production of power and heat. During the last few years the climate issue has been highlighted, which in turn will change the conditions for the use of alternative sources of energy. Carbon dioxide is the most important of the greenhouse gases, and it is closely associated with the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas. These fossil fuels play dominant roles in the world 's energy supply. Far-reaching measures to decrease carbon dioxide emissions will thus greatly affect the ways in which we use fossil fuels and non-carbon dioxide generating sources of energy. We have chosen a global starting point for our energy study. From there we will zoom in on the energy systems of Europe and Sweden. The climate issue demands global approach. Deregulation of electricity and gas markets, and the development of integrated European systems related to these energy sources, requires an international perspective on he Swedish energy system. Our project differs from earlier governmental energy studies in the sense that we are not trying to present the most likely, nor the most desirable energy future. Instead we have opted to draw up some illustrations of Sweden's future energy system, with Europe as a backdrop. The climate issue differentiates the scenarios. Our time perspective is 20 years, with glimpses 50 years ahead. On the 18th of February 2003, the Steering Group of Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe, presented it's final report. The bulk of the work has been done in four panels. Their reflections and conclusions are presented in separate panel reports. The 12 factual reports present different

  3. Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The IVA-project 'Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe' deals with possibilities and problems associated with our energy future. We take it for granted that various forms of energy will always be available for a multitude of purposes and at acceptable prices. Sweden also places high demands on health and environmental protection issues when it comes to the production of power and heat. During the last few years the climate issue has been highlighted, which in turn will change the conditions for the use of alternative sources of energy. Carbon dioxide is the most important of the greenhouse gases, and it is closely associated with the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas. These fossil fuels play dominant roles in the world 's energy supply. Far-reaching measures to decrease carbon dioxide emissions will thus greatly affect the ways in which we use fossil fuels and non-carbon dioxide generating sources of energy. We have chosen a global starting point for our energy study. From there we will zoom in on the energy systems of Europe and Sweden. The climate issue demands global approach. Deregulation of electricity and gas markets, and the development of integrated European systems related to these energy sources, requires an international perspective on he Swedish energy system. Our project differs from earlier governmental energy studies in the sense that we are not trying to present the most likely, nor the most desirable energy future. Instead we have opted to draw up some illustrations of Sweden's future energy system, with Europe as a backdrop. The climate issue differentiates the scenarios. Our time perspective is 20 years, with glimpses 50 years ahead. On the 18th of February 2003, the Steering Group of Energy Foresight - Sweden in Europe, presented it's final report. The bulk of the work has been done in four panels. Their reflections and conclusions are presented in separate panel reports. The 12 factual reports present different sources of energy, how hey are

  4. The history of tuberculosis management in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallstedt, Helen; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    We review the history of TB in Sweden beginning in 1800, when 25% of mortality in Sweden was associated with TB. The Royal Family was involved in establishing dedicated sanatoria in Sweden to offer better diagnostics and clinical care. TB has declined in Sweden steadily, with some recent increases due to local spread of TB and challenging international and national socio-economical structures. Improved research and clinical knowledge is needed to diagnose and manage drug-susceptible as well as drug-resistant TB. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. The History of Tuberculosis Management in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Wallstedt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the history of TB in Sweden beginning in 1800, when 25% of mortality in Sweden was associated with TB. The Royal Family was involved in establishing dedicated sanatoria in Sweden to offer better diagnostics and clinical care. TB has declined in Sweden steadily, with some recent increases due to local spread of TB and challenging international and national socio-economical structures. Improved research and clinical knowledge is needed to diagnose and manage drug-susceptible as well as drug-resistant TB.

  6. Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkman, H; Iverfeldt, Aa [Swedish Environmental Research Inst. (Sweden); Borg, H; Lithner, G [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Inst. for Applied Environmental Research

    1998-03-01

    This report aims at assessing possible effects of cadmium in the Swedish environment. Swedish soils and soft freshwater systems are, due to a generally poor buffering capacity, severely affected by acidification. In addition, the low salinity in the Baltic Sea imply a naturally poor organism structure, with some important organisms living close to their limit of physiological tolerance. Cadmium in soils is mobilized at low pH, and the availability and toxicity of cadmium in marine systems are enhanced at low salinity. The Swedish environment is therefore extra vulnerable to cadmium pollution. The average concentrations of cadmium in the forest mor layers, agricultural soils, and fresh-waters in Sweden are enhanced compared to `back-ground concentrations`, with a general increasing trend from the north to the south-west, indicating strong impact of atmospheric deposition of cadmium originating from the central parts of Europe. In Swedish sea water, total cadmium concentrations, and the fraction of bio-available `free` cadmium, generally increases with decreasing salinity. Decreased emissions of cadmium to the environment have led to decreasing atmospheric deposition during the last decade. The net accumulation of cadmium in the forest mor layer has stopped, and even started to decrease. In northern Sweden, this is due to the decreased deposition, but in southern Sweden the main reason is increased leakage of cadmium from the topsoil as a consequence of acidification. As a result, cadmium in the Swedish environments is undergoing an extended redistribution between different soil compartments, and from the soils to the aquatic systems. 90 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs. With 3 page summary in Swedish

  7. Residential mobility among foreign-born persons living in Sweden is associated with lower mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Albin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Björn Albin1,2, Katarina Hjelm1,2, Jan Ekberg3, Sölve Elmståhl41School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; 2Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden; 3Centre of Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO, School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden; 4Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, SwedenAbstract: There have been few longitudinal studies on the effect of within-country mobility on patterns of mortality in deceased foreign-born individuals. The results have varied; some studies have found that individuals who move around within the same country have better health status than those who do not change their place of residence. Other studies have shown that changing one’s place of residence leads to more self-reported health problems and diseases. Our aim was to analyze the pattern of mortality in deceased foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the years 1970–1999 in relation to distance mobility. Data from Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare was used, and the study population consisted of 281,412 ­foreign-born persons aged 16 years and over who were registered as living in Sweden in 1970. Distance mobility did not have a negative effect on health. Total mortality was lower (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.69–0.73 in foreign-born persons in Sweden who had changed their county of residence during the period 1970–1990. Higher death rates were observed, after adjustment for age, in three ICD diagnosis groups “Injury and poisoning”, “External causes of injury and poisoning”, and “Diseases of the digestive system” among persons who had changed county of residence.Keywords: residential mobility, health, foreign-born, immigrant, Sweden, mortality

  8. Power and Authority. Birgitta of Sweden and her Revelations

    OpenAIRE

    Salmesvuori, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    In the High Middle Ages female saints were customarily noble virgins. Thus, as a wife and a mother of eight children, the Swedish noble lady Birgitta (1302/3 1373) was an atypical candidate for sanctity. However, in 1391 she was canonized only 18 years after her death and became a role model for many late medieval women, who were mothers and widows. The dissertation Power and Authority Birgitta of Sweden and Her Revelations investigates how Birgitta went about establishing her power an...

  9. Aespoe hard rock laboratory Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the new Aespoe hard rock laboratory is to demonstrate state of the art of technology and evaluation methods before the start of actual construction work on the planned deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The nine country OECD/NEA project in the Stripa mine in Sweden has been an excellent example of high quality international research co-operation. In Sweden the new Aespoe hard rock laboratory will gradually take over and finalize this work. SKB very much appreciates the continued international participation in Aespoe which is of great value for the quality efficiency, and confidence in this kind of work. We have invited a number of leading experts to this first international seminar to summarize the current state of a number of key questions. The contributions show the great progress that has taken place during the years. The results show that there is a solid scientific basis for using this knowledge on site specific preparation and work on actual repositories. (au)

  10. [The history of polio in Sweden - from infantile paralysis to polio vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Per

    2004-01-01

    Although other epidemics declined due to improved hygiene and sanitation, legislation, and vaccination, polio epidemics appeared in Sweden in 1881 and at the turn of the 20th century the disease became and annual feature in the Swedish epidemiological pattern. Due to the vaccination starting in 1957 epidemics ceased to exist in Sweden around 1965. This article deals with the history polio epidemics in Sweden, 1880-1965 and gives a brief description of: the demographical influence of polio, how did the medical authorities investigate and try to combat it, and the different comprehensions of how polio affected its victims.A study of polio incidence in Sweden at the national level during 1905-1962 reveals that the disease caused major epidemics in 1911-1913 and 1953. At the beginning of the 20th century polio primarily attacked children up to 10 years of age, and at the end of the period victims were represented in all age groups, but mainly in the ages 20-39. Due to its enigmatic appearance, polio was not considered as an epidemic infectious disease during the 19th century. Sweden's early epidemics enabled Swedish medical science to act and together with American research institutes it acquired a leading role in international medical research on the disease. In the 1955 Jonas Salk produced the first successful vaccine against polio but also Sweden developed its own vaccine, different in choice of methods and materials from the widely used Salk-vaccine.

  11. A central spent fuel storage in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, B.; Hagberth, R.

    1978-01-01

    A planned central spent fuel storage facility in Sweden is described. The nuclear power program and quantities of spent fuel generated in Sweden is discussed. A general description of the facility is given with emphasis on the lay-out of the buildings, transport casks and fuel handling. Finally a possible design of a Swedish transportation system is discussed. (author)

  12. ASEA reduces nuclear waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    ASEA, the worldwide manufacturer of electrical and mechanical equipment with headquarters in Vasteras, Sweden, is working on the development of a method using hot isostatic pressing for the safe containment and storage of nuclear waste. This development work is being carried out at the company's High-Pressure Laboratory at Robertsfors, in the north of Sweden

  13. Public Procurement of Innovation in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfstam, Max; Ågren, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sweden is often thought of as a country with a strong tradition for using public procurement as a means to stimulate innovation. Early on, Sweden recognized and developed procedures for using public procurement as a technologydevelopment tool. After a period where emphasis was put on this aspect ...... government authorities to engage in public procurement for innovation, and by issuing guidance on the topic.......Sweden is often thought of as a country with a strong tradition for using public procurement as a means to stimulate innovation. Early on, Sweden recognized and developed procedures for using public procurement as a technologydevelopment tool. After a period where emphasis was put on this aspect...... of public procurement Sweden dropped many policy initiatives within this field. This was in part due to neo-liberal movements during the 1980s which in interaction with a distributed institutional setup led to the removal of incentives for a procuring authority to engage in public procurement of innovation...

  14. Relative Deprivation and Sickness Absence in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Helgertz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high prevalence of sickness absence in many countries, at a substantial societal cost, underlines the importance to understand its determining mechanisms. This study focuses on the link between relative deprivation and the probability of sickness absence. Methods: 184,000 men and women in Sweden were followed between 1982 and 2001. The sample consists of working individuals between the ages of 19 and 65. The outcome is defined as experiencing more than 14 days of sickness absence during a year. Based on the complete Swedish population, an individual’s degree of relative deprivation is measured through income compared to individuals of the same age, sex, educational level and type. In accounting for the possibility that sickness absence and socioeconomic status are determined by common factors, discrete-time duration models were estimated, accounting for unobserved heterogeneity through random effects. Results: The results confirm that the failure to account for the dynamics of the individual’s career biases the influence from socioeconomic characteristics. Results consistently suggest a major influence from relative deprivation, with a consistently lower risk of sickness absence among the highly educated. Conclusions: Altering individual’s health behavior through education appears more efficient in reducing the reliance on sickness absence, rather than redistributive policies.

  15. Relative deprivation and sickness absence in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgertz, Jonas; Hess, Wolfgang; Scott, Kirk

    2013-08-29

    A high prevalence of sickness absence in many countries, at a substantial societal cost, underlines the importance to understand its determining mechanisms. This study focuses on the link between relative deprivation and the probability of sickness absence. 184,000 men and women in Sweden were followed between 1982 and 2001. The sample consists of working individuals between the ages of 19 and 65. The outcome is defined as experiencing more than 14 days of sickness absence during a year. Based on the complete Swedish population, an individual's degree of relative deprivation is measured through income compared to individuals of the same age, sex, educational level and type. In accounting for the possibility that sickness absence and socioeconomic status are determined by common factors, discrete-time duration models were estimated, accounting for unobserved heterogeneity through random effects. The results confirm that the failure to account for the dynamics of the individual's career biases the influence from socioeconomic characteristics. Results consistently suggest a major influence from relative deprivation, with a consistently lower risk of sickness absence among the highly educated. Altering individual's health behavior through education appears more efficient in reducing the reliance on sickness absence, rather than redistributive policies.

  16. Research on Pentecostalism in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Åke Alvarsson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to orientate and introduce potential researchers into Swedish Pentecostal movements, or those who wish to provide an overview of Scandinavian Christianity, by giving a brief summary of the history of Pentecostalism in Sweden and an overview of the main academic monographs that have been produced on this particular branch of Christianity. The idea is to highlight areas where we find relevant research and to point to areas into which there has been little or no investigation. Following, by way of introduction, a brief historical sketch, there is a note on spirituality before we are given a review of some thirty major academic works on the subject that a potential researcher would need to take into consideration.

  17. Chernobyl - its impact on Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    In case of radiological emergency in Sweden, the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection (SSI) has the responsability of organizing a special task force with experts both from SSI and from other authorities. Reports of increased radiation levels reached SSI around 10 am on April 28, 1986, and the task force convened at 1030 am. A large number of measurements were made all over the country, and temporary grazing restrictions were imposed so as to aviod excessive doses from the food chain grass-cow-milk. Attention is now concentrated on regions with high cesium activity and on foodstuffs in general. A very tentative estimate of the collective dose commiment is 10 000 man.Sv. It turned out that the general public was not always satisfied with the information provided by the authorities, in spite of complete openness (Author)

  18. Radioactive wast management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivintsev, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    A system under development and partially realized of NPP radioactive waste management in Sweden up to spent-fuel disposal in underground storage is described. The system implies that the spent fuel after unloading from a reactor is stored at the NPP in water shielded tanks. Then fuel assemblies (FA) are transforted by a special ship, being operated since 1982, to the CLAB central storage. In CLAB water pools lacated in underground granite openings fuel assemblies will be stored for 40 years. CLAB is suggested to be put in operation in 1985. At the next stage FA are transported from CLAB to the canning set-up (located on the ground above the under ground disposal). Hot isostatic pressing is used for hermetization as a method allowing to make monolithic copper containers with a storage time of about 1 mln years. Sealed copper containers will be put into a burial ground sited in crystal rocks

  19. Radon in dwellings in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies on specific activities in building materials, gamma-radiation levels in dwellings, the concentrations of radon and daughters in the air indoors and the concentration of radon in tap water are in progress in Sweden. On the basis of these investigations and of the investigation of Hultqvist from the beginning of the 1950's, an attempt has been made to show how the radiation doses in dwellings have changed or may be changed by human activities and what these changes imply in terms of collective dose. The annual collective absorbed dose in the basal cells of the critical bronchial region have increased from 11 x 10 3 man-Gy for the occupants of dwellings existing in 1950 to 25 x 10 3 man-Gy for dwellings existing in 1975

  20. Incidence of hyperthyroidism in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham-Nordling, Mirna; Byström, Kristina; Törring, Ove; Lantz, Mikael; Berg, Gertrud; Calissendorff, Jan; Nyström, Helena Filipsson; Jansson, Svante; Jörneskog, Gun; Karlsson, F Anders; Nyström, Ernst; Ohrling, Hans; Orn, Thomas; Hallengren, Bengt; Wallin, Göran

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of hyperthyroidism has been reported in various countries to be 23-93/100,000 inhabitants per year. This extended study has evaluated the incidence for ~40% of the Swedish population of 9 million inhabitants. Sweden is considered to be iodine sufficient country. All patients including children, who were newly diagnosed with overt hyperthyroidism in the years 2003-2005, were prospectively registered in a multicenter study. The inclusion criteria are as follows: clinical symptoms and/or signs of hyperthyroidism with plasma TSH concentration below 0.2 mIE/l and increased plasma levels of free/total triiodothyronine and/or free/total thyroxine. Patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism or thyroiditis were not included. The diagnosis of Graves' disease (GD), toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG) and solitary toxic adenoma (STA), smoking, initial treatment, occurrence of thyroid-associated eye symptoms/signs, and demographic data were registered. A total of 2916 patients were diagnosed with de novo hyperthyroidism showing the total incidence of 27.6/100,000 inhabitants per year. The incidence of GD was 21.0/100,000 and toxic nodular goiter (TNG=STA+TMNG) occurred in 692 patients, corresponding to an annual incidence of 6.5/100,000. The incidence was higher in women compared with men (4.2:1). Seventy-five percent of the patients were diagnosed with GD, in whom thyroid-associated eye symptoms/signs occurred during diagnosis in every fifth patient. Geographical differences were observed. The incidence of hyperthyroidism in Sweden is in a lower range compared with international reports. Seventy-five percent of patients with hyperthyroidism had GD and 20% of them had thyroid-associated eye symptoms/signs during diagnosis. The observed geographical differences require further studies.

  1. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    Energy in Sweden. Facts and Figures 2005 contains the tabular data for most of the diagrams in the main publication. These data consist primarily of the results of the Agency's processing of basic data from Statistics Sweden. Facts and Figures is available at www.stem.se in pdf- and excel file formats. With effect from the 2001 edition, statistics are of preliminary character for the two preceding years (2003 and 2004). Breakdowns into certain types of fuels vary somewhat depending on whether preliminary or final data has been used. Further information about the statistics can be found in Energy in Sweden, chapter 8 Energy Facts

  2. Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Jörgen; Wahlberg, Roger

    2000-01-01

    We estimate the relationship between wages and occupational gender segregation in Sweden. Because of high wage equality in Sweden compared to the U.S., we expect a lower wage penalty of job femaleness in Sweden than in the U.S. Our results supports this hypothesis. We also investigate how the unexplained gender wage gap vary across occupations and find that this gap is smallest in male dominated jobs and largest in female dominated jobs. Finally, we investigate whether the female wage-experie...

  3. Renewable Energy Policy Fact sheet - Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    The EurObserv'ER policy profiles give a snapshot of the renewable energy policy in the EU Member States. Sweden surpassed its 2020 nationally binding renewable energy in 2013. Main support measures to promote renewable energy in Sweden consists of a quota system, various tax regulation mechanisms and subsidy schemes. Sweden has a joint support scheme with Norway, thus being the first EU Member State to implement a cooperation mechanism, as defined under the 2009 EU Renewable Energy Directive. The Swedish coalition government has agreed on a target of 100% renewable electricity production by 2040

  4. Occupational balance in health professionals in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagman, Petra; Lindmark, Ulrika; Rolander, Bo; Wåhlin, Charlotte; Håkansson, Carita

    2017-01-01

    Health care employees are often women, a group that has high degrees of sick leave and perhaps problems attaining occupational balance. However, people think differently about their everyday activities and it is therefore important to take their perceptions into account but occupational balance has not yet been measured in health professionals. The aim was to describe occupational balance in three different samples of health professionals in Sweden. A further aim was to investigate whether occupational therapists (OTs) rate their occupational balance differently from other health professionals. Four hundred and eighty-two health professionals, employees in public dentistry, mental health care and OTs, aged 21-70 years participated. The participants' occupational balance was measured using the occupational balance questionnaire (OBQ). The ratings of occupational balance were similar to earlier studies and did not differ significantly between the samples. The OTs' occupational balance was also similar to that of the other health professionals. The similarities in occupational balance indicate the same difficulties in attaining it. The result highlights the possibility that working people face similar difficulties in achieving occupational balance. Further research is warranted about how to attain it.

  5. A profile and analysis of willow growers in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenqvist, H.; Roos, A.; Ling, E.; Hektor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Willow plantations on Swedish farmland increased considerably between 1991 and 1996. The main driving forces behind this development were (1) the 1991 introduction of an agriculture deregulation policy in Sweden which created lower grain prices and simultaneously introduced compensation for set-aside land and subsidies for willow plantations on surplus arable land, (2) higher taxes on fossil fuels, and (3) the existence of a biofuel market in Sweden based on forest fuels. This paper presents a statistical study of 1,158 willow growers in southern and central-eastern Sweden. The resulting profile of growers will help policy makers and agents in the bioenergy business design information campaigns and marketing strategies. Willow growers are described according to geographical distribution, willow parcel sizes, farm sizes, and farm types. They are compared with the population of farmers who are not growing willow. Willow growers are more often between 50-65 years of age, and they have larger farms than non-willow growers. They are less often focused on animal and milk production and more often on cereal and food crop production than are other farmers. (author)

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Sweden, covers an area of approx. 450 000 square kilometers. It has a population of 8 millions. With few exceptions in the northern part the access can be regarded as good. A dense network of motorroads and railroad exists. The results obtained by the exploration works combined with other available geo-information permit a separation of two principal uranium provinces in Sweden. The first one is confined to sediments of Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician which appears in Southern Sweden and along the border of the Caledonian mountain range in Central Sweden. The uranium occurrence are stratiform, of blackshale type which occurs in the Peltura zone of Upper Cambrian or they are associated to a phosphatite-bearing unit of Lower Ordovician overlying the Cambrian shale formation. The distribution of uranium in Upper Cambrian rocks is in general dependant on their lithology which itself is related to the paleography. This conditions explain relatively higher uranium content of the shale from Billigen.The potential resources of the province are estimated at about 1 million tonnes uranium. The second uranium province, called Arjeplog-Arvidsjaur, situated immediately south of the Arctic circle, comprises one deposit - Pleutajokk - and a group of more than twenty occurrences of similar characteristics and age (1 700 - 1 800 my.). The results of the past exploration have shown that uranium is present in different types of rocks. Because of the presence of uranium in many of the pegmatites the possibility of the formation of large low grade deposits should be tested. Favourable areas are those regions where the geological conditions are similar to the geology of the Grenville province in Canada or the Damara belt of SW-Africa. Special studies are recommended on this subject

  7. Development of nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowski, E.

    1994-01-01

    The history and development of nuclear energetics in Sweden has been described. Up to now 12 units (9 BWR and 3 PWR nuclear reactors) with total 70 TWh electric power is being working in Sweden. If the same power will be installed as a coal-fired units the emissions of 65 million tons of CO 2 , 240,000 tons of SO 2 and 140 tons of NO x would be expected. 1 tab

  8. Radon in dwellings in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1978-04-01

    Studies on the specific activities in building materials, the γ-radiation levels in dwellings, the concentrations of radon and daughters in the air indoors and the concentration of radon in tap water are in progress in Sweden. On basis of these investigations and of the investigation of Hultqvist from the beginning of the 1950s, an attempt has been made to show how the radiation doses in dwellings have changed or may be changed by human activities and what these changes imply in terms of collective dose. The annual collective absorbed dose in the basal cells of the critical bronchial region have increased from 11 . 10 3 manGy for the occupants of dwellings existing in 1950 to 25 . 10 3 manGy for dwellings existing in 1975. If the building of houses continues as at present it can be estimated that the annual collective dose will be between 25 and 31 . 10 3 manGy for the dwellings of 1985. (author)

  9. Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults? How can you reduce anesthesia risks in older patients? Age Age may bring wisdom but it also brings ... Ask your physician to conduct a pre-surgery cognitive test — an assessment of your mental function. The physician can use the results as a ...

  10. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yamada, Michiko

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to ionizing radiation accelerates the aging process has been actively investigated at ABCC-RERF since 1958, when longitudinal cohort studies of the Adult Health Study (AHS) and the Life Span Study (LSS) were initiated. In their 1975 overall review of aging studies related to the atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, Finch and Beebe concluded that while most studies had shown no correlation between aging and radiation exposure, they had not involved the large numbers of subjects required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Extending LSS mortality data up to 1978 did not alter the earlier conclusion that any observed life-shortening was associated primarily with cancer induction rather than with any nonspecific cause. The results of aging studies conducted during the intervening 15 years using data from the same populations are reviewed in the present paper. Using clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory techniques, a broad spectrum of aging parameters have been studied, such as postmortem morphological changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, laboratory tests, tissue changes, and morbidity. With respect to the aging process, the overall results have not been consistent and are generally thought to show no relation to radiation exposure. Although some preliminary results suggest a possible radiation-induced increase in atherosclerotic diseases and acceleration of aging in the T-cell-related immune system, further study is necessary to confirm these findings. In the future, applying the latest gerontological study techniques to data collected from subjects exposed 45 years ago to A-bomb radiation at relatively young ages will present a new body of data relevant to the study of late radiation effects. (author) 103 refs

  11. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.C.; Beebe, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that ionizing radiation accelerates natural aging has been under investigation at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission since 1959. Postmortem observations of morphologic and chemical changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, clinical laboratory tests, tissue changes, morbidity, and mortality have all been examined by ABCC investigators interested in this hypothesis. These studies have been beset with conceptual difficulties centered on the definition and measurement of aging. An empirical approach early led to the calculation of an index of physiologic age as a linear combination of age-related tests of various organ systems. Most studies have been negative but have not involved the large numbers that might be required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Mortality, however, has been examined on the basis of a large sample and over the period 1950-1972 had provided no support for the hypothesis of radiation-accelerated aging. Ionizing radiation dose, of course shorten human life, but its life-shortening effect appears to be the result of specific radiation-induced disease, especially neoplasms. The hypothesis is now much less attractive than it was 10-20 years ago but still has some value in stimulating research on aging. The experience of the A-bomb survivors provides an unusual opportunity for a definitive test of the hypothesis. (auth.)

  12. Electricity supply in Sweden 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The year 1983 was characterized by a continued decrease in oil consumption and an increase in electricity consumption. Totally the supply of fuels decreased from 278TWh to 264 TWh in 1983. The electricity supply increased from 99.9 TWh in 1982 to 110.8 TWh in 1983. The consumers total energy use decreased from 358 TWh in 1982 to 355 TWh in 1983. Electricity consumption excluding transmission losses increased from 91,4 TWh in 1982 to 101.1TWh in 1983. The increase was due to electric space heating disconnectable electric boilers and to industry. At the end of 1983 the electric heating subscriptions are estimated to corresponds to 45 percent of all one-family houses. Hydropower accounted for 54 percent and nucler power accounted for 34 percent of the total supply of electricity in 1983. The highest hourly load during 1983 amounted to 20862 MW. The lowest load during 1983 amounted to 5185 MW. Ten nuclear power units were in commercial operation during the year. The energy availability figures were as follows: Barsebaeck 1 85 percent, Barsebaeck 2 82 percent, Forsmark 1 84 percent, Forsmark 2 88 percent, Oskarshamn 1 87 percent, Oskarshamn 2 83 percent, Ringhals 1 59 percent and Ringhals 2 68 percent. The production of electricity from conventional thermal power stations was only 4.0 TWh. Back pressure power in industry contributed 2.5 TWh of this figure and combined power and district heating stations 1.3 TWh. Two coal fired combined power and district heating plants were added and sevearl combined power and district heating plants have been rebuilt to be coal fired. The high voltage power grid system permits joint operation by all the power companies in the country, and the major power companies utilize the network for exchanging surplus power with other power companies. An account of the public debate on energy in Sweden during 1983 is also given.(L.E.)

  13. CO2 storage in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, Clas; Andersson, Annika; Kling, Aasa; Bernstone, Christian; Carlsson, Anders; Liljemark, Stefan; Wall, Caroline; Erstedt, Thomas; Lindroth, Maria; Tengborg, Per; Edstroem, Mikael

    2004-07-01

    This study considers options, that could be feasible for Sweden, to transport and geologically store CO 2 , providing that technology for electricity production with CO 2 capture will be available in the future and also acceptable from cost- and reliability point of view. As a starting point, it is assumed that a new 600-1000 MW power plant, fired with coal or natural gas, will be constructed with CO 2 capture and localised to the Stockholm, Malmoe or Goeteborg areas. Of vital importance for storage of carbon dioxide in a reservoir is the possibility to monitor its distribution, i.e. its migration within the reservoir. It has been shown in the SACS-project that the distribution of carbon dioxide within the reservoir can be monitored successfully, mainly by seismic methods. Suitable geologic conditions and a large storage potential seems to exist mainly in South West Scania, where additional knowledge on geology/hydrogeology has been obtained since the year 2000 in connection to geothermal energy projects, and in the Eastern part of Denmark, bordering on South West Scania. Storage of carbon dioxide from the Stockholm area should not be excluded, but more studies are needed to clarify the storage options within this area. The possibilities to use CO 2 for enhanced oil recovery, EOR, in i.a. the North Sea should be investigated, in order to receive incomes from the CO 2 and shared costs for infrastructure, and by this also make the CO 2 regarded as a trading commodity, and thereby achieving a more favourable position concerning acceptance, legal issues and regulations. The dimensions of CO 2 -pipelines should be similar to those for natural natural gas, although regarding some aspects they have different design and construction prerequisites. To obtain cost efficiency, the transport distances should be kept short, and possibilities for co-ordinated networks with short distribution pipelines connected to common main pipelines, should be searched for. Also, synergies

  14. Prenatal diagnosis in Sweden: organisation and current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, T H; Kristoffersson, U

    1997-01-01

    Invasive prenatal diagnosis was introduced in Sweden in the early 1970s and is an integral part of the public health care system. Funding is provided by taxation; the patient only pays a consultation fee. Genetic analyses on a broad range of cytogenetic and molecular disorders are performed at the 6 university-affiliated hospitals and in 1 county hospital. About 6% of all newborns have been cytogenetically screened during pregnancy, and about 90% of the analyses are performed after amniocentesis. The main indication is chromosome analysis because of advanced maternal age.

  15. Use of lithium in the adult populations of Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramness, Jørgen G; Ringbäck Weitoft, Gunilla; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lithium is an important drug in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Earlier epidemiological studies of lithium use have depended on sales statistics, clinical surveys or population surveys. The national prescription databases in Denmark, Norway and Sweden may help provide more reliable.......25% of the populations in Denmark, Norway and Sweden respectively redeemed at least 1 prescription for lithium in the period studied. The amount prescribed per user per year varied with age, increasing to maximum doses at 40 years of age and then decreasing. CONCLUSION: This study is the first attempt to use...... information on the epidemiology of lithium use. METHODS: Data were taken from the three national prescription databases in Denmark, Norway and Sweden from July 2005 until June 2006, encompassing 1 year of prescription data. Similar methods were used to identify a number of different pharmacoepidemiological...

  16. A comparative study of educational inequality in the risk of stillbirth in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden 1981-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Ane L; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Cnattingius, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Background The stillbirth rates in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are among the lowest in the world, but socioeconomic disparities in stillbirth still exist. This study examined the educational patterns in the risk of stillbirth in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden from 1981 to 2000. Methods...... From the national birth registries, all singleton live births and stillbirths with a gestational age of at least 28 weeks were selected in Denmark (n=1¿182¿888), Finland (n=419¿729), Norway (n=1¿006¿767) and Sweden (n=1¿974¿101). The births were linked with individual data on parental...

  17. Income distribution and mortality in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Lindholm

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The hypothesis that a high income inequality on a societal level is associated with poor health outcomes has been both rejected and accepted in empirical studies. Whether the influence of economic circumstances on health operates at the individual level or societal level has important implications on policy and intervention alternatives. The objective of this study was to analyse the relationship between income inequality and mortality in Swedish municipalities and if the relationship varies depending on the mean income or on the time-lag between income inequality and mortality.

    Methods: The study was based on register data on mean income and income inequality (Gini coefficients from Statistics Sweden 1982 and 1998, aggregated on the municipality level. Data on age-standardised death rates per 100,000 persons were obtained for 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998 and 2002. The analysis on 1998 was a test of the robustness of the results.

    Results: The relationship between high income inequality in 1982 and mortality in 1983 was negative with a similar relationship in 1998. Using latency periods, the results show a decreasing trend of mortality in relation to higher Gini coefficients. A positive relationship between Gini and mean income implies that municipalities with larger income distribution also had a higher mean income and vice versa.

    Conclusions: High income inequality does not have a negative effect on mortality in Swedish municipalities. The municipalities with high income inequality have also high mean income as opposed to many other countries. The income level seems to be more substantial for mortality than the income inequality.

  18. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    Energy in Sweden 2004: Facts and Figures contains the tabular data for most of the diagrams in the main publication. These data consist primarily of the results of the Agency's processing of basic data from Statistics Sweden. Facts and Figures is available at www.stem.se in pdf- and excel file formats. Since the year 2001 statistics for the period 1983-1998 are revised compared to data for previous editions. With effect from the 2001 edition, statistics are of preliminary character for the two preceding years. Breakdowns into certain types of fuels vary somewhat depending on whether preliminary or final data has been used. Further information about the statistics can be found in Energy in Sweden, chapter 8 Energy Facts.

  19. Health and social inequities in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diderichsen, Finn

    1990-01-01

    Sweden is one of Europe's most egalitarian countries. The social inequities in living conditions have been gradually reduced to a level that is more equal than in most countries in Europe. Even if general health development has been positive during recent years, data reviewed here indicate...... that there may be adverse effects for some groups which may increase inequities. This article presents results on inequities in health from the Public Health Report of Sweden 1987 and discusses causal mechanisms and implications for health policy....

  20. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  1. Labour Force Activity after 65: What Explain Recent Trends in Denmark, Germany and Sweden?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mona; Pedersen, Peder J.

    2017-01-01

    In most OECD member countries labour force attachment has increased in recent years in the age groups 60-64 years in particular, but also among people 65 years and older. Focus in this paper is on the trend in older workers’ labour force participation in Denmark, Germany and Sweden since 2004. Ma...

  2. Ethnic differences in social participation and social capital in Malmo, Sweden: a population-based study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate ethnic differences in different aspects of social participation in Malmö, Sweden. The public health survey in Malmö 1994 is a cross-sectional study. A total of 5600 randomly chosen individuals aged 20–80 years were asked to complete a postal questionnaire. The participation rate was 71%. The population was divided into categories born in Sweden, Denmark/Norway, other Western countries, former Yugoslavia, Poland, Arabic speaking countries and all other ...

  3. Changes in access to structural social capital and its influence on self-rated health over time for middle-aged men and women: a longitudinal study from northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Malin; Ng, Nawi

    2015-04-01

    Until recently, most studies on social capital and health have been cross-sectional making it difficult to draw causal conclusions. This longitudinal study used data from 33,621 individuals (15,822 men and 17,799 women) from the Västerbotten Intervention Program, to analyse how changes in access to individual social capital influence self-rated health (SRH) over time. Two forms of structural social capital, i.e. informal socializing and social participation, were measured. Age, sex, education, marital status, smoking, snuff, physical activity, alcohol consumption, high blood pressure, and body mass index were analysed as potential confounders. The association between changes in access to structural social capital and SRH in the follow-up was adjusted for SRH at baseline, as well as for changes in the socio-demographic and health-risk variables over time. The results support that changes in access to structural social capital over time impact on SRH. Remaining with no/low level of informal socializing over time increased the odds ratio for poor SRH for both men and women (OR of 1.45; 95%CI = 1.22-1.73 among men and OR of 1.56; 95%CI = 1.33-1.84 among women). Remaining with no/low levels of social participation was also detrimental to SRH in men and women (OR 1.14; 95%CI = 1.03-1.26 among men and OR 1.18; 95%CI = 1.08-1.29 among women). A decrease in informal socializing over time was associated with poor SRH for women and men (OR of 1.35; 95%CI = 1.16-1.58 among men and OR of 1.57; 95%CI = 1.36-1.82 among women). A loss of social participation had a negative effect on SRH among men and women (OR of 1.16; 95%CI = 1.03-1.30 among men and OR of 1.15; 95%CI = 1.04-1.27 among women). Gaining access to social participation was harmful for SRH for women (OR 1.17; 95%CI = 1.05-1.31). Structural social capital has complex and gendered effects on SRH and interventions aiming to use social capital for health promotion purposes require an awareness of its gendered nature

  4. Gout in immigrant groups: a cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wändell, Per; Carlsson, Axel C; Li, Xinjun; Gasevic, Danijela; Ärnlöv, Johan; Holzmann, Martin J; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-05-01

    Our aim was to study the association between country of birth and incidence of gout in different immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included the whole population of Sweden. Gout was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis in the National Patient Register. The association between incidence of gout and country of birth was assessed by Cox regression, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), using Swedish-born individuals as referents. All models were conducted in both men and women, and the full model was adjusted for age, place of residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, neighbourhood socio-economic status and co-morbidities. The risk of gout varied by country of origin, with highest estimates, compared to Swedish born, in fully adjusted models among men from Iraq (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.54-2.16), and Russia (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.26-2.27), and also high among men from Austria, Poland, Africa and Asian countries outside the Middle East; and among women from Africa (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.50-3.31), Hungary (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.45-2.71), Iraq (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.13-2.74) and Austria (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.07-2.70), and also high among women from Poland. The risk of gout was lower among men from Greece, Spain, Nordic countries (except Finland) and Latin America and among women from Southern Europe, compared to their Swedish counterparts. The increased risk of gout among several immigrant groups is likely explained by a high cardio-metabolic risk factor pattern needing attention.

  5. Introducing Micro-finance in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barinaga, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The case describes the first year of efforts to introduce microfinance as a tool to work with vulnerable groups in Sweden, more particularly ex-convicts, former drug-addicts and longterm unemployed women of immigrant background. The teaching objective is to discuss whether micro-finance can be seen...

  6. Status and use of PSA in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knochenhauer, M.

    1996-05-01

    The performance and use of PSA:s in Sweden goes back about two decades. During all of this time, the field of PSA has been developing intensively, both internationally and within Sweden. The latest years have been characterised by an increased use of PSA models and results, and by major extensions of existing PSA models. The aim of this document is to describe PSA in Sweden with respect to development, scope and maturity, as well as to the contents of the analyses and the use of results. PSA activities will be described from the point of view of both the authorities and the utilities. The report gives an overview of the development within the area of PSA in Sweden both its history and current trends. The aim has been to include a reasonable amount of detail, both on the methods and results in PSA:s performed and on the numerous supporting research programs dealing with various aspects of PSA. 39 refs 39 refs

  7. Status and use of PSA in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knochenhauer, M

    1996-05-01

    The performance and use of PSA:s in Sweden goes back about two decades. During all of this time, the field of PSA has been developing intensively, both internationally and within Sweden. The latest years have been characterised by an increased use of PSA models and results, and by major extensions of existing PSA models. The aim of this document is to describe PSA in Sweden with respect to development, scope and maturity, as well as to the contents of the analyses and the use of results. PSA activities will be described from the point of view of both the authorities and the utilities. The report gives an overview of the development within the area of PSA in Sweden both its history and current trends. The aim has been to include a reasonable amount of detail, both on the methods and results in PSA:s performed and on the numerous supporting research programs dealing with various aspects of PSA. 39 refs 39 refs.

  8. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    This supplement contains the tabular data of most of the diagrams in the main publication (Energy in Sweden 1999, STEM-ET-82-1999). The figures are based on preliminary statistics, and there may be minor differences between similar data in different sections or tables etc. All table headings and notes are given in both Swedish and English

  9. Disturbed security in Norway and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Lieder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The content of the article is an attempt to determine the course and consequences of terrorist attacks that took place in 2010 in Sweden and 2011 in Norway. A Comparative Study includes responses of societies and political elites of both countries.

  10. INOPS Survey data report for Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Severin, Majbritt Christine

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Sweden. The statistics rely on data collected in the period from May 2015 to June 2015 through an online survey...

  11. Atomoxetine's Effect on Societal Costs in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myren, Karl-Johan; Thernlund, Gunilla; Nylen, Asa; Schacht, Alexander; Svanborg, Par

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare societal costs between patients treated with atomoxetine and placebo in Sweden. Method: Ninety-nine pediatric ADHD patients were randomized to a 10-week double-blind treatment with atomoxetine (n = 49) or placebo (n = 50). All parents received four sessions of psycho-education. Parents filled out a resource utilization…

  12. Public Dialogue on Science in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyring, Annagreta

    1988-01-01

    Explains how Sweden has proceeded to popularize science. Addresses topics dealing with policy, the energy debate, booklets with large circulation, computers and society, contacts between schools and research, building up small science centers, mass media, literary quality, children's responsibility, and some of the challenges. (RT)

  13. Consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    It summarizes the consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident, describes the emergency response, the basis for decisions and countermeasures, the measurement strategies, the activity levels and doses and countermeasures and action levels used. Past and remaining problems are discussed and the major investigations and improvements are given. (author)

  14. The history of nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear power developments in Sweden are reviewed, from the first initiatives to start research in the area in 1945 to the parliament decision in 1979 to phase out nuclear power by 2010. The article is primarily concerned with the political and R and D management aspects in the field. (L.E.)

  15. Reconsidering School Politics: Educational Controversies in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredholm, Axel

    2017-01-01

    School politics in Sweden has recently moved in a conservative direction, emphasising the importance of conventional school subjects, stronger teacher authority and more discipline in the classroom. At the same time, consensus on the utility of such measures is lacking in the school debate. The conservative approach is often criticised as…

  16. C. h. p. saves fuel in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugas, C F

    1979-04-01

    A combined heat and power plant based on a diesel generator to produce 12MW of electricity and 12MW of heat has successfully supplied the town of Skultuna in Sweden during the winter and has saved 3,700t of oil annually.

  17. Yoshio Nakajima. A Japanese Artist from Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Yoshio Nakajima is an interesting example of the globalisation of art. His education and early work as an artist took place in his native Japan, but continued in Europe where he has spent more than 30 years, mainly in provincial Sweden....

  18. Mobility of Knowledge as a Recognition Challenge: Experiences from Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Per; Fejes, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the tensions between mobility, knowledge and recognition, and what the impact of migration could be on lifelong education and society. This is discussed with the case of Sweden as the starting point. The main issue in Sweden concerning migration is the admission of refugees. Sweden has had a relatively open policy…

  19. Death, Dying and Bereavement in Norway and Sweden in Recent Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gustavsson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of my research projects examines pictorial symbols and epitaphs on gravestones in Norway and Sweden. The focus has been on the 1990s and the 2000s. The choice of this period is motivated by the fact that new national burial laws were adopted in both countries in the early 1990s. These laws provided the next of kin with the possibility of choosing memorial symbols and inscriptions more freely than had previously been the case. To judge from the data under study, individual symbols have gained popularity, especially in Sweden, while Norway has been more faithful to earlier traditions of a collective character; moreover, secular motifs are more manifest on the gravestones in Sweden than in Norway. Another research project analyses memorial websites on the Internet related to persons who have died in recent years. The all-inclusive issue in these studies concerns mourners’ expressions of their emotions and beliefs regarding the deceased person’s afterlife, that is, beliefs in after-death existence. Belief in the deceased being somewhere in heaven is common. Belief in angels is also a popular concept in memorial websites. Moreover, in Sweden, this includes deceased pets as well. The previously strictly observed distinction between humans and pets has become indiscernible in Sweden. Norwegian practice, however, remains critical towards this type of “humanlike characterization”. In Norway, memorial websites for the deceased are generally associated with more traditional Christian concepts than are similar sites in Sweden. By contrast, in Sweden, one observes a kind of diffuse religiosity reminiscent of New Age ways of thinking, according to which the individual plays the central role, and glorification of afterlife existence prevails. Secularization, that is, a decline in the influence of traditional forms of religious experience, is conspicuously more prominent in Sweden. Within the project on memorial websites, I have performed a special

  20. Structural health monitoring of a concrete bridge in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enochsson, Ola; Täljsten, Björn; Olofsson, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Over the past decade the interests in upgrading, assessment and maintenance of our ageing infrastructure has grown avalanche-like. The main reason is economical aspects but also reasons due to accessibility environmental consideration play a vital role. Recently the Swedish and Norwegian Railway Association decided to upgrade the Iron Ore Line "Malmbanan", a railway line for transportation of iron from northern Sweden to the coasts of Norway and Sweden. Here the owner wanted to increase the axle loads from 25 to 30 tons to reduce the transportation costs. In one of the cases, the Luossajokk Bridge, a recalculation according to design codes showed that the increased axle loads would exceed the yield limit in the reinforcement. Before any decision was taken regarding strengthening or replacing the bridge an assessment with probabilistic methods was used. It appeared that the bridge could carry the higher load with a safety index β >= 4.7 for reasonable assumptions of the load distributions. A measurement system was installed to check the real worst placement of the new iron ore locomotive (IORE), and the actually level of strains in the reinforcement for the worst load case1. It was shown that the strain level was far from critical and that the evaluated worst placement of the locomotive was almost correct. To assure a reliable transportation a long term monitoring program was arranged to check the development of strains with time. Examples from the probabilistic evaluation and the monitoring of the bridge are given and discussed.

  1. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  2. An instructive comparison of Denmark and Sweden CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2007-02-01

    Denmark and Sweden are close neighbors, they have pretty much the same Climate, so that it is interesting to try to understand what makes them so different in their per capita GHG (Green House Gas) emissions from fuel combustion. Indeed, the CO 2 emissions of Denmark and Sweden are practically equal while the population of Sweden is much larger. Thus, the per capita CO 2 emissions of Denmark are 63 % larger than those of Sweden. Denmark resorts heavily to fossil fuels for its production of both its electric power and its industrial heat whereas Sweden resorts to other primary energy sources which are either renewable or do not emit CO 2 . True, Sweden is in a privileged situation for its access to hydro power and to biomass but Denmark could considerably reduce its CO 2 emissions if it were to call on nuclear power as Sweden has been doing. (A.L.B.)

  3. Cancer mortality by country of birth, sex, and socioeconomic position in Sweden, 1961-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Abdoli

    Full Text Available In 2010, cancer deaths accounted for more than 15% of all deaths worldwide, and this fraction is estimated to rise in the coming years. Increased cancer mortality has been observed in immigrant populations, but a comprehensive analysis by country of birth has not been conducted. We followed all individuals living in Sweden between 1961 and 2009 (7,109,327 men and 6,958,714 women, and calculated crude cancer mortality rates and age-standardized rates (ASRs using the world population for standardization. We observed a downward trend in all-site ASRs over the past two decades in men regardless of country of birth but no such trend was found in women. All-site cancer mortality increased with decreasing levels of education regardless of sex and country of birth (p for trend <0.001. We also compared cancer mortality rates among foreign-born (13.9% and Sweden-born (86.1% individuals and determined the effect of education level and sex estimated by mortality rate ratios (MRRs using multivariable Poisson regression. All-site cancer mortality was slightly higher among foreign-born than Sweden-born men (MRR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.07, but similar mortality risks was found among foreign-born and Sweden-born women. Men born in Angola, Laos, and Cambodia had the highest cancer mortality risk. Women born in all countries except Iceland, Denmark, and Mexico had a similar or smaller risk than women born in Sweden. Cancer-specific mortality analysis showed an increased risk for cervical and lung cancer in both sexes but a decreased risk for colon, breast, and prostate cancer mortality among foreign-born compared with Sweden-born individuals. Further studies are required to fully understand the causes of the observed inequalities in mortality across levels of education and countries of birth.

  4. The Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anckarsäter, Henrik; Lundström, Sebastian; Kollberg, Linnea; Kerekes, Nora; Palm, Camilla; Carlström, Eva; Långström, Niklas; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Halldner, Linda; Bölte, Sven; Gillberg, Christopher; Gumpert, Clara; Råstam, Maria; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS) is an ongoing longitudinal twin study targeting all twins born in Sweden since July 1, 1992. Since 2004, parents of twins are interviewed regarding the children's somatic and mental health and social environment in connection with their 9th or 12th birthdays (CATSS-9/12). By January 2010, 8,610 parental interviews concerning 17,220 twins had been completed, with an overall response rate of 80%. At age 15 (CATSS-15) and 18 (CATSS-18), twins and parents complete questionnaires that, in addition to assessments of somatic and mental health, include measures of personality development and psychosocial adaptation. Twin pairs in CATSS-9/12 with one or both twins screening positive for autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, developmental coordination disorder, learning disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and/or eating problems have been followed with in-depth questionnaires on family, social environment and personality, and subsequently by clinical assessments at age 15 together with randomly selected population controls, including 195 clinically assessed twin pairs from the first 2 year cohorts (CATSS-15/DOGSS). This article describes the cohorts and study groups, data collection, and measures used. Prevalences, distributions, heritability estimates, ages at onset, and sex differences of mental health problems in the CATSS-9/12, that were analyzed and found to be overall comparable to those of other clinical and epidemiological studies. The CATSS study has the potential of answering important questions on the etiology of childhood mental health problems and their role in the development of later adjustment problems.

  5. Labour force activity after 65: what explain recent trends in Denmark, Germany and Sweden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Mona; Pedersen, Peder J

    2017-01-01

    In most OECD member countries labour force attachment, has increased in recent years not only in the age groups 60-64 years but also among people 65 years and older. Focus in this paper is on the trend in older workers' labour force participation in Denmark, Germany and Sweden since 2004. Main emphasis is given to people aged 65-69 years eligible for social security retirement programs from age 65. The gender aspect is included to accommodate different trends for women and men. To explain country differences in trends, the importance of changes in retirement policies of relevance for this age group and cohort relevant changes in education and health is examined and discussed. Further, country differences in the impact from education and health is examined. Results show that the largest increase in labour force participation among people aged 65-69 years has taken place in Sweden following by Germany, while the increase in Denmark is rather small. While the increase in Germany mainly seems to be a result of policy reforms, the increase in Sweden appear to be a result of a combination of policy changes and an increasing educational level. Financial incentives seem most important in Germany and only of minor importance in Denmark, where policy changes directed towards individuals above the age of 65 appear to have been too small so far to affect retirement behaviour significantly.

  6. Nord Stream, Sweden and Baltic Sea Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Robert L

    2007-03-15

    In June 2006, FOI published the report: Sweden and the NEGP: a Pilot Study of the North European Gas Pipeline and Sweden's Dependence on Russian Energy, a base data report on a topic that FOI considered to be of rising importance. Much has happened since then and the NEGP has changed its name to Nord Stream and submitted an official notification on the intention of realising the project of constructing a gas pipeline from Russia to Germany via the Baltic Sea. The primary aim of this report is to discuss and analyse some of the core aspects of Nord Stream and the pipeline project with regard to the security situation for the Baltic Sea region. The report constitutes an updated version of the previous report. Most of the old report still stands valid, especially concerning the historical survey of Russia's energy policy, but the new report has additional chapters and is broader in scope concerning the consequences of the project

  7. Chlamydia psittaci in birds of prey, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Blomqvist

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlamydia psittaci is an intracellular bacterium primarily causing respiratory diseases in birds but may also be transmitted to other animals, including humans. The prevalence of the pathogen in wild birds in Sweden is largely unknown. Methods: DNA was extracted from cloacae swabs and screened for C. psittaci by using a 23S rRNA gene PCR assay. Partial 16S rRNA and ompA gene fragments were sequence determined and phylogenies were analysed by the neighbour-joining method. Results and conclusion: The C. psittaci prevalence was 1.3% in 319 Peregrine Falcons and White-tailed Sea Eagles, vulnerable top-predators in Sweden. 16S rRNA and ompA gene analysis showed that novel Chlamydia species, as well as novel C. psittaci strains, are to be found among wild birds.

  8. Nord Stream, Sweden and Baltic Sea Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Robert L.

    2007-03-01

    In June 2006, FOI published the report: Sweden and the NEGP: a Pilot Study of the North European Gas Pipeline and Sweden's Dependence on Russian Energy, a base data report on a topic that FOI considered to be of rising importance. Much has happened since then and the NEGP has changed its name to Nord Stream and submitted an official notification on the intention of realising the project of constructing a gas pipeline from Russia to Germany via the Baltic Sea. The primary aim of this report is to discuss and analyse some of the core aspects of Nord Stream and the pipeline project with regard to the security situation for the Baltic Sea region. The report constitutes an updated version of the previous report. Most of the old report still stands valid, especially concerning the historical survey of Russia's energy policy, but the new report has additional chapters and is broader in scope concerning the consequences of the project

  9. Social inequality in fetal growth: a comparative study of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden in the period 1981-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Diderichsen, F; Arntzen, A

    2008-01-01

    ,077,584; Finland n = 400,442; Norway n = 929,458; Sweden n = 1,761,562). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Slope index of inequality (SII) and mean differences in birthweight for gestational age, SII and risk differences in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants. RESULTS: In all countries....... CONCLUSION: The economic recession in Denmark in the 1980s was concurrent with an increase in disparities in fetal growth, whereas the economic recession in Finland and Sweden in the early 1990s did not substantially increase the socioeconomic inequality in fetal growth. The economic growth in the later part...... of the 1990s may have diminished the socioeconomic inequality in fetal growth in Finland, Norway, and Sweden....

  10. The Y2K issue in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, G.; Ek, P.; Isaksson, S.; Ericsson, A.M.; Jaernry, C.

    1999-01-01

    The paper overviews the work performed in Sweden on the Y2K issue. It describes in summary how the work is done at the utilities, some lessons learned and the work performed by the regulatory body, the Swedish Power Inspectorate. It discusses as well, how the reporting and accountancy has been changed to meet the Y2K problem at the Swedish State Authority as well as at the Swedish nuclear facilities. There is a section describing the Physical Protection issues

  11. Transportation of radioactive materials in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, A.M.

    1979-06-01

    This report is designed to calculate the total risk due to shipping radioactive materials in Sweden. The base case developed is the shipment model that is used now or the best estimate for expected shipments. The model for the calculations and the computer program used has been developed at the Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA and is the same that was used for the NUREG-0170 study. The results from the calculations show an annual expected population dose of 30 person-rem due to normal transport conditions. The annual expected dose from accidents were calculated to be between 2.3-20.8 person rem. The higher figure represents the case where plutonium is shipped back to Sweden from reprocessing plants abroad in the form of PuO2 and the lower figure represent the case when plutonium is shipped back in the form of mixed oxide fuel. The total additional population dose in Sweden due to both normal and accident conditions in the transportation of radioactive materials will be 30 - 50 person rem/year. Compared to the natural background radiation that is 8x10 5 person rem per year in Sweden, this figure is very low. If converted to latent cancer fatalities this population dose will add approximately 3.5x10 3 cancers each year. The consequences due to accidents have been calculated and are discussed separately from their probabilities. The most severe accident that was found was an accident involving PuO 2 . This accident would give 82 400 rem as a maximum individual dose and 8.1x10 5 person rem as a population dose. (Auth.)

  12. Citizens and taxation : Sweden in comparative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Edlund, Jonas

    1999-01-01

    In the contemporary critique of the welfare state a common target is taxation. The consequences of the high levels of taxes collected by the modern state, the critics argue, are slowdown in economic growth, high unemployment, and declining public legitimacy for taxes and state provided welfare. This thesis explores the political support for taxation in Sweden, the epitome of high-tax-society. The thesis consists of one introductory chapter and five journal articles. The first objective of the...

  13. Radon problems in Sweden. Investigations and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.; Ehdwall, H.

    1978-11-01

    For some years radon has been of great concern in Sweden both as a source of occupational exposure in mines and other underground spaces and as a source of radiation exposures in dwellings has lately increased to a considerable extent and appropriate measurements and possible countermeasures are under intensive discussion. The policy and general principles of the supervision especially at work places are described here with a brief description of the progress of the development work on measuring methods. (author)

  14. Evaluating the gender wage gap in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Malmberg, Åsa

    2007-01-01

    Using mainly quantile regressions, this paper evaluates the gender wage gap throughout the conditional wage distribution in Sweden. The gender wage is found to increase at the upper tail of the wage distribution, indicating an enforcement of the glass ceiling effect recorded in earlier studies. The results also indicate that the earlier noted trend of diminishing wage differences at the bottom of the wage distribution now is turning. The increase of overall wage inequalities coincides with a ...

  15. Risk factors of long-term sickness absence in Norway and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard Johansen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This paper examines the level of long-term sickness absence (LTSA in Norway and Sweden. It also investigates whether risk factors of LTSA are the same in Norway and Sweden. Methods: More than 2500 Norwegian and Swedish workers between 20 and 60 years of age answered a postal questionnaire. The Norwegian and Swedish samples are weighted and representative with regard to regional background variables and demographic background variables, but the response rate was low. LTSA is defined as 15 days or more sickness absence in the previous year. Binary logistic regression is used to detect which factors influence LTSA. The analyses of LTSA include demographic factors, socio-economic position, and occupational characteristics. Results: Nineteen per cent of respondents in Norway and 11 per cent of respondents in Sweden experienced LTSA in the previous year. Many respondents from Sweden report mental problems and many Norwegian respondents report pain in back, neck, knuckles, and muscles. Income level is the most important predictor of LTSA in both countries. The direct impacts of gender, age, and physical work conditions are stronger in Norway than Sweden.Discussion: In accordance with official statistics and previous studies, the proportion of Norwegian respondents with LTSA is much higher than the proportion of Swedish respondents. The different levels of LTSA could be linked to differences in social policy. In line with previous studies, respondents with low income are overrepresented with LTSA, and gender, age, and physical work also matter. In contrast to previous studies, there is not any evidence of higher levels of LTSA among non-western immigrants, people with less education, and non-managers. These results reflect the control for ‘income level’, but they could also be related to limits with the survey (non-response, response bias, etc..

  16. Uranium recovery in Sweden. History and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Olsson, G.

    1993-08-01

    In 1945 the potential of nuclear energy for military and peaceful purpose had initiated a strong interest in Sweden to establish a national programme in the field. The Atomic Energy Committee was formed at the end of 1945 and charged the Research Institute of National Defence in January 1946 with the test to investigate possibilities of uranium recovery in Sweden. AB Atomenergi, a semi-state owned body, was formed in November 1947 to take charge of nuclear energy related research and development. The search for and the recovery of uranium from indigenous resources became a dominant objective over the first years of the company. The report gives a broad overview of the efforts to establish a national uranium fuel supply programme in Sweden from the early days of the postwar years of the 1940s. Process and plant development, plant operations at Kvarntorp and Ranstad, and the development of the uranium supply policy are presented against a background of the nuclear power development in the country. The nuclear weapons debate and the decision to sign the non proliferation treaty in 1968 are briefly reported. Special attention has been given an account of the technical development and the various projects related to the Ranstad plant and its final restoration in the 1980s

  17. Consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haegg, Conny.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation doses to man in Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident originate mainly from external irradiation from deposited radionuclides and internal irradiation from consumption of radioactively contaminated food stuffs. Inhalation and external irradiation from the passing cloud give only a minor contribution to the total dose. As an average for the Swedish population the individual radiation dose during the first year amounts to about 0.1 mSv, i.e. 10% of the natural background radiation. In the most contaminated areas, however, the individual dose may become 30 times higher than the average dose. The dose committed over 50 years has estimated to be about six times as high as the first year dose. The collective dose for the Swedish population has been estimated to about 1300 manSv the first year after the accident and the corresponding dose over 50 years to 5000 to 7000 manSv. This could lead to 100 to 200 extra fatal cancers. Furthermore, no damages on man that can be related to Chernobyl fallout, e.g. pre-natal effects, have so far been observed in Sweden. Shortly after the accident, several research projects were initiated in Sweden in order to follow the distribution of radionuclides in the aquatic and terrestrial environment. The results which in many cases are preliminary, shows that the recovery of the ecosystem will take several decades. (author)

  18. Entry into motherhood in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available On the background of the dramatic swings in the Swedish TFR since the mid-1980s we present a first attempt at assessing the impact of labor-market trends on the timing of the first birth based on individual-level register data covering all Swedish women born in 1950 or later. Among our covariates we have each woman's income, partitioned into any income earned from work, any unemployment benefits, and any public support for educational activities. We also have employment trends in her home municipality. The latter variables are included for every relevant year. We find that first-birth rates rose and fell in step with municipal employment levels. The effect is especially strong for young women, and the decline in first birth during the 1990s was concentrated primarily among women aged below 30. First-birth rates increased with a woman's earned income. Unemployed women did not have particularly low first-birth rates, but students did.

  19. Socioeconomic differences in the burden of disease in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljung, Rickard; Peterson, Stefan; Hallqvist, Johan

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to analyse how much of the total burden of disease in Sweden, measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), is a result of inequalities in health between socioeconomic groups. We also sought to determine how this unequal burden is distributed across different disease...... of disease that take both mortality and morbidity into account can help policy-makers understand the magnitude of inequalities in health for different disease groups....... groups and socioeconomic groups. METHODS: Our analysis used data from the Swedish Burden of Disease Study. We studied all Swedish men and women in three age groups (15-44, 45-64, 65-84) and five major socioeconomic groups. The 18 disease and injury groups that contributed to 65% of the total burden...

  20. Knee injuries in skiing. A prospective study from northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, G; Gedda, S; Hemborg, A

    1980-01-01

    This paper evaluates 420 ski injuries occurring in Northern Sweden in 1977. Our main aim was to correlate knee injuries with types of skiing and to note a change in incidence with evolution of equipment. Fifty-eight lesions (13.8%) affected the knee joint which is about the same frequency as 10 years earlier nor has introduction of high stiff boots in downhill skiing increased incidence of knee injuries. Cross-country and long-distance skiing produced more knee injuries (24.7%) than downhill skiing (11.4%). Cross-country skiers were older and more women in this group sustained knee injuries. The use of non-release type bindings is probably the main reason for this higher incidence but age and different skiing techniques seem to contribute.

  1. Composition of atmospheric precipitation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emanuelsson, A; Eriksson, E; Egner, H

    1954-01-01

    Preliminary charts are presented based on two years of data, to demonstrate the geographic distribution over Sweden of the annual amounts of Na, Cl, K, Ca, NH/sub 3//sup -n/, and NO/sub 3//sup -n/ brought to the surface of the earth by precipitation. The ratios of these total amounts to the total amounts of Na deposited during the same time interval are shown to possess systematic geographic distribution patterns. Comparisons are made between these ratios and the corresponding quantities in sea water. The investigation is now being resumed to provide additional data from a larger number of stations and for longer time periods.

  2. Industrial action in Sweden - a new pattern?

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies the modern conflict patterns and conflict dimensions in Sweden 1993-2005. The aim is to trace and interpret the new patterns and dimensions of labour market conflict by collecting and compiling strike data from the National Conciliation Office, (1993-99) and the National Mediation Office (2000-2005). On the whole, strike activity has decreased steadily from the 1980s and onwards and in large parts of the Swedish labour market conflicts are very rare. A few small un-ions orga...

  3. Buildings with enhanced radioactivity in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1980-12-01

    Enhanced radon/radon daughter concentrations indoors have been found in some houses in Sweden, especially in combination with low air exchange rates. The radon sources have been found to be some types of building materials, some types of filling materials, some types of ground and any combination of these sources. The radon source may also be radon-rich tap water. The same types of building materials also give an enhanced gamma radiation level. In all houses, both lower and higher concentrations of radon than the average levels given here have been found in individual rooms and with single measurements. (author)

  4. PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE IN SWEDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf BJÖRNSTIG

    2004-01-01

    In Sweden (9 million inhabitants, a sparsely populated country with sometimes long transportation distances to the nearest trauma hospital, 800 ambulances, 7 ambulance helicopters and 3–5 fixed wing ambulance aircraft are the available transport resources. In case of a mass casualty or disaster situation, inside or outside the country, a governmental project (Swedish National Medevac aims to convert a passenger aircraft from Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS to a qualified medical resource for long distance transport, with capacity to nurse six intensive care patients and an additional 6–20 lieing or seated patients during transport.

  5. Country policy profile - Sweden. October 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-10-01

    The main support mechanism for electricity from RES is a quota system that is based on a certificate trading system. Furthermore, tax incentives are in place and PV installations are subsidised with grants. Promotion of heating from RES is mainly promoted through tax exemptions. Households may deduct investments of renewable energy heating installations replacing heating systems based on fossil fuels from tax. Heating from RES further benefits from an exemption of various taxes, as carbon dioxide taxes on supply, import and production of fossil fuels for heating purposes, which apply for fossil fuels (Source, RES LEGAL Europe, www.res-legal.eu/search-by-country/sweden/)

  6. Household energy demand. Empirical studies concerning Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dargay, J; Lundin, A

    1978-06-01

    This paper investigates the effects of energy policy on households in Sweden and provides the material necessary for evaluation of current and proposed energy-conservation measures. Emphasis is placed on the impact of enery taxation or price changes on household demand for electricity, heating oil, and gasoline and the consequences of such measures for income distribution. The results of the Swedish studies of household demand for heating oil and gasoline indicate that price changes can have a considerable long run impact on fuel utilization. In the short run, price responsiveness is notably reduced, but it is nevertheless of consequence for energy demand.

  7. National Debate and Public Confidence in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Ted Lindquist, coordinator of the Association of Swedish Municipalities with Nuclear Facilities (KSO), closed the first day of conferences. He showed what the nuclear landscape was in Sweden, and in particular that through time there has been a rather good support from the population. He explained that the reason could be the confidence of the public in the national debate. On a more local scale, Ted Lindquist showed how overwhelmingly strong the support was in towns where the industry would like to operate long-term storage facilities

  8. Differences in sickness absence in Sweden and Denmark: the cross national HAKNAK study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas; Christensen, Karl Bang; Vaez, Marjan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate potential differences in sickness absence among public sector employees in Sweden and Denmark, and to what extent a difference was associated with age, gender, physical and psychosocial work environment exposures, lifestyle factors, self-rated health or work ability. METHODS...... of dependent and independent variables in the two sub-cohorts. Stratified logistic regression analysis was performed to identify causes for absence within the two sub-cohorts, and logistic regression analysis was performed to study differences in sickness absence levels between the two sub-cohorts. RESULTS......: More subjects from the Swedish study population reported more than 7 days of sickness absence. Factors associated with sickness absence were largely similar in the two countries. The difference in absence level between Sweden and Denmark was not associated with differences in age, gender, skill level...

  9. This is how we manage Sweden`s radioactive waste. Activities 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    SKB operates systems and facilities for the management and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste in Sweden. SKB has conducted extensive R, D and D work with regard to constructing a spent fuel encapsulation plant and a deep repository in crystalline bedrock. This annual report treats all the different activities without going into technical details.

  10. Excess mortality in women of reproductive age from low-income countries: a Swedish national register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esscher, Annika; Haglund, Bengt; Högberg, Ulf; Essén, Birgitta

    2013-04-01

    Cause-of-death statistics is widely used to monitor the health of a population. African immigrants have, in several European studies, shown to be at an increased risk of maternal death, but few studies have investigated cause-specific mortality rates in female immigrants. In this national study, based on the Swedish Cause of Death Register, we studied 27,957 women of reproductive age (aged 15-49 years) who died between 1988 and 2007. Age-standardized mortality rates per 100,000 person years and relative risks for death and underlying causes of death, grouped according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, were calculated and compared between women born in Sweden and in low-, middle- and high-income countries. The total age-standardized mortality rate per 100,000 person years was significantly higher for women born in low-income (84.4) and high-income countries (83.7), but lower for women born in middle-income countries (57.5), as compared with Swedish-born women (68.1). The relative risk of dying from infectious disease was 15.0 (95% confidence interval 10.8-20.7) and diseases related to pregnancy was 6.6 (95% confidence interval 2.6-16.5) for women born in low-income countries, as compared to Swedish-born women. Women born in low-income countries are at the highest risk of dying during reproductive age in Sweden, with the largest discrepancy in mortality rates seen for infectious diseases and diseases related to pregnancy, a cause of death pattern similar to the one in their countries of birth. The World Bank classification of economies may be a useful tool in migration research.

  11. Sport as a context for integration:newly arrived immigrant children in Sweden drawing sporting experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Hertting, Krister; Karlefors, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Sport is a global phenomenon, which can make sport an important arena for integration into new societies. However, sport is also an expression of national culture and identities. The aim of this study is to explore images and experiences that newly-arrived immigrant children in Sweden have about sport in their country of origin, and challenges that can arise in processes of integration through sport. We asked 20 newly arrived children aged 10 to 13 to make drawings about sporting experiences ...

  12. Sibling risk of anxiety disorders based on hospitalizations in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2011-04-01

    This study used nationwide hospital records to examine sibling risk of any type of anxiety disorder in Sweden over a 40-year period. This study, carried out between 1 January 1968 and 31 December 2007, of the entire population of Sweden, linked information on family relationships from the nationwide Multi-Generation Register with information from the nationwide Swedish Hospital Discharge Register on first diagnosis of anxiety disorder. A total of 42,602 persons hospitalized for anxiety disorders and 2093 affected siblings were identified. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated by comparing risk in siblings of persons hospitalized for anxiety disorders with risk in persons whose siblings had no hospital diagnosis of anxiety disorders. The sibling risk was 2.26, which was independent of sex and age differences between siblings. The SIR was highest in siblings sibling diagnosed with any anxiety disorder resulted in increased risks of a number of disorders; the highest increased risk was of social phobia (SIR 3.68, 95% confidence interval, 1.68-7.69). Risk of panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety and depressive disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder was raised in female but not male siblings. Heritable effects likely play an important role in the cause of anxiety disorders, but the extent of their role remains to be established. Important contributions could be made by studies of gene-environment interactions that have sufficient sample sizes to produce reliable results. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  13. Cancer mortality by country of birth, sex, and socioeconomic position in Sweden, 1961-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Gholamreza; Bottai, Matteo; Moradi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, cancer deaths accounted for more than 15% of all deaths worldwide, and this fraction is estimated to rise in the coming years. Increased cancer mortality has been observed in immigrant populations, but a comprehensive analysis by country of birth has not been conducted. We followed all individuals living in Sweden between 1961 and 2009 (7,109,327 men and 6,958,714 women), and calculated crude cancer mortality rates and age-standardized rates (ASRs) using the world population for standardization. We observed a downward trend in all-site ASRs over the past two decades in men regardless of country of birth but no such trend was found in women. All-site cancer mortality increased with decreasing levels of education regardless of sex and country of birth (p for trend sex estimated by mortality rate ratios (MRRs) using multivariable Poisson regression. All-site cancer mortality was slightly higher among foreign-born than Sweden-born men (MRR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.07), but similar mortality risks was found among foreign-born and Sweden-born women. Men born in Angola, Laos, and Cambodia had the highest cancer mortality risk. Women born in all countries except Iceland, Denmark, and Mexico had a similar or smaller risk than women born in Sweden. Cancer-specific mortality analysis showed an increased risk for cervical and lung cancer in both sexes but a decreased risk for colon, breast, and prostate cancer mortality among foreign-born compared with Sweden-born individuals. Further studies are required to fully understand the causes of the observed inequalities in mortality across levels of education and countries of birth.

  14. Domestic gender equality and childbearing in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Goldscheider

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sweden, which is among the most gender-equal societies in the world, combines 'modern' family patterns such as unmarried cohabitation, delayed parenthood, high maternal labor force participation, and high break-up rates - all usually linked with low birth rates - with relatively high fertility. Sweden also has a high level of shared parental responsibility for home and children. Objective: After decades of late 20th century research showing that increasing gender equality in the workplace was linked with lower fertility, might gender equality in the home increase fertility? Methods: Using data from the Swedish Young Adult Panel Study (YAPS, we use Cox regression to examine the effects on first, second, and third births of 1 holding attitudes about sharing equally in the care of the home and children, and 2 actual sharing in these domestic tasks. Results: Our analysis shows that, measuring attitudes before the transition to parenthood and actual practice four years later, it is inconsistency between sharing attitudes and the actual division of housework that reduces the likelihood of continued childbearing, especially on second births among women. Conclusions: As women are most likely to confront an inconsistent situation, with egalitarian ideals in a household without equal sharing, it is clear that having a partner who does not share housework is depressing Swedish fertility.

  15. Space education in Kiruna, Northern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sandahl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The town of Kiruna in the north of Sweden has a concentration of space activities and space research with, for example, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Esrange, the ESA Salmijärvi satellite station, and EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter Radar Scientific Association. The Department of Space Science is a joint department between the two most northern universities in Sweden, Luleå University of Technology and Umeå University in collaboration with the Swedish Institute of Space Physics. It offers a range of education programmes in the space field. There are bachelor and master programmes in space engineering, and a bridging programme for students without a science background from secondary school. The Department also contributes to courses for teachers, Ph.D. courses and secondary school level courses. One master´s program and a three week summer course are given entirely in English and welcome international students. Thanks to good cooperation with Esrange students can build and fly experiments on high altitude balloons and sounding rockets and also take a large responsibility for the management of the projects. Close interaction with research and industry is an important part of the education.

  16. Situation of nuclear power generation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S [Swedish Atomic Forum

    1978-01-01

    In Sweden, nuclear power generation was received initially favorably. In the end of 1960s, however, nuclear power generation got involved in the activities of environment preservation. Then, political parties became opposed to nuclear power generation, and now, the need of nuclear power generation itself is regarded as questionable. In the general election in 1976, the Government opposing the nuclear power generation won. As the result, the conditional nuclear power development law and the energy committee were set up. The committee composed of parliament members, experts, and representatives of enterprises and trade unions is to submit its report so that the parliament can prepare a new energy program in the fall of 1978. Meanwhile, the nuclear fuel safety project formed newly has studied to satisfy the conditions of the law. In Sweden, which has developed nuclear reactors independently from the technology of USA, the oppositions are on the decrease, however. It is awaited what decision will be made by the Government in this fall.

  17. Sweden: Combining childbearing and gender equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bernhardt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sweden is the forerunner of the Second Demographic Transition. Fertility trends have fluctuated greatly since the 1960s, and the 1990s showed both European-highest and lowest-ever-in-Sweden levels, while the cohort pattern has been relatively stable. Period fluctuations have been accompanied by a postponement of entering committed partnerships and parenthood as well as an increasing instability of family relationships. The awareness and the availability of effective contraceptives have been extensive since the mid-1970s, the year the liberal abortion law was introduced. Post-modern values are dominant in this highly secularized society, but ideal family size is among the highest in the European Union, and childlessness has remained at a relatively low level. Ethnic diversification has increased over time, with about one-fifth of the population having a 'foreign background' in the early 2000s. The level of female labor-force participation is the highest in Europe (although mothers of pre-schoolers often work part-time, and young women are just as highly educated as men. Family policies, based on the principle of equality across social groups and gender, seem to play an important role in keeping fertility relatively high. In combination with other factors, family policies also play a role in the fluctuations of fertility rates, as eligibility to parental-leave and benefits as well as the availability of public childcare are linked to parents' labor-force attachment.

  18. Sweden to host a new neutron source

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The first European neutron source, currently under development, should commence operations by the end of this decade. Its aim: to produce beams of neutrons that can penetrate into the heart of matter without damaging it and reveal its secrets.   An artist's impression of what the ESS should look like in 2019. At the southern end of Sweden, a town called Lund is preparing for the arrival of the world's most powerful neutron source: the European Spallation Source (ESS). Construction is scheduled to start at the beginning of next year, and the facility is expected to become operational by 2019, when it will produce its first neutron beams. “The ESS is the result of an idea that began 20 years ago!” underlines Mats Lindroos, in charge of the ESS Accelerator Division. “Today, 17 European countries support the project, including Sweden, Denmark and Norway, who together account for 50% of the construction funding.” The ESS, whose design is al...

  19. Nord Stream, Sweden and Baltic Sea Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Robert L.

    2007-03-15

    In June 2006, FOI published the report: Sweden and the NEGP: a Pilot Study of the North European Gas Pipeline and Sweden's Dependence on Russian Energy, a base data report on a topic that FOI considered to be of rising importance. Much has happened since then and the NEGP has changed its name to Nord Stream and submitted an official notification on the intention of realising the project of constructing a gas pipeline from Russia to Germany via the Baltic Sea. The primary aim of this report is to discuss and analyse some of the core aspects of Nord Stream and the pipeline project with regard to the security situation for the Baltic Sea region. The report constitutes an updated version of the previous report. Most of the old report still stands valid, especially concerning the historical survey of Russia's energy policy, but the new report has additional chapters and is broader in scope concerning the consequences of the project

  20. Haematological and biochemical reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Establishment of haematological and biochemical reference intervals is important to assess health of animals on individual and population level. Reference intervals for 13 haematological and 34 biochemical variables were established based on 88 apparently healthy free-ranging brown bears (39 males and 49 females) in Sweden. The animals were chemically immobilised by darting from a helicopter with a combination of medetomidine, tiletamine and zolazepam in April and May 2006–2012 in the county of Dalarna, Sweden. Venous blood samples were collected during anaesthesia for radio collaring and marking for ecological studies. For each of the variables, the reference interval was described based on the 95% confidence interval, and differences due to host characteristics sex and age were included if detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears in Sweden. Results The following variables were not affected by host characteristics: red blood cell, white blood cell, monocyte and platelet count, alanine transaminase, amylase, bilirubin, free fatty acids, glucose, calcium, chloride, potassium, and cortisol. Age differences were seen for the majority of the haematological variables, whereas sex influenced only mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, aspartate aminotransferase, lipase, lactate dehydrogenase, β-globulin, bile acids, triglycerides and sodium. Conclusions The biochemical and haematological reference intervals provided and the differences due to host factors age and gender can be useful for evaluation of health status in free-ranging European brown bears. PMID:25139149

  1. New Forms of Youth Participation and Work in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jurgen

    1985-01-01

    Surveys past and current youth employment and social participation programs in Sweden. Maintains that while these were effective in giving Sweden one of the lowest youth unemployment rates among market-economy nations, more must be done to ensure meaningful social participation of youth in the community. (JDH)

  2. Occupational doses and ALARA - recent developments in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godas, T.; Viktorsson, C. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    Sweden has traditionally experienced very slow doses to workers in the nuclear industry. However, this trend has since last year been broken mainly due to significant maintenance and repair work. This paper will describe occupational dose trends in Sweden and discuss actions that are being implemented to control this new situation.

  3. Infantile autism in children of immigrant parents. A population-based study from Göteborg, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillberg, C; Steffenburg, S; Börjesson, B; Andersson, L

    1987-06-01

    A population-based study of infantile autism from western Sweden has been completed. Urban children with autism more often than age-matched children in the general population had immigrant parents from 'exotic' countries. No such trend was seen in rural children with infantile autism.

  4. Ethnicity, self reported psychiatric illness, and intake of psychotropic drugs in five ethnic groups in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard-Burfield, L; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S E

    2001-09-01

    This study hypothesises that the presumed increased risk of self reported longstanding psychiatric illness and intake of psychotropic drugs among Iranian, Chilean, Turkish, and Kurdish adults, when these groups are compared with Polish adults, can be explained by living alone, poor acculturation, unemployment, and low sense of coherence. Data from a national sample of immigrants/refugees, who were between the ages of 20-44 years old, upon their arrival in Sweden between 1980 and 1989. Unconditional logistic regression was used in the statistical modelling. Sweden. 1059 female and 921 male migrants from Iran, Chile, Turkey, Kurdistan and Poland and a random sample of 3001 Swedes, all between the ages of 27-60 years, were interviewed in 1996 by Statistics Sweden. Compared with Swedes, all immigrants had an increased risk of self reported longstanding psychiatric illness and for intake of psychotropic drugs, with results for the Kurds being non-significant. Compared with Poles, Iranian and Chilean migrants had an increased risk of psychiatric illness, when seen in relation to a model in which adjustment was made for sex and age. The difference became non-significant for Chileans when marital status was taken into account. After including civil status and knowledge of the Swedish language, the increased risks for intake of psychotropic drugs for Chileans and Iranians disappeared. Living alone, poor knowledge of the Swedish language, non-employment, and low sense of coherence were strong risk factors for self reported longstanding psychiatric illness and for intake of psychotropic drugs. Iranian, Chilean, Turkish and Kurdish immigrants more frequently reported living in segregated neighbourhoods and having a greater desire to leave Sweden than their Polish counterparts. Evidence substantiates a strong association between ethnicity and self reported longstanding psychiatric illness, as well as intake of psychotropic drugs. This association is weakened by marital status

  5. Meet the parents? Family size and the geographic proximity between adult children and older mothers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, Helena; Rainer, Helmut; Siedler, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the causal effect of family size on the proximity between older mothers and adult children by using a large administrative data set from Sweden. Our main results show that adult children in Sweden are not constrained by sibship size in choosing where to live: for families with more than one child, sibship size does not affect child-mother proximity. For aging parents, however, having fewer children reduces the probability of having at least one child living nearby, which is likely to have consequences for the intensity of intergenerational contact and eldercare.

  6. General equilibrium effects of increasing carbon taxes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.W.; Kristroem, B.

    1997-01-01

    Sweden was one of the first countries to introduce carbon taxes, and is currently evaluating further carbon taxes. The authors were asked to advise a government commission charged with undertaking the official Swedish evaluation. We did so by constructing and simulating a computable general equilibrium model of Sweden. In this report, the carbon tax debate in Sweden is first reviewed, then our model is described and the main results presented. The conclusion from the cost-benefit analysis is clear, the benefits of increasing the carbon tax in Sweden are a tiny fraction of the costs that consumers must pay in the form of higher prices and reduced incomes. Although we do not put much credence in the gross benefit numbers, they do serve to highlight the basis of our conclusion that carbon tax increases are not currently justifiable in Sweden. 35 refs., 13 tabs

  7. General equilibrium effects of increasing carbon taxes in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, G W [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Economics, College of Business Administration; Kristroem, B [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Economics

    1997-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first countries to introduce carbon taxes, and is currently evaluating further carbon taxes. The authors were asked to advise a government commission charged with undertaking the official Swedish evaluation. We did so by constructing and simulating a computable general equilibrium model of Sweden. In this report, the carbon tax debate in Sweden is first reviewed, then our model is described and the main results presented. The conclusion from the cost-benefit analysis is clear, the benefits of increasing the carbon tax in Sweden are a tiny fraction of the costs that consumers must pay in the form of higher prices and reduced incomes. Although we do not put much credence in the gross benefit numbers, they do serve to highlight the basis of our conclusion that carbon tax increases are not currently justifiable in Sweden. 35 refs., 13 tabs.

  8. The role of income differences in explaining social inequalities in self rated health in Sweden and Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yngwe, M A; Diderichsen, F; Whitehead, M

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To analyse to what extent differences in income, using two distinct measures-as distribution across quintiles and poverty-explain social inequalities in self rated health, for men and women, in Sweden and Britain. DESIGN: Series of cross sectional surveys, the Swedish Survey...... of Living Conditions (ULF) and the British General Household Survey (GHS), during the period 1992-95. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Swedish and British men and women aged 25-64 years. Approximately 4000 Swedes and 12 500 Britons are interviewed each year in the cross sectional studies used. The sample contains...... 15 766 people in the Swedish dataset and 49 604 people in the British dataset. MAIN RESULTS: The magnitude of social inequalities in less than good self rated health was similar in Sweden and in Britain, but adjusting for income differences explained a greater part of these in Britain than in Sweden...

  9. Climate impact from peat utilisation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppenberg, S.; Zetterberg, L.; Aahman, M.

    2001-08-01

    The climate impact from the use of peat for energy production in Sweden has been evaluated in terms of contribution to atmospheric radiative forcing. This was done by attempting to answer the question 'What will be the climate impact if one would use 1 m{sup 2} of mire for peat extraction during 20 years?'. Two different methods of after-treatment were studied: afforestation and restoration of wetland. The climate impact from a peatland - wetland energy scenario and a peatland - forestry energy scenario was compared to the climate impact from coal, natural gas and forest residues. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate which parameters that are important to take into consideration in order to minimize the climate impact from peat utilisation.

  10. Documents and legal texts: Australia, Germany, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    Australia: National Radioactive Waste Management Act 2012 No. 29, 2012 (An Act to make provision in relation to the selection of a site for, and the establishment and operation of, a radioactive waste management facility, and for related purposes). Germany: Act on the Peaceful Utilisation of Atomic Energy and the Protection against its Hazards (Atomic Energy Act) of 23 December 1959, as amended and promulgated on 15 July 1985, last amendment by the Act of 8 November 2011. Sweden: The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority's regulations concerning clearance of materials, rooms, buildings and land in practices involving ionising radiation (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority Regulatory Code issued on 20 October 2011, Published on 2 November 2011); The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority's general advice on the application of the regulations concerning clearance of materials, rooms, buildings and land in practices involving ionising radiation (issued on 20 October 2011)

  11. Reprocessing in Sweden: History and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Oesterlund, C.G.

    1990-10-01

    Against the background of nuclear power development and installation in Sweden an overview is presented of the parallel domestic development of the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The original selection of the natural uranium - heavy water reactor in the 1950s included spent fuel reprocessing and recycle, and process and plant studies were performed to that end. The switch to light water reactors in the 1960s did not change the planning to recycle; however, the participation in the Eurochemic undertaking, and the delay in the nuclear programme stopped further domestic development work. A number of governmental committee investigations in the 1970s on the radioactive waste issue and, above all, the decision to phase out nuclear power by 2010, after a referendum following the TMI-accident, finally resulted in a decision to plan only for direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This policy still prevails. (42 refs.)

  12. Media use in distance education in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman F. Davies

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of distance language teaching which developed rapidly in Sweden after the Second World War. It argues that so far little use has been made of technical aids and that the computer as such is still a stranger both to the language teacher and the student. The writer concludes that perhaps the time has come for a technical revolution amongst Arts students. Met hierdie artikel word 'n oorsig gegee oor afstandsonderrig-spesifiek wat tale betref-soos dit in Swede ontwikkel het na die Tweede Wereldoorlog. Daar word op gewys dat tot dusver min gebruik gemaak is van tegniese hulpmiddels en dat vera! die rekenaar onderbenut is. Die skrywer sluit met die gedagte dat die tyd moontlik ryp is vir 'n tegnologiese rewolusie"in die geledere van die Lettere en Wysbegeerte.

  13. Selling eugenics: the case of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Maria; Widmalm, Sven

    2010-12-20

    This paper traces the early (1910s to 1920s) development of Swedish eugenics through a study of the social network that promoted it. The eugenics network consisted mainly of academics from a variety of disciplines, but with medicine and biology dominating; connections with German scientists who would later shape Nazi biopolitics were strong. The paper shows how the network used political lobbying (for example, using contacts with academically accomplished MPs) and various media strategies to gain scientific and political support for their cause, where a major goal was the creation of a eugenics institute (which opened in 1922). It also outlines the eugenic vision of the institute's first director, Herman Lundborg. In effect the network, and in particular Lundborg, promoted the view that politics should be guided by eugenics and by a genetically superior elite. The selling of eugenics in Sweden is an example of the co-production of science and social order.

  14. Climate impact from peat utilisation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppenberg, S.; Zetterberg, L.; Aahman, M.

    2001-08-01

    The climate impact from the use of peat for energy production in Sweden has been evaluated in terms of contribution to atmospheric radiative forcing. This was done by attempting to answer the question 'What will be the climate impact if one would use 1 m 2 of mire for peat extraction during 20 years?'. Two different methods of after-treatment were studied: afforestation and restoration of wetland. The climate impact from a peatland - wetland energy scenario and a peatland - forestry energy scenario was compared to the climate impact from coal, natural gas and forest residues. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate which parameters that are important to take into consideration in order to minimize the climate impact from peat utilisation

  15. Landscape Epidemiology of Tularemia Outbreaks in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Kerstin; Bäck, Erik; Eliasson, Henrik; Berglund, Lennart; Granberg, Malin; Karlsson, Linda; Larsson, Pär; Forsman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Summer outbreaks of tularemia that occurred from 1995 through 2005 in 2 locations in Sweden affected 441 persons. We performed an epidemiologic investigation of these outbreaks using a novel strategy, involving high-resolution genotyping of Francisella tularensis isolates obtained from 136 patients (using 18 genetic markers developed from 6 F. tularensis genome sequences) and interviews with the patients. Strong spatial associations were found between F. tularensis subpopulations and the places of disease transmission; infection by some subpopulations occurred within areas as small as 2 km2, indicating unidentified environmental point sources of tularemia. In both locations, disease clusters were associated with recreational areas beside water, and genetic subpopulations were present throughout the tularemia season and persisted over years. High-resolution genotyping in combination with patients’ statements about geographic places of disease transmission provided valuable indications of likely sources of infection and the causal genotypes during these tularemia outbreaks. PMID:19961673

  16. Physical protection philosophy and techniques in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufva, B.

    1988-01-01

    The circumstances for the protection of nuclear power plants are special in Sweden. A very important factor is that armed guards at the facilities are alien to the Swedish society. They do not use them. The Swedish concept of physical protection accepts that the aggressor will get into the facility. With this in mind, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) has established the policy that administrative, technical, and organizational measures will be directed toward preventing an aggressor from damaging the reactor, even if he has occupied the facility. In addition, the best conditions possible shall be established for the operator and the police to reoccupy the plant. The author believes this policy is different from that of many other countries. Therefore, he focusses on the Swedish philosophy and techniques for the physical protection of nuclear power plants

  17. Smoking rate and periodontal disease prevalence: 40-year trends in Sweden 1970-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Jan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between smoking rate and periodontal disease prevalence in Sweden. National smoking rates were found from Swedish National Statistics on smoking habits. Based on smoking rates for the years 1970-2010, periodontal disease prevalence estimates were calculated for the age bracket 40-70 years and smoking-associated relative risks between 2.0 and 20.0. The impact of smoking on the population was estimated according to the concept of population attributable fraction. The age-standardized smoking rate in Sweden declined from 44% in 1970 to 15% in 2010. In parallel with the smoking decline the calculated prevalence estimate of periodontal disease dropped from 26% to 12% assuming a 10-fold smoking-associated relative risk. Even at more moderate magnitudes of the relative risk, e.g. 2-fold or 5-fold, the prevalence decrease was quite tangible, suggesting that the current prevalence in Sweden is about 20-50% of the level 40 years ago. The population attributable fraction, estimating the portion of the disease that would have been avoided in the absence of smoking, was 80% in 1970 and 58% in 2010 at a ten-fold relative risk. Calculated estimates of periodontal disease prevalence are closely related to real changes in smoking rate. As smoking rate drops periodontal disease prevalence will drop. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Trends in absolute socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in Sweden and New Zealand. A 20-year gender perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blakely Tony

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both trends in socioeconomic inequalities in mortality, and cross-country comparisons, may give more information about the causes of health inequalities. We analysed trends in socioeconomic differentials by mortality from early 1980s to late 1990s, comparing Sweden with New Zealand. Methods The New Zealand Census Mortality Study (NZCMS consisting of over 2 million individuals and the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions (ULF comprising over 100, 000 individuals were used for analyses. Education and household income were used as measures of socioeconomic position (SEP. The slope index of inequality (SII was calculated to estimate absolute inequalities in mortality. Analyses were based on 3–5 year follow-up and limited to individuals aged 25–77 years. Age standardised mortality rates were calculated using the European population standard. Results Absolute inequalities in mortality on average over the 1980s and 1990s for both men and women by education were similar in Sweden and New Zealand, but by income were greater in Sweden. Comparing trends in absolute inequalities over the 1980s and 1990s, men's absolute inequalities by education decreased by 66% in Sweden and by 17% in New Zealand (p for trend Conclusion Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in mortality were clearly most favourable for men in Sweden. Trends also seemed to be more favourable for men than women in New Zealand. Assuming the trends in male inequalities in Sweden were not a statistical chance finding, it is not clear what the substantive reason(s was for the pronounced decrease. Further gender comparisons are required.

  19. Wind Power Statistics Sweden 2009; Vindkraftstatistik 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-04-15

    In 2009, wind power produced 2.5 TWh, an increase of 26 percent over the previous year. Throughout the period 2003-2009 has production of electricity from wind power almost quadrupled. Sweden's total net production of electricity amounted, according to provisional statistics for 2009, to 133.7 TWh. The year 2007 wind energy's share passed 1.0 percent of total net production of electricity for the first time. In 2008 the proportion was 1.4 percent, and in 2009 to almost 1.9 percent of total net production. Total installed power 2009 was 1448 MW and the number of plants was 1359, an inckW{sub pse} with 363 MW and 198 resp. from 2008. In 2009, there were three main support system for wind power in Sweden: the certificate system; the wind pilot project; and the environmental bonus. The electricity certificate system is a market-based support system for electricity generation from renewables which includes wind power as one of the approved techniques. The system was introduced in 2003 and aims to increase the production of electricity from renewable energy sources by 25 TWh from 2002 levels by 2020.. Wind pilot support is a support to the market for large-scale wind power. Support aims to reduce the cost of the creation of new wind energy and promoting new technologies. Wind Pilot Aid, which has existed since 2003, has been extended until in 2012 and has increased by 350 million SEK (about 36 M Euro) for the period 2008-2012. The environmental bonus, which means a tax subsidy, has been stepped down for each year until and by the year 2009, which was the last year. In 2009, environmental bonus was 0.12 SEK/kWh for electricity from offshore wind. For onshore wind power the environmentally bonus ceased in 2008

  20. Osmium in environmental samples from Northeast Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodushkin, Ilia [Division of Applied Geology, Lulea University of Technology, S-971 87 Lulea (Sweden); ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: ilia.rodushkin@alsglobal.com; Engstroem, Emma [Division of Applied Geology, Lulea University of Technology, S-971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Soerlin, Dieke; Ponter, Christer; Baxter, Douglas C. [ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Lulea (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Osmium (Os) concentrations and {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os isotope abundance ratios are presented for sedimentary materials, soils, humus, plants, mushrooms, mosses and lichens collected in the vicinity of the town of Lulea, Northeast Sweden, the data for biological specimens being the first reported. Contributions from sampling and varying exposure time to the observed environmental variability were evaluated. Sedimentary materials (from both fresh and brackish water) are most elevated in radiogenic {sup 187}Os, followed by inorganic soil horizons, mushrooms and humus. The Os isotopic compositions of plants, mosses and lichens are much less radiogenic, with mean {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os lying within a relatively narrow 0.3-0.6 range. Significant temporal variations in Os concentrations and isotopic compositions of plant samples are attributed to integrative uptake of airborne Os with non-radiogenic composition. Measured Os concentrations in biological matrices increase in the order: small shrub leaves (blueberry and lingonberry) {<=} spruce needles {<=} mushrooms {<=} tree leaves {<=} pine needles < mosses << lichens. The concentrations found in three different species of plant were used to provide the first estimates of gaseous osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) in the environment. Though the Os content of samples from Northeast Sweden does not differ significantly from matrix-matched international reference materials (not certified for Os) of abiotic origin, the estimates of gaseous OsO{sub 4} concentrations are roughly an order of magnitude higher than have been reported for particle-bound Os in other studies. The pronounced spatial variations between relatively closely situated sites in mean {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os ratios for samples of the same species (presumably with the same dominating uptake mechanism) point to the presence of different local Os sources. This study therefore demonstrates that emissions of Os from automobile catalytic converters are not the only

  1. Osmium in environmental samples from Northeast Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodushkin, Ilia; Engstroem, Emma; Soerlin, Dieke; Ponter, Christer; Baxter, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    Osmium (Os) concentrations and 187 Os/ 188 Os isotope abundance ratios are presented for sedimentary materials, soils, humus, plants, mushrooms, mosses and lichens collected in the vicinity of the town of Lulea, Northeast Sweden, the data for biological specimens being the first reported. Contributions from sampling and varying exposure time to the observed environmental variability were evaluated. Sedimentary materials (from both fresh and brackish water) are most elevated in radiogenic 187 Os, followed by inorganic soil horizons, mushrooms and humus. The Os isotopic compositions of plants, mosses and lichens are much less radiogenic, with mean 187 Os/ 188 Os lying within a relatively narrow 0.3-0.6 range. Significant temporal variations in Os concentrations and isotopic compositions of plant samples are attributed to integrative uptake of airborne Os with non-radiogenic composition. Measured Os concentrations in biological matrices increase in the order: small shrub leaves (blueberry and lingonberry) ≤ spruce needles ≤ mushrooms ≤ tree leaves ≤ pine needles 4 ) in the environment. Though the Os content of samples from Northeast Sweden does not differ significantly from matrix-matched international reference materials (not certified for Os) of abiotic origin, the estimates of gaseous OsO 4 concentrations are roughly an order of magnitude higher than have been reported for particle-bound Os in other studies. The pronounced spatial variations between relatively closely situated sites in mean 187 Os/ 188 Os ratios for samples of the same species (presumably with the same dominating uptake mechanism) point to the presence of different local Os sources. This study therefore demonstrates that emissions of Os from automobile catalytic converters are not the only source of contemporary environmental contamination

  2. The reproductive pattern and potential of free ranging female wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmsten, Anna; Jansson, Gunnar; Lundeheim, Nils; Dalin, Anne-Marie

    2017-08-01

    The number and spatial distribution of wild boars (Sus scrofa) has increased remarkably in Sweden as well as in other European countries. To understand the population dynamics of the wild boar, knowledge of its reproductive period, oestrus cycle and reproductive success is essential. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the seasonal reproductive pattern and reproductive potential of a wild boar population in Sweden. The study was based on findings from macroscopic examinations of the reproductive organs from 575 hunter-harvested female wild boars (>30 kg body weight). Samples were collected between December 2011 and December 2015 in the southern and middle parts of Sweden. The age of the sampled animals was determined and dressed weight was noted. The stage of the reproductive cycle was defined according to ovarian structures and in relation to the appearance of/and findings in the uterus. The crown-rump length (CRL) of the embryos/foetuses was used to calculate the oestrus/mating month and month for the expected farrowing. The macroscopic examination revealed a seasonal variation of reproductive stages, although cyclic and pregnant females were found in all seasons. Moreover, the estimated oestrus/mating and farrowing months based on the CRL showed that mating and farrowing may occur 'off-season'. The average litter size (no. of embryos or foetuses) per pregnant female was 5.4. Sow weight and age had significant effect on both the reproductive potential (ovulation rate and litter size) and pregnancy rate, respectively. The reproductive potential in the studied wild boar population was high compared to studies from other countries and farrowing may occur 'off-season'. This suggests that the environmental conditions in Sweden, including supplemental feeding, are favourable for wild boar reproduction.

  3. Periodontal disease in the oldest-old living in Kungsholmen, Sweden: findings from the KEOHS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Russell, Stefanie Luise; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study evaluated the oral health status of generally healthy, community-dwelling persons aged 80 years and over living in Stockholm, Sweden. This paper reports periodontal disease findings and evaluates the distribution by sociodemographic factors. METHODS......-analysis of the differences in proportion of participants with SP revealed that the difference by sex also increased by age. CONCLUSIONS: These findings document the substantial and ongoing impact of periodontal disease in a sample of generally healthy, community dwelling older adults and underscore the importance...... of continued periodontal disease prevention and treatment in the oldest-old....

  4. Integration or specialization? Similarities and differences between Sweden and the United States in gerontology education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Mary E; Börjesson, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the similarities and differences in the education and training of gerontologists and others who work with older people in Sweden and the United States. It outlines the aging trends in both countries and assesses the level of training for those who provide care in a variety of fields. Both countries are aging, but the programs for gerontological training are quite different in the two countries, reflecting underlying cultural values. Sweden's education is generally more oriented toward the integration of some aging education in more disciplinary fields, such as nursing and social work and thus could benefit from more specialized, aging-specific courses. The United States is highly specialized, with multiple programs in various subfields of aging (e.g., geropsychology; aging services administration) and could benefit from integrating more aging knowledge into courses in other disciplines. The authors challenge professionals to consider if there is a basic but global curriculum and/or set of competencies in gerontology that could be agreed upon. As an increasingly global village, the ability to share and learn is more easily achievable. Sweden and the United States have much to learn from each other in terms of appropriately educating and training those who support our older people.

  5. The Autumn Ghost : the history of polioepidemics in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, Per

    2004-01-01

    Polio epidemics appeared in Sweden in 1881 and at the turn of the 20th century the disease became an annual feature in the epidemiological pattern. Due to vaccination starting in 1957 epidemics ceased to exist in Sweden around 1965. This thesis deals with the history polio epidemics in Sweden, 1880-1965 and studies the demographical influence of polio, how the medical authorities investigated and tried to combat it, and the care of those who contracted the disease. A study of polio mortality ...

  6. Annual Report 1999. Electric power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    Power Association is of the opinion that the increase in production taxes on nuclear power is completely misdirected. Sweden is the only EU country to have production taxes on electricity. Uncertainty and the lack of stability in the present taxation system will entail considerable difficulties both for electricity-intensive industry and for the power companies vis-a-vis long-term investment in Sweden. In 1999, overall consumption in the country fell by 0.3 TWh to 142.9 TWh, compared with last year. The decrease is explained by the fact that the autumn was very warm. Inflow into the major rivers was somewhat higher than normal enabling 70.4 TWh to be generated by the hydropower plants. This is 6 TWh more than during a normal year. Nuclear power accounted for 70.2 TWh, equal to the previous year. Additionally, combined heat and power and condensing plants accounted for 9.5 TWh, almost half of which using biofuels. Wind power continues to increase. At year-end, there were about 480 wind power plants, and the annual production was 0.4 TWh. Overall electricity production in the country was 150.5 TWh, a decrease of 3.4 TWh, or just under three percent. Exports amounted to 16.1 TWh and imports to 8.5 TWh. The average price for the year on the Nordic power exchange's spot market (Sector Sweden) was SEK 0.119 per kWh. The low price is explained by the mild weather and a plentiful supply of water in the Nordic reservoirs. On 1 November, the electricity market was changed in such a way that small consumers, with a fuse rating of up to 200 amps, were also able to take part. Parliament's decision to remove the requirement for continually registering hourly meters was of crucial importance. With this measure, the electricity market was also opened up to household customers. Hourly metering was replaced by profile settlement. Customers were offered fixed prices that could be considerably lower than previously. Flexible prices were on offer, e.g. linked to the power exchange's spot

  7. Consumers of eldercare in Sweden: the semblance of choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinow, Bettina; Parker, Marti G; Thorslund, Mats

    2011-11-01

    In Sweden and other countries, the benefits of user choice and market forces are often voiced in relation to the provision of medical care and social services. Policy makers increasingly view people as customers and consumers of care services. Among very old people-the most frequent care users-how many have the capacity necessary to find information and make decisions concerning providers of medical and social services? Using a nationally representative sample of Swedes aged 77+ (SWEOLD) in 2002 this study describes the prevalence of cognitive, physical and sensory resources associated with the capacity to make and carry out informed choices concerning medical and social care providers. Results showed that one third of a nationally representative sample of persons aged 77+ scored low on a cognitive test or they were so cognitively impaired that they could not be interviewed directly. Another 22% scored poorly on a test of the ability to find and process information. A further 32% had adequate cognition but had limitations in sensory function or mental vitality or were unable to go outside on their own. A total of 10% did not report any of the measured problems. In general, care utilisation increases with age. As health problems increase, physical and cognitive abilities decline. Results suggest that those elderly people who are most dependent on care services and who could benefit most from a "good choice", are also those who have the highest prevalence of cognitive and physical limitations associated with the capacity to act as a rational consumer of care services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth & development of Indian children adopted in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proos, Lemm A

    2009-11-01

    More than 6800 children from India have been adopted in Sweden over the last four decades. At arrival many were undernourished and suffered from infectious diseases. Catch-up growth was common. Unexpectedly, cases of early pubertal development were subsequently reported. In order to investigate the growth and development of adopted children more in detail we studied 114 children adopted from India prospectively during two years. The majority were stunted at arrival and caught up in height and weight after two years. Psychomotor retardation and common infections diminished fairly soon. Those that were stunted did not attain the higher catch-up levels of those not stunted at arrival. Low birthweight also limited the degree of catch-up growth. 107 girls were analysed retrospectively in another study. The median menarcheal age was 11.6 yr (range 7.3-14.6 yr) which is significantly earlier than the mean in Swedish and privileged Indian girls (13.0 and 12.4-12.9 yr, respectively). The pubertal linear growth component was normal in duration and magnitude but likewise started 1.5 yr earlier. The final height/age was 154 cm (-1.4 SDS) and the weight/age 46.9 kg (-1.1 SDS) 8 per cent were 145 cm or shorter. Stunting limited catch-up growth and final height. Those that were most stunted at arrival, and had the fastest catch-up growth, had the earliest menarche. Good maternal and child nutrition is necessary for full expression of a child's growth potential. What is lost in growth early in life can only partially be recovered by catch-up growth. Such growth is associated with risk for early pubertal development which abbreviates the childhood growth period and limits final height. The mechanism underlying the early pubertal development, and the optimal management of nutrition rehabilitation after chronic malnutrition, need to be clarified by further studies.

  9. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-02-01

    Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

  10. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. Patients and methods We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. Results In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 105 person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 105 person-years in 1997 to 97 per 105 person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. Interpretation The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries. PMID:26122621

  11. The epidemiology of anophthalmia and microphthalmia in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källén, Bengt; Tornqvist, Kristina

    2005-01-01

    Infants with a clinical diagnosis of anophthalmia or microphthalmia were identified from four health registers in Sweden, covering different parts of the period 1965-2001. During the observation period, the rate of anophthalmia decreased from the early 1970s from 0.4 to 0.2 per 10,000 births. The registered rate of microphthalmia increased markedly during the observation period to reach a maximum in 1987 of about 1.5 per 10,000. About 10% of the 432 identified children had a chromosome anomaly. There was no geographical variation in prevalence and infants born in urban or rural districts had, if anything, a lower risk than infants born in cities (0.93 and 1.13 per 10,000, respectively). Non-eye malformations were more common at anophthalmia (63%) than at microphthalmia (30%). Sex ratio was normal and no statistically significant variation between sub-groups (anophthalmia, microphthalmia, isolated, associated with non-eye malformations) could be demonstrated. There was a marked risk increase with maternal age but no certain parity effect, no effect of maternal education, but a possible association with subfertility. Maternal smoking in early pregnancy seemed to increase the risk for anophthalmia or microphthalmia in the absence of a coloboma.

  12. Organisational factors and occupational balance in working parents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgh, Madeleine; Eek, Frida; Wagman, Petra; Håkansson, Carita

    2018-05-01

    Parents with small children constitute a vulnerable group as they have an increased risk of sick leave due to stress-related disorders compared to adults without children. It has been shown that mothers and fathers to small children together spend more time in paid work than any other group, which could create negative stress and an experience of low occupational balance. The aim of this study was to examine associations between organisational factors and occupational balance among parents with small children in Sweden. Data were collected by a survey including questions about occupational balance, organisational factors and age, sex, employment rate, work position, monthly household income, number of children at home, separation/divorce last five years and overtime. The total number of parents included in this study was 718 (490 mothers and 228 fathers). Logistic regression models were applied to examine the odds ratios for occupational balance in relation to organisational factors. Parents who experienced positive attitudes towards parenthood and parental leave among colleagues and managers were more likely to experience high occupational balance than parents who experienced negative or neutral attitudes. Having a clear structure for handover when absent from work was also strongly associated with high occupational balance. The result of the present study indicates that some organisational factors could be important for the occupational balance of parents with small children.

  13. Postglacial faulting and paleoseismicity in the Landsjaerv area, northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerbaeck, R.

    1988-10-01

    Post-glacial fault scarps, up to about 20 m in height and forming a 50 km long fault set with a SSW-NNE orientation, occur in the Lansjaerv area in northern Sweden. By trenching across the fault scarps it has been possible to date fault movement relative to the Quaternary stratigraphy. It is concluded that the fault scarps generally developed as single event movements shortly after the deglaciation about 9000 years ago. At one location there are indications that minor fault movements may have occurred earlier during a previous glaciation but this is uncertain. The fault scarps are, at least partially, developed in strongly fractured and chemically weathered zones of presumed pre-Quaternary age. To judge from the appearance of the bedrock fault scarps, and the deformation of the Quaternary deposits, the faults are reverse and have dips between some 40-50 0 and the vertical. The faulting was co-seismic and earthquakes in the order of M 6.5-7.0, or higher, are inferred from fault dimensions and the distribution of seismically triggered landslides in a wider region. Distortions in different types of sediment, interpreted as caused by the influence of seismic shock, occur frequently in the area. Examples of these are briefly described. (orig.)

  14. Burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy in Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanash, Hanan A; Ringbaek, Thomas; Huss, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    % confidence interval [CI], 126-225) vs 85 (95% CI, 44-148) per 100,000 person-years; rate ratio 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0-4.1). The risk remained higher after adjustment for gender, age, and diagnosis in multivariate Cox regression, hazard ratio 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0-3.5). Thirty-day mortality after burn injury was 8......BACKGROUND: Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) increases life expectancy in patients with COPD and severe hypoxemia. Smoking is the main cause of burn injury during LTOT. Policy regarding smoking while on LTOT varies between countries. In this study, we compare the incidence of burn injury...... end point was burn injury during LTOT. RESULTS: A total of 23,741 patients received LTOT in Denmark and 7,754 patients in Sweden. Most patients started LTOT due to COPD, both in Sweden (74%) and in Denmark (62%). The rate of burn injury while on LTOT was higher in Denmark than in Sweden; 170 (95...

  15. Drug-abusing women in Sweden: marginalization, social exclusion and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byqvist, Siv

    2006-12-01

    A quantitative epidemiological prevalence study of problem drug abuse in Sweden is the basis for a study of differences between drug abuse among men and women. A significant difference between genders was that, of those who come to the attention of the authorities, fewer women than men abuse drugs. The women were younger than the men. A greater percent of women abused amphetamines and injected heroin, as well as abusing tranquilizers/soporifics. A larger proportion of women than men were unemployed. The men had a significantly longer history of drug abuse than the women, a greater percent of them were born outside Sweden, and more of them had smoked heroin and used cannabis. A greater percent of the men had used illegal means to finance their abuse. There was a group of women (17%, median age 32) at the margins of the society, i.e. who had no work or place of residence, socialized solely with other addicts and financed their habit by illegal activities. Abuse of amphetamines and heroin was the most common. The majority of the women were polydrug abusers. Sweden has historically had, and continues to have, a large number of amphetamine abusers, but has now also developed a distinct population of heroin addicts.

  16. The U.S. Financial Crisis: Lessons From Sweden

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, James K

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1990s, Sweden faced a banking and exchange rate crisis that led it to rescue banks that had experienced large losses on their balance sheets and that threatened a collapse of the banking system...

  17. Nuclear Liability and Insurance for Nuclear Damage in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thofelt, H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper contains some facts about the Swedish nuclear energy production system and about the nuclear operators liability with the important issues. The nuclear insurance of Sweden is also explained in short terms. (author)

  18. Trends in consumption of ultra-processed foods and obesity in Sweden between 1960 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Filippa; Hemmingsson, Erik

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how consumption of ultra-processed foods has changed in Sweden in relation to obesity. Nationwide ecological analysis of changes in processed foods along with corresponding changes in obesity. Trends in per capita food consumption during 1960-2010 were investigated using data from the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Food items were classified as group 1 (unprocessed/minimally processed), group 2 (processed culinary ingredients) or group 3 (3·1, processed food products; and 3·2, ultra-processed products). Obesity prevalence data were pooled from the peer-reviewed literature, Statistics Sweden and the WHO Global Health Observatory. Nationwide analysis in Sweden, 1960-2010. Swedish nationals aged 18 years and older. During the study period consumption of group 1 foods (minimal processing) decreased by 2 %, while consumption of group 2 foods (processed ingredients) decreased by 34 %. Consumption of group 3·1 foods (processed food products) increased by 116 % and group 3·2 foods (ultra-processed products) increased by 142 %. Among ultra-processed products, there were particularly large increases in soda (315 %; 22 v. 92 litres/capita per annum) and snack foods such as crisps and candies (367 %; 7 v. 34 kg/capita per annum). In parallel to these changes in ultra-processed products, rates of adult obesity increased from 5 % in 1980 to over 11 % in 2010. The consumption of ultra-processed products (i.e. foods with low nutritional value but high energy density) has increased dramatically in Sweden since 1960, which mirrors the increased prevalence of obesity. Future research should clarify the potential causal role of ultra-processed products in weight gain and obesity.

  19. The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Kianian, Babak; Tavassoli, Sam; Larsson, Tobias; Diegel, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies in Sweden. The data set consists of a recent and representative sample of Swedish AM users (companies, universities, and research institutes). The authors investigate two questions. First, what are the current applications of AM in Sweden (e.g., rapid prototyping [RP], production)? Second, what are the factors that can explain the variation in AM adoption among the users? Using a regression analysis technique, the ...

  20. Energy policies of IEA countries: Sweden - 2008 review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-05-15

    Sweden is one of the leading IEA countries in the use of renewable energy and has a long tradition of ambitious and successful policies to improve energy efficiency. Compared to the other IEA countries, Sweden's CO2 emissions per capita and per unit of GDP are low, partly owing to efficient and low-carbon space heating, and virtually carbon-free electricity generation. The country also remains a forerunner in electricity market liberalisation. Still, even if Sweden has continued to make progress in most areas of its energy policy since the IEA last conducted an in-depth review in 2004, there is room for improvement. As Sweden plans to further increase the use of renewable energy, it is crucial that these supplies are produced and used in the most sustainable manner for the environment and the economy as a whole. With regard to CO2 emissions, more can be done in all sectors, but as transport is the largest polluter and its emissions are increasing, it is the logical focus for Sweden's efforts to reduce emissions further. This is a significant challenge. Nuclear provides almost half of the electricity in Sweden, at a low cost and without CO2 emissions. But the future of nuclear power in the national power mix is still uncertain. To provide clear guidance to the electricity sector, Sweden will need to resolve the ambiguity about the future of nuclear power in the country. This review analyses the energy challenges facing Sweden and provides critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to provide input to Swedish energy policy makers to help them identify a path towards a more sustainable energy future.

  1. The health and working conditions of female immigrants in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Akhavan, Sharareh

    2006-01-01

    Sweden is one of the European countries that has gradually changed from a mainly ethnically homogeneous society into a multi-ethnic society. This change began in the late 1940s and has increased in pace, especially since the early 1960s. The overall aim of this thesis is to understand, describe and analyze the factors that contribute to poor health among female immigrants in Sweden, from the perspectives of class, gender and ethnicity. This thesis is based on four differ...

  2. Procurement of medical equipment in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Terio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In many hospitals in Sweden the importance of technology management is already accepted and accepted since the hospital managements have recognised that technology is an integral part of all major policy and planning decisions. Today’s medical devices are technically complex and sometimes a system of interacting devices is required to achieve the desired clinical function. If the hospitals want to use the latest, modern technology, then they need to make substantial investments in both equipment and competence. Complex technology, large investments and need of highly qualii ed personnel to handle the medical devices are factors that indicate a need of well-dei ned procurement process as an essential part of the total health technology management system that should be used in a hospital. In such a procurement process, carefully prepared planning of technology investments can reduce the running costs and costs for maintenance substantially. In addition, a well-dei ned procurement process contributes to increase the patient safety. In Karolinska University Hospital goods and services are purchased for more than 20% of the hospital’s €1.2 billion turnover. It is therefore very important that the procurement is carried out ef ectively.

  3. File 'Energy-climate actions in Sweden'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In a first part, this publication briefly presents some basic data and information on Sweden (geography, population, economy, administrative organisation, powers of local authorities, local finances), the Swedish 'energy profile' (consumption, intensity, imports and exports), greenhouse gas emissions (total and per sector), and the energy-climate strategy (impacts of climate change, national climatic strategy, national measures, action framework for local authorities). The second part addresses one of these action frameworks, the Klimatkommunernas network. It describes this network, its objectives, and possibilities for communities to join it. It describes its activities: information, publication of a strategic document of climate-energy actions for municipalities, examples of projects. The third part presents experiments performed by different local communities (Kristianstad, Vaexjoe, Malmoe, and Lund). For each of them are presented: the energy strategy (objectives, strategy, adaptation, energy-climate follow-up, application and actual measures), and some specific measures. These specific examples can be integrated systems based on biogas and biomass, a zero fossil fuel objective with the use of renewable energies for heat and cold production, for electricity production and to improve energy efficiency, to promote green fuels in transports, to reduce the impact of transports on climate, a sustainable town planning, environmental management. Some features are then highlighted in the adopted approach for these examples: a systemic, collaborative, participative and communicative approach

  4. Trends in nuclear power costs in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterhaugh, O.; Blomsnes, B.

    1979-01-01

    At the request of the Swedish Ministry of Industry, a study of the costs of nuclear power in Sweden was performed early this year. The main purpose of the study was to determine the real and projected costs of electricity produced by nuclear stations. The basis for the calculations of the study was the currently planned Swedish nuclear power programme consisting of 11 reactors of which six are operating, two waiting for start-up permission and the remainder are under construction. All cost components, relevant to the commercial programme were covered, with particular emphasis on future costs for handling of spent fuel, waste disposal and plant decommissioning. A capital depreciation time of 25 years and a 4 per cent effective annual interest rate (ie interest after correction for inflation) were assumed in the calculations given in December 1978 currency. The main result of the study is the average cost per kWh for the reactors. The results are in close agreement with the cost estimate given by the Swedish Energy Commission and now that the nuclear plants produce electricity considerably cheaper than other plants with the exception of some hydroelectric ones. (author)

  5. Projects on filter testing in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normann, B.; Wiktorsson, C.

    1985-01-01

    The Swedish nuclear power program comprises twelve light water reactors. Nine are boiling water reactors of ASEA-ATOM design and three are pressurized water reactors of Westinghouse design. Of these, ten are in operation and two are under construction and planned to go into operation during late 1984 and early 1985, respectively. Frequent tests on the penetration of particles through HEPA filters, regular tests on the adsorption of methyl iodide in the stand-by carbon filter units by laboratory testing are discussed. The proposed new regulations are based on many years of experience of filter system operation and of tests in-situ and in the laboratory. Moisture and water are factors that affect the functioning of filters. In addition, high loading of dust can give rise to increased penetration through HEPA filters, however pinholes could have less influence on the total penetration. Laboratory tests show that DOP particles retain 30-40% in 90 mm carbon filters (8-12 mesh). However no effect on the ability of carbon to adsorb methyl iodide after DOP contamination in combined carbon/HEPA filters has been observed. Leakage from ventilation ducts can cause radioactive contamination problems during filter testing with radioiodine. In-situ testing of control-room filters has been performed using inactive methyl iodide. A type of carbon bed not previously used in Sweden has been introduced. Testing of this filter type is discussed

  6. Reindeer pastoralism in Sweden 1550-1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Lundmark

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of the 16th century we get the first opportunity to a more detailed knowledge of reindeerpastoralism in Sweden. At that time the Sami lived in a hunter-gatherer economy. A family had in average about 10-20 domesticated reindeer, mainly used for transport. They could also be milked and used as decoys when hunting wild reindeer. During late 16th century the Swedish state and merchants bought large amounts of fur from the Sami. The common payment was butter and flour. This created a new prosperity, which lead to a considerable increase in population in Swedish Lapland. The population became too large for a hunter-gatherer economy. A crisis in early 17th century was the starting point for the transition to a large-scale nomadic reindeer pastoralism. Up to the middle of the 18th century intensive reindeer pastoralism was successful. But the pastoralism became gradually too intensive and diseases started to spread when the herds were kept too densely crowded for milking in summertime. During the first decades of the 19th century reindeer pastoralism in Sweden went through a major crisis. The number of reindeer herding mountain-Sami decreased considerably, mainly because they went to live permanently along the Norwegian coastline. Intensive reindeer pastoralism started to give way for extensive herding towards the end of the 19th century. In the north of Sweden influences from the Kautokeino Sami were an important factor, in the south extensive reindeer herding started to expand when the market for meat came closer to the Sami. During the 1920s the milking of reindeer ceased in Sweden, except in a few families. At that time Sami families from the north had been removed southwards. They further demonstrated the superiority of extensive herding to the Sami in mid- and southern Lapland. Reindeer pastoralism is basically a system of interaction between man and animal, but it has been heavily influenced by market forces and state intervention

  7. IAEA Team Concludes Peer Review of Sweden's Nuclear Regulatory Framework, 17 February 2012, Stockholm, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety and radiation protection experts today concluded a 12-day mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Sweden. The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission, which was conducted at the request of Sweden, noted good practices in the country's nuclear regulatory system and also made recommendations and suggestions for the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) and the government. These are aimed at strengthening the effectiveness of the country's regulatory framework and functions in line with IAEA Safety Standards. ''Throughout the mission, the IRRS team received full cooperation from SSM staff in its review of Sweden's regulatory, technical and policy issues,'' said Georg Schwarz, mission leader and Deputy Director General of the Swiss nuclear regulator (ENSI). 'The staff were open and candid in their discussions and provided the fullest practicable assistance', he commented. The main observations of the IRRS Review team included the following: SSM operates as an independent regulator in an open and transparent manner with well-organized regulatory processes; SSM is receptive to feedback and strives to maintain a culture of continuous learning; and Following the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi accident, SSM responded promptly to public demand for information and communicated effectively with the national government, the public and other interested parties. Good practices identified by the IRRS team included, though they are not limited to, the following: The consolidation of the two previous national regulatory authorities into SSM was successful; Overall, SSM's management system is comprehensive and contributes to staff efficiency and effectiveness; The nuclear power plant refurbishment programme as required by SSM enhanced safety; and Sweden's regulatory framework for high-level waste disposal is comprehensive and technically sound. The IRRS Review team identified

  8. Sweden in the Delaware Valley: Everyday Life and Material Culture in New Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naum, Magdalena; Ekengren, Fredrik; Zagal Mach Wolfe, Ulla Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In 1637 the Swedish Crown, encouraged by Dutch merchants, developed a plan to establish a colonial outpost in America to tap into profitable tobacco and beaver pelt trade. The same year the first cargo ships left Sweden and sailed westwards to claim their piece of America along the Delaware River......, their perception and interactions with the neighbouring Native American groups. It discusses the ways material culture was used, exchanged and appropriated by the colonists and the local Lenape and Susquehannock in the processes of meeting, negotiations and daily coexistence....

  9. Annual Report 1999. Electric power in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-15

    . The Swedish Power Association is of the opinion that the increase in production taxes on nuclear power is completely misdirected. Sweden is the only EU country to have production taxes on electricity. Uncertainty and the lack of stability in the present taxation system will entail considerable difficulties both for electricity-intensive industry and for the power companies vis-a-vis long-term investment in Sweden. In 1999, overall consumption in the country fell by 0.3 TWh to 142.9 TWh, compared with last year. The decrease is explained by the fact that the autumn was very warm. Inflow into the major rivers was somewhat higher than normal enabling 70.4 TWh to be generated by the hydropower plants. This is 6 TWh more than during a normal year. Nuclear power accounted for 70.2 TWh, equal to the previous year. Additionally, combined heat and power and condensing plants accounted for 9.5 TWh, almost half of which using biofuels. Wind power continues to increase. At year-end, there were about 480 wind power plants, and the annual production was 0.4 TWh. Overall electricity production in the country was 150.5 TWh, a decrease of 3.4 TWh, or just under three percent. Exports amounted to 16.1 TWh and imports to 8.5 TWh. The average price for the year on the Nordic power exchange's spot market (Sector Sweden) was SEK 0.119 per kWh. The low price is explained by the mild weather and a plentiful supply of water in the Nordic reservoirs. On 1 November, the electricity market was changed in such a way that small consumers, with a fuse rating of up to 200 amps, were also able to take part. Parliament's decision to remove the requirement for continually registering hourly meters was of crucial importance. With this measure, the electricity market was also opened up to household customers. Hourly metering was replaced by profile settlement. Customers were offered fixed prices that could be considerably lower than previously. Flexible prices were on offer, e.g. linked to the

  10. Trends in work disability with mental diagnoses among social workers in Finland and Sweden in 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantonen, O; Alexanderson, K; Pentti, J; Kjeldgård, L; Hämäläinen, J; Mittendorfer-Rutz, E; Kivimäki, M; Vahtera, J; Salo, P

    2017-12-01

    Aims Social workers report high levels of stress and have an increased risk for hospitalisation with mental diagnoses. However, it is not known whether the risk of work disability with mental diagnoses is higher among social workers compared with other human service professionals. We analysed trends in work disability (sickness absence and disability pension) with mental diagnoses and return to work (RTW) in 2005-2012 among social workers in Finland and Sweden, comparing with such trends in preschool teachers, special education teachers and psychologists. Records of work disability (>14 days) with mental diagnoses (ICD-10 codes F00-F99) from nationwide health registers were linked to two prospective cohort projects: the Finnish Public Sector study, years 2005-2011 and the Insurance Medicine All Sweden database, years 2005-2012. The Finnish sample comprised 4849 employees and the Swedish 119 219 employees covering four occupations: social workers (Finland 1155/Sweden 23 704), preschool teachers (2419/74 785), special education teachers (832/14 004) and psychologists (443/6726). The reference occupations were comparable regarding educational level. Risk of work disability was analysed with negative binomial regression and RTW with Cox proportional hazards. Social workers in Finland and Sweden had a higher risk of work disability with mental diagnoses compared with preschool teachers and special education teachers (rate ratios (RR) 1.43-1.91), after adjustment for age and sex. In Sweden, but not in Finland, social workers also had higher work disability risk than psychologists (RR 1.52; 95% confidence interval 1.28-1.81). In Sweden, in the final model special education teachers had a 9% higher probability RTW than social workers. In Sweden, in the final model the risks for work disability with depression diagnoses and stress-related disorder diagnoses were similar to the risk with all mental diagnoses (RR 1.40-1.77), and the probability of RTW was 6% higher in

  11. On the masculinization of population: The contribution of demographic development -- A look at sex ratios in Sweden over 250 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Spoorenberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Almost everywhere, women live longer than men, but the world population includes increasingly more men than women. This fact is observed not only in populations where gender-based discrimination is practised, but also in developed countries like Sweden. Objective: Whereas discrimination against female infants and women is usually given as an explanation for this paradox, demographic development (through improved survival also plays a role. This study examines the largely unnoticed role of demographic development in the masculinization of population, taking the case of Sweden. Methods: Using high-quality data from the Human Mortality Database for Sweden over the last 250 years, changes in the sex ratio at various ages are described and linked to the continuing survival gains achieved over the mortality transition. Results: Thanks to the reduction of secular mortality in Sweden, the natural sex imbalance observed at birth has been progressively prolonged later in life, and the age at which women outnumber men has been postponed to older ages. Similar developments are found in Norway and Denmark. Conclusions: The general decline of mortality is one of humanity's biggest achievements, but the accompanying change in age- and sex-specific survival patterns, coupled with the natural sex imbalance at birth, influences the age and sex composition of a population and, therefore, the sex ratio at successive ages. In a world where each new generation can expect to enjoy a longer life than the previous one, an increasing number of men can also be expected. Contribution: The role of demographic development in the masculinization of population has remained largely unnoticed so far.

  12. Utility loss and indirect costs after stroke in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Peter; Glader, Eva-Lotta; Jönsson, Bengt

    2008-04-01

    Currently little data exist on the development of quality of life over time in patients suffering from stroke, in particular using instruments that can be adapted in economic studies. The purpose of the study was to assess the utility loss and indirect costs following a stroke in Sweden. A cross-sectional mail survey. In collaboration with the National Stroke registry (RIKS-STROKE), a questionnaire consisting of the EuroQol-5D and questions regarding the present working status and the status prior to the stroke was mailed to patients below 76 years of age at six participating centres. The questionnaire was mailed to 393 patients in total, divided into groups with 3, 6, 9 or 12 months having passed since the stroke. The EuroQol-5D scores were converted to utility scores using the UK social tariff. Indirect costs were valued according to the average salary+employer contributions. A total of 275 questionnaires (70%) were returned. Utility scores were similar over time: 0.65, 0.75, 0.63, and 0.67 at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, respectively. Regression analyses revealed a tendency for lower utility scores among women, but no significant differences overall. Among patients in the working ages, a stroke caused 18.5 work weeks lost, corresponding to an indirect cost of 120,000 Swedish Kronor (SEK) (13,200euro, 95% confidence interval 82,541-160,050 SEK, 9080-17 605euro). Stroke causes a significant reduction in utility and causes high indirect costs. A substantial improvement was not noted over time, which is important to consider in economic models.

  13. Liver and gallbladder cancer in immigrants to Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Brandt, Andreas; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan

    2010-03-01

    The changes of cancer incidence upon immigration can be used as an estimator of environmental influence on cancer risk. We studied site-specific liver and biliary cancers in first-generation immigrants to Sweden with an aim to search for aetiological clues and to find evidence for indigenous incidence rates. We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) in immigrants compared to native Swedes. A total of 1428 cancers were identified in immigrants whose median ages (years) at immigration were 27 for men and 26 for women and whose median diagnostic ages were 64 and 66, respectively. The highest SIRs of 6.7 for primary liver cancer were observed for men from East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Increased SIRs were recorded for male immigrants from previous Yugoslavia (1.78), Southern Europe (2.91), Turkey (2.15) and Asian Arab countries (2.89). For gallbladder cancer, only women from the Indian subcontinent (3.84) and Chile (2.34) had increased risk while some Northern European immigrants showed decreased risks. Primary liver cancer was increased in immigrants from endemic regions of hepatitis B virus infection but also from large regions lacking cancer incidence data, North Africa, Asian Arab countries, Turkey and previous Yugoslavia; these are probably intermediary risk regions for this infection. The consideration of these regions as risk areas would justify active diagnostic and vaccination programs. The increase in gallbladder cancer in Chileans and Indians suggests that some persistent damage was inflicted before emigration, characterisation of which will be a challenge for aetiological studies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Birth order and hospitalization for alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Kieron; Myrskylä, Mikko; Tynelius, Per; Berglind, Daniel; Rasmussen, Finn

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that birth order is an important predictor of later life health as well as socioeconomic attainment. In this study, we examine the relationship between birth order and hospitalization for alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden. We study the relationship between birth order and hospitalization related to alcohol and narcotics use before and after the age of 20 using Swedish register data for cohorts born 1987-1994. We apply Cox proportional hazard models and use sibling fixed effects, eliminating confounding by factors shared by the siblings. Before age 20 we find that later born siblings are hospitalized for alcohol use at a higher rate than first-borns, and there is a monotonic increase in the hazard of hospitalization with increasing birth order. Second-borns are hospitalized at a rate 47% higher than first-borns, and third-borns at a rate 65% higher. Similar patterns are observed for hospitalization for narcotics use. After age 20 the pattern is similar, but the association is weaker. These patterns are consistent across various sibling group sizes. Later born siblings are more likely to be hospitalized for both alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden. These birth order effects are substantial in size, and larger than the estimated sex differences for the risk of hospitalization related to alcohol and drug use before age 20, and previous estimates for socioeconomic status differences in alcohol and drug abuse. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Neotectonics in northern Sweden - geological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerbaeck, R.; Witschard, F.

    1983-05-01

    Fairly large areas around the formerly known quaternary faults have been air photo interpreted. The fault known as the Parvie fault has been found to extend somewhat further towards the south, thereby crossing the valley of the Stora Lule river. Furthermore, another fault has been discovered in the Lansjaerv region, and thus the faults in this area form a better fit to the regional pattern, with a SSW - NNE trend and a relative uplift of the eastern part. The fault scarps have been leveled photogrammatrically, and reproduced on maps on the scales of 1:50000 and 1:100000, and on overview maps on the scale of 1:250000. The highest leveld scarps somewhat exceed 30 m. The total length of the faults is roughly 300 km. During the air photo interpretation, several landslides have been detected, and it seems evident from their location that there is a causal connection between faults and landslides. It seems evident that the different faults are not simultaneously formed, but created at separate events. Representative samples have been collected, and thin sections of these investigated under the microscope. Often, the bedrock shows signs of older tectonic influence, and it seems that the faults largerly have been released along existing zones of weakness in the bedrock. However, striking exceptions, with fracturing through unaltered rock, have been found in several places. The faults illustrated in the maps below undoubtedly represent the most important signs of late quaternary fault activity in Norrbotten east of the Caledonian mountains. The geographic, and very probably also causal connection between faults and landslides seems obvious in both Finland and Sweden. We need a satisfactory tectonic explanation for the faults. Undoubtedly, the glacial - isostatic forces have a central role. The strike of the faults is approximately perpendicular to the direction of plate motion, and compressive forces have acted at the formation of the faults. (author)

  16. A review of the seismotectonics of Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir Wood, R.

    1993-04-01

    A study has been undertaken of data relating to the seismotectonic state of Sweden, both under current conditions and also through the glaciation/deglaciation cycle. The focus of the study has been to explore primary data on all the separate sources of information bearing on seismotectonics including: a. regional tectonics, b. neotectonic surface faulting, c. geodetic and tide-gauge observations of land-level changes, d. the horizontal strain field, e. Holocene land-level changes, f. historical and instrumental seismicity, g. palaeosesmicity, h. stress determinations, and i. geothermal observations. These data have then been combined into a regional seismotectonic model, relating the distribution, style and rates of seismicity to the seismogenic properties of the crust and the continuing crustal deformation. From the evidence of the modelled and observed horizontal strain field and the diversity of focal mechanisms, all the current seismicity of the region appear to be a response to postglacial rebound. Through and understanding of the interaction between the pre-existing tectonic strain field, and the strain field resulting from glacial loading and unloading it is possible to make testable predictions about the localisation of deformation and seismicity in Fennoscandia at different stages of the glacial cycle. Immediately following glacial unloading intense deformation was concentrated on the northwestern flank of the down warped crustal bowl. Currently low-level deformation and associated seismicity is most pronounced around the western margins of the dome of postglacial rebound. While the rebound dome is primarily extensional relieving the high levels of compression that accompanied crustal down warping, there are also areas of compression and extension associated with flexures in the rebound surface that appear to affect the distribution and style of seismicity. The study shows how the significance and localisation of deformation and seismicity may be predicted

  17. Thermomechanical studies in granite at Stripa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Myer, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Media other than rock salt are being considered for the deep, geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a deep, underground repository will subject the rock to a thermal pulse that will induce displacements, strains, and stresses in the rock. Thermomechanical experiments, with electrical heaters simulating the thermal output of waste canisters, were carried out in granite at a depth of 340 m below surface adjacent to a defunct iron ore mine at Stripa, Sweden. Changes in temperature, displacement, and stress in the rock around these heaters were measured, and the measurements were compared with predictions calculated from the theory of linear thermoelasticity. Measured temperature changes agreed well with predictions, but measured displacements and stresses were consistently less than those predicted with constant values for the coefficient of thermal expansion and elastic properties of the rock. A laboratory test program to measure these coefficients over ranges of stress and temperature representing those in the field experiment has been initiated. Test specimens were taken from cores recovered from the instrumentation holes in the Stripa experiments. Preliminary results from laboratory tests on specimens free of joints indicate that the values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase from about 60 to 80 MPa and from 0.15 to 0.22, respectively, as the confining stress is increased from 2 to 55 MPa; these values decrease with increasing temperature, more so at 2 MPa than at 55 MPa. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion at a confining stress of 30 MPa increases from about 10 x 10 - 6 / 0 C at 40 0 C to about 14 x 10 - 6 / 0 C. The magnitudes of these changes are not sufficient to resolve the disparity between measured and predicted results. Perhaps the properties of test specimens containing joints will show greater variations in the values of the thermomechanical coefficients with temperature and pressure

  18. The Use of Religious Coping Methods in a Secular Society: A Survey Study Among Cancer Patients in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Nader; Ahmadi, Fereshteh

    2017-07-01

    In the present article, based on results from a survey study in Sweden among 2,355 cancer patients, the role of religion in coping is discussed. The survey study, in turn, was based on earlier findings from a qualitative study of cancer patients in Sweden. The purpose of the present survey study was to determine to what extent results obtained in the qualitative study can be applied to a wider population of cancer patients in Sweden. The present study shows that use of religious coping methods is infrequent among cancer patients in Sweden. Besides the two methods that are ranked in 12th and 13th place, that is, in the middle (Listening to religious music and Praying to God to make things better), the other religious coping methods receive the lowest rankings, showing how nonsignificant such methods are in coping with cancer in Sweden. However, the question of who turns to God and who is self-reliant in a critical situation is too complicated to be resolved solely in terms of the strength of individuals' religious commitments. In addition to background and situational factors, the culture in which the individual was socialized is an important factor. Regarding the influence of background variables, the present results show that gender, age , and area of upbringing played an important role in almost all of the religious coping methods our respondents used. In general, people in the oldest age-group, women, and people raised in places with 20,000 or fewer residents had a higher average use of religious coping methods than did younger people, men, and those raised in larger towns.

  19. Incidence of tonsillar cancer in northern Sweden: Impact of human papilloma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, Christos; Laurell, Göran; Lindquist, David; Öfverman, Charlotte; Stefansson, Kristina; Nylander, Karin; Olofsson, Katarina

    2015-12-01

    The incidence rate of tonsillar cancer is increasing worldwide. The current study identifies a parallel increase in the incidence of tonsillar cancer, human papilloma virus (HPV) and p16 expression among a population from northern Sweden, a sparsely populated area, confirming the strong association between p16 and HPV infection in tonsillar tissue. Data from the Swedish Cancer Registry was assessed to identify cases of tonsillar cancer in the northern territorial area of Sweden. HPV DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded diagnostic biopsies and detected by polymerase chain reaction using general primers Gp5+/6+ and CpI/IIG. Expression of p16 was identified by immunochemistry. Patients were grouped into urban or rural residence categories. A total of 214 cases were identified, comprising 155 (72.4%) men and 59 (27.6%) women, and 65 of these patients, who presented between 2000 and 2012, were analyzed. The overall median age for the analyzed patients was 58 years; 48 (74%) were males (median age, 57.5 years) and 17 (26%) were females (median age, 65 years). Of the 65 specimens, 59 (91%) were positive for HPV, and 62 (95%) expressed p16. The incidence of tonsillar cancer in the cohort demonstrated a 2-fold increase between 1990 and 2013; specifically, a 2.7-fold increase was observed in men whilst the female group exhibited only a small increase. These findings demonstrate a strong association between p16 expression and HPV infection in tonsillar malignancies. The incidence of HPV-positive tonsillar cancer has increased in recent years, even in sparsely populated regions, as demonstrated in northern Sweden.

  20. Increased alcohol use over the past 20 years among the oldest old in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelfve Susanne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS - Increased alcohol consumption among old people, reported in many countries, will likely present a major challenge to public health and policy in the future. In Sweden, current knowledge about old people’s alcohol consumption is incomplete because of limited historical data and a dearth of nationally representative studies. We describe the frequency of alcohol consumption among the oldest old in Sweden over a 20-year period by sex, age, education, living situation, mobility and Activities of Daily Living. METHODS - We used repeated cross-sectional survey data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, conducted in 1992, 2002 and 2011. The samples were nationally representative of the Swedish population aged 77+, with response rates of 95.4%, 84.4% and 86.2% (total n=2007. Self-reported consumption frequency was measured with the question “How often do you drink alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer or spirits?” RESULTS - Frequency of alcohol consumption increased among the oldest old from 1992 to 2011. The proportion reporting no or less-than-monthly alcohol consumption decreased, whereas the proportion reporting weekly consumption increased. This was true for men, women and most age and educational groups. The period change in consumption frequency was not explained by changes in demographic factors, living situation or functional capacity during the study period. CONCLUSIONS - Alcohol use increased among the oldest old in Sweden during the 20-year study period. More liberal attitudes toward alcohol could contribute to the increased use. The increase in weekly alcohol consumers suggests an increase in the number of older risk consumers.

  1. Shift work to balance everyday life - a salutogenic nursing perspective in home help service in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Agosti, Madelaine T?rnquist; Andersson, Ingemar; Ejlertsson, G?ran; Janl?v, Ann-Christin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses in Sweden have a high absence due to illness and many retire before the age of sixty. Factors at work as well as in private life may contribute to health problems. To maintain a healthy work–force there is a need for actions on work-life balance in a salutogenic perspective. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of resources in everyday life to balance work and private life among nurses in home help service. Methods: Thirteen semi-structured individual interviews...

  2. Cancer Mortality by Country of Birth, Sex, and Socioeconomic Position in Sweden, 1961–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoli, Gholamreza; Bottai, Matteo; Moradi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, cancer deaths accounted for more than 15% of all deaths worldwide, and this fraction is estimated to rise in the coming years. Increased cancer mortality has been observed in immigrant populations, but a comprehensive analysis by country of birth has not been conducted. We followed all individuals living in Sweden between 1961 and 2009 (7,109,327 men and 6,958,714 women), and calculated crude cancer mortality rates and age-standardized rates (ASRs) using the world population for stan...

  3. Mortality among children and young persons in Sweden in relation to childhood socioeconomic group.

    OpenAIRE

    Vågerö, D; Ostberg, V

    1989-01-01

    More than 1.5 million children in Sweden were followed up for the period 1961-1979 with respect to mortality. Mortality differences by socioeconomic group were studied for the age groups 1-19 years. Children in families of non-manual workers, both boys and girls, had a significantly lower mortality than children of manual workers and children of self employed persons. The socioeconomic differences in risk of dying were greater among boys than among girls. For boys, the socioeconomic differenc...

  4. Is acculturation associated with physical activity among female immigrants in Sweden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Lena S; Palmér, Karolina; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-06-01

    Immigrant women in Sweden have lower levels of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) than Swedish-born women. The reasons are unclear, although acculturation has been suggested to play a role. We used a cross-sectional study design to investigate the association between LTPA and two indicators of acculturation: (i) language proficiency (ability to understand news reports on the radio and television) and (ii) age at the time of migration, and if there existed a modifying effect on these hypothesized associations. The study sample consisted of 1651 women, aged 18-65, living in Sweden and born in Finland, Chile or Iraq. A postal questionnaire (translated into the women's native language) was used to collect the variables. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess LTPA. Data were collected in 2002-05 and analyzed in 2009-10. A partial-proportional odds model was used for the analysis. Increased language proficiency was associated with increased LTPA [odds ratio (OR) = 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.57-3.41]. Country of birth modified the association. Furthermore, younger age at migration was associated with increased LTPA (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.03). Increased language proficiency has the potential to be an important health-promoting factor among immigrant women.

  5. Gambling in Sweden: the cultural and socio-political context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binde, Per

    2014-02-01

    To provide an overview, with respect to Sweden, of the cultural history of gambling, the commercialization of gambling, problem gambling research, the prevalence of problem gambling and its prevention and treatment. A review of the literature and official documents relating to gambling in Sweden; involvement in gambling research and regulation. Gambling has long been part of Swedish culture. Since about 1980 the gambling market, although still largely monopolistic, has been commercialized. At the same time, problem gambling has emerged as a concept in the public health paradigm. Debate regarding whether or not Sweden's national restrictions on the gambling market are compliant with European Community legislation has helped to put problem gambling on the political agenda. Despite expanded gambling services, the extent of problem gambling on the population level has not changed significantly over the past decade. The stability of problem gambling in Sweden at the population level suggests a homeostatic system involving the gambling market, regulation, prevention and treatment and adaption to risk and harm by gamblers. We have relatively good knowledge of the extent and characteristics of problem gambling in Sweden and of how to treat it, but little is known of how to prevent it effectively. Knowledge is needed of the effectiveness of regulatory actions and approaches, and of responsible gambling measures implemented by gambling companies. © 2013 The Author, Addiction © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. A database on electric vehicle use in Sweden. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridstrand, Niklas [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Electrical Engineering and Automation

    2000-05-01

    The Department of Industrial Electrical Engineering and Automation (IEA) at the Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), has taken responsibility for developing and maintaining a database on electric and hybrid road vehicles in Sweden. The Swedish Transport and Communications Research Board, (KFB) initiated the development of this database. Information is collected from three major cities in Sweden: Malmoe, Gothenburg and Stockholm, as well as smaller cities such as Skellefteaa and Haernoesand in northern Sweden. This final report summarises the experience gained during the development and maintenance of the database from February 1996 to December 1999. Our aim was to construct a well-functioning database for the evaluation of electric and hybrid road vehicles in Sweden. The database contains detailed information on several years' use of electric vehicles (EVs) in Sweden (for example, 220 million driving records). Two data acquisition systems were used, one less and one more complex with respect to the number of quantities logged. Unfortunately, data collection was not complete, due to malfunctioning of the more complex system, and due to human factors for the less complex system.

  7. Case analyses of all children's drowning deaths occurring in Sweden 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyllander, Jan; Janson, Staffan; Nyberg, Cecilia; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt; Stark Ekman, Diana

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this research project was to explore circumstances surrounding each drowning death occurring to children and adolescents ages 0-17 in Sweden during the years 1998-2007. Records from the National Board of Forensic Medicine (NBFM) and other sources were analysed. We collected information on children's personal characteristics (sex, age, ethnic background, weight, height, physical condition, and pre-existing health conditions) and the circumstances of deaths (time and place of occurrence, type of drowning, resuscitation efforts and medical care given, for example). We also collected information on prevention factors: the physical environment, adult supervision, whether or not the child could swim, and if the child was using a personal flotation device at the time of death. Our analysis showed that 109 children had drowned in Sweden during the study period - of this group, 96 had died from unintentional causes. Children from immigrant backgrounds, particularly with families coming from the Middle East and Iran, were inordinately represented in the group of victims who had died from unintentional drowning deaths. Other risk factors included: coming from a single parent-headed family, alcohol use by older victims and a lack of ability to swim. Prevention efforts to prevent drowning in the future should focus on preventing alcohol use by young bathers; better fencing around swimming sites; improved coverage of swimming lessons to all children in Sweden, especially children from immigrant families; more education on drowning risks for single parents; and better awareness by adults on the need for constant supervision of children and adolescents in and near water.

  8. The state of the residential fire fatality problem in Sweden: Epidemiology, risk factors, and event typologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Anders; Bonander, Carl; Nilson, Finn; Huss, Fredrik

    2017-09-01

    Residential fires represent the largest category of fatal fires in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of fatal residential fires in Sweden and to identify clusters of events. Data was collected from a database that combines information on fatal fires with data from forensic examinations and the Swedish Cause of Death-register. Mortality rates were calculated for different strata using population statistics and rescue service turnout reports. Cluster analysis was performed using multiple correspondence analysis with agglomerative hierarchical clustering. Male sex, old age, smoking, and alcohol were identified as risk factors, and the most common primary injury diagnosis was exposure to toxic gases. Compared to non-fatal fires, fatal residential fires more often originated in the bedroom, were more often caused by smoking, and were more likely to occur at night. Six clusters were identified. The first two clusters were both smoking-related, but were separated into (1) fatalities that often involved elderly people, usually female, whose clothes were ignited (17% of the sample), (2) middle-aged (45-64years old), (often) intoxicated men, where the fire usually originated in furniture (30%). Other clusters that were identified in the analysis were related to (3) fires caused by technical fault, started in electrical installations in single houses (13%), (4) cooking appliances left on (8%), (5) events with unknown cause, room and object of origin (25%), and (6) deliberately set fires (7%). Fatal residential fires were unevenly distributed in the Swedish population. To further reduce the incidence of fire mortality, specialized prevention efforts that focus on the different needs of each cluster are required. Cooperation between various societal functions, e.g. rescue services, elderly care, psychiatric clinics and other social services, with an application of both human and technological interventions, should reduce residential fire

  9. Materialist and post-materialist values and cannabis smoking among young adults: A population-based study in southern Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. The association between materialist, mixed and post-materialist values, and the experience of cannabis smoking among young adults was investigated. Methods. The 2004 public health survey in Skane, southern Sweden, is a cross-sectional study with a 59% response rate. The 6787 persons aged 18-34 years included in this study answered a postal questionnaire. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between materialist, mixed and post-materialist values and e...

  10. Social capital, political trust and experience of cannabis smoking: A population-based study in southern Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Martin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether political mistrust in the Riksdag (the national parliament in Sweden) is an independent characteristic of cannabis smokers, or whether it reflects low confidence in people in general, and therefore low social capital. METHOD: The 2004 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study answered by 27,757 respondents aged 18-80 with a 59% response rate providing data on political trust, cannabis smoking, and potential confounders. RES...

  11. Exploring similarities and differences in hospital adverse event rates between Norway and Sweden using Global Trigger Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Deilk?s, Ellen Tveter; Risberg, Madeleine Borgstedt; Haugen, Marion; Lindstr?m, Jonas Christoffer; Nyl?n, Urban; Rutberg, Hans; Michael, Soop

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: In this paper, we explore similarities and differences in hospital adverse event (AE) rates between Norway and Sweden by reviewing medical records with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). Design: All acute care hospitals in both countries performed medical record reviews, except one in Norway. Records were randomly selected from all eligible admissions in 2013. Eligible admissions were patients 18 years of age or older, undergoing care with an in-hospital stay of at least 24 hours, exc...

  12. Twenty-four-year trends in the incidence of ischemic stroke in Sweden from 1987 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Annika; Giang, Kok Wai; Lappas, Georgios; Jern, Christina; Torén, Kjell; Björck, Lena

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of stroke in Sweden increased between 1989 and 2000 among people aged ≤65 years, but more recent data on those aged >65 years are lacking. Through the Swedish Hospital Discharge and Cause of Death registries, we identified all cases of nonfatal and fatal ischemic stroke (IS) among people aged 18 to 84 years during 1987-2010 in Sweden. Of the 391 081 stroke cases identified, 1.6% were 18 to 44 years, 16.7% were 45 to 64 years, and 81.7% were 65 to 84 years. Among people aged 18 to 44 years, there was a continuous increase in the incidence of stroke of 1.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.8%-1.8%) per year for men and 1.6% (1.0%-2.3%) per year for women. Among men and women aged 45 to 64 years, slightly declining rates were observed from the late 1990s, with a mean annual decrease of 0.4% (0.1%-0.7%) among men and 0.6% (0.2%-1.0%) among women. Among men aged 65 to 84 years, a decrease of 3.7% in IS (3.4%-4.0%) per year was observed from the late 1990s. This was more marked in women, where an initial decrease of 2.5% (2.1%-2.9%) per year was followed by an accelerated decrease of 5.1% (4.4%-5.8%) after 2005. Mortality from IS decreased markedly in all age groups. The incidence of IS in elderly people in Sweden is now decreasing, whereas the decline in IS incidence in the middle-aged people is much less steep. The increasing incidence of stroke in the young, particularly if carried forward to an older age, is concerning.

  13. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 2007; Energilaeget 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-12-15

    Energy in Sweden 2007: Facts and Figures contains the tabular for most of the diagrams in the main publication. These data consist primarily of the results of the Agency's processing of basic data from Statistics Sweden. 2001 statistics for the period 1983-1999 where revised compared to data for previous editions. With effect from the 2001 edition, statistics are of preliminary character for the two last published years (2005 and 2006). Breakdowns into certain types of fuels vary somewhat depending on whether preliminary or final data is used. Further information about the statistics can be found in Energy in Sweden, chapter 8 Energy Facts. Please note that the figures have been rounded up or down, therefore totals do not always comply with the sum of individual figures

  14. Vocational Education and Industrial Relations: Sweden 1910–1975

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Karlsson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we discuss vocational education in Sweden against the backdrop of the changing nature of industrial relations in the period from ca 1910 to 1975. Drawing upon evidence from official inquiries and case studies of two industries (forest industry and shipbuilding, we show that Sweden in the 1940s and 1950s can be described as a collective skill formation system in the making, where firms, intermediary associations, and the state cooperated around vocational education and training. However, Sweden developed in a very different direction than similar countries. We argue that this remarkable change of trajectory cannot be understood without considering the simultaneous disintegration of the model of industrial relations, along with general changes in the system of education.

  15. Public and political attitudes to nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikdahl, C.-E.; Swedish Atomic Forum)

    1988-01-01

    The first important decisions about a large nuclear programme in Sweden were taken in the early 1960s without any political opposition at all. The first signs of an anti-nuclear movement were seen in 1972, and at the general election in 1976 nuclear power was for the first time the main political issue. It remained so until 1980, when Parliament, after a referendum, decided to phase out nuclear power not later than the year 2010. After that decision, political interest in nuclear power evaporated, but returned again after the Chernobyl accident in April 1986. Both the decision in Parliament in 1980 and the Government's bill of May 1987 put Sweden in an unique position. Public attitudes and the political situation in Sweden are examined. (author)

  16. Quality of renewable energy utilization in transport in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, Ari

    2015-04-01

    Renewable energy utilization in transportation (RES-T) is a long way behind its utilization in power (RES-E) and heat (RES-H) sectors. International and national environmental policies have recently given a lot of emphasis on this problem. For that reason information is sought on how to implement solutions both politically and technologically. As Sweden is a global leader in this area, it can provide valuable examples. In 2012 Sweden became the first country to reach the binding requirement of the European Union for at least 10 % share for renewable energy in transport energy consumption. But qualitative development has been even stronger than quantitative. Among the success stories behind qualitative progress, most noteworthy are those created by innovative municipal policies. By 2030 Sweden aims to achieve fossil fuel independent road transport system and by 2050 completely carbon neutral transport system in all modes of transport.

  17. An electric-drive vehicle strategy for Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, D.; Lipman, T. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies; Lundberg, M. [Swedish Transport and Communications Research Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-07-01

    The strategy that Sweden has taken regarding the use of electric-powered vehicles (EVs) to mitigate the environmental impacts caused by the transportation sector was discussed. Sweden's unique attributes include inexpensive and clean electricity, a strong environmental ethic and a strong automotive sector. All versions of electric-drive technology are considered to be environmentally superior to internal combustion engine vehicles. While the cost of batteries is dropping, they will remain highly priced. However, manufacturers are making larger investments into hybrid EVs and fuel cell EVs. Electric drive buses are also gaining in popularity as a means by which to reduce exhaust gases in urban areas. Sweden's industrial policy is aimed at manufacturing electrically driven heavy duty vehicles such as buses and trucks. The environmental policy is aimed at deploying small EVs for on and off-road transportation use, as well as heavy duty EVs targeted by the industrial policy. refs.

  18. Air Pollution Mortality in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Lehmijoki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse health consequences of air pollution are of concern currently and there is a fear that these consequences escalate along with economic growth. The effect of economic growth on air pollution deaths is analyzed in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden by applying the Environmental Kuznets Curve approach, according to which economic growth has competing effects on air pollution and related deaths. On the one hand, emissions tend to increase as the scale of economic activity increases, but on the other hand, consumers and firms in richer countries use cleaner goods and adopt cleaner technologies. In Denmark and Finland, the latter effects are stronger, while in Sweden the opposite is true. Therefore, air pollution deaths will decrease in Denmark and Finland but increase in Sweden. Since country's own emissions do not determine air pollution completely, the paper briefly analyzes emissions from the Baltic countries and Russia.

  19. Sweden's Leadership in a Climate Constrained World. An analysis for Sweden of the Greenhouse Development Rights framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartha, Sivan; Baer, Paul; Athanasiou, Tom; Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2008-10-15

    This report presents an analysis of the Greenhouse Development Rights framework applied to the case of Sweden. Its objective is to provide useful quantitative guidance on Sweden's role as a leader in our climate constrained world. It presents guidance that is rigorous from the standpoint of climate science and framed in the context of a right to development for the world's poor. This analysis fully accounts for Sweden's true responsibility, by looking beyond territorial emissions alone, and reckoning emissions in terms of Sweden's net 'carbon footprint.' Accounting for carbon embedded in imports, exports and international transport reveals that Sweden's responsibility is 17% larger than would be inferred by considering Sweden's territorial emissions alone. Sweden will naturally have significant obligations under any burden-sharing regime that is based on capacity and responsibility, and only more so under a regime that honors a right to development. Under the GDR framework, our indicative quantification suggests that Sweden's share of responsibility and capacity, and hence its obligation under a politically viable climate regime, will be approximately 0.51% of the global total in 2010. This can be compared to the US's 33%, the EU's 26%, Japan's 7.8%, China's 5.5%, and India's 0.5%. Sweden's 0.51% share of the global total is thus not large in absolute terms, though it is rather large relative to Sweden's small size (0.14% of the global population). These national shares shift over time, as countries' relative proportion of income and emissions change. In light of the emergence of rapidly growing developing country economies, Sweden's share of the global total obligation is projected to decline to 0.43% by 2020, and to 0.35% by 2030. This quantification of Sweden's obligation is useful in two complementary ways. First, if the total global costs of an emergency climate

  20. Awareness of cancer symptoms and anticipated patient interval for healthcare seeking. A comparative study of Denmark and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidberg, Line; Lagerlund, Magdalena; Pedersen, Anette F; Hajdarevic, Senada; Tishelman, Carol; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic data show that Denmark has considerably poorer survival from common cancers than Sweden. This may be related to a lower awareness of cancer symptoms and longer patient intervals in Denmark than in Sweden. The aims of this study were to: 1) compare population awareness of three possible symptoms of cancer (unexplained lump or swelling, unexplained bleeding and persistent cough or hoarseness); 2) compare anticipated patient interval when noticing any breast changes, rectal bleeding and persistent cough; and 3) examine whether potential differences were noticeable in particular age groups or at particular levels of education in a Danish and Swedish population sample. Method Data were derived from Module 2 of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Telephone interviews using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure were conducted in 2011 among 3000 adults in Denmark and 3070 adults in Sweden. Results Danish respondents reported a higher awareness of two of three symptoms (i.e. unexplained lump or swelling and persistent cough or hoarseness) and a shorter anticipated patient interval for two of three symptoms studied (i.e. any breast changes and rectal bleeding) than Swedish respondents. Differences in symptom awareness and anticipated patient interval between these countries were most pronounced in highly educated respondents. Conclusion Somewhat paradoxically, the highest awareness of symptoms of cancer and the shortest anticipated patient intervals were found in Denmark, where cancer survival is lower than in Sweden. Thus, it appears that these differences in symptom awareness and anticipated patient interval do not help explain the cancer survival disparity between Denmark and Sweden.

  1. Large outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis infection transmitted through the public water supply, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widerström, Micael; Schönning, Caroline; Lilja, Mikael; Lebbad, Marianne; Ljung, Thomas; Allestam, Görel; Ferm, Martin; Björkholm, Britta; Hansen, Anette; Hiltula, Jari; Långmark, Jonas; Löfdahl, Margareta; Omberg, Maria; Reuterwall, Christina; Samuelsson, Eva; Widgren, Katarina; Wallensten, Anders; Lindh, Johan

    2014-04-01

    In November 2010, ≈27,000 (≈45%) inhabitants of Östersund, Sweden, were affected by a waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis. The outbreak was characterized by a rapid onset and high attack rate, especially among young and middle-aged persons. Young age, number of infected family members, amount of water consumed daily, and gluten intolerance were identified as risk factors for acquiring cryptosporidiosis. Also, chronic intestinal disease and young age were significantly associated with prolonged diarrhea. Identification of Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IbA10G2 in human and environmental samples and consistently low numbers of oocysts in drinking water confirmed insufficient reduction of parasites by the municipal water treatment plant. The current outbreak shows that use of inadequate microbial barriers at water treatment plants can have serious consequences for public health. This risk can be minimized by optimizing control of raw water quality and employing multiple barriers that remove or inactivate all groups of pathogens.

  2. Pediatric reference intervals for general clinical chemistry components - merging of studies from Denmark and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridefelt, Peter; Hilsted, Linda; Juul, Anders; Hellberg, Dan; Rustad, Pål

    2018-05-28

    Reference intervals are crucial tools aiding clinicians when making medical decisions. However, for children such values often are lacking or incomplete. The present study combines data from separate pediatric reference interval studies of Denmark and Sweden in order to increase sample size and to include also pre-school children who were lacking in the Danish study. Results from two separate studies including 1988 healthy children and adolescents aged 6 months to 18 years of age were merged and recalculated. Eighteen general clinical chemistry components were measured on Abbott and Roche platforms. To facilitate commutability, the NFKK Reference Serum X was used. Age- and gender-specific pediatric reference intervals were defined by calculating 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles. The data generated are primarily applicable to a Nordic population, but could be used by any laboratory if validated for the local patient population.

  3. Marriage choices and social reproduction.: The interrelationship between partner selection and intergenerational socioeconomic mobility in 19th-century Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dribe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the relationship between partner selection and socioeconomic status (SES attainment and mobility in five rural parishes in southern Sweden, 1815-1894. Three different aspects of partner selection are considered: age, social origin, and geographical origin. We use an individual-level database containing information on the SES origin (parental land holding and occupation, age difference, and place of birth of the married couple. The results show a powerful association between partner selection and SES attainment and mobility. Social heterogamy was particularly important, but age heterogamy and geographic exogamy was also clearly related to both SES attainment and mobility.

  4. Potentially avoidable perinatal deaths in Denmark and Sweden 1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff-Roos, J; Borch-Christensen, H; Larsen, S

    1996-01-01

    to some extent could reflect differences in the quality of care, indicated by the numbers of perinatal deaths in categories of potentially avoidable deaths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 97% of all perinatal deaths in 1991 in the two countries were analyzed. A new classification focusing......BACKGROUND: Since 1950 the perinatal mortality has been significantly higher in Denmark than in Sweden. In 1991 the rate in Denmark was 8.0/1000 deliveries compared to 6.5/1000 in Sweden. An international audit was designed to investigate whether the perinatal death rates in the two countries...

  5. Occurrence of the hermit beetle (Osmoderma eremita), in Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Antonsson, Kjell; Hedin, Jonas; Jansson, Niklas; Nilsson, Sven; Ranius, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We have compiled data on the occurrence of a threatened beetle, Osmoderma eremita, in Sweden. The species inhabits tree hollows with wood mould. The data were compiled from field surveys conducted in 1993-2003, using pitfall traps at 401 localities and using wood mould sampling at 104 localities. We have also gone through published data and all larger Swedish museums and registered old records. O. eremita was recorded at about 30% of the field surveys. In Sweden, oak is by far the most import...

  6. The bedrock and the soil types in the Finnsjoearea, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, K.-E.; Ekman, L.; Olkiewicz, A.

    1978-11-01

    This report is a part of a long-term project, started at the request of the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, Sweden. The aim of the project is to claryfy the geohydrological situation of a drainage area close to Finnsjoen in northern Uppland, Sweden. The work comprised bedrock- and soil mapping as well as an investigation of existing literature about the geology of northern Uppland. The area is about 25 km 2 and is limited by its water-shed. The area is relatively flat, rich in outcrops - expecially in the western parts - and often swampy. Big areas of forests and agriculture have been drained by ditches. (author)

  7. Diet and Predatory Behavior of Lynx in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshøj, Charlotte Margaret

    2002-01-01

    and hunters who fear predation on livestock and reindeer as well as a general reduction in wild game abundance, especially roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Prey spectrum and predation of lynx was studied based on stomach analyses of lynx throughout Sweden and on data from a field study in south-central Sweden...... (reindeer and roe deer) comprised the greatest part of the diet, while a regional division indicated that while lynxes from northern regions had a narrower diet niche, they were in better condition than lynxes from south of the reindeer husbandry districts. Lynx gender and status also influenced diet...

  8. Potentially avoidable perinatal deaths in Denmark and Sweden 1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff-Roos, J; Borch-Christensen, H; Larsen, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 1950 the perinatal mortality has been significantly higher in Denmark than in Sweden. In 1991 the rate in Denmark was 8.0/1000 deliveries compared to 6.5/1000 in Sweden. An international audit was designed to investigate whether the perinatal death rates in the two countries...... to some extent could reflect differences in the quality of care, indicated by the numbers of perinatal deaths in categories of potentially avoidable deaths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 97% of all perinatal deaths in 1991 in the two countries were analyzed. A new classification focusing...

  9. Sustainable Development in Sweden - a success story. Discourse analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlberg, Malin

    2009-01-01

    In Sweden the term 'Sustainable Development' is very well known and is often used as leitmotivs in many parts of the society. Since the UN Conference on Environment and Development took place in Rio de Janeiro 1992 SD has become more and more indispensable in political debates and it has even become a crucial argument in management decisions in the business sector. Due to the tradition of consensus policy and the strong involvement of different interest group in policy decision-making processes, the idea of SD as a holistic policy concept fell in Sweden on a fruitful ground

  10. Parental leave and the glass ceiling in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, James; Skogman Thoursie, Peter; Vroman, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we update and extend "Is There a Glass Ceiling in Sweden?" (Albrecht et al. 2003) by documenting the extent to which the gender log wage gap across the distribution in Sweden has changed over the period 1998-2008. We then examine the Swedish glass ceiling in 2008 in more detail by documenting how it differs for white-collar versus blue-collar workers and for private- versus public-sector workers. We also examine when in the life cycle the glass ceiling effect arises and how thi...

  11. Energy in Sweden: Facts and figures 2009; Energilaeget 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-12-15

    Energy in Sweden 2009: Facts and figures contains the tabular for most of the diagrams in the main publication (STEM-ET--2009-30). These data consist primarily of the results of the Agency's processing of basic data from Statistics Sweden. Statistics are of preliminary character for the two last published years (2007 and 2008). Breakdowns into certain types of fuels vary somewhat depending on whether preliminary or final data is used. Please note that the figures have been rounded up or down, therefore totals do not always comply with the sum of individual figures

  12. The close relation between birth, abortion and employment rates in Sweden from 1980 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmqvist, Mikael

    2006-09-01

    Birth and abortion rates in Sweden have fluctuated since 1980 while the proportion between the rates are the same at the beginning and end of the period. An increase in birth rates in the late 1980s resulted in a peak in 1991 and 1992, with 124,000 live births each year. Thereafter followed a steady decline in the rate until 2000, when the number of live births was about 90,000. At that point, the trend changed to an increase. The aim of this analysis was to investigate any relation between employment rates and the number of live births among women aged 20-34, and at the same time to explore the trend for abortion rates compared to the trend for live births. The relation between employment status and live birth rate is statistically more significant for women than men, and the rates have a higher correlation for the period after 1986. Young adults in this age group are vulnerable to economic cycles that can explain this covariation but the decline in birth rates in economically developed societies has multidimensional aspects and many other possible explanations. Much has been done in recent years in Sweden to decrease household inequality for families with children to avoid the risk of relative poverty, but the fact that there is no explicit health policy to reduce the abortion level that remain unchanged since the early 1980s may appear as a notable lack of strategy in a country with many other health-related goals.

  13. Secular slowing auditory simple reaction time in Sweden (1959-1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Madison

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are indications that simple reaction time might have slowed in Western countries, based on both cohort- and multi-study comparisons. A possible limitation of the latter method in particular is measurement error stemming from methods variance, which results from the fact that instruments and experimental conditions change over time and between studies. We therefore set out to measure the simple auditory reaction time (SRT of 7,081 individuals (2,997 males and 4,084 females born in Sweden 1959-1985 (subjects were aged between 27 and 54 years at time of measurement. Depending on cut-offs and adjustment for ageing related slowing on SRT, the data suggest that SRT has increased between 3 and 16 ms in the 27 birth years covered in the present sample. The slowing is unlikely to be explained by attrition, as evaluated by comparing the general intelligence × birth-year interactions and standard deviations for both male participants and dropouts, utilizing military conscript cognitive ability data. The present result is consistent with previous studies employing alternative methods, and may result from several synergistic factors, such as possible recent micro-evolutionary trends favouring lower g in Sweden and the effects of industrially produced neurotoxic substances on peripheral nerve conduction velocity.

  14. A comparative population-based study of prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in Singapore, Sweden and Geneva, Switzerland from 1973 to 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cynthia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men in Sweden and Geneva, and the third most common in men in Singapore. This population-based study describes trends in the incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer in Singapore, Sweden and Geneva (Switzerland from 1973 to 2006 and explores possible explanations for these different trends. Methods Data from patients diagnosed with prostate cancer were extracted from national cancer registries in Singapore (n = 5,172, Sweden (n = 188,783 and Geneva (n = 5,755 from 1973 to 2006. Trends of incidence and mortality were reported using the Poisson and negative binomial regression models. The age, period and birth-cohort were tested as predictors of incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer. Results Incidence rates of prostate cancer increased over all time periods for all three populations. Based on the age-period-cohort analysis, older age and later period of diagnosis were associated with a higher incidence of prostate cancer, whereas older age and earlier period were associated with higher mortality rates for prostate cancer in all three countries. Conclusions This study demonstrated an overall increase in incidence rates and decrease in mortality rates in Singapore, Sweden and Geneva. Both incidence and mortality rates were much lower in Singapore. The period effect is a stronger predictor of incidence and mortality of prostate cancer than the birth-cohort effect.

  15. Change in child mortality patterns after injuries in Sweden: a nationwide 14-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, D; Steinvall, I; Sjöberg, F

    2017-06-01

    Sweden has one of the world's lowest child injury mortality rates, but injuries are still the leading cause of death among children. Child injury mortality in the country has been declining, but this decline seems to decrease recently. Our objective was therefore to further examine changes in the mortality of children's death from injury over time and to assess the contribution of various effects on mortality. The underlying hypothesis for this investigation is that the incidence of lethal injuries in children, still is decreasing and that this may be sex specific. We studied all deaths from injury in Sweden under-18-year-olds during the 14 years 1999-2012. We identified those aged under 18 whose underlying cause of death was recorded as International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis from V01 to X39 in the Swedish cause of death, where all dead citizens are registered. From the 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2012, 1213 children under the age of 18 died of injuries in Sweden. The incidence declined during this period (r = -0.606, p = 0.02) to 3.3 deaths/100,000 children-years (95 % CI 2.6-4.2). Death from unintentional injury was more common than that after intentional injury (p causes of death were injury to the brain (n = 337, 41 %), followed by drowning (n = 109, 13 %). The number of deaths after intentional injury increased (r = 0.585, p = 0.03) and at the end of the period was 1.5 deaths/100,000 children-years. The most common causes of death after intentional injuries were asphyxia (n = 177, 45 %), followed by injury to the brain (n = 76, 19 %). Mortality patterns in injured children in Sweden have changed from being dominated by unintentional injuries to a more equal distribution between unintentional and intentional injuries as well as between sexes and the overall rate has declined further. These findings are important as they might contribute to the preventive work that is being done to further reduce

  16. Sweden-Norway at the Berlin Conference 1884-85 : History, national identity-making and Sweden's relations with Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, David

    2013-01-01

    The international image of Sweden is one of a small, democratic and peace-loving country without the moral burden of a colonial past. This image has been reproduced in Swedish government policy as well as in most historical accounts. However, in this Current African Issues publication, the notion that “Sweden lacks a colonial past in Africa” is brought into question. The Berlin Conference 1884-85 is perhaps the most infamous political event in the history of European domination of Africa. At ...

  17. The male-female health-survival paradox and sex differences in cohort life expectancy in Utah, Denmark, and Sweden 1850-1910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Hanson, Heidi A; Oksuzyan, Anna; Mineau, Geraldine P; Christensen, Kaare; Smith, Ken R

    2013-04-01

    In Utah, the prevalence of unhealthy male risk behaviors are lower than in most other male populations, whereas women experience higher mortality risk because of higher fertility rates. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Utah sex differential in mortality would be small and less than in Sweden and Denmark. Life tables from Utah, Denmark, and Sweden were used to calculate cohort life expectancies for men and women born in 1850-1910. The sex difference in cohort life expectancy was similar or larger in Utah when compared with Denmark and Sweden. The change over time in the sex differences in cohort life expectancy was approximately 2 years smaller for active Mormons in Utah than for other groups suggesting lifestyle as an important component for the overall change seen in cohort life expectancy. Sex differences in cohort life expectancy at the age of 50 years were similar for individuals actively affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and for Denmark and Sweden. The hypothesis that a smaller sex difference in cohort life expectancies in Utah would be detected in relation to Denmark and Sweden was not supported. In Utah, the male-female differences in life expectancy remain substantial pointing toward biological mechanisms or other unmeasured risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Qualitative study of pregnancy and childbirth experiences in Somalian women resident in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essén, B; Johnsdotter, S; Hovelius, B; Gudmundsson, S; Sjöberg, N O; Friedman, J; Ostergren, P O

    2000-12-01

    To explore the attitudes, strategies and habits of Somalian immigrant women related to pregnancy and childbirth, in order to gain an understanding as to how cultural factors might affect perinatal outcome. Interpreter assisted qualitative in depth interviews around topics such as attitudes and strategies regarding childbirth. Fifteen women from the Somalian community in a city in Sweden, between the ages of 20 and 55 years with delivery experience in Somalia and Sweden. The interviews describe how the women themselves perceived their experiences of childbirth in the migrant situation. Many voluntarily decreased food intake in order to have a smaller fetus, an easier delivery and to avoid caesarean section. The participants considered a safe delivery to be the same as a normal vaginal delivery They reduced food intake in order to diminish the growth of the fetus, thereby avoiding caesarean section and mortality. The practice of food intake reduction, while rational for the participants when in Somalia, was found less rational in Sweden and may lead to suboptimal obstetric surveillance. Somalian women have childbirth strategies that differ from those of Swedish women. These strategies should be seen as 'survival behaviours' related to their background in an environment with high maternal mortality. The hypothesis generated is that there is a relationship between the strategies during pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcome among Somalian immigrants. Considering the strong association of the habits to safe birth, it seems doubtful whether the women will change their habits as long as health care providers are unaware of their motives. We suggest a more culturally sensitive perinatal surveillance.

  19. Intimate partner violence and poor mental health among Thai women residing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernbrant, Cecilia; Emmelin, Maria; Essén, Birgitta; Östergren, Per-Olof; Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The current aim is to examine the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among Thai women residing in Sweden and its association with mental health. We also investigate the potential influence of social isolation and social capital regarding the association between IPV and mental health outcome. A public health questionnaire in Thai was distributed by post to the entire population of Thai women, aged 18-64, residing in two regions in Sweden since 2006. Items included aspects related to IPV (physical/sexual/emotional), sociodemographic background, physical health, mental health (GHQ-12), social isolation, and social capital (i.e. social trust/participation). The response rate was 62.3% (n=804). Prevalence of lifetime reported IPV was 22.1%, with 20.5% by a previous partner and 6.7% by a current partner. Previous IPV exposure was significantly related to current IPV exposure, and all IPV exposure measures were significantly related to poor mental health. However, Thai women experiencing IPV by a current partner were more at risk for poor mental health than Thai women with previous or without any experience of IPV. Also, among all women exposed to IPV, those with trust in others and without exposure to social isolation seemed to have partial protection against the adverse mental health consequences associated with IPV. Most Thai women had never been exposed to IPV, and after migrating to Sweden, women had lower IPV exposure than in Thailand. However, the increased risk for poor mental health among those Thai women exposed to IPV suggests the need for supportive measures and targeted interventions to prevent further injuries and adverse health consequences. Although poor mental health in Thai women represents an obstacle for integration, the potential resilience indicated in the group with high social trust and without exposure to social isolation suggests that such aspects be included in the program designed to facilitate integration.

  20. Forecast of icing events at a wind farm in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for identifying icing events using a physical icing model, driven by atmospheric data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and applies it to a wind park in Sweden. Observed wind park icing events were identified by deviation from an idealized power...

  1. The management of intermediate level wastes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Thegerstroem, C.

    1980-01-01

    A brief overview of current practices and research in Sweden on the management of intermediate level wastes is given. Intermediate level wastes include spent resins, filters and core components from the six power reactors in operation; radioactive wastes from nuclear fuel development at Studsvik and from non-nuclear applications are a minor contribution. (Auth.)

  2. Social Policy and Immigrant Joblessness in Britain, Germany and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Christel

    2006-01-01

    I examine patterns of joblessness among immigrant men and women from 33 countries of origin now living in Britain, Germany and Sweden. Access to welfare, access to the labor market, job segregation and institutional support for women's employment define distinct policy configurations in these three destinations. Findings show that gaps in…

  3. At the Bridging Point: Tutoring Newly Arrived Students in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Helen

    2017-01-01

    In Sweden, tutoring in the mother tongue is a special support measure primarily intended for newly arrived students to facilitate their transition into the Swedish school system. Tutoring is premised on the collaboration between the class teacher, responsible for subject-related expertise, and the tutor, who contributes with knowledge of the…

  4. Students' Perspectives on Raising Achievement through Inclusion in Essunga, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julie; Persson, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A Swedish municipality that has transformed its position at the bottom of the national school league tables to top within three years--through inclusive education--has attracted much attention both in Sweden and internationally. This article offers the students' perspectives on the transformation and how they have experienced success. A social…

  5. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident for reindeer husbandry in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Åhman, G.; Rydberg, A.; Åhman, B.

    1990-01-01

    Large parts of the reindeer hearding area in Sweden were contaminated with radioactive caesium from the Chernobyl fallout. During the first year after the accident no food with activity concentrations exceeding 300 Bq/kg was allowed to be sold in Sweden. This meant that about 75% of all reindeer meat produced in Sweden during the autumn and winter 1986/87 were rejected because of too high caesium activités. In May 1987 the maximum level for Cs-137 in reindeer, game and fresh-water fish was raised to 1500 Bq/kg. During the last two year, 1987/88 and 1988/89, about 25% of the slaughtered reindeer has had activities exceeding this limit. The effective long-time halflife or radiocaesium in reindeer after the nuclear weapon tests in the sixties was about 7 years. If this halflife is correct also for the Chernobyl fallout it will take about 35 years before most of the reinder in Sweden are below the current limit 1500 Bq/kg in the winter. However, by feeding the animals uncontaminated food for about two months, many reindeer can be saved for human consumption

  6. Coordination between primary and secondary healthcare in Denmark and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wadmann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insights into effective policy strategies for improved coordination of care is needed. In this study we describe and compare the policy strategies chosen in Denmark and Sweden, and discuss them in relation to interorganisational network theory. Policy practice: The policy initiatives to improve collaboration between primary and secondary healthcare in Denmark and Sweden include legislation and agreements aiming at clarifying areas of responsibility and defining requirements, creation of links across organisational boarders. In Denmark many initiatives have been centrally induced, while development of local solutions is more prominent in Sweden. Many Danish initiatives target the administrative level, while in Sweden initiatives are also directed at the operational level. In both countries economic incentives for collaboration are weak or lacking, and use of sanctions as a regulatory mean is limited. Discussion and conclusion: Despite a variety of policy initiatives, lacking or poorly developed structures to support implementation function as barriers for coordination. The two cases illustrate that even in two relatively coherent health systems, with regional management of both the hospital and general practice sector, there are issues to resolve in regard to administrative and operational coordination. The interorganisational network literature can provide useful tools and concepts for interpreting such issues.

  7. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident for reindeer husbandry in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Åhman

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Large parts of the reindeer hearding area in Sweden were contaminated with radioactive caesium from the Chernobyl fallout. During the first year after the accident no food with activity concentrations exceeding 300 Bq/kg was allowed to be sold in Sweden. This meant that about 75% of all reindeer meat produced in Sweden during the autumn and winter 1986/87 were rejected because of too high caesium activités. In May 1987 the maximum level for Cs-137 in reindeer, game and fresh-water fish was raised to 1500 Bq/kg. During the last two year, 1987/88 and 1988/89, about 25% of the slaughtered reindeer has had activities exceeding this limit. The effective long-time halflife or radiocaesium in reindeer after the nuclear weapon tests in the sixties was about 7 years. If this halflife is correct also for the Chernobyl fallout it will take about 35 years before most of the reinder in Sweden are below the current limit 1500 Bq/kg in the winter. However, by feeding the animals uncontaminated food for about two months, many reindeer can be saved for human consumption.

  8. The Progressive Development of Environmental Education in Sweden and Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiting, Soren; Wickenberg, Per

    2010-01-01

    Our paper traces the history and progressive development of environmental education and education for sustainable development (ESD) in Sweden and Denmark. Our main focus is on work in primary and lower secondary schools as part of a search for trends of international interest related to the conceptualisation and practice of environmental education…

  9. The Use of Personal Identity Numbers in Sweden and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The paper of Katarina Hyltén-Cavallius focuses on personal identity numbers in Sweden and Denmark. This paper looks into formal and informal structures, which organise society in a host member state and which can make it difficult for a non-national Union citizen to, in practice, access public an...

  10. Is There Hidden Potential for Rural Population Growth in Sweden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedomysl, Thomas; Amcoff, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Rural depopulation is a concern in many countries, and various policy initiatives have been taken to combat such trends. This article examines whether hidden potential for rural population growth can be found in Sweden. If such potential exists, it implies that the development prospects for many rural areas are not as unpromising as they may seem…

  11. Energy policies of IEA countries. Sweden 1996 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This IEA report provides a comprehensive, in-depth assessment of the energy policies of Sweden, including recommendations on future policy developments. Electricity is a focal point of Sweden's energy policy. After a shift in the energy mix to favour electricity in the early 1970's, nuclear and hydro power each make up about half of the electricity supply. Two key events have occurred since then: the 1980 referendum, which calls for the phase-out of all nuclear plants by 2010; the recent restructuring and liberalization of the electricity sector with the creation of a Nordic electricity market. In this context, the report argues the case for making a decision now on the nuclear issue to clarify Sweden's electricity future. Other key issues highlighted in the report include Sweden's use of economic policy instruments such as a carbon tax to achieve energy and environment goals, and the adequacy and effectiveness of government efforts to promote biofuels and energy efficiency. This report forms part of a series of periodic in-depth reviews conducted and discussed by the IEA Member countries on a four-year cycle. Short reviews of energy policy developments in all twenty-three Member countries are published annually in Energy Policies of IEA Countries. (author). 13 figs., 9 tabs., 4 appends

  12. The Role of the School Library: Reflections from Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Libraries are critical learning spaces and may play a significant role in intercultural education initiatives, particularly in Sweden where the national curriculum ascribes central functions to libraries for learning activities. Unfortunately, the ways in which teachers and librarians may collaborate to leverage mutual resources is not fully…

  13. M.S.Sigyn - Simbol of Sweden waste transport success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, B.; Dibek, P.

    1995-01-01

    The article is devoted to the presently existing system in Sweden of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes maritime transportation from NPPs to places of permanent and intermediate storage. Transport casks and penals, their maintenance and control system are described. Explanatory work with public is partially also considered. 1 tab

  14. Comparison of the energy structures in Denmark, France and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    2003-12-01

    Denmark is an example of country which involves massively in the renewable energies development and in the energy efficiency, since 1980. Facing this policy, France and Sweden produce their energy without fossil energies, mainly from nuclear and hydroelectric power. These countries energy policies, providing not much of carbon dioxide emission, are compared by the author. (A.L.B.)

  15. Life Satisfaction among Outbound Students in Northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per A.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from one's home country to a university abroad can be demanding. This study is a follow-up study exploring life satisfaction among outbound students. Outbound students at Umeå University, Sweden, were surveyed before and after experiencing studying abroad. Thus, the students' life satisfaction could be compared after an…

  16. Russia’s Security Relations with Finland, Norway, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. RUSSIA’S SECURITY... RELATIONS WITH FINLAND, NORWAY, AND SWEDEN by Rory J. Hayden September 2017 Thesis Advisor: Mikhail Tsypkin Co-Advisor: David S. Yost...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of

  17. Privatizing Education: Free School Policy in Sweden and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate why Sweden, the epitome of social democracy, has implemented education reforms leading to an extraordinary growth in Free Schools in contrast to liberal England, where Free School policy has been met with enormous resistance. Conventional wisdom would predict the contrary, but as a matter of fact Sweden…

  18. This is how we manage Sweden's radioactive waste. Activities 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    SKB operates systems and facilities for the management and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste in Sweden. SKB has conducted extensive R, D and D work with regard to constructing a spent fuel encapsulation plant and a deep repository in crystalline bedrock. This annual report treats all the different activities without going into technical details

  19. Biology and outbreaks of Microdiprion pallipes (Hymenoptera; Diprionidae) in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsson, E. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Entomology)

    1994-01-01

    During outbreaks, Microdiprion pallipes (Fall.) is the most destructive of the pine sawflies in Sweden. Its distribution includes most provinces, but damaging outbreaks have until recently occurred only in two inland areas in northern Sweden. These areas are characterised by high elevation, a harsh climate, and slow tree growth. The four recorded outbreak periods showed a 10 year periodicity. Outside these areas, a lesser outbreak occurred in 1988 to 1990, on the east coast (province of Uppland). Outbreak patterns, life history variation, and mortality factors were studied. Factors that may explain the distribution of outbreaks and the population patterns were identified.Experimental and observational evidence on the potential of various factors to influence fecundity, dispersal, and survival was evaluated. In the outbreak areas, there were few major population factors. Parasitism by Rhorus substitutor (Thunb.) was the largest cause of larval mortality and the only important density-dependent mortality factor. The different diapause strategies of M. pallipes and R. substitutor may contribute to stabilize this system. Different flight periods of the host and the parasitoid may explain a possible correlation between weather and outbreaks. Elsewhere in Sweden, where low population densities prevail, there may be similarities in population processes between M. pallipes and the other widely distributed diprionids with solitary larvae, which never have attained outbreak densities in Sweden. Interactions with other diprionids through shared natural enemies may be an important population process and may influence the distribution of outbreaks. 37 refs, 4 figs, 11 tabs

  20. The Ultimate in Flexitime: From Sweden, by Way of Volvo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Paul

    1988-01-01

    In the Volvo component plant on Koping, Sweden, an innovative system of multiple shifts and flexible working hours is offered to employees. The system meets the needs of those who are available for work at certain times and helps curtail turnover and absenteeism. (JOW)

  1. Energy in Sweden. Facts and figures 1999; Energilaeget i siffror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This supplement contains the tabular data of most of the diagrams in the main publication (Energy in Sweden 1999, STEM-ET-82-1999). The figures are based on preliminary statistics, and there may be minor differences between similar data in different sections or tables etc. All table headings and notes are given in both Swedish and English.

  2. Electric power supply in Sweden 1979/80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Generation, transmission and consumption of electricity for the year 1979/80 in Sweden are review in this report. The net supply of electricity in TWh was 60.2 from hydro, 20.1 from nuclear, 12.1 from fossil thermal and 1.4 imported. Detailed statistics are given for both consumption and generation. (L.E.)

  3. Wood production potential in poplar plantations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christersson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Shortage of oil, large variations in exports from Russia of wood to Europe, plenty of abandoned agriculture land, new ideas about a more intensive silviculture; these circumstances are driving forces in Sweden for planting fast-growing poplar and hybrid aspen clones on suitable land. The advantage of such trees is that the wood can be used for both energy (heat, biofuels, electricity), paper and for construction. Poplar clones bred in the USA and Belgium, and older hybrid aspen clones from Sweden, together with new poplar clones collected and selected for Swedish conditions from British Columbia, Canada, were planted during the 1990s in south and central Sweden. The stem diameters and heights of the trees have been measured during the last 10 years and the woody biomass production above ground has been calculated. MAI for all the plantations is 10-31 m 3 or 3-10 ton DM per hectare with the highest annual woody production of 45 m 3 or 15 ton DM per hectare in some years in a very dense plantation in the most southern part of Sweden. All the plantations have been fenced for at least the first ten years. The damage has been caused by stem canker, insects, leaf rust and by moose after removal of the fences. The possibilities for the use of poplar plantations as energy forest and vegetation filters are discussed. (author)

  4. The mites associated with Ips typographus in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Moser; Hubertus H. Eidmann; Jan R. Regnander

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-four species of mites were found associated with Ips typographus (Linnaeus) collected from pherommone traps in Sweden, bringing to 38 the total recorded for this scolytid. Because three of the species are parasites, it may be possible to use them in biological control of I. typographus. Couplets from an earlier key to these...

  5. Sweden's Engagement with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Magnus; Bae, Jinsun

    2015-01-01

    on semistructured interviews of individuals who have taken part in Swedish engagement programs. Findings: - Besides having its embassy in Pyongyang and serving as a protecting power for the U.S., Sweden has provided capacity building programs for North Korean government officials and scholars and has taken part...

  6. Wood production potential in poplar plantations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christersson, Lars [Section of Short Rotation Forestry, VPE, SLU, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-09-15

    Shortage of oil, large variations in exports from Russia of wood to Europe, plenty of abandoned agriculture land, new ideas about a more intensive silviculture; these circumstances are driving forces in Sweden for planting fast-growing poplar and hybrid aspen clones on suitable land. The advantage of such trees is that the wood can be used for both energy (heat, biofuels, electricity), paper and for construction. Poplar clones bred in the USA and Belgium, and older hybrid aspen clones from Sweden, together with new poplar clones collected and selected for Swedish conditions from British Columbia, Canada, were planted during the 1990s in south and central Sweden. The stem diameters and heights of the trees have been measured during the last 10 years and the woody biomass production above ground has been calculated. MAI for all the plantations is 10-31 m{sup 3} or 3-10 ton DM per hectare with the highest annual woody production of 45 m{sup 3} or 15 ton DM per hectare in some years in a very dense plantation in the most southern part of Sweden. All the plantations have been fenced for at least the first ten years. The damage has been caused by stem canker, insects, leaf rust and by moose after removal of the fences. The possibilities for the use of poplar plantations as energy forest and vegetation filters are discussed. (author)

  7. 75 FR 57815 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the... carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  8. Licensing procedure for nuclear power in Sweden. An international look with lessons for Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaahlin, Emil; Nilsson, Isabelle; Pettersson, Maria; Soederholm, Patrik

    2011-02-01

    In this study we present an in-depth analysis of the existing licensing procedure for nuclear power in Sweden, and the related processes towards different public authorities. In order to put the existing legislation into context we also analyze the legal and political prerequisites for the establishment of nuclear reactors during the 1970s. The purpose of this report is thus to: (a) analyze the legal and political conditions under which the existing nuclear power plants in Sweden were built; and (b) review and analyze the existing licensing procedure for nuclear power in the country. Four main statutes (and several subordinated regulations) apply in connection with the establishment of a new nuclear plant in Sweden, including the adoption of physical plans, a principal governmental decision on the permissibility of the plant and at least five major licenses. Physical planning according to the Planning and Building Act is primarily a municipal responsibility. A plan has to meet certain environmental requirements; not least the 'provisions on efficient management of natural resources' in the Environmental Code, indicating how different kinds of land and water areas should be used and thereby direct the location of different installations. The Swedish rules are complex and vague in many respects, and may therefore imply major uncertainties for a prospective investor. The legal protection is less unclear if an area is of national interest for a specific purpose, such as nature conservation, where it normally would not be possible to locate, say, a nuclear power plant. An area may also be of national interest for nuclear plants, which of course significantly alters the preconditions in favour of the plant project. The physical planning procedure comprises an 'environmental consideration' of the plan, including an 'environmental impact assessment' (EIA), provided the plan is likely to have significant effects on the environment. This 'programmatic EIA' does however not

  9. Late quaternary faulting and paleoseismicity in northern Fennoscandia, with particular reference to the Lansjaerv area, northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerbaeck, R.

    1990-01-01

    Many fault scarps, interpreted as post- or late-glacial in age, occur in northern Sweden and adjacent parts of Finland and Norway. In the Lansjaerv area in northern Sweden attempts have been made to date fault displacement relative to the glacial and postglacial stratigraphy by trenching across some of these fault scarps. It is shown that the faulting occurred soon after the local deglaciation some 9000 years ago. There are no signs of movements since that time. The faulting was obviously associated with violent earthquakes because seismically induced phenomena, dating from the same period as the faulting, are frequently found in the vicinity. Numerous landslides, developed in glacial till, occur in the same region as the faults and different types of seismites (seismically-induced sediment deformation) were found when actively sought for. It is concluded that several earthquakes of high magnitudes occurred in northern Fennoscandia during the vanishing of the inland ice sheet. (author)

  10. Use of radiography in public dental care for children and adolescents in northern Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk Kieri, Catarina; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The primary aims were to investigate the total number of radiographs and the reason for dental radiography in children and adolescents in the Public Dental Health Service. Secondary aims were to study the influence of caries experience and orthodontic treatment on the number of radiographs....... For this retrospective study, 544 adolescents regularly attending three Public Dental Health clinics in the county of Västerbotten, northern Sweden were selected. The number of radiographs exposed each year from 3 to 19 years of age was registered. Information on reason for the radiographic examination was extracted...... from dental records as well as the caries experience at 19 years of age. The attrition rate was 7% due to incomplete data. The total mean number of radiographs exposed was 23+/-6 of which 1+/-2 were extra-oral radiographs. Bitewing radiographs for caries registration constituted 87% of the intra...

  11. Awareness of risk factors for cancer: a comparative study of Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Hvidberg, Line; Hajdarevic, Senada; Fischer Pedersen, Anette; Runesdotter, Sara; Vedsted, Peter; Tishelman, Carol

    2015-11-23

    Sweden and Denmark are neighbouring countries with similarities in culture, healthcare, and economics, yet notable differences in cancer statistics. A crucial component of primary prevention is high awareness of risk factors in the general public. We aimed to determine and compare awareness of risk factors for cancer between a Danish and a Swedish population sample, and to examine whether there are differences in awareness across age groups. Data derive from Module 2 of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Telephone interviews were conducted with 3000 adults in Denmark and 3070 in Sweden using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure. Data reported here relate to awareness of 13 prompted risk factors for cancer. Prevalence ratios with 95 % confidence intervals were calculated to examine associations between country, age, and awareness of risk factors. Over 90 % of respondents in both countries recognized smoking, use of sunbeds and ionizing radiation as risk factors for cancer. Lowest awareness (awareness than Danish respondents for ten of the 13 risk factors studied. Respondents from Denmark reported higher awareness only regarding low fruit and vegetable intake and use of sunbeds. Low physical activity was the only risk factor for which there was no difference in awareness between the countries. A decline in awareness was generally seen with increasing age in both countries, but deviating patterns were seen for alcohol intake, red/processed meat, obesity and age 70+. This study supports findings from other European studies that generally demonstrate modest public awareness of many established cancer risk factors. Efforts should be made to improve awareness of the cancer risk factors HPV-infection, low fruit and vegetable intake and alcohol intake, which showed particularly low awareness in both countries. Previous studies indicate that repeated, broad campaigns are successful, and suggest that a multimedia approach is used.

  12. Time trends in burdens of cadmium, lead, and mercury in the population of northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennberg, Maria; Lundh, Thomas; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Hallmans, Goeran; Jansson, Jan-Hakan; Stegmayr, Birgitta; Custodio, Hipolito M.; Skerfving, Staffan

    2006-01-01

    The time trends of exposure to heavy metals are not adequately known. This is a worldwide problem with regard to the basis for preventive actions and evaluation of their effects. This study addresses time trends for the three toxic elements cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb). Concentrations in erythrocytes (Ery) were determined in a subsample of the population-based MONICA surveys from 1990, 1994, and 1999 in a total of 600 men and women aged 25-74 years. The study took place in the two northernmost counties in Sweden. To assess the effect of changes in the environment, adjustments were made for life-style factors that are determinants of exposure. Annual decreases of 5-6% were seen for Ery-Pb levels (adjusted for age and changes in alcohol intake) and Ery-Hg levels (adjusted for age and changes in fish intake). Ery-Cd levels (adjusted for age) showed a similar significant decrease in smoking men. It is concluded that for Pb and maybe also Hg the actions against pollution during recent decades have caused a rapid decrease of exposure; for Hg the decreased use of dental amalgam may also have had an influence. For Cd, the decline in Ery-Cd was seen only in smokers, indicating that Cd exposure from tobacco has decreased, while other environmental sources of Cd have not changed significantly. To further improve the health status in Sweden, it is important to decrease the pollution of Cd, and actions against smoking in the community are important

  13. Hydrocarbon potential of Ordovician and Silurian rocks. Siljan Region (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, U. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Lehnert, O. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany); Meinhold, G. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration in the vicinity of Europe's largest impact structure (Siljan, Central Sweden) focused for years on abiogenic concepts and largely neglected state of the art knowledge on hydrocarbon generation via thermal decomposition of organic matter. In our study we use sedimentary rocks obtained from three drill sites (Mora001, Stumsnaes 1 and Solberga 1) within the ring structure around the central uplift to investigate the hydrocarbon potential of Ordovician and Silurian strata of the region and also for comparison with the shale oil and gas potential of age equivalent rocks of the Baltic Sea. Elemental analyses provided information on concentrations of carbonate and organic carbon, total sulfur as well as on the composition of major and minor elements of the sediments. The data has been used to evaluate the depositional environment and possible diagenetic alterations of the organic matter. RockEval pyrolysis and solvent hydrocarbon extraction gave insight into the hydrocarbon generation potential and the type and thermal maturity of the sediments. From the geochemistry data of the studied wells it is obvious that changes of depositional environments (lacustrine - marine) have occurred during Ordovician and Silurian times. Although, the quality of the organic matter has been influenced in marine and brackish environments through sulfate reduction, we observe for a number of marine and lacustrine sediments a good to excellent preservation of the biological precursors which qualify the sediments as hydrocarbon source rocks (Type II kerogens). Lacustrine source rocks show a higher remaining hydrocarbon potential (up to {proportional_to}550 mg HC per g C{sub org}) than those of marine or brackish environments. Our investigations indicate that the thermal maturity of organic matter of the drill sites has reached the initial stage of oil generation. However, at Mora001 some of the sediments were stained with oil indicating that hydrocarbons have

  14. Immigrant fertility in Sweden, 2000-2011: A descriptive note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Persson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modern Scandinavian population registers provide excellent data sources that allow a user to quickly gain an impression of the level of fertility and its structure across subpopulations. This may also allow the analyst to check a feature of the much-cited disruption hypothesis, at least in part. Objective: The purpose of this note is to exploit this potential to give an overview of the structure of recent total fertility after immigration to Sweden from various groups of sending countries, separately for males and females. In the process we demonstrate to what extent the post-migration fertility compensation which is part of the fertility disruption hypothesis is fulfilled in our study population. Due to the nature of our data we have refrained from studying fertility before migration. Methods: Based on data from a combination of two Swedish administrative registers (the Historic Population Register and the Multi-Generation Register that cover both men and women in the entire population for the years 2000-2011, we compute and plot TFR-like age-cumulated fertility levels, specific for years since immigration, for six groups of sending countries, separately for men and women. Results: We find that the post-migration fertility compensation specified as part of the fertility disruption hypothesis is visibly confirmed in our Swedish study population for female European immigrants from non-EU countries and for female immigrants from non-European countries with a low or medium UN Human Development Index, but not so for other female immigrants, i.e. not for those who come from a Nordic country or from a non-Nordic EU country, and not for female immigrants from a non-European country with a high Human Development Index, including the United States. We find mild but less conclusive evidence for the same feature for males. Conclusions: This shows that at least as far as post-migration fertility compensation is concerned, the disruption

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of bone spavin in Icelandic horses in Sweden: A radiographic field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eksell, P.; Axelsson, M.; Brostroem, H.; Roneus, B.; Haeggstroem, J.; Carlsten, J.

    1998-01-01

    The present field study was performed to estimate the prevalence of radiographic signs of bone spavin (RSBS) and to evaluate some possible risk factors for RSBS in the Icelandic horse in Sweden. The survey included horses from 11 farms involving 379 horses, comprising 238 geldings, 125 mares and 16 stallions. Age ranged from 0 to 19 years with a mean age of 8.1 years. Horses were radiographed with a dorsolateral-plantaromedial-oblique projection of both tarsi. Information about age, gender, origin, working intensity, number of gaits and age when saddle broken were obtained by interviewing the owners. Features of each horse's conformation were obtained by measurement or inspection. Radiographic signs of bone spavin were found in 23% (n = 88) of the horses. Horses younger than 5 years did not show any RSBS and the prevalence increased from zero to 33% between 4 and 8 years of age. Using a multivariate logistic regression model increasing age and sickle hock conformation were found to be significantly associated with increased risk of RSBS. Age when saddle broken in combination with height at the withers also influenced the multivariate logistic regression model significantly

  16. Delivery outcome among women employed in the plastics industry in Sweden and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, G; Bjerkedal, T; Egenaes, J

    1987-01-01

    In Sweden and Norway separate case-control studies of pregnancy outcome for the period 1973-1981 among female workers in the plastics industry were carried out with similar design. Employment records were obtained from companies producing and/or processing plastics and these were matched with the national medical birth and malformation registers. Within the cohorts of pregnancies during which the mother held employment in a plastics industry (1.397 in the Swedish and 288 in the Norwegian study), cases of stillbirths or infant deaths, selected malformations, or low birthweight (less than 2,000 g) were identified. For each case two controls from the same source were individually matched with regard to date of birth, age of mother, and parity. Exposure data concerning the 44 Swedish and ten Norwegian triplets were obtained from the employers. An increased odds ratio was found for processing of polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastics (95% CI Sweden 1.0-5.1; total material 1.1-4.5). However, processing of cold plastics yielded a higher odds ratio than processing of heated plastics. No increased odds ratio was found for processing of styrene or polyurethane plastics. Since not all of the plastics industries in the two countries participated in the studies and the number of cases was small, the result must be interpreted with caution.

  17. Cholecystectomy in Sweden 2000 – 2003: a nationwide study on procedures, patient characteristics, and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenlund Hans

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological data on characteristics of patients undergoing open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy are limited. In this register study we examined characteristics and mortality of patients who underwent cholecystectomy during hospital stay in Sweden 2000 – 2003. Methods Hospital discharge and death certificate data were linked for all patients undergoing cholecystectomy in Sweden from January 1st 2000 through December 31st 2003. Mortality risk was calculated as standardised mortality ratio (SMR i.e. observed over expected deaths considering age and gender of the background population. Results During the four years of the study 43072 patients underwent cholecystectomy for benign biliary disease, 31144 (72% using a laparoscopic technique and 11928 patients (28% an open procedure (including conversion from laparoscopy. Patients with open cholecystectomy were older than patients with laparoscopic cholecystectomy (59 vs 49 years, p Conclusion Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed on patients having a lower mortality risk than the general Swedish population. Patients with open cholecystectomy are more sick than patients with laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and they have a mortality risk within 90 days of admission for cholecystectomy, which is four times that of the general population. Further efforts to reduce surgical trauma in open biliary surgery are motivated.

  18. Implementation of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Colorectal Neoplasms in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Thorlacius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is an effective method for en bloc removal of large colorectal tumors in Japan, but this technique is not yet widely established in western countries. The purpose here was to report the experience of implementing colorectal ESD in Sweden. Methods. Twenty-nine patients with primarily nonmalignant and early colorectal neoplasms considered to be too difficult to remove en bloc with EMR underwent ESD. Five cases of invasive cancer underwent ESD due to high comorbidity excluding surgical intervention or as an unexpected finding. Results. The median age of the patients was 74 years. The median tumor size was 26 mm (range 11–89 mm. The median procedure time was 142 min (range 57–291 min. En bloc resection rate was 72% and the R0 resection rate was 69%. Two perforations occurred amounting to a perforation rate of 6.9%. Both patients with perforation could be managed conservatively. One bleeding occurred during ESD but no postoperative bleeding was observed. Conclusion. Our data confirms that ESD is an effective method for en bloc resection of large colorectal adenomas and early cancers. This study demonstrates that implementation of colorectal ESD is feasible in Sweden after proper training, careful patient selection, and standardization of the ESD procedure.

  19. Violent mass shootings in Sweden from 1960 to 1995: profiles, patterns, and motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, O; Lidberg, L

    1998-03-01

    During the past few decades, violent mass shooting in Sweden has increased rapidly. In the 36 years between 1960 and 1995, fourteen such occasions were recorded, during which 32 people were killed and 57 were wounded. The 14 offenders were men between the ages of 17 and 61 years. In the 20 years from 1960 to 1979, five shootings were committed by five offenders, leaving 10 dead and 13 wounded; in the 16 years between 1980 and 1995, there were nine different shootings committed by nine offenders, with 22 dead and 44 wounded. Seven of the shootings were classified as mass shootings, six as spree shootings, and one as a serial shooting. In all but four of these cases, the firearms used were illegal weapons. The four legal firearms belonged to an unemployed young laborer, an officer, a former United Nations (U.N.) soldier, and a member of the Swedish military volunteer corps. Of those killed, 68.8% were strangers to the offender; among the wounded, the corresponding figure was 89.5%. Profiles of the offenders and of the victims were studied. The psychiatric diagnoses among the offenders and the measures taken to prevent the increase in mass shooting in Sweden are presented.

  20. A 'civic turn' in Scandinavian family migration policies? Comparing Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Emily Cochran; Borevi, Karin; Mouritsen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Family migration policy, once basing citizens and resident foreigners' possibilities to bring in foreign family members mainly on the right to family life, is increasingly a tool states use to limit immigration and to push newcomers to integrate into civic and economic life. The family migration policies of Denmark, Norway and Sweden range widely - from more minimal support and age requirements to high expectations of language skills, work records and even income levels. While in Denmark and increasingly in Norway growing sets of requirements have been justified on the need to protect the welfare state and a Nordic liberal way of life, in Sweden more minimal requirements have been introduced in the name of spurring immigrants' labor market integration even as rights-based reasoning has continued to dominate. In all three countries, new restrictions have been introduced in the wake of the refugee crisis. These cases show how prioritizations of the right to family life vis-à-vis welfare-state sustainability have produced different rules for family entry, and how family migration policies are used to different extents to push civic integration of both new and already settled immigrants.

  1. Ethnic enclaves and risk of psychiatric disorders among first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Li, Xinjun; Cederin, Klas; Concha, Jeannie; Kendler, Kenneth S; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-11-01

    Some non-Western immigrant groups in Europe have elevated risk of psychosis relative to native-born. It is hypothesized that neighborhood ethnic density moderates this risk. Immigration to Sweden has increased substantially recently, particularly from the Middle East. This study examined the relationship between neighborhood ethnic density (i.e., living in an immigrant enclave) and risk of psychotic and affective disorders among three groups: Iraqi immigrants, immigrants from other nations, and native-born Swedes. Individuals aged 15-60, without prevalent psychopathology, were drawn from Swedish population-based registries and followed from 2005 to 2010 (N = 950,979). Multi-level logistic regression was used to examine the association between neighborhood ethnic composition and incident psychopathology. Cumulative incidence of psychopathology was greater in Iraqi enclaves relative to predominantly Swedish neighborhoods (6.3 vs. 4.5%). Iraqis living in enclaves did not have significantly greater risk of psychosis (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.66, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.92-2.97) or affective disorders (OR: 1.04, 95%CI 0.85-1.27) relative to those in predominantly Swedish neighborhoods. There was no increased risk of psychosis (OR: 0.93, p > 0.05) or affective disorders (OR: 0.93, p > 0.05) for other immigrants living in an enclave. Swedes living in an enclave had elevated risk of both psychosis (OR: 1.37, p immigrants in Sweden. Findings regarding Swedes are consistent with social drift.

  2. Distribution of radioactive caesium in the population of northern Sweden 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.; Wickman, G.; Aagren, G.; Eriksson, A.; Jonsson, H.; Tavelin, B.

    1995-01-01

    During the period from May 1988 until June 1993 the 137 Cs concentration was measured in 751 samples of psoas muscle from selected medico-legal autopsy cases in the northern half of Sweden. In this area the deposition level of 137 Cs from the Chernobyl accident varied from negligible to 100 kBq.m -2 . Northern Sweden is characterised by large boreal forest areas and a sparse population. The rural population often has a high level of subsistence through meat from reindeer, moose and other game, fresh water fish, forest wild berries and mushrooms. From a multiple linear regression performed on the 137 Cs concentration in the 751 measured samples of human muscle, the effective half-time of caesium whole-body content in the population could be assessed as 3.7 years. A slight increase in 137 Cs concentration was observed with the age of the individual and a significant difference between the sexes, the level for men exceeded that for women by 23%. The dose commitment to this population of approximately 900,000 inhabitants from internal radiation due to the Chernobyl debris could, by this model, be estimated at 220 man.Sv which, with the current ICRP lifetime risk estimates, would cause an addition of ten fatal cancer cases. (author)

  3. Reimbursement of hormonal contraceptives and the frequency of induced abortion among teenagers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydsjö, Adam; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Bladh, Marie; Josefsson, Ann

    2014-05-29

    Reduction in costs of hormonal contraceptives is often proposed to reduce rates of induced abortion among young women. This study investigates the relationship between rates of induced abortion and reimbursement of dispensed hormonal contraceptives among young women in Sweden. Comparisons are made with the Nordic countries Finland, Norway and Denmark. Official statistics on induced abortion and numbers of prescribed and dispensed hormonal contraceptives presented as "Defined Daily Dose/thousand women" (DDD/T) aged 15-19 years were compiled and related to levels of reimbursement in all Swedish counties by using public official data. The Swedish numbers of induced abortion were compared to those of Finland, Norway and Denmark. The main outcome measure was rates of induced abortion and DDD/T. No correlation was observed between rates of abortion and reimbursement among Swedish counties. Nor was any correlation found between sales of hormonal contraceptives and the rates of abortion. In a Nordic perspective, Finland and Denmark, which have no reimbursement at all, and Norway all have lower rates of induced abortion than Sweden. Reimbursement does not seem to be enough in order to reduce rates of induced abortion. Evidently, other factors such as attitudes, education, religion, tradition or cultural differences in each of Swedish counties as well as in the Nordic countries may be of importance. A more innovative approach is needed in order to facilitate safe sex and to protect young women from unwanted pregnancies.

  4. Clinical and pathological features of hair coat abnormalities in curly coated retrievers from UK and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R; Varjonen, K; Hendricks, A; Chang, Y M; Brooks Brownlie, H

    2016-12-01

    To gain information on hair loss amongst curly coated retrievers by questionnaire and to define the clinical and pathological features of hair coat abnormalities in affected dogs in the United Kingdom and Sweden. Questionnaires were completed by members of the Curly Coated Retriever Clubs. Fourteen dogs (six in the United Kingdom, eight in Sweden) were clinically examined and skin/hair samples collected for microscopy and histopathology. Blood was collected for haematological, biochemical and endocrine assays. Of 90 dogs surveyed, 39 had current or previous episodes of symmetrical, non-pruritic alopecia and or frizzy coat changes, usually affecting caudal thighs, axillae, dorsum and neck before 18 months of age; 23 dogs had a waxing/waning course. Examined dogs generally matched the pattern described in questionnaires. Hair shaft anomalies comprised occasional distorted anagen bulbs (10 dogs) and transverse fractures (8 dogs). Vertical histopathological sections showed infundibular hyperkeratosis (28 of 30 sections) and low-grade pigment clumping (17 of 30). Subtle telogenisation of hair follicles was unequivocally confirmed by transverse histomorphometric analyses. The follicular dysplasia of curly coated retriever reported here is similar to that of Irish water spaniels and Chesapeake Bay retrievers but distinct from that of Portuguese water dogs. The genetic basis requires further assessment. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. Uranium-enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by the anatexis of continental crust or processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichment in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (author)

  6. Acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of short-term survival in national outcome registries in Sweden and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng-Chia; Gedeborg, Rolf; Nicholas, Owen; James, Stefan; Jeppsson, Anders; Wolfe, Charles; Heuschmann, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Deanfield, John; Timmis, Adam; Jernberg, Tomas; Hemingway, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background International research for acute myocardial infarction lacks comparisons of whole health systems. We assessed time trends for care and outcomes in Sweden and the UK. Methods We used data from national registries on consecutive patients registered between 2004 and 2010 in all hospitals providing care for acute coronary syndrome in Sweden and the UK. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality 30 days after admission. We compared effectiveness of treatment by indirect casemix standardisation. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01359033. Findings We assessed data for 119 786 patients in Sweden and 391 077 in the UK. 30-day mortality was 7·6% (95% CI 7·4–7·7) in Sweden and 10·5% (10·4–10·6) in the UK. Mortality was higher in the UK in clinically relevant subgroups defined by troponin concentration, ST-segment elevation, age, sex, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus status, and smoking status. In Sweden, compared with the UK, there was earlier and more extensive uptake of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (59% vs 22%) and more frequent use of β blockers at discharge (89% vs 78%). After casemix standardisation the 30-day mortality ratio for UK versus Sweden was 1·37 (95% CI 1·30–1·45), which corresponds to 11 263 (95% CI 9620–12 827) excess deaths, but did decline over time (from 1·47, 95% CI 1·38–1·58 in 2004 to 1·20, 1·12–1·29 in 2010; p=0·01). Interpretation We found clinically important differences between countries in acute myocardial infarction care and outcomes. International comparisons research might help to improve health systems and prevent deaths. Funding Seventh Framework Programme for Research, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust (UK), Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation. PMID:24461715

  7. Social Pedagogy in Finland and Sweden: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Hämäläinen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Discussing how the concept of social pedagogy has been used in Finland and Sweden, this paper provides a historical and systemic comparison of policies and practices of social pedagogy in these two countries. The main aim is to identify and explain the main similarities and differences between the Finnish and Swedish national trajectories of social pedagogical thinking and action. In the first phase of the analysis, country-specific features of social pedagogy were described paying attention to historical and structural aspects. In the second phase, these descriptions were compared in a dialogue between the au- thors, one from Finland and the other from Sweden. The dialogue-based comparison was targeted to ex- plain the identified similar and different features of social pedagogical policies and practices. The explanation was based on historical and systemic considerations, especially those of historical development, research activities, theory buildings, methodologies and techniques, professionalization and the practice fields, and the future prospects of social pedagogy.The analysis showed that the historical roots and theoretical foundations of social pedagogical think- ing and action are very similar in Finland and Sweden but the position of social pedagogy  as an academic discipline  as well as a field of practice is partly different. Since social pedagogy has not been acknowl- edged as an academic discipline in Sweden, its outlook as a field of practice is on shaky ground, while in Finland the future of social pedagogy as an academic discipline  is uncertain because the social-peda- gogical know-how based on academic education is not well known and has not found general acceptance in the field’s practice.The analysis showed that the historical roots and theoretical foundations of social pedagogical thinking and action are very similar in Finland and Sweden but the position of social pedagogy as an academic discipline as well as a

  8. Mortality attributable to tobacco among men in Sweden and other European countries: an analysis of data in a WHO report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramström, Lars; Wikmans, Tom

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that Swedish men have lower tobacco-related mortality than men in other European countries, but there are questions that need further investigation to what extent this is related to the specific patterns of tobacco use in Sweden, where use of snus, the Swedish low-nitrosamine oral tobacco, dominates over smoking in men but not in women. The recent WHO Global Report: Mortality Attributable to Tobacco provides a unique set of estimates of the health burden of tobacco in all countries of the world in the year 2004, and these data can help elucidating the above-mentioned questions. For Sweden and all other European Union Member States mortality data for a number of tobacco-related causes of death were extracted from the WHO Report. The size of the mortality advantage for selected causes of death in different age groups of Swedish men compared to men of the same age in Europe as a whole was calculated in terms of ratios of death rates attributable to tobacco. Differences between age groups with respect to tobacco-related mortality were analyzed with respect to differences in terms of development and status of smoking and snus use. The analyses also paid attention to differences between countries regarding tobacco control regulations. Among men in the European Union Member States the lowest level of mortality attributable to tobacco was consistently found in Sweden, while Swedish women showed levels similar to European average. A strong co-variation was found between the mortality advantage and the degree of dominance of snus use in the different age groups of Swedish men. Among Swedish women there are no age groups with dominant use of snus, and similar observations were therefore not possible for women. The above findings support the assumption that the widespread use of snus instead of cigarettes among Swedish men may be a major part of the explanation behind their position with Europe's lowest mortality attributable to tobacco.

  9. Fissure fillings from Finnsjoen and Studsvik Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullborg, E.-L.; Larsson, S.Aa.

    1982-12-01

    Samples were taken from cores and collected at different levels. The bedrock at Finnsjoen is a Svecokarelian granite-granodiorite, the most frequent mineral in the fissures being calcite. The water from boreholes have a mean S 18 O value of -12 per thousand and saturated by calcite. Isotopically three different groups of calcite have been distinguished. Ages of 29+-13x10 3 years to 79+-25x10 3 years were estimated. Two generations of quartz were recognized the minerals prehnite and lanmontite were found Most fissure filling materials have cation exchange capacities. The bedrock at Studsvik is a Svecokarelian gneiss of sedimentary type which is migmatized with calcite and chlorite as fissure filling minerals. Most fissure fillings are thin and simple Claby minerals of smectite type are also frequent. (G.B.)

  10. Factors associated with the success of rabies vaccination of dogs in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Esteban

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background United Kingdom, Ireland, Malta and Sweden maintain their national provisions for a transitional period regarding rules concerning rabies vaccination and individual serological test for rabies neutralizing antibodies. The purpose of vaccinating dogs against rabies is to establish pre-exposure immunity and protect individual animals from contracting rabies. The aim of the study was to investigate factors associated with reaching the internationally accepted threshold antibody titre of 0.5 IU/mL after rabies vaccination of dogs. Methods The study was a prospective single cohort study including 6,789 samples from Swedish dogs vaccinated with commercially available vaccines in Sweden, and the dog's antibody responses were determined by the OIE approved FAVN test. Information on potential risk factors; breed, age, gender, date of vaccination, vaccine label and the number of vaccinations, was collected for each dog. Associations between the dependent variable, serological response ≥ 0.5 IU/mL or Results Of 6,789 vaccinated dogs, 6,241 (91.9% had an approved test result of ≥ 0.5 IU/mL. The results of the multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that vaccinating with vaccine B reduced the risk of having antibody titres of 5 years of age to have antibody titres of Conclusions The probability of success of rabies vaccinations of dogs depends on type of vaccine used, number of rabies vaccinations, the breed size of the dog, age at vaccination, and number of days after vaccination when the antibody titres are tested. The need for a booster vaccination regimen is recommended for larger breeds of dog.

  11. Incidence of legal abortion in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odlind, V.; Ericson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The number of legal abortions in Sweden increased around the time of the Chernobyl accident, particularly in the summer and autumn of 1986. Although there was no recording of reasons for legal abortions, one might have suspected this increase to be a result of fear and anxiety after the accident. However, seen over a longer time perspective, the increase in the number of abortions started before and continued far beyond the time of the accident. There was also a simultaneous and pronounced increase in the number of births during the years subsequent to the accident. Therefore, it seems unlikely that fear of the consequences of radioactive fall-out after the Chernobyl accident resulted in any substantial increase of the number of legal abortions in Sweden

  12. Ambivalence about Children in the Family Building Process in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sweden provides strong support for childbearing and parenthood, including generously subsidized medical, maternal, and child care, paid parental leave, and child allowances. In this context, attitudes towards parenthood are likely to have a particularly strong impact on the decision about whether and when to have children. We examine the links between first births and holding attitudes about children, not just of positive and negative attitudes, but also of ambivalence, namely those who both value children but also value the things that compete with parenthood for young adults’ time and other resources. Our analysis shows, measuring attitudes before the transition to parenthood, that ambivalence about childbearing delays the transition to parenthood, but not nearly as much as holding purely negative attitudes. Further, reporting an ambivalent experience from the first child had no significant effect on further childbearing, which testifies to the strong two-child norm in Sweden.

  13. A. Butovsky about the system of physical education in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bubka S.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of A. Butovsky's views on the physical education in Sweden, and, first of all, on the system of Swedish gymnastics. Alexey Butovsky got acquainted with it in 1892 while visiting that country on a mission trip, and later he generalized that system in some of his works. Positive and negative points of Swedish physical education, the role of the Royal Gymnastics Central Institute in Stockholm are examined, and some prominent figures of Sweden, who governed it at different periods, are characterized. Aspects of various exercises from this system are accentuated. It is marked that the Swedish gymnastics on the orientation, on principle differed composition of exercises and method of their application from other gymnastic systems in XIX century. It is underlined that exercises of the Swedish gymnastics differ naturalness of poses and motions, absence in them of maximal efforts, hard and rough motions.

  14. Reception and dissemination of American amateur telescope making in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnfelt, Johan

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the appropriation of the American Amateur Telescope Making (ATM) movement in Sweden in the 1940s and 1950s. A key player was the Swedish Astronomical Society, which in 1943, and inspired by the American example, launched a campaign to raise interest in ATM and disseminate the necessary knowledge amongst potential amateur astronomers. The campaign was successful and in just a few years it quadrupled the number of amateurs with access to telescopes. Swedish amateurs kept on building telescopes through the 1950s, but the activities then stalled with the introduction of cheap mass-market telescopes. The appropriation of ATM in Sweden is an important example of how technical innovations have shaped the course of amateur astronomy.

  15. Radioactive waste management in Sweden experiences and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstroem, M.

    1999-01-01

    Since some years, the necessary facilities are in operation in Sweden for the safe transport and storage of radioactive waste and spent fuel from nuclear power production. These include a final repository, SFR, for short-lived low and intermediate level waste, a central interim storage facility, CLAB, for spent fuel and a sea-based transport system. The experiences from the operation of these facilities have generally been very good. The next step is the development of an encapsulation facility and a deep repository for the spent nuclear fuel. R and D-work on direct disposal have been conducted in Sweden for more than 20 years. In the preferred method the spent fuel will be encapsulated in a copper canister with a steel internal structure, and the canister will then be disposed of at about 500 metres depth in the Swedish bedrock. The siting and design of the encapsulation facility and the deep repository is now in progress. (author)

  16. Epidemiology and Ecology of Tularemia in Sweden, 1984–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvars, Amélie; Furberg, Maria; Hjertqvist, Marika; Vidman, Linda; Sjöstedt, Anders; Rydén, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease tularemia is endemic in large areas of the Northern Hemisphere, but research is lacking on patterns of spatial distribution and connections with ecologic factors. To describe the spatial epidemiology of and identify ecologic risk factors for tularemia incidence in Sweden, we analyzed surveillance data collected over 29 years (1984–2012). A total of 4,830 cases were notified, of which 3,524 met all study inclusion criteria. From the first to the second half of the study period, mean incidence increased 10-fold, from 0.26/100,000 persons during 1984–1998 to 2.47/100,000 persons during 1999–2012 (ptularemia was higher than expected in the boreal and alpine ecologic regions (ptularemia in Sweden and illustrate that incidence is higher in locations near lakes and rivers. PMID:25529978

  17. Guide tube support pin experience at Ringhals plant, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, E.

    1984-01-01

    The intention with my presentation is to give an information about how we finally made the decision to make the replacement of Guide Tube Support Pin (GTSP) on unit 3 and how it was done. At the Ringhals Plant in Sweden, there are four units of which three are Westinghouse 3-loop PWR:s. One unit is an ASEA-ATOM BWR. Mainly due to climate reasons with a long and cold winter and switching to electrical heating in Swedish housing, a demand for highest possible availability of electrical power supply during the winter season has become a necessity. Therefore all refueling/maintenance outages for the nuclear units in Sweden are scheduled during the summer months, when also all recognized risks for disturbances during the following operation period have to be eliminated

  18. The MTO concept and organisational learning at Forsmark NPP, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Olle; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2002-01-01

    The term 'MTO' (Man-Technology-Organisation) has been widely used by Swedish utilities and regulators to describe knowledge and analytical techniques that focus on human and organisational factors and their relationship with nuclear safety. MTO was introduced in Sweden after the TMI accident as a concept similar to the 'Human Factors' (HF) concept developed in the USA. It was the intent that the explicit mention of the three interrelated elements in the concept - Man, Technology and Organisation - would stimulate a comprehensive 'system view' on nuclear safety. This view should go beyond a strict technological perspective to recognise and highlight human and organisational factors as important moderators of risk. In retrospect, the MTO concept has been successful in stimulating a socio-technological view of nuclear safety in Sweden - a general trend supported by international developments. A further step along this path has been taken with the LearnSafe project. (author)

  19. Self-rated health and social capital in Iraqi immigrants to Sweden: The MEDIM population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Louise; Lindström, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Poor self-rated health is an estimator of quality of life and a predictor of mortality seldom studied in immigrant populations. This work aimed to study self-rated health in relation to social capital, socioeconomic status, lifestyle and comorbidity in immigrants from Iraq - one of the largest non-European immigrant group in Sweden today - and to compare it with the self-rated health of native Swedes. The study was a cross-sectional population-based study conducted from 2010 to 2012 among citizens of Malmö, Sweden, aged 30-65 years and born in Iraq or Sweden. All participants underwent a health examination and answered questionnaires on self-rated health, social capital, comorbidity, lifestyle and socioeconomic status. In total, 1348 Iraqis and 677 Swedes participated. Poor self-rated health was identified in 43.9% of Iraqis and 21.9% of native Swedes ( psocial capital was highly prevalent in the immigrants. Female gender showed higher odds of poor self-rated health in Iraqis than in Swedes (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.5, p interaction =0.024), independent of other risk factors connected to social capital, socioeconomic status, lifestyle or comorbidity. Although public health initiatives promoting social capital, socioeconomic status and comorbidity in immigrants are crucial, the excess risk of poor self-rated health in Iraqi women is not fully attributed to known risk factors for self-rated health, but remains to be further explored.

  20. Sickness Absence and Precarious Employment: A Comparative Cross-National Study of Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Oke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precarious employment is a major social determinant of health and health inequalities with effects beyond the health of workers. Objective: To investigate the association between precarious employment and sickness absence in 4 Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Methods: Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each country on data from 4186 respondents aged 15–65 years in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden derived from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey. Sickness absence was based on self-reports and defined as absence of seven or more day per year. Precarious employment was operationalized as a multidimensional construct of indicators. Analyses were also conducted separately for men and women. Results: The prevalence of sickness absence was lowest in Sweden (18%, and highest in Finland (28%. 3 precarious employment indicators were positively associated with sickness absence; the pattern being largely similar in the total sample. In the sex-disaggregated sample, 5 precarious employment indicators increased the likelihood of sickness absence; the pattern was heterogeneous, with women generally having significantly higher odds of sickness absence than men. “Low household income” and “sickness presenteeism” were strong predictors of sickness absence among both sexes in most of the 4 studied countries. Sickness absence varied between the Nordic countries in the sex-disaggregated analyses. Conclusion: Precarious employment indicators predicted sickness absence in the Nordic countries. Findings emphasize the need to prioritize informed and monitored collective bargaining for all workers, increase working time flexibility, and improving work conditions.

  1. Sickness Absence and Precarious Employment: A Comparative Cross-National Study of Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, A; Braithwaite, P; Antai, D

    2016-07-01

    Precarious employment is a major social determinant of health and health inequalities with effects beyond the health of workers. To investigate the association between precarious employment and sickness absence in 4 Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each country on data from 4186 respondents aged 15-65 years in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden derived from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey. Sickness absence was based on self-reports and defined as absence of seven or more day per year. Precarious employment was operationalized as a multidimensional construct of indicators. Analyses were also conducted separately for men and women. The prevalence of sickness absence was lowest in Sweden (18%), and highest in Finland (28%). 3 precarious employment indicators were positively associated with sickness absence; the pattern being largely similar in the total sample. In the sex-disaggregated sample, 5 precarious employment indicators increased the likelihood of sickness absence; the pattern was heterogeneous, with women generally having significantly higher odds of sickness absence than men. "Low household income" and "sickness presenteeism" were strong predictors of sickness absence among both sexes in most of the 4 studied countries. Sickness absence varied between the Nordic countries in the sex-disaggregated analyses. Precarious employment indicators predicted sickness absence in the Nordic countries. Findings emphasize the need to prioritize informed and monitored collective bargaining for all workers, increase working time flexibility, and improving work conditions.

  2. Japanese Mobile Phone Usage in Sweden - Technological and Social Prerequisites

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Susanne; Hillerdal, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Japan is an advanced country when it comes to mobile phone technology. This thesis firstly investigates the mobile phone usage in Japan. Secondly it describes the prerequisites for implementation of some distinguished Japanese mobile phone functions in Sweden. This is done from a social as well as a technological aspect. The Japanese mobile phone usage is investigated on three levels; governmental, industrial and consumer. The governmental level is characterised by an ICT policy which strives...

  3. The Rise of the Nuclear System of Innovation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonter, Thomas; Fjaestad, Maja

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. Firstly, the ambition is to analyze the role of the government in relation to private industry in the development of the nuclear power infrastructure in Sweden in the period of 1945-1970. Secondly, the purpose is to account for what was actually made in terms of education, research and financial funding in 'the Swedish line' and to assess its importance for the swift take over by the light water reactor system

  4. Training and accreditation for radon professionals in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Radon training courses and seminars on radon have been arranged in Sweden since the early 1980s. A commercial educational company initiated the first regular training courses in 1987. Up to 1990 about 400 persons had attended courses in radon measurement and radon mitigation methods. In 1991 the training programme was taken over by the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SSI. Today SSI's Radon Training Programme comprises three different two-day courses, a Basic Radon Course and two continuation courses: Radon Measurements and Radon in Water. Until 2003 SSI also arranged courses about Radon Remedial Measures and Radon Investigation and Risk Map Production. The courses are arranged twice a year. Altogether, about 750 municipal environmental health officers and technicians from private companies have been educated in the SSI training programme between 1991 and 2003. The continuation courses are completed with an examination, consisting of a theoretical test. The names of the persons who pass are being published in a list that is found on the SSI web site. Since no certification system is currently in place for radon professionals in Sweden, this list helps people who need to get in contact with radon counsellors to find one in their area and is used by authorities as well as private house-owners. Since 1991 it has been possible to obtain accreditation for measurements of indoor radon in Sweden and since 1997, also for measurements of radon in water. Although accreditation is voluntary in Sweden, accredited laboratories perform most measurements, both for indoor air and water. Passing the examination in the SSI training courses is a condition for accreditation. The Swedish Board for Accreditation and Conformity Assessment, SWEDAC, is in charge of the accreditation. So far, three major companies have obtained accreditation for measurement of indoor radon and four have been accredited for measurements of radon in water

  5. The sensitivity of snowfall to weather states over Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, Lars; Devasthale, Abhay; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2017-09-01

    For a high-latitude country like Sweden snowfall is an important contributor to the regional water cycle. Furthermore, snowfall impacts surface properties, affects atmospheric thermodynamics, has implications for traffic and logistics management, disaster preparedness, and also impacts climate through changes in surface albedo and turbulent heat fluxes. For Sweden it has been shown that large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, or weather states, are important for precipitation variability. Although the link between atmospheric circulation patterns and precipitation has been investigated for rainfall there are no studies focused on the sensitivity of snowfall to weather states over Sweden.In this work we investigate the response of snowfall to eight selected weather states. These weather states consist of four dominant wind directions together with cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation patterns and enhanced positive and negative phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The presented analysis is based on multiple data sources, such as ground-based radar measurements, satellite observations, spatially interpolated in situ observations, and reanalysis data. The data from these sources converge to underline the sensitivity of falling snow over Sweden to the different weather states.In this paper we examine both average snowfall intensities and snowfall accumulations associated with the different weather states. It is shown that, even though the heaviest snowfall intensities occur during conditions with winds from the south-west, the largest contribution to snowfall accumulation arrives with winds from the south-east. Large differences in snowfall due to variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation are shown as well as a strong effect of cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation patterns. Satellite observations are used to reveal the vertical structures of snowfall during the different weather states.

  6. Majority versus Minority: ‘Governmentality’ and Muslims in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sofie Roald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the Muslim community in Sweden in view of the majority–minority dynamics with focus on how values, attitudes, behaviors, and practices of the Swedish majority influence Muslim minority communities and how majority society’s approach to Muslims and Islam influences both the relationship Muslims have with non-Muslims and the understandings that Muslims have of Islam.

  7. Preliminary study of the heating market in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The successive deregulation of the market for electric power, in Sweden as well as abroad, results in an increased competition in generation and trade of electricity. This market that previously was known for its oligopoly in the production sector and its monopoly in the distribution sector has now been opened for competition. This study is focused on the district heating sector, because it is still comparatively unregulated, and because it partly comprises what is called natural monopolies

  8. Establishment and early management of Populus species in southern Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Mc Carthy, Rebecka

    2016-01-01

    Populus species are among the most productive tree species in Sweden. Interest in growing them has increased during the 21st century due to political goals to increase the share of renewable energy and to increase the proportion of hardwood species in forests. Populus species have been shown to be potentially profitable, but currently they are mostly planted on abandoned agricultural land. There is a lack of knowledge about the establishment of Populus species on forest sites. There is also a...

  9. Female labour force participation, fertility and public policy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, M; Stafford, F P

    1992-01-01

    2nd only to Ireland in total fertility, Sweden has the highest total fertility (TFR) and female labor force participation rates (FLFPR) among European countries in the late 1980s and early 1990s. 1988 TFR and FLFPR were 1.96 and 80.1%, respectively. This paper considers the role of public policy in creating this unique trend, with particular focus on family leave policy. In 1974, Sweden became the 1st country to allow leave to both parents following childbirth. By 1990, leave duration had grown from an initial 6-month period to 15 months. In addition, subsidized day care, flexible working hours, and economic support to families with children is provided in the context of a family-supportive tax structure. While generous, benefits are related to work and income history. Labor income is replaced at 90% of gross earnings, while the unemployed receive only minimal taxable flat payments. Benefits overall are paid from general taxes. Given that benefits reflect job history and income, and income level tends to rise fastest in the initial stages of employment, women in Sweden postpone childbirth in order to realize wage increases and greater job standing over the short- to medium-terms. In sum, Sweden's policies stimulate both fertility and women's paid work by reducing the costs of having children while requiring parents to be employed to receive full benefits. This paper further reviews the development of parental leave and related policies and compares Swedish fertility, female labor force participation, and parental leave benefits to those of countries in the European Community.

  10. Impact of energy-saving information in Sweden. [Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byman, D; Furubo, J E

    1980-02-01

    Energy conservation is a central part of Sweden's national energy policy. It represents an important means of attaining the goals that have been set for this policy: (1) safeguarding sources of supply; (2) curbing energy-transformation effects and reinforcing safety measures; and (3) freedom of action and flexibility. Government measures, public-information activities, and the help of many organizations in accomplishing the goals are emphasized here.

  11. Breast cancer diagnosis and mortality by tumor stage and migration background in a nationwide cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Gholamreza; Bottai, Matteo; Sandelin, Kerstin; Moradi, Tahereh

    2017-02-01

    Survival in breast cancer patients has steadily increased over the years, but with considerable disparities between individuals with different migration background and social position. We explored differences in diagnosis and all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients by stage of disease at the time of diagnosis and by country of birth, while considering the effect of comorbidity, regional and socio-demographic factors. We used Swedish national registers to follow a cohort of 35,268 patients (4232 foreign-born) with breast cancer between 2004 and 2009 in Sweden. We estimated relative risk ratio (RRR) for diagnosis, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality and relative excess rate (RER) for breast cancer mortality using multinomial logistic regression models, multivariable Cox proportional hazard, and Poisson regression, respectively. We observed 4178 deaths due to any causes. Among them 418 women were born abroad. Foreign-born patients were on average 3 years younger at the time of breast cancer diagnosis and had higher risk of stage II tumors compared with Sweden-born women (RRR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.19). Risk of dying was 20% higher in foreign-born compared with Sweden-born breast cancer patients, if the tumor was diagnosed at stages III-IV after adjustment for age at diagnosis, education, county of residence and Charlson's comorbidity index (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.95-1.51 and RER = 1.21, 95% CI 0.95-1.55). The worse prognosis in foreign-born patients with advanced tumors compared with Sweden-born patients is not explained by educational level or comorbidity. The reasons behind the observed disparities should be further studied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidemiology of Chronic Pain in Denmark and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Harker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Estimates on the epidemiology of chronic pain vary widely throughout Europe. It is unclear whether this variation reflects true differences between populations or methodological factors. Information on the epidemiology of chronic pain can support decision makers in allocating adequate health care resources. Methods. In order to obtain epidemiological data on chronic pain in Denmark and Sweden, we conducted a literature review of epidemiological data primarily on chronic noncancer pain, prioritising studies of highest quality, recency, and validity by conducting a systematic search for relevant studies. Following quality assessment, data were summarised and assigned to the research questions. Results. The prevalence of moderate to severe noncancer pain was estimated at 16% in Denmark and 18% in Sweden. Chronic pain impacts negatively on perceived health status, quality of life and is associated with increased cost. Despite using pain medications, a large proportion of chronic pain sufferers have inadequate pain control. There was a lack of high-quality and low-bias studies with clear inclusion criteria. Conclusions. In both Denmark and Sweden, chronic pain is a common health problem which is potentially undertreated and warrants attention of health care workers, policy makers and researchers. Future research should utilise clear reporting guidelines to assist decision and policy makers, in this important area.

  13. Long term health effects in Sweden from the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, R; Mellander, H; Moberg, L; Edvardson, K; Nyblom, L [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    The morning of 28 April 1986 was the beginning of an intensive period of radiation protection work in Sweden. During that morning the Chernobyl accident became known in the western world through the detection of radioactive contamination in Sweden and at the Forsmark nuclear power plant in particular. The environmental consequences of the fallout have been studied in various research projects. The effects on agriculture in Sweden was mainly limited to the first year after the accident. The long term effects are instead seen in products from the semi-natural ecosystems: in moose, roedeer, reindeer, mushrooms and fish from lakes in areas with a high deposition of radioactive caesium. High concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in reindeer meat in combination with an estimated effective ecological half-life of about 4 years, will cause problems for reindeer husbandry in the most contaminated parts for many years to come. In moose, roedeer and mushrooms, the ecological half-lives are very long and in some compartments seem to approach the physical half-life of {sup 137}Cs. 22 refs, 3 figs.

  14. Long term health effects in Sweden from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, R.; Mellander, H.; Moberg, L.; Edvardson, K.; Nyblom, L.

    1997-01-01

    The morning of 28 April 1986 was the beginning of an intensive period of radiation protection work in Sweden. During that morning the Chernobyl accident became known in the western world through the detection of radioactive contamination in Sweden and at the Forsmark nuclear power plant in particular. The environmental consequences of the fallout have been studied in various research projects. The effects on agriculture in Sweden was mainly limited to the first year after the accident. The long term effects are instead seen in products from the semi-natural ecosystems: in moose, roedeer, reindeer, mushrooms and fish from lakes in areas with a high deposition of radioactive caesium. High concentrations of 137 Cs in reindeer meat in combination with an estimated effective ecological half-life of about 4 years, will cause problems for reindeer husbandry in the most contaminated parts for many years to come. In moose, roedeer and mushrooms, the ecological half-lives are very long and in some compartments seem to approach the physical half-life of 137 Cs. 22 refs, 3 figs

  15. The sacred foodscapes of Thai Buddhist temples in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Plank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thai Buddhist communities are by far the fastest-growing Buddhist establishments in Sweden, and – contrary to other Buddhist congregations that are mainly clustered in the cities – Thai Buddhist temples can be found in sparsely-populated areas and rural parts of Sweden. This article aims to document and analyse the ‘foodscape’ of diasporic Thai Buddhism in Sweden. In particular the article identifies and discusses five different strategies used by local communities- in order to support their temples in urban as well as rural areas: 1 local support, 2 pre-cooking and freezing, 3 pre-organised almsgiving in nearby cities, 4 change of food gifts, 5 change of the nikaya. A temple’s location in a rural area can drive forward a reinterpretation and adaptation of the monk’s rules, and contribute to a changing composition of food gifts. Food performs several functions. In addition to the religious functions that are associated with almsgiving, food can also serve as a means of generating bonding and bridging civic social capital, and providing economic income to temples.

  16. Assessment of soil acidification effects on forest growth in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdrup, H.; Warfvinge, P.; Nihlgaard, B.

    1994-01-01

    The results of mapping critical loads, areas where they have been exceeded and steady state (Ca+Mg+K)/Al ratios of soils in Sweden, has been used to assess the order of magnitude of the ecological and economic risks involved with acid deposition for Swedish forests. The results of the calculations indicate that 81% of the Swedish forested area received acid deposition in excess of the critical load at present. Under continued deposition at 1990 level, forest die-back is predicted to occur on approximately 1% of the forested area, and significant growth rate reductions are predicted for 80% of the Swedish forested area. For Sweden, growth losses in the order of 17.5 million m -3 yr -1 are predicted, equivalent to approximately 19% of current growth. Comparable losses can be predicted for other Nordic countries. The soil acidification situation is predicted to deteriorate significantly during the next 5-15 years, unless rapid emission reductions can be achieved. A minimum deposition reduction over Sweden of 95% on sulphur deposition and 30% on the N deposition in relation to 1990 level is required in order to protect 95% of the Swedish forest ecosystems from adverse effects of acidification. A minimum reduction of 60% on sulphur deposition and 30% on the N deposition is required to keep forest harvest at planned levels. 148 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Differences in socioeconomic and gender inequalities in tobacco smoking in Denmark and Sweden; a cross sectional comparison of the equity effect of different public health policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eek, Frida; Ôstergren, Per-Olof; Diderichsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Denmark and Sweden are considered to be countries of rather similar socio-political type, but public health policies and smoking habits differ considerably between the two neighbours. A study comparing mechanisms behind socioeconomic inequalities in tobacco smoking, could yield...... information regarding the impact of health policy and -promotion in the two countries. Methods Cross-sectional comparisons of socioeconomic and gender differences in smoking behaviour among 6 995 Danish and 13 604 Swedish persons aged 18-80 years. Results The prevalence of smoking was higher in Denmark......, these differences were modified by gender and age. As a general pattern, socioeconomic differences in Sweden tended to contribute more to the total burden of this habit among women, especially in the younger age groups. In men, the patterns were much more similar between the two countries. Regarding continued...

  18. Fissure fillings from Gideaa, central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullborg, E.L.; Larsson, S.Aa.

    1983-08-01

    The most frequent fissure filling minerals at Gideaa are calcite, chlorite, pyrite, laumontite, stilbite, smectite, quartz and epidote. Potentially young minerals, i.e. minerals which can be formed during present conditions, are smectite, calcite and quartz, Equilibrium calculations show that these minerals can be stable in the water analysed from Gideaa. In borehole Gi 2, the water exhibits a greater equilibrium with existing minerals in the fissures than water from Gi 4. This is due to the recharge of the water in Gi 4 and discharge of the water in Gi 2. When carbonate saturated water penetrated through the bedrock, calcite precipitated within the more superficial portions of the rock. However, both calcite and zeolite fissures fillings are associated with certain zones in the drill holes. A large number of fractures can be concluded to be of post-Jotnian age. Stilbite, calcite and smectite are associated with these fractures. Laumontite can also be assumed to belong here. The dolerites in the area exhibit a high fracture frequency but a relatively low hydraulic conductivity. This is due to the fact that smectite is very prevalent in the dolerite fractures, Several generations of fracturefilling minerals (above all calcite) have been found in a single fracture. Stable isotope analyses of fissure filling calcites indicate that there are three different groups of calcite. Most of the calcites could not have been precipitated from water of present-day isotope composition at Gideaa, whereas recent calcite may be found in one of the groups. Another group of calcite was precipitated during hydro-thermal conditions.(author)

  19. Prevalence and sensitization of atopic allergy and coeliac disease in the Northern Sweden Population Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Enroth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atopic allergy is effected by a number of environmental exposures, such as dry air and time spent outdoors, but there are few estimates of the prevalence in populations from sub-arctic areas. Objective. To determine the prevalence and severity of symptoms of food, inhalation and skin-related allergens and coeliac disease (CD in the sub-arctic region of Sweden. To study the correlation between self-reported allergy and allergy test results. To estimate the heritability of these estimates. Study design. The study was conducted in Karesuando and Soppero in Northern Sweden as part of the Northern Sweden Population Health Study (n=1,068. We used a questionnaire for self-reported allergy and CD status and measured inhalation-related allergens using Phadiatop, food-related allergens using the F×5 assay and IgA and IgG antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG to indicate prevalence of CD. Results. The prevalence of self-reported allergy was very high, with 42.3% reporting mild to severe allergy. Inhalation-related allergy was reported in 26.7%, food-related allergy in 24.9% and skin-related allergy in 2.4% of the participants. Of inhalation-related allergy, 11.0% reported reactions against fur and 14.6% against pollen/grass. Among food-related reactions, 14.9% reported milk (protein and lactose as the cause. The IgE measurements showed that 18.4% had elevated values for inhalation allergens and 11.7% for food allergens. Self-reported allergies and symptoms were positively correlated (p<0.01 with age- and sex-corrected inhalation allergens. Allergy prevalence was inversely correlated with age and number of hours spent outdoors. High levels of IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies, CD-related allergens, were found in 1.4 and 0.6% of participants, respectively. All allergens were found to be significantly (p<3e–10 heritable, with estimated heritabilities ranging from 0.34 (F×5 to 0.65 (IgA. Conclusions. Self-reported allergy

  20. Cancer incidence in northern Sweden before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Tondel, Martin; Walinder, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Sweden received about 5 % of the total release of (137)Cs from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. The distribution of the fallout mainly affected northern Sweden, where some parts of the population could have received an estimated annual effective dose of 1-2 mSv per year. It is disputed whether an increased incidence of cancer can be detected in epidemiological studies after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident outside the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. In the present paper, a possible exposure-response pattern between deposition of (137)Cs and cancer incidence after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident was investigated in the nine northernmost counties of Sweden (2.2 million inhabitants in 1986). The activity of (137)Cs from the fallout maps at 1986 was used as a proxy for the received dose of ionizing radiation. Diagnoses of cancer (ICD-7 code 140-209) from 1980 to 2009 were received from the Swedish Cancer Registry (273,222 cases). Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios, stratified by gender, were calculated with Poisson regression in two closed cohorts of the population in the nine counties 1980 and 1986, respectively. The follow-up periods were 1980-1985 and 1986-2009, respectively. The average surface-weighted deposition of (137)Cs at three geographical levels; county (n = 9), municipality (n = 95) and parish level (n = 612) was applied for the two cohorts to study the pre- and the post-Chernobyl periods separately. To analyze time trends, the age-standardized total cancer incidence was calculated for the general Swedish population and the population in the nine counties. Joinpoint regression was used to compare the average annual percent change in the general population and the study population within each gender. No obvious exposure-response pattern was seen in the age-adjusted total cancer incidence rate ratios. A spurious association between fallout and cancer incidence was present, where areas with the

  1. Cancer incidence in northern Sweden before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Tondel, Martin; Walinder, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sweden received about 5 % of the total release of "1"3"7Cs from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. The distribution of the fallout mainly affected northern Sweden, where some parts of the population could have received an estimated annual effective dose of 1-2 mSv per year. It is disputed whether an increased incidence of cancer can be detected in epidemiological studies after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident outside the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. In the present paper, a possible exposure-response pattern between deposition of "1"3"7Cs and cancer incidence after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident was investigated in the nine northernmost counties of Sweden (2.2 million inhabitants in 1986). The activity of "1"3"7Cs from the fallout maps at 1986 was used as a proxy for the received dose of ionizing radiation. Diagnoses of cancer (ICD-7 code 140-209) from 1980 to 2009 were received from the Swedish Cancer Registry (273,222 cases). Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios, stratified by gender, were calculated with Poisson regression in two closed cohorts of the population in the nine counties 1980 and 1986, respectively. The follow-up periods were 1980-1985 and 1986-2009, respectively. The average surface-weighted deposition of "1"3"7Cs at three geographical levels; county (n = 9), municipality (n = 95) and parish level (n = 612) was applied for the two cohorts to study the pre- and the post-Chernobyl periods separately. To analyze time trends, the age-standardized total cancer incidence was calculated for the general Swedish population and the population in the nine counties. Joinpoint regression was used to compare the average annual percent change in the general population and the study population within each gender. No obvious exposure-response pattern was seen in the age-adjusted total cancer incidence rate ratios. A spurious association between fallout and cancer incidence was present, where areas with the lowest

  2. Cancer incidence in northern Sweden before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Tondel, Martin; Walinder, Robert [Uppsala University, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    Sweden received about 5 % of the total release of {sup 137}Cs from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. The distribution of the fallout mainly affected northern Sweden, where some parts of the population could have received an estimated annual effective dose of 1-2 mSv per year. It is disputed whether an increased incidence of cancer can be detected in epidemiological studies after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident outside the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. In the present paper, a possible exposure-response pattern between deposition of {sup 137}Cs and cancer incidence after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident was investigated in the nine northernmost counties of Sweden (2.2 million inhabitants in 1986). The activity of {sup 137}Cs from the fallout maps at 1986 was used as a proxy for the received dose of ionizing radiation. Diagnoses of cancer (ICD-7 code 140-209) from 1980 to 2009 were received from the Swedish Cancer Registry (273,222 cases). Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios, stratified by gender, were calculated with Poisson regression in two closed cohorts of the population in the nine counties 1980 and 1986, respectively. The follow-up periods were 1980-1985 and 1986-2009, respectively. The average surface-weighted deposition of {sup 137}Cs at three geographical levels; county (n = 9), municipality (n = 95) and parish level (n = 612) was applied for the two cohorts to study the pre- and the post-Chernobyl periods separately. To analyze time trends, the age-standardized total cancer incidence was calculated for the general Swedish population and the population in the nine counties. Joinpoint regression was used to compare the average annual percent change in the general population and the study population within each gender. No obvious exposure-response pattern was seen in the age-adjusted total cancer incidence rate ratios. A spurious association between fallout and cancer incidence was present, where areas with

  3. Policy instruments for development of wind power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aastrand, Kerstin; Neij, Lena

    2003-01-01

    It is often believed that energy policy and policy instruments can play a significant role in the transition towards sustainable energy by stimulating and accelerating the development and deployment of new energy technologies. However, despite the known need for, and benefits of, new energy technologies their market introduction and expansion is often slow. Wind power has been on the political agenda since the 1970s in several European countries as well as in other countries throughout the world. However, the technology and market development of wind power has been very different in these countries. Despite three decades of policy intervention the installed capacity in Sweden was only 265 MW in 2000, compared with 6,107 MW in Germany, 2,836 MW in Spain and 2,341 MW in Denmark. This report analyses the effects of policy instruments on wind power development in Sweden and identifies possible reasons why wind power has not been installed to a greater extent. The analysis is based on an empirical example of a socio technological system-based approach to evaluation of technology and market development for new energy technologies; i.e. an approach focused on the technological system including the actors, institutions and organizations that build, drive and utilise it and the economic and legal framework that regulates it. The aim is to assess the impact on technology and market development and to discuss the relatively late and slow wind power development in Sweden. The report also examines the achievement of governmental energy policy goals. Using the socio-technological systems approach we analyse Swedish policy programmes and wind power development between 1975 and 2000. The political and economic framework is identified. The discussion of the political and economic frameworks is limited to public policy goals and policy instruments. The policy focus is set to policy instruments aimed for technology and market development of wind power, such as research and

  4. Cohort Profile: the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Wigertz, Annette; Sandin, Fredrik; Garmo, Hans; Hellström, Karin; Fransson, Per; Widmark, Anders; Lambe, Mats; Adolfsson, Jan; Varenhorst, Eberhard; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Stattin, Pär

    2013-08-01

    In 1987, the first Regional Prostate Cancer Register was set up in the South-East health-care region of Sweden. Other health-care regions joined and since 1998 virtually all prostate cancer (PCa) cases are registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) of Sweden to provide data for quality assurance, bench marking and clinical research. NPCR includes data on tumour stage, Gleason score, serum level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and primary treatment. In 2008, the NPCR was linked to a number of other population-based registers by use of the personal identity number. This database named Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) has now been extended with more cases, longer follow-up and a selection of two control series of men free of PCa at the time of sampling, as well as information on brothers of men diagnosed with PCa, resulting in PCBaSe 2.0. This extension allows for studies with case-control, cohort or longitudinal case-only design on aetiological factors, pharmaceutical prescriptions and assessment of long-term outcomes. The NPCR covers >96% of all incident PCa cases registered by the Swedish Cancer Register, which has an underreporting of <3.7%. The NPCR is used to assess trends in incidence, treatment and outcome of men with PCa. Since the national registers linked to PCBaSe are complete, studies from PCBaSe 2.0 are truly population based.

  5. Oil and Gas Emergency Policy: Sweden 2012 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Oil and natural gas represented respectively 27% and 3% of Sweden’s total primary energy supply (TPES) in 2010. With coal representing 5% of TPES, Sweden has the lowest share of fossil fuels in the energy supply mix among IEA member countries. This is a significant difference from the mid-1970s, when fossil fuels made up three-quarters of Sweden’s energy supply, and is the result of a concerted effort to move away from the use of oil through the development of nuclear and renewable energy sources. Sweden’s energy policy seeks to further increase the share of renewable energy sources, including having them provide half of all energy, and 10% of all transport needs, by 2020. The share of fossil fuel is also to be further reduced, through plans to fully eliminate their use for heating purposes by 2020 and having a vehicle stock in Sweden that is ''independent'' of fossil fuels by 2030. Under this policy, demand for both oil and natural gas is anticipated to decline from current levels. Oil demand in Sweden was nearly 330 thousand barrels per day (kb/d) in 2011. While fully dependent on imports to meet domestic oil demand, Sweden is a net exporter of refined oil products. Overall oil demand will likely decline in the coming decade, however demand for oil in the transport sector is expected to grow. At the same time, oil demand will be ever more concentrated on transport diesel, with demand for the fuel reaching over 110 kb/d by 2020 compared to just under 80 kb/d in 2011. Concerning natural gas, consumption in Sweden totalled 1.3 billion cubic metres (bcm) in 2011, all of which was supplied via a single interconnector with Denmark. While natural gas plays only a minor role in Sweden’s TPES, its role in the energy supply of southern and western Sweden is much more substantial, accounting for around 20% of the area’s total energy use. Around 30 large consumers, including CHP plants, account for roughly 80% of total gas demand in the country

  6. The geomorphic impact of glaciers as indicated by tors in North Sweden (Aurivaara, 68° N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marie-Françoise

    2004-02-01

    Geomorphological investigations carried out on 15 tor-like features located on the Aurivaara plateau (North Sweden, 68° N) provide new insights in the greatly debated age of these landforms. Erratics and till trapped deep in the tor joints support a pre-Weichselian age for tor formation. Moreover, the occurrence of various weathering stages in allochtonous material, the joint width up to 1.5 m (requiring long-term weathering), and the frequent association of tors with pediment-like forms, suggest pre-Quaternary tor formation. The juxtaposition of fresh erratics and in situ old weathering features (mushroom rocks, concentrically weathered well-rounded corestones, and grus) indicates a predominantly cold-based regime for the Scandinavian ice sheet, with erratics carried by the overlying moving ice being repeatedly deposited on tor summits during deglaciation phases. The relationships between tors and ice action indicated for the Aurivaara plateau result in the proposal of a morphodynamical succession of five tor subtypes ranging from the preservation of well-rounded corestones still embedded in grus (suggesting negligible glacial erosion) to the almost complete removal of tor features by ice scouring. A comparison with tors in similar geological and topographical contexts from the unglaciated Dartmoor area allows a tentative evaluation of an average overall glacial erosion of 0-10 m on the northern Sweden plateaus, in sharp contrast with the 190 m overdeepening of the nearby Torneträsk basin. Thus, this case study of Swedish tors provides additional support to the recent interpretations of relict landscapes in previously glaciated areas and is in accordance with the classical «model» of glacial selective erosion established in the Nordic and Arctic mountains.

  7. Socio-economic status and overall and cause-specific mortality in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundquist Jan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported discrepancies in cause-specific mortality among groups of individuals with different socio-economic status. However, most of the studies were limited by the specificity of the investigated populations and the broad definitions of the causes of death. The aim of the present population-based study was to explore the dependence of disease specific mortalities on the socio-economic status in Sweden, a country with universal health care. Another aim was to investigate possible gender differences. Methods Using the 2006 update of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified over 2 million individuals with socio-economic data recorded in the 1960 national census. The association between mortality and socio-economic status was investigated by Cox's proportional hazards models taking into account the age, time period and residential area in both men and women, and additionally parity and age at first birth in women. Results We observed significant associations between socio-economic status and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, to cancer and to endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases. The influence of socio-economic status on female breast cancer was markedly specific: women with a higher socio-economic status showed increased mortality due to breast cancer. Conclusion Even in Sweden, a country where health care is universally provided, higher socio-economic status is associated with decreased overall and cause-specific mortalities. Comparison of mortality among female and male socio-economic groups may provide valuable insights into the underlying causes of socio-economic inequalities in length of life.

  8. Inequality in oral health related to early and later life social conditions: a study of elderly in Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülcan, Ferda; Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven; Lie, Stein Atle; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2015-02-10

    A life course perspective recognizes influences of socially patterned exposures on oral health across the life span. This study assessed the influence of early and later life social conditions on tooth loss and oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) of people aged 65 and 70 years. Whether social inequalities in oral health changed after the usual age of retirement was also examined. In accordance with "the latent effect life course model", it was hypothesized that adverse early-life social conditions increase the risk of subsequent tooth loss and impaired OIDP, independent of later-life social conditions. Data were obtained from two cohorts studies conducted in Sweden and Norway. The 2007 and 2012 waves of the surveys were used for the present study. Early-life social conditions were measured in terms of gender, education and country of birth, and later-life social conditions were assessed by working status, marital status and size of social network. Logistic regression and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to analyse the data. Inverse probability weighting (IPW) was used to adjust estimates for missing responses and loss to follow-up. Early-life social conditions contributed to tooth loss and OIDP in each survey year and both countries independent of later-life social conditions. Lower education correlated positively with tooth loss, but did not influence OIDP. Foreign country of birth correlated positively with oral impacts in Sweden only. Later-life social conditions were the strongest predictors of tooth loss and OIDP across survey years and countries. GEE revealed significant interactions between social network and survey year, and between marital status and survey year on tooth loss. The results confirmed the latent effect life course model in that early and later life social conditions had independent effects on tooth loss and OIDP among the elderly in Norway and Sweden. Between age 65 and 70, inequalities in tooth loss related to marital

  9. The changing structure and tree composition in the traditionally grazed forests in the parish of Stenbrohult, southern Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Sven

    2006-01-01

    The formerly grazed forest (utmark) was the dominant land use on most farms in southern Sweden until about 100 years ago. Here I describe the changed structure and tree species composition over time of the utmark on three farms owned by the church in the central part of Stenbrohult. In this area Carl Linnaeus spent his first 20 summers until 1728. The study is based on old forest management plans, other old documents, published and unpublished pollen analyses from 3 small bogs, tree ages on a...

  10. Outbreak of enterovirus D68 of the new B3 lineage in Stockholm, Sweden, August to September 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrdak, Robert; Grabbe, Malin; Hammas, Berit; Ekwall, Jonas; Hansson, Karin E; Luthander, Joachim; Naucler, Pontus; Reinius, Henrik; Rotzén-Östlund, Maria; Albert, Jan

    2016-11-17

    We report an enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) outbreak in Stockholm Sweden in 2016. Between 22 August and 25 September EV-D68 was detected in 74/495 respiratory samples analysed at the Karolinska University Hospital. During the peak week, 30/91 (33%) samples were EV-D68 positive. Viral protein (VP)P4/VP2 sequencing revealed that cases were caused by B3 lineage strains. Forty-four (59%) EV-D68-positive patients were children aged ≤ 5 years. Ten patients had severe respiratory or neurological symptoms and one died. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  11. Mental health symptoms in relation to socio-economic conditions and lifestyle factors ? a population-based study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Molarius, Anu; Berglund, Kenneth; Eriksson, Charli; Eriksson, Hans G; Lind?n-Bostr?m, Margareta; Nordstr?m, Eva; Persson, Carina; Sahlqvist, Lotta; Starrin, Bengt; Ydreborg, Berit

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Poor mental health has large social and economic consequences both for the individual and society. In Sweden, the prevalence of mental health symptoms has increased since the beginning of the 1990s. There is a need for a better understanding of the area for planning preventive activities and health care. Methods The study is based on a postal survey questionnaire sent to a random sample of men and women aged 18–84 years in 2004. The overall response rate was 64%. The area ...

  12. Autumn phenology and morphometrics in the Garden Warbler Sylvia borin at the Ottenby Bird Observatory, Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwajomo, Soladoye B.; Hedenström, Anders; Ottosson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    not significantly vary over the years. Median passage dates were 24 August, 30 August and 2 September for adults, juveniles and birds of unknown age, respectively. Median passage did not change significantly over the years. Among adults, larger individuals passed the observatory earlier than smaller individuals......Trapping and ringing near ecological barriers can provide useful information about the migration strategies of bird species. In this paper we analyzed ringing data of the Garden Warbler, collected within the period of 1950-2008 at the Ottenby Bird Observatory, south-eastern Sweden, and describe...

  13. Total Stem and Merchantable Volume Equations of Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) Growing on Former Farmland in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Tord

    2014-01-01

    An equation was constructed to estimate the stem volume of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in 145 stands growing on former farmland in Sweden (Latitude 56-63 degrees N). The mean total age was 40 +/- 13 (range 17-91) years, the mean diameter at breast height (ob) was 15 +/- 4 (range 5-27) cm and the mean density was 1621 +/- 902 (range 100-7600) stems ha(-1). The equation which fits the data best used the diameter at breast height and total stem height as predictive variables. Merchan...

  14. Importance of participation rate in sampling of data in population based studies, with special reference to bone mass in Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Düppe, H; Gärdsell, P; Hanson, B S; Johnell, O; Nilsson, B E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of participation rate in sampling on "normative" bone mass data. DESIGN: This was a comparison between two randomly selected samples from the same population. The participation rates in the two samples were 61.9% and 83.6%. Measurements were made of bone mass at different skeletal sites and of muscle strength, as well as an assessment of physical activity. SETTING: Malmö, Sweden. SUBJECTS: There were 230 subjects (117 men, 113 women), aged 21 to 42 years. RESUL...

  15. Biology and distribution of chafers (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) living in hollow trees in Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Sven; Baranowski, Rickard; Hedin, Jonas; Jansson, Niklas; Ranius, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We review the ecology and distributions of the chafers Liocola marmorata (F.), Gnorimus nobilis (L.) and Gnorimus variabilis (L.) in Sweden based on museum and several large private collections. These species live in hollow deciduous trees, in Sweden especially in oaks. The former and recently documented localities are shown on maps. More than 100 years ago, all the species as well as their habitats were more common in Sweden than today. One problem when interpreting old finds is that hollow ...

  16. Concentrations of base cations, phosphorous and nitrogen in tree stumps in Sweden, Finland and Denmark; Halter av baskatjoner, fosfor och kvaeve i stubbar i Sverige, Finland och Danmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsten, Sofie; Waengberg, Ingvar (The Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)); Helmisaari, Heljae-Sisko; Kaakinen, Seija; Kukkola, Mikko; Saarsalmi, Anna (Metla, Vantaa (Finland)); Melin, Ylva; Petersson, Hans (Swedish Univ. of Agriculture, Umeaa (Sweden)); Skovsgaard, Jens Peter (Forest and Landscape Denmark, Univ. of Copenhagen, Hoersholm (Denmark)); Akselsson, Cecilia (Lunds Univ., Lund (Sweden))

    2009-05-15

    Stump removal is becoming increasingly important in as demand for renewable energy is increasing. Nutrient concentrations in stumps are applied when evaluating the environmental effect of stump removal on acidification and nutrient balances in forest soil. The objectives of this study was to evaluate concentrations of nutrients in stumps in Sweden, Finland and Denmark, and to evaluate how nutrient concentrations vary with site characteristics, stand age and deposition level. Concentrations of N, P, Ca, K, Mg and Na in spruce, pine and birch stumps were assessed in eight sites across Scandinavia. The results of this study indicate that the concentration of nutrients are higher in birch stumps compared with spruce and pine. In Sweden and Finland, the nutrient concentrations were generally higher in the southern sites compared with northern sites in the country, except for P. Nutrient concentrations were significantly higher in the bark of the stump and the roots compared to the wood for all nutrients. Furthermore nutrients concentration increased significantly with decreasing root diameter. In Jaedraaas, Sweden, nutrient concentration of N, K, Mg and P in pine decreased with age of the stump harvested tree, for stumps < 65 years. This relation was not evident for other age spans or sites. Further studies are needed to provide a broader picture of how the nutrient concentrations vary with site characteristics, stand age and forestry management to get a better foundation when setting up recommendations for stump removal

  17. 76 FR 27663 - Purified Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... Carboxymethylcellulose From Finland, Mexico, Netherlands and Sweden Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... carboxymethylcellulose from Finland and Netherlands would be likely to lead [[Page 27664

  18. Sweden's third national communication on climate change. Under the United Nations framework convention on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Sweden's national communication to the UN Convention on Climate Change describes everything about the emission and absorption of greenhouse gases, the motives and forces behind emissions, and official Swedish climate policies. Every five years, Sweden submits a communication on practical climate efforts in Sweden to the UN Convention on Climate Change. The Swedish Environmental Protection Board has coordinated the work of producing the basic documentation for the communication, which also describes the measures already taken and those planned for the future. In addition, scenarios have been adopted for developments in Swedish greenhouse gas emissions, Sweden's vulnerability and Swedish research into the climate and climate change

  19. Development of Dalaelven hydro power scheme in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokko, Voitto; Hjerthen, Peter; Ingfaelt, Hans; Loewen, Karl-Erik; Sjoegren, Arne

    2015-01-01

    The Dalaelven hydro scheme is located in central Sweden. Fortum has in the scheme 50 dams and 35 hydro power plants producing 4 TWh energy with a capacity of 970 MW. The main reservoirs are Lake Siljan and Traengsletsjoen with Traengslet dam, the highest earth-filled dam in Sweden. Development of the hydro scheme started 1878 with construction of four power plants for industry until 1930. From 1931 to 1974 15 power plants were built for increasing electricity consumption. De-regulation of the energy market in 1990's and EU environmental targets in 2000's resulted in the rehabilitation of ten power plants between 1990 and 2014 with increased annual energy production of 377 GWh (29%) and capacity 124 MW (59%). This energy decreases the annual CO 2 emissions with 125918 tons in comparison to production of the same amount of energy by coal. In several cases the rehabilitation was made in new power houses, allowing the development of the layout and technology of civil structures, and use of state-of-art equipment. Sweden uses the green certificate system, and 235 GWh of the energy received this certificate. Other environmental benefits come from use of the environmentally friendly Kaplan turbines and construction of some new fish pass. There are further plans to increase the spillway capacity of Traengslet dam and to rehabilitate eight power plant units. The possibilities of obtaining the Environmental licences for the rehabilitations has became challenging in the past years and green certificates are nowadays agreed only for increased energy. (authors)

  20. Bioenergy policy and market development in Finland and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, Karin; Huttunen, Suvi; Nilsson, L.J.; Svenningsson, Per

    2004-01-01

    The use of biomass in Finland and Sweden has steadily increased over the past 25 years, up to approximately 20% of the primary energy supply in 2001. In both countries most biomass originates from forests. Forest biomass is now an integral part of modern energy systems, although primarily in industry and in the heating sector. For example, biomass accounts for 7.9% and 53% of the fuel mix in district heating in Finland and Sweden, respectively. The general energy policy of both countries has supported biomass for energy over the entire period, although specific policies have changed with time. Research, development and demonstration has been continuously supported, and some subsidy schemes have been applied, in particular, for district heating systems (DHS) and combined heat and power. Heavy taxation of competing fossil fuels seems to have been the most effective policy instrument, although this has been directed mainly at the heat and transportation fuel markets. Electricity taxes are imposed on consumption (industry is largely exempt), and do not discriminate significantly between the sources of electricity. Starting in 2003, Sweden will have a quota-based system, a renewable portfolio standard, which is expected to increase biomass-based electricity production. Both countries possess vast and not fully exploited biomass resources in the form of forests, and have a history of rational and large-scale forestry. Strong actors exist both with regard to forest ownership and the industrial processing of forest products. The user side, in particular, represented by DHS, can also be characterised by strong and professional management. Over time, structures have developed that facilitate an increased use of biomass for energy, for example, the forest industry infrastructure and extensive district heating. Actors within these structures have had the ability to react to policies, resulting in a stable growth in biomass use

  1. Management of low- and intermediate level waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Jan

    1999-01-01

    This presentation describes how the management of radioactive waste is organised in Sweden, where Swedish law places the responsibility for such management with the waste generators. The four nuclear utilities have formed a joint company, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, to handle the nuclear waste. The Swedish waste management system includes a final repository for short-lived low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) and an interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and long-lived waste. Some very low-level, short-lived waste is disposed of in shallow-land repositories at the nuclear power stations. The final repository is situated in underground rock caverns close to the Forsmark nuclear power plant. The rock caverns have been excavated to a depth of more than 50 m beneath the Baltic Sea floor. LLW is compacted into bales or packaged in metal drums or cases that can be transported in standard freight containers. Radioactive materials used in other sectors such as hospitals are collected and packaged at Studsvik and later deposited in the deep repository. ILW is mixed with cement or bitumen and cast in cement or steel boxes or metal drums. The final repository has different chambers for different kinds of waste. The environmental impact of the repository is negligible. Because Sweden's nuclear power plants and the SKB facilities all are located on the coast, all the waste transport can be conducted by sea. The costs of managing and disposing of Sweden's nuclear waste are small compared to the price of electricity

  2. Oil spill R ampersand D efforts in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorell, D.; Jansson, B.

    1992-01-01

    Let me at first mention some significant facts of the Baltic Sea and of Sweden. It has an average depth of only 60 to 70 meters.The waters are low in temperature as well as low in oxygen and salt content (salinity). The air-temperature is in the winter often lower than minus 20 degrees C. The entrance to the Baltic is very narrow and shallow, which means that it takes thirty years before the water in the Baltic is completely renewed. This makes the Baltic Sea to the world's largest brackish water area where the organisms are very vulnerable and sensitive to all kinds of pollution. Oil spills pose a special threat. Every year, approximately 45 million tons of oil of all types crude, bunker, diesel - to name some - are transported through Swedish waters. The shipping of oil in other parts of the Baltic Sea exceeds this figure; a shipping not subject to our legislation but from time to time, with its spills polluting our environment. Sweden has an extremely long coastline to protect: 14,000 kilometers (nearly 9,000 miles) along the mainland plus the shores of more than 100,000 islands. Some oil spills have contaminated more than 12,000 islands which have large bird and seal populations and are public recreation areas for 1 million people and pleasure boats. Sweden started a comprehensive oil spill R ampersand D programme in 1982. This programme, introduced in this document, is now ended and strategies for the twenty-first century are now being drawn up

  3. Characterization of new users of cilostazol in the UK, Spain, Sweden, and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsague, Jordi; Perez-Gutthann, Susana; Calingaert, Brian; Bui, Christine; Varas-Lorenzo, Cristina; Arana, Alejandro; Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Rubio, Francisca; Giner-Soriano, Maria; Roso-Llorach, Albert; Linder, Marie; Citarella, Anna; Scholle, Oliver; Blenk, Tilo; Garbe, Edeltraut

    2017-06-01

    To describe the characteristics of new users of cilostazol in Europe with the aim to support the evaluation of its benefit/risk as used in regular clinical practice before the implementation of labeling changes recommended by the European Medicines Agency. New users of cilostazol were identified in populations enrolled in five European health automated databases in the UK (The Health Improvement Network [THIN]), Spain (EpiChron cohort and Information System for the Improvement of Research in Primary Care [SIDIAP]), Sweden (National Registers), and Germany (German Pharmacoepidemiological Research Database [GePaRD]) between 2002 and 2012. New users were characterized according to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities, concurrent use of interacting medications, new contraindications, duration of use, and potential off-label prescribing. We identified 22 593 new users of cilostazol. The median age was between 68.0 (THIN) and 73.7 (Sweden) years. More than 78% of users had concomitant cardiovascular disease, and between 78.8% (GePaRD) and 91.6% (THIN) were treated with interacting medications. Prevalence of new cardiovascular contraindications ranged from 1.5% (THIN) to 11.6% (GePaRD), and concurrent use of two or more antiplatelet drugs ranged from 6.3% (SIDIAP) to 13.5% (EpiChron cohort). Between 39.4% (Sweden) and 52.9% (THIN) of users discontinued cilostazol in the first 3 months. Between 41.0% (SIDIAP) and 93.4% (THIN) were considered to have received cilostazol according to the European Medicines Agency labeling. In this collaborative European study, most cilostazol users were elderly patients with a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and other comorbidity and concurrent use of interacting drugs, indicating that this is a vulnerable population at high risk of complications, especially cardiovascular events. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2017 The Authors

  4. Childhood death rates declined in Sweden from 2000 to 2014 but deaths from external causes were not always investigated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, Gabriel; Lahne, Klara; Arkema, Elizabeth V; Lucas, Steven; Janson, Staffan; Hellström-Westas, Lena

    2018-03-08

    Countries that conduct systematic child death reviews report a high proportion of modifiable characteristics among deaths from external causes, and this study examined the trends in Sweden. We analysed individual-level data on external, ill-defined and unknown causes from the Swedish cause of death register from 2000 to 2014, and mortality rates were estimated for children under the age of one and for those aged 1-14 and 15-17 years. Child deaths from all causes were 7914, and 2006 (25%) were from external, ill-defined and unknown causes: 610 (30%) were infants, 692 (34%) were 1-14 and 704 (35%) were 15-17. The annual average was 134 cases (range 99-156) during the study period. Mortality rates from external, ill-defined and unknown causes in children under 18 fell 19%, from 7.4 to 6.0 per 100 000 population. A sizeable number of infant deaths (8.0%) were registered without a death certificate during the study period, but these counts were lower in children aged 1-14 (1.3%) and 15-17 (0.9%). Childhood deaths showed a sustained decline from 2000 to 2014 in Sweden and a quarter were from external, ill-defined or unknown causes. Systematic, interagency death reviews could yield information that could prevent future deaths. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Time trends in 20 years of medication use in older adults: Findings from three elderly cohorts in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craftman, Åsa Gransjön; Johnell, Kristina; Fastbom, Johan; Westerbotn, Margareta; von Strauss, Eva

    2016-01-01

    New drugs and expanded drug indications are constantly being introduced. Welfare states strive to provide equity in drug treatment for all of its citizens and todaýs healthcare systems spend financial resources on drugs for the elderly in a higher rate than for any other age group. Drug utilization in elderly persons has an impact in health and wellbeing in older people. It was to describe the changes in medication use including people aged 78 years and over regardless of residence and other characteristics over 20 years. The study population consisted of 4304 participants in three population-based cross-sectional surveys conducted in the Kungsholmen area of central Stockholm, Sweden. The participant's current drug utilization was reviewed by physicians following standardized protocols. Data were statistical analyzed. Logistic regression models was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for use of analgesics and psychotropic drugs in the cohorts of 2001 and 2007, controlling for age, gender, education and cognition. Results shows that the prevalence of medication use and polypharmacy in older adults has increased dramatically the late 1980s to the 2000s in central Stockholm, Sweden. In particular, the use of analgesics increased significantly, while some drug groups decreased, i.e., antipsychotics. Women used more medication than men in all three cohorts. Older adults living in service buildings used the largest amount of drugs in 1987, whereas those living in institutions were the most frequent users in 2001 and 2007. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant

  7. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E.; Kahlbom, U.; Rollenhagen, C.

    2011-02-01

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant sense of

  8. Some remarks about remedial actions and research program in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, S.O.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1978 six houses in Sweden were found to have unacceptably high radon concentrations. These houses were built on land where shale ash had been used as landfill. Radon levels were reduced significantly by increasing ventilation rates or by removing the shale ash. In five houses built of aerated concrete based on alum shale attempts are being made to reduce the radon concentration by papering the walls with aluminum foil. Further work is being done on the relation between elevated activity in rock and soil and indoor concentrations of radon, and on the exhalation of radon from building materials

  9. No opt-out is forever. Sweden opts back in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2010-01-01

    The draft legislation by the conservative-liberal Swedish government of early 2010, which was adopted by the Swedish parliament on June 17, 2010, not only repeals the shutdown of all Swedish nuclear power plants, which had earlier been foreseen by this year, but permits the construction and operation of new plants. In Sweden, a referendum in 1980 started the opt-out process. Shutdown within 30 years was foreseen in the regulation. As early as in late 1995, an Energy Committee appointed by the government reported that a complete opt-out by 2010 was impossible to achieve on economic and environmental grounds. Under the 1997 Opt-out Act, the government may shut down nuclear power plants at any time against an indemnification - unlike Germany. Another prerequisite is the realistic availability of new energy sources. As a consequence, only 2 nuclear power plants have been shut down so far, mainly because of protests from neighboring Denmark. Thirty years after the referendum, the acceptance of nuclear power in Sweden is high and stable. In line with growing public acceptance in the course of the debate about climate change, the Christian-Democratic Party changed its policy in March 2007, opting out of the opt-out. Finally, the conservative-liberal Swedish government submitted draft legislation to parliament which also permitted building new nuclear power plants. The Social Democratic Workers' Party, which is in the opposition, stuck to its rejection of the use of nuclear power and announced its intention to reverse the repeal of the opt-out in September 2010, after parliamentary elections and a possible new red-green government. The public and political developments in Sweden show that social attitudes towards nuclear power, opt-out policies and legal regulations can change. Adopting a rational attitude when discussing nuclear power and realities is possible, and political views sooner or later will adapt to the new situation. This could happen also in Germany

  10. Apartment price determinants : A comparison between Sweden and Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Anop, Sviatlana

    2015-01-01

    Similar development of economic fundamentals in Germany over the last two decades did not lead to the same dramatic house price increases as it is in Sweden. What can explain this house price stability over a long period? This thesis attempts to find the answer this question. The first paper in this thesis contains an extended literature review on the studies focused on the factors affecting house prices in the short and in the long run. Existing literature adopts a broad variation of approac...

  11. The principle of public access to official documents in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, I.

    2001-01-01

    In Sweden, access to information is considered one of the cornerstones of the free democratic exchange of views. It is not enough that public authorities give information about their work. Public activities shall be open to the citizens and the media in such a way that they can choose the information they wish to obtain, without having to rely on public information services. An official document is public, it must be kept available to anyone who wishes to peruse it. Official documents are registered in a public register in order to allow to anyone to exercise their right of access to official document. (N.C.)

  12. Gas turbine installations in nuclear power plants in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevestedt, Lars [Electrical Equipment and Gas Turbines, Swedish State Power Board, Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, S-430 22 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    1986-02-15

    At each of the four nuclear power stations in Sweden (Ringhals, Forsmark, Oskarshamn, Barsebaeck) gas turbine generating sets have been installed. These units are normally used for peak load operation dictated of grid and System requirements but they are also connected to supply the electrical auxiliary load of the nuclear plant as reserve power sources. The gas turbines have automatic start capability under certain abnormal conditions (such as reactor trips, low frequency grid etc) but they can also be started manually from several different locations. Starting time is approximately 2- 3 minutes from start up to full load. (author)

  13. Optimal localisation of next generation Biofuel production in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterlund, Elisabeth [Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden); Pettersson, Karin [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mossberg, Johanna [SP Technical Research Inst. of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden)] [and others

    2013-09-01

    With a high availability of lignocellulosic biomass and various types of cellulosic by-products, as well as a large number of industries, Sweden is a country of great interest for future large scale production of sustainable, next generation biofuels. This is most likely also a necessity as Sweden has the ambition to be independent of fossil fuels in the transport sector by the year 2030 and completely fossil free by 2050. In order to reach competitive biofuel production costs, plants with large production capacities are likely to be required. Feedstock intake capacities in the range of about 1-2 million tonnes per year, corresponding to a biomass feed of 300-600 MW, can be expected, which may lead to major logistical challenges. To enable expansion of biofuel production in such large plants, as well as provide for associated distribution requirements, it is clear that substantial infrastructure planning will be needed. The geographical location of the production plant facilities is therefore of crucial importance and must be strategic to minimise the transports of raw material as well as of final product. Competition for the available feedstock, from for example forest industries and CHP plants (combined heat and power) further complicates the localisation problem. Since the potential for an increased biomass utilisation is limited, high overall resource efficiency is of great importance. Integration of biofuel production processes in existing industries or in district heating systems may be beneficial from several aspects, such as opportunities for efficient heat integration, feedstock and equipment integration, as well as access to existing experience and know-how. This report describes the development of Be Where Sweden, a geographically explicit optimisation model for localisation of next generation biofuel production plants in Sweden. The main objective of developing such a model is to be able to assess production plant locations that are robust to varying

  14. NSFR Seminar 2014 – National Report for Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleist David

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to give an overview of the rules concerning taxation of companies in Sweden and of trends in the taxation of companies that have been evident in the last few years. It focuses in particular on issues that are connected with the so-called BEPS discussion, for instance interest deduction limitations, CFC rules, general anti-avoidance rules and other rules intended to protect the national tax base. It also sets out to describe other important features of the Swedish tax legislation in regard to companies, such as the rules on taxation of inbound and outbound dividends, interest and royalty.

  15. Regulatory aspects on underground disposal of radioactive waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    The underground disposal of radioactive waste in Sweden is primarily governed by the Atomic Energy Act, the Radiation Protection Act, and to some extent by the Nuclear Liability Act. The regulatory authorities in question are the Nuclear Power Inspectorate, and the Radiation protection Institute. Application for a licence relating to waste management facilities are examined by the Inspectorate which presents its recommendations to the Government for decision. The Inspectorate is also called upon to impose conditions for the operation of the installation. The choice of site for the proposed nuclear waste facility is subject to the approval of the local authorities concerned. (NEA) [fr

  16. Gas turbine installations in nuclear power plants in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevestedt, Lars

    1986-01-01

    At each of the four nuclear power stations in Sweden (Ringhals, Forsmark, Oskarshamn, Barsebaeck) gas turbine generating sets have been installed. These units are normally used for peak load operation dictated of grid and System requirements but they are also connected to supply the electrical auxiliary load of the nuclear plant as reserve power sources. The gas turbines have automatic start capability under certain abnormal conditions (such as reactor trips, low frequency grid etc) but they can also be started manually from several different locations. Starting time is approximately 2- 3 minutes from start up to full load. (author)

  17. Accident management strategy in Sweden - implementation and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenhielm, Gustaf; Engqvist, Alf; Espefaelt, Ralf

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive program for severe accident mitigation was completed in Sweden by the end of 1988. As described in this paper, this program included plant modifications such as the introduction of filtered containment venting, and an accident management system comprising emergency operating strategies and procedures, training and emergency drills. The accident management system at Vattenfall has been further developed since 1988 and some results and experience from this development are reported in this paper. The main aspects covered concern the emergency organization and the supporting tools developed for use by the emergency response teams, the radiological implications such as accessibility to various locations and the long-term aspects of accident management. ((orig.))

  18. The concept of visitors' centres: a mobile alternative from Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungermark, S.

    1993-01-01

    The information activities at the permanent exhibitions at the four nuclear facility sites in Sweden have been enhanced during the last four years by travelling exhibitions touring the whole country. In this way it has been possible to communicate the most important facts about radioactive waste management to more than 100 000 Swedes annually, i.e. more people than visit all the permanent visitors'centres each year. Also these efforts have opened a dialogue between the general public and the very technicians and scientists who work daily with handling the radioactive waste and planning its future management

  19. Sweden's Cooperation with Eastern Europe in Radiation Safety 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dassen, Lars; Andersson, Sarmite; Bejarano, Gabriela

    2011-09-01

    The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority implemented in 2010 cooperation projects in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia, Lithuania and Moldova based on instructions from the Swedish Government and agreements with the European Union and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SIDA. The projects aim at achieving a net contribution to radiation safety (including nuclear safety, nuclear security and non-proliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness) for the benefit of the host country as well as Sweden. This report gives an overview of all the projects implemented in 2010

  20. Heat transfer in underground heating experiments in granite, Stipa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Javandel, I.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    Electrical heater experiments have been conducted underground in granite at Stripa, Sweden, to investigate the effects of heating associated with nuclear waste storage. Temperature data from these experiments are compared with closed-form and finite-element solutions. Good agreement is found between measured temperatures and both types of models, but especially for a nonlinear finite-element heat conduction model incorporating convective boundary conditions, measured nonuniform initial rock temperature distribution, and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. In situ thermal properties, determined by least-squares regression, are very close to laboratory values. A limited amount of sensitivity analysis is undertaken

  1. Fuel options for public bus fleets in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Xylia, Maria; Silveira, Semida

    2015-01-01

    The Swedish public transport sector has defined two major targets, i.e., to run 90% of the total vehicle kilometers of the fleet on non-fossil fuels and double the volume of travel via public transport by 2020, increasing the share of public transport in relation to the total personal transport in the country . The f3 report Fuel options for public bus fleets in Sweden highlights the challenges and solutions encountered, particularly when it comes to the adoption of renewable fuels in the reg...

  2. Ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden. Varying influence of psychosocial and economic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Martin; Sundquist, Jan

    2002-12-01

    The aim was to investigate ethnic differences in daily smoking in Malmö, Sweden, and whether these differences could be explained by psychosocial and economic conditions. The public health survey in Malmö 1994 is a cross-sectional study. A total of 5,600 individuals aged 20-80 years were randomly chosen to respond to a postal questionnaire. The participation rate was 71%. The study population was divided into seven categories according to country of birth; Sweden, Denmark/Norway, other Western countries, former Yugoslavia, Poland, Arabic-speaking countries and all other countries. A multivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression model in order to investigate the importance of possible confounders on the ethnic differences in daily smoking. Finally, variables measuring social network, social support and economic conditions were introduced. The prevalence of daily smoking was significantly higher among both men and women born in Denmark/Norway (39.1% and 37.0%), men born in other Western countries (32.9%), Poland (34.0%) and Arabic-speaking countries (36.4%) than among Swedish men (21.7%) and women (23.8%). Women born in Arabic-speaking countries had a significantly lower smoking prevalence (7.1%). The multivariate analysis, including age, education and snuff, did not affect these results. A reduction of the odds ratio of daily smoking was observed for men born in Arabic-speaking countries and Poland after the introduction of the psychosocial and economic factors in the model. Only small changes were observed for women. There were significant ethnic group differences in daily smoking. Psychosocial and economic conditions in Sweden may be of importance in some ethnic groups.

  3. Long-term fiscal implications of subsidizing in-vitro fertilization in Sweden: a lifetime tax perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Anders; Connolly, Mark; Gallo, Federico; Hägglund, Leif

    2008-11-01

    In Sweden approximately 3% of annual births are conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ART). In light of increasing use of ART in Sweden we estimate the lifetime future tax revenues of a child conceived by in-vitro fertilization (IVF) to establish whether public subsidy of IVF represents sound fiscal policy. A modified generational accounting model was developed to calculate the net present value (NPV) of average investment costs required to achieve an IVF-conceived child. The model simulates direct lifetime financial interactions between the child and the Swedish government. Within the model we assume average direct financial transfers are made to the individual (eg, child allowance, education, health care, pension, etc). In return, the individual transfers resources to the government through taxation based on anticipated average earnings. The difference between direct transfers and gross taxes paid equals the net-tax contribution. Individual tax contributions were held constant in the model. Based on average life-expectancy an individual born in 2005 will pay an undiscounted 32.5 million SEK in taxes to the Swedish government and receive 20.9 million SEK in direct financial transfers over their lifetime. When these figures are discounted and IVF costs are included in the analysis we obtain a lifetime NPV of 254,000 SEK with a break-even point at age 41 (the age of achieving a positive NPV) for an individual conceived through IVF. Based on results presented here we conclude that State-funded IVF in Sweden does not negatively impact the long run fiscal budget. Conversely, over an average lifetime an IVF offspring returns a positive net value to the State.

  4. Differences in cancer awareness and beliefs between Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK (the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership): do they contribute to differences in cancer survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, L J L; Simon, A E; Warburton, F; Boniface, D; Brain, K E; Dessaix, A; Donnelly, C; Haynes, K; Hvidberg, L; Lagerlund, M; Lockwood, G; Tishelman, C; Vedsted, P; Vigmostad, M N; Ramirez, A J; Wardle, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are wide international differences in 1-year cancer survival. The UK and Denmark perform poorly compared with other high-income countries with similar health care systems: Australia, Canada and Sweden have good cancer survival rates, Norway intermediate survival rates. The objective of this study was to examine the pattern of differences in cancer awareness and beliefs across these countries to identify where these might contribute to the pattern of survival. Methods: We carried out a population-based telephone interview survey of 19 079 men and women aged ⩾50 years in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure. Results: Awareness that the risk of cancer increased with age was lower in the UK (14%), Canada (13%) and Australia (16%) but was higher in Denmark (25%), Norway (29%) and Sweden (38%). Symptom awareness was no lower in the UK and Denmark than other countries. Perceived barriers to symptomatic presentation were highest in the UK, in particular being worried about wasting the doctor's time (UK 34% Canada 21% Australia 14% Denmark 12% Norway 11% Sweden 9%). Conclusion: The UK had low awareness of age-related risk and the highest perceived barriers to symptomatic presentation, but symptom awareness in the UK did not differ from other countries. Denmark had higher awareness of age-related risk and few perceived barriers to symptomatic presentation. This suggests that other factors must be involved in explaining Denmark's poor survival rates. In the UK, interventions that address barriers to prompt presentation in primary care should be developed and evaluated. PMID:23370208

  5. HLA haplotype map of river valley populations with hemochromatosis traced through five centuries in Central Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, K Sigvard; Ritter, Bernd; Hansson, Norbeth; Chowdhury, Ruma R

    2008-07-01

    The hemochromatosis mutation, C282Y of the HFE gene, seems to have originated from a single event which once occurred in a person living in the north west of Europe carrying human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A3-B7. In descendants of this ancestor also other haplotypes appear probably caused by local recombinations and founder effects. The background of these associations is unknown. Isolated river valley populations may be fruitful for the mapping of genetic disorders such as hemochromatosis. In this study, we try to test this hypothesis in a study from central Sweden where the haplotyope A1-B8 was common. HLA haplotypes and HFE mutations were studied in hemochromatosis patients with present or past parental origin in a sparsely populated (1/km(2)) rural district (n = 8366 in the year of 2005), in central Sweden. Pedigrees were constructed from the Swedish church book registry. Extended haplotypes were studied to evaluate origin of recombinations. There were 87 original probands, 36 females and 51 males identified during 30 yr, of whom 86% carried C282Y/C282Y and 14% C282Y/H63D. Of 32 different HLA haplotypes A1-B8 was the most common (34%), followed by A3-B7 (16%), both in strong linkage disequilibrium with controls, (P females. River valley populations may contain HLA haplotypes reflecting their demographic history. This study has demonstrated that the resistance against recombinations between HLA-A and HFE make HLA haplotypes excellent markers for population movements. Founder effects and genetic drift from bottleneck populations (surviving the plague?) may explain the commonness of the mutation in central Scandinavia. The intergenerational time difference >30 yr was greater than expected and means that the age of the original mutation may be underestimated.

  6. A health economic lifetime treatment pathway model for low back pain in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Gylfi; Jonsson, Emma; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle; Borgström, Fredrik

    2017-12-01

    To develop a health economic model to evaluate the long-term costs and outcomes over the healthcare treatment pathway for patients with low back pain (LBP). A health economic model, consisting of a decision tree structure with a Markov microsimulation model at the end of each branch, was created. Patients were followed from first observed clinical presentation with LBP until the age of 100 years or death. The underlying data to populate the model were based on Swedish national and regional registry data on healthcare resource use and sickness insurance in patients presenting with LBP in the Swedish region Västra Götaland during 2008-2012. Costs (outpatient healthcare visits, inpatient bed days, pharmaceuticals, productivity loss), EUR 2016, and quality-of-life based on EQ-5D data from the registries and published estimates were summarized over the lifetime of the patients with 3% annual discount. A lost quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was valued at €70,000. Mean lifetime total cost was estimated at €47,452/patient, of which indirect costs were 57%. Total lifetime economic burden for all patients coming to clinical presentation in Sweden per year was €8.8bn. The average LBP patient was estimated to face a loss of 2.7 QALYs over their lifetime compared with the general population. For all patients in Sweden coming to clinical presentation in 1 year this gives 505,407 QALYs lost, valued at €35.3bn. Adding the economic burden, the total societal burden amounts to €44.1bn. This pathway model shows that most patients with LBP receive conservative care, and a minority consume high-cost healthcare interventions like surgery. The model could be used to see broad economic effects of different patterns of healthcare provision in sub-groups with LBP and to estimate where it is possible to influence these pathways to increase utility for patients and for society.

  7. Shift work to balance everyday life - a salutogenic nursing perspective in home help service in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, Madelaine Törnquist; Andersson, Ingemar; Ejlertsson, Göran; Janlöv, Ann-Christin

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in Sweden have a high absence due to illness and many retire before the age of sixty. Factors at work as well as in private life may contribute to health problems. To maintain a healthy work-force there is a need for actions on work-life balance in a salutogenic perspective. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of resources in everyday life to balance work and private life among nurses in home help service. Thirteen semi-structured individual interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with home help service nurses in Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was used for the analyses. In the analyses, six themes of perceptions of recourses in everyday life emerged; (i) Reflecting on life. (ii) Being healthy and taking care of yourself. (iii) Having a meaningful job and a supportive work climate. (iv) Working shifts and part time. (v) Having a family and a supporting network. (vi) Making your home your castle. The result points out the complexity of work-life balance and support that the need for nurses to balance everyday life differs during different phases and transitions in life. In this salutogenic study, the result differs from studies with a pathogenic approach. Shift work and part time work were seen as two resources that contributed to flexibility and a prerequisite to work-life balance. To have time and energy for both private life and work was seen as essential. To reflect on and discuss life gave inner strength to set boundaries and to prioritize both in private life and in work life. Managers in nursing contexts have a great challenge to maintain and strengthen resources which enhance the work-life balance and health of nurses. Salutogenic research is needed to gain an understanding of resources that enhance work-life balance and health in nursing contexts.

  8. Sweden and the NEGP: A Pilot Study of the North European Gas Pipeline and Sweden's Dependence on Russian Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Robert L

    2006-06-15

    Developments between 2004 and 2006 indicate that a North European Gas Pipeline (NEGP) through the Baltic Sea, from Russia to Germany, may be realised in the coming decade. This would provide Europe with yet another opportunity to diversify its import channels of gas. It is however reasonable to assume that the NEGP also could change the strategic pattern and be a source of friction. The NEGP may rock the regional stability and reduce the potential of the new EU members to become security providers in Europe's northern dimension. It also gives increased leverage and influence to Russia, a state that has moved in an authoritarian direction under President Putin. The aim of this pilot study is to elucidate on the NEGP pipeline and Sweden's increasing dependence on Russian energy. A subsidiary aim is to outline a set of concerns that have bearing on the situation for the EU and Baltic Sea Region and that need to be further addressed. In conclusion, the NEGP will enhance Russia's direct leverage on Poland, Ukraine, and Belarus, as it will allow Russia to turn off gas supplies without affecting exports to other parts of Europe. Russia will also increase its leverage over the states that will or may be connected to the NEGP (Germany, and possibly Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK). Even if Sweden is not embracing the NEGP, it is today highly sensitive as it imports most of its energy. It is increasingly dependent on Russian oil and is partly dependent on imports of electricity from Russia. Should the NEGP materialise and Sweden becomes connected in the future, it would likely be dependent also on natural gas. It is of paramount importance for the energy security of the connected states how the pipeline is constructed and operated. If there will be technical possibilities for Russia to tamper with the flow of gas to individual states without affecting supply to others, there are tangible threats to the importing states.

  9. Sweden and the NEGP: A Pilot Study of the North European Gas Pipeline and Sweden's Dependence on Russian Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Robert L.

    2006-06-01

    Developments between 2004 and 2006 indicate that a North European Gas Pipeline (NEGP) through the Baltic Sea, from Russia to Germany, may be realised in the coming decade. This would provide Europe with yet another opportunity to diversify its import channels of gas. It is however reasonable to assume that the NEGP also could change the strategic pattern and be a source of friction. The NEGP may rock the regional stability and reduce the potential of the new EU members to become security providers in Europe's northern dimension. It also gives increased leverage and influence to Russia, a state that has moved in an authoritarian direction under President Putin. The aim of this pilot study is to elucidate on the NEGP pipeline and Sweden's increasing dependence on Russian energy. A subsidiary aim is to outline a set of concerns that have bearing on the situation for the EU and Baltic Sea Region and that need to be further addressed. In conclusion, the NEGP will enhance Russia's direct leverage on Poland, Ukraine, and Belarus, as it will allow Russia to turn off gas supplies without affecting exports to other parts of Europe. Russia will also increase its leverage over the states that will or may be connected to the NEGP (Germany, and possibly Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK). Even if Sweden is not embracing the NEGP, it is today highly sensitive as it imports most of its energy. It is increasingly dependent on Russian oil and is partly dependent on imports of electricity from Russia. Should the NEGP materialise and Sweden becomes connected in the future, it would likely be dependent also on natural gas. It is of paramount importance for the energy security of the connected states how the pipeline is constructed and operated. If there will be technical possibilities for Russia to tamper with the flow of gas to individual states without affecting supply to others, there are tangible threats to the importing states

  10. Incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in Malmö, Sweden, 1990-2000: marked differences between groups defined by birth country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhad Ali; Zia, Elisabet; Janzon, Lars; Engstrom, Gunnar

    2004-09-01

    The proportion of immigrants has increased in Sweden markedly during the last decades, as in many other Western countries. Incidence of stroke has increased during this period. However, it is primarily unknown whether incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in Sweden is related to country of birth. Incidence of first-ever stroke was followed during 10 years in a cohort consisting of all 40- to 89-year-old inhabitants in the city of Malmö, Sweden (n=118,134). Immigrants from 12 different countries were compared with native-born Swedes. Adjusted for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic indicators, the incidence of stroke (all subtypes) was significantly higher among immigrants from former Yugoslavia (relative risk [RR], 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6) and Hungary (RR, 1.33; CI, 1.02 to 1.7). A significantly increased incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage was observed in immigrants from Peoples Republic of China or Vietnam (RR, 4.2; CI, 1.7 to 10.4) and the former Soviet Union (RR, 2.7; CI, 1.01 to 7.3). Immigrants from Finland had a significantly higher incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (RR, 2.8; CI, 1.1 to 6.8). A significantly lower incidence of stroke was observed in the group from Romania (RR, 0.14; CI, 0.04 to 0.6). Immigrants from Denmark, Norway, Germany, Chile, Czechoslovakia, and Poland had approximately the same risk as citizens born in Sweden. In this urban population from Sweden, there are substantial differences in stroke incidence and stroke subtypes between immigrants from different countries. To what extent this could be accounted for by exposure to biological risk factors remains to be explored.

  11. Seasonal variation of radionuclides in Fucus vesiculosus L. from the Oresund, Southern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.; Erlandsson, B.

    1991-01-01

    The activity concentrations of radionuclides ( 60 Co, 54 Mn, 137 Cs, 40 K) in whole plants of Fucus vesiculosus of different ages, and also in tissues of different ages from the same plant were investigated in the vicinity of the Barseback nuclear power plant in southern Sweden. Activity concentration differed between the tissues of different age of the plants, depending on the radionuclide as well as the time of year. The highest concentrations of 60 Co and 54 Mn were measured in the older parts of the plants in spring and summer, while the activity concentrations of 137 Cs and 40 K were highest in receptacles and new vegetative fronds. The discharge of radionuclides from the nuclear power plants was reflected in the measured activity concentration in the algae. For 60 Co, the response seemed to be smoothed out when considering the whole plant, while the new vegetative tissue better reflected the discharge during the autumn. Thus it is important to have knowledge about the autecology of the organism when it is used as an indicator for radionuclides. (author)

  12. Seasonal variation of radionuclides in Fucus vesiculosus L. from the Oeresund, southern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Lena; Erlandsson, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    The activity concentrations of radionuclides ( 60 Co, 54 Mn, 137 Cs, 40 K) in whole plants of Fucus vesiculosus of different ages and also in tissues of different ages from the same plants were investigated in the vicinity of the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant in southern Sweden. Activity concentration differed between the tissues of different age of the plants, depending on the radionuclide as well as the time of year. The highest concentration of 60 Co and 54 Mn was measured in the older parts of the plants in spring and summer, while the activity concentration of 137 Cs and 40 K was highest in receptacles and new vegetative fronds. The discharge of radionuclides from the nuclear power plant was reflected in the measured activity concentration in the algae. For 60 Co the response seemed to be smoothed out when considering the whole plant, while the new vegetative tissue better reflected the discharge during the autumn. Thus, it is important to have knowledge about the autecology of the organism when it is used as an indicator for radionuclides. (authors)

  13. The value of the change in health in Sweden 1980/81 to 1996/97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burström, Kristina; Johannesson, Magnus; Diderichsen, Finn

    2003-01-01

    The study aimed to estimate the value of the change in health in Sweden 1980/81 to 1996/97. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for men and women at specific ages were estimated for 1980/81, 1988/89 and 1996/97, by combining survival rates and health state scores. Data from the Swedish Survey...... for infants increased by 3.68 years for males and 2.70 years for females between 1980/81 and 1996/97. Average health status decreased in younger age groups whereas it increased in older age groups. Expected QALYs for infants increased by 2.64 for males and 0.54 for females. With 3% discounting the gain was 0.......11 QALYs (11,000 dollars) among males and a loss by 0.58 QALYs (58,000 dollars) among females. The corresponding gain in discounted QALYs for a 75-year-old was 1.15 (115,000 dollars) and 0.80 (80,000 dollars), respectively. It is concluded that older persons have experienced considerable health gains...

  14. Grand Advantage: Family Wealth and Grandchildren's Educational Achievement in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hällsten, Martin; Pfeffer, Fabian T

    2017-04-01

    We study the role of family wealth for children's educational achievement using novel and unique Swedish register data. In particular, we focus on the relationship between grandparents' wealth and their grandchildren's educational achievement. Doing so allows us to reliably establish the independent role of wealth in contributing to long-term inequalities in opportunity. We use regression models with rich controls to account for observed socioeconomic characteristics of families, cousin fixed effects to net out potentially unobserved grandparental effects, and marginal structural models to account for endogenous selection. We find substantial associations between grandparents' wealth and their grandchildren's grade point averages (GPA) in the 9th grade that are only partly mediated by the socioeconomic characteristics and wealth of parents. Our findings indicate that family wealth inequality - even in a comparatively egalitarian context like Sweden - has profound consequences for the distribution of opportunity across multiple generations. We posit that our estimates of the long-term consequences of wealth inequality may be conservative for nations other than Sweden, like the United States, where family wealth - in addition to its insurance and normative functions - allows the direct purchase of educational quality and access.

  15. Sweden beyond oil: nuclear commitments and solar options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, M.; Johansson, T.B.; Steen, P.

    1982-01-01

    The paper argues that both a nuclear and a solar future are technically possible, but that institutional differences are vast. There is a consensus in Sweden to keep long term options open. Approaches are identified that will allow Sweden to postpone as many decisions as possible as to which path to follow. Decentralized systems require emphasis on local planning, and will require substantial expansions of authority of local planners. A nuclear future would require substantial increases in central planning and would also require substantial institutional change if most energy is to be provided by nuclear energy in 2015. The primary near term reform needed to maintain maximum flexibility includes: (1) strengthening of local authority, especially in areas relating to district heating and conservation; (2) regulatory reform to assure adequate financing on the local level, and to assure adequate balancing of conservation and supply financing; (3) increased national control over large energy users; (4) state financed procurement and development of new energy technologies, especially smaller scale technologies; (5) national land use planning; (6) electric utility reform to encourage dispersed electric technologies

  16. 137Cs in the population of northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagren, G.; Bjoereland, A.; Johansson, Lennart.

    1996-12-01

    The activity of Cs 137 has been studied in several different population groups in northern Sweden after the Chernobyl accident. Special attention has been given to the Saami (Lapp) population from which we have measured a group of volunteers regularly between 1986 and 1990. In 1991 we started a study on randomly chosen groups from the general population and members of the Saami communities from three regions in northern Sweden with different deposition levels. The results from these measurements have shown an effective half-time of Cs whole-body content in the Saami groups of about five years. The measurements in 1996 show decreasing levels of activities in the different population groups with half-times between 4 and 12 years. Another exposed group is breast-fed babies. We have measured the transfer of Cs from mother to baby via the breast milk in 12 cases. The activity in breast milk was measured to be 14% of the activity in the mother (calculated using specific activity - Bq/kg). The corresponding activity in the baby was 90% of the activity in the mother. 13 refs

  17. SWEDEN--RECENT CHANGES IN WELFARE STATE ARRANGEMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Swedish welfare state, once developed to create a new society based on social equality and universal rights, has taken on a partly new direction. Extensive choice reforms have been implemented in social services and an increasing proportion of tax-funded social services, including child day care, primary and secondary schools, health care, and care of the elderly, is provided by private entrepreneurs, although funded by taxes. Private equity firms have gained considerable profits from the welfare services. The changes have taken place over a 20-year period, but at an accelerated pace in the last decade. Sweden previously had very generous sickness and unemployment insurance, in terms of both duration and benefit levels, but is falling behind in terms of generosity, as indicated by increasing levels of relative poverty among those who depend on benefits and transfers. Increasing income inequality over the past 20 years further adds to increasing the gaps between population groups. In some respects, Sweden is becoming similar to other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. The article describes some of the changes that have occurred. However, there is still widespread popular support for the publicly provided welfare state services.

  18. Consequences for wind power in Sweden of climatic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovsenius, Gunnar; Kjellstroem, Erik

    2007-05-01

    In an earlier report to Elforsk SMHI has calculated that a total installed effect of 4000 MW in wind mills in Sweden will as an annual average generate approximately 10 TWh of electricity during the period of 1992 - 2001. These estimates has an uncertainty of ±5 %. The calculations are related to a scenario with 56 larger wind mill farms of which an essential part is located to the southern part of Sweden and to off shore installations. This study is aimed to investigate if a climate change in a future of 20 - 30 years from now will influence the wind power generation compared to the earlier study. The views of the future wind energy which are presented in this study are partly based on calculations performed at Rossby Centre, SMHI, partly on other reported studies. The calculations performed at Rossby Centre originate from three of the emission scenarios - A1B, A2 and B2 - presented by the International Panel on Climate Change, IPCC. The differences between these scenarios are marginal for the next 20-30 years. The calculations are also based on a regional climate model developed at the Rossby Centre, which has been widely accepted in the science. The boundary conditions used to the regional model are generated from two global circulation models developed at Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg. This study can be concluded in the following four points: 1. The generation of electricity from wind mills may increase by 5 - 20 % within a period of 20 - 30 years from now, compared to the period 1992 - 2001 or from 10 up to about 12 TWh per annum. A long-term increase of the wind energy in the region of the Baltic Sea seems to be a trend in several of the scientific well reputed global circulation models. 2. The energy content of the wind has during the last century varied approximately with ± 10 % in Sweden and in the region of the Baltic Sea. For the period of 1992- 2001 the energy content of the wind however decreased. If the estimated increase in wind

  19. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in a county in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, I M; Simonsson, B; Brantefor, B; Ringqvist, I

    2001-06-01

    Overweight among young people in Sweden is increasing. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of overweight and obesity based on body mass index (BMI) values among children and adolescents. Overweight was defined as a BMI value > or = 91st percentile and obesity as a BMI value > 98th percentile on an international reference BMI curve. The study population included boys and girls from four age groups: 9, 12, 15 and 18 y. The data consisted of self-reported measures of height and weight that were obtained from questionnaires used in a cross-sectional study in December 1997. A validation study was performed using a part of the study population. A total of 7011 (81.7%) participants completed the questionnaire. The correlation between self-reported estimations and objective measures of height and weight was high in the oldest age groups (0.88-0.98), but lower in the 9-y-old age groups (0.37-0.72). These self-reported estimations in the 9-y-olds were excluded from further analysis. It was found that 12.3%, 11.6% and 11.4% of the boys in the 12-, 15- and 18-y-old age groups and 6.8%, 5.5% and 4.8% of the girls in the same age groups were overweight and 7.9%, 8.9% and 7.3% of the boys and 5.1%, 4.2% and 3.9% of the girls were obese. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was found to be high in the study population and is a serious public health problem. The prevalence of obesity was significantly higher (p old boys living in rural areas than in city and town dwellers of the same age.

  20. Disease burden of herpes zoster in Sweden - predominance in the elderly and in women - a register based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The herpes zoster burden of disease in Sweden is not well investigated. There is no Swedish immunization program to prevent varicella zoster virus infections. A vaccine against herpes zoster and its complications is now available. The aim of this study was to estimate the herpes zoster burden of disease and to establish a pre-vaccination baseline of the minimum incidence of herpes zoster. Methods Data were collected from the Swedish National Health Data Registers including the Patient Register, the Pharmacy Register, and the Cause of Death Register. The herpes zoster burden of disease in Sweden was estimated by analyzing the overall, and age and gender differences in the antiviral prescriptions, hospitalizations and complications during 2006-2010 and mortality during 2006-2009. Results Annually, 270 per 100,000 persons received antiviral treatment for herpes zoster, and the prescription rate increased with age. It was approximately 50% higher in females than in males in the age 50+ population (rate ratio 1.39; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.58). The overall hospitalization rate for herpes zoster was 6.9/100,000 with an approximately three-fold increase for patients over 80 years of age compared to the age 70-79 group. A gender difference in hospitalization rates was observed: 8.1/100,000 in females and 5.6/100,000 in males. Herpes zoster, with a registered complication, was found in about one third of the hospitalized patients and the most common complications involved the peripheral and central nervous systems. Death due to herpes zoster was a rare event. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate the significant burden of herpes zoster disease in the pre-zoster vaccination era. A strong correlation with age in the herpes zoster- related incidence, hospitalization, complications, and mortality rates was found. In addition, the study provides further evidence of the female predominance in herpes zoster disease. PMID:24330510

  1. Blood Versus Land: The Comparative Foundations for Citizenship and Voting Rights in Germany and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Sweden After 1866," in How Did They Become Voters? The History of Franchise in Modern European Representation, ed. Raffaele Romanelli, 341–372 (Boston...Andersson, Lars I. "How Did They Become Voters: Sweden After 1866." In How Did They Become Voters? The History of Franchise in Modern European

  2. Students' Perceptions of Assessment: A Comparative Analysis between Portugal and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diana; Niklasson, Laila; Flores, Maria Assunção

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating students' perceptions about assessment, especially the ways in which it is put into practice. Data were collected through questionnaires in different programmes in Portugal and Sweden. In total, 173 students from Portugal and 72 from Sweden participated in the study. Findings showed that students had similar ideas…

  3. Second Chance Education Matters! Income Trajectories of Poorly Educated Non-Nordics in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, Madelene; Bonfanti, Sara; Strandh, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the long-term impact of second chance education (SCE) on incomes of poorly educated individuals who live in Sweden but were not born in a Nordic country, using data on income changes from 1992 to 2003 compiled by Statistics Sweden. Ordinary Least Squares regression analyses show that participation in SCE increased the work…

  4. Patients' satisfaction ratings and their desire for care improvement across oncology settings from France, Italy, Poland and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Robertson, C; Razavi, D; Batel-Copel, L; Larsson, G; Lichosik, D; Meyza, J; Schraub, S; von Essen, L; de Haes, J C J M

    2003-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in patient satisfaction assessment across nations recently. This paper reports on a cross-cultural comparison of the comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care (CASC) response scales. We investigated what proportion of patients wanted care improvement for the same level of satisfaction across samples from oncology settings in France, Italy, Poland and Sweden, and whether age, gender, education level and type of items affected the relationships found. The CASC addresses patient's satisfaction with the care received in oncology hospitals. Patients are invited to rate aspects of care and to mention for each of these aspects, whether they would want improvement.One hundred and forty, 395, 186 and 133 consecutive patients were approached in oncology settings from France, Italy, Poland and Sweden, respectively. Across country settings, an increasing percentage of patients wanted care improvement for decreasing levels of satisfaction. However, in France a higher percentage of patients wanted care improvement for high-satisfaction ratings whereas in Poland a lower percentage of patients wanted care improvement for low-satisfaction ratings. Age and education level had a similar effect across countries. Confronting levels of satisfaction with desire for care improvement appeared useful in comprehending the meaning of response choice labels for the CASC across oncology settings from different linguistic and cultural background. Linguistic or socio-cultural differences were suggested for explaining discrepancies between countries. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Training and Accreditation for Radon Professionals in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soderman, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    Radon training courses and seminars of different kinds have been arranged in Sweden since the early 1980s. A commercial educational company initiated the first regular training courses in 1987. Up to 1990 about 400 persons had attended courses in radon measurement and radon mitigation methods. In 1991 the first in a series of courses focussed on radon from the ground and production of radon risk maps organised. From 1991 it has been possible to obtain accreditation for measurements of indoor radon in Sweden and from 1997 also for measurements of radon in water. Even if accreditation s is voluntary, in Sweden accredited laboratories perform most measurements, both for indoor air and water. A condition for accreditation in to have passed the examination following the training courses at SSI, SO far, three major companies have obtained accreditation for measurement of indoor radon and four have been accredited for measurements of radon in water. Education on radon is also given at universities and institutes of technology. A two-day course is included in the education for environmental health officers. A number of training courses aimed at real state agents have been organised by SSI through the years. During the autumn of 2001 altogether 400 authorised real estate agents attended a series of regional half-day courses. In 1995 SSI arranged an international training course, Radon Indoor Risk and Remedial Actions, in Stockholm for the European commission. About 40 scientists from all over Europe attended the course, which much appreciated by the participants. Today SSI's Radon Training Programme comprises five different courses, a Basic radon Course and four continuation courses: Radon measurements, Radon remedial measures, Radon in water and Radon investigation and risk map production. The courses are arranged twice a year, in spring and autumn, except the Radon risk map production course, which is arranged about every second year. Altogether, between 1991 and 2003

  6. Socioeconomic disadvantage and primary non-adherence with medication in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Sarah; Merlo, Juan; Bostrom, Gunnel; Hogstedt, Christer; Agren, Gunner

    2007-06-01

    Lack of adherence with pharmacological therapy is a public health concern that compels tremendous costs for the health care system and the community. To analyse the association between socioeconomic disadvantage and primary non-adherence with medication, and to explore possible mediating effects of trust in health care and lifestyle profile. Cross-sectional population-based study based on data from the Swedish national public health surveys 2004-2005. The study comprised 13603 men and 18292 women aged 21-84 years who had any contact with a physician at a hospital or primary care centre. Measures Primary non-adherence with medication based on whether respondents reported that they refrained from purchasing at the pharmacy prescribed medication. Socioeconomic Disadvantage Index was based on four different indicators of economic deprivation. Socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with primary non-adherence with medication independent of long-term illness, risky lifestyle, low education, living alone and low trust for health care. This association increased with older age, particularly among women. Among individuals aged 21-34 years, severe compared with no socioeconomic disadvantage, was associated with two-fold increased odds for non-adherence with medication. The corresponding odds among individuals aged 65-84 years were three-fold increase among elderly men (OR=3.3, 95% CI: 1.4-7.8) and six-fold increase among elderly women (OR=6.2, 95% CI: 2.5-15.3). Yet every seventh elderly woman aged 65-84 years suffered from long-term illness. Results indicate that health policies for 'care on equal terms' in Sweden have been less successful in relation to equitable access to prescribed medication, especially among the elderly.

  7. The Willingness to Pay for Vaccination against Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Implications for Public Health Policy: Evidence from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slunge, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in Sweden and several other European countries has sparked a discussion about the need for a public vaccination strategy. However, TBE vaccination coverage is incomplete and there is little knowledge about the factors influencing vaccination behavior. Based on a survey of 1,500 randomly selected respondents in Sweden, we estimate vaccination coverage in areas with different TBE risk levels and analyze the role of vaccine price and other factors influencing the demand for vaccination. First, we find that the average rate of TBE vaccination in Sweden is 33% in TBE risk areas and 18% elsewhere. Income, age and risk-related factors such as incidence of TBE in the area of residence, frequency of visits to areas with TBE risk, and experience with tick bites are positively associated with demand for TBE vaccine. Next, using contingent valuation methodology, we estimate the willingness to pay for TBE vaccination among the unvaccinated respondents and the effect of a possible subsidy. Among the unvaccinated respondents in TBE risk areas, we estimate the mean willingness to pay for the recommended three doses of TBE vaccine to be 465 SEK (approximately 46 euros or 40% of the current market price). We project that a subsidy making TBE vaccines free of charge could increase the vaccination rate in TBE risk areas to around 78%, with a larger effect on low-income households, whose current vaccination rate is only 15% in risk areas. However, price is not the only factor affecting demand. We find significant effects on vaccination behavior associated with trust in vaccine recommendations, perceptions about tick bite-related health risks and knowledge about ticks and tick-borne diseases. Hence, increasing knowledge and trust, as well as ease of access to vaccinations, can also be important measures for public health agencies that want to increase the vaccination rate.

  8. The Willingness to Pay for Vaccination against Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Implications for Public Health Policy: Evidence from Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Slunge

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE in Sweden and several other European countries has sparked a discussion about the need for a public vaccination strategy. However, TBE vaccination coverage is incomplete and there is little knowledge about the factors influencing vaccination behavior. Based on a survey of 1,500 randomly selected respondents in Sweden, we estimate vaccination coverage in areas with different TBE risk levels and analyze the role of vaccine price and other factors influencing the demand for vaccination. First, we find that the average rate of TBE vaccination in Sweden is 33% in TBE risk areas and 18% elsewhere. Income, age and risk-related factors such as incidence of TBE in the area of residence, frequency of visits to areas with TBE risk, and experience with tick bites are positively associated with demand for TBE vaccine. Next, using contingent valuation methodology, we estimate the willingness to pay for TBE vaccination among the unvaccinated respondents and the effect of a possible subsidy. Among the unvaccinated respondents in TBE risk areas, we estimate the mean willingness to pay for the recommended three doses of TBE vaccine to be 465 SEK (approximately 46 euros or 40% of the current market price. We project that a subsidy making TBE vaccines free of charge could increase the vaccination rate in TBE risk areas to around 78%, with a larger effect on low-income households, whose current vaccination rate is only 15% in risk areas. However, price is not the only factor affecting demand. We find significant effects on vaccination behavior associated with trust in vaccine recommendations, perceptions about tick bite-related health risks and knowledge about ticks and tick-borne diseases. Hence, increasing knowledge and trust, as well as ease of access to vaccinations, can also be important measures for public health agencies that want to increase the vaccination rate.

  9. Awareness of sunburn in childhood, use of sunbeds and change of moles in Denmark, Northern Ireland, Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdarevic, Senada; Hvidberg, Line; Lin, Yulan; Donnelly, Conan; Gavin, Anna; Lagerlund, Magdalena; Pedersen, Anette F; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Runesdotter, Sara; Vedsted, Peter; Tishelman, Carol

    2016-02-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is increasing rapidly in Northern Europe. To reduce incidence and mortality through earlier diagnosis, public awareness of MM is important. Thus, we aim to examine awareness of risk factors and a symptom of MM, and how awareness varies by country and socio-demographic factors in Denmark, Northern Ireland (NI), Norway and Sweden. Population-based telephone interviews using the 'Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer' measure were conducted in 2011 among 8355 adults ≥50 years as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 2. Prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. In these four countries, lowest awareness was found for 'sunburn in childhood' (63%), whereas awareness was high for 'use of sunbeds' (91%) and 'mole change' (97%). Lack of awareness of 'sunburn in childhood' was more prevalent among respondents from Norway [PR = 1.38 (1.28-1.48)] but less prevalent among respondents from Northern Ireland (NI) [PR = 0.78 (0.72-0.85)] and Sweden [PR = 0.86 (0.79-0.93)] compared with respondents from Denmark. Lack of awareness of 'use of sunbeds' was more prevalent among respondents from Norway [PR = 2.99 (2.39-3.74)], Sweden [PR = 1.57 (1.22-2.00)], and NI [PR = 1.65 (1.30-2.10)] compared with respondents form Denmark. Being a man, age ≥70, living alone, and having lower education, were each independently associated with lack of MM-awareness. The results indicate relatively low awareness of 'sunburn in childhood' as a risk factor for MM, and important disparities in MM-awareness across countries and socio-demographic groups. Improved and more directed initiatives to enhance public MM-awareness, particularly about 'sunburn in childhood', are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Who wants to be involved in health care decisions? Comparing preferences for individual and collective involvement in England and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mio Fredriksson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient and public involvement (PPI is framed as positive for individuals, the health system, public health, as well as for communities and society as a whole. We investigated whether preferences for PPI differed between two countries with Beveridge type health systems–Sweden and England. We measured willingness to be involved in individual treatment decisions and in decisions about the organization and provision of local health and social care services. Methods This was a comparative cross-sectional study of the general population’s preferences. Together, the two samples included 3125 respondents; 1625 in England and 1500 in Sweden. Country differences were analysed in a multinomial regression model controlling for gender, age and educational attainment. Results Overall, 68% of respondents wanted a passive patient role and 44% wanted to be involved in local decisions about organization and provision of services. In comparison with in Sweden, they were in England less likely to want a health professional such as a GP or consultant to make decisions about their treatment and also more likely to want to make their own decisions. They were also less likely to want to be involved in local service development decisions. An increased likelihood of wanting to be involved in organizational decision-making was associated with individuals wanting to make their own treatment decisions. Women were less likely to want health professionals to make decisions and more likely to want to be involved in organizational decisions. Conclusions An effective health system that ensures public health must integrate an effective approach to PPI both in individual treatment decisions and shaping local health and social care priorities. To be effective, involvement activities must take in to account the variation in the desire for involvement and the implications that this has for equity. More work is needed to understand the relationship between the

  11. Parental occupation and preterm births: a nationwide epidemiological study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Kane, Kimberly; Jin, Qianren; Sundquist, Kristina

    2010-11-01

    The hypothesis was that some occupations could lead to preterm birth (PTB) because of potential exposures to various agents. The objective in this nationwide follow-up study was to analyse the association between PTB and parental occupational groups, controlling for potential confounders. Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, in which all children born in Sweden from 1990 onward are registered with their parents, were linked to census data. Inclusion criteria for the study population were employment (both women and men) and age >20 years (women). There were 816,743 first singleton live births from 1990 to 2004, of whom 43,956 were PTBs. A total of 7659 of the 43,956 PTBs were very PTBs. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated separately for mothers and fathers to estimate the odds of PTB and very PTB in 51 occupational groups (reference groups: mothers or fathers who were 'Technical, science research-related workers and physicians') and by family income level. Women and men with low family incomes had increased ORs of PTB and very PTB. Significantly increased ORs of PTB (including very PTB) were found in four maternal and nine paternal occupational groups after accounting for family income, geographic region of residence, civil status, smoking habits, maternal age at infant's birth and period of birth. Further studies should examine specific agents in those parental occupations that were associated with increased odds of PTB and very PTB. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Falls in very old people: the population-based Umeå 85+ study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heideken Wågert, Petra; Gustafson, Yngve; Kallin, Kristina; Jensen, Jane; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe incidences of falls and fall-related injuries, and to identify predisposing factors for falls in very old people in a prospective population-based follow-up study for falls. The study is part of the Umeå 85+ Study which includes half of the population aged 85, and the total population aged 90 and > or =95 (-103), in Umeå, Sweden. Of the 253 people interviewed, 220 (87%) were followed up for falls for 6 months, of whom 109 lived in ordinary and 111 in institutional housing. A comprehensive geriatric baseline assessment was made through interviews and testing during home visits. Forty percent of the participants did fall a total 304 times, corresponding to 2.17 falls per Person Year (PY). It occurred 0.83 injuries per PY, including 0.14 fractures per PY. In a Cox regression analysis, the independent explanatory risk factors for time to first fall were dependency in activities of daily living (ADL), thyroid disorders, treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and occurrence of falls in the preceding year. It could be predicted that every seventh participant and every third of the people who did fall would suffer a fracture within 1 year. ADL, thyroid disorders and treatment with SSRIs should be considered in fall prevention programmes.

  13. Express delivery of fossil meteorites from the inner asteroid belt to Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Bottke, William F.; Gladman, Brett; Häggström, Therese

    2007-06-01

    Our understanding of planet formation depends in fundamental ways on what we learn by analyzing the composition, mineralogy, and petrology of meteorites. Yet, it is difficult to deduce the compositional and thermal gradients that existed in the solar nebula from the meteoritic record because, in most cases, we do not know where meteorites with different chemical and isotopic signatures originated. Here we developed a model that tracks the orbits of meteoroid-sized objects as they evolve from the ν secular resonance to Earth-crossing orbits. We apply this model to determining the number of meteorites accreted on the Earth immediately after a collisional disruption of a D˜200-km-diameter inner-main-belt asteroid in the Flora family region. We show that this event could produce fossil chondrite meteorites found in an ≈470 Myr old marine limestone quarry in southern Sweden, the L-chondrite meteorites with shock ages ≈470 Myr falling on the Earth today, as well as asteroid-sized fragments in the Flora family. To explain the measured short cosmic-ray exposure ages of fossil meteorites our model requires that the meteoroid-sized fragments were launched at speeds >500 m s -1 and/or the collisional lifetimes of these objects were much shorter immediately after the breakup event than they are today.

  14. New insights into the burden and costs of multiple sclerosis in Europe: Results for Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundin, Lou; Kobelt, Gisela; Berg, Jenny; Capsa, Daniela; Eriksson, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    To assess the value of management strategies in multiple sclerosis (MS), outcome data have to be combined with cost data. This requires that cost data be regularly updated. This study is part of a cross-sectional retrospective study in 16 countries collecting current data on resource consumption, work capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Descriptive analyses are presented by level of severity; costs are estimated in the societal perspective, in 2015 SEK. A total of 1864 patients (mean age 56 years) participated in Sweden; 74% were below retirement age, and of these, 55% were employed. MS was reported to affect productivity at work in 78% of patients. Overall, 94% and 72% of patients felt that fatigue and cognition were a problem, respectively. The mean utility and costs were 0.757 and 244,000SEK at Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 0-3, 0.563 and 384,000SEK at EDSS 4-6.5 and 0.202 and 888,000SEK at EDSS 7-9, respectively. The average cost of a relapse was 36,900SEK. This study illustrates the burden of MS on Swedish patients and provides current data that are important for the development of health policies.

  15. Loss of life expectancy derived from a standardized mortality ratio in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skriver, Mette Vinther; Væth, Michael; Støvring, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) is a widely used measure. A recent methodological study provided an accurate approximate relationship between an SMR and difference in lifetime expectancies. This study examines the usefulness of the theoretical relationship, when comparing historic mortality data in four Scandinavian populations. For Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, data on mortality every fifth year in the period 1950 to 2010 were obtained. Using 1980 as the reference year, SMRs and difference in life expectancy were calculated. The assumptions behind the theoretical relationship were examined graphically. The theoretical relationship predicts a linear association with a slope, [Formula: see text], between log(SMR) and difference in life expectancies, and the theoretical prediction and calculated differences in lifetime expectancies were compared. We examined the linear association both for life expectancy at birth and at age 30. All analyses were done for females, males and the total population. The approximate relationship provided accurate predictions of actual differences in lifetime expectancies. The accuracy of the predictions was better when age was restricted to above 30, and improved if the changes in mortality rate were close to a proportional change. Slopes of the linear relationship were generally around 9 for females and 10 for males. The theoretically derived relationship between SMR and difference in life expectancies provides an accurate prediction for comparing populations with approximately proportional differences in mortality, and was relatively robust. The relationship may provide a useful prediction of differences in lifetime expectancies, which can be more readily communicated and understood.

  16. The Humanistic Medicine program at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlzén, Rolf; Stolt, Carl-Magnus

    2003-10-01

    In 1998, the Humanistic Medicine program was established at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. A fundamental element of the program is to promote medical humanities within clinical practice. The program's design focuses on three interconnected areas of study, the history of medicine, philosophy of medical science and practice, and aspects of the clinical encounter. The program offers undergraduate and postgraduate studies. The program's humanities content is bolstered in the medical curriculum by The Doctor School, a line of teaching medical students follow through their first four semesters. From this parallel series of lectures and seminars, students are exposed to further humanities and medical training. Students also have the option to select from humanities courses for their 17 eligible weeks of electives. It is hoped that the Karolinska Institute will continue to develop the humanities content of its curriculum, intertwining scientific exploration and humanistic understanding.

  17. Safety considerations concerning light water reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, T.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was commissioned by the Government to perform a Reactor Safety Study concerning commercial light water reactors. The study will contain an account of: - rules and regulations for reactor designs; - operation experience of the Swedish nuclear power plants with international comparisons; - the development of reactor designs during the last 10 years; - demands and conditions for inspection and inspection methods; - nuclear power plant operation organization; - training of operators; and - the results of research into nuclear safety. The study is scheduled for completion by July 1st, 1977, however, this paper gives a summary of the results of the Reactor Safety Study already available. The paper contains detailed statistics concerning safety related occurrences and reactor scrams in Sweden from July 1st, 1974 until the beginning of 1977

  18. Zooplankton from Lake Magelungen, Central Sweden 1960-1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almquist, Elisabeth

    1970-11-15

    The investigation of the zooplankton of Lake Magelungen, Central Sweden, was carried out over a period of three years. The aim of the investigation was to illustrate the qualitative and quantitative composition of the zooplankton before the release of waste water from the Aagesta Heat and Power Station began. Vertical sampling series were collected once a month at three different stations in the lake. The highest volumes of zooplankton were obtained in the summer. The ciliates predominated when the conditions were unfavourable for other zooplankton, as in winter just below the ice. The rotifers dominated during and immediately after the spring circulation. With one exception the crustaceans reached their peak volume values in August or September. The composition of the zooplankton indicates that Lake Magelungen is highly eutrophic

  19. Economic theory and the failure of electricity deregulation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, F.E.

    2004-01-01

    The deregulation of electricity has failed in Sweden. Since the beginning of the deregulation 'experiment', the trend price of electricity has increased much faster than the consumer price index, especially during recent years. More importantly, because of (1) the lack of investment in domestic generating (and perhaps transmission) facilities by Swedish power companies, (2) the questionable strategy employed by these firms to mange hydroelectric reserves, (3) increased and to some extent irrational energy taxes, and (4) the beginning of nuclear 'disengagement', households and businesses are vulnerable to a prolonged 'spike' in electricity prices. Everything considered, the recent history of the Swedish electricity sector - and particularly that of the overpraised Nordic Electric Exchange (i.e. Nord Pool) - should be considered a wake-up call instead of an example. (author)

  20. Social Enterprise, Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, H. Thomas R.; Hafen, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    gradually been liberalised through the introduction of ele-ments of individual freedom of choice and decentralisation in welfare provision, a process initiated by a Centre-Right coalition during the end of the 1980s, continued by Social Democratic Govern-ments and most recently by the Centre-Right coalition....... As a result a new strain of social entrepreneurs making use of mainstream entrepreneurial logic – discovery, evaluation and exploitation of opportunities to create future goods and services – when addressing societal problems, demonstrating that it works to be both commercially oriented as well...... as ideologically driven. Sweden is no exception to this trend. However, when the President of the European Commission, José Manuel Barroso states that: “Social business can be indeed a very powerful agenda for change. To deliver better outcomes for the common good. To show that it is possible to do things more...

  1. Zooplankton from Lake Magelungen, Central Sweden 1960-1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almquist, Elisabeth

    1970-11-01

    The investigation of the zooplankton of Lake Magelungen, Central Sweden, was carried out over a period of three years. The aim of the investigation was to illustrate the qualitative and quantitative composition of the zooplankton before the release of waste water from the Aagesta Heat and Power Station began. Vertical sampling series were collected once a month at three different stations in the lake. The highest volumes of zooplankton were obtained in the summer. The ciliates predominated when the conditions were unfavourable for other zooplankton, as in winter just below the ice. The rotifers dominated during and immediately after the spring circulation. With one exception the crustaceans reached their peak volume values in August or September. The composition of the zooplankton indicates that Lake Magelungen is highly eutrophic

  2. Monitoring the Achievement of Deaf Pupils in Sweden and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendar, Nils Ola Ebbe; O'Neill, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades there have been major developments in deaf education in many countries. Medical and technical advances have made it possible for more deaf children to hear and speak successfully. Most deaf pupils learn in ordinary classes in mainstream schools. In this article we explore...... patterns of achievements of deaf pupils to see if these reforms had improved attainment outcomes. International surveys such as PISA do not include deaf pupils. This article describes two independent large-scale surveys about deaf pupils in Sweden and Scotland. The similar results from both countries show...... that deaf children, after two decades of social reform and technical advances, still lag behind their hearing peers. The results also show how large-scale surveys can contribute to a greater understanding of educational outcomes in a small, vulnerable group and make it possible to continue to reform...

  3. Qualification paths of adult educators in Sweden and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Per; Köpsén, Susanne; Larson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    fields of education and training. In this study, we analyse the qualification paths, or learning trajectories, of prospective adult educators in Sweden and Denmark. The analysis is based on narrative interviews with 29 students in training to become adult educators. The career paths of adult educators...... are often long and winding roads. Becoming an adult educator could be their primary desire, but it could also be their ‘Plan B’, a second choice. Individual motives and external demands interact in the professionalisation process. A shift in focus from teaching subject and methods to teaching context...... and the relation to the learners is part of the professional development. Finally, we argue that both academic studies and hands-on work in the adult education community are crucial parts of the adult educator’s qualification path....

  4. Formando Trabajadores Sociales en Suecia Forming social workers in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Montesino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo discute cierta contradicción existente entre el contenido de la Educación en Trabajo Social de Suecia y las realidades cambiantes del sistema de bienestar sueco. La integración social de todos los ciudadanos ya no forma parte de las políticas que rigen las actividades de bienestar sueco, sin embargo, este enfoque sigue siendo una premisa en muchos de los contenidos de la educación institucionalizada de los trabajadores sociales en Suecia.This article discusses a certain contradiction that exists between the contents of the Swedish social work education and the changing realities of the Swedish welfare system. The social integration of all citizens is no longer part of the policies that direct the Swedish welfare activities, however, this approach continues to be taken for granted as a premise in several of the contents of the social workers' institutionalized education in Sweden.

  5. Fish Consumption and Ischemic stroke in Southern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennberg Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between fish intake and stroke incidence has been inconsistent in previous Swedish studies. Here, we report the risk of stroke and fish intake in a cohort from southern Sweden. Findings Data were obtained from an already available population based case-control study where the cases were defined as incident first-time ischemic stroke patients. Complete data on all relevant variables were obtained for 2722 controls and 2469 cases. The data were analyzed with logistic regression analysis. Stroke risk decreased with fat fish intake ([greater than or equal to] 1/week versus Conclusions The results suggest fat fish intake to decrease ischemic stroke risk and lean fish intake to increase women's stroke risk. The inconsistent relationship between fish intake and stroke risk reported in previous studies is further stressed by the results of this study.

  6. Organic carbon input in shallow groundwater at Aspo, southeastern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, B.

    1993-01-01

    The variation in carbon and oxygen isotopes in calcite fissure fillings and dissolved carbonate from shallow groundwaters has been examined at Aspo, southeastern Sweden. The shallow water lens is refilled by meteoric water and is considered as an open system. The σ 13 C-signatures of the dissolved carbonate fall within a narrow range of -15.8 to -17.4 per-thousand, indicative of organic an organic carbon source. The low σ 13 C-values suggest that input of soil-CO 2 is the dominating carbon source for the system. σ 13 C and σ 18 O-values in the calcite fissure fillings show a wide range in values with a possible two end-member mixing of early post glacial atmospheric CO 2 dominated system to a present day soil-CO 2 dominating carbon source

  7. A 3 MW wind power plant at Maglarp in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, B.

    1991-01-01

    The wind power plant at Maglarp, in a frequented region of Sweden, is described. Its technical parameters are given and its environmental impacts are dealt with. The whiz of the rotor blades is heard at a distance of 500 to 1000 m; the author refers to the whiz as pleasant. Not a single bird has been found killed by the facility. Interference with the TV signal can at times be observed in the town; this is more marked with metal rotor blades than with blades made of reinforced plastic. A wing of the wind power plant concentrates on its surface an energy of about 20 kW per square meter. (M.D.)

  8. Emerging genotype (GGIIb) of norovirus in drinking water, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Karin; Torvén, Maria; Ancker, Camilla; Knauth, Siv Britt; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Giesecke, Johan; Andersson, Yvonne; Svensson, Lennart

    2003-12-01

    From May through June 2001, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis that affected at least 200 persons occurred in a combined activity camp and conference center in Stockholm County. The source of illness was contaminated drinking water obtained from private wells. The outbreak appears to have started with sewage pipeline problems near the kitchen, which caused overflow of the sewage system and contaminated the environment. While no pathogenic bacteria were found in water or stools specimens, norovirus was detected in 8 of 11 stool specimens and 2 of 3 water samples by polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequencing of amplicons from two patients and two water samples identified an emerging genotype designated GGIIb, which was circulating throughout several European countries during 2000 and 2001. This investigation documents the first waterborne outbreak of viral gastroenteritis in Sweden, where nucleotide sequencing showed a direct link between contaminated water and illness.

  9. The Rise of the Professional Field of Medicine in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Carlhed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an analysis of conditions enabling the rise of the professional field of medicine in Sweden. The analysis is based mainly on second- ary data, while the use of primary data is restricted to official statistics. Primarily, it aims to study the conditions promoting professionalization in medicine. Important exogenous conditions were derived from early emerging nation state administration structures concerning policy and governance of public health, as well as a delegated supervision of professional health activities to the medical profession and the organization of a public national health care system. Professionalization strategies such as social organization of the medical profession and their use of a variety of legitimizing resources as tools for jurisdictional claims are considered as endogenous conditions. Broadly, the analysis shows a close relationship between the growth of professionalization in the field of medicine and the development of state prosperity in the Swedish welfare state. 

  10. Director Experience and the Performance of IPOs: Evidence from Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Isaksson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available private to public. In this paper the experience of directors is examined to determine the extent of the role they play in ensuring a successful listing. Unique data from 122 IPOs on the Swedish Stock Exchange have been examined in a search for the effect of director experience on aftermarket performance. Specific aspects of director experience within a board, such as interlocking directorships and average tenure, are connected to the underpricing of Swedish IPOs. Contrary to expectations, no statistically significant relationship was found between long-run aftermarket performance and director experience at the time of an IPO. This suggests that the previous experience of directors, as measured in earlier studies, is less relevant to long-term aftermarket performance in Sweden compared to other countries studied in the literature review. This emphasises the importance of examining different institutional contexts.

  11. Experimental evidence from active placement efforts among unemployed in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Pathric

    2014-06-01

    This article uses data from a field experiment in Sweden to analyze the effects of active placement efforts. In particular, the relative efficiency between combining job-search monitoring and job-search assistance, and monitoring alone, is analyzed. Although the impact estimates are generally imprecisely estimated, a general conclusion is that placement programs are effective policies in increasing the job exit rate for various groups of unemployed. I find that monitoring of job search is an efficient method to increase off-unemployment exit rate both alone and combined with job-search assistance services. The results, however, indicate that the combined services generate more permanent job exits. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. A novel stroke locus identified in a northern Sweden pedigree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janunger, T.; Nilsson-Ardnor, S.; Wiklund, P.-G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The population of northern Sweden is characterized by reduced genetic diversity and a high incidence of stroke. We sought to reduce genetic variation further, using genealogic analysis in a set of nuclear families affected by stroke, and we subsequently performed a genome-wide scan...... to identify novel stroke susceptibility loci. METHODS: Through genealogy, 7 nuclear families with a common ancestor, connected over 8 generations, were identified. A genome-wide scan using 449 microsatellite markers was performed with subsequent haplotype analyses. RESULTS: A maximum allele-sharing lod score...... of 4.81 on chromosome 9q31-q33 was detected. Haplotype analysis identified a common 2.2-megabase interval in the chromosomal region in 4 of the nuclear families, where an overrepresentation of intracerebral hemorrhage was observed. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel susceptibility locus for stroke...

  13. Mother Tongue Tuition in Sweden - Curriculum Analysis and Classroom Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne REATH WARREN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The model of Mother Tongue Tuition (MTT which has developed in Sweden since the 1970’s offers speakers of languages other than Swedish the opportunity to request tuition in their mother tongue, from kindergarten through to year 12. It is unique among the major immigrant-receiving countries of the world yet little is known about MTT and its syllabus outside of its Nordic context. This article examines the syllabus for MTT from two perspectives; firstly using the framework of Constructive Alignment, secondly from the perspective of what is hidden. The intended syllabus is revealed as well-aligned, but the hidden curriculum impedes successful enactment in many contexts. Examples from case studies in a larger on-going research project offer an alternate approach to syllabus implementation when the negative effects of the hidden curriculum are challenged. While highly context-specific, this model may represent a step in the right direction for implementation of the syllabus.

  14. Progress report on nuclear data activities in Sweden for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, H.

    1981-04-01

    The report contains information from laboratories in Sweden about measurements and compilations which are relevant to obtain nuclear data for research and development in different applied fields of nuclear physics. The report also contains short information about changes of existing experimental facilities. Reports relevant to the nuclear energy field are given of neutron cross section measurements and studies of the fission process. Reports are also given of nuclear structure and decay data measurements especially fission product nuclear data measurements of importance for the research on reactor safety and nuclear waste handling. Charged particle and photonuclear cross section measurements with applications in e.g. activation analysis and the production of radioisotopes for medical use are reported as well.(author)

  15. Progress report on nuclear data activities in Sweden for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, H.

    1981-04-01

    This report contains information from laboratories in Sweden about measurements and compilations which are relevant to obtain nuclear data for research and development in different applied fields of nuclear physics. Reports relevant to the nuclear energy field are given of neutron cross section measurements and studies of the fission process. Reports are also given of nuclear structure and decay data measurements especially fission product nuclear data measurements of importance for the research on reactor safety and nuclear waste handling. Charged particle and photonuclear cross section measurements with applications in e.g. activation analysis and the production of radioisotopes for medical use are reported as well. In some cases reports are also given of measurements aiming to test nuclear models which are commonly used for the calculation of the above type of data. The report also contains short information about changes of existing experimental facilities. (Auth.)

  16. The impact of party on nuclar power attitudes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, S.

    1991-04-01

    Mass attitudes to nuclear power in general and to the more specific problems having to do with the management of nuclear waste are related to each other. People with anti-nuclear attitudes tend to view many of the nuclear waste problems differently than persons who are positive to the use of nuclear power. Hence, the study of mass attitudes to nuclear power is of relevance for the study of attitudes to nuclear waste. The present study analyse attitudes to nuclear power as well as attitudes to nuclear waste. The emphasis, however, is on the development of mass attitudes to nuclear power. The setting is Sweden and the time-frame the last 20 years. (author)

  17. Mechanical properties of granitic rocks from Gideaa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljunggren, C.; Stephansson, O.; Alm, O.; Hakami, H.; Mattila, U.

    1985-10-01

    The elastic and mechanical properties were determined for two rock types from the Gideaa study area. Gideaa is located approximately 30 km north-east of Oernskoeldsvik, Northern Sweden. The rock types that were tested were migmatitic gneiss and migmatitic granite. The following tests were conducted: - sound velocity measurements; - uniaxial compression tests with acoustic emission recording; - brazilian disc tests; - triaxial tests; - three point bending tests. All together, 12 rock samples were tested with each test method. Six samples of these were migmatic gneiss and six samples were migmatitic granite. The result shows that the migmatitic gneiss has varying strength properties with low compressive strength in comparison with its high tensile strength. The migmatitic granite, on the other hand, is found to have parameter values similar to other granitic rocks. With 15 refs. (Author)

  18. Wood pellets offer a competitive energy option in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The market for wood pellets in Sweden grew rapidly during the 1990s and production now stands at around 550,000 tonnes/year. More efficient combustion technology, pellet transportation, pellet storage and pellet delivery have also been developed. The pellets, which are produced by some 25 plants, are used in family houses, large-scale district heating plants, and combined heat and power (CHP) plants. Most of the pellets are made from biomass resources such as forest residues and sawdust and shavings from wood mills. Pellet production, the energy content of saw mill by-products, the current market and its potential for future expansion, the way in which the pellets are used in different combustion systems, the theoretical market potential for wood pellet heating installations in small houses and the Swedish P-certificate system for the certification of pellet stoves and burners are described

  19. National Survey on Justification of CT-examinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, Anja; Leitz, Wolfram; Richter, Sven

    2009-02-15

    All examinations in diagnostic radiology shall be justified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of the patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the degree of justification for CT-examinations in Sweden. Referrals for all examinations performed during one day were retrospectively evaluated by a group of physicians. The study was designed and conducted by a project group lead by prof. Haakan Jorulf. The authors of this report have derived the results and conclusions on the basis of the data and are responsible for the content of this report. The principle result was that approximately 20 % of all examinations were not justified. The degree of justification varied strongly with organ examined, moderately with prescriber affiliation and weakly with geographical region. If unjustified examinations could be avoided a large dose reduction for the population would be achieved. This study shows that there is a need for improvements and the authority will continue to work with this issue

  20. Environmental taxes in Sweden, does the polluter pay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoelin, M.

    2001-01-01

    Environmental taxes have been on the agenda in many countries in Europe the last couple of years. The aim of environmental taxes is mainly to decrease the harm to the environment by charging the activities that are harmful to the environment. The statistics on environmental taxes have, until today, often been presented on an aggregated level i.e. the total tax revenue for different taxes. Something that has a high political interest is to present environmental taxes broken down by industries. This makes it possible to analyse how the tax burden is spread between different economic activities. This presentation will cover environmental taxes in Sweden on an aggregate level as well as broken down by industries and sectors. The breakdown of environmental taxes by industry are compared to relevant environmental data within the system of environmental accounts, like pollution and energy consumption

  1. National Survey on Justification of CT-examinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Leitz, Wolfram; Richter, Sven

    2009-02-01

    All examinations in diagnostic radiology shall be justified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of the patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the degree of justification for CT-examinations in Sweden. Referrals for all examinations performed during one day were retrospectively evaluated by a group of physicians. The study was designed and conducted by a project group lead by prof. Haakan Jorulf. The authors of this report have derived the results and conclusions on the basis of the data and are responsible for the content of this report. The principle result was that approximately 20 % of all examinations were not justified. The degree of justification varied strongly with organ examined, moderately with prescriber affiliation and weakly with geographical region. If unjustified examinations could be avoided a large dose reduction for the population would be achieved. This study shows that there is a need for improvements and the authority will continue to work with this issue

  2. Content of nitrogen in atmospheric precipitation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angstroem, A; Hoegberg, L

    1952-01-01

    In the present paper an attempt is made to give a general idea of the geographical distribution of fixed nitrogen (NH/sub 4/-N) transferred to the soil through precipitation in Sweden. Further a map is given showing the distribution af alpha, a quantity proportional to the nitrogen concentration in the precipitation at the beginning of a rain and, it is assumed, representative for the content of fixed nitrogen in the atmosphere before the rain is falling. A discussion of different causes of the concentration of fixed nitrogen in precipitation is presented and a photochemical process is suggested, which would explain the almost constant ratio between NH/sub 4//sup -n/ and NO/sub 3//sup -n/ frequently found within the temperate zones. It is evident, however, that other causes also are at work, especially at lower latitudes. The need of laboratory experiments is emphasized.

  3. Case mix adjusted variation in cesarean section rate in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton, Johan; Ladfors, Lars; Ekenberg Abreu, Anna; Lindgren, Peter; Saltvedt, Sissel; Weichselbraun, Marianne; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis

    2017-05-01

    Cesarean section (CS) rate is a well-established indicator of performance in maternity care and is also related to resource use. Case mix adjustment of CS rates when performing comparisons between hospitals is important. The objective of this study was to estimate case mix adjusted variation in CS rate between hospitals in Sweden. In total, 139 756 deliveries in 2011 and 2012 were identified in administrative systems in seven regions covering 67% of all deliveries in Sweden. Data were linked to the Medical birth register and population data. Twenty-three different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were used for adjustment. Analyses were performed for the entire study population as well as for two subgroups. Logistic regression was used to analyze differences between hospitals. The overall CS rate was 16.9% (hospital minimum-maximum 12.1-22.6%). Significant variations in CS rate between hospitals were observed after case mix adjustment: hospital odds ratios for CS varied from 0.62 (95% CI 0.53-0.73) to 1.45 (95% CI 1.37-1.52). In nulliparous, cephalic, full-term, singletons the overall CS rate was 14.3% (hospital minimum-maximum: 9.0-19.0%), whereas it was 4.7% for multiparous, cephalic, full-term, singletons with no previous CS (hospital minimum-maximum: 3.2-6.7%). In both subgroups significant variations were observed in case mix adjusted CS rates. Significant differences in CS rate between Swedish hospitals were found after adjusting for differences in case mix. This indicates a potential for fewer interventions and lower resource use in Swedish childbirth care. Best practice sharing and continuous monitoring are important tools for improving childbirth care. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Drivers behind the development of forest energy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerheden, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The use of forest fuels has more than doubled in Sweden over the last 25-30 years. Almost a fifth of the utilized energy is now based on forest biomass. Concurrently, real prices of bioenergy have decreased to less than a third of what they were 25 years ago. Some principal driving forces behind this development are identified and discussed in this paper. The origin of this development was equally the result of a foreseen shortage of fibre and a reaction to this vulnerable position, made obvious through the 'oil crises'. Although Sweden has a long tradition of large-scale use of forest energy, 35 years ago she was almost totally dependent on imported oil. Forest mechanisation provided rational solutions to handling small diameter wood and stumps in conventional industrial processes, but also enabled the economical use of such wood for energy. During 3 decades of development, drivers and obstacles have shifted. What started to reduce dependence on fossil fuels was later driven by increased general environmental awareness. An emerging 'green' lobby blocked the development of nuclear power and expanded harnessing of hydropower which were alternative means of self-sufficiency. In the last 10-15 years, focus has changed again. Global concern for climatic change due to emissions of greenhouse gases is a powerful driver, endorsing increased use of CO 2 -neutral energy sources. Sustainability, resource cycling and the welfare of future generations are seen as goals for continued development. Ideals and policies do not, however, automatically induce change in regular operations. A set of drivers is identified, that has played the decisive role in practice. These include the direct technical-operational drivers, as well as indirect drivers through market development, taxation and other legislation

  5. Regional environmental documentation of natural radiation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.

    1982-01-01

    In 1979, when the problem of high radon daughter levels in Swedish houses became widely published, the need for information on variations in the natural radiation environment became very apparent. The radon problem was at first attributed to radon emanation from alum shale based aerated concrete, but it was soon obvious that ground with an abnormally high uranium content constitutes an even greater risk for high radon daughter levels in houses. The geological Survey of Sweden was commissioned to produce a documentation in map form for all areas and rock types with gamma ray levels exceeding 30 μR/h, with the intention of delimiting risk areas for high soil gas radon contents. The maps, known as GEO-radiation maps, are produced at scale of 1:50 000. They are based primarily upon radiometric surveys, ground measurements of gammaradiation and geological mapping. To date some 450 map sheets have been published covering approximately 55% of the country. The maps provide primary information to local planning, health and building authorities as to variations in the natural radiation environment. Within the so-called risk areas marked on the maps, local authorities are recommended to investigate the soil gas radon content prior to any new development. Geological environments known, in Sweden, to be associated with radon daughter problems in dwellings are alum shale, a Cambrian, uranium-rich black shale, uranium-rich granites and uranium-rich pegmatites. Both alum shale and uranium-rich granites constitute extensive areas of bedrock. More recently it has been established that high soil-gas radon concentrations are also associated with glacial eskers. (Author)

  6. Prostate cancer incidence and survival in immigrants to Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Ankerst, Donna P; Sundquist, Jan; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2013-12-01

    The large international variation in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC) is well known but the underlying reasons are not understood. We want to compare PC incidence and survival among immigrants to Sweden in order to explain the international differences. Cancer data were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for PC in first-degree immigrants by country of birth. The immigrants were classified into four groups by SIR and area of origin. Survival in PC was assessed by hazard ratio (HR) in the four groups. In some analyses, clinical stage of PC was assessed by the tumor, node, and metastasis classification. The SIR was 0.47 (95% confidence interval 0.43-0.51) for immigrants with the lowest risk, constituting men from Turkey, Middle East, Asia, and Chile. The HR was 0.60 (0.45-0.81) for these men and it was 0.49 if they had stayed 20+ years in Sweden. The SIR in screening detected PC, T1c, was 0.55. Among these men, screening detected PC constituted 34.5% of all PC, compared to 29.0% among Swedes (p = 0.10). The results showed that the non-European immigrants, of mainly Middle East, Asian, and Chilean origin, with the lowest risk of PC, also had the most favorable survival in PC. As the available clinical features of PC at diagnosis or the distribution of known risk factors could not explain the differences, a likely biological mechanism through a favorable androgenic hormonal host environment is suggested as an explanation of the observed effects.

  7. Epidural analgesia during labor among immigrant women in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekéus, Cecilia; Cnattingius, Sven; Hjern, Anders

    2010-01-01

    To investigate differences in the use of epidural analgesia (EDA) during labor between native Swedish and immigrant women and whether such possible differences could be explained by other maternal factors or birthweight. Population-based register study. Nationwide study in Sweden. A total of 455,274 primiparous women, who gave birth to a singleton infant at 37-41 completed gestational weeks during 1992-2005. Of the 72,086 (16%) immigrants, data on 31,148 women from the eight most common countries of origin were analyzed to test our hypotheses. Register study with perinatal data from the Medical Birth Register and socio-demographic variables from national income and population registers. Use of EDA during vaginal delivery. Compared with native Swedish women, EDA was more often used by women from Chile, odds ratio (OR) 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.57); Iran, OR 1.38 (1.26-1.53); Poland, OR 1.22 (1.08-1.37) and Finland, OR 1.10 (1.03-1.17) after adjustments for perinatal and socio-demographic confounders, while EDA was less often used among women from Somalia, OR 0.57 (0.46-0.70); Iraq, OR 0.71 (0.64-0.78); Turkey, OR 0.77(0.69-0.86) and Yugoslavia, OR 0.85 (0.79-0.91). Having a native Swedish partner increased the use of EDA in immigrant women. EDA use during labor varies more by maternal country of origin than by socio-economic factors. This suggests that expectations of care from the country of origin continue to influence the use of EDA after immigration to Sweden.

  8. Likelihood of treatment in a coronary care unit for a first-time myocardial infarction in relation to sex, country of birth and socioeconomic position in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; James, Stefan; de Faire, Ulf; Alfredsson, Lars; Jernberg, Tomas; Moradi, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    To examine the relationship between sex, country of birth, level of education as an indicator of socioeconomic position, and the likelihood of treatment in a coronary care unit (CCU) for a first-time myocardial infarction. Nationwide register based study. Sweden. 199 906 patients (114 387 men and 85,519 women) of all ages who were admitted to hospital for first-time myocardial infarction between 2001 and 2009. Admission to a coronary care unit due to myocardial infarction. Despite the observed increasing access to coronary care units over time, the proportion of women treated in a coronary care unit was 13% less than for men. As compared with men, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio among women was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 0.82). This lower proportion of women treated in a CCU varied by age and year of diagnosis and country of birth. Overall, there was no evidence of a difference in likelihood of treatment in a coronary care unit between Sweden-born and foreign-born patients. As compared with patients with high education, the adjusted odds ratio among patients with a low level of education was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.89 to 0.96). Foreign-born and Sweden-born first-time myocardial infarction patients had equal opportunity of being treated in a coronary care unit in Sweden; this is in contrast to the situation in many other countries with large immigrant populations. However, the apparent lower rate of coronary care unit admission after first-time myocardial infarction among women and patients with low socioeconomic position warrants further investigation.

  9. Sweden's third national report under the the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Swedish implementation of the obligations of the Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    deregulation, in order ro verify that preventive safety work, such as operating experience feedback analysis and its implementation at the plant level, has the necessary strength. Events occurred during 2003 show that licensees need to implement a stronger internal assessment of their safety management. A good planning needs to be implemented, by the licensees as well as the regulatory bodies, in order to deal with management of ageing as well as modernisation and upgrading of the nuclear power plants. The licensees need to closely monitor their efforts to transfer knowledge from key staff soon being retired, with experience from the beginning of the Swedish nuclear programme, to younger generations of engineers and other specialists. Sweden is looking forward to reporting on the development regarding the above issues in its 2008 national report to the Convention

  10. Dietary intake, leisure time activities and obesity among adolescents in Western Sweden: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkvist, Anna; Hultén, Bodil; Kim, Jeong-Lim; Johansson, Ingegerd; Torén, Kjell; Brisman, Jonas; Bertéus Forslund, Heléne

    2016-04-21

    Overweight and obesity among adolescents are increasing worldwide. Risk factors include dietary intake characteristics and high levels of physical inactivity. In Sweden, few large comprehensive population-based surveys of dietary intake and lifestyle among adolescents have been carried out. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to describe dietary intake and food choices as well as leisure time activities in relation to overweight and obesity in a total sample of all schoolchildren aged 15 years in Western Sweden. In 2008, a questionnaire was sent to all 21,651 adolescents born in 1992 in Västra Götaland Region, Sweden. Participation rate was 54.3 % (50.7 % girls/49.3 % boys). The questionnaire included a 73-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and questions on lifestyle. Results were evaluated against the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations and Swedish indicators of healthy diet and exercise habits. Associations with concurrent overweight and obesity were evaluated in multiple linear regression analysis. Among girls, 49.5 % reached the goal of consuming fruit and vegetables at least daily, whereas for boys the figure was 34.4 %. Among both sexes, 15 % reached the goal of consuming fish at least twice weekly. Two-thirds of both sexes reached the goal of regular moderate or vigorous physical activity weekly. In total, 12.4 % were overweight and 2.4 % were obese. More girls than boys were underweight, whereas more boys than girls were overweight or obese (p bread and potatoes and fast food (p < 0.001). Frequent intake of candies and chocolate was reported by both sexes. Among girls and boys, living in rural areas, living in apartments and reporting no frequent leisure time physical activity were significant risk factors for being overweight or obese, also when adjusted for other risk factors. Dietary habits of adolescents in Western Sweden warrant improvements. Public health actions should be taken to increase consumption of fruit, vegetables and

  11. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Papadopoulos, Fotios C.; Pukkala, Eero; Ekbom, Anders; Gissler, Mika; Christensen, Jane; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. The comparison group consisted of randomly selected persons from population registers who were similar to the anorexia nervosa patients in respect to sex, year of birth and place of residence. Patients and population comparisons were followed for cancer by linkage to Cancer Registries. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Poisson models. In total, 366 cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) were seen among women with anorexia nervosa, and the IRR for all cancer sites was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.87-1.08) adjusted for age, parity and age at first child. There were 76 breast cancers corresponding to an adjusted IRR of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.49-0.77). Significantly increased IRRs were observed for esophageal, lung, and liver cancer. Among men with anorexia nervosa, there were 23 cases of cancer (age-adjusted IRR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.71-1.66). There seems to be no general reduction in cancer occurrence among patients with anorexia nervosa, giving little support to the energy restriction hypothesis. PMID:26000630

  12. Health care systems in Sweden and China: Legal and formal organisational aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Björn; Hjelm, Katarina; Chang Zhang, Wen

    2010-06-22

    Sharing knowledge and experience internationally can provide valuable information, and comparative research can make an important contribution to knowledge about health care and cost-effective use of resources. Descriptions of the organisation of health care in different countries can be found, but no studies have specifically compared the legal and formal organisational systems in Sweden and China. To describe and compare health care in Sweden and China with regard to legislation, organisation, and finance. Literature reviews were carried out in Sweden and China to identify literature published from 1985 to 2008 using the same keywords. References in recent studies were scrutinized, national legislation and regulations and government reports were searched, and textbooks were searched manually. The health care systems in Sweden and China show dissimilarities in legislation, organisation, and finance. In Sweden there is one national law concerning health care while in China the law includes the "Hygienic Common Law" and the "Fundamental Health Law" which is under development. There is a tendency towards market-orientated solutions in both countries. Sweden has a well-developed primary health care system while the primary health care system in China is still under development and relies predominantly on hospital-based care concentrated in cities. Despite dissimilarities in health care systems, Sweden and China have similar basic assumptions, i.e. to combine managerial-organisational efficiency with the humanitarian-egalitarian goals of health care, and both strive to provide better care for all.

  13. Age-related prevalence and characteristics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in periodontitis patients living in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, Rolf; Höglund-Åberg, Carola; Haubek, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in patients with periodontitis has been extensively studied for decades. Objective: To study the prevalence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in younger and older periodontitis patients and to genetically characterize isolates...

  14. The impact of policy changes on consumer behaviour and alcohol consumption in Scania, Sweden 1999-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafström, Martin; Ostergren, Per-Ölof

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the hypothesis that a gradual deregulation of traveller allowances, starting in 2001 and ending in 2004, on alcoholic beverages changed consumer behaviours that ultimately led to an increase in alcohol consumption in southern Sweden between in 2005 compared with 1999. The data for this general population random sample prospective cohort study with repeated measurements were collected in 1999 (T1) and in 2005 (T2) in the county of Scania, analysing the answers from 8612 individuals, who at T1 were alcohol consumers and 18-80 years old. Aggregate age-adjusted general mean alcohol consumption did not change significantly between T1 and T2. Significant downward changes were found in a number of demographical and socioeconomic sub-groups. Generalized linear model analyses indicated that the uptake of buying alcohol from a private person was associated with significantly higher consumption (P consuming illicitly distilled spirits or buying alcohol abroad were significantly associated with lower consumption at follow-up. Interaction effects between changing consumer behaviours were also identified. The deregulation of the cross-border trade of alcohol into Sweden did not, within our sample, lead to an increase in consumption. There were, however, significant decreases in consumption levels within different socio-demographic sub-groups. In relation to changing consumer behaviours both upward and downward shifts in drinking trends were observed. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  15. Health Effects of Unemployment in Denmark, Norway and Sweden 2007-2010: Differing Economic Conditions, Differing Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggebø, Kristian

    2016-07-01

    This article investigates short-term health effects of unemployment for individuals in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden during an economic downturn (2007-2010) that hit the Scandinavian countries with diverging strength. The longitudinal part of the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) data material is analyzed, and results from generalized least squares estimation indicate that Denmark is the only Scandinavian country in which health status deteriorated among the unemployed. The individual-level (and calendar year) fixed-effect results confirm the negative relationship between unemployment and health status in Denmark. This result is robust across different subsamples, model specifications, and changes in both the dependent and independent variable. Health status deteriorated especially among women and people in prime working age (30-59 years). There is, however, only scant evidence of short-term health effects among the recently unemployed in Norway and Sweden. The empirical findings are discussed in light of: (1) the adequacy of the unemployment insurance system, (2) the likelihood of re-employment for the displaced worker, and (3) selection patterns into and out of employment in the years preceding and during the economic downturn. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Cumulative Risk of Bovine Mastitis Treatments in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Valde, JP; Lawson, LG; Lindberg, A; Agger, JF; Saloniemi, H; Østerås, O

    2004-01-01

    Data from the national dairy cow recording systems during 1997 were used to calculate lactation-specific cumulative risk of mastitis treatments and cumulative risk of removal from the herds in Denmark, Finland Norway and Sweden. Sweden had the lowest risk of recorded mastitis treatments during 305 days of lactation and Norway had the highest risk. The incidence risk of recorded mastitis treatments during 305 days of lactation in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden was 0.177, 0.139, 0.215 and...

  17. Sweden, Finland and the German energy policy turnaround; Schweden, Finnland und die deutsche Energiewende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fjaestad, Maja [Royal Institute for Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden); Hakkarainen, Petri [Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    After the nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima Finland and Sweden have chosen completely different paths compared to Germany: both countries plan to build new nuclear power plants. The contribution discusses the historical development of nuclear power in these countries. In Sweden a political polarization exists between those who want to use renewable energies and those who expect increasing greenhouse gas emissions in case of nuclear power phaseout. In Finland no important anti-nuclear movement has been formed. The authors do not expect a change of policy in Sweden and Finland.

  18. Production and ecological aspects of short rotation poplars in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacic, Almir

    2005-02-01

    Poplars (Populus sp.) are widely used in short rotation forestry for production of biomass for bioenergy, fibre and environmental services. Swedish short rotation forestry is based on Salix sp., and little is known about the production potential of poplar plantations and their effects on the environment. This thesis focuses on four aspects of intensive short rotation forestry with poplars: 1) Biomass production and partitioning at several initial densities and a range of latitudes and growing conditions in Sweden, 2) the effects of poplar plantation on floristic diversity in the Swedish agricultural landscape, 3) the pattern of wind damage and its effects on production in poplar plantations in southern Sweden, and 4) ecological characterisation of poplar varieties in short-term experiments with pot-grown plants. Annual biomass production in poplar plots and plantations over a rotation period of 9-14 years ranges between 3.3 and 9.2 Mg/ha/yr. These high production figures are achieved on relatively fertile, non-fertilised and non-irrigated agricultural land. The production assessments for commercial poplar plantations established at lower initial densities (1000 trees/ha) in southern Sweden indicate a similar production potential as in closely spaced cultures (5000 trees/ha), though at 3-5 years longer rotations. Lower initial densities enable higher pulpwood yields along with the production of biomass for bioenergy. A comparison among 21 poplar plots, 0.1-13 ha large and adjacent arable fields, indicates that small poplar plantations may increase floristic diversity on a landscape scale, mainly by providing a different type of habitat that may favour shade-tolerant and draught-sensitive species. This is reflected by a relatively low number of species shared by both types of habitat. Wind damage in two poplar plantations, 15 and 33 ha large, was assessed using wind damage classes based on leaning angle of individual trees on plots established before wind damage

  19. Hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among young adult refugees who arrived in Sweden as teenagers - a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhica, Hélio; Gauffin, Karl; Almquist, Ylva B; Rostila, Mikael; Berg, Lisa; Rodríguez García de Cortázar, Ainhoa; Hjern, Anders

    2017-08-08

    Psychological distress and lack of family support may explain the mental health problems that are consistently found in young unaccompanied refugees in Western countries. Given the strong relationship between poor mental health and alcohol misuse, this study investigated hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among accompanied and unaccompanied young refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers. The dataset used in this study was derived from a combination of different registers. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risks of hospital care due to alcohol related disorders in 15,834 accompanied and 4376 unaccompanied young refugees (2005-2012), aged 13 to 19 years old when settling in Sweden and 19 to 32 years old in December 2004. These young refugees were divided into regions with largely similar attitudes toward alcohol: the former Yugoslavian republics, Somalia, and the Middle East. The findings were compared with one million peers in the native Swedish population. Compared to native Swedes, hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders were less common in young refugees, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.65 and 95% confidence interval (CI) between 0.56 and 0.77. These risks were particularly lower among young female refugees. However, there were some differences across the refugee population. For example, the risks were higher in unaccompanied (male) refugees than accompanied ones (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00-2.19), also when adjusted for age, domicile and income. While the risks were lower in young refugees from Former Yugoslavia and the Middle East relative to native Swedes, independent of their length of residence in Sweden, refugees from Somalia who had lived in Sweden for more than ten years showed increased risks (HR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.71-3.76), after adjustments of age and domicile. These risks decreased considerably when income was adjusted for. Young refugees have lower risks of alcohol disorders compared with native

  20. Hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among young adult refugees who arrived in Sweden as teenagers – a national cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Manhica

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress and lack of family support may explain the mental health problems that are consistently found in young unaccompanied refugees in Western countries. Given the strong relationship between poor mental health and alcohol misuse, this study investigated hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among accompanied and unaccompanied young refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers. Methods The dataset used in this study was derived from a combination of different registers. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risks of hospital care due to alcohol related disorders in 15,834 accompanied and 4376 unaccompanied young refugees (2005–2012, aged 13 to 19 years old when settling in Sweden and 19 to 32 years old in December 2004. These young refugees were divided into regions with largely similar attitudes toward alcohol: the former Yugoslavian republics, Somalia, and the Middle East. The findings were compared with one million peers in the native Swedish population. Results Compared to native Swedes, hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders were less common in young refugees, with a hazard ratio (HR of 0.65 and 95% confidence interval (CI between 0.56 and 0.77. These risks were particularly lower among young female refugees. However, there were some differences across the refugee population. For example, the risks were higher in unaccompanied (male refugees than accompanied ones (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00–2.19, also when adjusted for age, domicile and income. While the risks were lower in young refugees from Former Yugoslavia and the Middle East relative to native Swedes, independent of their length of residence in Sweden, refugees from Somalia who had lived in Sweden for more than ten years showed increased risks (HR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.71–3.76, after adjustments of age and domicile. These risks decreased considerably when income was adjusted for. Conclusion Young