WorldWideScience

Sample records for swaying

  1. Measuring postural sway in sitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek John; Hansen, Lisbeth; Luun, Malene

    2015-01-01

    and younger than 10 years old, participated in this study. The children sat unsupported for 30 s while their posture and sway were quantified using stereophotogrammetry. The tendency in both age groups was to sit with a backward tilted pelvis and a kyphotic trunk. The sitting position was most varied...... group appeared to result from an equally stable trunk supported on a less stable pelvis. Mediolateral marker sway and intersegmental angular sway showed a clearer age dependency. Trunk postural control does not appear to differ between children older and younger than 10 years old, but sagittal plane...

  2. Sway as predictor of injuries in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Junge, Tina

    2014-01-01

    ). Outcome measures Primary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using......Introduction Poor postural control measured as sway performance is an intrinsic risk of injury and re-injury among adults. This has not been investigated in children. Objective To investigate the associations between balance, measured as sway performance, and the risk of both acute and overuse...... injuries in a population of children. Hypothesis: Excessive sway increases the risk of injury. Design The current study is part of The Childhood Health, Activity and Motor Performance School Study-Denmark (CHAMPS Study-DK II), a natural experiment with a prospective, quasi-experimental study design...

  3. Measuring postural sway in sitting: a new segmental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Derek John; Hansen, Lisbeth; Luun, Malene; Løberg, Ragnhild; Woollacott, Marjorie; Saavedra, Sandy; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Berggreen, Steen; Bencke, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Global measures of trunk sway are traditionally used even though the trunk comprises a multiple number of segments. The authors' aim was to measure the seated sway of typically developing children using a multisegment approach. Twenty typically developing children divided into 2 groups, older and younger than 10 years old, participated in this study. The children sat unsupported for 30 s while their posture and sway were quantified using stereophotogrammetry. The tendency in both age groups was to sit with a backward tilted pelvis and a kyphotic trunk. The sitting position was most varied in the younger group. Marker sway amplitude and velocity in sitting were age dependent, with reduced sway amplitude and velocity with increased age for all segments. Anteroposterior intersegmental angular sway was not age dependent. The difference in marker sway in the anteroposterior direction for the younger group appeared to result from an equally stable trunk supported on a less stable pelvis. Mediolateral marker sway and intersegmental angular sway showed a clearer age dependency. Trunk postural control does not appear to differ between children older and younger than 10 years old, but sagittal plane pelvic stability can explain the increased sway reported in younger children.

  4. Sway as predictor of injuries in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Junge, Tina

    ). Outcome measures Primary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using...... ICD-10. Results Injuries: 2276, traumatic injuries: 714, ankle sprains: 164, knee sprains: 42 Preliminary multivariate analysis taking into account competing risk showed significant odds ratios (OR) at test 1; A) 1.003 per cm increase of sway; B) overall traumatic injury OR=3.0, ankle sprain OR=5...

  5. Kinesthetic motor imagery modulates body sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, E C; Lemos, T; Gouvea, B; Volchan, E; Imbiriba, L A; Vargas, C D

    2010-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of imagining an action implicating the body axis in the kinesthetic and visual motor imagery modalities upon the balance control system. Body sway analysis (measurement of center of pressure, CoP) together with electromyography (EMG) recording and verbal evaluation of imagery abilities were obtained from subjects during four tasks, performed in the upright position: to execute bilateral plantar flexions; to imagine themselves executing bilateral plantar flexions (kinesthetic modality); to imagine someone else executing the same movement (visual modality), and to imagine themselves singing a song (as a control imagery task). Body sway analysis revealed that kinesthetic imagery leads to a general increase in CoP oscillation, as reflected by an enhanced area of displacement. This effect was also verified for the CoP standard deviation in the medial-lateral direction. An increase in the trembling displacement (equivalent to center of pressure minus center of gravity) restricted to the anterior-posterior direction was also observed to occur during kinesthetic imagery. The visual imagery task did not differ from the control (sing) task for any of the analyzed parameters. No difference in the subjects' ability to perform the imagery tasks was found. No modulation of EMG data were observed across imagery tasks, indicating that there was no actual execution during motor imagination. These results suggest that motor imagery performed in the kinesthetic modality evokes motor representations involved in balance control. Copyright (c)10 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SWAYING THREADS OF A SOLAR FILAMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Engvold, O.; Langangen, Oe.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Oliver, R.

    2009-01-01

    From recent high-resolution observations obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope in La Palma, we detect swaying motions of individual filament threads in the plane of the sky. The oscillatory characters of these motions are comparable with oscillatory Doppler signals obtained from corresponding filament threads. Simultaneous recordings of motions in the line of sight and in the plane of the sky give information about the orientation of the oscillatory plane. These oscillations are interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. Kink MHD waves supported by the thread body are proposed as an explanation of the observed thread oscillations. On the basis of this interpretation and by means of seismological arguments, we give an estimation of the thread Alfven speed and magnetic field strength by means of seismological arguments.

  7. Comparison of postural sway depending on balance pad type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, DongGeon; Kim, HaNa; An, HyunJi; Jang, JiEun; Hong, SoungKyun; Jung, SunHye; Lee, Kyeongbong; Choi, Myong-Ryol; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Lee, GyuChang

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the postural sway of healthy adults standing on different types of balance pads. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy adults participated in this study. Postural body sway was measured while participants were standing on four different types of balance pads: Balance-pad Elite (BE), Aero-Step XL (AS), Dynair Ballkissen Senso (DBS), and Dynair Ballkissen XXL Meditation and Yoga (DBMY). A Wii Balance Board interfaced with Balancia software was used to measure postural body sway. [Results] In the sway velocity, sway path length, and sway area, no significant differences were found between baseline conditions (participants were standing on the floor with no balance pad) and the use of the BE or AS. However, significant increases in all parameters were found comparing baseline conditions to the use of either Dynair balance pad. Furthermore, the use of either Dynair balance pad significantly increased postural sway compared to both the BE and the AS. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the DBS and DBMY balance pads may serve as superior tools for providing unstable condition for balance training than the BE and the AS balance pads.

  8. WHAT IS THE ROLE BODY SWAY DEVIATION AND BODY SWAY VELOCITY PLAY IN POSTURAL STABILITY IN OLDER ADULTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Jančová Všetečková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross sectional study focused on how Postural Stability (PS indicators: body sway deviation (BSD and body sway velocity (BSV, change with age and their association with levels of social and physical activity. Observational study: 80 older adults (aged: 60–96 were purposefully recruited from two sources: the University of the Third Age (TAU (n = 35 and a residential care home (CH (n = 45. Differences in the indicators of PS, approximated through Centre of Pressure (COP measurements, were assessed by the Romberg Stance Test (Test A subsequently repeated on 10 cm foam surface (Test B, using a Kistler® Dynamometric Platform. The RCH Group was older, had higher BMI and was less socially and physically active, showed more body sway in all indicators compared to TAU group. For all participants body sway velocity (BSV was significantly correlated with age. The strength of correlation of body sway deviation (BSD with age was also significant but not as strong. The findings indicate in line with previous studies that deterioration in BSV is associated with poor PS more than deterioration in BSD.

  9. Patterns of postural sway in high anxious children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dokkum Elisabeth H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current research suggests that elevated levels of anxiety have a negative impact on the regulation of balance. However, most studies to date examined only global balance performance, with little attention to the way body posture is organized in space and time. The aim of this study is to examine whether posturographic measures can reveal (subclinical balance deficits in children with high levels of anxiety. Methods We examined the spatio-temporal structure of the centre-of-pressure (COP fluctuations in children with elevated levels of anxiety and a group of typically developing children while maintaining quiet stance on a force plate in various balance challenging conditions. Balance was challenged by adopting sensory manipulations (standing with eyes closed and/or standing on a foam surface and using a cognitive manipulation (dual-tasking. Results Across groups, postural performance was strongly influenced by the sensory manipulations, and hardly by the cognitive manipulation. We also found that children with anxiety had overall more postural sway, and that their postural sway was overall less complex than sway of typically developing children. The postural differences between groups were present even in the simple baseline condition, and the group differences became larger with increasing task difficulty. Conclusion The pattern of postural sway suggests that balance is overall less stable and more attention demanding in children with anxiety than typically developing children. The findings provide further evidence for a neuro-behavioral link between psychopathology and the effectiveness of postural control.

  10. SWAY Bæredygtighed hos SMV'er

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Valg af materiale/medie/form: SWAY der indeholder forskelligt materiale Valg af arbejdsform: Kan anvendes som et element i undervisning eller indlæg Begrundelse for valg af materiale/medie/form/arbejdsform: Forskelligt materiale kan samlet heri og det kan tilgås af alle via linket...

  11. An input shaping controller enabling cranes to move without sway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, N.; Singhose, W.; Kriikku, E.

    1997-01-01

    A gantry crane at the Savannah River Technology Center was retrofitted with an Input Shaping controller. The controller intercepts the operator's pendant commands and modifies them in real time so that the crane is moved without residual sway in the suspended load. Mechanical components on the crane were modified to make the crane suitable for the anti-sway algorithm. This paper will describe the required mechanical modifications to the crane, as well as, a new form of Input Shaping that was developed for use on the crane. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new process. Several practical considerations will be discussed including a novel (patent pending) approach for making small, accurate moves without residual oscillations

  12. Body sway reflects leadership in joint music performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Steven R.; Bosnyak, Dan J.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2017-01-01

    The cultural and technological achievements of the human species depend on complex social interactions. Nonverbal interpersonal coordination, or joint action, is a crucial element of social interaction, but the dynamics of nonverbal information flow among people are not well understood. We used joint music making in string quartets, a complex, naturalistic nonverbal behavior, as a model system. Using motion capture, we recorded body sway simultaneously in four musicians, which reflected real-time interpersonal information sharing. We used Granger causality to analyze predictive relationships among the motion time series of the players to determine the magnitude and direction of information flow among the players. We experimentally manipulated which musician was the leader (followers were not informed who was leading) and whether they could see each other, to investigate how these variables affect information flow. We found that assigned leaders exerted significantly greater influence on others and were less influenced by others compared with followers. This effect was present, whether or not they could see each other, but was enhanced with visual information, indicating that visual as well as auditory information is used in musical coordination. Importantly, performers’ ratings of the “goodness” of their performances were positively correlated with the overall degree of body sway coupling, indicating that communication through body sway reflects perceived performance success. These results confirm that information sharing in a nonverbal joint action task occurs through both auditory and visual cues and that the dynamics of information flow are affected by changing group relationships. PMID:28484007

  13. An experimental controlled study on postural sway and therapeutic exercise in subjects with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuukkanen, T M; Mälkiä, E A

    2000-04-01

    To describe postural sway and its associations to background factors, low back pain and functional capacity. To evaluate the changes in postural sway after three months of therapeutic exercise in the gym or at home. A one-year randomized experimental trial evaluated postural sway in three study groups: intensive training, home exercise and control group. Subjects were recruited from seven local occupational health care centres in Central Finland and were examined at Central Finland Hospital by medical doctors. Measurements and therapeutic exercise programmes were carried out in the Research Laboratory of Sport and Health Sciences at Jyväskylä University. Initially, 49 male and 41 female subjects (aged 20-55 years) with nonspecific and subacute low back pain were examined. Postural sway using a force platform, the Oswestry Index, as well as a measure of low back pain intensity were measured at the initial stage of the study, directly after interventions, as well as at three and nine months after the interventions. The background variables were not strongly correlated with postural sway. No changes occurred in the amplitude of sway during the study, but the sway velocity of the home exercise group increased. Postural sway measurements with a force platform may be suitable for detecting impairments of balance performance among subjects with pronounced functional or activity limitations and severe low back pain problems. In order to enhance balance performance, specific and customized exercise programmes are required.

  14. Multisensory training for postural sway control in non-injured elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings demonstrated that the trained ETG improved in their total Berg Balance Test (BBT) scores indicated that the training program successfully improved postural sway control for non-injured elderly females. Keywords: multisensory training, postural sway control, balance ability, visual input; vestibular input ...

  15. Motion in images is essential to cause motion sickness symptoms, but not to increase postural sway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubeck, A.J.A.; Bos, J.E.; Stins, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective It is generally assumed that motion in motion images is responsible for increased postural sway as well as for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, this has not yet been tested. To that end, we studied postural sway and VIMS induced by motion and still images. Method

  16. Effect of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation on center of pressure sway of static standing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Yasuto; Otsuru, Naofumi; Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Kei; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Onishi, Hideaki

    The vestibular system is involved in the control of standing balance. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a noninvasive technique that can stimulate the vestibular system. In recent years, noisy GVS (nGVS) using noise current stimulation has been attempted, but it has not been clarified whether it affects postural sway in open-eye standing. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of nGVS on the center of pressure (COP) sway measurement in open-eye standing postural control and identify the responders of nGVS. nGVS (0.1-640 Hz) was delivered at 0.4 and 1.0 mA over the bipolar mastoid. COP sway root mean square area, sway path length, medio-lateral (ML) mean velocity, and antero-posterior (AP) mean velocity before and during nGVS in an open-eye standing posture was measured. nGVS at 0.4 and 1.0 mA significantly reduced sway path length, mean velocity. The stimulation effect of nGVS was also large in subjects with a long sway path. For subjects with high COP sway of Baseline, nGVS was effective even with stimulation for a short duration (5 s). These findings suggest that nGVS improves postural sway in an open-eye standing posture among young subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sex differences in visual performance and postural sway precede sex differences in visually induced motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslucher, Frank; Haaland, Eric; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Motion sickness is more common among women than among men. Previous research has shown that standing body sway differs between women and men. In addition, research has shown that postural sway differs between individuals who experience visually induced motion sickness and those who do not and that those differences exist before exposure to visual motion stimuli. We asked whether sex differences in postural sway would be related to sex differences in the incidence of visually induced motion sickness. We measured unperturbed standing body sway before participants were exposed to visual motion stimuli that induced motion sickness in some participants. During postural testing, participants performed different visual tasks. Results revealed that postural sway was affected by visual tasks, consistent with the literature. In addition, we found a statistically significant three-way interaction between visual tasks, sex, and (subsequent) motion sickness status. These results suggest that sex differences in motion sickness may be related to sex differences in the control of postural balance.

  18. Comparison of Computerized Sway Referencing and Standing on a Compliant Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, S. Lance; Paloski, William H.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: By removing vision and altering somatosensory inputs, we can examine the contributions of the vestibular system on balance control. Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) systems accomplish this by using a dynamic plate that moves in proportion to the sway of the subject. A potential alternative to CDP is the use of a compliant foam surface. The goal of this study was to compare postural sway during each condition. Methods: Thirty-two healthy subjects (16 male and 16 female) were tested on a Equitest computerized posturography system and on a 5 inch thick block of foam (NeuroCom International; Clackamas, OR). Subjects performed three trials with their head erect and five trials with dynamic head tilts ( 20 at 0.33Hz) in the anterior-posterior (AP) plane. Subjects were instructed to stand quietly with their arms folded and eyes closed for each trial lasting 20 seconds. The sway in both AP and medial-lateral (ML) planes was calculated for each trial, as well as the total sway path length. Results: In general, AP sway tended to be greater on the Equitest than on foam and greater during the head movement trials than the head erect. The ML sway was consistently higher on foam and did not vary between head erect and moving conditions. Sway path length was consistently greater for head erect trials on foam and tended to be greater for head movement trials on the Equitest. The addition of head movements increases AP sway and the total path length. Conclusions: Based on the increase of sway in the ML direction, it is important to quantify sway in all directions when on a compliant foam surface.

  19. The relation between postural sway magnitude and metabolic energy cost during upright standing on a compliant surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houdijk, J.H.P.; Brown, S.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Postural control performance is often described in terms of postural sway magnitude, assuming that lower sway magnitude reflects better performance. However, people do not typically minimize sway magnitude when performing a postural control task. Possibly, other criteria are satisfied when people

  20. Validation of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, J. H. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore); Ng, E. Y. K. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore); Robertson, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Driscoll, Frederick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    As part of a collaboration of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SWAY AS, NREL installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the spar-type 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating offshore wind system. The equipment enhanced SWAY's data collection and allowed SWAY to verify the concept and NREL to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), in collaboration with NREL, assisted with the validation. This final report gives an overview of the SWAY prototype and NREL and NTU's efforts to validate a model of the system. The report provides a summary of the different software tools used in the study, the modeling strategies, and the development of a FAST model of the SWAY prototype wind turbine, including justification of the modeling assumptions. Because of uncertainty in system parameters and modeling assumptions due to the complexity of the design, several system properties were tuned to better represent the system and improve the accuracy of the simulations. Calibration was performed using data from a static equilibrium test and free-decay tests.

  1. Analysis of postural sway in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus: effects of shunt implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czerwosz L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor postural balance is one of the major risk factors for falling in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH. Postural instability in the clinic is commonly assessed based upon force platform posturography. In this study we focused on the identification of changes in sway characteristics while standing quiet in patients with NPH before and after shunt implantation. Postural sway area and sway radius were analyzed in a group of 9 patients and 46 controls of both genders. Subject's spontaneous sway was recorded while standing quiet on a force platform for 30-60 s, with eyes open and then closed. Both analyzed sway descriptors identified between-group differences and also an effect of shunt implantation in the NPH group. Sway radius and sway area in patients exhibited very high values compared with those in the control group. Importantly, the effect of eyesight in patients was not observed before shunt implantation and reappeared after the surgical treatment. The study documents that static force platform posturography may be a reliable measure of postural control improvement due to shunt surgery.

  2. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  3. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, R.; Walker, B.

    2011-01-01

    compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were......Background: Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between...... pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less) with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90...

  4. SWAY/NREL Collaboration on Offshore Wind System Testing and Analysis: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-459

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and SWAY. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA agreement, NREL and SWAY will collaborate on the SWAY 1/5th-scale floating wind turbine demonstration project in Norway. NREL and SWAY will work together to obtain measurement data from the demonstration system to perform model validation.

  5. Changes in trunk sway of quay crane operators during work shift: A possible marker for fatigue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leban, Bruno; Fancello, Gianfranco; Fadda, Paolo; Pau, Massimiliano

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated changes in task-induced trunk sway of quay crane operators during a four-hour shift performed in a dedicated simulator as an indicator of postural control system effectiveness. Using a pressure sensitive mat placed on the seat pan, center-of-pressure (COP) time series were acquired and processed to calculate sway area, path length and COP displacements and velocities. The results show a well-defined linear trend for sway path and area, with significant increases starting from 65 to 155 min of work respectively. This indicates non-optimized trunk control most likely originated by the combination of physical and cognitive workload and suggests a possible role of long-term monitoring of trunk sway of crane operators as a useful tool in detecting non-optimized movements potentially associated with deteriorating performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Postural sway at ground and bevel levels in subjects with spina bifida occulta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shin-Tsu; Ku, Chih-Hung

    2007-06-01

    To assess whether the postural function is impaired by comparing the performances in upright standing at ground and bevel levels in adult subjects with spina bifida occulta (SBO). Eighty subjects with SBO (38 with minor type and 42 with major type) and 35 healthy control subjects participated in the study. All participants performed ten tests while standing upright on a platform at ground level (0 degrees, baseline) and on a beveled surface (with their feet in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion at 10 degrees and 20 degrees). Tests were done with their eyes open and closed. The postural sway was examined using a force platform (CATSYS, Danish) that records sway intensity and velocity. Sway intensity and sway velocity were universally associated with group, degree of bevel, open- or closed-eyes condition, and dorsiflexion or plantarflexion after adjusting for age and gender. With respect to sway intensity, the differences of minor or major SBO group were significantly decreased at different bevel degrees when compared with control groups, whereas the differences between minor and major SBO were significant differences at 10 degrees and 20 degrees. With respect to sway velocity, the differences of major SBO group were significantly decreased at different bevel degrees when compared with minor SBO and control groups, whereas the difference in minor SBO was only significant at 0 degrees when compared with control. Group differences (minor SBO vs. control, major SBO vs. control) showed a significant decrease in sway velocity when comparing at 10 degrees than at 0 degrees and at 20 degrees than at 0 degrees. In all subjects with SBO, the sway intensity/velocity values obtained with open eyes and with plantarflexion had lower values, when compared with values obtained with closed eyes and with dorsiflexion. This study supports the hypothesis that SBO impairs control of postural sway in both the resting upright and stressful postures. Our results imply that the larger the bone

  7. Postural sway changes during pregnancy: a descriptive study using stabilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Liliam F; Vieira, Taian M M; Macedo, Adriana R; Simpson, David M; Nadal, Jurandir

    2009-11-01

    This study aims to analyse changes in body sway over the course of pregnancy. This is a descriptive study in which stabilometric tests were applied at three stages of pregnancy and with a combination of different visual conditions (eyes open/closed) and support base configuration (feet together/apart). Twenty healthy pregnant women participated in the study. Changes in postural control with pregnancy were analysed via the elliptical area of the stabilograms and spectral analysis of the displacements of the centre of pressure (COP) along the lateral and anterior/posterior directions. The elliptical area encompassing the COP significantly increased over the course of the pregnancy for the feet apart and eyes closed test protocols. The spectral analysis revealed a significant increase of COP oscillations along the anterior-posterior direction when subjects stood with the eyes open/feet together and feet apart. A reduction (significant) of the lateral oscillations of COP was observed for the eyes open/feet together protocol. Pregnancy induced significant changes in the postural control when pregnant women stood with a reduced support base or with eyes closed.

  8. Do voluntary strength, proprioception, range of motion, or postural sway predict occurrence of lateral ankle sprain?

    OpenAIRE

    de Noronha, M; Refshauge, K M; Herbert, R D; Kilbreath, S L

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of ankle sprain, the most common sporting injury, is only possible once risk factors have been identified. Voluntary strength, proprioception, postural sway, and range of motion are possible risk factors. A systematic review was carried out to investigate these possiblities. Eligible studies were those with longitudinal design investigating ankle sprain in subjects aged ⩾15 years. The studies had to have measured range of motion, voluntary strength, proprioception, or postural sway...

  9. Age-gender differences in the postural sway during squat and stand-up movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kwon, Yuri; Ho, Yeji; Jeon, Hyeong-Min; Bang, Min-Jung; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Park, Byung Kyu; Cho, Yeong Bin

    2014-01-01

    Incidence of falling among elderly female has been reported to be much higher than that of elderly male. Although the gender differences in the elderly were reported for the static postural sway, there has been no investigation of the gender difference for the dynamic postural sway. This study investigates how age and gender affect the postural sway during dynamic squat and stand-up movement. 124 subjects (62 subjects for each of young and elderly) performed consecutive squat and stand-up movement, 2 times in one session, and 2 sessions per subject. Center of pressure (COP) was measured using force platform during the test. Outcome measures included peak-to-peak sways of the COP (COP sway) in the sagittal plane (anteroposterior) and frontal plane (mediolateral) and also those normalized by body height. Two-way ANOVA and post-hoc comparisons were performed for the outcome measures with the independent factors of age and gender. All outcome measures, excluding mediolateral COP sway, showed significant interaction of age and gender (pelderly female than elderly male. This may be related to the greater fall rate of elderly female than that of elderly men while performing dynamic activities.

  10. Static Standing Trunk Sway Assessment in Amputees – Effects of Sub-Threshold Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ming-Yih

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sub-threshold electrical stimulation can enhance the sensitivity of the human somatosensory system to improve the balance control capability of elderly was shown in recent rehabilitation articles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the postural sway of trans-tibial amputees when performing single leg quiet standing on firm surface. Four unilateral trans-tibial amputees who consecutively wore prosthetics over 2 years were recruited in this study. Subjects performed single leg quiet standing trails with sub-threshold electrical stimulation applied at the quadriceps muscle during the trails. Spatial co-ordinates for the determination kinematic data (sway distance of the center of mass (COM on second sacral (S2 were collected using an ultrasound-based Zebris CMS-HS system. The single leg quiet standing test is measure considered to assess postural steadiness in a static position by a spatial measurement. The common notion is that a better postural steadiness, i.e. less postural sway, allows for longer time single leg quiet standing. However, there is lack of evidence how postural steadiness during single leg quiet standing changes over time. In this article, we hypothesized that the static balance of single leg quiet standing could be improved for providing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation using sub-sensory stimulation in amputees. To test this hypothesis, a computerized sub-threshold low-level electrical stimulation device was developed and proposed for clinical study. Experimental results show that reduction in all of the postural sway indices (constant time sway length, max sway distance and average sway distance and increase in single leg support time index during single leg quiet standing by applying sub-sensory stimulation. The single leg quiet standing test findings suggest that sub-threshold electrical stimulation rehabilitation strategies may be effective in improving static balance performance for amputees.

  11. Postural sway in individuals with type 2 diabetes and concurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Kluding, Patricia M; Whitney, Susan L; Dai, Hongying; Santos, Marcio

    2017-12-01

    diabetes has been shown to affect the peripheral vestibular end organs and is associated with an increase in the frequency of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). People with diabetes have higher postural sway; however, the impact of symptomatic BPPV on postural sway in individuals with diabetes is unclear. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine postural sway in people with type 2 diabetes who have symptomatic, untreated BPPV (BPPVDM). fifty-two participants (mean age 56.9 ± 5.6 years) were enrolled: controls (n = 14), diabetes (n = 14), BPPV only (n = 13) and BPPVDM (n = 11). An inertial motion sensor was used to detect pelvic acceleration across five standing conditions with eyes open/closed on firm/foam surfaces. Range of acceleration (cm/s 2 ), peak velocity (cm/s) and variability of sway [root mean square (RMS)] in the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions were used to compare postural sway between groups across conditions. participants with BPPVDM had higher ranges of acceleration in the AP (p = 0.02) and ML (p = 0.02) directions, as well as higher peak velocity (p diabetes groups. Standing on foam with eyes closed and tandem stance were challenging conditions for people with BPPVDM. clinicians may consider using standing on foam with eyes closed and tandem standing with eyes open to assess postural control in people with BPPVDM to identify postural instability.

  12. The use of a safety harness does not affect body sway during quiet standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sandra M S F; Prado, Janina M; Duarte, Marcos

    2005-03-01

    Postural sway during quiet standing reduces when somatosensorial information is provided by an active or passive "light touch" of different body parts with a surface. The contact of the safety harness with the body could induce a similar effect, leading to an undesirable side effect in the balance evaluation. This study investigated if a safety harness system, commonly used in balance studies, affects body sway during the balance evaluation. Healthy adults stood as quietly as possible for 60s in a comfortable position on a force plate. First, we performed an experiment on the light-touch effect with 10 subjects to determine the necessary sample size for the main investigation. Then, 60 subjects completed four tasks where the use of the safety harness and the visual information were manipulated. Area, root-mean square, speed, and frequency of the center of pressure displacement were analyzed. A light touch decreased postural sway on both visual conditions but there was no effect of the use of a safety harness on sway when quietly standing, independent of the visual information. Postural sway increased on both somatosensorial conditions when the visual information was not provided. This result shows that the safety harness does not interfere with the evaluation what is of major importance to methodological aspects of balance evaluation.

  13. Motor imagery modulation of postural sway is accompanied by changes in the EMG-COP association.

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    Lemos, Thiago; Rodrigues, Erika C; Vargas, Claudia D

    2014-08-08

    Motor imagery (MI) performed in an upright stance promotes increases in postural sway without changes in usual amplitude measures of calf muscle EMG. However, postural muscle activity can also be determined from the temporal association between EMG and center of pressure (COP) displacements. In this study we investigated whether the MI modulation of postural sway is accompanied by changes in EMG-COP association. Surface EMG from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle and COP coordinates were collected from 12 subjects while they imagined themselves performing a rising on tiptoes movement via kinesthetic or visual imagery. As a control condition subjects were requested to imagine singing a song. The standard deviation of the forward-backward COP sway and the coefficient of variation of the EMG were calculated and compared across tasks. The degree of association between COP sways and LG activity was evaluated through a cross-correlation function. Kinesthetic imagery promoted a larger COP displacement than both visual and control imagery (pCOP association during kinesthetic imagery compared to control imagery (p=0.02), whereas the EMG-COP association in visual imagery was not different from that observed during kinesthetic or control imagery (p>0.19). In conclusion, kinesthetic imagery resulted in a higher EMG-COP temporal association. Subliminal fringe mechanisms may account for the imagery effects on muscle activity and postural sway during upright stance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Static postural sway of women with and without fibromyalgia syndrome: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Deborah Colucci; Driusso, Patricia; Avila, Mariana Arias; Gramani-Say, Karina; Moreira, Fernando Manuel Araujo; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-05-01

    There is a frequent complaint about balance problems among fibromyalgia syndrome patients; however, there are not enough studies that have shown static postural sway of women with fibromyalgia syndrome. This study aimed to compare static postural sway of women with and without fibromyalgia syndrome. This is a cross-sectional study in which twenty-nine women with fibromyalgia syndrome and 20 without took part. A posturography evaluation was performed in six different situations (bipedal, right tandem and left tandem, with eyes opened and closed), and questionnaires for clinical depression symptoms, clinical anxiety symptoms, sleep quality, and Visual Analogue Scales for Pain and Fatigue were applied. Mann-Whitney U test was used to check differences among groups; Wilcoxon matched-pair test was used to check differences intragroup; Cohen d coefficient was used to measure effect sizes and Pearson Correlation Coefficient was used for correlations among variables. Level of significance adopted was 5%. Women with fibromyalgia syndrome have presented worse postural sway than women without fibromyalgia syndrome in all situations (Pfibromyalgia syndrome presented worse postural sway than women without in the same conditions. Women with fibromyalgia syndrome have worse performance in the static posture test, more prominent in reduced support bases with eyes closed. Pain, fatigue, depression and anxiety may have directly influenced postural sway in fibromyalgia syndrome patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Force measurements of postural sway and rapid arm lift in seated children with and without MMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrlin, Simone; Karlsson, Annica; Ahlsten, Gunnar; Lanshammar, Håkan; Silander, Hans C; Dahl, Margareta

    2002-03-01

    The aim was to investigate the horizontal ground reaction forces of seated postural sway and rapid arm lift in children with and without myelomeningocele. BACKGROUND; It is unclear whether children with myelomeningocele have limited control of body posture entirely caused by the impairment in the legs or also by other dysfunction. 11 children with myelomeningocele, 10-13 years, and 20 children without physical impairment were investigated. Data were collected by force plate measurements during quiet sitting and during rapid arm lift. The forces were expressed as the corresponding acceleration of the centre of mass. The amplitude and the frequency of the centre of mass acceleration quantified the sway. Movement time, onset and anteroposterior peak acceleration were analysed during arm lift. The children with myelomeningocele had a low sway frequency under both conditions: eyes open and eyes closed. The movement time was longer for these children compared to the controls. The onset of initial anteroposterior centre of mass acceleration preceded the arm lift and was directed forward in both groups. The peak centre of mass acceleration was usually directed backward. The control of postural sway was different in children with myelomeningocele compared to children without disabilities and this could not be explained by the cele level. The children with myelomeningocele had a slow motor performance of the seated sway and during arm lift. Slow motor performance involves functional limitations in the individual child and is important for the therapy program.

  16. Attentional demand for regulating postural sway: the effect of expertise in gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Nougier, Vincent

    2004-03-15

    A dual-task paradigm was used to investigate whether the expertise in motor skills requiring a fine postural control can modify the attentional demand necessary for regulating postural sway. Seven expert gymnasts and seven experts in other non-gymnastic sports were asked to respond as rapidly as possible to an unpredictable auditory stimulus while maintaining stable seated and in three upright postures of increasing difficulty: bipedal, unipedal, and unipedal on an unstable support (i.e. a 7 cm thick foam surface). RT values were used as an index of the attentional demand necessary for performing the postural tasks. Results showed that the attentional demand necessary for regulating postural sway increased as the postural task increased in difficulty. Interestingly, this effect was smaller for the gymnasts during unipedal stance. These findings suggest a decreased dependency on attentional processes for regulating postural sway during unipedal stance in gymnasts with respect to non-gymnasts.

  17. Extraction of traditional COP-based features from COM sway in postural stability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, F; Colagiorgio, P; Buizza, A; Sardi, F; Ramat, S

    2015-08-01

    Postural control during quiet standing is evaluated by analyzing CoP sway, easily measured using a force platform. However, recent proliferation of motion tracking systems made easily available an estimate of the CoM location. Traditional CoP-based measures presented in literature provide information about age-related changes in postural stability and fall risk. We investigated, on an age-matched group of subjects, the relationship between classical CoP-based measures computed on sway path and statistical mechanics parameters on diffusion plot, with those extracted from CoM time-series. Our purpose is to understand which of these parameters, computed on CoM sway, can discriminate postural abnormalities, in order to use a video tracking system to evaluate balance in addition to motor capabilities.

  18. Reproducibility of a new signal processing technique to assess joint sway during standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Fabian Marcel; Graser, Judith Verena; Meichtry, André; Ernst, Markus Josef; Bauer, Christoph Michael

    2017-01-25

    Postural control strategies can be investigated by kinematic analysis of joint movements. However, current research is focussing mainly on the analysis of centre of pressure excursion and lacks consensus on how to assess joint movement during postural control tasks. This study introduces a new signal processing technique to comprehensively quantify joint sway during standing and evaluates its reproducibility. Fifteen patients with non-specific low back pain and ten asymptomatic participants performed three repetitions of a 60-second standing task on foam surface. This procedure was repeated on a second day. Lumbar spine movement was recorded using an inertial measurement system. The signal was temporally divided into six sections. Two outcome variables (mean absolute sway and sways per second) were calculated for each section. The reproducibility of single and averaged measurements was quantified with linear mixed-effects models and the generalizability theory. A single measurement of ten seconds duration revealed reliability coefficients of .75 for mean absolute sway and .76 for sways per second. Averaging a measurement of 40 seconds duration on two different days revealed reliability coefficients higher than .90 for both outcome variables. The outcome variables' reliability compares favourably to previously published results using different signal processing techniques or centre of pressure excursion. The introduced signal processing technique with two outcome variables to quantify joint sway during standing proved to be a highly reliable method. Since different populations, tasks or measurement tools could influence reproducibility, further investigation in other settings is still necessary. Nevertheless, the presented method has been shown to be highly promising. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does postural sway change in association with manual therapeutic interventions? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Literature Review Objectives The objective of this literature review was to determine if postural sway changes in association with manual therapeutic interventions and to investigate whether any changes occur in healthy individuals or in association with pain intensity. Summary of Background data Improving postural stability has been proposed as a goal of manual therapeutic interventions. So far, no literature review has addressed whether there is supportive evidence for this and if so, what factors may be associated or causative for observed sway alterations. Search methods Seven online databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ScienceDirect and the Cochrane library were systematically searched followed by a manual search of the retrieved papers. Selection criteria Studies comparing postural sway derived from bipedal force plate measurements in association with a manual therapeutic intervention, ideally compared to a control group. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance, conducted the data extraction and the risk of bias assessment which was conducted using the RTI item bank. A descriptive analysis was conducted as the heterogeneous study designs prevented pooling of data. Results Nine studies of varying methodological quality met the inclusion criteria. No direct comparison of data across the studies was possible. There was no evidence that manual interventions lead to a change in postural sway in healthy individuals regardless of the body regions addressed by the intervention. There was some indication that postural sway may change at follow-up measurements in pain sufferers; however, this may be due to variations in pain intensity rather than resulting from the intervention itself. Conclusions There is no conclusive scientific evidence that manual therapeutic interventions may exhibit any immediate or long-term effect on COP excursions. Any

  20. Trunk sway in mildly disabled multiple sclerosis patients with and without balance impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, Oliver; Sellner, Johann; Meier, Niklaus; Allum, John H J; Vibert, Dominique; Lienert, Carmen; Mattle, Heinrich P

    2011-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) causes a broad range of neurological symptoms. Most common is poor balance control. However, knowledge of deficient balance control in mildly affected MS patients who are complaining of balance impairment but have normal clinical balance tests (CBT) is limited. This knowledge might provide insights into the normal and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying stance and gait. We analysed differences in trunk sway between mildly disabled MS patients with and without subjective balance impairment (SBI), all with normal CBT. The sway was measured for a battery of stance and gait balance tests (static and dynamic posturography) and compared to that of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Eight of 21 patients (38%) with an Expanded Disability Status Scale of 1.0-3.0 complained of SBI during daily activities. For standing on both legs with eyes closed on a normal and on a foam surface, patients in the no SBI group showed significant differences in the range of trunk roll (lateral) sway angle and velocity, compared to normal persons. Patients in the SBI group had significantly greater lateral sway than the no SBI group, and sway was also greater than normal in the pitch (anterior-posterior) direction. Sway for one-legged stance on foam was also greater in the SBI group compared to the no SBI and normal groups. We found a specific laterally directed impairment of balance in all patients, consistent with a deficit in proprioceptive processing, which was greater in the SBI group than in the no SBI group. This finding most likely explains the subjective symptoms of imbalance in patients with MS with normal CBT.

  1. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejer René

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less with non-specific low back pain. Methods Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11, an equal number of patients (n = 11 was enrolled per pain score. Results Generally, our results confirmed increased postural instability in pain sufferers compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were reached with an incremental change in NRS scores of two to three points. Conclusions COP mean velocity and sway area are closely related to self-reported pain scores. This relationship may be of clinical use as an objective monitoring tool for patients under treatment or rehabilitation.

  2. An improved input shaping design for an efficient sway control of a nonlinear 3D overhead crane with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Mohammad Javad; Mohamed, Z.; Sudin, S.; Buyamin, S.; Jaafar, H. I.; Ahmad, S. M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes an improved input shaping scheme for an efficient sway control of a nonlinear three dimensional (3D) overhead crane with friction using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. Using this approach, a higher payload sway reduction is obtained as the input shaper is designed based on a complete nonlinear model, as compared to the analytical-based input shaping scheme derived using a linear second order model. Zero Vibration (ZV) and Distributed Zero Vibration (DZV) shapers are designed using both analytical and PSO approaches for sway control of rail and trolley movements. To test the effectiveness of the proposed approach, MATLAB simulations and experiments on a laboratory 3D overhead crane are performed under various conditions involving different cable lengths and sway frequencies. Their performances are studied based on a maximum residual of payload sway and Integrated Absolute Error (IAE) values which indicate total payload sway of the crane. With experiments, the superiority of the proposed approach over the analytical-based is shown by 30-50% reductions of the IAE values for rail and trolley movements, for both ZV and DZV shapers. In addition, simulations results show higher sway reductions with the proposed approach. It is revealed that the proposed PSO-based input shaping design provides higher payload sway reductions of a 3D overhead crane with friction as compared to the commonly designed input shapers.

  3. Age-adjusted normality patterns for posturography by Sway Star system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraldo-García, Ana; Santos-Pérez, Sofía; Labella-Caballero, Torcuato; Crujeiras, Rosa; Soto-Varela, Andrés

    2013-11-01

    Technological advances have led to the development of new measurement techniques that have improved the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with vertigo, dizziness and balance disorders. The objective of this study was to propose population normality patterns, adjusted for age, for summary option (balance control summary, BCS) of Sway Star system. Prospective study involving 70 healthy individuals (average age 44.9 years) evenly distributed in seven age groups and who underwent a postural study with the Sway Star system. The normality patterns for the BCS are presented in Tables 2, 3 and 4. No influence of the gender variable was found. Age had an influence in the more sensorially complex stance tests, and the sensory analysis (visual and vestibular contributions). No influence of age in gait tests or in balance control indexes was found. The BCS option is the most feasible way of systematically using the Sway Star, because it provides complete information of the patient's postural capacity in sensorially complex settings. Establishing normality patterns is the initial and essential step to validate the usefulness of Sway Star in the study of patients with balance disorder. Gait test results were not influenced by age because of their greater capacity to reproduce physiological situations; these could be the tests of choice for detecting elderly patients with a tendency to fall.

  4. Postural sway parameters in seated balancing; their reliability and relationship with balancing performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieen, J.H.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated a representative set of 39 parameters characterizing center of pressure movements (sway) in seated balancing, with the aims to determine test-retest reliability, to clarify the interrelations between these parameters, and to determine which parameters were related to balance

  5. Postural sway and regional cerebellar volume in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Hove

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These findings show that sway abnormalities commonly reported in children with ADHD are also present in adults, and for the first time show a relationship between postural control atypicalities and the cerebellum in this group. Our findings extend the literature on motor abnormalities in ADHD and contribute to our knowledge of their neural substrate.

  6. Light and heavy touch reduces postural sway and modifies axial tone in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Erika; Paquette, Caroline; Gurfinkel, Victor; Horak, Fay

    2012-10-01

    Light touch with a stable object reduces postural sway by increasing axial postural tone in healthy subjects. However, it is unknown whether subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD), who have more postural sway and higher axial postural tone than healthy subjects, can benefit from haptic touch. To investigate the effect of light and heavy touch on postural stability and hip tone in subjects with PD. Fourteen subjects with mid-stage PD and 14 healthy control subjects were evaluated during quiet standing with eyes closed with their arms (a) crossed, (b) lightly touching a fixed rigid bar in front of them, and (c) firmly gripping the bar. Postural sway was measured with a forceplate, and axial hip tone was quantified using a unique device that measures the resistance of the hips to yaw rotation while maintaining active stance. Subjects with PD significantly decreased their postural sway with light or heavy touch (P touch, hip tone was larger in PD subjects. With touch, however, tone values were similar in both groups. This change in hip tone with touch was highly correlated with the initial amount of tone (PD, r = -.72 to -.95; controls, r = -.74 to -.85). The authors showed, for the first time, that subjects with PD benefit from touch similarly to control subjects and that despite higher axial postural tone, PD subjects are able to modulate their tone with touch. Future studies should investigate the complex relationship between touch and postural tone.

  7. Standing body sway in women with and without morning sickness in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yawen; Chung, Hyun Chae; Hemingway, Lauren; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Morning sickness typically is attributed to hormonal changes in pregnancy. We asked whether morning sickness is associated with changes in standing postural equilibrium, as occurs in research on visually induced motion sickness. Twenty-one pregnant women (mean age=30 years, mean height=163cm; mean weight=63kg) were tested during the first trimester. Laboratory-based balance measures were collected, along with perceived postural stability, the presence of morning sickness, and the severity of subjective symptoms. We varied the distance between the feet and the visual task performed during stance. Participants were classified as either experiencing (Sick, n=12) or not experiencing (Well, n=9) morning sickness. Perceived balance stability was lower for Sick than for Well women. The positional variability of sway was reduced for the Sick group, relative to the Well group. Positional variability decreased with wider stance width, and was reduced during performance of a more demanding visual task. Stance width and visual task also influenced the temporal dynamics of sway. Effects of stance width and visual task on postural sway were similar to effects in non-pregnant adults, suggesting that sensitive tuning of posture is maintained during the first trimester. The findings suggest that women with morning sickness may attempt to stabilize their bodies by reducing overall body sway. It may be useful to recommend that women adopt wider stance early in pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Intersection of reality and fiction in art perception: pictorial space, body sway and mental imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganczarek, Joanna; Ruggieri, V; Nardi, D; Olivetti Belardinelli, M

    2015-09-01

    The thesis of embodied cognition claims that perception of the environment entails a complex set of multisensory processes which forms a basis for the agent's potential and immediate actions. However, in the case of artworks, an agent becomes an observer and action turns into a reaction. This raises questions about the presence of embodied or situated cognition involved in art reception. The study aimed to assess the bodily correlates of perceiving fictional pictorial spaces in the absence of a possibility of an actual physical immersion or manipulation of represented forms. The subjects were presented with paintings by Vermeer and De Hooch, whilst their body sway and eye movements were recorded. Moreover, test and questionnaires on mental imagery (MRT, VVIQ and OSIQ) were administered. Three major results were obtained: (1) the degree of pictorial depth did not influence body sway; (2) fixations to distant elements in paintings (i.e. backgrounds) were accompanied by an increase in body sway; and (3) mental rotation test scores correlated positively with body sway. Our results suggest that in certain cases--despite the fictional character of art--observers' reactions resemble reactions to real stimuli. It is proposed that these reactions are mediated by mental imagery (e.g. mental rotation) that contributes to the act of representing alternative to real artistic spaces.

  9. The effects of vibrotactile biofeedback training on trunk sway in Parkinson's disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanhoe-Mahabier, S.W.; Allum, J.H.J.; Pasman, E.P.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) can lead to falls, injuries and reduced quality of life. We investigated whether balance in PD can improve by offering patients feedback about their own trunk sway as a supplement to natural sensory inputs. Specifically, we investigated

  10. Trunk sway in patients with and without, mild traumatic brain injury after whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, O; Schuster, C; Sellner, J; Ettlin, T; Allum, J H J

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the addition effect of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) on the balance control of patients who simultaneously suffered a whiplash associated disorder (WAD). Dizziness is common in patients suffering from whiplash injury with or without a MTBI, but data is lacking about the additional balance problems and dizziness caused by MTBI. 44 patients with WAD and MTBI and 36 WAD patients without MTBI participated in the study. A dizziness handicap index (DHI) was used to quantify self-perceived handicap. Balance control was assessed using measures of trunk sway for a battery of stance and gait tests. Patients with WAD and MTBI perceived significantly higher dizziness and unsteadiness (higher score in DHI Emotional category) and had greater trunk sway than WAD patients without MTBI for stance tasks and complex gait tasks (e.g. walking up and down stairs). Both groups had greater sway than controls for these tasks. Both groups of patients showed equal reductions in trunk sway with respect to controls for simple gait tasks (e.g. walking while rotating the head). A similar pattern of balance impairment was present in patients with whiplash injury with and without MTBI. However, the impairment was greater for stance and complex gait tasks in WAD patients with MTBI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative trunk sway and prediction of incident falls in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jeannette R; Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Ayers, Emmeline; Verghese, Joe

    2017-10-01

    Poor balance and balance impairments are major predictors of falls. The purpose of the current study was to determine the clinical validity of baseline quantitative static trunk sway measurements in predicting incident falls in a cohort of 287 community-dwelling non-demented older Americans (mean age 76.14±6.82years; 54% female). Trunk sway was measured using the SwayStar™ device, and quantified as angular displacement in degrees in anterior-posterior (pitch) and medio-lateral (roll) planes. Over a one-year follow-up period, 66 elders (23%) reported incident falls. Anterior-posterior angular displacement was a strong predictor of incident falls in older adults in Cox proportional hazards models (hazard ratio adjusted for age, gender, education, RBANS total score, medical comorbidities, geriatric depression scale score, sensory impairments, gait speed, and history of fall in the past 1year ((aHR)=1.59; p=0.033) whereas, angular displacement in the medio-lateral plane was not predictive of falls (aHR=1.35; p=0.276). Our results reveal the significance of quantitative trunk sway, specifically anterior-posterior angular displacement, in predicting incident falls in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative assessment of anti-sway control strategy for tower crane system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Reza Ezuan; Mohamed, Zaharuddin

    2017-09-01

    Tower crane is also known as rotary crane and widely used in constructions due to limited human capability to carry the various types of load at the construction site. In general crane is used for the purpose of loading and unloading heavy material from one place to another. However, in order to transfer the material in minimum time from one location to another, swaying of the payload will occur. Hence, this research presents the investigation of tower crane system which mainly focusing on the swaying angle of the payload by implementing conventional and intelligent controllers. Its mathematical modeling is developed using the Newton's Second Law and simulation is done within the MATLAB/Simulink environment. Simulation results are presented in cart trajectory capability and payload sway angle reduction. A comparative assessment between conventional controller and intelligent controller for the tower crane system are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the effect of various rope length and payload mass of the tower crane system to the performance of trajectory capability and sway angle reduction are also presented and discussed.

  13. Correlation between Mechanical Properties of the Ankle Muscles and Postural Sway during the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, JongEun; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul

    2018-03-01

    Ankle and foot injuries are common among athletes and physically active individuals. The most common residual disability, ankle sprain, is characterized by instability along with postural sway. If the supporting structures around a joint become lax, posture stability and balance are also affected. Previous studies have examined muscle stiffness and elasticity and postural sway separately; however, the relationship between these factors is yet unknown. It is well known that the levels of sex hormones, especially estrogen, change in women over the phase of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between the mechanical properties of tissue and balance activity using a non-invasive digital palpation device to determine if they undergo any changes over the menstrual cycle in young women. Sixteen young women with regular menstrual cycles completed the study. Tone, stiffness, and elasticity of the ankle muscles (lateral gastrocnemius, peroneus longus, and tibialis anterior) were measured using a non-invasive digital palpation device. Postural sway was recorded while the participants performed balance tasks during ovulation and menstruation. Significantly greater posture sway characteristics and ankle muscle elasticity were found during ovulation than during menstruation; lower tone and stiffness of the ankle muscles were observed at ovulation (p < 0.05). Additionally, weak-to-strong relationships between ankle muscle mechanical properties and postural sway characteristics were found (p < 0.05). These results suggest the effect of estrogen on human connective tissues. We therefore postulate that estrogen increases joint and muscle laxity and affects posture stability according to the phase of the menstrual cycle.

  14. Directional measures of postural sway as predictors of balance instability and accidental falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszczyk W.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the obvious advantages and popularity of static posturography, universal standards for posturographic tests have not been developed thus far. Most of the center-of-foot pressure (COP indices are strongly dependent on an individual experimental design, and are susceptible to distortions, which makes results of their analysis incomparable. In this research, we present a novel approach to the analysis of the COP trajectory based on the directional features of postural sway. Our novel output measures: the sway directional indices (DI and sway vector (SV were applied to assess the postural stability in the group of young able-bodied subjects. Towards this aim, the COP trajectories were recorded in 100 students standing still for 60 s, with eyes open (EO and then, with eyes closed (EC. Each record was subdivided then into 20, 30 and 60 s samples. Interclass correlation coefficients were calculated from the samples. The controlled variables (visual conditions uniquely affected the output measures, but only in case of proper signal pretreatment (low-pass filtering. In filtering below 6 Hz, the DI and SV provided a unique set of descriptors for postural control. Both sway measures were highly independent of the trial length and the sampling frequency, and were unaffected by the sampling noise. Directional indices of COP filtered at 6 Hz showed high to very high reliability, with ICC range of 0.7-0.9. Results of a single 60 s trial are sufficient to reach acceptable reliability for both DI and SV. In conclusion, the directional sway measures may be recommended as the primary standard in static posturography.

  15. The Association between Seasonal Variation in Vitamin D, Postural Sway, and Falls Risk: An Observational Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise Bird

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Low serum vitamin D levels are associated with increased postural sway. Vitamin D varies seasonally. This study investigates whether postural sway varies seasonally and is associated with serum vitamin D and falls. Methods. In a longitudinal observational study, eighty-eight independently mobile community-dwelling older adults (69.7 ± 7.6 years were evaluated on five occasions over one year, measuring postural sway (force platform, vitamin D levels, fall incidence, and causes and adverse outcomes. Mixed-methods Poisson regression was used to determine associations between measures. Results. Postural sway did not vary over the year. Vitamin D levels varied seasonally (P<0.001, peaking in summer. Incidence of falls (P=0.01 and injurious falls (P=0.02 were lower in spring, with the highest fall rate at the end of autumn. Postural sway was not related to vitamin D (P=0.87 or fall rates, but it was associated with fall injuries (IRR 1.59 (CI 1.14 to 2.24, P=0.007. Conclusions. Postural sway remained stable across the year while vitamin D varied seasonally. Participants with high values for postural sway demonstrated higher rates of injurious falls. This study provides important evidence for clinicians and researchers providing interventions measuring balance outcomes across seasons.

  16. Loss of Peripheral Sensory Function Explains Much of the Increase in Postural Sway in Healthy Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Anson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postural sway increases with age and peripheral sensory disease. Whether, peripheral sensory function is related to postural sway independent of age in healthy adults is unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship between tests of visual function (VISFIELD, vestibular function (CANAL or OTOLITH, proprioceptive function (PROP, and age, with center of mass sway area (COM measured with eyes open then closed on firm and then a foam surface. A cross-sectional sample of 366 community dwelling healthy adults from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging was tested. Multiple linear regressions examined the association between COM and VISFIELD, PROP, CANAL, and OTOLITH separately and in multi-sensory models controlling for age and gender. PROP dominated sensory prediction of sway across most balance conditions (β's = 0.09–0.19, p's < 0.001, except on foam eyes closed where CANAL function loss was the only significant sensory predictor of sway (β = 2.12, p < 0.016. Age was not a consistent predictor of sway. This suggests loss of peripheral sensory function explains much of the age-associated increase in sway.

  17. Correlations between measurement time and different expansibility of the elastic tape on the rectus femoris and body sway index with plyometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine correlations between measurement time and different expansibility of the elastic tape on the rectus femoris and body sway index with plyometric exercise. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 24 healthy men. C90 area, C90 angle, trace length, sway average velocity for body sway index were measured using a force plate by BT4. The collected data were analyzed using Kendall's coefficient of concordance. [Results] All of body sway index on measuring follow up 24 hours after removing tape were significantly decreased than before and right after plyometric exercise. No significant correlations were found between body sway index and different expansibility of the elastic tape. [Conclusion] It appears that different expansibility of the elastic tape does not affect the ability to body sway index. Carry over effect of taping was verified on measuring follow up 24 hours after removing tape through the decreasing body sway index.

  18. Postural orientation and equilibrium processes associated with increased postural sway in autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Hallac, Rami R; Conroy, Kaitlin C; White, Stormi P; Kane, Alex A; Collinsworth, Amy L; Sweeney, John A; Mosconi, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Increased postural sway has been repeatedly documented in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Characterizing the control processes underlying this deficit, including postural orientation and equilibrium, may provide key insights into neurophysiological mechanisms associated with ASD. Postural orientation refers to children's ability to actively align their trunk and head with respect to their base of support, while postural equilibrium is an active process whereby children coordinate ankle dorsi-/plantar-flexion and hip abduction/adduction movements to stabilize their upper body. Dynamic engagement of each of these control processes is important for maintaining postural stability, though neither postural orientation nor equilibrium has been studied in ASD. Twenty-two children with ASD and 21 age and performance IQ-matched typically developing (TD) controls completed three standing tests. During static stance, participants were instructed to stand as still as possible. During dynamic stances, participants swayed at a comfortable speed and magnitude in either anterior-posterior (AP) or mediolateral (ML) directions. The center of pressure (COP) standard deviation and trajectory length were examined to determine if children with ASD showed increased postural sway. Postural orientation was assessed using a novel virtual time-to-contact (VTC) approach that characterized spatiotemporal dimensions of children's postural sway (i.e., body alignment) relative to their postural limitation boundary, defined as the maximum extent to which each child could sway in each direction. Postural equilibrium was quantified by evaluating the amount of shared or mutual information of COP time series measured along the AP and ML directions. Consistent with prior studies, children with ASD showed increased postural sway during both static and dynamic stances relative to TD children. In regard to postural orientation processes, children with ASD demonstrated reduced spatial

  19. Girls with generalized joint hypermobility display changed muscle activity and postural sway during static balance tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, B; Johansen, Kl; Hendriksen, P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study knee muscle activity and static postural sway in girls with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH). METHOD: Sixteen girls with GJH and 11 girls with non-GJH (NGJH) aged 14 years, randomly recruited among schoolchildren, participated in this study. GJH inclusion criteria were: ......, compared with NGJH, static balance tasks with higher medial knee muscle activity relative to the lateral activity, and larger postural sway when vision was eliminated. The short- and long-term consequences should be studied further.......) of Q, H, and G muscle activity was calculated. Knee function was self-reported using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score for children (KOOS-Child). RESULTS: GJH had a significantly lower lateral HQ CCI and a higher medial/lateral HQ CCI ratio in all balance tasks. Group mean EMG varied...

  20. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25-63 ...... have preventive effects with regard to future perceived muscle pain in the respective body regions. Furthermore, the Zumba group revealed positive effects on lower limb lean mass and postural sway compared to the control group.......This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25...... neck extension strength both after 3 (1.2 kg; P postural sway velocity moment (-9.2 mm(2)/s; P

  1. Pain relief is associated with decreasing postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, René; Walker, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Increased postural sway is well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby a linear relationship between higher pain intensities and increasing postural sway has been described. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate whether this relationship...... is maintained if pain levels change in adults with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Postural sway was measured by three identical static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed...... in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS 11). The patients received three manual interventions (e. g. manipulation, mobilization or soft tissue techniques) at 3-4 day intervals, postural sway measures were obtained at each occasion. Results...

  2. Effects of external loads on postural sway during quiet stance in adults aged 20-80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M W; Duncan, M J; Oxford, S W; Kay, A D; Price, M J

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of holding external loads on postural sway during upright stance across age decades. Sixty-five healthy adults (females, n = 35), aged 18-80 years were assessed in four conditions; (1) standing without holding a load, holding a load corresponding to 5% body mass in the (2) left hand, (3) right hand and (4) both hands. The centre of pressure (COP) path length and anteroposterior and mediolateral COP displacement were used to indirectly assess postural sway. External loading elicited reductions in COP measures of postural sway in older age groups only (P  0.05). Holding external loads during standing is relevant to many activities of daily living (i.e. holding groceries). The reduction in postural sway may suggest this type of loading has a stabilising effect during quiet standing among older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of motor imagery on postural sway: Differential effects of type of body movement and person perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stins, J.F.; Schneider, I.K.; Koole, S.L.; Beek, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the differential effects of kinesthetic imagery (first person perspective) and visual imagery (third person perspective) on postural sway during quiet standing. Based on an embodied cognition perspective, the authors predicted that kinesthetic imagery would lead to

  4. Light and heavy touch reduces postural sway and modifies axial tone in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Erika; Paquette, Caroline; Gurfinkel, Victor; Horak, Fay

    2014-01-01

    Background Light touch with a stable object reduces postural sway by increasing axial postural tone in healthy subjects. However, it is unknown whether subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD), who have more postural sway and higher axial postural tone than healthy subjects, can benefit from haptic touch. Objective To investigate the effect of light and heavy touch on postural stability and hip tone in subjects with PD. Methods Fourteen subjects with mid-stage PD, and 14 healthy control subjects were evaluated during quiet standing with eyes closed with their arms: 1) crossed, 2) lightly touching a fixed rigid bar in front of them and 3) firmly gripping the bar. Postural sway was measured with a forceplate and axial hip tone was quantified using a unique device that measures the resistance of the hips to yaw rotation while maintaining active stance. Results Subjects with PD significantly decreased their postural sway with light or heavy touch (ptouch, hip tone was larger in PD subjects. With touch, however, tone values were similar in both groups. This change in hip tone with touch was highly correlated with the initial amount of tone (PD: r=− 0.72 to −0.95 and controls: r=−0.74 to−0.85). Conclusions We showed, for the first time, that subjects with PD benefit from touch similarly to control subjects and that despite higher axial postural tone, PD subjects are able to modulate their tone with touch. Future studies should investigate the complex relationship between touch and postural tone. PMID:22415944

  5. Does postural sway change in association with manual therapeutic interventions? A review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhe, Alexander; Fejer, Ren?; Walker, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Study design Literature Review Objectives The objective of this literature review was to determine if postural sway changes in association with manual therapeutic interventions and to investigate whether any changes occur in healthy individuals or in association with pain intensity. Summary of Background data Improving postural stability has been proposed as a goal of manual therapeutic interventions. So far, no literature review has addressed whether there is supportive evidence for...

  6. Can dancers suppress the haptically mediated interpersonal entrainment during rhythmic sway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianidis, George; Elliott, Mark T; Wing, Alan M; Hatzitaki, Vassilia

    2014-07-01

    Interpersonal entrainment emerges spontaneously when partners performing rhythmic movements together exchange sensory feedback about the other's movements. In this study, we asked whether couples of expert dancers, non-dancers and mixed couples can suppress the spontaneous haptically mediated inter-personal entrainment when their rhythmic sway is paced by differing metronome tempos. Fifty-four young participants formed three types of couples: nine dancer couples, consisting of individuals with at least eight years systematic practice in traditional Greek dance; nine non-dancer couples, consisting of individuals with no prior experience in dance and nine mixed couples, consisting of one dancer and one novice partner. Partners swayed rhythmically for 60 s, at different pacing frequencies (one at 0.25 Hz and the other at 0.35 Hz) under three haptic contact conditions: no contact between them; light fingertip touch established in the 2nd trial segment (30 s); and light fingertip touch released in the 2nd trial segment (30 s). Spectral analysis of the antero-posterior center of pressure displacement revealed that light touch increased the deviation of the dominant from the target (pacing) sway frequency, decreased the proportion of the signal's power at the target frequency and increased the coherence between the partners' sway signals (inter-personal coherence). These effects were specific to the mixed group whereas touch interference was weaker in non-dancers and absent in dancers. In addition, the coherence between the trial segments (intra-personal coherence) significantly decreased with touch only for the non-dancer while it remained unchanged for the dancer partner of the mixed group suggesting that the dancer was leading the non-dancer partner. It is concluded that systematic practice with traditional dance can modulate the spontaneous tendency towards haptically mediated interpersonal entrainment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of obesity and standing time on postural sway during prolonged quiet standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D; Park, W; Levy, M S; Jung, Eui S

    2009-08-01

    This study examined the effects of obesity level, standing time and their interaction on postural sway during a prolonged quiet upright standing task. Ten extremely obese (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) and 10 non-obese (18.5 kg/m(2) falls, especially during prolonged physical work activities. The research findings are relevant to identifying and reducing risks of balance loss and falls in various workplace settings for a wide variety of workers.

  8. Can explicit visual feedback of postural sway efface the effects of sensory manipulations on mediolateral balance performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Cofre Lizama, L.E.; Pijnappels, M.A.G.M.; Reeves, N.P.; Verschueren, S.M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Explicit visual feedback on postural sway is often used in balance assessment and training. However, up-weighting of visual information may mask impairments of other sensory systems. We therefore aimed to determine whether the effects of somatosensory, vestibular, and proprioceptive manipulations on mediolateral balance are reduced by explicit visual feedback on mediolateral sway of the body center of mass and by the presence of visual information. We manipulated sensory inputs of the somatos...

  9. TENS to the Lateral Aspect of the Knees During Stance Attenuates Postural Sway in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yocheved Laufer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory input is known to be essential for postural control. The present study examined the effects on postural sway of sensory input delivered via transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS applied to the knees during stance. Electrodes from a dual-channel portable TENS unit were adhered to the skin overlying the lateral and medial aspect of both knees of 20 young healthy volunteers (mean age 24.0 years, standard deviation 4.0. Postural sway parameters were obtained during static bipedal stance with an AMTI force platform. Four stimulation conditions were tested with eyes open and with eyes closed: no TENS; TENS applied bilaterally; and TENS applied to either the right or the left knee. Participants underwent two eight-trial blocks, with each trial lasting 30 seconds. The order of conditions was randomized for each participant. Stimulation consisted of a biphasic symmetrical stimulus delivered at the sensory detection level, with a pulse duration of 200μsec and a pulse frequency of 100Hz. The application of TENS induced significant reductions in mean sway velocity and in the medio-lateral dispersion of the center of pressure, with no corresponding effect on the anterior-posterior dispersion. These findings suggest that electrical stimulation delivered at the sensory detection level to the lateral aspects of the knees may be effective in improving balance control, and that this effect may be directionally specific.

  10. Validation of a dumbbell body sway test in olympic air pistol shooting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mon

    Full Text Available We present and validate a test able to provide reliable body sway measurements in air pistol shooting, without the use of a gun. 46 senior male pistol shooters who participated in Spanish air pistol championships participated in the study. Body sway data of two static bipodal balance tests have been compared: during the first test, shooting was simulated by use of a dumbbell, while during the second test the shooters own pistol was used. Both tests were performed the day previous to the competition, during the official training time and at the training stands to simulate competition conditions. The participantś performance was determined as the total score of 60 shots at competition. Apart from the commonly used variables that refer to movements of the shooters centre of pressure (COP, such as COP displacements on the X and Y axes, maximum and average COP velocities and total COP area, the present analysis also included variables that provide information regarding the axes of the COP ellipse (length and angle in respect to X. A strong statistically significant correlation between the two tests was found (with an interclass correlation varying between 0.59 and 0.92. A statistically significant inverse linear correlation was also found between performance and COP movements. The study concludes that dumbbell tests are perfectly valid for measuring body sway by simulating pistol shooting.

  11. Effects of atmospheric turbulence and building sway on optical wireless-communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2003-01-15

    Urban optical wireless communication (UOWC) systems are considered a last-mile technology. UOWC systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium. To provide a line of sight the transceivers are placed on high-rise building. However, dynamic wind loads, thermal expansion, and weak earthquakes cause buildings to sway. These sways distort the alignment between transmitter and receiver, causing pointing errors, the outcome of which is fading of the received signal. Furthermore, atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and the phase of the received signal, resulting in impaired link performance. A bit-error probability (BEP) model is developed that takes into account both building sway and turbulence-induced log amplitude fluctuations (i.e., fading of signal intensity) in the regime in which the receiver aperture, D0, is smaller than the turbulence coherence diameter, d0. It is assumed that the receiver has knowledge about the marginal statistics of the signal fading and the instantaneous signal-fading state.

  12. Effects of visual motion consistent or inconsistent with gravity on postural sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrucci, Priscilla; Daprati, Elena; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Maffei, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    Vision plays an important role in postural control, and visual perception of the gravity-defined vertical helps maintaining upright stance. In addition, the influence of the gravity field on objects' motion is known to provide a reference for motor and non-motor behavior. However, the role of dynamic visual cues related to gravity in the control of postural balance has been little investigated. In order to understand whether visual cues about gravitational acceleration are relevant for postural control, we assessed the relation between postural sway and visual motion congruent or incongruent with gravity acceleration. Postural sway of 44 healthy volunteers was recorded by means of force platforms while they watched virtual targets moving in different directions and with different accelerations. Small but significant differences emerged in sway parameters with respect to the characteristics of target motion. Namely, for vertically accelerated targets, gravitational motion (GM) was associated with smaller oscillations of the center of pressure than anti-GM. The present findings support the hypothesis that not only static, but also dynamic visual cues about direction and magnitude of the gravitational field are relevant for balance control during upright stance.

  13. Evaluation of the temporal structure of postural sway fluctuations based on a comprehensive set of analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M.; Schubert, P.; Schmidtbleicher, D.; Haas, C. T.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of postural control has a long history. Traditionally, the amount of body sway is solely used as an index of postural stability. Although this leads to some extent to an effective evaluation of balance performance, the control mechanisms involved have not yet been fully understood. The concept of nonlinear dynamics suggests that variability in the motor output is not randomness but structure, providing the stimulus to reveal the functionality of postural sway. The present work evaluates sway dynamics by means of COP excursions in a quiet standing task versus a dual-task condition in three different test times (30, 60, 300 s). Besides the application of traditional methods-which estimate the overall size of sway-the temporal pattern of body sway was quantified via wavelet transform, multiscale entropy and fractal analysis. We found higher sensitivity of the structural parameters to modulations of postural control strategies and partly an improved evaluation of sway dynamics in longer recordings. It could be shown that postural control modifications take place on different timescales corresponding to the interplay of the sensory systems. A continued application of nonlinear analysis can help to better understand postural control mechanisms.

  14. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goble DJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Goble, Mason C Hearn, Harsimran S Baweja School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technology called the Balance Tracking System (BTrackS was utilized to assess postural sway of older adults before and after 90 days of a well-established exercise program called Geri-Fit. Results showed an overall reduction in postural sway across all participants from pre- to post-intervention. However, the magnitude of effects was significantly influenced by the amount of postural sway demonstrated by individuals prior to Geri-Fit training. Specifically, more participants with atypically high postural sway pre-intervention experienced an overall postural sway reduction. These reductions experienced were typically greater than the minimum detectable change statistic for the BTrackS Balance Test. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTrackS is an effective means of identifying older adults with elevated postural sway, who are likely to benefit from Geri-Fit training to mitigate fall risk. Keywords: aging, balance, BTrackS, Geri-Fit, postural sway, fall risk

  15. Postural sway and gaze can track the complex motion of a visual target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilia Hatzitaki

    Full Text Available Variability is an inherent and important feature of human movement. This variability has form exhibiting a chaotic structure. Visual feedback training using regular predictive visual target motions does not take into account this essential characteristic of the human movement, and may result in task specific learning and loss of visuo-motor adaptability. In this study, we asked how well healthy young adults can track visual target cues of varying degree of complexity during whole-body swaying in the Anterior-Posterior (AP and Medio-Lateral (ML direction. Participants were asked to track three visual target motions: a complex (Lorenz attractor, a noise (brown and a periodic (sine moving target while receiving online visual feedback about their performance. Postural sway, gaze and target motion were synchronously recorded and the degree of force-target and gaze-target coupling was quantified using spectral coherence and Cross-Approximate entropy. Analysis revealed that both force-target and gaze-target coupling was sensitive to the complexity of the visual stimuli motions. Postural sway showed a higher degree of coherence with the Lorenz attractor than the brown noise or sinusoidal stimulus motion. Similarly, gaze was more synchronous with the Lorenz attractor than the brown noise and sinusoidal stimulus motion. These results were similar regardless of whether tracking was performed in the AP or ML direction. Based on the theoretical model of optimal movement variability tracking of a complex signal may provide a better stimulus to improve visuo-motor adaptation and learning in postural control.

  16. Influence of age on postural sway during different dual-task conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eBergamin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dual-task performance assessments of competing parallel tasks and postural outcomes are growing in importance for geriatricians, as it is associated with predicting fall risk in older adults. This study aims to evaluate the postural stability during different dual-task conditions including visual (SMBT, verbal (CBAT and cognitive (MAT tasks in comparison with the standard Romberg’s open eyes position (OE. Furthermore, these conditions were investigated in a sample of young adults and a group of older healthy subjects to examine a potential interaction between type of secondary task and age status. To compare these groups across the four conditions, a within-between mixed model ANOVA was applied. Thus, a stabilometric platform has been used to measure center of pressure velocity (CoPV, sway area (SA, antero-posterior (AP and medio-lateral (ML oscillations as extents of postural sway. Tests of within-subjects effects indicated that different four conditions influenced the static balance for CoPV (p<0.001, SA (p<0.001. Post-hoc analyses indicated that CBAT task induced the worst balance condition on CoPV and resulted in significantly worse scores than OE (-11.4%; p<0.05, SMBT (-17.8% p<0.01 and MAT (-17.8% p<0.01 conditions; the largest SA was found in OE, and it was statistically larger than SMBT (-27.0%, p<0.01 and MAT (-23.1%; p<0.01. The between-subjects analysis indicated a general lower balance control in the group of elderly subjects (CoPV p<0.001, SA p<0.002, while, the mixed model ANOVA did not detect any interaction effect between types of secondary task and groups in any parameters (CoPV p=0.154, SA p=0.125. Postural sway during dual-task assessments was also found to decrease with advancing age, however, no interactions between aging and types of secondary tasks were found. Overall, these results indicated that the secondary task which most influenced the length of sway path, as measured by postural stability was a simple verbal

  17. Light finger contact concurrently reduces postural sway and enhances signal detection performance in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Chen; Tsai, Chia-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The current study examined the effects of light finger touch on postural sway and signal detection performance in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Children with DCD (n=30; 18 boys, 12 girls; age=11.87 ± 0.48 years) and typically developing children (n=30; 14 boys, 16 girls; age=11.73 ± 0.52 years) were recruited from schools in Pintung County, Taiwan. Participants completed a signal detection task under no finger touch (NT) and light finger touch (LT) conditions, while postural sway in both anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) axes was recorded. In both conditions, children with DCD exhibited significantly higher levels of postural sway (pTDC. Additionally, both groups significantly reduced postural sway (pTDC relative to children with DCD (pTDC (p<0.05). These results suggest that light finger touch is effective in concurrently reducing postural sway and enhancing signal detection in both groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Visualization of Flow in Pressurizer Spray Line Piping and Estimation of Thermal Stress Fluctuation Caused by Swaying of Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumaya, Toru; Nakamura, Akira; Onojima, Daisuke; Takenaka, Nobuyuki

    The pressurizer spray line of PWR plants cools reactor coolant by injecting water into pressurizer. Since the continuous spray flow rate during commercial operation of the plant is considered insufficient to fill the pipe completely, there is a concern that a water surface exists in the pipe and may periodically sway. In order to identify the flow regimes in spray line piping and assess their impact on pipe structure, a flow visualization experiment was conducted. In the experiment, air was used substituted for steam to simulate the gas phase of the pressurizer, and the flow instability causing swaying without condensation was investigated. With a full-scale mock-up made of acrylic, flow under room temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions was visualized, and possible flow regimes were identified based on the results of the experiment. Three representative patterns of swaying of water surface were assumed, and the range of thermal stress fluctuation, when the surface swayed instantaneously, was calculated. With the three patterns of swaying assumed based on the visualization experiment, it was confirmed that the thermal stress amplitude would not exceed the fatigue endurance limit prescribed in the Japanese Design and Construction Code.

  19. Postural Sway Parameters and Gait Symmetry in Preschool Children: Cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane E de Sá

    Full Text Available Abstract The most important function of posture is to ensure the maintenance of control during the start and the continuation of human movement, moreover, posture serves as a reference for the production of precise movements. The aim of this study was to relate the postural sway parameters and gait symmetry in preschool children.This study is a cross-sectional study, conducted in 49 children with a mean age of 4.65 ± 0.44 years. Initially, height and body mass of children were measured using anthropometric scales. Next, an electronic baropodometer was used to evaluate the distribution of dynamic plantar pressure (gait and stabilometry (balance.A Student t test or Mann-Whitney test for comparing two groups was used. To correlate variables, a Pearson's correlation or Spearman's correlation coefficient was used. The stabilometric parameters showed no significant difference between an eyes open test and eyes closed test in preschool child. We found a moderate relationship between axis inclination and cadence symmetry (R=0.40;p=0.007. Postural sway parameters have relationship cadence symmetry of the gait in preschool children.

  20. The influence of commercial-grade carpet on postural sway and balance strategy among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Joan I; Shroyer, JoAnn L; Elias, Jeffrey W

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine the effect of a selected commercial-grade carpet on the static balance of healthy, older adults who had not fallen more than twice in the last 6 months. We tested a total of 45 participants. Each participant stood on a computerized balance machine and was subjected to a carpeted versus a noncarpeted condition while exposed to various sensory limitations. We measured both postural sway and balance strategy. The selected commercial-grade carpet did not affect postural sway. The participants were able to adapt to the sensory limitations regardless of whether they were standing on the carpet. Although balance strategy scores were significantly lower during the carpeted conditions, the clinical significance was questionable as the difference between the means was small for practical purposes. Healthy, older adults did not have difficulty maintaining static balance on the carpeted surface; however, the results could be different if participants who had a history of falling had been included. The results from this study are important and provide a basis of comparison for those individuals who have experienced more than two falls in the last 6 months or who have a history of falling.

  1. A longitudinal assessment of myoelectric activity, postural sway, and low-back pain during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Luciana S; Elias, Leonardo A; Gomide, Adriane B; Vieira, Marcus F; DO Amaral, Waldemar N

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the control of upright quiet standing in pregnant women throughout pregnancy, and whether low-back pain exerts influence on this motor task. Myoelectric signals from postural muscles and stabilometric data were collected from 15 non-pregnant and 15 pregnant women during upright quiet standing. Electromyogram envelopes and center of pressure metrics were evaluated in the control group, as well as in pregnant women in their first and third trimester of pregnancy. A correlation analysis was performed between the measured variables and a low-back pain disability index. Pregnant women exhibited a decreased maximum voluntary isometric activity for all postural muscles evaluated. Additionally, the activity of lumbar muscles during the postural task was significantly higher in the pregnant women in comparison to the non-pregnant controls. The soleus muscle maintained its activity at the same level as the gestation progressed. Higher postural oscillations were observed in the anteroposterior direction while mediolateral sway was reduced in the third trimester of pregnancy. No correlation was detected between the lowback pain disability index and neuromechanical variables. This study provides additional data regarding the functioning and adaptations of the postural control system during pregnancy. Also, we provide further evidence that postural control during quiet standing cannot be used to predict the occurrence of low-back pain. We hypothesize that the modifications in the neural drive to the muscles, as well as in postural sway may be related to changes in the biomechanics and hormonal levels experienced by the pregnant women.

  2. Motor imagery modulation of body sway is task-dependent and relies on imagery ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago eLemos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study we investigate to what extent the effects of motor imagery on postural sway are constrained by movement features and the subject’s imagery ability. Twenty-three subjects were asked to imagine three movements using the kinesthetic modality: rising on tiptoes, whole-body forward reaching, and whole-body lateral reaching. After each task, subjects reported the level of imagery vividness and were subsequently grouped into a HIGH group (scores ≥3, moderately intense imagery or a LOW group (scores ≤2, mildly intense imagery. An eyes closed trial was used as a control task. Center of gravity (COG coordinates were collected, along with surface EMG of the deltoid (medial and anterior portion and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. COG variability was quantified as the amount of fluctuations in position and velocity in the forward-backward and lateral directions. Changes in COG variability during motor imagery were observed only for the HIGH group. COG variability in the forward-backward direction was increased during the rising on tiptoes imagery, compared with the control task (p=0.01 and the lateral reaching imagery (p=0.02. Conversely, COG variability in the lateral direction was higher in rising on tiptoes and lateral reaching imagery than during the control task (p0.08 or task (p>0.46 for any of the tested muscles. In summary, motor imagery influences body sway dynamics in a task-dependent manner, and relies on the subject’ imagery ability.

  3. Visual dependence affects postural sway responses to continuous visual field motion in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yawen; Lauer, Richard T; Tucker, Carole A; Thompson, Elizabeth D; Keshner, Emily A

    2018-01-17

    The current study aimed to explore the impact of visual dependence on sensorimotor coupling of postural sway and visual motion in adults and teens with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). We hypothesized that individuals with CP would exhibit greater magnitudes of sway than healthy individuals, and the presence of visual dependence (VD) would produce instability in the direction of visual motion. Participants stood in a virtual environment in which the visual scene remained static or continuously rotated 30 degree/second in pitch-up or pitch-down. Increased center of pressure and center of mass responses were observed in the direction of visual scene motion in those with CP. Those with VD exhibited reduced frequency responses in anterior-posterior direction than those who were visually independent. VD suggests deficient sensorimotor integration that could contribute to postural instability and reduced motor function. Individuals with CP who are visually dependent may benefit from more sensory focused rehabilitation strategies. AP, anterior-posterior; CP, cerebral palsy; COM, center of mass; COP, center of pressure; MDF, median frequency; ML, mediolateral; PD, pitch down (nose down) rotation; PU, pitch up (nose up) rotation; RFT, rod and frame test; RMS, root mean square; SLP, slope of the fitted line; TD, typical development; VD, visual dependence; VI, visual independence; VOR, vestibulo-ocular reflex; VPI, visual perceptual impairment.

  4. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Hearn, Mason C; Baweja, Harsimran S

    2017-01-01

    Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technology called the Balance Tracking System (BTrackS) was utilized to assess postural sway of older adults before and after 90 days of a well-established exercise program called Geri-Fit. Results showed an overall reduction in postural sway across all participants from pre- to post-intervention. However, the magnitude of effects was significantly influenced by the amount of postural sway demonstrated by individuals prior to Geri-Fit training. Specifically, more participants with atypically high postural sway pre-intervention experienced an overall postural sway reduction. These reductions experienced were typically greater than the minimum detectable change statistic for the BTrackS Balance Test. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTrackS is an effective means of identifying older adults with elevated postural sway, who are likely to benefit from Geri-Fit training to mitigate fall risk.

  5. A systematic review of the relationship between physical activities in sports or daily life and postural sway in upright stance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.; van Dieen, J.H.; Dekkers, H.; Wittink, H.; Vanhees, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In many sports, maintaining balance is necessary to compete at a high level. Also, in many health problems, balance is impaired. Postural sway (PS) is often used as an indicator of upright balance control, and physical activity (PA) might enhance balance control. However, the

  6. Athletic skill level is reflected in body sway : A test case for accelometry in combination with stochastic dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, Claudine J. C.; van Lummel, Rob C.; Beek, Peter J.

    Recent studies on postural control have shown that the variability of body sway during quiet standing may provide valuable information to characterize changes in postural control due to age, pathology, skill and task. The aim of the present study was to determine - as spade work for possible

  7. MRI-related static magnetic stray fields and postural body sway: a double-blind randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nierop, Lotte E; Slottje, Pauline; Kingma, Herman; Kromhout, Hans

    2013-07-01

    We assessed postural body sway performance after exposure to movement induced time-varying magnetic fields in the static magnetic stray field in front of a 7 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Using a double blind randomized crossover design, 30 healthy volunteers performed two balance tasks (i.e., standing with eyes closed and feet in parallel and then in tandem position) after standardized head movements in a sham, low exposure (on average 0.24 T static magnetic stray field and 0.49 T·s(-1) time-varying magnetic field) and high exposure condition (0.37 T and 0.70 T·s(-1)). Personal exposure to static magnetic stray fields and time-varying magnetic fields was measured with a personal dosimeter. Postural body sway was expressed in sway path, area, and velocity. Mixed-effects model regression analysis showed that postural body sway in the parallel task was negatively affected (P < 0.05) by exposure on all three measures. The tandem task revealed the same trend, but did not reach statistical significance. Further studies are needed to investigate the possibility of independent or synergetic effects of static magnetic stray field and time-varying magnetic field exposure. In addition, practical safety implications of these findings, e.g., for surgeons and others working near magnetic resonance imaging scanners need to be investigated. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Can explicit visual feedback of postural sway efface the effects of sensory manipulations on mediolateral balance performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cofre Lizama, L.E.; Pijnappels, M.A.G.M.; Reeves, N.P.; Verschueren, S.M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Explicit visual feedback on postural sway is often used in balance assessment and training. However, up-weighting of visual information may mask impairments of other sensory systems. We therefore aimed to determine whether the effects of somatosensory, vestibular, and proprioceptive manipulations on

  9. On the relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, Alexander; Fejer, René; Walker, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients with non-specific neck pain. While a linear relationship between pain intensity and postural sway has been described in low back pain patients, no such investigation has been conducted in adults with non-specific neck pain....

  10. The effects of aging on the rambling and trembling components of postural sway: effects of motor and sensory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabon, Nejc; Panjan, Andrej; Latash, Mark

    2013-09-01

    The effects of healthy aging on postural sway and its rambling and trembling components were studied. Young and elderly subjects stood quietly for 1 min in different postures, and with eyes open and closed. We found that age-related changes in postural sway and its components were similar to those observed in young participants in challenging conditions. These changes may therefore be viewed as secondary to the increased subjective perception of the complexity of postural tasks. Contrary to our expectations, stronger effects of age were seen in characteristics of rambling, not trembling. The commonly accepted hypothesis that older persons rely on vision more was not supported by this study: we found no significant interaction effects of age and vision on any of the sway characteristics. It was concluded that the reported higher reliance on vision in older persons may be task-specific. The results are compatible with the ideas that much of the age-related changes in postural sway emerge at the level of exploring the limits of stability and using the drift-and-act strategy. Our results suggest that the dominant view on rambling and trembling as reflecting supraspinal and peripheral mechanisms, respectively, may be too simplistic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low back pain and postural sway during quiet standing with and without sensory manipulation: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazaheri, M.; Coenen, P.; Parnianpour, M; Kiers, H.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    A previous review concluded that postural sway is increased in patients with low back pain (LBP). However, more detailed analysis of the literature shows that postural deficit may be dependent on experimental conditions in which patients with LBP have been assessed. The research question to be

  12. Selection of body sway parameters according to their sensitivity and repeatability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available For the precise evaluation of body balance, static type of tests performed on a force plate are the most commonly used ones. In these tests, body sway characteristics are analyzed based on the model of inverted pendulum and looking at the center of pressure (COP movement in time. Human body engages different strategies to compensate for balance perturbations. For this reason, there is a need to identify parameters which are sensitive to specific balance changes and which enable us to identify balance sub-components. The aim of our study was to investigate intra-visit repeatability and sensibility of the 40 different body sway parameters. Twenty-nine subjects participated in the study. They performed three different balancing tasks of different levels of difficulty, three repetitions each. The hip-width parallel stance and the single leg stance, both with open eyes, were used as ways to compare different balance intensities due to biomechanical changes. Additionally, deprivation of vision was used in the third balance task to study sensitivity to sensory system changes. As shown by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, repeatability of cumulative parameters such as COP, maximal amplitude and frequency showed excellent repeatability (ICC>0,85. Other parameters describing sub-dynamics through single repetition proved to have unsatisfying repeatability. Parameters most sensitive to increased intensity of balancing tasks were common COP, COP in medio-lateral and in antero-posterior direction, and maximal amplitues in the same directions. Frequency of oscilations has proved to be sensitive only to deprivation of vision. As shown in our study, cumulative parameters describing the path which the center of pressure makes proved to be the most repeatable and sensitive to detect different increases of balancing tasks enabling future use in balance studies and in clinical practice.

  13. Age-related hip proprioception declines: effects on postural sway and dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Jason R; Welder, Catherine; Foo, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of age on hip proprioception, and determine whether age-related hip proprioception declines disrupt balance. Survey of proprioception and balance differences between 3 age groups. University balance laboratory. Volunteer sample of independent community-dwelling adults (N=102) without sensory or other neurologic impairments in 3 age groups: younger (mean age, 24.6y; range, 19-37y), mid-aged (mean age, 53.3y; range, 40-64y), and older adults (mean age, 76.3y; range, 65-94y). Not applicable. Hip joint position sense (JPS) and kinesthesia were measured using a custom-built device. JPS error was determined by the magnitude of matching errors during vision and no-vision conditions. Kinesthesia was evaluated by the ability to detect passive limb rotation without vision. Postural sway was assessed during static stance and measured using root mean square of center of pressure (COP) displacement and velocity of COP displacement. Clinical balance and fear of falling were assessed with the mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (mini-BESTest) and Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. Both older and mid-aged adults had significantly increased JPS error compared with younger adults (Pbalance abilities (P=.005). These results provide evidence of significant hip proprioception declines with age. Although these declines are not related to increases in postural sway, participants with hip proprioception declines demonstrated disrupted dynamic balance, as indicated by decreased mini-BESTest scores. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The acute effect of Bowen therapy on pressure pain thresholds and postural sway in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Gonçalo J S; Black, Lisa; Rodrigues, Mário; Silva, Anabela G

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the immediate effect of Bowen Therapy in pressure pain threshold and postural sway of healthy individuals. Crossover, randomized, and double blinded study. University. Participants aged 18 years old or over, naïve to Bowen therapy were recruited among university students. An a priori sample size calculation determined that 34 participants were needed. Each participant attended two sessions and received Bowen Therapy and a sham procedure. The order in which Bowen or the sham procedure were administered was randomized. All participants had their postural control and pressure pain thresholds assessed in sessions 1 and 2 both at baseline and at the end of the session. Postural control was assessed using a force plate and centre of pressure antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, velocity and total sway area were calculated. Pressure pain threshold was measured at 10 different body sites on the paraspinal muscles from C1 to S1 using an electronic algometer. The results showed a significant increase in the anteroposterior displacement (p = 0.04) and a significantly lower decrease in the mean velocity (p = 0.01) of the centre of pressure and a significant increase in the pressure pain thresholds of two (out of ten; p ≤ 0.04) body sites in the group receiving Bowen Therapy compared to the group receiving the sham. No other significant differences were found. The findings suggest that Bowen Therapy has inconsistent immediate effects on postural control and pain threshold in healthy subjects. Further studies are needed using symptomatic participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual task interference on postural sway, postural transitions and gait in people with Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Fortaleza, Ana Claudia; Mancini, Martina; Carlson-Kuhta, Patty; King, Laurie A; Nutt, John G; Chagas, Eliane Ferrari; Freitas, Ismael Forte; Horak, Fay B

    2017-07-01

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is associated with less automatic gait and more impaired cognition, balance and postural transitions compared to people with PD who do not have FoG. However, it is unknown whether dual-task cost during postural sway, postural transitions (such as gait initiation and turning), and gait are more in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) who have freezing of gait (FoG+) compared to those who do not have FoG (FoG-). Here, we hypothesized that the effects of a cognitive dual task on postural sway, postural transitions and gait would be larger in FoG+ than FoG-. Thirty FoG- and 24 FoG+ performed an Instrumented Stand and Walk test in OFF medication state, with and without a secondary cognitive task (serial subtraction by 3s). Measures of postural sway, gait initiation, turning, and walking were extracted using body-worn inertial sensors. FoG+ showed significantly larger dual task cost than FoG- for several gait metrics, but not during postural sway or postural transitions. During walking, FoG+ exhibited a larger dual task cost than FoG- resulting in shorter stride length and slower stride velocity. During standing, FoG+ showed a larger postural sway compared to FoG- and during gait initiation, FoG+, but not FoG-, showed a longer first step duration during the dual-task condition compared to single-task condition (interaction effect, p=0.04). During turning, both groups showed a slower turn peak speed in the dual-task condition compared to single task condition. These findings partly support our hypothesis that dual task cost on walking is greater in FoG+ than FoG-. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, W.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanical and Thermal Environments Dept.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggested resources for programmers.

  17. A user`s guide to LUGSAN 1.1: A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, W.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

    1994-07-01

    LUGSAN (LUG and Sway brace ANalysis) is a analysis and database computer program designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads from aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85 and the maneuver calculation code, MILGEN, with an INGRES database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the operation of the LUGSAN application program, including function description, layout examples, and sample sessions. This report is intended to be a user`s manual for version 1.1 of LUGSAN operating on the VAX/VMS system. The report is not intended to be a programmer or developer`s manual.

  18. Validation of SWAY Wind Turbine Response in FAST, with a Focus on the Influence of Tower Wind Loads: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, R.; Yin Kwee Ng, E.

    2015-04-23

    Need to modify simulated system behavior to the measured data, but the tower wind loads improved the comparison for nonoperating conditions. the SWAY system in both turbine operating and nonoperating conditions. Mixed results were observed when comparing the simulated system behavior to the measured data, but the tower wind loads improved the comparison for nonoperating conditions. without the new tower-load capability to examine its influence on the response characteristics of the system. This is important in situations when the turbine is parked in survival conditions. The simulation results were then compared to measured data from the SWAY system in both turbine operating and nonoperating conditions. Mixed results were observed when comparing the simulated system behavior to the measured data, but the tower wind loads improved the comparison for nonoperating conditions.

  19. Differences in evaluation methods of trunk sway using different MoCap systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, Patrik; Socha, Vladimir; Cakrt, Ondrej; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The position of the trunk can be negatively influenced by many diseases. Several methods can be used for identifying defects in balance and coordination as a result of pathology of the musculoskeletal or nervous system. The aim of this article is to examine the relationship between the three methods used for analysis of trunk sway and compare two fundamentally different MoCap systems. We used a camera system and a 3DOF orientation tracker placed on subject's trunk, and measured inclination (roll) and flexion (pitch) during quiet stance. Ten healthy participants in the study were measured with eyes open and closed. The pitch versus roll plots of trunk were formed, and the area of the convex hull, area of confidence ellipse and total length of the trajectory of the pitch versus roll plot were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed and strong correlation between the area of the convex hull and area of the confidence ellipse was found. Also, the results show moderate correlation between the area of the confidence ellipse and total length of the trace, and moderate correlation between the area of the convex hull and total length of the trace. In general, the different MoCap systems show different areas and lengths but lead to the same conclusions. Statistical analysis of the participants with eyes open and eye closed did not show significant difference in the areas and total lengths of the pitch versus roll plots.

  20. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk

    OpenAIRE

    Goble,Daniel; Hearn,Mason; Baweja,Harsimran

    2017-01-01

    Daniel J Goble, Mason C Hearn, Harsimran S Baweja School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technolo...

  1. A systematic review of the relationship between physical activities in sports or daily life and postural sway in upright stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiers, Henri; van Dieën, Jaap; Dekkers, Henk; Wittink, Harriët; Vanhees, Luc

    2013-11-01

    In many sports, maintaining balance is necessary to compete at a high level. Also, in many health problems, balance is impaired. Postural sway (PS) is often used as an indicator of upright balance control, and physical activity (PA) might enhance balance control. However, the relationship between PS and PA has never been systematically reviewed. Our objective was to summarize the evidence regarding the relationship between PS in upright bipedal and unipedal standing and PA. We conducted a literature search in MEDLINE, EmBase, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database, and PEDro, up to March 2012, with no limit on the starting date. Characteristics and methodological aspects of each article were extracted by two reviewers. We used centre of pressure (CoP) velocity, and variables related to the CoP area, to compare studies. A total of 39 articles were reviewed from an initial yield of 2,058. Of these 39 studies, 37 used a comparative design, one was a cohort study, and one was a randomized controlled trial. The main conclusion was that in general, sport practitioners sway less than controls, and high-level athletes sway less than low-level athletes. Additionally, we identified specific effects dependent on the use of vision, sport-specific postures, and frequency and duration of the (sports) activity. PS in unperturbed bipedal stance appears to have limited sensitivity to detect subtle differences between groups of healthy people.

  2. The Influence of Motor Imagery on Postural Sway: Differential Effects of Type of Body Movement and Person Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stins, John F; Schneider, Iris K; Koole, Sander L; Beek, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the differential effects of kinesthetic imagery (first person perspective) and visual imagery (third person perspective) on postural sway during quiet standing. Based on an embodied cognition perspective, the authors predicted that kinesthetic imagery would lead to activations in movement-relevant motor systems to a greater degree than visual imagery. This prediction was tested among 30 participants who imagined various motor activities from different visual perspectives while standing on a strain gauge plate. The results showed that kinesthetic imagery of lower body movements, but not of upper body movements, had clear effects on postural parameters (sway path length and frequency contents of sway). Visual imagery, in contrast, had no reliable effects on postural activity. We also found that postural effects were not affected by the vividness of imagery. The results suggest that during kinesthetic motor imagery participants partially simulated (re-activated) the imagined movements, leading to unintentional postural adjustments. These findings are consistent with an embodied cognition perspective on motor imagery.

  3. Individuals with chronic ankle instability exhibit decreased postural sway while kicking in a single-leg stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcio José; Gorges, Ana Luiza; Rios, Jaqueline Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) usually experience deficits in balance control, which increase displacement in the body's center of pressure (COP) when they balance on a single leg. Little is known, however, about whether or not these individuals use the strategies of postural adjustment properly, especially during functional tasks that may predispose them to ankle sprain. The aim of this study was to investigate anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) postural adjustments in individuals with and without CAI as they kick a ball while standing in a single-leg stance with their ankle in neutral and supinated positions. COP displacements were calculated and their magnitudes (range) analyzed during APA and CPA intervals and over the duration of the whole task, represented by the COP area of sway and mean velocity. The CAI group exhibited a significant decrease in CPA and area of sway over the whole task, relative to controls. These results suggest that the decreased balance sway could be caused by the need for further stabilization of the ankle in more unstable postures to prevent recurrent sprain. Our findings could help clinicians to better understand the strategies of postural adjustments in individuals with CAI, and may assist and motivate new investigations into balance control interventions in such individuals, as well as proactively address recurrent ankle sprain conditions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Postural Sway, Balance Confidence, and Fear of Falling in Women With Knee Osteoarthritis in Comparison to Matched Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglietti, Marcelo; Dela Bela, Laís Faganello; Dias, Josilainne Marcelino; Pelegrinelli, Alexandre Roberto Marcondes; Nogueira, Jéssyca Fernandes; Batista Júnior, João Pedro; Carvalho, Rodrigo Gustavo da Silva; McVeigh, Joseph Gerard; Facci, Ligia Maria; Moura, Felipe Arruda; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2017-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease that commonly affects the knee joints. Individuals older than 65 years of age with knee OA have a greater risk of falls. However, there has been limited examination of the parameters of postural sway (increased time, speed, and postural sway area [center of pressure{CoP}]), and OA of the knee. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the CoP variables discriminate between patients with knee OA and matched healthy volunteers, and to correlate the CoP variables with the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and Falls Self-Efficacy Scale (FES). The secondary objective was to compare the CoP of older women with OA with a control group in bipedal support condition with eyes opened and closed. Cross-sectional study. University Biomechanics Laboratory. A total of 22 participants were divided into the following 2 groups of 11 participants each: an OA group (mean = 68 years, standard deviation = 7.4 years) and a control group (mean = 66 years, standard deviation = 4.4 years). Static postural balance was measured by a portable force platform. Data were collected in both visual conditions (eyes open and closed), in random order. Three attempts of 30 seconds were allowed for each participant on the force platform, with a 1-minute interval between attempts. Variables were the CoP total displacement of sway (TDS, in centimeters), anteroposterior amplitude displacement (APAD, in centimeters), medial-lateral amplitude displacement (MLAD, in centimeters), total mean velocity (TMV, in centimeters per second), and dispersion of the center of pressure (AREA, in centimeters squared). The postural sway analysis found statistically significant differences in the eyes open condition for the TDS (P = .020), APAD (P = .042), TMV (P = .010), and AREA (P = .045). In the discriminant analysis, none of the CoP variables were able to classify the groups (P = .15). The correlation analysis showed that only the

  5. A new measure of the CoP trajectory in postural sway: dynamics of heading change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; Haran, F J; Glass, Stephen M; Warren, William H

    2014-11-01

    The maintenance of upright stance requires the simultaneous control of posture in both the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) dimensions. Postural sway is typically measured by quantifying the movement of the center of pressure (CoP) in the AP and ML dimensions independently. Metrics such as path length and 95% ellipse area have been developed to take into account movement in both the AP and ML directions, but these metrics only quantify the magnitude of the CoP movement. The movement of the CoP is technically a vector quantity with both magnitude and direction characteristics. The direction of displacement, or heading, of the CoP may provide further insight into the control of posture. Accordingly, we present a novel variable that describes the rate of change in direction of CoP displacement in two dimensions, the heading change (Δϕ), which is derived from the CoP heading (ϕ). We then compared the standard deviation (SD) and the dynamic structure characterized by sample entropy (SampEn) of the heading change time series to previously examined metrics presented in the literature (SD and SampEn of the AP and ML time series, path length, SD and SampEn of the CoP resultant magnitude time series) during a 60s single-leg stance performed by healthy participants and patients with a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) prior to surgical intervention. Patients with an ACL rupture exhibited a different dynamic structure in Δϕ compared to healthy controls, t(14)=2.44, p=0.029, whereas none of the other metrics differed between groups (all p>0.05). The novelty and utility of Δϕ is that it characterizes directional changes of the CoP, whereas previously documented postural control analyses describe only changes in magnitude. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  6. Resting State Default Mode Network Connectivity, Dual Task Performance, Gait Speed, and Postural Sway in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Rachel A; Hsu, Chun Liang; Best, John R; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased risk of falling. In particular, older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are more vulnerable to falling compared with their healthy counterparts. Major contributors to this increased falls risk include a decline in dual task performance, gait speed, and postural sway. Recent evidence highlights the potential influence of the default mode network (DMN), the frontoparietal network (FPN), and the supplementary motor area (SMA) on dual task performance, gait speed, and postural sway. The DMN is active during rest and deactivates during task-oriented processes, to maintain attention and stay on task. The FPN and SMA are involved in top-down attentional control, motor planning, and motor execution. The DMN shows less deactivation during task in older adults with MCI. This lack of deactivation is theorized to increase competition for resources between the DMN and task-related brain regions (e.g., the FPN and SMA), increasing distraction from the task and reducing task performance. However, no study has yet investigated the relationship between the between-network connectivity of the DMN with these regions and dual task walking, gait speed or postural sway. We hypothesized that greater functional connectivity both within the DMN and between DMN-FPN and DMN-SMA, will be associated with poorer performance during dual task walking, slower gait speed, and greater postural sway in older adults with MCI. Forty older adults with MCI were measured on a dual task-walking paradigm, gait speed over a 4-m walk, and postural sway using a sway-meter. Greater within-DMN connectivity was significantly correlated with poorer dual task performance. Furthermore, greater inter-network connectivity between the DMN and SMA was significantly correlated with slower gait speed and greater postural sway on the eyes open floor sway task. Thus, greater resting state DMN functional connectivity may be an underlying neural mechanism for reduced dual task

  7. Influence of Electrotactile Tongue Feedback on Controlling Upright Stance during Rotational and/or Translational Sway-referencing with Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Bach-y-Rita, Paul; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Moore, Steven T.; Stallings, Valerie L.; Paloski, William H.; Black, F. Owen

    2007-01-01

    Integration of multi-sensory inputs to detect tilts relative to gravity is critical for sensorimotor control of upright orientation. Displaying body orientation using electrotactile feedback to the tongue has been developed by Bach-y-Rita and colleagues as a sensory aid to maintain upright stance with impaired vestibular feedback. MacDougall et al. (2006) recently demonstrated that unpredictably varying Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) significantly increased anterior-posterior (AP) sway during rotational sway referencing with eyes closed. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of electrotactile feedback on postural control performance with pseudorandom binaural bipolar GVS. Postural equilibrium was measured with a computerized hydraulic platform in 10 healthy adults (6M, 4F, 24-65 y). Tactile feedback (TF) of pitch and roll body orientation was derived from a two-axis linear accelerometer mounted on a torso belt and displayed on a 144-point electrotactile array held against the anterior dorsal tongue (BrainPort, Wicab, Inc., Middleton, WI). Subjects were trained to use TF by voluntarily swaying to draw figures on their tongue, both with and without GVS. Subjects were required to keep the intraoral display in their mouths on all trials, including those that did not provide TF. Subjects performed 24 randomized trials (20 s duration with eyes closed) including four support surface conditions (fixed, rotational sway-referenced, translating the support surface proportional to AP sway, and combined rotational-translational sway-referencing), each repeated twice with and without GVS, and with combined GVS and TF. Postural performance was assessed using deviations from upright (peak-to-peak and RMS sway) and convergence toward stability limits (time and distance to base of support boundaries). Postural stability was impaired with GVS in all platform conditions, with larger decrements in performance during trials with rotation sway

  8. Resting State Default Mode Network Connectivity, Dual Task Performance, Gait Speed, and Postural Sway in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Crockett

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with an increased risk of falling. In particular, older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI are more vulnerable to falling compared with their healthy counterparts. Major contributors to this increased falls risk include a decline in dual task performance, gait speed, and postural sway. Recent evidence highlights the potential influence of the default mode network (DMN, the frontoparietal network (FPN, and the supplementary motor area (SMA on dual task performance, gait speed, and postural sway. The DMN is active during rest and deactivates during task-oriented processes, to maintain attention and stay on task. The FPN and SMA are involved in top-down attentional control, motor planning, and motor execution. The DMN shows less deactivation during task in older adults with MCI. This lack of deactivation is theorized to increase competition for resources between the DMN and task-related brain regions (e.g., the FPN and SMA, increasing distraction from the task and reducing task performance. However, no study has yet investigated the relationship between the between-network connectivity of the DMN with these regions and dual task walking, gait speed or postural sway. We hypothesized that greater functional connectivity both within the DMN and between DMN–FPN and DMN–SMA, will be associated with poorer performance during dual task walking, slower gait speed, and greater postural sway in older adults with MCI. Forty older adults with MCI were measured on a dual task-walking paradigm, gait speed over a 4-m walk, and postural sway using a sway-meter. Greater within-DMN connectivity was significantly correlated with poorer dual task performance. Furthermore, greater inter-network connectivity between the DMN and SMA was significantly correlated with slower gait speed and greater postural sway on the eyes open floor sway task. Thus, greater resting state DMN functional connectivity may be an underlying neural mechanism for

  9. Nintendo Wii Balance Board is sensitive to effects of visual tasks on standing sway in healthy elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslucher, Frank; Wade, Michael G; Nelson, Brent; Lim, Kelvin; Chen, Fu-Chen; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2012-07-01

    Research has shown that the Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) can reliably detect the quantitative kinematics of the center of pressure in stance. Previous studies used relatively coarse manipulations (1- vs. 2-leg stance, and eyes open vs. closed). We sought to determine whether the WBB could reliably detect postural changes associated with subtle variations in visual tasks. Healthy elderly adults stood on a WBB while performing one of two visual tasks. In the Inspection task, they maintained their gaze within the boundaries of a featureless target. In the Search task, they counted the occurrence of designated target letters within a block of text. Consistent with previous studies using traditional force plates, the positional variability of the center of pressure was reduced during performance of the Search task, relative to movement during performance of the Inspection task. Using detrended fluctuation analysis, a measure of movement dynamics, we found that COP trajectories were more predictable during performance of the Search task than during performance of the Inspection task. The results indicate that the WBB is sensitive to subtle variations in both the magnitude and dynamics of body sway that are related to variations in visual tasks engaged in during stance. The WBB is an inexpensive, reliable technology that can be used to evaluate subtle characteristics of body sway in large or widely dispersed samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in Postural Sway After a Single Global Postural Reeducation Session in University Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Quijada, Carlos; Poveda-Pagán, Emilio J; Segura-Heras, José V; Hernández-Sánchez, Sergio; Prieto-Castelló, María J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a single session of global postural reeducation (GPR) in postural sway in young adult university students who use data visualization screens. A randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel groups was performed. Sixty-four subjects were randomized in the experimental group (12 men and 20 women) who underwent the GPR session, and a control group (13 men and 19 women) that did not receive any intervention was included. Center of pressure (COP) was assessed using a stabilometric platform, with eyes open and eyes closed before, immediately after, 48 hours after, and 7 days after intervention in both groups. In the interaction of time and gender, statistically significant differences were found for the area covered by COP (P = .020) and for the standard deviation (SD) in the mediolateral axis (P = .035). Considering the complete interaction time, gender, and group, statistically significant differences were found (P = .015) for the anteroposterior rate covered by COP and the SD in the anteroposterior axis (P = .033). In eyes closed condition, the intersubject analysis showed statistically significant differences for the interaction between group and gender for the variable mediolateral SD (P = .043). Considering the interaction of time with group, statistically significant differences were found for full length covered by COP (P = .017). Changes in postural sway were observed after a single GPR session, mainly at 48 hours, with different behaviors between men and women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Correction for Patient Sway in Radiographic Biplanar Imaging for Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Spine: In Vitro Study of a New Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legaye, J. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Univ. of Louvain - Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Saunier, P.; Dumas, R. (Univ. of Lyon 1 - INRETS, Villeurbanne (France)); Vallee, C. (Radiology Dept., Hpital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France))

    2009-08-15

    Background: Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the spine in the upright position are classically obtained using two-dimensional, non-simultaneous radiographic imaging. However, a subject's sway between exposures induces inaccuracy in the 3D reconstructions. Purpose: To evaluate the impact of patient sway between successive radiographic exposures, and to test if 3D reconstruction accuracy can be improved by a corrective method with simultaneous Moire-X-ray imaging. Material and Methods: Using a calibrated deformable phantom perceptible by both techniques (Moire and X-ray), the 3D positional and rotational vertebral data from 3D reconstructions with and without the corrective procedure were compared to the corresponding data of computed tomography (CT) scans, considered as a reference. All were expressed in the global axis system, as defined by the Scoliosis Research Society. Results: When a sagittal sway of 10 deg occurred between successive biplanar X-rays, the accuracy of the 3D reconstruction without correction was 8.8 mm for the anteroposterior vertebral locations and 6.4 deg for the sagittal orientations. When the corrective method was applied, the accuracy was improved to 1.3 mm and 1.5 deg, respectively. Conclusion: 3D accuracy improved significantly by using the corrective method, whatever the subject's sway. This technique is reliable for clinical appraisal of the spine, if the subject's sway does not exceed 10 deg. For greater sway, improvement persists, but a risk of lack of accuracy exists

  12. Postural Control Can Be Well Maintained by Healthy, Young Adults in Difficult Visual Task, Even in Sway-Referenced Dynamic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lions, Cynthia; Bucci, Maria Pia; Bonnet, Cédrick

    2016-01-01

    To challenge the validity of existing cognitive models of postural control, we recorded eye movements and postural sway during two visual tasks (a control free-viewing task and a difficult searching task), and two postural tasks (one static task in which the platform was maintained stable and a dynamic task in which the platform moved in a sway-referenced manner.) We expected these models to be insufficient to predict the results in postural control both in static-as already shown in the literature reports-and in dynamic platform conditions. Twelve healthy, young adults (17.3 to 34.1 years old) participated in this study. Postural performances were evaluated using the Multitest platform (Framiral®) and ocular recording was performed with Mobile T2 (e(ye)BRAIN®). In the free-viewing task, the participants had to look at an image, without any specific instruction. In the searching task, the participants had to look at an image and also to locate the position of an object in the scene. Postural sway was only significantly higher in the dynamic free-viewing condition than in the three other conditions with no significant difference between these three other conditions. Visual task performance was slightly higher in dynamic than in static conditions. As expected, our results did not confirm the main assumption of the current cognitive models of postural control-i.e. that the limited attentional resources of the brain should explain changes in postural control in our conditions. Indeed, 1) the participants did not sway significantly more in the sway-referenced dynamic searching condition than in any other condition; 2) the participants swayed significantly less in both static and dynamic searching conditions than in the dynamic free-viewing condition. We suggest that a new cognitive model illustrating the adaptive, functional role of the brain to control upright stance is necessary for future studies.

  13. Postural Control Can Be Well Maintained by Healthy, Young Adults in Difficult Visual Task, Even in Sway-Referenced Dynamic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Lions

    Full Text Available To challenge the validity of existing cognitive models of postural control, we recorded eye movements and postural sway during two visual tasks (a control free-viewing task and a difficult searching task, and two postural tasks (one static task in which the platform was maintained stable and a dynamic task in which the platform moved in a sway-referenced manner. We expected these models to be insufficient to predict the results in postural control both in static-as already shown in the literature reports-and in dynamic platform conditions.Twelve healthy, young adults (17.3 to 34.1 years old participated in this study. Postural performances were evaluated using the Multitest platform (Framiral® and ocular recording was performed with Mobile T2 (e(yeBRAIN®. In the free-viewing task, the participants had to look at an image, without any specific instruction. In the searching task, the participants had to look at an image and also to locate the position of an object in the scene.Postural sway was only significantly higher in the dynamic free-viewing condition than in the three other conditions with no significant difference between these three other conditions. Visual task performance was slightly higher in dynamic than in static conditions.As expected, our results did not confirm the main assumption of the current cognitive models of postural control-i.e. that the limited attentional resources of the brain should explain changes in postural control in our conditions. Indeed, 1 the participants did not sway significantly more in the sway-referenced dynamic searching condition than in any other condition; 2 the participants swayed significantly less in both static and dynamic searching conditions than in the dynamic free-viewing condition. We suggest that a new cognitive model illustrating the adaptive, functional role of the brain to control upright stance is necessary for future studies.

  14. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A CORE MUSCLES STABILITY PROGRAM IN REDUCING THE POSTURAL SWAY OF ADOLESCENT ARCHERS: A PANACEA FOR A BETTER ARCHERY PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathmanathan K. Suppiah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Expert athletes in archery can rapidly achieve postural stability compared to beginners and novice athletes. This study investigated the effectiveness of a core stability training program in reducing the postural sway among adolescent archers. Methods: Participants (n=12 of this study were aged between 13-18 years; were divided into two groups (i.e., experimental and control. The experimental group underwent a supplementary eight-week core stability training program apart from their regular training program. Data were collected at three-time points; pre, after four weeks and post-training. Postural sway was measured in the anteroposterior plane and medio-lateral plane – center of pressure (CoP. Results: Mixed factorial ANOVA yielded significant interactions over time in the performance of the push up; plank; archery performance and postural sway. Postural sway between the experimental and control group was significantly different on both planes at T2; (CoP range x - F(1,10 = 7.952, p <.05, d = 1.302; CoP range y - T2; F(1,10 = 7.887, p<.05. The results were replicated at T3; CoP range x - F(1,10= 7.952, p <.05; CoP range y - F(1,10= 11.105, p <.05. Conclusion: The experimental group showed a smaller range in postural sway on both axes; indicating a reduction in the postural sway. A significant relationship was also evident between CoP range x, CoP range y and the participants’ performance in archery. It is recommended that a core stability training program is incorporated into an archery training program for adolescent archers.

  15. An approximative method for the determination of the hydrodynamic coefficients of a ship in case of swaying and yawing on shallow water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontijn, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    This report gives information about the hydrodynamic coefficients of a box-shaped ship with zero speed of advance in case of pure swaying and yawing on shallow water. In the horizontal plane a harmonically oscillating motion is imposed on the ship; the hydrodynamic coefficients for the modes of

  16. Adaptive output-based command shaping for sway control of a 3D overhead crane with payload hoisting and wind disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Auwalu M.; Mohamed, Z.; Selamat, H.; Pota, Hemanshu R.; Zainal Abidin, M. S.; Ismail, F. S.; Haruna, A.

    2018-01-01

    Payload hoisting and wind disturbance during crane operations are among the challenging factors that affect a payload sway and thus, affect the crane's performance. This paper proposes a new online adaptive output-based command shaping (AOCS) technique for an effective payload sway reduction of an overhead crane under the influence of those effects. This technique enhances the previously developed output-based command shaping (OCS) which was effective only for a fixed system and without external disturbances. Unlike the conventional input shaping design technique which requires the system's natural frequency and damping ratio, the proposed technique is designed by using the output signal and thus, an online adaptive algorithm can be formulated. To test the effectiveness of the AOCS, experiments are carried out using a laboratory overhead crane with a payload hoisting in the presence of wind, and with different payloads. The superiority of the method is confirmed by 82% and 29% reductions in the overall sway and the maximum transient sway respectively, when compared to the OCS, and two robust input shapers namely Zero Vibration Derivative-Derivative and Extra-Insensitive shapers. Furthermore, the method demonstrates a uniform crane's performance under all conditions. It is envisaged that the proposed method can be very useful in designing an effective controller for a crane system with an unknown payload and under the influence of external disturbances.

  17. Foot muscle morphology is related to center of pressure sway and control mechanisms during single-leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianyi; Schütte, Kurt Heinrich; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining balance is vitally important in everyday life. Investigating the effects of individual foot muscle morphology on balance may provide insights into neuromuscular balance control mechanisms. This study aimed to examine the correlation between the morphology of foot muscles and balance performance during single-leg standing. Twenty-eight recreational runners were recruited in this study. An ultrasound device was used to measure the thickness and cross-sectional area of three intrinsic foot muscles (abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum brevis and quadratus plantae) and peroneus muscles. Participants were required to perform 30s of single-leg standing for three trials on a force plate, which was used to record the center of pressure (COP). The standard deviation of the amplitude and ellipse area of the COP were calculated. In addition, stabilogram diffusion analysis (SDA) was performed on COP data. Pearson correlation coefficients were computed to examine the correlation between foot muscle morphology and traditional COP parameters as well as with SDA parameters. Our results showed that larger abductor hallucis correlated to smaller COP sway, while larger peroneus muscles correlated to larger COP sway during single-leg standing. Larger abductor hallucis also benefited open-loop dynamic stability, as well as supported a more efficient transfer from open-loop to closed loop control mechanisms. These results suggest that the morphology of foot muscles plays an important role in balance performance, and that strengthening the intrinsic foot muscles may be an effective way to improve balance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The effect of 8-weeks proprioceptive exercise program in postural sway and isokinetic strength of ankle sprains of Tunisian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moussa Zouita, A; Majdoub, O; Ferchichi, H; Grandy, K; Dziri, C; Ben Salah, F Z

    2013-12-01

    Our objective is to investigate the effects of proprioceptive exercises rehabilitation on isokinetic strength and postural balance in athletes with sprain ankle. The ankles of 16 subjects were tested: eight in the functional instability (FI) group and eight non-injured (NI) subjects in the control group. Subjects were asked to take part in a testing session. The test order for the postural stability and isokinetic strength tests was randomized to avoid learning or fatigue effects. The testing session started with a 5-minute warm-up. Subjects were then instructed to perform several lower body flexibility exercises. The test procedure consisted in static assessments, where single-limb (right and left) stance postural stability was assessed. Three practice trials were allowed for each subject. The assessment quantifies postural sway velocity while the athlete stands calmly on one foot on the force plate, for each leg. They were asked to stand as still as possible for 30s, upper limbs along the body. The subjects were requested to maintain balance with eyes open and then with the eyes closed on the firm surface. The sway velocity (in degrees per second) is given for all trials. Subjects were allowed a 1-minute rest between tests. The regime of isokinetic evaluation of dorsi-plantar flexions is concentric, with three successive speeds: slow (30°/s, reps 5), average (60°/s, reps 10), and fast (120°/s, reps 15), according to the protocol established by European Group for the development and the isokinetic research and the procedural guidelines. Relative moment of strength and times of acceleration and deceleration were calculated for each set of isokinetic testing repetitions per body side, muscle group and testing speed. The results of tests-retest and between both groups (injured vs. healthy) show that after eight weeks of proprioceptive work, significant increase of maximal strength, decrease in times of acceleration and deceleration at the level of plantar flexors

  19. Balance measured by the sway balance smart-device application does not discriminate between older persons with and without a fall history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzo, Jennifer L; Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Stephanie M; Gray, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    Clinical functional assessments of balance often lack specificity and sensitivity in discriminating and predicting falls among community-dwelling older adults. We determined the feasibility of using a smart-device application measuring balance to discriminate fall status among older adults. We also evaluated differences between smart-device balance measurements when secured with or without a harness. A cross-sectional study design to determine the ability of the Sway Balance smart-device application (SWAY) to discriminate older adults based on fall history. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) were used as comparative, clinically based assessments. Community-dwelling older adults with (n = 25) and without (n = 32) a history of fall(s) participated. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine differences among assessments based on fall history. Logistic regression models determined the ability of each assessment to discriminate fall history. Older adults with and without a history of falls were not significantly different on SWAY (P = 0.92) but were different on BBS (P = 0.01), and ABC (P fall history (P = 0.92), while BBS and ABC both discriminated fall history (P older adults studied, the BBS and ABC measures discriminated groups defined by fall history, while the SWAY smart-device balance application did not. Modifications to the application may improve the discriminating ability of the measure in the recognition of fall status in older adults.

  20. Risk-factor analysis of high school basketball-player ankle injuries: a prospective controlled cohort study evaluating postural sway, ankle strength, and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Chen, Chia-Hong; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang; Jan, Mei-Hwa; Lin, Kwan-Hwa

    2006-06-01

    To analyze risk factors, including postural sway, ankle strength, and flexibility, for the prediction of ankle injuries in men's high school basketball players. A cohort study with follow-up duration of 1 basketball season. Biomechanics laboratory. Forty-two (age, 16.5+/-1.1y) players competing in first league of the High School Basketball Association without history of injury in the lower extremities within 6 months before recruitment and without significant malalignment in the lower extremities were included. None of these players met exclusion criteria such as using ankle braces or taping or failed in wearing low-top sports shoes during the follow-up season. Not applicable. Biomechanic measurements including isokinetic ankle strength, 1-leg standing postural sway, and ankle joint dorsiflexion flexibility were performed before the basketball season by 1 physical therapist. The subsequent monthly follow-up questionnaires were sent and returned by mail to prospectively record the incidence of ankle injury occurring in the season. Results of these preseason measurements were analyzed to correlate if any of these measured variables could predict future ankle injuries. Eighteen ankle sport injuries were recorded for 42 players during the follow-up season. High variation of postural sway in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions corresponded to occurrences of ankle injuries (P=.01, odds ratio [OR]=1.220; P< .001, OR=1.216, respectively). All other variables were not associated with injury. High variations of postural sway in 1-leg standing test could explain partly the increased prevalence of ankle injury in basketball players. It may be used as a screening tool to recommend balance training before basketball season.

  1. Effects of clear visual input and change in standing sequence on standing sway related to falls during night toilet use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Kouji; Uchiyama, Junko; Ohnishi, Toshihiko; Ninomiya, Ishio; Masino, Yachiyo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to provide objective evidence that clear visual input and change in standing sequence can reduce fall risk related to night toilet use among hospitalized older patients. In hospitalized older patients, falls are likely to occur during night toileting needs. Using a stabilometer, we measured and compared maximal standing sway for 10 seconds immediately after standing with three visual input modes in two standing patterns, comparing healthy younger adults (n=22) and older patients (n=19). The three modes are no visual input (mode 1), vague (mode 2), and clear visual input (mode 3). Standing sequences A and B are defined as supine-to-standing and supine-to-sitting-to-standing, respectively. For a given visual mode, maximal moved distance was significantly greater for older patients than for younger adults with both standing patterns (Polder patients. A greater maximal moved distance score indicated a greater fall risk. It is important for nurses to train older patients to turn on the light and perform standing pattern B, when going to the bathroom at night. In addition, it is advisable to confirm the placement of distinct visual markers on the way to the bathroom. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees: a 9-month randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25-63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the last 6 months. Tests were conducted at baseline, after 3 and 9 months. The soccer group improved maximal neck extension strength both after 3 (1.2 kg; P strength (3.1 kg; P = 0.04) after 3 months, with improvements in postural sway velocity moment (-9.2 mm(2)/s; P exercise may be beneficial for improvement of the neck and trunk strength, which may have preventive effects with regard to future perceived muscle pain in the respective body regions. Furthermore, the Zumba group revealed positive effects on lower limb lean mass and postural sway compared to the control group.

  3. Interwoven fluctuations during intermodal perception: fractality in head sway supports the use of visual feedback in haptic perceptual judgments by manual wielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelty-Stephen, Damian G; Dixon, James A

    2014-12-01

    Intermodal integration required for perceptual learning tasks is rife with individual differences. Participants vary in how they use perceptual information to one modality. One participant alone might change her own response over time. Participants vary further in their use of feedback through one modality to inform another modality. Two experiments test the general hypothesis that perceptual-motor fluctuations reveal both information use within modality and coordination among modalities. Experiment 1 focuses on perceptual learning in dynamic touch, in which participants use exploratory hand-wielding of unseen objects to make visually guided length judgments and use visual feedback to rescale their judgments of the same mechanical information. Previous research found that the degree of fractal temporal scaling (i.e., "fractality") in hand-wielding moderates the use of mechanical information. Experiment 1 shows that head-sway fractality moderates the use of visual information. Further, experience with feedback increases head-sway fractality and prolongs its effect on later hand-wielding fractality. Experiment 2 replicates effects of head-sway fractality moderating use of visual information in a purely visual-judgment task. Together, these findings suggest that fractal fluctuations may provide a modal-general window onto not just how participants use perceptual information but also how well they may integrate information among different modalities. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Reaction Time and Postural Sway Modify the Effect of Executive Function on Risk of Falls in Older People with Mild to Moderate Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Morag E; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim; Kurrle, Susan E; Mikolaizak, A Stefanie; Close, Jacqueline C T

    2017-04-01

    To explore the relationship between cognitive performance and falls in older people with mild to moderate cognitive impairment (CI) by investigating the mediational effects of medical, medication, neuropsychological, and physiological factors. Secondary analysis, prospective cohort study. Community and low-level care. 177 older people (aged 82 ± 7 years) with mild to moderate CI (MMSE 11-23; ACE-R vision, reaction time, knee extension strength, balance (postural sway, controlled leaning balance), and higher physiological fall risk scores. Participants with poorer EF were 1.5 times (RR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.18) more likely to have multiple falls. Mediational analyses demonstrated that reaction time and postural sway reduced the relative risk of EF on multiple falls by 31% (RR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.81-1.74). Within this sample of older people with mild to moderate CI, poorer EF increased the risk of multiple falls. This relationship was mediated by reaction time and postural sway,suggesting cognitively impaired older people with poorer EF may benefit from fall prevention programs targeting these mediating factors. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered visual and feet proprioceptive feedbacks during quiet standing increase postural sway in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Pessoto Hirata

    Full Text Available The objective was to investigate how postural control in knee osteoarthritis (KOA patients, with different structural severities and pain levels, is reorganized under different sensory conditions.Forty-two obese patients (BMI range from 30.1 to 48.7 kg*m(-2, age range from 50 to 74 years with KOA were evaluated. One minute of quiet standing was assessed on a force platform during 4 different sensory conditions, applied 3 times at random: Eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC standing on firm and soft (foam surfaces (EO-soft and EC-soft. Centre of pressure (Cop standard deviation, speed, range and Cop mean position in both directions (anterior-posterior and medial-lateral were extracted from the force platform data. Structural disease severity was assessed from semiflexed standing radiographs and graded by the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL score. Pain intensity immediately before the measurements was assessed by numeric rating scale (range: 0-10.The patients were divided into "less severe" (KL 1 and 2, n = 24 and "severe" (KL>2, n = 18 group. The CoP range in the medial-lateral direction was larger in the severe group when compared with the less severe group during EC-soft condition (P<0.01. Positive correlation between pain intensity and postural sway (range in medial-lateral direction was found during EC condition, indicating that the higher the pain intensity, the less effective is the postural control applied to restore an equilibrium position while standing without visual information.THE RESULTS SUPPORT THAT: (i the postural reorganization under manipulation of the different sensory information is worse in obese KOA patients with severe degeneration and/or high pain intensity when compared with less impaired patients, and (ii higher pain intensity is related to worse body balance in obese KOA patients.

  6. Comparison between ankle proprioception measurements and postural sway test for evaluating ankle instability in subjects with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish the effective evaluation approaches that are appropriate for measuring ankle proprioception. But, only a few studies used more than one test procedure simultaneously to identify proprioceptive deficits. Further, no data are available on the correlations between the measures of ankle proprioception and postural sway (PS) test in subjects with functional ankle instability (FAI). The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between ankle proprioception measurements and PS test in subjects with FAI. Of the 79 subjects enrolled in the case-control study, 40 had FAI and 39 were control subjects. Ankle proprioception was evaluated by the angle reproduction (AR), force matching (FM), and the muscle reaction (MR) to sudden ankle inversion tests. For the AR and FM tests, absolute errors (AE) of ankle plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion directions were calculated. For the MR test, reaction times and activation of tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured during sudden ankle inversion with a 30° tilting angle. The PS test was investigated by using a force platform during single-limb standing test. Three trials were performed and averaged in each test. Reaction time of the PL (p = 0.006), a variable of MR test, and plantarflexion (p = 0.001, p = 0.009) and eversion (p = 0.016, p = 0.039) error variables of the AR and FM tests differed significantly between the control and FAI groups. Moreover, these variables (r = -0.381 ∼ 0.788, p proprioception measurements were more sensitive and discriminative than others, and could be useful to assess ankle instability, particularly if the method is to be applied in clinical studies and laboratory settings.

  7. Higher gait speed and smaller sway area decrease the risk for decline in higher-level functional capacity among middle-aged and elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Mariko; Otsuka, Rei; Yuki, Atsumu; Nishita, Yukiko; Tange, Chikako; Tomida, Makiko; Kato, Yuki; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether physical function can indicate a risk of decline in higher-level functional capacity. Data were derived from the National Institute for Longevity Sciences-Longitudinal Study of Aging. Subjects comprised 466 men and 495 women aged 40-79 years at baseline (1997-2000), whose total score for the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC) at baseline was ≥11 and who participated in the follow-up survey. Baseline physical function examination included grip strength, comfortable gait speed, and sway area with eyes open. A decline in higher-level functional capacity was defined as a ≥2-point decrease in the TMIG-IC score after 14 years. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for decline in the TMIG-IC score for 14 years according to a 1-standard deviation (SD) increase in physical function measurements at baseline were estimated. Subjects with decreased TMIG-IC scores included 78 (16.7%) men and 80 (16.2%) women. In women, the multivariate-adjusted OR (95% CI) for a TMIG-IC score decrease with a 1-SD increase in comfortable gait speed was 0.68 (0.50-0.92; p=0.013), and that with a 1-SD increase in sway area with eyes open was 1.49 (1.17-1.90; p=0.001). Grip strength was not associated with TMIG-IC score decline. None of the physical performance measures affected TMIG-IC score declines in men. These results suggest that gait speed decreases and sway area increases might predict a risk of decline in higher-level functional capacity among middle-aged and elderly women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Altered postural sway in patients suffering from non-specific neck pain and whiplash associated disorder - A systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Study design Systematic literature review. Objectives To assess differences in center of pressure (COP) measures in patients suffering from non-specific neck pain (NSNP) or whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) compared to healthy controls and any relationship between changes in postural sway and the presence of pain, its intensity, previous pain duration and the perceived level of disability. Summary of Background data Over the past 20 years, the center of pressure (COP) has been commonly used as an index of postural stability in standing. While several studies investigated COP excursions in neck pain and WAD patients and compared these to healthy individuals, no comprehensive analysis of the reported differences in postural sway pattern exists. Search methods Six online databases were systematically searched followed by a manual search of the retrieved papers. Selection Criteria Papers comparing COP measures derived from bipedal static task conditions on a force plate of people with NSNP and WAD to those of healthy controls. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance. Screening for final inclusion, data extraction and quality assessment were carried out with a third reviewer to reconcile differences. Results Ten papers met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity in study designs prevented pooling of the data and no direct comparison of data across the studies was possible. Instead, a qualitative data analysis was conducted. There was broad consensus that patients with either type of neck pain have increased COP excursions compared to healthy individuals, a difference that was more pronounced in people with WAD. An increased sway in antero-posterior direction was observed in both groups. Conclusions Patients with neck pain (due to either NSNP or WAD) exhibit greater postural instability than healthy controls, signified by greater COP excursions irrespective of the COP parameter chosen. Further, the decreased

  9. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees: A 9-month randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald; Brekke, Ole Lars; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25–63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the las...

  10. The Acute Effects of Unilateral Ankle Plantar Flexors Static- Stretching on Postural Sway and Gastrocnemius Muscle Activity During Single-Leg Balance Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bráulio N. Lima, Paulo R.G. Lucareli, Willy A. Gomes, Josinaldo J. Silva, Andre S. Bley, Erin H. Hartigan, Paulo H. Marchetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG and the center of pressure (COP during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions. Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM] was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]. COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively. In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect.

  11. Effects of body weight-support treadmill training on postural sway and gait independence in patients with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias-Escudero, Felipe; Rivera-Lillo, Gonzalo; Torres-Castro, Rodrigo; Varas-Díaz, Gonzalo

    2017-10-23

    To examine the effects of a six-week body weight-support treadmill training (BWSTT) program on center-of-mass control and gait independence in chronic, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) patients. Descriptive. Clinica Los Coihues. Neurorehabilitation center in Santiago, Chile. 17 chronic iSCI patients and 17 healthy subjects. An instrumented sway (ISway) test was performed before and after the implementation of a six-week BWSTT program. The standing balance of participants was measured by Normalized jerk (NJ) and root mean square (RMS). These values were used to assess the standing balance of participants, and were correlated with the scores obtained on the Walking Index Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI) II test. Significant differences were found in standing balance (i.e., through NJ) after the BWSTT program (P = 0.016), but no significant differences were found in RMS values for postural sway (P = 0.693). None of the patients obtained improved WISCI II scores pre- vs. post-intervention. While a BWSTT program can improve center-of-mass control in iSCI patients, no effects were recorded for gait independence. National Clinical Trials, registry number NCT02703883.

  12. Role of the Frontal Cortex in Standing Postural Sway Tasks While Dual-Tasking: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Examining Working Memory Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Fujita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posture control during a dual-task involves changing the distribution of attention resources between the cognitive and motor tasks and involves the frontal cortex working memory (WM. The present study aimed to better understand the impact of frontal lobe activity and WM capacity in postural control during a dual-task. High and low WM-span groups were compared using their reading span test scores. High and low WM capacity were compared based on cognitive and balance performance and hemoglobin oxygenation (oxyHb levels during standing during single (S-S, standing during dual (S-D, one leg standing during single (O-S, and one leg standing during dual (O-D tasks. For sway pass length, significant difference in only the O-D task was observed between both groups. oxyHb levels were markedly increased in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor area in the high-span group during a dual-task. Therefore, WM capacity influenced the allocation of attentional resources and motor performance.

  13. Nonlinear dynamical structure of sway path during standing in patients with multiple sclerosis and in healthy controls is affected by changes in sensory input and cognitive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali; Mofateh, Razieh; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2013-10-11

    Although several studies have applied traditional linear measures to evaluate postural control of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about the nonlinear dynamics of this patient group. In this study, recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), a well documented nonlinear method, was used to compare the nonlinear dynamical structure of postural sway in two groups consisting of MS patients (n=23) and healthy matched controls (n=23). The study focuses on three levels of postural difficulty consisting of (1) standing on a rigid surface (force platform) with eyes open, (2) standing on a rigid surface with eyes closed, and (3) standing on a foam surface with eyes closed. The two levels of cognitive difficulty measured, consisted of a single postural task and a dual postural-cognitive task. It was observed that as the postural conditions became more difficult, the center of pressure (COP) time series of both groups became less regular as recorded in lower recurrence rate, less complex in deterministic structure as reflected in lower RQA entropy, and less nonstationary as reflected in the recording of lower Trend. Moreover, as cognitive conditions became more difficult, COP time series became less regular (lower %Rec in the anteroposterior direction and lower %Det in both directions), less complex in deterministic structure (lower RQA Ent in the anteroposterior direction), and less nonstationary (lower trend in the anteroposterior direction). The analytical results of the research show that there is a similar dynamical structure for both the MS patients and the control group; however, the nonlinear behavior of both groups was different under various experimental conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparação da oscilação postural estática na posição sentada entre jovens e idosos saudáveis Comparing static sitting postural sway of healthy young and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia S. Melo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Descrever uma nova metodologia de análise da oscilação postural estática sentada e comparar os resultados de jovens e idosos saudáveis. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 38 indivíduos saudáveis, 17 jovens (idade média 23±2,38 anos e 21 idosos (idade média 67±2,42 anos. A oscilação postural foi mensurada por meio do sistema eletromagnético Polhemus® 3Space Isotrack II. As avaliações foram feitas nas condições olhos abertos (OA e fechados (OF, com os voluntários sentados sem apoio plantar e sem encosto em suportes de madeira (superfície estável-SE e de espuma (superfície instável-SI. Cada condição sensorial foi avaliada durante 90 segundos. Os parâmetros analisados foram: deslocamento máximo (Dmáx, trajetória total (Traj e velocidade média (Vel nos planos sagital (X e frontal (Y. RESULTADOS: Nas condições OA e OF em SE, foram encontradas oscilações nos planos X e Y dos parâmetros Traj e Vel maiores em jovens que em idosos. Em SI, foram observadas maiores Traj Y e Vel Y nos jovens, sem diferença significativa entre os grupos quanto a Traj X e Vel X com olhos fechados. Em relação ao Dmáx, tanto no plano X quanto no Y, em todas as condições sensoriais, só houve diferença significativa na condição OASE no plano sagital, sendo maior nos jovens. CONCLUSÕES: Jovens saudáveis oscilam mais que os idosos saudáveis na posição sentada. Além disso, a ferramenta utilizada mostrou ser útil para análise da oscilação postural estática na posição sentada, possibilitando o surgimento de estudos que a associem com o efeito de diversas tarefas motoras.OBJECTIVES: To describe a new method to analyze the static sitting postural sway and to compare the results of healthy young and older adult subjects. METHODS: Thirty-eight healthy subjects took part in the study, including 17 young adults (mean age 23±2.38 years old and 21 older adults (mean age 67±2.42 years old. The device used to quantify trunk

  15. Objectification of psychogenic postural instability by trunk sway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsegger, Thomas; Pischinger, Barbara; Topakian, Raffi

    2013-11-15

    The attribution of balance or gait disorders to psychogenic origin can be exceedingly challenging, as clinical tests involving distraction maneuvers are prone to subjective bias. We tested the value of biomechanical balance analysis to identify psychogenic balance and gait (PBG) disorders. We quantified and compared the effects of distraction maneuvers on balance based on four stance conditions (eyes open, EO; eyes closed, EC; EO on foam, EOF; and EC on foam; ECF) in subjects with suspected PBG (n = 12), subjects with balance and gait disorder due to multiple sclerosis (MS; n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 12). We measured trunk inclination in transverse plane (°)(2) and the corresponding body angular velocity (°/s). Distractibility of postural stability was analysed using ANOVA with repeated measures. In evident contrast to the MS group and healthy controls, the PBG group showed increased values of (°)(2) and (°/s) and significant distractibility in all four stance conditions. Biomechanical balance analysis can help clinicians to get objective, quantified results of distraction maneuvers and confirm a positive diagnosis of PBG disorders. Large prospective studies are needed to confirm these results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Swayed by the Logo and Name: Does University Branding Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Muhammad Zaffwan; Whitfield, T. W. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, many universities attempted to improve their public image by changing their corporate visual identity (CVI) and/or name. Despite the prevalence of such practices, little research has been conducted into their effectiveness. The research reported here focused upon one facet of the higher education branding debate, that of the…

  17. Fire response of composite columns subject to sway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virdi, Kuldeep

    conditions is adequately covered in the relevant standard, Eurocode 4, simplified design of unbraced composite columns for the fire limit state has not been included. Recognising this, a collaborative research project was undertaken with funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel. The paper describes...... the scope of the project which covered control tests under ambient conditions, carried out by the author while at City University London. Other aspects covered in the project included fire tests carried out by CTICM in France, on isolated columns and on two frames designed by Leibniz Universität Hannover......Composite columns, using profiled steel sections encased in concrete or steel tubes filled with concrete, are increasingly used in practice taking advantage of speed of erection as well as offering cost-effective solutions. While the design of braced and unbraced composite columns under ambient...

  18. Fire response of composite columns subject to sway

    OpenAIRE

    Virdi, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Composite columns, using profiled steel sections encased in concrete or steel tubes filled with concrete, are increasingly used in practice taking advantage of speed of erection as well as offering cost-effective solutions. While the design of braced and unbraced composite columns under ambient conditions is adequately covered in the relevant standard, Eurocode 4, simplified design of unbraced composite columns for the fire limit state has not been included. Recognising this, a collaborative ...

  19. Analyst: Soldier fails to sway election / Joel Alas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alas, Joel

    2007-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilves ei kuulutanud välja keelatud rajatise kõrvaldamise seadust, sest see on põhiseadusega vastuolus. Politoloog Vello Pettai hinnangul pole valijatele Tõnismäe pronkssõduri teema oluline

  20. How Life History Can Sway the Fixation Probability of Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Kurokawa, Shun; Giaimo, Stefano; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of demographic structure on evolutionary dynamics when selection acts on reproduction, survival, or both. In contrast to the previously discovered pattern that the fixation probability of a neutral mutant decreases while the population becomes younger, we show that a mutant with a constant selective advantage may have a maximum or a minimum of the fixation probability in populations with an intermediate fraction of young individuals. This highlights the importance of life history and demographic structure in studying evolutionary dynamics. We also illustrate the fundamental differences between selection on reproduction and selection on survival when age structure is present. In addition, we evaluate the relative importance of size and structure of the population in determining the fixation probability of the mutant. Our work lays the foundation for also studying density- and frequency-dependent effects in populations when demographic structures cannot be neglected. PMID:27129737

  1. Effect of neural mobilization on static postural sway and lower limb functional performance of football layers

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Jéssica Filipa Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neural mobilization is commonly used by physiotherapists, and in broad sense, it could be used either as tension mobilization or as gliding mobilization. Nevertheless, studies comparing the effects of both techniques are scarce and mainly devoted to flexibility. The aims of this study is to compare the effects of tensioning neural mobilization versus sliding neural mobilization of the dominant lower limb on static postural control and on the functional perform...

  2. Effects of Balance Training on Postural Sway, Leg Extensor Strength, and Jumping Height in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert; Kriemler, Susi

    2010-01-01

    Deficits in strength of the lower extremities and postural control have been associated with a high risk of sustaining sport-related injuries. Such injuries often occur during physical education (PE) classes and mostly affect the lower extremities. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of balance training on postural…

  3. Role Identification of Yaw and Sway Motion in Helicopter Yaw Control Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellerbroek, J.; Stroosma, O.; Van Paassen, M.M.; Mulder, M.

    2008-01-01

    A set of experiments has been conducted to investigate the relative effect of translational and rotational motion cues on pilot performance. Two helicopter yaw control tasks were performed on the SIMONA: a yaw capture task and a target-tracking task with simulated turbulence. The yaw capture task

  4. Rudder-Roll Damping Autopilot Robustness to Sway-Yaw-Roll Couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Christensen, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Contributions of the paper are to advise ways to access the effects of coupling term changes on RRD control, to show the changes in robustness, including roll reduction capability for various parameters, and to provide a complete, parameterized model that can be used for comparison of methodology...

  5. Attentional and sensory contributions to postural sway in children with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stins, J.F.; Emck, C.; de Vries, E.M.; Doop, S.; Beek, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Postural control is known to depend on sensory and cognitive factors. Little is known about how children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) regulate static balance, and to what extent vision and cognition contribute to the regulation of balance in this group. We compared a group of children with

  6. Test-retest reliability of muscle vibration effects on postural sway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.; Brumagne, S.; van Dieen, J.H.; Vanhees, L.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of alterations in the processing of proprioceptive signals, on postural control, has been studied using muscle vibration effects. However, reliability and agreement of muscle vibration have still to be addressed.This study aimed to assess intra- and interday reliability and agreement of

  7. Body Sway as a Possible Indicator of Fatigue in Clerical Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Völker

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Data suggest that postural stability of clerical workers was comparable in the morning and afternoon, but COP movement was greater in the morning. Within the framework of dynamic systems theory, this could indicate that the postural system explored the state space in more detail, and thus was more ready to respond to unexpected perturbations in the morning.

  8. Trunk sway analysis to quantify the warm-up phenomenon in myotonia congenita patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, G.C.; Drost, G.; Bloem, B.R.; Trip, J.; Pieterse, A.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Allum, J.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with autosomal recessive myotonia congenita display myotonia and transient paresis that diminish with repetitive muscle contractions (warm-up phenomenon). A new approach is presented to quantify this warm-up phenomenon under clinically relevant gait and balance tasks. METHODS:

  9. To what extent do they sway Australian water management decision making?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Papas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available At a time when the reliability of freshwater resources has become highly unpredictable, as a result of climate change and increased droughts frequency, the role of scientific evidence in forecasting the availability of seasonal water has become more critical. Australia is one of the driest inhabited continents. Its freshwater availability is highly variable, which poses unique problems for the management of the nation's water resources. Under Australia's federal system, water management challenges have been progressively dealt with through political institutions that rely on best available science to inform policy development. However, it could be argued that evidenced-based policy making is an impossible aim in a highly complex and uncertain political environment: that such a rational approach would be defeated by competing values and vested interests across stakeholders. This article demonstrates that, while science has a fundamental role to play in effective water resource management, the reality on the ground often diverges from the intended aim and does not always reflect efforts at reform. This article briefly reviews the Water Act 2007 (Cth and comments on why policy makers need to manage rather than try to eliminate uncertainty to promote change.

  10. A Characterization of Sway Forces Induced by Close Proximity Ship Towing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The scope of this thesis is to characterize the connection forces in the horizontal plane of surface ships in close proximity towing in waves, Strip theory calculations are used in order to predict...

  11. Considerations on the application of the chaos paradigm to describe the postural sway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascolo, Paolo [Laboratorio di meccanica funzionale, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, Udine 33100 (Italy)] e-mail: p.pascolo@dic.uniud.it; Barazza, Fausto [Dipartimento di Georisorse e Territorio, Universita di Udine (Italy); Carniel, Roberto [Dipartimento di Georisorse e Territorio, Universita di Udine (Italy)

    2006-03-01

    Time-series of statokinesigram (SKG) of healthy subjects and parkinsonians are investigated and compared. This is done by employing the chaos paradigm in order to obtain the main characteristics of the SKG. The interpretation of our findings is twofold:when a proper Theiler window is not used we find a virtual invariance of the chaos parameters when healthy subjects and parkinsonians are compared but a discrepancy of our values (correlation dimension equals to 1.4) with those found in previous works; when a proper Theiler window is used (more) appropriately, the SKGs do not show a convergence of the fractal dimension estimates; therefore nothing can be said in terms of chaoticity of system.

  12. Swayed by the music: sampling bias towards musical preference distinguishes like from dislike decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsen, Job P; Moonga, Gurpreet; Shimojo, Shinsuke; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the interaction between sampling behavior and preference formation underlying subjective decision making for like and dislike decisions. Two-alternative forced-choice tasks were used with closely-matched musical excerpts and the participants were free to listen and re-listen, i.e. to sample and resample each excerpt, until they reached a decision. We predicted that for decisions involving resampling, a sampling bias would be observed before the moment of conscious decision for the like decision only. The results indeed showed a gradually increasing sampling bias favouring the choice (73%) before the moment of overt response for like decisions. Such a bias was absent for dislike decisions. Furthermore, the participants reported stronger relative preferences for like decisions as compared to dislike decisions. This study demonstrated distinct differences in preference formation between like and dislike decisions, both in the implicit orienting/sampling processes prior to the conscious decision and in the subjective evaluation afterwards. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Apical bud toughness tests and tree sway movements to examine crown abrasion: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler Brannon; Wayne Clatterbuck

    2012-01-01

    Apical bud toughness differences were examined for several species to determine if crown abrasion affects shoot growth of determinate and indeterminate species during stand development. Determinate buds will set and harden after initial shoot elongation in the spring, while the indeterminate shoots form leaves from the apical meristem continuously based on the...

  14. Heat transfer along the route to chaos of a swaying thermal plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, D; Corticelli, M A; Fichera, A; Pagano, A

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analyses have been recently reported on the low order dynamics of a thermal plume arising from a horizontal cylindrical heat source concentric to an air-filled isothermally cooled square enclosure, together with those of the related flow structures, in the limit of the 2D approximation. In particular, within the range of 0 < Ra < 3Ra cr , with Ra cr corresponding to the loss of stability of the stationary buoyant plume, the entire evolution from a periodic limit cycle (P 1 ) to the birth of chaos through a period-doubling cascade has been fully explored. With this respect, special attention has been given to the window of quasiperiodic dynamics onto a T 2 -torus that is observed to separate the monoperiodic dynamics from the biperiodic dynamics onto a P 1 and a P 2 -limit cycle, respectively. The results of these analyses hint at the bimodal nature of the overall dynamics, in general, and of the subharmonic cascade, in particular, which are still under investigation. Although relevant on a dynamical perspective, a with a main reflection on the laminar-turbulent transition, the observed oscillations appear to be characterised by comparable amplitudes and to be determined by similar evolutions of the flow pattern evolutions, so that their role on the overall heat transfer rate is expected to be marginal. Within this frame, the present study aims at reporting the influence played by the observed dynamics of the thermal plume and of the flow structures on the global heat transfer rate. In particular, the aim is the assessment of the correlation between the Rayleigh number and the average Nusselt number on the cylinder surface, as well as the effect on the latter of the observed series of bifurcations. (paper)

  15. Factors affecting the compliance and sway properties of tree branches used by the Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam van Casteren

    Full Text Available The tropical arboreal environment is a mechanically complex and varied habitat. Arboreal inhabitants must adapt to changes in the compliance and stability of supports when moving around trees. Because the orangutan is the largest habitual arboreal inhabitant, it is unusually susceptible to branch compliance and stability and therefore represents a unique animal model to help investigate how animals cope with the mechanical heterogeneity of the tropical canopy. The aim of this study was to investigate how changes in compliance and time of oscillation of branches are related to easily observable traits of arboreal supports. This should help predict how supports react mechanically to the weight and mass of a moving orangutan, and suggest how orangutans themselves predict branch properties. We measured the compliance and time of oscillation of branches from 11 tree species frequented by orangutans in the rainforest of Sumatra. Branches were pulled at several points along their length using a force balance at the end of a stiff rope, and the local diameter of the branch and the distance to its base and tip were measured. Compliance was negatively associated with both local diameter and length to the tip of the branch, and positively, if weakly, associated with length from the trunk. However, branch diameter not only predicted compliance best, but would also be easiest for an orangutan to observe. In contrast, oscillation times of branches were largely unaffected by local diameter, and only significantly increased at diameters below 2 cm. The results of this study validate previous field research, which related locomotory modes to local branch diameter, while suggesting how arboreal animals themselves sense their mechanical environment.

  16. MUSIC PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION AND THE SERVICE-GOOD SPECTRUM UNDER THE SWAY OF A SHIFT WITHIN A SHIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena Meyer Carvalho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays music constitutes a phenomenon whose complexion entangles aspects simultaneously related to society, culture, art, business, and technology. Due to the combined influence of these aspects, music production-consumption acquires some unique features. Added to that, the swift evolution and growing influence of the economic-technological association have increasingly affected music as a sociocultural phenomenon, as an art form, and as a corporative business, increasing the complexity of an already convoluted context. Given the composite and dynamic constitution of the music field, the present approach departs from a multidisciplinary analysis, establishing a methodological groundwork that comprehends conceptual and qualitative research, elaborated through exploratory study. Under a standard economic perspective, music production-consumption belongs in the structure of the music supply chain, presenting a rather uncertain status between service and good. Apart from the economic understanding, however, music comprises a wide variety of manifestations, which do not suit conventional production-consumption processes. In order to cope with the inexorable duality of this paradoxical coexistence, this study proposes a model intended to contribute to the building of a comprehensive knowledge on music production and consumption. As this model departs from some specific flows of music production and consumption, it creates an array of patterns, pinpointing their situation within the service-good spectrum. In addition, it considers Digital Revolution and globalized communications as enablers that affect the foundations of traditional music, unbalance routine flows inside the supply chain of the music industry and cause music production-consumption relationships to shift their status from product-oriented to service-oriented.

  17. What Sways People's Judgment of Sleep Quality? A Quantitative Choice-Making Study With Good and Poor Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Fatanah; Sanborn, Adam N; Tang, Nicole K Y

    2017-07-01

    We conceptualized sleep quality judgment as a decision-making process and examined the relative importance of 17 parameters of sleep quality using a choice-based conjoint analysis. One hundred participants (50 good sleepers; 50 poor sleepers) were asked to choose between 2 written scenarios to answer 1 of 2 questions: "Which describes a better (or worse) night of sleep?". Each scenario described a self-reported experience of sleep, stringing together 17 possible determinants of sleep quality that occur at different times of the day (day before, pre-sleep, during sleep, upon waking, day after). Each participant answered 48 questions. Logistic regression models were fit to their choice data. Eleven of the 17 sleep quality parameters had a significant impact on the participants' choices. The top 3 determinants of sleep quality were: Total sleep time, feeling refreshed (upon waking), and mood (day after). Sleep quality judgments were most influenced by factors that occur during sleep, followed by feelings and activities upon waking and the day after. There was a significant interaction between wake after sleep onset and feeling refreshed (upon waking) and between feeling refreshed (upon waking) and question type (better or worse night of sleep). Type of sleeper (good vs poor sleepers) did not significantly influence the judgments. Sleep quality judgments appear to be determined by not only what happened during sleep, but also what happened after the sleep period. Interventions that improve mood and functioning during the day may inadvertently also improve people's self-reported evaluation of sleep quality. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  18. Capsule loss or death: the position of mutations among capsule genes sways the destiny of Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkitjaroen, Nattakan; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Okura, Masatoshi; Sato, Masumi; Osaki, Makoto; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2014-05-01

    Streptococcus suis, an emerging zoonotic pathogen, is responsible for various diseases in swine and humans. Most S. suis strains from clinical cases possess a group of capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes and phenotypically express capsular polysaccharides (CPs). Although CPs are considered to be an important virulence factor, our previous study showed that many S. suis isolates from porcine endocarditis lost their CPs, and some of these unencapsulated isolates had large insertions or deletions in the cps gene clusters. We further investigated 25 endocarditis isolates with no obvious genetic alterations to elucidate the unencapsulation mechanisms and found that a single-nucleotide substitution and frameshift mutation in two glycosyltransferase genes (cps2E and cps2F) were the main causes of the capsule loss. Moreover, mutations in the genes involved in side-chain formation (cps2J and cps2N), polymerase (cps2I), and flippase (cps2O) appeared to be lethal; however, these lethal effects were relieved by mutations in the cps2EF region. As unencapsulation and even the death of individual cells have recently been suggested to be beneficial to the pathogenesis of infections, the results of the present study provide a further insight into understanding the biological significance of cps mutations during the course of S. suis infections. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Altered Visual and Feet Proprioceptive Feedbacks during Quiet Standing Increase Postural Sway in Patients with Severe Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Rosager, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to investigate how postural control in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients, with different structural severities and pain levels, is reorganized under different sensory conditions....

  20. What Sways People’s Judgment of Sleep Quality? A Quantitative Choice-Making Study With Good and Poor Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Fatanah; Sanborn, Adam N.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Study objectives: We conceptualized sleep quality judgment as a decision-making process and examined the relative importance of 17 parameters of sleep quality using a choice-based conjoint analysis. Methods: One hundred participants (50 good sleepers; 50 poor sleepers) were asked to choose between 2 written scenarios to answer 1 of 2 questions: “Which describes a better (or worse) night of sleep?”. Each scenario described a self-reported experience of sleep, stringing together 17 possible determinants of sleep quality that occur at different times of the day (day before, pre-sleep, during sleep, upon waking, day after). Each participant answered 48 questions. Logistic regression models were fit to their choice data. Results: Eleven of the 17 sleep quality parameters had a significant impact on the participants’ choices. The top 3 determinants of sleep quality were: Total sleep time, feeling refreshed (upon waking), and mood (day after). Sleep quality judgments were most influenced by factors that occur during sleep, followed by feelings and activities upon waking and the day after. There was a significant interaction between wake after sleep onset and feeling refreshed (upon waking) and between feeling refreshed (upon waking) and question type (better or worse night of sleep). Type of sleeper (good vs poor sleepers) did not significantly influence the judgments. Conclusions: Sleep quality judgments appear to be determined by not only what happened during sleep, but also what happened after the sleep period. Interventions that improve mood and functioning during the day may inadvertently also improve people’s self-reported evaluation of sleep quality. PMID:28525617

  1. بررسی تغییرات ساختاری و رفتاری عضلات ثبات دهنده ستون مهره ای با استفاده از روش‌های تصویربرداری اولتراسوند، MRI و الکترومیوگرافی در افراد دارای اختلال پاسچر Sway-Back"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    الناز مهدوی

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available مقدمه و اهداف اختلال پاسچر sway-back (SB یکی از شایعترین اختلالات ستون مهره ها درمیان افراد جامعه بخصوص خانم های جوان می باشد. با وجود شیوع این اختلال پاسچر، در مورد نحوه تغییر راستای اسکلتی در ناحیه کمر و لگن و تغییرات عضلانی حاصله اتفاق نظری بین محققان وجود ندارد. هدف از مطالعه حاضر، جمع آوری تغییرات گزارش شده در ابعاد، تولید تنشن و ساختار عضلات ثبات دهنده ستون مهره ای در پاسچر SB، با استفاده از روش های دقیق تصویربرداری اولتراسوند، الکترومیوگرافی و MRI می باشد. مواد و روش ها با جستجو در پایگاههای اطلاعاتی Google scholar, Pubmed, Embase در ابتدا 102 مقاله که در بازه ی زمانی 2002-2016 بودند بدست آمد که بعد از تطابق با معیارهای ورود و خروج، تعداد 97 مقاله حذف شد و 5 مقاله باقی مانده به صورت تمام متن مورد بررسی قرار گرفتند. در این مرور از مقالاتی استفاده شد که تغییرات عضلانی در پاسچر SB را با استفاده ار روشهای USI ,MRI و EMG مورد بررسی قرار داده بودند. یافته ها با استفاده از الکترومیوگرافی سطحی کاهش فعالیت عضلات اینترنال ابلیک، مولتی فیدوس کمری و ارکتوراسپاین و افزایش فعالیت عضله ی رکتوس ابدومینوس را نشان داده شد. بررسی ضخامت عضله ی ترانسورس ابدومینوس با استفاده از اولتراسونوگرافی نیز نشان داد که ضخامت این عضله در

  2. “Under the Sway of Coal,” or a Story of the British Coal Miner Harold Heslop, Who Failed to Become a Soviet Writer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Ostrovskaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the rapid and short-living Soviet writing career of the British coal miner Harold Heslop. Between 1926 and 1931, three novels by Heslop were published in the USSR (in Russian translation and the translation of a fourth was commissioned and completed, and in 1930 the author himself travelled to the USSR as one of two members of the British delegation at the Kharkov conference of the International Union of Revolutionary Writers (IURW. However, that was the end of his success: the translated novel Red Earth was not published nor were any of his later novels. The only venue for his rare shorter essays and occasional prose excerpts was the magazine International Literature. The paper discusses this curious writer’s biography from different perspectives. It analyzes at length the critical article by Anna Elistratova, published in Na literaturnom postu and International Literature, juxtaposing the two versions and the text of Heslop’s novel to contextualize the writer and his work in the Soviet literary criticism of the time. It explores archival materials—Heslop’s correspondence with different people and institutions as well as institutional papers—to discuss the case as  personal as well as institutional history, representative of the situation of the 1930s. Finally the article shifts perspective to discuss the author and his work in the context of the British working-class literature of the time.

  3. Measuring Regularity of Human Postural Sway Using Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Galli, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Ligament laxity in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) patients can influence the intrinsic information about posture and movement and can have a negative effect on the appropriateness of postural reactions. Several measures have been proposed in literature to describe the planar migration of CoP over the base of support, and the…

  4. Reliability of Center of Pressure Parameters in Postural Sway among Athlete and Non-athlete Men in Different Levels of Fatigue and Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Meshkati

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to investigate the skill, fatigue and vision-related differences between athletes and non-athletes in reliability of center of pressure (COP measures derived from force platform. Materials & Methods: Thirty-one healthy male participants (15 athletes and 16 non-athletes were tested on force platform on two sessions with a 48-72 hr interval. COP parameters was recorded during two-legged quiet standing before and after a generalized fatigue exercise by treadmill, with eyes-open (EO and eyes-closed (EC. Standard deviation (SD of amplitude, SD of velocity in anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral directions and mean total velocity were calculated from 30 sec COP data. Results: Higher intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was found for COP measures in the athlete (compared with the non-athlete group. ICC was increased in post-fatigue (compared with pre-fatigue conditions. Also higher ICC was found for EC (compared with EO tests. Coefficients of variation smaller than 15% were obtained for most of the COP measures. Alpha level of 0. 05 was considered for all statistical analyses. Regarding the level of skill, fatigue and vision, mean total velocity (P=0. 001 and SD of velocity (AP (P=0. 001 were the most reliable parameters. Conclusion: The results aid researchers in selection of reliable COP measures for future studies of postural control in sports. In this way, researchers can use mean total velocity and SD of velocity (AP parameters in their studies in same conditions on athletes.

  5. The dynamics of postural sway cannot be captured using a one-segment inverted pendulum model: a PCA on segment rotations during unperturbed stance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinter, I.J.; van Swigchem, R.; van Soest, A.J.; Rozendaal, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Research on unperturbed stance is largely based on a one-segment inverted pendulum model. Recently, an increasing number of studies report a contribution of other major joints to postural control. Therefore this study evaluates whether the conclusions originating from the research based on a

  6. Elite level adolescent athletes with Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) display increased lower extremity symptoms and larger postural sway than those without GJH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, B; Schmidt, H; Pedersen, T Lykke

    in the BT score was positively associated with an increase of HSA, seen as an increased HSA of 3.9 degrees at BT cut point ≥5/9, 5.7 degrees at BT cut point ≥6/7 and 7.9 degrees at BT cut point ≥7/9. Normative values for HSA ranged from 40 to 52 degrees, with a trend towards decreasing HSA by increasing age......, competitive swimmers, and secondly to describe reference values for HSA among this group. Methods In total, 92 pain-free competitive swimmers (age 10-15 years) participated. GJH was evaluated by the Beighton test (BT) a 0-9 scoring system. GJH was classified at cut points ≥5/9, ≥6/9 and ≥7/9. Shoulder...

  7. Quantitative Romberg's test in acute carbon monoxide poisoning treated by hyperbaric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, Daniel; Jansen, Erik Christian; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2017-01-01

    a negative change in sway. We found no correlation between CO level and sway (P=0.1028; P=0.8764; P=0.4749; P=0.5883). Results showed that loss of visual input caused a significant increase in mean sway (P=0.028) and sway velocity (P⟨0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The Quantitative Romberg's test is a fast, useful...

  8. Brazil is a country of “balangandãs” (swaying ornaments in French imaginary O Brasil é um país de “balangandãs” no imaginário francês

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranúbia Barbosa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explains how the French have built a distorted image of Brazil in their imaginary. Such image was built long before, based on French travelers reports and even Brazilian historians. For the French, Brazil is a country of balangandãs, plenty of festivals, bronzed female mulattoes, carnival and football. In 2005, there was the Year of Brazil in France and the event organizers insisted on exhibiting stereotyped images (clichés of Brazil.Este artigo mostra como os franceses construíram uma imagem distorcida do Brasil em seu imaginário. Essa imagem foi construída, desde os primórdios, a partir de relatos de viajantes franceses e mesmo de historiadores brasileiros. Para os franceses, o Brasil é um país de balangandãs, muita festa, gente alegre, sol o ano inteiro, mulatas bronzeadas, carnaval e futebol. Em 2005, aconteceu o Ano do Brasil na França e a organização do evento insistiu em exibir imagens estereotipadas (clichês do Brasil.

  9. Contribution of the multifidus muscle for control of upright posture in subjects with spina bifida occulta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shin-Tsu; Ku, Chih-Hung; Hsieh, Ming-Fu; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Chiang; Tsai, Kao-Chung

    2008-08-01

    The multifidus muscle plays a role in controlling lumbosacral position and postural sway. One of its attachment sites is the exact site of spina bifida occulta (SBO). To investigate the role of the muscle for postural control in SBO. Cross-sectional cohort. Eighty subjects with SBO (38 in minor; 42 in major) and controls. N/A. Subjects stood upright on a platform at 0 degrees and on an inclined surface (10 degrees and 20 degrees) with feet in plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, together with eyes open and closed. The platform system measured posture to obtain sway area and sway mean for statistics. Upon sway area/mean, the group differences of major/minor SBO vs. control were all significant. Sway means of minor SBO were lower than those of major SBO at corresponding inclined degrees. Subjects with SBO demonstrated increased sway as compared to controls.

  10. The Speed Control of Constant Tension Motor of Marine Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xinyang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the working principle of the marine beacon crane hanging disc mechanical anti-sway device, and establish mathematical model on the rope controlling hanging disc of mechanical anti-sway device; Through matlab simulation analysis, this article obtains the relation curve between the velocity of traction rope of hanging disc and output frequency of the crane motor, combining rotary crane scaled model, this article carries out anti-sway experiment for the rotary crane to examine the crane’s anti-sway effects.

  11. Investigation on applicability of substitute beam-column frame for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the sway frame moment magnification provision for the design of slender reinforced concrete columns in sway frames according to EBCS 2: 1995. A special feature of the moment magnification method in EBCS 2: 1995 is the introduction of the concept of substitute frame for the determination of the storey buckling load.

  12. Dynamic loadings of deepwater spar palatform - A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Narasimhan, M.C.; Ambulgekar, P.P.

    of freedom, i.e., surge, sway, heave, roll, pitch and yaw are analyzed It is observed that responses due to sway, roll and yaw are negligible as compared to responses of surge, heave and pitch Tensions at the mooring points are also presented in the paper....

  13. Reducing Insecurity in Africa: Roles and Responsibilities of the U.S. Military, U.S. Government and Non-Governmental Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    the rationale of state borders do not hold sway over transnational groups operating in postcolonial realities of the developing world, where “the...not hold sway over transnational groups operating in postcolonial realities of the developing world, where “the nation-state has unnaturally

  14. The Postural Responses to a Moving Environment of Adults Who Are Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Ito, Kiyohide; Hove, Philip; Yank, Jane Redfield; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2010-01-01

    Adults who are blind stood in a room that could be moved around them. A sound source moved with the room, simulating the acoustic consequences of body sway. Body sway was greater when the room moved than when it was stationary, suggesting that sound may have been used to control stance. (Contains 1 figure.)

  15. Identifying deficits in balance control following vestibular or proprioceptive loss using posturographic analysis of stance tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, C.G.; Kung, U.M.; Bloem, B.R.; Honegger, F.; Alfen, N. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Allum, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To distinguish between normal and deficient balance control due to vestibular loss (VL) or proprioceptive loss (PL) using pelvis and shoulder sway measures. METHODS: Body-worn gyroscopes measured pelvis and shoulder sway in pitch (anterior-posterior) and roll (side-to-side) directions in

  16. Auditory cues for orientation and postural control in sighted and congenitally blind people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, R. D.; Greene, A. J.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    This study assessed whether stationary auditory information could affect body and head sway (as does visual and haptic information) in sighted and congenitally blind people. Two speakers, one placed adjacent to each ear, significantly stabilized center-of-foot-pressure sway in a tandem Romberg stance, while neither a single speaker in front of subjects nor a head-mounted sonar device reduced center-of-pressure sway. Center-of-pressure sway was reduced to the same level in the two-speaker condition for sighted and blind subjects. Both groups also evidenced reduced head sway in the two-speaker condition, although blind subjects' head sway was significantly larger than that of sighted subjects. The advantage of the two-speaker condition was probably attributable to the nature of distance compared with directional auditory information. The results rule out a deficit model of spatial hearing in blind people and are consistent with one version of a compensation model. Analysis of maximum cross-correlations between center-of-pressure and head sway, and associated time lags suggest that blind and sighted people may use different sensorimotor strategies to achieve stability.

  17. Evaluation of postural balance control in patients with multiple sclerosis - effect of different sensory conditions and arithmetic task execution. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porosińska, Aleksandra; Pierzchała, Krystyna; Mentel, Marzena; Karpe, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of concomitant cognitive task execution and different sensory conditions on balance control in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thirty-two subjects with MS and 30 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects were included in the study. Balance Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment was performed in all subjects. Their spontaneous sway characteristics while standing with different sensory conditions and during execution of a simple arithmetic task were analysed. Mean sway in the coronary and sagittal plane, as well as sway velocity, were measured. The values of all evaluated variables obtained in all tests were significantly higher in the MS group than in controls. In the MS group, more pronounced progression of changes in response to increased difficulty of the test was also observed. Analysis of risk of falls in MS revealed a significant increase of sway velocity and mean sway in the mediolateral and anteroposterior plane in the majority of tests. Postural stability in patients with MS is significantly decreased in comparison with the control group in all evaluated conditions. Stability deficit is enhanced in response to more difficult conditions of evaluation. Increased risk of falls is related to the increased postural sway velocity and length of mean sway; this association is most pronounced in the coronary plane.

  18. Balance and Gait Represent Independent Domains of Mobility in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Fay B.; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Nutt, John G.; Salarian, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The Instrumented Stand and Walk (ISAW) test, which includes 30 seconds of stance, step initiation, gait, and turning, results in many objective balance and gait metrics from body-worn inertial sensors. However, it is not clear which metrics provide independent information about mobility. Objective It was hypothesized that balance and gait represent several independent domains of mobility and that not all domains would be abnormal in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) or would change with levodopa therapy. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods A factor analysis approach was used to identify independent measures of mobility extracted from the ISAW in 100 participants with PD and 21 control participants. First, a covariance analysis showed that postural sway measures were independent of gait measures. Then, the factor analysis revealed 6 independent factors (mobility domains: sway area, sway frequency, arm swing asymmetry, trunk motion during gait, gait speed, and cadence) that accounted for 87% of the variance of performance across participants. Results Sway area, gait speed, and trunk motion differed between the PD group in the off-levodopa state and the control group, but sway frequency (but not sway area) differed between the PD group in the off-levodopa state and the control group. Four of the 6 factors changed significantly with levodopa (off to on): sway area, sway frequency, trunk motion during gait, and cadence. When participants were on levodopa, the sway area increased compared with off levodopa, becoming more abnormal, whereas the other 3 significant metrics moved toward, but did not reach, the healthy control values. Limitations Exploratory factor analysis was limited to the PD population. Conclusions The different sensitivity various balance and gait domains to PD and to levodopa also support neural control of at least 6 independent mobility domains, each of which warrants clinical assessment for impairments in mobility. PMID

  19. Balance and Gait Represent Independent Domains of Mobility in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Fay B; Mancini, Martina; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Nutt, John G; Salarian, Arash

    2016-09-01

    The Instrumented Stand and Walk (ISAW) test, which includes 30 seconds of stance, step initiation, gait, and turning, results in many objective balance and gait metrics from body-worn inertial sensors. However, it is not clear which metrics provide independent information about mobility. It was hypothesized that balance and gait represent several independent domains of mobility and that not all domains would be abnormal in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) or would change with levodopa therapy. This was a cross-sectional study. A factor analysis approach was used to identify independent measures of mobility extracted from the ISAW in 100 participants with PD and 21 control participants. First, a covariance analysis showed that postural sway measures were independent of gait measures. Then, the factor analysis revealed 6 independent factors (mobility domains: sway area, sway frequency, arm swing asymmetry, trunk motion during gait, gait speed, and cadence) that accounted for 87% of the variance of performance across participants. Sway area, gait speed, and trunk motion differed between the PD group in the off-levodopa state and the control group, but sway frequency (but not sway area) differed between the PD group in the off-levodopa state and the control group. Four of the 6 factors changed significantly with levodopa (off to on): sway area, sway frequency, trunk motion during gait, and cadence. When participants were on levodopa, the sway area increased compared with off levodopa, becoming more abnormal, whereas the other 3 significant metrics moved toward, but did not reach, the healthy control values. Exploratory factor analysis was limited to the PD population. The different sensitivity various balance and gait domains to PD and to levodopa also support neural control of at least 6 independent mobility domains, each of which warrants clinical assessment for impairments in mobility. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  20. Zede Journal - Vol 33 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation on applicability of substitute beam-column frame for design of reinforced concrete sway frames · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Abrham Ewnetie, Girma Zerayohannes, 13-26 ...

  1. Increasing and visualising meme effectiveness

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veerasamy, N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet provides the ideal platform to disseminate messages which could potentially sway the opinions and behaviour of people. The ease, convenience, and transmission capabilities of the Internet facilitate the seamless transfer and replication...

  2. Perceptual inhibition is associated with sensory integration in standing postural control among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Mark S; Jennings, J Richard; Mendelson, David; Nebes, Robert D

    2009-09-01

    In older adults, maintaining balance and processing information typically interfere with each other, suggesting that executive functions may be engaged for both. We investigated associations between measures of inhibitory processes and standing postural control in healthy young and older adults. Perceptual and motor inhibition was measured using a protocol adapted from Nassauer and Halperin (2003, Dissociation of perceptual and motor inhibition processes through the use of novel computerized conflict tasks. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 9, 25-30). These measures were then correlated to postural sway during standing conditions that required resolving various levels of sensory conflict, for example, world-fixed versus sway-referenced floor and visual scene. In the older adults, perceptual inhibition was positively correlated with sway amplitude on a sway-referenced floor and with a fixed visual scene (r = .68, p sensory integration process important for maintaining balance in older adults.

  3. Popmuusika / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2006-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest "Walk The Line", "B.B. King & Friends", Green Day "Bullet In A Bible", "It's All Gone Pete Tong O.S.T.", Mogwai "Mr. Beast", Cypress Hill "Greatest Hits From The Bong", Sway "This Is My Demo"

  4. The Politics of Air Power: From Confrontation to Cooperation in Army Aviation Civil-Military Relations, 1919-1940

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rice, Rondall

    2002-01-01

    .... In order to sway public opinion and elected officials, air leaders used propaganda to arouse public sentiment and circumvented military and civilian superiors to appeal directly to like-minded congressmen...

  5. Impaired postural stability after laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, K Z; Staehr-Rye, A K; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early postoperative mobilisation may reduce patient morbidity and improve hospital efficiency by accelerated discharge. The aim of this study was to measure postural stability early after laparoscopic surgery in order to assess how early it is safe to mobilise and discharge patients....... METHODS: We included 25 women undergoing outpatient gynaecological laparoscopic surgery in the study. Patients received standardised anaesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. Postural stability was assessed preoperatively, at 30 min after tracheal extubation, and at discharge from the post......-anaesthesia care unit using a force platform where sway area, mean sway and sway velocity were determined. The assessments were done with eyes closed and with eyes open. The primary outcome was the change in sway area with eyes closed 30 min after extubation. Data are reported as median (25-75% range). RESULTS...

  6. Height, surface firmness, and visual reference effects on balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, P; Hsiao, H

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the effects of height, surface firmness, and visual reference on standing balance in construction workers. Controlled laboratory study with balanced repeated measures. Twenty four construction workers. Test subjects performed standing tasks at ground level as well as at 3 m and 9 m high balconies on firm or deformable surfaces with close visual references included or excluded from their visual field. Standing balance was determined from center of pressure as measured by a force platform. Dependent variables were root mean square of sway in medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, area of sway, and velocity of sway. Heights without close visual references significantly increased all sway parameters. The effect of height in conditions without close visual references increased dramatically on deformable surfaces. Elevated work environments and deformable work surfaces negatively affect balance and may be associated with increased risk of fall incidents. Appropriate close visual references increase the ability to maintain balance.

  7. Comparisons Of The Effects Of Medetomidine, Lidocaine And Their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with a one-week interval between subsequent injections. Lumbosacral epidural injection of medetomidine and medetomidine-lidocaine combinations induced behavioral changes characterized by ataxia, swaying movements, tail flaccidity, low head carriage, sternal and lateral recumbency posture coupled with salivation.

  8. Complexity-Based Measures Inform Effects of Tai Chi Training on Standing Postural Control: Cross-Sectional and Randomized Trial Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Wayne

    Full Text Available Diminished control of standing balance, traditionally indicated by greater postural sway magnitude and speed, is associated with falls in older adults. Tai Chi (TC is a multisystem intervention that reduces fall risk, yet its impact on sway measures vary considerably. We hypothesized that TC improves the integrated function of multiple control systems influencing balance, quantifiable by the multi-scale "complexity" of postural sway fluctuations.To evaluate both traditional and complexity-based measures of sway to characterize the short- and potential long-term effects of TC training on postural control and the relationships between sway measures and physical function in healthy older adults.A cross-sectional comparison of standing postural sway in healthy TC-naïve and TC-expert (24.5±12 yrs experience adults. TC-naïve participants then completed a 6-month, two-arm, wait-list randomized clinical trial of TC training. Postural sway was assessed before and after the training during standing on a force-plate with eyes-open (EO and eyes-closed (EC. Anterior-posterior (AP and medio-lateral (ML sway speed, magnitude, and complexity (quantified by multiscale entropy were calculated. Single-legged standing time and Timed-Up-and-Go tests characterized physical function.At baseline, compared to TC-naïve adults (n = 60, age 64.5±7.5 yrs, TC-experts (n = 27, age 62.8±7.5 yrs exhibited greater complexity of sway in the AP EC (P = 0.023, ML EO (P<0.001, and ML EC (P<0.001 conditions. Traditional measures of sway speed and magnitude were not significantly lower among TC-experts. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no significant effects of short-term TC training; however, increases in AP EC and ML EC complexity amongst those randomized to TC were positively correlated with practice hours (P = 0.044, P = 0.018. Long- and short-term TC training were positively associated with physical function.Multiscale entropy offers a complementary

  9. Differences Between Men and Women in Balance and Tremor in Relation to Plantar Fascia Laxity During the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haneul; Petrofsky, Jerrold

    2018-03-01

      Although much attention has been paid to the effect of estrogen on the knee ligaments, little has been done to examine the ligaments in the foot, such as the plantar fascia, and how they may be altered during the menstrual cycle.   To (1) examine sex differences in plantar fascia thickness and laxity and postural sway and (2) identify any menstrual cycle effects on plantar fascia laxity, postural sway, and neuromuscular tremor between menstruation and the ovulation phase.   Case-control study.   Research laboratory.   Fifteen healthy women (age = 25.9 ± 1.8 years) and 15 healthy men (age = 27.3 ± 2.0 years) volunteered to participate in this study.   We asked participants to perform 8 balance tasks on a force platform while we assessed postural sway and tremor.   Plantar fascia length and thickness unloaded and loaded with body weight were measured via ultrasound. Postural sway and tremor were measured using a force platform.   Plantar fascia length and thickness with pressure were greater in ovulating women compared with men ( P < .001), but no differences were found between women during menstruation and men. Postural sway and tremor were greater at ovulation than during menstruation ( P < .05), and men had less sway than ovulating women on the 3 most difficult balance tasks ( P < .01).   Plantar fascia laxity was increased and postural sway and tremor were decreased at ovulation compared with menstruation in women. Postural sway and tremor in men were the same as in women during menstruation. These findings support the need to be aware of the effect of sex hormones on balance to prevent lower extremity injuries during sport activities.

  10. Post-Concussion Tools to Assist with Assessment, Treatment, and Return to Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    cognitively engaged in a challenging mental task. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dizziness, balance dysfunction, vestibular , sway, instability, falls, physiotherapy...Dizziness, balance dysfunction, vestibular , sway, instability, falls, physiotherapy, tactile cueing, vibrotactile, tactors, mild traumatic brain injury, mTBI...85(3), 347. Lawson, B.D., Rupert, A.H., & Legan, S.M. (2012-10). Vestibular and balance deficits following head injury: recommendations concerning

  11. Study on Vortex-Induced Motions of A New Type of Deep Draft Multi-Columns FDPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jia-yang; Xie, Yu-lin; Zhao, Yuan; Li, Wen-juan; Tao, Yan-wu; Huang, Xiang-hong

    2018-03-01

    A numerical simulation and an experimental study on vortex-induced motion (VIM) of a new type of deep draft multi-columns floating drilling production, storage and offloading (FDPSO) are presented in this paper. The main dimension, the special variable cross-section column and the cabin arrangement of the octagonal pontoon are introduced based on the result. The numerical simulation is adapted to study the effects of current incidence angles and reduced velocities on this platform's sway motion response. The 300 m water depth equivalent truncated mooring system is adopted for the model tests. The model tests are carried out to check the reliability of numerical simulation. The results consist of surge, sway and yaw motions, as well as motion trajectories. The maximum sway amplitudes for different types of offshore platform is also studied. The main results show that the peak frequencies of sway motion under different current incidence angles and reduced velocities vary around the natural frequency. The analysis result of flow field indicates that the change of distribution of vortex in vertical presents significant influences on the VIM of platform. The trend of sway amplitude ratio curve of this new type FDPSO differs from the other types of platform. Under 45° current incidence angle, the sway amplitude of this new type of FDPSO is much smaller than those of other types of offshore platform at 4.4 ≤ V r ≤ 8.9. The typical `8' shape trajectory does not appear in the platform's motion trajectories.

  12. Auditory white noise reduces age-related fluctuations in balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J M; Will, O J; McGann, Z; Balasubramaniam, R

    2016-09-06

    Fall prevention technologies have the potential to improve the lives of older adults. Because of the multisensory nature of human balance control, sensory therapies, including some involving tactile and auditory noise, are being explored that might reduce increased balance variability due to typical age-related sensory declines. Auditory white noise has previously been shown to reduce postural sway variability in healthy young adults. In the present experiment, we examined this treatment in young adults and typically aging older adults. We measured postural sway of healthy young adults and adults over the age of 65 years during silence and auditory white noise, with and without vision. Our results show reduced postural sway variability in young and older adults with auditory noise, even in the absence of vision. We show that vision and noise can reduce sway variability for both feedback-based and exploratory balance processes. In addition, we show changes with auditory noise in nonlinear patterns of sway in older adults that reflect what is more typical of young adults, and these changes did not interfere with the typical random walk behavior of sway. Our results suggest that auditory noise might be valuable for therapeutic and rehabilitative purposes in older adults with typical age-related balance variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sensorimotor integration in dyslexic children under different sensory stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, André R; Razuk, Milena; de Freitas, Paulo B; Barela, José A

    2013-01-01

    Dyslexic children, besides difficulties in mastering literacy, also show poor postural control that might be related to how sensory cues coming from different sensory channels are integrated into proper motor activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sensory information and body sway, with visual and somatosensory information manipulated independent and concurrently, in dyslexic children. Thirty dyslexic and 30 non-dyslexic children were asked to stand as still as possible inside of a moving room either with eyes closed or open and either lightly touching a moveable surface or not for 60 seconds under five experimental conditions: (1) no vision and no touch; (2) moving room; (3) moving bar; (4) moving room and stationary touch; and (5) stationary room and moving bar. Body sway magnitude and the relationship between room/bar movement and body sway were examined. Results showed that dyslexic children swayed more than non-dyslexic children in all sensory condition. Moreover, in those trials with conflicting vision and touch manipulation, dyslexic children swayed less coherent with the stimulus manipulation compared to non-dyslexic children. Finally, dyslexic children showed higher body sway variability and applied higher force while touching the bar compared to non-dyslexic children. Based upon these results, we can suggest that dyslexic children are able to use visual and somatosensory information to control their posture and use the same underlying neural control processes as non-dyslexic children. However, dyslexic children show poorer performance and more variability while relating visual and somatosensory information and motor action even during a task that does not require an active cognitive and motor involvement. Further, in sensory conflict conditions, dyslexic children showed less coherent and more variable body sway. These results suggest that dyslexic children have difficulties in multisensory integration because

  14. Sex differences in sensitivity to prenatal and early childhood manganese exposure on neuromotor function in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Claus Henn, Birgit; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien Leon; Pendo, Mathew P; Coull, Brent A; Austin, Christine; Cagna, Giuseppa; Fedrighi, Chiara; Placidi, Donatella; Smith, Donald R; Wright, Robert O; Lucchini, Roberto G; Arora, Manish

    2017-11-01

    While studies have suggested that exposure to manganese (Mn) may be associated with neurodevelopment in school-age children, there is limited information on prenatal and postnatal Mn exposures and tremor or motor function in children. We measured Mn levels in dentine of shed teeth, representing prenatal, early postnatal, and cumulative childhood exposure windows, from 195 children (predominantly right-handed, 92%) in Italy. Pursuit Aiming, Luria Nebraska Motor Battery, as well as Tremor and Sway system from Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS) were administered at 11-14 years old. We examined the relationships of tooth Mn (ln-transformed) with motor function using multivariable linear regressions and generalized additive models, adjusting for age, sex, and socioeconomic status index. Effect modification by sex was also examined. We found that higher prenatal Mn was associated with better body stability in boys in a number of sway tests (including mean sway, transversal sway, sagittal sway, sway area, and sway intensity), while Mn was associated with poorer performance in girls on all of these metrics (all p for Mn × sex interaction hand/finger and eye-hand coordination in boys compared to girls in sex-stratified analyses, although interaction models did not reach statistical significance. For tremor, on the other hand, higher early postnatal Mn was associated with increased right-hand center frequency in girls (p for interaction < 0.01), but increased Mn level at the later postnatal period was associated with increased center frequency in boys (p for interaction = 0.01). This study, which used a direct measure of prenatal and childhood Mn exposure, suggested sex-specific critical windows of early life Mn exposure in relation to neuromotor function in adolescents. The sex-specific associations might be strongest with measures of whole body stability, for which the critical exposure window was during the prenatal period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Haptic stabilization of posture: changes in arm proprioception and cutaneous feedback for different arm orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, E.; Bortolami, S. B.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Postural sway during quiet stance is attenuated by actively maintained contact of the index finger with a stationary surface, even if the level of applied force (proprioceptive information about the hand and arm can serve as an active sensor of body position relative to the point of contact. A geometric analysis of the relationship between hand and torso displacement during body sway led to the prediction that arm and hand proprioceptive and finger somatosensory information about body sway would be maximized with finger contact in the plane of body sway. Therefore, the most postural stabilization should be possible with such contact. To test this analysis, subjects touched a laterally versus anteriorly placed surface while in each of two stances: the heel-to-toe tandem Romberg stance that reduces medial-lateral stability and the heel-to-heel, toes-outward, knees-bent, "duck stance" that reduces fore-aft stability. Postural sway was always least with finger contact in the unstable plane: for the tandem stance, lateral fingertip contact was significantly more effective than frontal contact, and, for the duck stance, frontal contact was more effective than lateral fingertip contact. Force changes at the fingertip led changes in center of pressure of the feet by approximately 250 ms for both fingertip contact locations for both test stances. These results support the geometric analysis, which showed that 1) arm joint angles change by the largest amount when fingertip contact is maintained in the plane of greatest sway, and 2) the somatosensory cues at the fingertip provide both direction and amplitude information about sway when the finger is contacting a surface in the unstable plane.

  16. Tonic immobility differentiates stress responses in PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, Iro; Stins, John; Roelofs, Karin; Jongedijk, Ruud A; Hagenaars, Muriel A

    2016-11-01

    Tonic immobility (TI) is a state of physical immobility associated with extreme stress and the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is unknown whether TI is associated with a distinct actual stress response, i.e., objective immobility measured by a stabilometric platform. This study made a first step in exploring this as well as differences in body sway responses between PTSD patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that PTSD would be related to increased body sway under stress, whereas TI would be related to decreased body sway under stress. Eye closure was selected as a PTSD-relevant stress induction procedure. Body sway and heart rate (HR) were measured in 12 PTSD patients and 12 healthy controls in four conditions: (1) maintaining a stable stance with eyes open, (2) with eyes closed, (3) during a mental arithmetic task with eyes open, and (4) with eyes closed. As predicted, PTSD patients showed increased body sway from eyes open to eyes closed compared to controls and this effect was eliminated by executing the arithmetic task. Most importantly, retrospective self-reported TI was associated with lower body sway increases in PTSD and higher body sway decreases in controls from eyes-open to eyes-closed conditions. These preliminary findings suggest that eye closure has a different effect on PTSD patients than controls and that high self-reported TI might indicate a distinct stress response pattern, i.e., a proneness for immobility. It may be relevant to take such individual differences in stress-response into account in PTSD treatment.

  17. Prism adaptation improves postural imbalance in neglect patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; Olthoff, Liselot; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2014-03-26

    Several studies have found a negative relation between neglect and postural imbalance. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of a single session of prism adaptation on balance [i.e. mediolateral and anteroposterior center of pressure (CoP)] and postural sway (i.e. mean variance of displacement in horizontal and vertical planes) in neglect patients. CoP and postural sway were measured in a single session while sitting unaided on a Wii Balance Board. With respect to mediolateral as well as anteroposterior CoP, there was an improvement in postural imbalance after prism adaptation when measurements were performed with the eyes open, but not with the eyes closed. With respect to postural sway, only horizontal sway was significantly reduced after prism adaptation, but no changes were found for vertical sway. Prism adaptation may produce the recalibration of disturbed representation of space as well as higher-level representations of extrapersonal and internal body space (i.e. internal body midline). Given the important role of postural control in daily life functioning in stroke patients, this study might open possibilities for a successful rehabilitation procedure to alleviate deficits in postural imbalance.

  18. Design and construction of a planar motion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasovici, Gilberto [Protemaq Engenharia e Projetos, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Fucatu, Carlos H. [Technomar Engenharia Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tannuri, Eduardo A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecatronica; Umeda, Carlos H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of a PMM (Planar Motion Mechanism) towed by the IPT-SP main carriage. The IPT towing tank no. 2 is 220 m length and 6.6 m wide. The PMM provides a forced sway and/or yaw oscillation on a ship or other marine structure scaled model.. The maximum sway amplitude (transversal motion) is {+-}1 m, and the maximum sway velocity is 1.0 m/s, with a maximum carrying load of 1000 N. The maximum yaw velocity (rotation motion) is 36 deg/s. High-precision components were used in the construction, and the final estimated accuracy in the sway axis is 0.02 mm and approximately 0.1 deg for yaw motions. Finite Element Analysis and Structural Optimization techniques were used during the design stage. The PMM structure total mass is less than 1 ton, lighter than similar mechanisms in other institutions. A Man-Machine Interface was developed, and the operator is able to define the period and amplitude of sway and yaw motions, as well as the fade-in and fade-out time. An integral 3-component force load cell is installed in the end of the support axis, which measures the hydrodynamic loads on the captive model at low speed tests. This novel laboratorial facility allows the IPT to execute new kinds of experimental procedures, related to evaluation of hydrodynamic loads acting on ship hulls and offshore structures. (author)

  19. Influence of virtual reality on postural stability during movements of quiet stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlings, Corinne G C; Carpenter, Mark G; Küng, Ursula M; Honegger, Flurin; Wiederhold, Brenda; Allum, John H J

    2009-02-27

    Balance problems during virtual reality (VR) have been mentioned in the literature but seldom investigated despite the increased use of VR systems as a training or rehabilitation tool. We examined the influence of VR on body sway under different stance conditions. Seventeen young subjects performed four tasks (standing with feet close together or tandem stance on firm and foam surfaces for 60s) under three visual conditions: eyes open without VR, eyes closed, or while viewing a virtual reality scene which moved with body movements. Angular velocity transducers mounted on the shoulder provided measures of body sway in the roll and pitch plane. VR caused increased pitch and roll angles and angular velocities compared to EO. The effects of VR were, for the most part, indistinguishable from eyes closed conditions. Use of a foam surface increased sway compared to a firm surface under eyes closed and VR conditions. During the movements of quiet stance, VR causes an increase in postural sway in amplitude similar to that caused by closing the eyes. This increased sway was present irrespective of stance surface, but was greatest on foam.

  20. Cognitively and socially induced stress affects postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Michail; Morsanyi, Kinga; Young, William R

    2018-01-01

    Postural control is an adaptive process that can be affected by many aspects of human behavior, including emotional contexts. The main emotional contexts that affect postural control are postural threat and passive viewing of aversive or threatening images, both of which produce a reduction in postural sway. The aim of the present study was to assess whether similar stress-related changes in postural sway can be observed using stress induced by social evaluative threat (SET) while performing arithmetic tasks. Twelve young adults performed an arithmetic and a postural control task separately, concurrently, and concurrently with added time pressure in the arithmetic task. In the final condition, participants were given negative feedback about their performance in the arithmetic task and performed it again while being observed (SET condition). Results showed that stress increased linearly with task demand. Postural sway and reaction times were not affected by the first two conditions; however, when time pressure was introduced, reaction times became faster and sway amplitude increased. Finally, introduction of SET caused the predicted reduction in postural sway and an increase in reaction times relative to the time pressure condition. Our results suggest that stress induced using a combination of arithmetic tasks and social evaluative threat leads to systematic changes in postural control. The paradigm developed in the present study would be very useful in assessing interactions between cognition, stress, and postural control in the context of postural instability and falls in older adults.

  1. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C Y; Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance.

  2. Auditory white noise reduces postural fluctuations even in the absence of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jessica Marie; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    The contributions of somatosensory, vestibular, and visual feedback to balance control are well documented, but the influence of auditory information, especially acoustic noise, on balance is less clear. Because somatosensory noise has been shown to reduce postural sway, we hypothesized that noise from the auditory modality might have a similar effect. Given that the nervous system uses noise to optimize signal transfer, adding mechanical or auditory noise should lead to increased feedback about sensory frames of reference used in balance control. In the present experiment, postural sway was analyzed in healthy young adults where they were presented with continuous white noise, in the presence and absence of visual information. Our results show reduced postural sway variability (as indexed by the body's center of pressure) in the presence of auditory noise, even when visual information was not present. Nonlinear time series analysis revealed that auditory noise has an additive effect, independent of vision, on postural stability. Further analysis revealed that auditory noise reduced postural sway variability in both low- and high-frequency regimes (> or noise. Our results support the idea that auditory white noise reduces postural sway, suggesting that auditory noise might be used for therapeutic and rehabilitation purposes in older individuals and those with balance disorders.

  3. Effect of expertise in shooting and Taekwondo on bipedal and unipedal postural control isolated or concurrent with a reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Aryan, Najmolhoda; Mazaheri, Masood; Norasteh, Ali Asghar; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    It was hypothesized that training in 'static balance' or 'dynamic balance' sports has differential effects on postural control and its attention demands during quiet standing. In order to test this hypothesis, two groups of female athletes practicing shooting, as a 'static balance' sport, and Taekwondo, as a 'dynamic balance' sport, and a control group of non-physically active females voluntarily participated in this study. Postural control was assessed during bipedal and unipedal stance with and without performing a Go/No-go reaction time task. Visual and/or support surface conditions were manipulated in bipedal and unipedal stances in order to modify postural difficulty. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of dual tasking on postural and cognitive performance. Similar pattern of results were found in bipedal and unipedal stances, with Taekwondo practitioners displaying larger sway, shooters displaying lower sway and non-athletes displaying sway characteristics intermediate to Taekwondo and shooting athletes. Larger effect was found in bipedal stance. Single to dual-task comparison of postural control showed no significant effect of mental task on sway velocity in shooters, indicating less cognitive effort invested in balance control during bipedal stance. We suggest that expertise in shooting has a more pronounced effect on decreased sway in static balance conditions. Furthermore, shooters invest less attention in postures that are more specific to their training, i.e. bipedal stance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of musculoskeletal pain on balance and concerns of falling in mobility-limited, community-dwelling Danes over 75 years of age: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Julie C; Hvid, Lars G; Hartvigsen, Jan; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Azari, Michael F; Skjødt, Mathias; Robinson, Stephen R; Caserotti, Paolo

    2017-12-11

    In older adults, musculoskeletal pain is associated with increased concerns of falling, reduced balance and increased occurrence of falls. In younger adults, the intensity of neck pain and low back pain is associated with increased postural sway. It is not known if pain further impairs balance and concerns of falling in mobility-limited older adults, and if so, whether this is associated with different intensities of pain. This study examined whether mobility-limited older adults with mild or intense neck pain and/or low back pain have significantly increased postural sway as measured by centre of pressure (COP) changes and concerns of falling compared to those without pain. 48 older adults with a gait speed of service. Self-reported neck pain, low back pain, and concerns of falling were recorded on questionnaires. Sway range, velocity and area were recorded on a force plate in a comfortable standing stance. Pain intensity was rated on an 11 point numerical rating scale (0-10). Participants were sub-grouped into mild (0-4) and intense (> 5) neck pain or low back pain. Intense neck pain was associated with increased anterior-posterior sway range and area of sway. Intense low back pain was associated with increased concerns of falling. Intense neck pain in mobility-limited older adults is associated with significant changes in postural balance, and intense low back pain is associated with significantly higher concerns of falling.

  5. Pain education combined with neck- and aerobic training is more effective at relieving chronic neck pain than pain education alone - A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brage, K; Ris Hansen, Inge; Falla, D

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of training and pain education vs pain education alone, on neck pain, neck muscle activity and postural sway in patients with chronic neck pain. METHODS: Twenty women with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive pain education and specific training (neck......-shoulder exercises, balance and aerobic training) (INV), or pain education alone (CTRL). Effect on neck pain, function and Global Perceived Effect (GPE) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from neck flexor and extensor muscles during performance of the Cranio-Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT...... for increased GPE (p = 0.06), reduced sternocleidomastoid activity during the CCFT (p = 0.09), reduced sway length (p = 0.09), and increased neck extensor activity (p = 0.02) during sway compared to the CTRL group. CONCLUSION: Pain education and specific training reduce neck pain more than pain education alone...

  6. Haptic cues for orientation and postural control in sighted and blind individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeka, J. J.; Easton, R. D.; Bentzen, B. L.; Lackner, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Haptic cues from fingertip contact with a stable surface attenuate body sway in subjects even when the contact forces are too small to provide physical support of the body. We investigated how haptic cues derived from contact of a cane with a stationary surface at low force levels aids postural control in sighted and congenitally blind individuals. Five sighted (eyes closed) and five congenitally blind subjects maintained a tandem Romberg stance in five conditions: (1) no cane; (2,3) touch contact (postural sway in all subjects, compared to the no-cane condition. A slanted cane was far more effective in reducing postural sway than was a perpendicular cane. Cane use also decreased head displacement of sighted subjects far more than that of blind subjects. These results suggest that head movement control is linked to postural control through gaze stabilization reflexes in sighted subjects; such reflexes are absent in congenitally blind individuals and may account for their higher levels of head displacement.

  7. Postural Adaptations To Supra-postural Tasks in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Michael G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of varying memory (cognitive demands, and visual (perceptual demands on postural motion. Sixty four children (32 DCD, 32 TDC, 9-to-10 years were volunteers. Each performed separate memory and visual tasks at two levels of difficulty; easy (LD and hard (HD while recording their postural motion. For the memory task, both groups reduced postural sway in the HD condition. For the visual task only the TDC group reduced postural sway in the HD condition; DCD children did not. The DCD group did not reduce postural motion but, in fact, increased motion. We also found several group  task interactions on sway. Our data suggest a weakening of the action linkage between both cognitive and perceptual tasks in children diagnosed with movement difficulties. The data are discussed in the context of limitations in the embodied relationship between posture and both perceptual and cognitive activity.

  8. Utilization of polar metabolite profiling in the comparison of juvenile wood and compression wood in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Feng; Morris, Cameron R; Goldfarb, Barry; Chang, Hou-Min; Kadla, John F

    2006-11-01

    Juvenile wood (JW) of conifers is often associated with compression wood (CW), with which it is sometimes believed to be identical. To determine whether JW and CW can be distinguished metabolically, we compared gas chromatographic profiles of 25 polar metabolites from rooted cuttings of a single loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) clone raised in controlled environment chambers and subject to three treatments: (1) grown erect with minimal wind sway (control); (2) swayed by wind from oscillating fans; and (3) with 30-cm growth increments successively bent at an angle of 45 degrees to the vertical. Profiles were compared by principal component analysis. Substantial increases in abundances of coniferin and p-glucocoumaryl alcohol separated immature JW-forming xylem tissues of the control trees from the CW-forming xylem of the bent and swayed trees.

  9. Core exercises elevate trunk stability to facilitate skilled motor behavior of the upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yuki; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Kelepecz, Dolly; Nakajima, Masaaki

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of core exercises on upper extremity function relative to skilled motor behavior and postural sway. We examined the effects of core exercises on the skilled motor behavior and postural sway of 40 healthy students who were assigned randomly to the core exercise group or the control group. Independent variable is extent of exposure to core exercise and dependent variables are skilled motor behavior and postural sway. A Purdue pegboard which measures skilled motor behavior and a stabilometer which measures postural sway were used to evaluate the influence of core exercises. Pre-intervention and post-intervention skilled motor behavior and postural sway were compared between the core exercise group and control group using the Wilcoxon rank sum test; a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Also, we investigated the application of core exercises in a clinical setting for one patient with cerebral vascular disease. The post intervention skilled motor behavior (p = 0.04) and postural sway, LNG (p = 0.05), LNG/TIME (p = 0.04) and X LNG (p = 0.02) were significantly higher in the core exercise group than control group. In the case report, there were good results; function of the upper extremity improved after doing the exercises. There were positive changes in some daily living activities. Core exercises are likely to enhance trunk stabilization to improve upper extremity function. It is possible for core exercises to be adapted for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-linear stimulus-response behavior of the human stance control system is predicted by optimization of a system with sensory and motor noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Herman; Peterka, Robert J

    2011-06-01

    We developed a theory of human stance control that predicted (1) how subjects re-weight their utilization of proprioceptive and graviceptive orientation information in experiments where eyes closed stance was perturbed by surface-tilt stimuli with different amplitudes, (2) the experimentally observed increase in body sway variability (i.e. the "remnant" body sway that could not be attributed to the stimulus) with increasing surface-tilt amplitude, (3) neural controller feedback gains that determine the amount of corrective torque generated in relation to sensory cues signaling body orientation, and (4) the magnitude and structure of spontaneous body sway. Responses to surface-tilt perturbations with different amplitudes were interpreted using a feedback control model to determine control parameters and changes in these parameters with stimulus amplitude. Different combinations of internal sensory and/or motor noise sources were added to the model to identify the properties of noise sources that were able to account for the experimental remnant sway characteristics. Various behavioral criteria were investigated to determine if optimization of these criteria could predict the identified model parameters and amplitude-dependent parameter changes. Robust findings were that remnant sway characteristics were best predicted by models that included both sensory and motor noise, the graviceptive noise magnitude was about ten times larger than the proprioceptive noise, and noise sources with signal-dependent properties provided better explanations of remnant sway. Overall results indicate that humans dynamically weight sensory system contributions to stance control and tune their corrective responses to minimize the energetic effects of sensory noise and external stimuli.

  11. Increased alertness, better than posture prioritization, explains dual-task performance in prosthesis users and controls under increasing postural and cognitive challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Charla L; Perry, Bonnie; Chow, John W; Wallace, Chris; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2017-11-01

    Sensorimotor impairments after limb amputation impose a threat to stability. Commonly described strategies for maintaining stability are the posture first strategy (prioritization of balance) and posture second strategy (prioritization of concurrent tasks). The existence of these strategies was examined in 13 below-knee prosthesis users and 15 controls during dual-task standing under increasing postural and cognitive challenge by evaluating path length, 95% sway area, and anterior-posterior and medial-lateral amplitudes of the center of pressure. The subjects stood on two force platforms under usual (hard surface/eyes open) and difficult (soft surface/eyes closed) conditions, first alone and while performing a cognitive task without and then with instruction on cognitive prioritization. During standing alone, sway was not significantly different between groups. After adding the cognitive task without prioritization instruction, prosthesis users increased sway more under the dual-task than single-task standing (p ≤ 0.028) during both usual and difficult conditions, favoring the posture second strategy. Controls, however, reduced dual-task sway under a greater postural challenge (p ≤ 0.017), suggesting the posture first strategy. With prioritization of the cognitive task, sway was unchanged or reduced in prosthesis users, suggesting departure from the posture second strategy, whereas controls maintained the posture first strategy. Individual analysis of dual tasking revealed that greater postural demand in controls and greater cognitive challenge in prosthesis users led to both reduced sway and improved cognitive performance, suggesting cognitive-motor facilitation. Thus, activation of additional resources through increased alertness, rather than posture prioritization, may explain dual-task performance in both prosthesis users and controls under increasing postural and cognitive challenge.

  12. Non-Gaussian center-of-pressure velocity distribution during quiet stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E. S. D.; Picoli, S.; Deprá, P. P.; Mendes, R. S.

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we investigate patterns in the postural sway that characterize the static balance in human beings. To measure the postural sway, sixteen healthy young subjects performed quiet stance tasks providing the center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories. From these trajectories, we obtained the COP velocities. We verified that the velocity distributions exhibit non-normal behavior and can be approximated by generalized Gaussians with fat tails. We also discuss possible implications of modeling COP velocity by using generalized Fokker-Planck equations related to Tsallis statistics and Richardson anomalous diffusion.

  13. Validating and calibrating the Nintendo Wii balance board to derive reliable center of pressure measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Julia M; Mancini, Martina; Peterka, Robert J; Hayes, Tamara L; Horak, Fay B

    2014-09-29

    The Nintendo Wii balance board (WBB) has generated significant interest in its application as a postural control measurement device in both the clinical and (basic, clinical, and rehabilitation) research domains. Although the WBB has been proposed as an alternative to the "gold standard" laboratory-grade force plate, additional research is necessary before the WBB can be considered a valid and reliable center of pressure (CoP) measurement device. In this study, we used the WBB and a laboratory-grade AMTI force plate (AFP) to simultaneously measure the CoP displacement of a controlled dynamic load, which has not been done before. A one-dimensional inverted pendulum was displaced at several different displacement angles and load heights to simulate a variety of postural sway amplitudes and frequencies (CoP measurement error, with an increase in error as both sway amplitude and frequency increased and a significantly greater error in the mediolateral (ML) (compared to the anteroposterior (AP)) sway direction. There was no difference in error across the 12 WBB's, supporting low inter-device variability. A linear calibration procedure was then implemented to correct the WBB's CoP signals and reduce measurement error. There was a significant effect of calibration on the WBB's CoP signal accuracy, with a significant reduction in CoP measurement error (quantified by root-mean-squared error) from 2-6 mm (before calibration) to 0.5-2 mm (after calibration). WBB-based CoP signal calibration also significantly reduced the percent error in derived (time-domain) CoP sway measures, from -10.5% (before calibration) to -0.05% (after calibration) (percent errors averaged across all sway measures and in both sway directions). In this study, we characterized the WBB's CoP measurement error under controlled, dynamic conditions and implemented a linear calibration procedure for WBB CoP signals that is recommended to reduce CoP measurement error and provide more reliable estimates of

  14. Trunk stabilization during sagittal pelvic tilt: from trunk-on-pelvis to trunk-in-space due to vestibular and visual feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drunen, Paul; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the human ability to stabilize the trunk in space during pelvic tilt. Upper body sway was evoked in kneeling-seated healthy subjects by angular platform perturbations with a rotation around a virtual low-back pivot point between the L4 and L5 vertebrae. To investigate motor control modulation, variations in task instruction (balance naturally or minimize trunk sway), vision (eyes open or closed), and perturbation bandwidth (from 0.2 up to 1, 3, or 10 Hz) were applied. Cocontraction and proprioceptive muscle spindle feedback were associated with minimizing low-back flexion/extension (trunk-on-pelvis stabilization), while vestibular and visual feedback were supposed to contribute to trunk-in-space stabilization. Trunk-in-space stabilization was only observed with the minimize trunk sway task instruction, while the task instruction to balance naturally led to trunk-on-pelvis stabilization with trunk rotations even exceeding the perturbations. This indicates that vestibular feedback is used when minimizing trunk sway but has only a minor contribution during natural trunk stabilization in the sagittal plane. The eyes open condition resulted in reduced global trunk rotations and increased global trunk reflexive responses, demonstrating effective visual contributions to trunk-in-space stabilization. On the other hand, increasing perturbation bandwidth caused a decreased feedback contribution leading to deteriorated trunk-in-space stabilization. PMID:26745247

  15. Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

    2012-01-01

    The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex…

  16. Eye Movements Affect Postural Control in Young and Older Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil M; Bampouras, Theodoros M; Donovan, Tim; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits, and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results showed that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions.

  17. Eye movements affect postural control in young and older females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Marshall Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results show that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions.

  18. Virtual Reality Reflection Therapy Improves Balance and Gait in Patients with Chronic Stroke: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Taesung; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-10-28

    BACKGROUND Virtual reality reflection therapy (VRRT) is a technically enhanced version of the mirror therapy concept. The aim of this study was to investigate whether VRRT could improve the postural balance and gait ability of patients with chronic stroke. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-five patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated into the VRRT group (n=13) and the control group (n=12). The participants in both groups performed a conventional rehabilitation program for 30 minutes. The VRRT group also performed a VRRT program for 30 minutes, five times a week for 4 weeks. The control group performed conventional rehabilitation program and a placebo VRRT program. Outcome measures included Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Functional Reaching Test (FRT), and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test (for dynamic balance ability), postural sway (for static balance ability), and 10 meter walking velocity (10 mWV) for gait ability. RESULTS There were statistically significant improvements in the VRRT group compared with the control group for BBS, FRT, TUG, postural sway (mediolateral sway distance with eyes open and eyes closed, anteroposterior and total sway distance with eyes open but not with eyes closed), and 10 mWV (pstroke might be even more beneficial than conventional rehabilitation program alone in improving affected lower limb function. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of VRRT with optimal patient selection, and duration and intensity of training.

  19. Wind Tunnel Assessment of Ship Manoeuvrability using a PMM Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agdrup, Kristian; Jensen, Andreas G.; Aage, Christian

    1999-01-01

    was a light foam hull equipped with fixed rudder but without propeller. Tests comprised the static drift, pure sway and pure yaw modes in the range corresponding to manoeuvring at forward speed. The resulting hydrodynamic coefficients and values of the stability criterion are compared with the towing tank...

  20. COMPUTER PROGRAMME FOR THE DYNAMIC ANALYSIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES OBE

    assumed to be of infinite rigidity when compared to the columns. ... beams infinitely rigid when compared to the columns; the deformation of ... be zero. Stiffness matrix elements for Model l if floor i (i=1 to n, the degree of freedom) a unit sway then the relevant stiffness matrix elements are given as: 3. 1. ,1. 3. ,1. 3. 3. 1. 1. ,. 12.

  1. A pilot study comparing the cognitive demand of walking for transfemoral amputees using the Intelligent Prosthesis with that using conventionally damped knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, B W; Datta, D; Howitt, J

    2000-10-01

    To compare the cognitive demand of walking when using a conventional prosthesis with that using a microprocessor-controlled prosthesis. Ten unilateral transfemoral amputees wearing conventional pneumatic swing phase control (conventional prosthesis) prostheses walked on a treadmill which enforced a pattern of constantly varying speeds. The subjects simultaneously performed a simple or a complex distracting task. Following a period of accustomization, the subjects performed the same test wearing a prosthesis with microprocessor control of swing phase damping (the Intelligent Prosthesis). The three-dimensional trajectory (sway) of a retroreflective marker attached to the forehead was measured by a video-based motion analysis system, and used as a measure of gait quality. The ratio of the sway for the complex task over the simple task (the 'automation index') was used as a measure of the degree of automation of gait. No significant differences were found in the automation index between the two devices. However, the total sway for the conventional prosthesis was significantly higher. Sway during the complex distracting task was significantly higher than during the simple task. The microprocessor-controlled prosthesis was not found to be less cognitively demanding than a conventional prosthesis.

  2. aetiopathology and management challenges of lung cancer in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... Background: There are newer diagnostic and therapeutic armamentaria for primary lung cancer. Application of molecular genetics in lung cancer management is evolving rapidly. However, the traditional knowledge and practices that were applicable before the 1980s still hold sway in most developing ...

  3. Effects of stress on bodily freezing in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermann, H.C.M.; Figner, B.; Tyborowska, A.B.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Roelofs, K.

    2015-01-01

    Freezing is a major defensive stress-response, characterized by reduced body-sway and heart rate. Exacerbated freezing in threatening situations has been associated with increased basal and stress-induced glucocorticoid levels and with long-lasting stress-related symptoms in animals. However, the

  4. Simulation Of Probabilistic Wind Loads On A Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shah, Ashwin R.

    1994-01-01

    Method of simulating probabilistic windloads on building developed. Numerical results of simulation used to assess reliability of building and risk associated with tendencies of large gusts or high steady winds to cause building to sway, buckle, and/or overturn. Using method to analyze proposed design in iterative design cycle, building designed for specified reliability.

  5. Effect of plantar cutaneous inputs on center of pressure during quiet stance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that mechanical facilitation of sensation on the plantar soles enhanced postural stability in older adults. The results show that plantar cutaneous inputs provide information that leads to reduced postural sway in healthy older adults. This could have implications in clinical and rehabilitative areas.

  6. Bridging East and West Educational Divides in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prem

    2013-01-01

    In Asia, we are witnessing an era where the pendulum of power is swaying towards the East with the rising economic strength of China and India. Singapore is at the "crossroads" between the East and West of these most populous nations on earth. Although Singapore may appear the most Westernised country in Asia, she is nevertheless a…

  7. Philosophical and Pedagogical Patterns of Beliefs among Vietnamese and Australian Mathematics Preservice Teachers: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Bao Hiep; Brew, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Swayed by global pressures and poor international academic standing, Vietnam in 2002 initiated further school-wide curriculum change reflecting a student-centred reform agenda. Initial research on implementation is producing mixed results. One explanation is a mismatch with a Confucian Heritage Culture as a social-constructivist philosophy may…

  8. THE ROLE OF LIBRARIES IN CURBING DRUG ABUSE AMONG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FBL

    mood-altering substances as recourse to ease off the unavoidable stresses and strains of life. The findings dovetail with the basic assumptions of. Social Learning theory, which formed the theoretical framework to this study. That is, adolescent boys are easily swayed by the destructive influence of media advertisements, ...

  9. The Dancing Sharma: A review of 'To the Things Themselves'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    The tall, lithe and stately figure of the author swaying to the music, surrounded by scholars of international standing and ... to a religious way of studying religion? Jacques. Waardenburg, the distinguished Professor of ..... listening to such scholars would enable a more careful application of the phenomenology of religion at a ...

  10. Influence of pilates mat and apparatus exercises on pain and balance of businesswomen with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Hyun, Ju; Kim, Seong Gil

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of mat Pilates and apparatus Pilates on pain and static balance of businesswomen with chronic back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Participants were randomly allocated to Pilates mat exercises (PME) or Pilates apparatus exercise (PAE), and performed the appropriate Pilates exercises 3 days per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure the improvement in the participants' static balance ability as a result of the exercise, the sway length and sway velocity of the subjects were measured before and after the experiment while the subjects stood on a Balance Performance Monitor (BPM) facing the front wall for 30 seconds with their eyes open. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the degree of pain. [Results] The VAS score, sway length, and sway velocity of both groups decreased significantly after the experiment, but the PME group showed a greater decrease than the PAE group. [Conclusion] PME showed greater improvement in pain level and balance compared with PAE in this research. Since the subjects of this study were patients with low back pain, PME is assumed to have been more suitable and effective because it uses body weight to strengthen core muscles rather than heavier apparatuses as in PAE.

  11. Seismic strengthening of RC structures with exterior shear walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has been observed that the usage of exterior shear walls considerably improve the capacity and sway ... Steel bracing for RC frames has also been used to reduce drift demands. Bracing can either ..... The column and beam elements have been modelled with plastic hinges so that lumped plas- ticity behaviour would be ...

  12. A biomimetic framework for coordinating and controlling whole body movements in humanoid robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasso, Pietro; Rea, Francesco; Mohan, Vishwanathan

    2013-01-01

    An integrated model for the coordination of whole body movements of a humanoid robot with a compliant ankle similar to the human case is described. It includes a synergy formation part, which takes into account the motor redundancy of the body model, and an intermittent controller, which stabilizes in a robust way postural sway movements, thus combining the hip strategy with ankle strategy.

  13. Tilting at Windmills: Colonialism, Communism, and the Limits of Coercion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    paper submitted to the faculty of the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies in partial satisfaction of graduation requirements for the School of...Jews to the war effort would sway British policy, however, they were proven wrong. Despite claims to the contrary in the Labour Party convention

  14. The Technolife Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Margareta

    2013-01-01

    The experimental approach of Technolife seeks for points of mediation by which varied public concerns can become embedded institutionally and secure sets of legitimate procedures It is an open (experimental) question if the wide variety of technologies now in sway can be handled within a uniform ...

  15. Detsibill : Hullumaja! Nii palju bände... White label : Project Massacre. Kuula / DJ Pickney Tiger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    DJ Pickney Tiger, pseud., 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Cyndi Lauper "The Body Acoustic", Sway "This is my demo", Röyksopp "Night Out Live", Hardcore Superstar "Gai", The Bamboos "Step It Up", "Innovatsioon", Scandinavian Music Group "Hölmö rakkaus - ylpeä sydän", Anti-Flag "For Blood and Epmpire", Depoo "Amazing", Azmuth "Pure (Best of Far Out)", "Parimad laulud uues kuues"

  16. Can real-time visual feedback during gait retraining reduce metabolic demand for individuals with transtibial amputation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Russell Esposito

    Full Text Available The metabolic demand of walking generally increases following lower extremity amputation. This study used real-time visual feedback to modify biomechanical factors linked to an elevated metabolic demand of walking in individuals with transtibial amputation. Eight persons with unilateral, traumatic transtibial amputation and 8 uninjured controls participated. Two separate bouts of real-time visual feedback were provided during a single session of gait retraining to reduce 1 center of mass sway and 2 thigh muscle activation magnitudes and duration. Baseline and post-intervention data were collected. Metabolic rate, heart rate, frontal plane center of mass sway, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activity, and co-contraction indices were evaluated during steady state walking at a standardized speed. Visual feedback successfully decreased center of mass sway 12% (p = 0.006 and quadriceps activity 12% (p = 0.041; however, thigh muscle co-contraction indices were unchanged. Neither condition significantly affected metabolic rate during walking and heart rate increased with center-of-mass feedback. Metabolic rate, center of mass sway, and integrated quadriceps muscle activity were all not significantly different from controls. Attempts to modify gait to decrease metabolic demand may actually adversely increase the physiological effort of walking in individuals with lower extremity amputation who are young, active and approximate metabolic rates of able-bodied adults.

  17. Cultural Resources Survey and Archeological Inventory of the Proposed Carrollton Revetment Project, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, Phase 1. Volume 1 of 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    of En- Magazine. From the edge of its eddies ofmen and wagons and barges and dollies and gineers 1893: 3822). Regardless of its origin, it swaying...sorbed all river trade, and keelmen became deck- you see nothin’, you dash-dashed aig- suckin’, sheep -stealin’, one-eyed son of a hands, mates, and

  18. Prism adaptation improves postural imbalance in neglect patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; Olthoff, Liselot; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Visser-Meily, Johanna M a

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have found a negative relation between neglect and postural imbalance. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of a single session of prism adaptation on balance [i.e. mediolateral and anteroposterior center of pressure (CoP)] and postural sway (i.e. mean

  19. Measuring Center of Pressure Signals to Quantify Human Balance Using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy by Designing a Force Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the improvement of human body balance, a low cost and portable measuring device of center of pressure (COP, known as center of pressure and complexity monitoring system (CPCMS, has been developed for data logging and analysis. In order to prove that the system can estimate the different magnitude of different sways in comparison with the commercial Advanced Mechanical Technology Incorporation (AMTI system, four sway tests have been developed (i.e., eyes open, eyes closed, eyes open with water pad, and eyes closed with water pad to produce different sway displacements. Firstly, static and dynamic tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the system. Then, correlation tests of the CPCMS and AMTI systems have been compared with four sway tests. The results are within the acceptable range. Furthermore, multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD and enhanced multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE analysis methods have been used to analyze COP data reported by the CPCMS and compare it with the AMTI system. The improvements of the CPCMS are 35% to 70% (open eyes test and 60% to 70% (eyes closed test with and without water pad. The AMTI system has shown an improvement of 40% to 80% (open eyes test and 65% to 75% (closed eyes test. The results indicate that the CPCMS system can achieve similar results to the commercial product so it can determine the balance.

  20. Postural Control Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Sensory Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Michail; McKenna, Roisin; Murphy, Blain

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nature of sensory integration deficits in postural control of young adults with ASD. Postural control was assessed in a fixed environment, and in three environments in which sensory information about body sway from visual, proprioceptive or both channels was inaccurate. Furthermore, two levels of inaccurate information were…

  1. Relationship between Dynamic Balance and the Muscular Strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with stroke are faced with a wide range of impairments, including diminished balance and increased postural sway. The unaffected (non-paretic) lower limbs play a prominent role in the maintenance of balance. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between dynamic balance and the muscular ...

  2. Examining Evidence for External and Consequential Validity of the First Term General Chemistry Exam from the ACS Examinations Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Validity of educational research instruments and student assessments has appropriately become a growing interest in the chemistry education research community. Of particular concern is an attention to the consequences to students that result from the interpretation of assessment scores and whether those consequences are swayed by invalidity within…

  3. Moving up in the U.S. News and World Report Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremy P.

    2015-01-01

    Rankings are a powerful force in higher education, swaying the enrollment decisions of prospective students and affecting the opinions of parents, board members, and policymakers. In the words of one provost, "The rankings matter to our university because they matter to people who matter to us." Rankings are also a business--one that is…

  4. Pain education combined with neck- and aerobic training is more effective at relieving chronic neck pain than pain education alone--A preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, K; Ris, I; Falla, D; Søgaard, K; Juul-Kristensen, B

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of training and pain education vs pain education alone, on neck pain, neck muscle activity and postural sway in patients with chronic neck pain. Twenty women with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive pain education and specific training (neck-shoulder exercises, balance and aerobic training) (INV), or pain education alone (CTRL). Effect on neck pain, function and Global Perceived Effect (GPE) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from neck flexor and extensor muscles during performance of the Cranio-Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT) and three postural control tests (two-legged: eyes open and closed, one-legged: eyes open). Sway parameters were calculated. Fifteen participants (CTRL: eight; INV: seven) completed the study. Per protocol analyses showed a larger pain reduction (p = 0.002) for the INV group with tendencies for increased GPE (p = 0.06), reduced sternocleidomastoid activity during the CCFT (p = 0.09), reduced sway length (p = 0.09), and increased neck extensor activity (p = 0.02) during sway compared to the CTRL group. Pain education and specific training reduce neck pain more than pain education alone in patients with chronic neck pain. These results provide encouragement for a larger clinical trial to corroborate these observations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Old Wine in New Bottles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, J.F.; Hoogesteger van Dijk, J.D.; Hidalgo, Jean Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Despite a widely embraced ecological turn and strident critique of megastructures in the 1990s, construction of large infrastructure has been reignited worldwide. While Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and River Basin Management (RBM) have at least discursively held sway as the dominant

  6. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Rodney

    2018-01-01

    Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg) and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg) in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (FMS), task simulations (vehicle exit; victim recovery), and subjective measures. Ten volunteer police officers (six females, four males) were randomly allocated to one of the designs on each of two days. Body armour type did not significantly affect postural sway, vertical jump, vehicle exit and 5 m sprint times, or victim recovery times. Both armour types increased sway velocity and sway-path length in the final five seconds compared to the first 5 s of a balance task. The MBA was associated with significantly slower times to complete the agility task, poorer FMS total scores, and poorer subjective ratings of performance and comfort. The LEBA was perceived as more comfortable and received more positive performance ratings during the agility test and task simulations. The impacts of MBA and LEBA differed significantly and they should not be considered interchangeable. PMID:29443905

  7. Journal - Ujah 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UJU

    Abstract. The utilitarian aesthetic of drama cannot be disputed particularly in Africa as it has since held sway and decked itself out from the genesis of the literary drama of the continent. This is because most African dramatists across the boundaries of critical currents have used drama to treat one social issue or the other.

  8. Development of the quality of reaching in infants with cerebral palsy : a kinematic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxum, Anke G; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Dijkstra, Linze-Jaap; Hamer, Elisa G; Hielkema, Tjitske; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess development of reaching and head stability in infants at very high risk (VHR-infants) of cerebral palsy (CP) who did and did not develop CP. METHOD: This explorative longitudinal study assessed the kinematics of reaching and head sway in sitting in 37 VHR-infants (18 CP) one to four

  9. Adaptation to altered balance conditions in unilateral amputees due to atherosclerosis: a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bretz Éva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amputation impairs the ability to balance. We examined adaptation strategies in balance following dysvascularity-induced unilateral tibial amputation in skilled prosthetic users (SPU and first fitted amputees (FFA (N = 28. Methods Excursions of center of pressure (COP were determined during 20 s quiet standing using a stabilometry system with eyes-open on both legs or on the non-affected leg(s. Main measures: COP trajectories and time functions; distribution of reaction forces between the two legs; inclination angles obtained through second order regression analysis using stabilogram data. Results FFA vs SPU demonstrated 27.8% greater postural sway in bilateral stance (p = 0.0004. Postural sway area was smaller in FFA standing on the non-affected leg compared with SPU (p = 0.028. The slope of the regression line indicating postural stability was nearly identical in FFA and SPU and the direction of regression line was opposite for the left and right leg amputees. Conclusion Of the two adaptation strategies in balance, the first appears before amputation due to pain and fatigue in the affected leg. This strategy appears in the form of reduced postural sway while standing on the non-affected leg. The second adaptation occurs during rehabilitation and regular use of the prosthesis resulting in normal weightbearing associated with reduced postural sway on two legs and return to the normal postural stability on one leg.

  10. Comparison of the Balance Performance of the Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy before and after Exercise Therapy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Sharif-Moradi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research is aimed to evaluate precisely a dynamic stability platform system to measure the center of gravity's sways around with fluctuations of cerebral spastic palsy children, before an after exercise therapy. Materials & Methods: Ten children with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy between 8 to15 years of age, wre participated in this quasi experimental (after – before study. Their mean weight and height were (30.8kg ± 5.7kg and (1.35m±0.09m respectively. Subjects underwent a 12 weeks of exercise therapy. A dynamic stability platform system (BIODEX was used to measure the center of gravity’s sway around the center of base of support (COBOS. The balance tests were repeated on stable, almost stable and unstable base of support as well as with and without shoes. Results: Findings showed that the mean sway of center of gravity of the cerebral palsy children was significantly decrease after exercise therapy by 0.2 degrees (P=0.001. The greatest improvement achieved on AP directions in all conditions. Wearing shoes resulted in a significant decrease on the body sway. Conclusion: Exercise therapy significantly improved body balance in CP children. The function of the proprioceptives of the hip and trunk can be improved by exercise therapy and therefore should be considered in rehabilitation program.

  11. Measuring Center of Pressure Signals to Quantify Human Balance Using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy by Designing a Force Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Sue, Pei-Der; Abbod, Maysam F.; Jiang, Bernard C.; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2013-01-01

    To assess the improvement of human body balance, a low cost and portable measuring device of center of pressure (COP), known as center of pressure and complexity monitoring system (CPCMS), has been developed for data logging and analysis. In order to prove that the system can estimate the different magnitude of different sways in comparison with the commercial Advanced Mechanical Technology Incorporation (AMTI) system, four sway tests have been developed (i.e., eyes open, eyes closed, eyes open with water pad, and eyes closed with water pad) to produce different sway displacements. Firstly, static and dynamic tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the system. Then, correlation tests of the CPCMS and AMTI systems have been compared with four sway tests. The results are within the acceptable range. Furthermore, multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) and enhanced multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) analysis methods have been used to analyze COP data reported by the CPCMS and compare it with the AMTI system. The improvements of the CPCMS are 35% to 70% (open eyes test) and 60% to 70% (eyes closed test) with and without water pad. The AMTI system has shown an improvement of 40% to 80% (open eyes test) and 65% to 75% (closed eyes test). The results indicate that the CPCMS system can achieve similar results to the commercial product so it can determine the balance. PMID:23966184

  12. Pedagogical Insights into the Teaching of Public Administration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crux of this paper was to have a pedagogical insight in the teaching of Public Administration in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria. It is a credo that the supra discipline Public Administration hold the sway for anchoring the policy and programmes of both federal, States and local government. It is in this breath, that curriculum ...

  13. The Interaction of Focused Attention with Flow-field Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, T.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies were performed to determine whether a subject's response to naturalistic optical flow specifying egomotion would be affected by a concurrent attention task. In the first study subjects stood in a moving room in which various areas of the optical flow generated by room movement were visible. Subjects responded to room motion with strong compensatory sway when the entire room was visible. When the side walls of the room were completely obscured by stationary screens, leaving only the front wall visible, sway was significantly reduced, though it remained greater than in an eyes-closed control. In Exp. 2 subjects were presented with either the full room (large sway response) or the room with only the front wall visible (moderate response), each in combination with either a hard or easy verbal addition task. Preliminary results show that swaying in the fully visible room and in the room with only the front wall visible increased when combined with either the hard or easy tasks. These preliminary results suggest that at the least the pick-up of optical flow specifying egomotion is not affected by concurrent attentional activity.

  14. The Ebay-ification of Education: Critical Literacy in a Consumerocracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Lil; Urbanski, Cynthia; Manship, Lacy; Arnold, Lucy; Iannone, Tony

    2010-01-01

    When people dive into the varied texts of culture, print and non-print, and explore and critique them, they are doing much more than showing various persuasive appeals or advertising gimmicks to sway their audience; they are examining the purposes and values of capitalism, the economic system that produces a consumerocracy. People might even turn…

  15. Deliberately light Interpersonal contact affects the control of head stability during walking in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulleri, Katrin Hanna; Burfeind, Frauke; Höß-Zenker, Beate; Feketené Szabó, Eva; Herzig, Nadine; Ledebt, A.; Johannsen, Leif

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential of deliberately light interpersonal touch (IPT) for reducing excessive head and trunk sway during self-paced walking in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). DESIGN: Quasi-experimental, proof-of-concept study with between-groups comparison. SETTING:

  16. Head movement measurement: An alternative method for posturography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciria, L F; Muñoz, M A; Gea, J; Peña, N; Miranda, J G V; Montoya, P; Vila, J

    2017-02-01

    The present study evaluated the measurement of head movements as a valid method for postural emotional studies using the comparison of simultaneous recording of center of pressure (COP) sway as criterion. Thirty female students viewed a set of 12 pleasant, 12 unpleasant and 12 neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System, repeated twice, using a block presentation procedure while standing on a force platform (AMTI AccuSway). Head movements were recorded using a webcam (©KPC139E) located in the ceiling in line with the force platform and a light-emitting diode (LED) placed on the top of the head. Open source software (CvMob 3.1) was used to process the data. High indices of correlation and coherence between head and COP sway were observed. In addition, pleasant pictures, compared with unpleasant pictures, elicited greater body sway in the anterior-posterior axis, suggesting an approach response to appetitive stimuli. Thus, the measurement of head movement can be an alternative or complementary method to recording COP for studying human postural changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Practical Recommendations for the Preliminary Design Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interior-to-exterior shear ratios for equal and unequal bay frames, as well as column inflection points were obtained to serve as practical aids for preliminary analysis/design of fixed-feet multistory sway frames. Equal and unequal bay five story frames were analysed to show the validity of the recommended design ...

  18. Measuring center of pressure signals to quantify human balance using multivariate multiscale entropy by designing a force platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Sue, Pei-Der; Abbod, Maysam F; Jiang, Bernard C; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2013-08-08

    To assess the improvement of human body balance, a low cost and portable measuring device of center of pressure (COP), known as center of pressure and complexity monitoring system (CPCMS), has been developed for data logging and analysis. In order to prove that the system can estimate the different magnitude of different sways in comparison with the commercial Advanced Mechanical Technology Incorporation (AMTI) system, four sway tests have been developed (i.e., eyes open, eyes closed, eyes open with water pad, and eyes closed with water pad) to produce different sway displacements. Firstly, static and dynamic tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the system. Then, correlation tests of the CPCMS and AMTI systems have been compared with four sway tests. The results are within the acceptable range. Furthermore, multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) and enhanced multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) analysis methods have been used to analyze COP data reported by the CPCMS and compare it with the AMTI system. The improvements of the CPCMS are 35% to 70% (open eyes test) and 60% to 70% (eyes closed test) with and without water pad. The AMTI system has shown an improvement of 40% to 80% (open eyes test) and 65% to 75% (closed eyes test). The results indicate that the CPCMS system can achieve similar results to the commercial product so it can determine the balance.

  19. An Examination of the Characteristics of Esan Traditional Music of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is made up of autochthonous groups with diverse musical cultures. In this essay, the researcher observes that over generalization associated with the characteristics of African music in general and Nigerian music in particular can no longer hold sway because each ethnic group has its peculiar musical attributes.

  20. Modulation of intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stabilization due to vision, task instruction, and perturbation bandwidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drunen, P.; Koumans, Y.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; van Dieen, J.H.; Happee, R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess how reflexes and intrinsic properties contribute to low-back stabilization and modulate with conditions. Upper body sway was evoked by anterior–posterior platform translations, while subjects were seated with a restrained pelvis and free upper body. Kinematic

  1. Effects of Behavioral and Social Class Information on Social Judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Reuben M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the role of disconfirming behavioral information and the limits on social class schema effects. Using a Bayesian model of social perception, it was found that unambiguous, relevant stimulus information influenced judgments. Although social class information did not affect relevant stimulus information, it did sway judgments in…

  2. Effects of pesticides on the peripheral and central nervous system in tobacco farmers in Malaysia: studies on peripheral nerve conduction, brain-evoked potentials and computerized posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sato, Hajime; Nordin, Rusli Bin; Naing, Lin; Kimura, Satoshi; Okabe, Shingo; Maeno, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yasuki; Kitamura, Fumihiko; Araki, Shunichi

    2005-04-01

    We examined the effects of pesticides on the central and peripheral nervous system in the setting of a tobacco farm at a developing country. Maximal motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (MCV and SCV, respectively) in the median, sural and tibial nerves, postural sway, and brain-evoked potentials (auditory event-related and visual-evoked potentials) were measured in 80 male tobacco farmers and age- and sex-matched 40 controls in Kelantan, Malaysia. Median SCV (finger-wrist) in farmers using Delsen (mancozeb, dithiocarbamate fungicide), who showed significant decrease of serum cholinesterase activities, were significantly lower compared with the controls. Sural SCV in farmers using Fastac (alpha-cypermethrin, pyrethroid insecticide) and median MCV (elbow-wrist) in farmers using Tamex (butralin, dinitroaniline herbicide) were significantly slowed compared with their respective controls. In Delsen (mancozeb, dithiocarbamate) users, the power of postural sway of 0-1 Hz was significantly larger than that in the controls both in the anterior-posterior direction with eyes open and in the right-left direction with eyes closed. The former type of sway was also significantly increased in Tamaron (methamidophos, organophosphorus insecticide) users. In conclusion, nerve conduction velocities and postural sway seem to be sensitive indicators of the effects of pesticides on the central and peripheral nervous system.

  3. Effects of support surface stability on feedback control of trunk posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreopoulou, G.; Maaswinkel, E.; Cofre Lizama, L.E.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the interactions of visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile sensory manipulations and sitting on either a stable or an unstable surface on mediolateral (ML) trunk sway. Fifteen individuals were measured. In each trial, subjects sat as quiet as possible, on a

  4. Does postural stability affect grasping?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voudouris, D.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Hatzitaki, V.; Brenner, E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether challenging upright stance influences the execution of a grasping task. Participants reached to grasp a small sphere while standing either on a stable surface or on foam. Before reaching for the sphere, participants exhibited more body sway and greater fluctuations in the centre

  5. Shut Up, Nobody Wants to Hear Your Poems!: Painter Versus Poet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri Glastonbury

    2013-08-01

    fall sway to the ‘glamour’ of a famous painter, one of the central investigations remains a questioning of how poetry sits within the montage effect of placing both artists’ work side by side, rather than, as the title suggests, simply squaring them off against each other.

  6. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Robin; Schram, Ben; Pope, Rodney

    2018-02-14

    Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg) and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg) in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (FMS), task simulations (vehicle exit; victim recovery), and subjective measures. Ten volunteer police officers (six females, four males) were randomly allocated to one of the designs on each of two days. Body armour type did not significantly affect postural sway, vertical jump, vehicle exit and 5 m sprint times, or victim recovery times. Both armour types increased sway velocity and sway-path length in the final five seconds compared to the first 5 s of a balance task. The MBA was associated with significantly slower times to complete the agility task, poorer FMS total scores, and poorer subjective ratings of performance and comfort. The LEBA was perceived as more comfortable and received more positive performance ratings during the agility test and task simulations. The impacts of MBA and LEBA differed significantly and they should not be considered interchangeable.

  7. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-28

    Mar 28, 2016 ... Cameroonian, in such products as Happy Birth Day and Sweet Mother quickly gave way to the likes of Awilo de .... modern day Cameroon is set, the folk artist profiles from the 1960s the leadership sway from Moslem ... the African was captured and deported to America in 1767 as a slave. Conscious of.

  8. Generation Who, What, Y? What You Need to Know about Generation Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldgehn, Leslie A.

    2004-01-01

    Generation Y wants to know why! Today's youth are curious, they want the facts, they want the hard data, and most of all they want the truth. Advertisements and creative marketing tactics do not easily sway this group. They do their research before they believe most things they hear and see. Purchasing behaviors of Generation Y show that the group…

  9. Conflict, Provocation and Fights among Boys in a South African High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlall, Vijay; Morrell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Boys are commonly associated with disruptive behaviour and physical fighting at school. Explanations for this behaviour range from naturalistic "boys will be boys" approaches to analyses which focus on the social construction of masculinity and emphasise the gendered nature of boys' behaviour. Whichever view holds sway, it is often…

  10. Aesthetic Modernism in the Post-Colony: The Making of a National College of Art in Pakistan (1950-1960s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarar, Nadeem Omar

    2008-01-01

    With the formation of Pakistan as a modern Islamic republic in 1947, the institutions of art and design education were transformed under the sway of modernization theories of development. A conceptual and physical infrastructure was put in place to modify existing institutions and to create new ones for encouraging modern art and artists in the…

  11. The functional effect of segmental trunk and head control training in moderate-to-severe cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek John; Woollacott, Marjorie; Bencke, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    . Outcomes were Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), Segmental Assessment of Trunk Control (SATCo), and postural sway at baseline, at primary endpoint (6 months), and at follow-up (12 months). RESULTS: There were no significant differences in either GMFM...

  12. Alternative Philosophies of Work: Some Questions for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Arthur G.

    1982-01-01

    For decades the principles of scientific management, borrowed from industry, have held sway in U.S. schools. Now these principles have been supplanted in the industrial workplace by new socio-technical theories. This article describes the new industrial management model and its implications for education. (Author/WD)

  13. African Ruling Political Parties and the Making of 'Authoritarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appearing to be a 'reincarnation' of the one-party system and military rule that held sway for about three to four decades in Africa (from the 1960s). In the process of this transformation, African ruling parties have been grossly destabilising opposition and perceived dissenters through clientelism, patronage politics and ...

  14. Genetic Engineering and Crop Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen C.; Frost, S.

    1991-01-01

    With a spotlight upon current agricultural difficulties and environmental dilemmas, this paper considers both the extant and potential applications of genetic engineering with respect to crop production. The nonagricultural factors most likely to sway the impact of this emergent technology upon future crop production are illustrated. (JJK)

  15. The role of vision in maintaining heading direction: effects of changing gaze and optic flow on human gait.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, M.; Bohner, C.; Berger, W.; Sprundel, M. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    How is heading direction maintained in human gait? This question was investigated with respect to the role of optic flow and in the context of different movement strategies. While walking on a treadmill the deviation from the ideal straight path was measured in terms of lateral sway induced by a

  16. Multimodal alignment during collaborative remembering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cienki, A.J.; Bietti, L.M.; Kok, K.I.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the roles that interactive alignment of manual gesture, postural sway, and eye-gaze play in small groups engaged in collaborative remembering. Qualitative analyses of a video corpus demonstrate that the coordination of these behaviors may contribute to joint remembering in

  17. Aetiopathology and Management Challenges of Lung Cancer in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are newer diagnostic and therapeutic armamentaria for primary lung cancer. Application of molecular genetics in lung cancer management is evolving rapidly. However, the traditional knowledge and practices that were applicable before the 1980s still hold sway in most developing countries. Objective: ...

  18. What Is at Stake in Knowing the Content and Capabilities of Children's Minds?: A Case for Basing High Stakes Tests on Cognitive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Stephen P.; Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Phillips, Linda M.

    2004-01-01

    Many significant changes in perspective have to take place before efforts to learn the content and capabilities of children's minds can hold much sway in educational testing. The language of testing, especially of high stakes testing, remains firmly in the realm of "behaviors", "performance" and "competency" defined…

  19. Interference between postural control and spatial vs. non-spatial auditory reaction time tasks in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Susan I; Redfern, Mark S; Jennings, J Richard; Furman, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether spatial aspects of an information processing task influence dual-task interference. Two groups (Older/Young) of healthy adults participated in dual-task experiments. Two auditory information processing tasks included a frequency discrimination choice reaction time task (non-spatial task) and a lateralization choice reaction time task (spatial task). Postural tasks included combinations of standing with eyes open or eyes closed on either a fixed floor or a sway-referenced floor. Reaction times and postural sway via center of pressure were recorded. Baseline measures of reaction time and sway were subtracted from the corresponding dual-task results to calculate reaction time task costs and postural task costs. Reaction time task cost increased with eye closure (p = 0.01), sway-referenced flooring (p vision x age interaction indicated that older subjects had a significant vision X task interaction whereas young subjects did not. However, when analyzed by age group, the young group showed minimal differences in interference for the spatial and non-spatial tasks with eyes open, but showed increased interference on the spatial relative to non-spatial task with eyes closed. On the contrary, older subjects demonstrated increased interference on the spatial relative to the non-spatial task with eyes open, but not with eyes closed. These findings suggest that visual-spatial interference may occur in older subjects when vision is used to maintain posture.

  20. Assessment and Rehabilitation of Central Sensory Impairments for Balance in mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The electrical components (circuit cards that support body sway recordings, power supply , electrical connections) have been designed and are in... healthy controls and 2) Interventional randomized pilot study (Aim II: Balance Rehabilitation) using a novel auditory biofeedback rehabilitation...to healthy control subjects without a history of mTBI. We hypothesize that a) objective measures of central sensorimotor integration, static and

  1. Gender Revolution Prospects in Nigeria: Implications for Marriage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We hypothesise that the prospects of gender revolution (GR) is rising in Nigeria and may be swaying marriage timing and fertility. The 1990 and 2013 NDHS data and 45 in-depth interviews were analysed. The analysis suggests that the prospects for the emergence of GR increased between 1990 and 2013. Women with ...

  2. The validity of a portable clinical force plate in assessment of static postural control: concurrent validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golriz, Samira; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Foreman, K Bo; Walker, Bruce F

    2012-05-23

    The broad use of force plates in clinical settings for postural control assessment suggests the need for instruments that are easy to use, affordable and readily available. In addition, these instruments of measurement should be reliable and valid as adequate reliability and validity are prerequisites to making correct inferences. The aim of this study was to examine the concurrent validity of postural control measures obtained with a clinical force plate. Thirty-one healthy adults were recruited. Participants completed 1 set of 5 trials on each force plate. Postural control measures (centre of pressure [COP] average velocity and sway area) were collected and compared using the Midot Posture Scale Analyzer (clinical force plate) and the Accugait force plate (criterion measure). Intra class correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement , and paired t-tests were calculated and Bland-Altman plots were constructed to compare the force plates and assess consistency of measurement and agreement between them. The ICC values (ICC = 0.14-0.60) between the two force plates were lower than the acceptable value for both COP average velocity and sway area. There was significant difference (p > 0.05) in COP average velocity and sway area between the force plates. Examination of the plots revealed that there is less difference between the force plates in lower magnitudes of COP for average velocity and sway area however, the greater the average velocity and sway area, the greater the difference between the measures obtained from the two force plates. Findings of this study showed poor concurrent validity of the clinical force plate. This clinical force plate cannot be a replacement for known reliable and valid force plates and consequently measures obtained from this force plate should be treated with caution especially in a clinical population.

  3. Effects of four days hiking on postural control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fraga Vieira

    Full Text Available Hiking is a demanding form of exercise that may cause delayed responses of the postural muscles and a loss of somatosensory information, particularly when repeatedly performed for several days. These effects may negatively influence the postural control of hikers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a four-day hike on postural control. Twenty-six adults of both sexes travelled 262 kilometers, stopping for lunch and resting in the early evening each day. Force platforms were used to collect center of pressure (COP data at 100 Hz for 70 seconds before hiking started and immediately after arriving at the rest station each day. The COP time course data were analyzed according to global stabilometric descriptors, spectral analysis and structural descriptors using sway density curve (SDC and stabilometric diffusion analysis (SDA. Significant increases were found for global variables in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions (COP sway area, COP total sway path, COP mean velocity, COP root mean square value and COP range. In the spectral analysis, only the 80% power frequency (F80 in the anterior-posterior direction showed a significant increase, reflecting the increase of the sway frequencies. The SDC revealed a significant increase in the mean distance between peaks (MD and a significant decrease in the mean peak amplitudes (MP, suggesting that a larger torque amplitude is required for stabilization and that the postural stability is reduced. The SDA revealed a decrease in the long-term slope (Hl and increases in the short-term (Ks and the long-term (Kl intercepts. We considered the likelihood that the presence of local and general fatigue, pain and related neuromuscular adaptations and somatosensory deficits may have contributed to these postural responses. Together, these results demonstrated that four days of hiking increased sway frequencies and deteriorated postural control in the standing

  4. Immediate effects of Pilates based therapeutic exercise on postural control of young individuals with non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Susana; Correia, Christophe; Félix, Gonçalo; Lopes, Mário; Cruz, Ana; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    Low back pain affects the person's ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of Pilates exercises on postural sway and dynamic balance of young individuals with non-specific low back pain. Controlled laboratory design. Forty-six participants with non-specific low back pain were randomized to a Pilates (n=23, 10 males; age: 21.8±3.2years) and a control group (n=23, 9 males; age: 22.8±3.6years). Postural sway was assessed with a force platform and dynamic balance with the Star Excursion Balance Test, before and after the intervention or rest period. To assess postural sway, participants stood still on an unstable surface set on the force plate for 90s, with eyes closed. The intervention lasted 20min and consisted on four Pilates exercises: single leg stretch (level 1), pelvic press (level 1), swimming (level 1) and kneeling opposite arm and leg reach. At baseline, no differences were found between groups. The Pilates group improved in all the postural sway values (area of CoP: 11.5±3.4 to 9.7±2.7cm 2 , p=0.002 and CoP velocity: 2.8±0.6 to 2.3±0.5cm/s, pPilates group. Pilates exercises immediately improved postural sway and dynamic balance in young adults with non-specific low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Entropy generation minimization for the sloshing phenomenon in half-full elliptical storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghi, Hassan

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the entropy generation in the sloshing phenomenon was obtained in elliptical storage tanks and the optimum geometry of tank was suggested. To do this, a numerical model was developed to simulate the sloshing phenomenon by using coupled Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver and the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method. The RANS equations were discretized and solved using the staggered grid finite difference and SMAC methods, and the available data were used for the model validation. Some parameters consisting of maximum free surface displacement (MFSD), maximum horizontal force exerted on the tank perimeter (MHF), tank perimeter (TP), and total entropy generation (Sgen) were introduced as design criteria for elliptical storage tanks. The entropy generation distribution provides designers with useful information about the causes of the energy loss. In this step, horizontal periodic sway motions as X =amsin(ωt) were applied to elliptical storage tanks with different aspect ratios namely ratios of large diameter to small diameter of elliptical storage tank (AR). Then, the effect of am and ω was studied on the results. The results show that the relation between MFSD and MHF is almost linear relative to the sway motion amplitude. Moreover, the results show that an increase in the AR causes a decrease in the MFSD and MHF. The results, also, show that the relation between MFSD and MHF is nonlinear relative to the sway motion angular frequency. Furthermore, the results show that an increase in the AR causes that the relation between MFSD and MHF becomes linear relative to the sway motion angular frequency. In addition, MFSD and MHF were minimized in a sway motion with a 7 rad/s angular frequency. Finally, the results show that the elliptical storage tank with AR =1.2-1.4 is the optimum section.

  6. Quality of standing balance in community-dwelling elderly: Age-related differences in single and dual task conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Tiago; Fernandes, Ângela; Santos, Rubim; Paúl, Constança; Fernandes, Lia

    2016-01-01

    To examine the relationship between age and quality of standing balance in single and dual task conditions. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a sample of 243 community-dwellers aged ≥65 years. Quality of standing balance was assessed by measuring the center of pressure (COP) sway with a pressure platform. Measurements were performed under single task (orthostatic position) and dual task (orthostatic position while performing a verbal fluency task) conditions. The mean age of the participants was 79.1(±7.3)years and 76.1% were women. Older age was associated with an increased COP sway, mainly in the medial/lateral (ML) direction. Most COP sway parameters were higher under dual task conditions than under single task. After controlling for the effect of the number of words enunciated in dual task conditions, only the differences in COP sway parameters in the ML direction remained significant. There was no significant interaction between age group (65-79; ≥80 years) and condition, which indicates that differences in COP sway caused by performing a secondary task were similar for younger and for older participants. Age did not seem to influence significantly the decline in the quality of standing balance triggered by performing a concurrent cognitive task. However, older age was consistently associated with poorer standing balance, both in single and in dual task conditions. Therefore, performing a secondary task may lead older individuals to reach their postural stability limits and, consequently, to fall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The acute effects of hip abductors fatigue on postural balance

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    Nejc Sarabon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral hip abductor fatigue on body sway in ipsilateral and contralateral single legged stance. Acute effects repeated measurements design. Thirteen recreationally active middle aged subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed two 30s repetitions of unilateral stance on each leg. The first measurement was obtained at baseline, the second followed a control protocol of active hip abduction in supine position without additional resistance and the third measurement was conducted as aforementioned second protocol, only against elastic resistance. The center of pressure (CoP movement characteristics during single-leg quiet stance (i.e. body sway were analyzed by calculating the average velocity of the CoP movement and direction specific (medial-lateral and anterior-posterior average velocity, amplitude and frequency of the CoP mo¬ve¬ment. The results of this study indicate that fatigue significantly affected body sway in both single leg stances (p < 0.05 and in both medial-lateral and anterior-posterior direction. However, medial-lateral body sway tended to be increased more than in anterior-posterior direction. A significant crossover effect of increased body sway on the opposing limb suggests that in addition to local muscle fatigue, changes in central nervous system might have taken place. The above findings are of greater importance as they allow a more thorough insight into the mechanisms responsible for controlling balance that could have an important implication on designing training programs.

  8. Novel use of the Wii Balance Board to prospectively predict falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Boon-Chong; Clark, Ross A; Pua, Yong-Hao

    2015-06-01

    The Wii Balance Board has received increasing attention as a balance measurement tool; however its ability to prospectively predict falls is unknown. This exploratory study investigated the use of the Wii Balance Board and other clinical-based measures for prospectively predicting falls among community-dwelling older adults. Seventy-three community-dwelling men and women, aged 60-85years were followed-up over a year for falls. Standing balance was indexed by sway velocities measured using the Wii Balance Board interfaced with a laptop. Clinical-based measures included Short Physical Performance Battery, gait speed and Timed-Up-and-Go test. Multivariable regression analyses were used to assess the ability of the Wii Balance Board measure to complement the TUG test in fall screening. Individually, the study found Wii Balance Board anteroposterior (odds ratio 1.98, 95% CI 1.16 to 3.40, P=0.01) and mediolateral (odds ratio 2.80, 95% CI 1.10 to 7.13, p=0.03) sway velocity measures predictive of prospective falls. However, when each velocity measure was adjusted with body mass index and Timed-Up-and-Go, only anteroposterior sway velocity was predictive of prospective falls (odds ratio 2.21, 95% CI 1.18 to 4.14). A faster anteroposterior velocity was associated with increased odds of falling. Area-under-the-curves for Wii Balance Board sway velocities were 0.67 and 0.71 for anteroposterior and mediolateral respectively. The Wii Balance Board-derived anteroposterior sway velocity measure could complement existing clinical-based measures in predicting future falls among community-dwelling older adults. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number: ACTRN12610001099011. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Shows Minimal, Measure-Specific Effects on Dynamic Postural Control in Young and Older Adults: A Double Blind, Sham-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Chesney E; Doumas, Michail

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether stimulating the cerebellum and primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could affect postural control in young and older adults. tDCS was employed using a double-blind, sham-controlled design, in which young (aged 18-35) and older adults (aged 65+) were assessed over three sessions, one for each stimulatory condition-M1, cerebellar and sham. The effect of tDCS on postural control was assessed using a sway-referencing paradigm, which induced platform rotations in proportion to the participant's body sway, thus assessing sensory reweighting processes. Task difficulty was manipulated so that young adults experienced a support surface that was twice as compliant as that of older adults, in order to minimise baseline age differences in postural sway. Effects of tDCS on postural control were assessed during, immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Additionally, the effect of tDCS on corticospinal excitability was measured by evaluating motor evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Minimal effects of tDCS on postural control were found in the eyes open condition only, and this was dependent on the measure assessed and age group. For young adults, stimulation had only offline effects, as cerebellar stimulation showed higher mean power frequency (MPF) of sway 30 minutes after stimulation. For older adults, both stimulation conditions delayed the increase in sway amplitude witnessed between blocks one and two until stimulation was no longer active. In conclusion, despite tDCS' growing popularity, we would caution researchers to consider carefully the type of measures assessed and the groups targeted in tDCS studies of postural control.

  10. The Effects of Cervical Muscle Fatigue on Balance – A Study with Elite Amateur Rugby League Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Gosselin, Michael J. Fagan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neck muscle fatigue has been shown to alter an individual’s balance in a similar way to that reported in subjects suffering from neck pain or subjects that have suffered a neck injury. The main purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of neck fatigue on neck muscle electromyography (EMG activity, balance, perceived fatigue and perceived stability. Forty four elite amateur rugby league players resisted with their neck muscles approximately 35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC force for 15 minutes in eight different directions. Sway velocity and surface electromyography were measured. Questionnaires were used to record perceived effort and stability. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that after 15 minutes isometric contraction, significant changes were seen in sway velocity, perceived sway and EMG median frequency. There were no differences in perceived efforts. The changes in sway velocity and median frequency were more pronounced after extension and right and left posterior oblique contractions but there was no significant difference in sway velocity after contraction in the right lateral flexion, right anterior oblique and left anterior oblique direction of contraction. All the subjects showed oriented whole-body leaning in the plane of the contraction. The experiment produced significantly altered and perceived altered balance in this group of physically fit individuals. The results may contribute to our understanding of normal functional capacities of athletes and will provide a basis for further investigation in healthy non-athletes and participants that have suffered neck injuries. This may ultimately help develop accurate and valid rehabilitation outcome measures.

  11. Reliability of Single-Leg Balance and Landing Tests in Rugby Union; Prospect of Using Postural Control to Monitor Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan C. Troester, Jason G. Jasmin, Rob Duffield

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the inter-trial (within test and inter-test (between test reliability of single-leg balance and single-leg landing measures performed on a force plate in professional rugby union players using commercially available software (SpartaMARS, Menlo Park, USA. Twenty-four players undertook test – re-test measures on two occasions (7 days apart on the first training day of two respective pre-season weeks following 48h rest and similar weekly training loads. Two 20s single-leg balance trials were performed on a force plate with eyes closed. Three single-leg landing trials were performed by jumping off two feet and landing on one foot in the middle of a force plate 1m from the starting position. Single-leg balance results demonstrated acceptable inter-trial reliability (ICC = 0.60-0.81, CV = 11-13% for sway velocity, anterior-posterior sway velocity, and mediolateral sway velocity variables. Acceptable inter-test reliability (ICC = 0.61-0.89, CV = 7-13% was evident for all variables except mediolateral sway velocity on the dominant leg (ICC = 0.41, CV = 15%. Single-leg landing results only demonstrated acceptable inter-trial reliability for force based measures of relative peak landing force and impulse (ICC = 0.54-0.72, CV = 9-15%. Inter-test results indicate improved reliability through the averaging of three trials with force based measures again demonstrating acceptable reliability (ICC = 0.58-0.71, CV = 7-14%. Of the variables investigated here, total sway velocity and relative landing impulse are the most reliable measures of single-leg balance and landing performance, respectively. These measures should be considered for monitoring potential changes in postural control in professional rugby union.

  12. Relationship between peripheral nerve decompression and gain of pedal sensibility and balance in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducic, Ivica; Taylor, Nathan S; Dellon, A Lee

    2006-02-01

    This was an initial exploratory study to determine if decompression of the 4 medial ankle tunnels (neurolysis of the tibial, medial and lateral plantar, and calcaneal nerves) could lead to improved foot sensibility, increased proprioception and balance, and decreased falls in a population of patients with impaired lower extremity sensation. Fourteen patients with peripheral neuropathy were included in this study. Seventy-one percent of patients were females. Average age was 67 years. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively to assess their lower extremity sensibility, as well as their ability to stand still, maintaining their balance with their eyes open and then closed, which is defined as "sway." Lower extremity sensibility was measured with the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device (PSSD), which evaluates 1- and 2-point discrimination for the pulp of the big toe and medial heel. The MatScan Measurement System measured each patient's sway. Neuropathy was the result of diabetes in 72% of patients, a combination of diabetes and hypothyroidism in 7%, chemotherapy in 7%, and idiopathic in 14%. Eight patients underwent peripheral nerve decompression on 1 lower extremity, whereas 6 patients underwent bilateral lower extremity peripheral nerve decompression. Mean toe and heel sensibility improved 9% and 7%, respectively, in the unilateral group, whereas the bilateral group experienced an improvement in mean toe and heel sensibility of 42% (P = 0.02) and 32%, respectively. Preoperative and postoperative sway comparison in the unilateral group revealed a reduction in sway with eyes open and eyes closed by 5% and 31%, respectively. Comparison of preoperative and postoperative sway in the bilateral group showed a reduction with eyes open and eyes closed by 23% and 145% (P = 0.05), respectively. This initial study suggests that there may be benefit from bilateral lower extremity peripheral nerve decompression in helping improve pedal sensibility and balance

  13. Otolith and canal reflexes in human standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathers, Ian; Day, Brian L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2005-01-01

    We used galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to identify human balance reflexes of the semicircular canals and otolith organs. The experiment used a model of vestibular signals arising from GVS modulation of the net signal from vestibular afferents. With the head upright, the model predicts that the GVS-evoked canal signal indicates lateral head rotation while the otolith signal indicates lateral tilt or acceleration. Both signify body sway transverse to the head. With the head bent forward, the model predicts that the canal signal indicates body spin about a vertical axis but the otolith signal still signifies lateral body motion. Thus, we compared electromyograms (EMG) in the leg muscles and body sway evoked by GVS when subjects stood with the head upright or bent forward. With the head upright, GVS evoked a large sway in the direction of the anodal electrode. This response was abolished with the head bent forward leaving only small, oppositely directed, transient responses at the start and end of the stimulus. With the head upright, GVS evoked short-latency (60–70 ms), followed by medium-latency (120 ms) EMG responses, of opposite polarity. Bending the head forward abolished the medium-latency but preserved the short-latency response. This is compatible with GVS evoking separate otolithic and canal reflexes, indicating that balance is controlled by independent canal and otolith reflexes, probably through different pathways. We propose that the short-latency reflex and small transient sway are driven by the otolith organs and the medium-latency response and the large sway are driven by the semicircular canals. PMID:15618274

  14. Changes in balance and joint position sense during a 12-day high altitude trek: The British Services Dhaulagiri medical research expedition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Clarke

    Full Text Available Postural control and joint position sense are essential for safely undertaking leisure and professional activities, particularly at high altitude. We tested whether exposure to a 12-day trek with a gradual ascent to high altitude impairs postural control and joint position sense. This was a repeated measures observational study of 12 military service personnel (28±4 years. Postural control (sway velocity measured by a portable force platform during standing balance, a Sharpened Romberg Test and knee joint position sense were measured, in England (113m elevation and at 3 research camps (3619m, 4600m and 5140m on a 12-day high altitude trek in the Dhaulagiri region of Nepal. Pulse oximetry, and Lake Louise scores were also recorded on the morning and evening of each trek day. Data were compared between altitudes and relationships between pulse oximetry, Lake Louise score, and sway velocity were explored. Total sway velocity during standing balance with eyes open (p = 0.003, d = 1.9 and during Sharpened Romberg test with eyes open (p = 0.007, d = 1.6 was significantly greater at altitudes of 3619m and 5140m when compared with sea level. Anterior-posterior sway velocity during standing balance with eyes open was also significantly greater at altitudes of 3619m and 5140m when compared with sea level (p = 0.001, d = 1.9. Knee joint position sense was not altered at higher altitudes. There were no significant correlations between Lake Louise scores, pulse oximetry and postural sway. Despite a gradual ascent profile, exposure to 3619 m was associated with impairments in postural control without impairment in knee joint position sense. Importantly, these impairments did not worsen at higher altitudes of 4600 m or 5140 m. The present findings should be considered during future trekking expeditions when developing training strategies targeted to manage impairments in postural control that occur with increasing altitude.

  15. Visiting Richard Serra’s “Promenade” sculpture improves postural control and judgment of subjective visual vertical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoula, Zoï; Lang, Alexandre; Lê, Thanh-Thuan; Adenis, Marie-Sarah; Yang, Qing; Lipede, Gabi; Vernet, Marine

    2014-01-01

    Body sway while maintaining an upright quiet stance reflects an active process of balance based on the integration of visual, vestibular, somatosensory, and proprioceptive inputs. Richard Serra’s Promenade sculpture featured in the 2008 Monumenta exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, France is herein hypothesized to have stimulated the body’s vertical and longitudinal axes as it showcased five monumental rectangular solids pitched at a 1.69° angle. Using computerized dynamic posturography we measured the body sway of 23 visitors when fixating a cross, or when observing the artwork (fixating it or actively exploring it with eye movements) before and after walking around and alongside the sculpture (i.e., before and after a promenade). A first fixation at the sculpture increased medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power of body sway). Eye movement exploration in the depth of the sculpture increased antero-posterior stability [in terms of spectral power and canceling time (CT) of body sway] at the expense of medio-lateral stability (in terms of CT). Moreover, a medio-lateral instability associated with eye movement exploration before the promenade (in terms of body sway sensu stricto) was canceled after the promenade. Finally, the overall medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power) increased after the promenade. Fourteen additional visitors were asked to stand in a dark room and adjust a luminous line to what they considered to be the earth-vertical axis. The promenade executed within the sculpted environment afforded by Serra’s monumental statuary works resulted in significantly improved performances on the subjective visual vertical test. We attribute these effects to the sculpted environment provided by the exhibition which may have acted as a kind of physiologic “training ground” thereby improving the visitors’ overall sense of visual perspective, equilibrium, and gravity. PMID:25566107

  16. Visiting Richard Serra's "Promenade" sculpture improves postural control and judgment of subjective visual vertical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoula, Zoï; Lang, Alexandre; Lê, Thanh-Thuan; Adenis, Marie-Sarah; Yang, Qing; Lipede, Gabi; Vernet, Marine

    2014-01-01

    Body sway while maintaining an upright quiet stance reflects an active process of balance based on the integration of visual, vestibular, somatosensory, and proprioceptive inputs. Richard Serra's Promenade sculpture featured in the 2008 Monumenta exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, France is herein hypothesized to have stimulated the body's vertical and longitudinal axes as it showcased five monumental rectangular solids pitched at a 1.69(°) angle. Using computerized dynamic posturography we measured the body sway of 23 visitors when fixating a cross, or when observing the artwork (fixating it or actively exploring it with eye movements) before and after walking around and alongside the sculpture (i.e., before and after a promenade). A first fixation at the sculpture increased medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power of body sway). Eye movement exploration in the depth of the sculpture increased antero-posterior stability [in terms of spectral power and canceling time (CT) of body sway] at the expense of medio-lateral stability (in terms of CT). Moreover, a medio-lateral instability associated with eye movement exploration before the promenade (in terms of body sway sensu stricto) was canceled after the promenade. Finally, the overall medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power) increased after the promenade. Fourteen additional visitors were asked to stand in a dark room and adjust a luminous line to what they considered to be the earth-vertical axis. The promenade executed within the sculpted environment afforded by Serra's monumental statuary works resulted in significantly improved performances on the subjective visual vertical test. We attribute these effects to the sculpted environment provided by the exhibition which may have acted as a kind of physiologic "training ground" thereby improving the visitors' overall sense of visual perspective, equilibrium, and gravity.

  17. Visiting Richard Serra’s Promenade sculpture improves postural control and judgment of subjective visual vertical.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoï eKapoula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Body sway while maintaining an upright quiet stance reflects an active process of balance based on the integration of visual, vestibular, somatosensory and proprioceptive inputs. Richard Serra’s Promenade sculpture featured in the 2008 Monumenta exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, France is herein hypothesised to have stimulated the body’s vertical and longitudinal axes as it showcased 5 monumental rectangular solids pitched at a 1.69° angle.Using computerised dynamic posturography we measured the body sway of 23 visitors when fixating a cross, or when observing the artwork (fixating it or actively exploring it with eye movements before and after walking around and alongside the sculpture (i.e., before and after a promenade. A first fixation at the sculpture increased medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power of body sway. Eye movement exploration in the depth of the sculpture increased antero-posterior stability (in terms of spectral power and cancelling time of body sway at the expense of medio-lateral stability (in terms of cancelling time. Moreover, a medio-lateral instability associated with eye movement exploration before the promenade (in terms of body sway sensu stricto was cancelled after the promenade. Finally, the overall medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power increased after the promenade.Fourteen additional visitors were asked to sit in a dark room and adjust a luminous line to what they considered to be the earth-vertical axis. The promenade executed within the sculpted environment afforded by Serra’s monumental statuary works resulted in significantly improved performances on the subjective visual vertical test.We attribute these effects to the sculpted environment provided by the exhibition which may have acted as a kind of physiologic training ground thereby improving the visitors’ overall sense of visual perspective, equilibrium and gravity.

  18. Validating and Calibrating the Nintendo Wii Balance Board to Derive Reliable Center of Pressure Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Leach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nintendo Wii balance board (WBB has generated significant interest in its application as a postural control measurement device in both the clinical and (basic, clinical, and rehabilitation research domains. Although the WBB has been proposed as an alternative to the “gold standard” laboratory-grade force plate, additional research is necessary before the WBB can be considered a valid and reliable center of pressure (CoP measurement device. In this study, we used the WBB and a laboratory-grade AMTI force plate (AFP to simultaneously measure the CoP displacement of a controlled dynamic load, which has not been done before. A one-dimensional inverted pendulum was displaced at several different displacement angles and load heights to simulate a variety of postural sway amplitudes and frequencies (<1 Hz. Twelve WBBs were tested to address the issue of inter-device variability. There was a significant effect of sway amplitude, frequency, and direction on the WBB’s CoP measurement error, with an increase in error as both sway amplitude and frequency increased and a significantly greater error in the mediolateral (ML (compared to the anteroposterior (AP sway direction. There was no difference in error across the 12 WBB’s, supporting low inter-device variability. A linear calibration procedure was then implemented to correct the WBB’s CoP signals and reduce measurement error. There was a significant effect of calibration on the WBB’s CoP signal accuracy, with a significant reduction in CoP measurement error (quantified by root-mean-squared error from 2–6 mm (before calibration to 0.5–2 mm (after calibration. WBB-based CoP signal calibration also significantly reduced the percent error in derived (time-domain CoP sway measures, from −10.5% (before calibration to −0.05% (after calibration (percent errors averaged across all sway measures and in both sway directions. In this study, we characterized the WBB’s CoP measurement error

  19. Reliability of inertial sensors in the assessment of patients with vestibular disorders: a feasibility study

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    Sathish K. Sankarpandi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular disorders affect an individual’s stability, balance, and gait and predispose them to falls. Traditional laboratory-based semi-objective vestibular assessments are intrusive and cumbersome provide little information about their functional ability. Commercially available wearable inertial sensors allow us to make this real life assessments objective, with a detailed view of their functional abilities. Timed Up and Go (TUG and Postural Sway tests are commonly used tests for gait and balance assessments. Our aim was to assess the feasibility, test-retest reliability and ability to classify fall status in individuals with vestibular disorders using parameters derived from the commercially available wearable system (inertial sensors and the Mobility Lab Software, APDM, Inc.. Methods We recruited 27 individuals diagnosed either with unilateral or bilateral vestibular loss on vestibular function testing. Instrumented Timed Up and Go (iTUG and Postural Sway (iSway were administered three times during the first session and then repeated at a similar time the following week. To evaluate within and between sessions reliability of the parameters the Intra-Class Correlation coefficient (ICC was used. Subsequently, the ability of reliable parameters (ICC ≥ 0.8 to classify fallers from non-fallers was estimated. Results The iTUG test parameters showed good within and between sessions’ reliability with mean ICC (between-sessions values of 0.81 ± 0.17 and 0.69 ± 0.15, respectively. For the iSway test, the relative figures were; 0.76 ± 0.13 and 0.71 ± 0.14, respectively. A retrospective falls classification analysis with past 12 months falls history data yielded an accuracy of 66.70% with an area under the curve of 0.79. Mean Distance from centre of COP (mm of accelerometer’s trajectory (m/s2 from the iSway test was the only significant parameter to classify fallers from non-fallers. Conclusions Using

  20. Effects of comprehensive osteopathic manipulative treatment on balance in elderly patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; King, Hollis H; Knebl, Janice A; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Collins, Deraan; Patterson, Rita M

    2011-06-01

    Falls, many of which are caused by balance problems, are a leading cause of injuries in elderly persons. Few studies have investigated osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for patients with balance problems. To test whether an OMT protocol with an emphasis on cranial manipulation can improve vestibular balance control structures and postural stability in a healthy elderly population. A pilot prospective clinical trial. Research laboratories of the University of North Texas Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Worth. Forty healthy elderly patients aged 65 or older were enrolled and separated into an OMT group and a control group. Owing to the recruitment process and limited time for the study, the first 20 patients to enroll were in the OMT group, and the next 20 were in the control group. Patients were excluded if they had a condition that could impair balance. The OMT protocol comprised 7 OMT techniques applied weekly by the same osteopathic physician before balance tests. Patients in the control group received no treatment. Patients were asked to stand on a force plate and to perform 3 balance tests: (1) eyes open, (2) eyes closed, and (3) a modified Romberg test. The center of pressure between their feet was recorded for 30 seconds. The average center of pressure displacement for each test was used to determine anteroposterior (AP) sway and mediolateral (ML) sway. Balance tests were performed each week for 4 weeks. Tests were performed at the same time of day as the first test. Changes in AP sway values between visits 1 and 4 were as follows: eyes open, -0.72 and 0.75 mm for the control and OMT groups, respectively; eyes closed, -0.49 and 0.44 mm; and Romberg test, -0.17 and 0.52 mm. The changes in ML sway values between visits 1 and 4 were as follows: eyes open, -0.58 and 0.07 mm for the control and OMT groups, respectively; eyes closed, -0.21 and 0.03 mm; and Romberg test, -0.15 and 0.39 mm. The OMT group had significantly

  1. The effects of the menstrual cycle on the static balance in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Wan Hee

    2017-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the menstrual cycle on the static balance of healthy young women. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy young subjects (mean age 19.1 years; weight 57.5 kg; height 159.9 cm) participated in this study. The Good Balance system was used to measure the postural sway speed and velocity moment of subjects in the static standing posture. Subjects were measured for static balance between 1 and 3 days after menstruation and 13 days after menstruation. [Results] The velocity moment of postural sway was significantly higher at 13 days after menstruation. [Conclusion] Our results indicate that the menstrual cycle affects the static balance of healthy subjects. During the menstrual cycle, intensity for balance exercises in females should be carefully controlled for injury prevention.

  2. Computational Model and Numerical Simulation for Submerged Mooring Monitoring Platform’s Dynamical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Kongde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational model and numerical simulation for submerged mooring monitoring platform were formulated aimed at the dynamical response by the action of flow force, which based on Hopkinson impact load theory, taken into account the catenoid effect of mooring cable and revised the difference of tension and tangential direction action force by equivalent modulus of elasticity. Solved the equation by hydraulics theory and structural mechanics theory of oceaneering, studied the response of buoy on flow force. The validity of model were checked and the results were in good agreement; the result show the buoy will engender biggish heave and swaying displacement, but the swaying displacement got stable quickly and the heaven displacement cause vibration for the vortex-induced action by the flow.

  3. Fire-induced collapses of steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondera, Alexandru; Giuliani, Luisa

    Single-story steel buildings such as car parks and industrial halls are often characterised by stiff beams and flexible columns and may experience an outward (sway) collapse during a fire, endangering people and properties outside the building. It is therefore a current interest of the research...... to investigate the collapse behaviour of single-story steel frames and identify relevant structural characteristics that influence the collapse mode. In this paper, a parametric study on the collapse a steel beam-column assembly with beam hinged connection and fixed column support is carried out under...... the assumption of a protected column and a standard temperature-time curve on the beam. The study shows that sway collapse can be avoided by increasing either the restrain offered by the column or the load-to-resistance ratio of the beam. It seems possible to extend these results to multi-span frames...

  4. The impact of diabetes on mobility, balance, and recovery after repositioning maneuvers in individuals with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Whitney, Susan L; Santos, Marcio; Dai, Hongying; Kluding, Patricia M

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with type 2 diabetes (DM). The impact of DM on mobility, balance, and management of BPPV is unknown. This prospective study compared symptom severity, mobility and balance before and after the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM) in people with posterior canal BPPV canalithiasis, with and without DM. Fifty participants, BPPV (n=34) and BPPV+DM (n=16) were examined for symptom severity (dizziness handicap inventory, DHI), mobility (functional gait assessment, FGA), and postural sway (using an accelerometer in five conditions) before and after the CRM. The number of maneuvers required for symptom resolution was recorded. At baseline, no differences in DHI or FGA scores were seen between groups, however, people with BPPV+DM had higher sway velocity in the medio-lateral direction in tandem stance (pdiabetes, as well as the influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on functional performance are essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Noise-Enhanced Human Balance Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priplata, Attila; Niemi, James; Salen, Martin; Harry, Jason; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Collins, J. J.

    2002-11-01

    Noise can enhance the detection and transmission of weak signals in certain nonlinear systems, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. Here we show that input noise can be used to improve motor control in humans. Specifically, we show that the postural sway of both young and elderly individuals during quiet standing can be significantly reduced by applying subsensory mechanical noise to the feet. We further demonstrate with input noise a trend towards the reduction of postural sway in elderly subjects to the level of young subjects. These results suggest that noise-based devices, such as randomly vibrating shoe inserts, may enable people to overcome functional difficulties due to age-related sensory loss.

  7. The Effects of Hippotherapy on Elderly Persons’ Static Balance and Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Gil; Lee, Chae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of hippotherapy on elderly persons’ static balance and gait. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two elderly persons residing in the community were randomly divided into a hippotherapy group and a treadmill group and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Step lengths increased significantly, and step time and sway path lengths significantly decreased in both groups. A comparison of sway path lengths after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the hippotherapy group showed larger decreases than the treadmill group. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that hippotherapy may improve the static balance and gait of elderly persons residing in the community. PMID:24567669

  8. Effects of the anchor system on postural control in older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mauerberg de Castro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Falls are common during aging, and can have drastic consequences. Within this context, maintaining the ability to balance plays an essential role in enabling older adults to continue to perform their daily activities. Therefore, the use of interventional and treatment tools for development of balance becomes essential. The objective of this study was to analyze the anchor system as a potential tool for decreasing body sway in older and young adults. Older adults had more postural sway than their young counterparts. The absence of visual information led to larger instability in both groups. The anchor system improved postural stability of both groups. Thus, it may be a useful tool for posture stabilization in old and young adults.

  9. The effects of trunk stability exercise and a combined exercise program on pain, flexibility, and static balance in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwangbo, Gak; Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong-Gil; Kim, Hyeon-Su

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of trunk stability exercise and combined exercise program on pain, flexibility, and static balance in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty persons diagnosed with chronic low back pain were divided into a trunk stability exercise group and a combined exercise group and then conducted exercise for six weeks. [Results] VAS and sway lengths decreased significantly in both groups. A comparison of sway lengths after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the trunk stability exercise group had a bigger decrease than the combined exercise group. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that trunk stability exercise would have bigger effect than combined exercise on the daily activities of chronic low back pain patients as it strengthens deep abdominal muscles and improves flexibility and balancing ability.

  10. Impact of musculoskeletal pain on balance and concerns of falling in mobility-limited, community-dwelling Danes over 75 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendall, Julie C; Hvid, Lars G; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2018-01-01

    on questionnaires. Sway range, velocity and area were recorded on a force plate in a comfortable standing stance. Pain intensity was rated on an 11 point numerical rating scale (0-10). Participants were sub-grouped into mild (0-4) and intense (> 5) neck pain or low back pain. RESULTS: Intense neck pain...... as measured by centre of pressure (COP) changes and concerns of falling compared to those without pain. METHODS: 48 older adults with a gait speed of from Odense, Denmark were recruited through the public health service. Self-reported neck pain, low back pain, and concerns of falling were recorded...... balance and concerns of falling in mobility-limited older adults, and if so, whether this is associated with different intensities of pain. OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether mobility-limited older adults with mild or intense neck pain and/or low back pain have significantly increased postural sway...

  11. The effects of virtual reality game exercise on balance and gait of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Cho; Kim, Seong-Gil; Lee, Chae-Woo

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ball exercise as a general exercise on the balance abilities of elderly individuals by comparing ball exercise with virtual reality exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty elderly individuals residing in communities were randomly divided into a virtual reality game group and a ball exercise group and conducted exercise for 30 min 3 times a week for 8 weeks. [Results] Step length increased significantly, and the average sway speed and Timed Up and Go time significantly decreased in both groups. A comparison of sway length after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the virtual reality game exercise resulted in a reduction than the ball exercise. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that the virtual reality game exercise may improve balance and gait of elderly individuals in communities.

  12. Hypermobility in Adolescent Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Heidi; Pedersen, Trine Lykke; Junge, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional. Background Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) may increase pain and likelihood of injuries and also decrease function and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in elite-level adolescent athletes. Objective To assess the prevalence of GJH in elite-level adolescent...... athletes, and to study the association of GJH with pain, function, HRQoL, and musculoskeletal injuries. Methods A total of 132 elite-level adolescent athletes (36 adolescent boys, 96 adolescent girls; mean ± SD age, 14.0 ± 0.9 years), including ballet dancers (n = 22), TeamGym gymnasts (n = 57), and team...... adolescent population. The GJH group demonstrated larger sway in the balance tests, which, in the current cross-sectional study, did not have an association with injuries or HRQoL. However, the risk of having (ankle) injuries due to larger sway for the GJH group must be studied in future longitudinal studies...

  13. Proprioceptive changes impair balance control in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Janssens

    Full Text Available Balance deficits are identified as important risk factors for falling in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the specific use of proprioception, which is of primary importance during balance control, has not been studied in individuals with COPD. The objective was to determine the specific proprioceptive control strategy during postural balance in individuals with COPD and healthy controls, and to assess whether this was related to inspiratory muscle weakness.Center of pressure displacement was determined in 20 individuals with COPD and 20 age/gender-matched controls during upright stance on an unstable support surface without vision. Ankle and back muscle vibration were applied to evaluate the relative contribution of different proprioceptive signals used in postural control.Individuals with COPD showed an increased anterior-posterior body sway during upright stance (p = 0.037. Compared to controls, individuals with COPD showed an increased posterior body sway during ankle muscle vibration (p = 0.047, decreased anterior body sway during back muscle vibration (p = 0.025, and increased posterior body sway during simultaneous ankle-muscle vibration (p = 0.002. Individuals with COPD with the weakest inspiratory muscles showed the greatest reliance on ankle muscle input when compared to the stronger individuals with COPD (p = 0.037.Individuals with COPD, especially those with inspiratory muscle weakness, increased their reliance on ankle muscle proprioceptive signals and decreased their reliance on back muscle proprioceptive signals during balance control, resulting in a decreased postural stability compared to healthy controls. These proprioceptive changes may be due to an impaired postural contribution of the inspiratory muscles to trunk stability. Further research is required to determine whether interventions such as proprioceptive training and inspiratory muscle training improve postural balance and reduce the

  14. Increased prevalence of fall risk factors in older people following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrington, C; Lord, S R

    1998-01-01

    Many people who suffer a hip fracture do not achieve full functional recovery. Simple tests of physical function such as quadriceps strength and postural sway may provide insight into why this population is at increased risk of experiencing further falls and fractures and assist in developing rehabilitation strategies for preventing falls. To determine whether impairments in a range of physiological measures and specific medical conditions are more prevalent in people who have suffered a fall-related hip fracture than in a matched sample of community-dwelling people without a history of falls. This case-control study involved 88 older people. The hip fracture group comprised 44 persons aged 64-94 years, assessed on average 7 months following a fall-related hip fracture. An age- and sex-matched control group (older persons who had not fallen in a 12-month period before recruitment) was drawn randomly from community samples. Compared with the control group, the hip fracture group had markedly reduced quadriceps strength and increased body sway when tested on firm and compliant (foam rubber) surfaces. Patients in the hip fracture group also had higher prevalence rates of poor vision, arthritis and stroke, were taking more medications, were less physically active and perceived themselves to be at greater risk of falling than the control group. No significant differences were apparent for cardiovascular conditions, subjective health status and psychoactive medication use between the groups. Multivariate analyses identified quadriceps strength and body sway on the compliant surface as the most important variables for distinguishing between the hip fracture and no hip fracture groups. These two variables correctly classified 92% of the cases, with equal sensitivity and specificity. The findings identify an increased prevalence of certain physical fall risk factors among older persons who have suffered a hip fracture. Decreased quadriceps strength and increased postural

  15. Body balance at static posturography in vestibular migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Leslie Palma; Silva, Adriana Marques da; Cusin, Flávia Salvaterra; Cesaroni, Suelen; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2017-12-27

    Migraine is one of the most frequent and incapacitating headaches, with a high degree of impairment in quality of life. Its association with vestibular symptoms is common, including imbalance and postural instability. To evaluate the body balance of patients with vestibular migraine through a static posturography test. An experimental group of 31 patients with a medical diagnosis of vestibular migraine in the intercritical period of the disease, and a control group of 31 healthy individuals, matched for age and gender, were submitted to the eight sensory conditions of the Tetrax Interactive Balance System. The parameters analyzed were: stability index, which measures the amount of sway, global stability and ability to compensate postural modifications; weight distribution index, which compares deviations in weight distribution; synchronization index, which measures the symmetry in the weight distribution; postural sway frequency, which indicates the frequency range with more sway; and fall risk index, which expresses the probability of falls. The stability index was higher in the experimental group in all eight sensory conditions, with a significant difference between the groups in six of them. The weight distribution index was higher in the experimental group in all conditions, with a significant difference in three of them. The number of cases with preferential sway in F2-F4 was significantly higher in the experimental group in three conditions, and in F5-F6 in two, while the fall risk was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Patients with vestibular migraine showed compromised body balance at the static posturography test. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimal transmitter power of an intersatellite optical communication system with reciprocal Pareto fading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian

    2010-02-10

    This paper shows that optical signal transmission over intersatellite links with swaying transmitters can be described as an equivalent fading model. In this model, the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio is stochastic and follows the reciprocal Pareto distribution. With this model, we show that the transmitter power can be minimized, subject to a specified outage probability, by appropriately adjusting some system parameters, such as the transmitter gain.

  17. Postural stability does not differ among female sports with high risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Nelson; Porter, Larissa D; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Shane V

    2014-12-01

    Dancers have a lower incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared to athletes in sports that involve cutting and landing motions. Balance can impact ACL injury risk and is related to neuromuscular control during movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether balance differences exist among female dancers and female soccer and basketball athletes. Fifty-eight female dancers, soccer, and basketball athletes (16.5 ± 1.6 yrs, 1.6 ± 0.2 m, 60.2 ± 14.1 kg) completed the Stability Evaluation Test (SET) on the NeuroCom VSR Sport (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR) to measure sway velocity. Video records of the SET test were used for Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) test scoring. A oneway ANCOVA compared composite sway velocity and BESS scores among sports. There was no statistically significant difference for sway velocity or BESS among sports (sway velocity soccer 2.3 ± 0.4, dance 2.2 ± 0.4, and basketball 2.4 ± 0.4; BESS soccer 13.6 ± 5.0, dance 11.9 ± 5.5, and basketball 14.9 ± 5.1, p>0.05). Balance was similar among athletes participating in different sports (dance, basketball, and soccer). Quasi-static balance may not play a significant role in neuromuscular control during movement and not be a significant risk factor to explain the disparity in ACL injury incidence among sports. Future research should examine the effects of dynamic balance and limb asymmetries among sports to elucidate on the existing differences on ACL injury incidence rates.

  18. Opinion dynamics aware marketing strategies in duopolies

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, Vineeth; Morarescu, Irinel-Constantin; Lasaulce, Samson; Martin, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    International audience; We analyze the competition between two firms when each firm's market share depends on the average opinion of the consumer population about their respective products. All the consumers interact with each other through a social network and these interactions result in a certain dynamics of their opinion. Each firm attempts to sway the public opinion to its own side by spending money on advertising or other marketing tools (like discounts) on specific consumers. We propos...

  19. Historical and Architectural Documentation of the Interurban Trolley Bridge at Three Mile Creek, Fort Riley, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    looked down idly from the Gothic windows of their varnished vehicle. And then it was gone, leaving behind only a dust cloud and a gently swaying...Riley for a modern 500 kilowatt motor generator to increase power.42 By 1917, the Manhattan City & Interurban Railway passenger levels had increased...begun in 1893 by Joseph and Philip Block. The initial steel works was greatly expanded in 1902 by the construction of a modern new steel mill in East

  20. Pharmaceutical patent bargains: the Brazilian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Salama, Bruno Meyerhof; Benoliel, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In the backdrop of the strict patent regime flatly adopted by the World Trade Organization (WTO) for all countries, a few countries constantly challenge this system through aggressive patent bargains. Within the pharmaceutical sector, noticeably, some countries now threaten to issue or otherwise actually issue compulsory licenses that may sway large pharmaceutical companies into selling drugs with large discounts or into granting voluntary licenses domestically. That is conspicuously the nego...

  1. Relative efficacy of various strategies for visual feedback in standing balance activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael W; Crowell, Charles R; Striegel, Aaron D; Villano, Michael; Schmiedeler, James P

    2013-09-01

    Seventy-nine young, healthy adults were led through static balance and weight-shifting activities in order to study the effects of visual feedback on balance. Based on their performance, the relative effects of various feedback properties were analyzed: (1) arrangement [direct center of pressure (CoP) vs. lateral weight distribution feedback], (2) numbers (presence vs. absence of numeric feedback), and (3) dimensionality (1D vs. 2D CoP information). In the static balance activity, subjects were instructed to maintain equal weight across both feet; in the dynamic weight-shifting activity, subjects were instructed to shift their weight to each displayed target location. For static balance, lateral symmetry and sway were measured by classical parameters using CoP, center of gravity (CoG), and the difference between the two (CoP-CoG). Weight-shifting balance performance was measured using the time required to shift between target CoP positions. Results indicated that feedback arrangement had a significant effect on static sway and dynamic weight shifting, with direct CoP feedback resulting in better balance performance than lateral weight distribution. Also, numbers had a significant effect on static sway, reducing lateral sway compared to feedback without numbers. Finally, 2D CoP feedback resulted in faster performance than 1D CoP feedback in dynamic weight shifting. These results show that altering different properties of visual feedback can have significant effects on resulting balance performance; therefore, proper selection of visual feedback strategy needs to take these effects into consideration.

  2. Fatigue-induced balance impairment in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Massimiliano; Ibba, Gianfranco; Attene, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Although balance is generally recognized to be an important feature in ensuring good performance in soccer, its link with functional performance remains mostly unexplored, especially in young athletes. To investigate changes in balance induced by fatigue for unipedal and bipedal static stances in young soccer players. Crossover study. Biomechanics laboratory and outdoor soccer field. Twenty-one male soccer players (age = 14.5 ± 0.2 years, height = 164.5 ± 5.6 cm, mass = 56.8 ± 6.8 kg). Static balance was assessed with postural-sway analysis in unipedal and bipedal upright stance before and after a fatigue protocol consisting of a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test (2 × 15-m shuttle sprint interspersed with 20 seconds of passive recovery, repeated 6 times). On the basis of the center-of-pressure (COP) time series acquired during the experimental tests, we measured sway area, COP path length, and COP maximum displacement and velocity in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. Fatigue increased all sway values in bipedal stance and all values except COP velocity in the mediolateral direction in unipedal stance. Fatigue index (calculated on the basis of RSA performance) was positively correlated with fatigue/rest sway ratio for COP path length and COP velocity in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions for nondominant single-legged stance. Fatigued players exhibited reduced performance of the postural-control system. Participants with better performance in the RSA test appeared less affected by balance impairment, especially in single-legged stance.

  3. The effects of plantar perception training on balance and falls efficacy of the elderly with a history of falls: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of plantar perception training using a hardness discrimination task on balance and falls efficacy of the elderly who have experienced a fall. Sixty-two elderly persons 65 years of age or older were randomly allocated to the experimental group (n = 31) or the control group (n = 31). The experimental group performed a hardness discrimination task using five different levels of hardness of sponge mats, while the control group performed the same task except that they were not asked to discriminate hardness levels of sponge mats. All subjects performed 10 sessions for two weeks. Outcome measures were conducted using center of pressure (CoP) sway in the standing position, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and falls efficacy scale (FES) to measure balance and falls efficacy. There were no significant differences in general characteristics between both groups (p > .05). After 10 sessions, plantar perception was significantly improved in the experimental group (F = 101.18, p CoP sway with eye closed and TUG test were significantly different (p CoP sway with eye closed, -208.32 ± 74.89; TUG test, -1.91 ± 0.72) and the control group (CoP sway with eye closed, -14.55 ± 35.44; TUG test, -1.31 ± 0.75). These results showed that plantar perception training might be beneficial to improve falls efficacy as well as balance of the elderly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Postural Control in Bilateral Vestibular Failure: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive, Vestibular, and Cognitive Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Sprenger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF suffer from postural and gait unsteadiness with an increased risk of falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of otolith, semicircular canal (SSC, visual, proprioceptive, and cognitive influences on the postural stability of BVF patients. Center-of-pressure displacements were recorded by posturography under six conditions: target visibility; tonic head positions in the pitch plane; horizontal head shaking; sensory deprivation; dual task; and tandem stance. Between-group analysis revealed larger postural sway in BVF patients on eye closure; but with the eyes open, BVF did not differ from healthy controls (HCs. Head tilts and horizontal head shaking increased sway but did not differ between groups. In the dual task condition, BVF patients maintained posture indistinguishable from controls. On foam and tandem stance, postural sway was larger in BVF, even with the eyes open. The best predictor for the severity of bilateral vestibulopathy was standing on foam with eyes closed. Postural control of our BVF was indistinguishable from HCs once visual and proprioceptive feedback is provided. This distinguishes them from patients with vestibulo-cerebellar disorders or functional dizziness. It confirms previous reports and explains that postural unsteadiness of BVF patients can be missed easily if not examined by conditions of visual and/or proprioceptive deprivation. In fact, the best predictor for vestibular hypofunction (VOR gain was examining patients standing on foam with the eyes closed. Postural sway in that condition increased with the severity of vestibular impairment but not with disease duration. In the absence of visual control, impaired otolith input destabilizes BVF with head retroflexion. Stimulating deficient SSC does not distinguish patients from controls possibly reflecting a shift of intersensory weighing toward proprioceptive-guided postural control. Accordingly

  5. Reliability of the Wii Balance Board in kayak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vando, Stefano; Laffaye, Guillaume; Masala, Daniele; Falese, Lavinia; Padulo, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    the seat of the kayaker represent the principal contact point to express mechanical Energy. therefore we investigated the reliability of the Wii Balance Board measures in the kayak vs. on the ground. Bland-Altman test showed a low systematic bias on the ground (2.85%) and in kayak (-2.13%) respectively; while 0.996 for Intra-class correlation coefficient. the Wii Balance Board is useful to assess postural sway in kayak.

  6. Standing balance post total knee arthroplasty: sensitivity to change analysis from four to twelve weeks in 466 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R A; Seah, F J-T; Chong, H-C; Poon, C L-L; Tan, J W-M; Mentiplay, B F; Pua, Y-H

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about how static standing balance changes post total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The primary aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity to change and redundancy of center of pressure (COP) variables post-TKA. The secondary aim was to compare the sensitivity of these measures to standard clinical assessments of one repetition maximum knee extension strength and fast pace gait speed. 466 participants performed instrumented double-limb standing balance tests with eyes open at 4 and 12 weeks post-TKA. Measures of COP standard deviation, amplitude, root mean square (RMS), path length, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and signal frequency content for the medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were examined. Significant decreases in total path length, ML variables related to sway velocity and AP signal complexity and frequency were observed. Inter-session Cohen's d effect size (ES) revealed the strongest effect was for high velocity ML path length, with a 12% decrease in this rapid sway. This variable, along with AP mean instantaneous frequency and AP DFA, were the only ones significantly different with effect sizes >0.20 and non-redundant (Spearman's rho <0.75). The ES of COP-derived variables (maximum = 0.45) were lower than gait speed (1.40) and knee extensor strength (1.54). Increased high velocity ML sway is present at four compared to 12 weeks post-TKA. This augmented rapid sway may provide increased challenges to the postural control system at a time coinciding with reduced strength levels, which could have implications for physical function during activities of daily living. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Rapid processing of haptic cues for postural control in blind subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieppati, Marco; Schmid, Monica; Sozzi, Stefania

    2014-07-01

    Vision and touch rapidly lead to postural stabilization in sighted subjects. Is touch-induced stabilization more rapid in blind than in sighted subjects, owing to cross-modal reorganization of function in the blind? We estimated the time-period elapsing from onset of availability of haptic support to onset of lateral stabilization in a group of early- and late-onset blinds. Eleven blind (age 39.4 years±11.7SD) and eleven sighted subjects (age 30.0 years±10.0SD), standing eyes closed with feet in tandem position, touched a pad with their index finger and withdrew the finger from the pad in sequence. EMG of postural muscles and displacement of centre of foot pressure were recorded. The task was repeated fifty times, to allow statistical evaluation of the latency of EMG and sway changes following the haptic shift. Steady-state sway (with or without contact with pad, no haptic shift) did not differ between blind and sighted. On adding the haptic stimulus, EMG and sway diminished in both groups, but at an earlier latency (by about 0.5 s) in the blinds (p blinds. When the haptic stimulus was withdrawn, both groups increased EMG and sway at equally short delays. Blinds are rapid in implementing adaptive postural modifications when granted an external haptic reference. Fast processing of the stabilizing haptic spatial-orientation cues may be favoured by cortical plasticity in blinds. These findings add new information to the field of sensory-guided dynamic control of equilibrium in man. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of static and dynamic balance in healthy elderly practitioners of Tai Chi Chuan versus ballroom dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Miguel Antônio; Alonso, Angélica Castilho; Andrusaitis, Felix Ricardo; Rodrigues, Thuam Silva; Speciali, Danielli Souza; Greve, Júlia Maria D Andréa; Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether Tai Chi Chuan or ballroom dancing promotes better performance with respect to postural balance, gait, and postural transfer among elderly people. We evaluated 76 elderly individuals who were divided into two groups: the Tai Chi Chuan Group and the Dance Group. The subjects were tested using the NeuroCom Balance Master¯ force platform system with the following protocols: static balance tests (the Modified Clinical Tests of Sensory Interaction on Balance and Unilateral Stance) and dynamic balance tests (the Walk Across Test and Sit-to-stand Transfer Test). In the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented a lower sway velocity on a firm surface with open and closed eyes, as well as on a foam surface with closed eyes. In the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Unilateral Stance, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented a lower sway velocity with open eyes, whereas the Dance Group presented a lower sway velocity with closed eyes. In the Walk Across Test, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented faster walking speeds than those of the Dance Group. In the Sit-to-stand Transfer Test, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented shorter transfer times from the sitting to the standing position, with less sway in the final standing position. The elderly individuals who practiced Tai Chi Chuan had better bilateral balance with eyes open on both types of surfaces compared with the Dance Group. The Dance Group had better unilateral postural balance with eyes closed. The Tai Chi Chuan Group had faster walking speeds, shorter transfer times, and better postural balance in the final standing position during the Sit-to-stand Test.

  9. Alcohol-Induced Impairment of Balance is Antagonized by Energy Drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Fillmore, Mark T; Stamates, Amy L; Maloney, Sarah F

    2018-01-01

    The acute administration of alcohol reliably impairs balance and motor coordination. While it is common for consumers to ingest alcohol with other stimulant drugs (e.g., caffeine, nicotine), little is known whether prototypical alcohol-induced balance impairments are altered by stimulant drugs. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the coadministration of a high-caffeine energy drink with alcohol can antagonize expected alcohol-induced increases in body sway. Sixteen social drinkers (of equal gender) participated in 4 separate double-blind dose administration sessions that involved consumption of alcohol and energy drinks, alone and in combination. Following dose administration, participants completed automated assessments of balance stability (both eyes open and eyes closed) measured using the Biosway Portable Balance System. Participants completed several subjective measures including self-reported ratings of sedation, stimulation, fatigue, and impairment. Blood pressure and pulse rate were recorded repeatedly. The acute administration of alcohol increased body sway, and the coadministration of energy drinks antagonized this impairment. When participants closed their eyes, alcohol-induced body sway was similar whether or not energy drinks were ingested. While alcohol administration increased ratings of sedation and fatigue, energy drink administration increased ratings of stimulation and reduced ratings of fatigue. Modest increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure following energy drink administration were also observed. Visual assessment of balance impairment is frequently used to indicate that an individual has consumed too much alcohol (e.g., as part of police-standardized field sobriety testing or by a bartender assessing when someone should no longer be served more alcohol). The current findings suggest that energy drinks can antagonize alcohol-induced increases in body sway, indicating that future work is needed to determine whether this

  10. Plaadid / Mart Normet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normet, Mart, 1979-

    2006-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Quantic "One Off's Remixes And B Sides", Sway "This In My Demo", Placebo "Meds", Lordi "The Arockalypse", Peer Günt "Bad Boys Are Here", "This Is How We Lounge vol 2", Ne-Yo "In My Own Words", David Gilmour "On An Island", Cat Power "The Greatest", KT Tunstall "Eye To The Telescope", "Memories Of A Geisha", "Uues kuues", Skye "Mind How You Go", Amparanoia "La Vida Te Da"

  11. US Army Research Laboratory Power-Line UAV Modeling and Simulation (ARL-PLUMS Ver 2.x) Software Tool: User Manual and Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    fields due to changing line geometry (e.g., wire sag due to heating, swaying lines due to wind ) or currents that are changing over time. However, for...Electrostatics Joint Conference, Boston, MA, 2009. Bergen AR. Power systems analysis . Prentice Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1986, pp. 100–115...Environmental Protection Agency, March, 1978. Technical Note 78-1. MathWorks, 2014. MATLAB and simulink for technical computing. http://www.mathworks.com

  12. On the revolution of heavenly spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Copernicus, Nicolaus

    1995-01-01

    The Ptolemaic system of the universe, with the earth at the center, had held sway since antiquity as authoritative in philosophy, science, and church teaching. Following his observations of the heavenly bodies, Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) abandoned the geocentric system for a heliocentric model, with the sun at the center. His remarkable work, On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres, stands as one of the greatest intellectual revolutions of all time, and profoundly influenced, among others, Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton.

  13. Changes of postural control and muscle activation pattern in response to external perturbations after neck flexor fatigue in young subjects with and without chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Chien, Andy; Hsu, Wei-Li; Yen, Ling-Wei; Lin, Yang-Hua; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have identified sensorimotor disturbances and greater fatigability of neck muscles in patients with neck pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck pain and neck flexor fatigue on standing balance following postural perturbations. Twenty patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) (24.7±3.6 year-old) and 20 age-matched asymptomatic subjects (22.1±2.2 year-old) were recruited. Subjects stood barefoot on a force plate and experienced backward perturbations before and after neck flexor fatigue. Center of pressure, electromyography of cervical and lumbar muscles, and head/trunk accelerations were recorded. Two-way ANOVA (pain×fatigue) was used for statistical analysis. CNP group showed larger body sway during quiet standing but not during perturbed standing compared with asymptomatic adults. In both groups, neck flexor fatigue resulted in greater body sway during the quiet standing but smaller body sway during perturbed standing, increased neck muscle activations and decreased lumbar muscle activations, as well as increased time to maximal head acceleration. Disturbed balance control was observed in CNP patients during the quiet standing. However, a rigid strategy was used to minimize the postural sway and to protect the head against backward perturbations in both CNP and asymptomatic young adults after neck flexor fatigue. The results facilitate the understanding of how the subjects with chronic neck pain and with neck muscle fatigue deal with the challenging condition. Further studies are needed to verify if such phenomenon could be changed after the intervention of specific flexor muscle retraining and balance control exercises. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Planning of overhead contact lines and simulation of the pantograph running; Oberleitungsplanung und Simulation des Stromabnehmerlaufes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, Gerhard [ALPINE-ENERGIE Oesterreich GmbH, Linz (Austria); Hofbauer, Werner

    2009-07-01

    Using the software FLTG all planning steps for overhead contact lines can be carried out based on the parameters of the contact line type and the line data. Contact line supports and individual spans are presented graphically. The geometric interaction of pantograph and contact line can be simulated taking into account the pantograph type, its sway and the wind action. Thus, the suitability of a line for the interoperability of the transEuropean rail system can be demonstrated. (orig.)

  15. Plantar pressure and foot pain in the last trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag-Saygi, Evrim; Unlu-Ozkan, Feyza; Basgul, Alin

    2010-02-01

    Back and foot pain are common complaints during pregnancy. Progression of symptoms is seen especially in the third trimester as the center of gravity (COP) is altered due to weight gain. The aim of the study was to evaluate plantar pressure changes and postural balance differences of pregnant women. Thirty-five last trimester pregnant women with complaints of foot pain were included. The control group consisted of 35 non-pregnant women who were age and body mass index (BMI) matched volunteers. All selected cases were overweight. Foot pain in pregnancy was measured by Visual analogue scale (VAS). Percentages of pressure on forefoot and hindfoot were measured using static pedobarography and peak pressures at forefoot, midfoot and hindfoot were measured using dynamic pedobarography. As a measurement of balance, COP sway length and width were also analyzed. Compared to overweight individuals, pregnant patients had higher forefoot pressure on the right side with standing and walking. Also, significant increases in contact times under the forefoot and longer floor contact times were found. VAS scores were correlated with forefoot contact times during walking. Although the sway length from COP was higher than controls, no significant correlation was found in sway length and weight gain. These data suggest that forefoot pressures increase in the last trimester of pregnancy during standing and walking. There is prominent increased postural sway in anterior-posterior direction in this period. We believe that based on the observed pressure changes, foot pain in pregnancy due to changes in body mass and distribution may be relieved by exercise and shoewear modifications.

  16. Contribution of hip joint proprioception to static and dynamic balance in cerebral palsy: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L; Wingert, Jason R; Stanley, Christopher J; Curatalo, Lindsey

    2013-06-15

    Balance problems are common in cerebral palsy (CP) but etiology is often uncertain. The classic Romberg test compares ability to maintain standing with eyes open versus closed. Marked instability without vision is a positive test and generally indicates proprioceptive loss. From previous work showing diminished hip joint proprioception in CP, we hypothesized that static and dynamic balance without vision (positive Romberg) would be compromised in CP. Force plate sway and gait velocity data were collected using 3D motion capture on 52 participants, 19 with diplegic CP, 13 with hemiplegic CP, and 20 without disability. Center of mass (COM) and center or pressure (COP) velocity, excursion, and differences between COM and COP in AP and ML directions were computed from static standing trials with eyes open and closed. Mean gait velocity with and without dribble glasses was compared. Hip joint proprioception was quantified as the root mean square of magnitude of limb positioning errors during a hip rotation task with and without view of the limb. Mixed model repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed with condition as within-subject (EO, EC) and group as between-subject factors (hemiplegia, diplegia, controls). Sway characteristics and gait speed were correlated with proprioception values. Groups with CP had greater sway in standing with eyes open indicating that they had poorer balance than controls, with the deficit relatively greater in the ML compared to AP direction. Contrary to our hypothesis, the decrement with eyes closed did not differ from controls (negative Romberg); however, proprioception error was related to sway parameters particularly for the non-dominant leg. Gait speed was related to proprioception values such that those with worse proprioception tended to walk more slowly. Postural instability is present even in those with mild CP and is yet another manifestation of their motor control disorder, the specific etiology of which may vary

  17. An intergenerational approach in the promotion of balance and strength for fall prevention: a mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Granacher, Urs; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Gollhofer, Albert; Kressig, Reto W.; Zahner, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    The risk of sustaining a fall is particularly high in children and seniors. Deficits in postural control and muscle strength either due to maturation, secular declines or biologic aging are two important intrinsic risk factors for falls. During life span, performance in variables of static postural control follows a U-shaped curve with children and seniors showing larger postural sway than healthy adults. Measures of dynamic postural control (i.e. gait speed) as well as isometric (i.e. maxima...

  18. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa island (Zaporizhzhya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. О. Fedorchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  19. The declining significance of homohysteria for male students in three sixth forms in the south of England.

    OpenAIRE

    McCormack, M.

    2011-01-01

    English schools have traditionally been institutions with high levels of homophobia. This is attributed to the need that heterosexual boys have to maintain a heteromasculine identity. However, by drawing on 44 in-depth interviews and 12 months of participant observation across three sixth forms, I detail the ways in which homophobia holds little cultural sway with the heterosexual male students in these settings. Here, the majority of students intellectualise pro-gay attitudes, maintain frien...

  20. Mobile Gait Analysis System for Lower Limb Amputee High-Level Activity Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    extremity trauma resulting in a unilateral transtibial amputation and may have contralateral limb injuries to include peripheral nerve injury, volumetric... Rehab . Res. and Dev. 2005:42 (2), 175-182. 11. Quesada PM, Pitkin M, Colvin J. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Prototype Foot/Ankle Prosthesis. IEEE...Trans. on Rehab . Eng. 2000:8(1), 156-159. 12. Buckley JG, ODriscoll D, Bennett SJ. Postural Sway and Active Balance Performance in Highly Active

  1. Lowering the YE+1 end-cap for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    On 9 January 2007, the massive YE+1 end-cap was lowered into the CMS cavern. This is a very precise process as the crane must lower the end-cap through minimal clearance without tilt or sway. Once in the cavern, the end-cap is then positioned over the end of the barrel to detect particles produced in collisions that travel close to the axis of the beams.

  2. Use of Galvanic Vestibular Feedback for a Balance Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Peterka, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of vestibular afferents by a bilateral bipolar galvanic vestibular stimulus (GVS) evokes medial-lateral (ML) body sway. By applying a GVS feedback signal that is a function of measured ML head motion, the potential exists for GVS to restore a useful vestibular contribution to ML balance control in vestibular-deficient subjects who remain responsive to GVS. A key to developing an effective balance prosthesis using GVS is to determine the functional relationship between GVS and its i...

  3. Preliminary evaluation of prototype footwear and insoles to optimise balance and gait in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2017-09-11

    Footwear has the potential to influence balance in either a detrimental or beneficial manner, and is therefore an important consideration in relation to falls prevention. The objective of this study was to evaluate balance ability and gait patterns in older women while wearing prototype footwear and insoles designed to improve balance. Older women (n = 30) aged 65 - 83 years (mean 74.4, SD 5.6) performed a series of laboratory tests of balance ability (postural sway on a foam rubber mat, limits of stability and tandem walking, measured with the Neurocom® Balance Master) and gait patterns (walking speed, cadence, step length and step width at preferred speed, measured with the GAITRite® walkway) while wearing (i) flexible footwear (Dunlop Volley™), (ii) their own footwear, and (iii) prototype footwear and insoles designed to improve dynamic balance. Perceptions of the footwear were also documented using a structured questionnaire. There was no difference in postural sway, limits of stability or gait patterns between the footwear conditions. However, when performing the tandem walking test, there was a significant reduction in step width and end sway when wearing the prototype footwear compared to both the flexible footwear and participants' own footwear. Participants perceived their own footwear to be more attractive, comfortable, well-fitted and easier to put on and off compared to the prototype footwear. Despite this, most participants (n = 18, 60%) reported that they would consider wearing the prototype footwear to reduce their risk of falling. The prototype footwear and insoles used in this study improve balance when performing a tandem walk test, as evidenced by a narrower step width and decreased sway at completion of the task. However, further development of the design is required to make the footwear acceptable to older women from the perspective of aesthetics and comfort. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. ACTRN12617001128381 , 01

  4. Favorable effect of rehabilitation on balance in ankylosing spondylitis: a quasi-randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, Alessandra; Trainito, Sabina; Del Felice, Alessandra; Masiero, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Balance impairment is a frequent and undertreated manifestation in ankylosing spondylitis, leading to increased risk of falls and lower quality of life. Our aim was to assess supervised training and home-based rehabilitation efficacy on balance improvement in ankylosing spondylitis subjects on biologic agents. This was a single-blinded, quasi-randomized parallel study in a single outpatient Rehabilitation Clinic of a tertiary referral center. Subjects with ankylosing spondylitis on biologic agents were assigned either to supervised training and home-based rehabilitation program (rehabilitation group) plus educational-behavioral therapy, or to educational-behavioral therapy alone (educational groups). The same therapist provided therapy. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline (T0), end of treatment (T1) and at 7-month follow-up (T2). Rheumatologic outcomes were Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index. Balance parameters (anterior-posterior oscillation, latero-lateral oscillation, sway area, sway density and sway path) were evaluated by stabilometry in a condition of open and closed eyes. Forty-six subjects (36 M, 10 F) were enrolled. Demographic data and clinical status at baseline were comparable between the two groups (22 rehabilitation group, 20 educational group). Primary outcome was sway density that improved both at T1 (SDy: open eyes p = 0.003, closed eyes p = 0.004) and at T2 (SDx: open eyes p = 0.0015, closed eyes p = 0.032). A trend toward improvement in the rehabilitation group rather than in the educational group emerged for balance parameters, especially those measured with closed eyes (0.004 ankylosing spondylitis. Eyes-closed trials show a more marked trend toward improvement, and this may suggest a positive effect of rehabilitation on proprioception.

  5. Age-dependent Changes in Corticospinal Excitability in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Kozo, FUNASE; Human Motor Control Laboratory, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University

    2011-01-01

    Motor functions, such as controlling body sway during standing or regulating the speed of a tapping movement, naturally decline with aging. Due to the functional decline of the motor cortex, cerebrum, and basal ganglia brought about reductions in neurotransmitter release, motor control decreases with age. Although individuals' dependence on cognitive processes for motor control increases with age, their attention capacity and recognition resources decline. As a result, motor function declines...

  6. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Robin Orr; Ben Schram; Rodney Pope

    2018-01-01

    Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg) and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg) in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (...

  7. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Helmchen

    Full Text Available The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia.The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects.Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements and postural (postural sway speed parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM.Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg's ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg's ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients.Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia.

  8. Postural Stability of Patients with Schizophrenia during Challenging Sensory Conditions: Implication of Sensory Integration for Postural Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Teng

    Full Text Available Postural dysfunctions are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and affect their daily life and ability to work. In addition, sensory functions and sensory integration that are crucial for postural control are also compromised. This study intended to examine how patients with schizophrenia coordinate multiple sensory systems to maintain postural stability in dynamic sensory conditions. Twenty-nine patients with schizophrenia and 32 control subjects were recruited. Postural stability of the participants was examined in six sensory conditions of different level of congruency of multiple sensory information, which was based on combinations of correct, removed, or conflicting sensory inputs from visual, somatosensory, and vestibular systems. The excursion of the center of pressure was measured by posturography. Equilibrium scores were derived to indicate the range of anterior-posterior (AP postural sway, and sensory ratios were calculated to explore ability to use sensory information to maintain balance. The overall AP postural sway was significantly larger for patients with schizophrenia compared to the controls [patients (69.62±8.99; controls (76.53±7.47; t1,59 = -3.28, p<0.001]. The results of mixed-model ANOVAs showed a significant interaction between the group and sensory conditions [F5,295 = 5.55, p<0.001]. Further analysis indicated that AP postural sway was significantly larger for patients compared to the controls in conditions containing unreliable somatosensory information either with visual deprivation or with conflicting visual information. Sensory ratios were not significantly different between groups, although small and non-significant difference in inefficiency to utilize vestibular information was also noted. No significant correlations were found between postural stability and clinical characteristics. To sum up, patients with schizophrenia showed increased postural sway and a higher rate of falls during challenging sensory

  9. Knee-extension strength, postural control and function are related to fracture type and thigh edema in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Bandholm, Thomas; Bencke, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    fracture type and thigh edema in the fractured limb (% non-fractured) to physical performances of basic mobility, postural control (sway), and isometric knee-extension strength were examined. All measures, except those of basic mobility, were conducted at the time of discharge, 8.5 days post......-surgery. FINDINGS: Patients with intertrochanteric fractures had greater edema (111% non-fractured limb) compared with cervical fractures (104% non-fractured, Ppostural control (r=0.67, P=0...

  10. Analysis of static and dynamic balance in healthy elderly practitioners of Tai Chi Chuan versus ballroom dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Antônio Rahal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Tai Chi Chuan or ballroom dancing promotes better performance with respect to postural balance, gait, and postural transfer among elderly people. METHODS: We evaluated 76 elderly individuals who were divided into two groups: the Tai Chi Chuan Group and the Dance Group. The subjects were tested using the NeuroCom Balance Master¯ force platform system with the following protocols: static balance tests (the Modified Clinical Tests of Sensory Interaction on Balance and Unilateral Stance and dynamic balance tests (the Walk Across Test and Sit-to-stand Transfer Test. RESULTS: In the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented a lower sway velocity on a firm surface with open and closed eyes, as well as on a foam surface with closed eyes. In the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Unilateral Stance, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented a lower sway velocity with open eyes, whereas the Dance Group presented a lower sway velocity with closed eyes. In the Walk Across Test, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented faster walking speeds than those of the Dance Group. In the Sit-to-stand Transfer Test, the Tai Chi Chuan Group presented shorter transfer times from the sitting to the standing position, with less sway in the final standing position. CONCLUSION: The elderly individuals who practiced Tai Chi Chuan had better bilateral balance with eyes open on both types of surfaces compared with the Dance Group. The Dance Group had better unilateral postural balance with eyes closed. The Tai Chi Chuan Group had faster walking speeds, shorter transfer times, and better postural balance in the final standing position during the Sit-to-stand Test.

  11. A data analysis method for identifying deterministic components of stable and unstable time-delayed systems with colored noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patanarapeelert, K. [Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Frank, T.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, 48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: tdfrank@uni-muenster.de; Friedrich, R. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Beek, P.J. [Faculty of Human Movement Sciences and Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tang, I.M. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2006-12-18

    A method is proposed to identify deterministic components of stable and unstable time-delayed systems subjected to noise sources with finite correlation times (colored noise). Both neutral and retarded delay systems are considered. For vanishing correlation times it is shown how to determine their noise amplitudes by minimizing appropriately defined Kullback measures. The method is illustrated by applying it to simulated data from stochastic time-delayed systems representing delay-induced bifurcations, postural sway and ship rolling.

  12. Postural Control in Workplace Safety: Role of Occupational Footwear and Workload

    OpenAIRE

    Harish Chander; John C. Garner; Chip Wade; Adam C. Knight

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining postural stability is crucial, especially in hazardous occupational environments. The purpose of the study was to assess the role of three occupational footwear (low top shoe (LT); tactical work boot (TB) and steel-toed work boot (WB)) on postural stability when exposed to an occupational workload (4-h) involving standing/walking using the sensory organization test (SOT) equilibrium (EQ) scores and comparing current results with previously published postural sway variables from th...

  13. Causes of death among the Caesars (27 BC-AD 476) | Retief | Acta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Roman Empire was ruled by 77 emperors between 27 BC and AD 476 (503 years); 18 (23,4%) of them held sway during the Early Empire (27 BC–AD 193, 220 years), and 59 (76,6%) during the Late Empire (193-476, 283 years). On the average emperors in the Early Empire ruled for a longer period (12,7 years as ...

  14. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    The Miasma theory held sway from middle ages to l800.It proposed that .... melluxl for hEUld hygiene in mo~t situations du-e to tln: superior effie~>· ... lling non- contaminated ilems nod .surtilce~ ilnd bcfoJ<: attending to ;motJwr txtticnt. Hartd hygiene is. pcrtOmted lrnmcdiat~lyafter ren1ovaJ of glovts. '" 6. Gowns: Gowns nri.!

  15. Effects of multi-directional vibrotactile feedback on vestibular-deficient postural performance during continuous multi-directional support surface perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienko, K H; Balkwill, M D; Oddsson, L I E; Wall, C

    2008-01-01

    Single-axis vibrotactile feedback of trunk tilt provided in real-time has previously been shown to significantly reduce the root-mean-square (RMS) trunk sway in subjects with vestibular loss during single-axis perturbation. This research examines the effect of multi-directional vibrotactile feedback on postural sway during continuous multi-directional surface perturbations when the subjects' eyes are closed. Eight subjects with vestibular loss donned a multi-axis feedback device that mapped body tilt estimates onto their torsos with a 3-row by 16-column array of tactile actuators (tactors). Tactor row indicated tilt magnitude and tactor column indicated tilt direction. Root-mean-square trunk tilt, elliptical fits to trunk sway trajectory areas, percentage of time spent outside a no vibrotactile feedback zone, RMS center of pressure, and anchoring index parameters indicating intersegmental coordination were used to assess the efficacy of the multi-directional vibrotactile balance aid. Four tactor display configurations in addition to the tactors off configuration were evaluated. Subjects had significantly reduced RMS trunk sway, significantly smaller elliptical fits of the trajectory area, and spent significantly less time outside of the no feedback zone in the tactors on versus the tactors off configuration. Among the displays evaluated in this study, there was not an optimal tactor column configuration for standing tasks involving continuous surface perturbations. Furthermore, subjects performed worse when erroneous information was displayed. Therefore, a spatial resolution of 90 degrees (4 columns) seems to be as effective as a spatial resolution of 22.5 degrees (16 columns) for control of standing.

  16. The central part of CMS is lowered

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    On 28 February 2007, the CMS central piece containing the magnet and weighing as much as five Jumbo jets (1920 tonnes) was gently lowered into place. Only 20 cm separated the detector, which was suspended by four huge cables, each with 55 strands and sophisticated monitoring to minimize sway and tilt, from the walls of the shaft. The entire process took about 10 hours to complete.

  17. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-12-15

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  18. Bridging the gap: parkour athletes provide new insights into locomotion energetics of arboreal apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G; Coward, Samuel R L; Thorpe, Susannah K S

    2016-11-01

    The tree canopy is an energetically challenging environment to traverse. Along with compliant vegetation, gaps in the canopy can prove energetically costly if they force a route-extending detour. Arboreal apes exhibit diverse locomotion strategies, including for gap crossing. Which one they employ in any given scenario may be influenced by the energy costs to do so, which are affected by the details of the immediate environment in combination with their body size. Measuring energetics of arboreal apes is not tractable; thus our knowledge in this area is limited. We devised a novel, custom-made experimental set-up to record the energy expenditure of parkour athletes tree-swaying, jumping and vertical climbing. The latter strategy was vastly more expensive, indicating that when energy economy is the focus arboreal apes will prioritize routes that limit height changes. Whether tree-swaying or jumping was most economical for the athletes depended upon interactions between tree stiffness, the distance to cross, number of tree-sways required and their own mass. Updated analysis of previous interspecific correlations suggests that whether the relative costs to vertical climb are size-invariant across primate species is complicated by details of the climbing context. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Bridging the gap: parkour athletes provide new insights into locomotion energetics of arboreal apes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Samuel R. L.; Thorpe, Susannah K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The tree canopy is an energetically challenging environment to traverse. Along with compliant vegetation, gaps in the canopy can prove energetically costly if they force a route-extending detour. Arboreal apes exhibit diverse locomotion strategies, including for gap crossing. Which one they employ in any given scenario may be influenced by the energy costs to do so, which are affected by the details of the immediate environment in combination with their body size. Measuring energetics of arboreal apes is not tractable; thus our knowledge in this area is limited. We devised a novel, custom-made experimental set-up to record the energy expenditure of parkour athletes tree-swaying, jumping and vertical climbing. The latter strategy was vastly more expensive, indicating that when energy economy is the focus arboreal apes will prioritize routes that limit height changes. Whether tree-swaying or jumping was most economical for the athletes depended upon interactions between tree stiffness, the distance to cross, number of tree-sways required and their own mass. Updated analysis of previous interspecific correlations suggests that whether the relative costs to vertical climb are size-invariant across primate species is complicated by details of the climbing context. PMID:27881766

  20. The effect of time-of-day on static and dynamic balance in recreational athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbaugh, Erika M; Smith, Derek T; Zhu, Qin; Wilson, Margaret A; Dai, Boyi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of time-of-day (morning vs. afternoon) on static and dynamic balance in recreational athletes. A total of 34 recreational athletes completed the single-leg stance test with or without eyes open, lower quarter Y-balance test, upper quarter Y-balance test, and single-leg landing balance test in a random order in the morning (7:00-10:00 am) and afternoon (3:00-6:00 pm) for two consecutive days. Compared with the morning, participants demonstrated decreased centre of pressure (COP) sway areas (p = 0.002; Cohen's d (d) = 0.28) and sway speeds (p = 0.002; d = 0.17) during the eyes-open single-leg stance test, increased stance time (p = 0.031; d = 0.16) and decreased COP sway areas (p = 0.029; d = 0.22) during the eyes-closed single-leg stance test, and increased reaching distances (p = 0.024; d = 0.10) during the upper quarter Y-balance test in the afternoon. The between-day effect (day 1 vs. day 2) was observed for several parameters. Time-of-day had a minimal effect on dynamic balance and a noticeable effect on static balance. Time-of-day may be considered as a factor in designing balance training programmes and intervention studies for recreational athletes.

  1. Application of mass-spring model in seismic analysis of liquid storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiayi; Bai Xinran; Li Xiaoxuan

    2013-01-01

    There are many tanks for storing liquid in nuclear power plant. When seismic analysis is performed, swaying of liquid may change the mechanical parameters of those tanks, such as the center of mass and the moment of inertia, etc., so the load due to swaying of liquid can't be neglected. Mass-spring model is a simplified model to calculate the dynamic pressure of liquid in tank under earthquake, which is derived by the theory of Housner and given in the specification of seismic analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary-4-98 (ASCE-4-98 for short hereinafter). According to the theory of Housner and ASCE-4-98, the mass-spring 3-D FEM model for storage tank and liquid in it was established, by which the force of stored liquid acted on liquid storage tank in nuclear power plant under horizontal seismic load was calculated. The calculated frequency of liquid swaying and effect of liquid convection on storage tank were compared with those calculated by simplified formula. It is shown that the results of 3-D FEM model are reasonable and reliable. Further more, it is more direct and convenient compared with description in ASCE-4-98 when the mass-spring model is applied to 3-D FEM model for seismic analysis, from which the displacement and stress distributions of the plate-shell elements or the 3-D solid finite elements can be obtained directly from the seismic input model. (authors)

  2. The effects of Pilates exercise training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee Sung; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of Pilates exercise on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen individuals with unilateral chronic hemiparetic stroke (age, 64.7 ± 6.9 years; height, 161.7 ± 7.9 cm; weight, 67.0 ± 11.1 kg) were randomly allocated to either a Pilates exercise group (PG, n=10) or a control group (CG, n=9). The PG attended 24 exercise sessions conducted over an 8-week period (3 sessions/week). Center of pressure (COP) sway and COP velocity were measured one week before and after the exercise program and compared to assess training effects. [Results] Pilates exercise positively affected both static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. For static balance, COP sway and velocity in the medial-lateral (M-L) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions were significantly decreased in the PG after training while no significant differences were found in the CG. For dynamic balance, measured during treadmill walking, the PG showed significantly reduced COP sway and velocity in the M-L and A-P directions for both the paretic and non-paretic leg. [Conclusions] The findings provide initial evidence that Pilates exercise can enhance static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27390424

  3. Personality traits and individual differences predict threat-induced changes in postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaback, Martin; Cleworth, Taylor W; Carpenter, Mark G; Adkin, Allan L

    2015-04-01

    This study explored whether specific personality traits and individual differences could predict changes in postural control when presented with a height-induced postural threat. Eighty-two healthy young adults completed questionnaires to assess trait anxiety, trait movement reinvestment (conscious motor processing, movement self-consciousness), physical risk-taking, and previous experience with height-related activities. Tests of static (quiet standing) and anticipatory (rise to toes) postural control were completed under low and high postural threat conditions. Personality traits and individual differences significantly predicted height-induced changes in static, but not anticipatory postural control. Individuals less prone to taking physical risks were more likely to lean further away from the platform edge and sway at higher frequencies and smaller amplitudes. Individuals more prone to conscious motor processing were more likely to lean further away from the platform edge and sway at larger amplitudes. Individuals more self-conscious about their movement appearance were more likely to sway at smaller amplitudes. Evidence is also provided that relationships between physical risk-taking and changes in static postural control are mediated through changes in fear of falling and physiological arousal. Results from this study may have indirect implications for balance assessment and treatment; however, further work exploring these factors in patient populations is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced driving impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, A; Robinson, J H

    2001-07-01

    The extent to which caffeine antagonizes alcohol-induced impairment of simulated automobile driving at the current lowest legal American limit (0.08% BrAC) was the focus of this study. Fifteen adults swallowed a capsule (0, 200, or 400 mg caffeine) then drank a beverage (0.0 or 0.6 g/kg ethanol) in a within-subject, double-blind, randomized procedure. Forty-five minutes later, participants completed a test battery of subjective effects scales, dynamic posturography, critical flicker fusion (CFF), choice reaction time (CRT), divided attention (Stroop test), and simulated driving. Alcohol alone increased ratings of 'dizzy', 'drug effect', and 'high', slowed CRT and brake latency, and increased body sway. Caffeine alone increased ratings of 'alert' and 'jittery', but did not significantly affect body sway or psychomotor performance. Both caffeine doses comparably counteracted alcohol impairment of brake latency but not CRT or body sway. Brake latency with either alcohol-caffeine combination remained significantly longer than that with placebo. Stroop and CFF performance were unaffected by any drug condition. The results suggest that caffeine may increase alertness and improve reaction time after alcohol use but will not completely counteract alcohol impairment in a driver.

  5. Effects of a full season on stabilometric Parameters of team handball elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. Marchetti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether athletes change their postural control over the course of a full sport season, or become more asymmetrical with respect to their neuromuscular performance over the same period. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a full sport season on the postural control of team handball elite athletes. Ten healthy, elite male team handball players performed bipodal standing (BP and right and left unipodal standing (UP during 30s. We used the RMS and speed of the center of pressure to describe postural sway. For the BP task, the sway was lower at the end of the season (p<0.005. For the UP tasks, the sway was lower at the end of the season only for the non-dominant limb (p<0.001. Differences between limbs were observed only at the end of the season (p<0.03. In conclusion, a full team handball season did not lead to deterioration of the athletes' postural control, but by the end of the season, the athletes were more asymmetrical.

  6. Effects of Sound on Postural Stability during Quiet Standing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Loss of postural stability can increase the likelihood of slips and falls in workplaces. The present study intended to extend understanding of the effects of frequency and pressure level of sound on postural stability during standing. Eleven male subjects participated. Standing on a force platform, the subjects' center of pressures were measured under different combinations of pressure level and frequency of the sound. Variables such as the position variability of COP and the length of postural sway path in anterior-posterior (AP and medio-lateral (ML direction were evaluated. Subjective ratings of perceived disturbance at each experimental condition were also obtained using a 7-point rating scale. Results showed that the length of sway path and the position variability of COP increased as the frequency of sound increased in posterior-anterior axis. The effect of sound pressure level, however, was not significant on both the postural sway length and the position variability of COP. These results suggested substantial disturbance of standing balance system among subjects exposed to high frequency noise. The results implied that physical workers should be alerted that their abilities of postural balance could be degraded significantly as disturbance caused by a sound existed.

  7. Dynamic balance is impaired after a match in young elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Massimiliano; Mereu, Federico; Melis, Marco; Leban, Bruno; Corona, Federica; Ibba, Gianfranco

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of actual match effort on dynamic balance abilities in young elite soccer players. Seventeen Under 15 male players who compete at national level participated in the study. Their dynamic balance was assessed by having them jump starting with both feet on the ground in a standing position and land on one foot only. Their vertical time to stabilization (vTTS) and postural sway were calculated before and after 35 min of an unofficial match. Postural sway was assessed on the basis of center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories. Parameters considered were sway area, COP displacements in the antero-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) directions and COP path length. After the match, a significant increase in vTTS (p = 0.007) COP path length (p = 0.001) and COP displacements in ML (p COP displacements). The physical effort associated with the match induces significant impairments of players' dynamic balance abilities. On the basis of such findings, coaches might consider integrating training sessions with specific balance exercises as well as performing injury-prevention routines even when players are fatigued, to better adapt them to match conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of Pilates exercise training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Lim, Hee Sung; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of Pilates exercise on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen individuals with unilateral chronic hemiparetic stroke (age, 64.7 ± 6.9 years; height, 161.7 ± 7.9 cm; weight, 67.0 ± 11.1 kg) were randomly allocated to either a Pilates exercise group (PG, n=10) or a control group (CG, n=9). The PG attended 24 exercise sessions conducted over an 8-week period (3 sessions/week). Center of pressure (COP) sway and COP velocity were measured one week before and after the exercise program and compared to assess training effects. [Results] Pilates exercise positively affected both static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. For static balance, COP sway and velocity in the medial-lateral (M-L) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions were significantly decreased in the PG after training while no significant differences were found in the CG. For dynamic balance, measured during treadmill walking, the PG showed significantly reduced COP sway and velocity in the M-L and A-P directions for both the paretic and non-paretic leg. [Conclusions] The findings provide initial evidence that Pilates exercise can enhance static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke.

  9. Effectiveness and Limitations of Unsupervised Home-Based Balance Rehabilitation with Nintendo Wii in People with Multiple Sclerosis

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    Massimiliano Pau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance training represents a critical part of the rehabilitation process of individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS since impaired postural control is a distinctive symptom of the disease. In recent years, the use of the Nintendo Wii system has become widespread among rehabilitation specialists for this purpose, but few studies have verified the effectiveness of such an approach using quantitative measures of balance. In this study, we analyzed the postural sway features of a cohort of twenty-seven individuals with MS before and after 5 weeks of unsupervised home-based balance training with the Wii system. Center of pressure (COP time-series were recorded using a pressure platform and processed to calculate sway area, COP path length, displacements, and velocities in mediolateral (ML and anteroposterior (AP directions. Although the results show a significant reduction in sway area, COP displacements, and velocity, such improvements are essentially restricted to the ML direction, as the Wii platform appears to properly stimulate the postural control system in the frontal plane but not in the sagittal one. Available Wii games, although somewhat beneficial, appear not fully suitable for rehabilitation in MS owing to scarce flexibility and adaptability to MS needs and thus specific software should be developed.

  10. Changes in gait and balance parameters in elderly subjects attending an 8-week supervised Pilates programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, D; Shead, V; Sloane, L

    2012-10-01

    Falls in the elderly have important clinical and economic costs and interventions that may reduce the risk of such problems are potentially important. Although evidence exists for a range of exercise interventions, few have looked at a Pilates-based intervention in a supervised community-based setting and none have specifically measured gait parameters as an outcome. This observational study investigated gait parameters including inter-stride variability (ISV) and postural sway in a group (n = 9) of elderly (age range, 60-76) subjects attending a weekly Pilates class over eight weeks. The results suggest that significant improvement in walking speed (0.14 m/s (95% CI: 0.06-0.21)), step cycle (0.07 m (95% CI: 0.01-0.14)) and length (0.10 m (95% CI: 0.05-0.15)) and a composite ambulation index (6.5% (95% CI: 1.85-11.26)) were seen post the intervention, while coefficients of variation decreased around 15%. In addition both anterior-posterior sway decreased along with a improvement in a fall risk index (FRI). Inter-stride variability on the other hand did not change. The results of this study suggest that a short Pilates program may have the potential to improve gait and sway parameters, including those associated with fall risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of community-based virtual reality treadmill training on balance ability in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nara; Park, YuHyung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] We aimed to examine the effectiveness of a community-based virtual reality treadmill training (CVRTT) program on static balance abilities in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Patients (n = 20) who suffered a stroke at least 6 months prior to the study were recruited. All subjects underwent conventional physical therapy for 60 min/day, 5 days/week, for 4 weeks. Additionally, the CVRTT group underwent community-based virtual reality scene exposure combined with treadmill training for 30 min/day, 3 days/week, for 4 weeks, whereas the control group underwent conventional physical therapy, including muscle strengthening, balance training, and indoor and outdoor gait training, for 30 min/day, 3 days/week, for 4 weeks. Outcome measurements included the anteroposterior, mediolateral, and total postural sway path lengths and speed, which were recorded using the Balancia Software on a Wii Fit(™) balance board. [Results] The postural sway speed and anteroposterior and total postural sway path lengths were significantly decreased in the CVRTT group. Overall, the CVRTT group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group. [Conclusions] The present study results can be used to support the use of CVRTT for effectively improving balance in stroke patients. Moreover, we determined that a CVRTT program for stroke patients is both feasible and suitable.

  12. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Zong-Hao Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1 no socks, system turned-off; (2 wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3 wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05, and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017, indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017. The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  13. Influence of Resistance Exercise Training to Strengthen Muscles across Multiple Joints of the Lower Limbs on Dynamic Balance Functions of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Min; Park, Myung Kyu; Lee, Na Kyung

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training for strengthening muscles across multiple joints on the dynamic balance function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects in the training group (n=14) and the control group (n=14) received conservative physical therapy for 30 minutes per day, five days per week, for a period of six weeks. The training group additionally performed three sets (eight to 10 repetitions per set) of resistance exercise at 70% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) to strengthen muscles across multiple joints. The control group did the same exercises for the same duration but without resistance. To assess dynamic balance function, before and after the intervention, we measured antero-posterior (A-P) and medio-lateral (M-L) sway distances, the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the timed up and go (TUG) times. [Results] Compared to pre-intervention values, the BBS score showed significant increases in both groups, and A-P and M-L sway distances and TUG times showed significant decreases in both groups. Changes in A-P and M-L sway distances, BBS scores, and TUG times were significantly different between the muscle training group and the control group. [Conclusion] Training involving muscle strength across multiple joints is an effective intervention for improvement of dynamic balance function of stroke patients.

  14. Vestibular ablation and a semicircular canal prosthesis affect postural stability during head turns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lara A.; Haburcakova, Csilla; Lewis, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    In our study, we examined postural stability during head turns for two rhesus monkeys: one, single animal study contrasted normal and mild bilateral vestibular ablation and a second animal study contrasted severe bilateral vestibular ablation with and without prosthetic stimulation. The monkeys freely stood, unrestrained on a balance platform and made voluntary head turns between visual targets. To quantify each animals’ posture, motions of the head and trunk, as well as torque about the body’s center-of-mass, were measured. In the mildly ablated animal, we observed less foretrunk sway in comparison to the normal state. When the canal prosthesis provided electric stimulation to the severely ablated animal, it showed a decrease in trunk sway during head turns. Because the rhesus monkey with severe bilateral vestibular loss exhibited a decrease in trunk sway when receiving vestibular prosthetic stimulation, we propose that the prosthetic electrical stimulation partially restored head velocity information. Our results provide an indication that a semicircular canal prosthesis may be an effective way to improve postural stability in patients with severe peripheral vestibular dysfunction. PMID:27405997

  15. Infant attachment predicts bodily freezing in adolescence: evidence from a prospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah C. M. Niermann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Early life-stress, particularly maternal deprivation, is associated with long-lasting deviations in animals’ freezing responses. Given the relevance of freezing for stress-coping, translational research is needed to examine the relation between insecure infant-parent attachment and bodily freezing-like behavior in humans. Therefore, we investigated threat-related reductions in body sway (indicative of freezing-like behavior in 14-year-old adolescents (N=79, for whom attachment security was earlier assessed in infancy. As expected, insecure (versus secure attachment was associated with less body sway for angry versus neutral faces. This effect remained when controlling for intermediate life-events. These results suggest that the long-lasting effects of early negative caregiving experiences on the human stress and threat systems extend to the primary defensive reaction of freezing. Additionally, we replicated earlier work in adults, by observing a significant correlation (in adolescents assessed as securely attached between subjective state anxiety and reduced body sway in response to angry versus neutral faces. Together, this research opens venues to start exploring the role of freezing in the development of human psychopathology.

  16. Influence of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise programs on idiopathic scoliosis patient in the early 20s in terms of curves and balancing abilities: single case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Ki

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) exercise programs for idiopathic scoliosis with a female patient in the early 20s in terms of her spinal curve and balancing abilities. The study subject was selected among 21-year-old female college students. There were no particular activities that the subject could not perform, but patient complained of difficulty in maintaining the standing position for a prolonged time. Patient chest X-ray results showed S-shaped curves tilted towards the left or right in the lumbar spine, thoracic spine, and cervical spine areas. The PNF exercise programs consists of seven therapeutic exercise programs, including home exercises considering the patients' balancing abilities, the lateral symmetry of the spinal sway, the distortion, and the height of the pelvis and scapula bones. The programs last for 6 weeks and includes three sessions per week, with each session lasting for 30 min. Before and after the execution of the PNF exercise programs, the subject was monitored for the changes in her spinal sways through chest X-ray tests. Also, using a balance measurement instrument, the subject's static and dynamic balancing abilities were tested. After executing the PNF exercise programs for 6 weeks, the spinal sways of the subject were corrected, and her static and dynamic balancing abilities were improved compared to the baseline values.

  17. Effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance and head alignment in stroke patients with neglect syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si-Eun; Min, Kyung-Ok; Lee, Sang-Bin; Choi, Wan-Suk; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups: the eye movements (EM) group; and the PNF with eye movements (PEM) group. The program was conducted five times each week for 6 weeks. Balance (both static and dynamic) and head alignment (craniovertebral angle and cranial rotation angle) were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurements of static balance, the EM group showed significant improvement in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not when examined in the eyes-closed condition. The PEM group showed significant improvement when examined under both conditions. In the assessment of dynamic balance, both groups showed significant improvement in measurements of sway areas. With respect to head alignment, there were no significant differences pre- and post-testing in either the craniovertebral angle or the cranial rotation angle in the EM group, but the PEM group showed significant differences in both measurements. [Conclusion] These results suggest that in stroke patients with neglect syndrome, PNF with eye movements, rather than eye movements alone, has a greater positive effect on balance and head alignment.

  18. Vibro-tactile and auditory balance biofeedback changes muscle activity patterns: Possible implications for vestibular implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, John H J; Honegger, Flurin

    2017-01-01

    The two different types of balance prostheses being developed, implants and vibro-tactile/auditory feedback prostheses, rely on different measures to prove efficacy (those based on vestibular ocular reflexes versus balance control, respectively). Here we provide evidence that examining muscle activity might provide a useful alternative for both. The muscle activity of 6 bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) and 7 age-matched healthy controls (HC) was examined while standing eyes closed on a foam support surface. Pelvis and upper trunk angular movements were recorded in the roll and pitch planes. Surface EMG was recorded from the lower leg, trunk and upper arm muscles. BVL subjects were first assessed without feedback of pelvis sway, then received training with combined vibro-tactile and auditory feedback, before being re-assessed with feedback. Feedback reduced the amplitudes of pelvis and shoulder sway to values of HC without feedback. Both the level of background EMG activity and the EMG area amplitudes changed when feedback was provided in a manner consistent with the reduced amplitude modulation of muscle synergies of HC. The results of this study indicate that changed muscle synergy amplitudes underlie improvements in sway achieved by BVL subjects. The concept of this investigation may provide a means to prove efficacy for different types of balance prostheses, including implants.

  19. Co-ordination of the upper and lower limbs for vestibular control of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig P; Allsop, Jonathan E; Mistry, Michael; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2017-11-01

    When standing and holding an earth-fixed object, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) can evoke upper limb responses to maintain balance. In the present study, we determined how these responses are affected by grip context (no contact, light grip and firm grip), as well as how they are co-ordinated with the lower limbs to maintain balance. When GVS was applied during firm grip, hand and ground reaction forces were generated. The directions of these force vectors were co-ordinated such that the overall body sway response was always aligned with the inter-aural axis (i.e. craniocentric). When GVS was applied during light grip (balance control and also that the upper and lower limbs co-ordinate for an appropriate whole-body sway response. Vestibular stimulation can evoke responses in the arm when it is used for balance. In the present study, we determined how these responses are affected by grip context, as well as how they are co-ordinated with the rest of the body. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to evoke balance responses under three conditions of manual contact with an earth-fixed object: no contact, light grip (vestibular-evoked balance responses. Furthermore, they demonstrate that upper and lower-limb forces are co-ordinated to produce an appropriate whole-body sway response. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  20. Dynamic tilt illusion induced by continuous contextual orientation alternations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xilei; Jiang, Yi

    2017-11-01

    In the classic tilt illusion, the perceived orientation of a center patch is shifted away from its oriented context. Additionally, a stronger illusion effect is yielded when the center patch is simultaneously rather than asynchronously presented with a constant context for a shorter duration. However, little is known about the temporal characteristic of the tilt illusion in a reverse situation in which a constant center patch is presented throughout while the contexts change. Therefore, we continuously alternated two opposite-oriented contexts and manipulated alternate speeds to examine how the tilt illusion would build up as a function of dynamic contextual alternation. Our results revealed that dynamic alternations between leftward- and rightward-oriented contexts caused a static vertical grating at the center to apparently sway from side to side. More importantly, the apparent sway illusion was modulated by the alternate speed of the oriented contexts (up to 8-10 Hz); the quicker the alternation is, the faster and weaker the apparent sway is. Intriguingly, the temporal characteristic of the "dynamic tilt illusion" suggests that, under a varying environment, the suppressions from temporally adjacent surrounds would be chunked into discrete epochs before affecting our percept.

  1. Relationships between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statin) use and strength, balance and falls in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerer, W; Delbaere, K; Bartlett, H; Lord, S R; Rowland, J

    2012-12-01

    To investigate associations between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) use and muscle strength, balance, mobility and falls in older people. Five hundred community-dwelling people aged 70-90 years provided information about their medication use and undertook tests of lower limb strength, postural sway, leaning balance (maximal balance range and coordinated stability tests) and functional mobility. Participants were then followed up for 12 months with respect to falls. After adjusting for general health in analyses of covariance procedures, statin users had poorer maximal balance range than non-statin users (P = 0.017). Statin and non-statin users did not differ with respect to strength, postural sway, mobility or falls experienced in the follow-up year. In a sample of healthy older people, statin use was not associated with muscle weakness, postural sway, reduced mobility or falls. Statin users, however, had poorer leaning balance which may potentially increase fall risk in this group. © 2011 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Mastoid vibration affects dynamic postural control during gait in healthy older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung Hung; Mukherjee, Mukul; Kent, Jenny; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular disorders are difficult to diagnose early due to the lack of a systematic assessment. Our previous work has developed a reliable experimental design and the result shows promising results that vestibular sensory input while walking could be affected through mastoid vibration (MV) and changes are in the direction of motion. In the present paper, we wanted to extend this work to older adults and investigate how manipulating sensory input through mastoid vibration (MV) could affect dynamic postural control during walking. Three levels of MV (none, unilateral, and bilateral) applied via vibrating elements placed on the mastoid processes were combined with the Locomotor Sensory Organization Test (LSOT) paradigm to challenge the visual and somatosensory systems. We hypothesized that the MV would affect sway variability during walking in older adults. Our results revealed that MV significantly not only increased the amount of sway variability but also decreased the temporal structure of sway variability only in anterior-posterior direction. Importantly, the bilateral MV stimulation generally produced larger effects than the unilateral. This is an important finding that confirmed our experimental design and the results produced could guide a more reliable screening of vestibular system deterioration.

  3. Embodied prosthetic arm stabilizes body posture, while unembodied one perturbs it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Koyama, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    Senses of ownership (this arm belongs to me) and agency (I am controlling this arm) originate from sensorimotor system. External objects can be integrated into the sensorimotor system following long-term use, and recognized as one's own body. We examined how an (un)embodied prosthetic arm modulates whole-body control, and assessed the components of prosthetic embodiment. Nine unilateral upper-limb amputees participated. Four frequently used their prosthetic arm, while the others rarely did. Their postural sway was measured during quiet standing with or without their prosthesis. The frequent users showed greater sway when they removed the prosthesis, while the rare users showed greater sway when they fitted the prosthesis. Frequent users reported greater everyday feelings of postural stabilization by prosthesis and a larger sense of agency over the prosthesis. We suggest that a prosthetic arm maintains or perturbs postural control, depending on the prosthetic embodiment, which involves sense of agency rather than ownership. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Misclassification of Patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia as having Psychogenic Postural Instability based on Computerized Dynamic Posturography

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    Susan J Herdman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific criteria have been developed based on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP to assist clinicians in identifying patients with psychogenic balance problems1-4. Patients with known Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA meet several of the criteria for psychogenic balance problem and risk being misclassified as having imbalance of psychogenic origin. However, our research shows that patients with SCA may be distinguished from patients with psychogenic balance problems in several ways. We compared test performance on CDP and the observation of specific behaviors that are associated with psychogenic balance problems in patients with SCA (n = 43 and patients with known psychogenic balance problems (n = 40. Chi square analysis was used to determine if there were significant differences between the groups for the frequency of each criterion for psychogenic CDP and Observed Behaviors. Level of significance was Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratios were calculated for each criterion. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to examine whether the two patient groups demonstrated similar groupings of criteria. Comparison of the results of these analyses identified two criteria that were significantly more frequent in the Psychogenic group than in the SCA group: Regular Periodicity of sway and Circular Sway. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratios identified two additional criteria, Inconsistent Motor Responses and Large lateral Sway that also seem to suggest a psychogenic component to a person’s imbalance. Prospective studies are needed to validate the usefulness of these findings.

  5. Effects of sound on postural stability during quiet standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Ha; Lee, Kichol; Lockhart, Thurmon; Kim, Sukwon

    2011-12-15

    Loss of postural stability can increase the likelihood of slips and falls in workplaces. The present study intended to extend understanding of the effects of frequency and pressure level of sound on postural stability during standing. Eleven male subjects participated. Standing on a force platform, the subjects' center of pressures were measured under different combinations of pressure level and frequency of the sound. Variables such as the position variability of COP and the length of postural sway path in anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) direction were evaluated. Subjective ratings of perceived disturbance at each experimental condition were also obtained using a 7-point rating scale. Results showed that the length of sway path and the position variability of COP increased as the frequency of sound increased in posterior-anterior axis. The effect of sound pressure level, however, was not significant on both the postural sway length and the position variability of COP. These results suggested substantial disturbance of standing balance system among subjects exposed to high frequency noise. The results implied that physical workers should be alerted that their abilities of postural balance could be degraded significantly as disturbance caused by a sound existed.

  6. Are we simplifying balance evaluation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Saba; Baldwin, Keith

    2018-01-01

    Clinical evaluation of the postural balance in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis has been measured by sagittal vertical axis and frontal balance. The impact of the scoliotic deformity in three planes on balance has not been fully investigated. 47 right thoracic and left lumbar curves adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and 10 non-scoliotic controls were registered prospectively. 13 spinopelvic postural parameters were calculated from the 3-dimantional reconstructions of X-rays. 7 balance variables describing the position and sway of the center of pressure were recorded using a pressure mat. A regression analysis was used to predict sagittal vertical axis and frontal balance from the 7 balance variables. A canonical correlation analysis was performed between all the postural parameters and balance variables and the significant associations between the postural and balance variables were determined. sagittal vertical axis and frontal balance were not significantly associated with the position or sway of the center of pressure (p>0.05). Canonical correlation analysis showed significant associations between the postural variables in the 3 planes and center of pressure position (R 2 =0.81) and sway (R 2 =0.62), pbalance contributed to the postural balance in the cohort. The compensatory role of the pelvis and distal kyphosis in sagittal plane was underlined. Multidimensional analyses between the postural and balance variables showed the alignment of the thoracic, lumbar, and pelvis in the 3 planes, in addition to the global head-pelvic position impact on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Can a newly-established test for assessing standing and balance function be an alternative to the timed up-and-go test?--functional assessment of gait and balance in elderly patients for a comprehensive geriatric assessment initiative named 'Dr. SUPERMAN'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoguro, Motohide; Ohnuma, Takeshi; Hirao, Kentarou; Iwamoto, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    To identify elderly patients who are at high risk for falls, we used the timed up-and-go test (TUG) as an assessment tool for gait and balance function in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) initiative named 'Dr. SUPERMAN'. However, this test is difficult to perform in a small area because it requires at least 3 meters of movement space. Therefore, we investigated whether another, newly-developed test, based on the Berg balance test, could be an alternative to the TUG test. We enrolled a total of 99 eligible subjects out of 105 elderly patients with disorders such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, cerebral infarction, osteoporosis and vascular risk factors, and administered the TUG test and the newly-developed standing and balance test (SBT). Of these 99, 6 patients could not stand independently. While the time to accomplish TUG was determined, any unsteadiness during TUG was also recorded. The SBT consists of 3 components: standing up independently, standing on a narrow base for 15 seconds without any swaying of the trunk, and a timed one-leg standing test (TOLS) for 15 seconds on both sides. Taking more than 14 seconds to accomplish the TUG or abnormal unsteadiness during the test was defined as positive, and each cut-off point was measured on the TOLS, with or without swaying of the trunk. The time to accomplish TUG significantly increased with age, and positive TUG findings were observed in 43 subjects. The mean TOLS time significantly and suddenly worsened at over 75 years of age, including among those subjects who showed swaying of the trunk and who could only perform the TOLS for less than 1 second. The receiver operating curve indicated that a TOLS cut-off point of less than 3 seconds, together with standing with help or swaying of the trunk during the SBT, most efficiently determined a positive TUG score, with high sensitivity (86%), high specificity (87.5%), and a high positive predictive value (84.1%). In a narrow space, the SBT can

  8. ISway: a sensitive, valid and reliable measure of postural control

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    Mancini Martina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians need a practical, objective test of postural control that is sensitive to mild neurological disease, shows experimental and clinical validity, and has good test-retest reliability. We developed an instrumented test of postural sway (ISway using a body-worn accelerometer to offer an objective and practical measure of postural control. Methods We conducted two separate studies with two groups of subjects. Study I: sensitivity and experimental concurrent validity. Thirteen subjects with early, untreated Parkinson’s disease (PD and 12 age-matched control subjects (CTR were tested in the laboratory, to compare sway from force-plate COP and inertial sensors. Study II: test-retest reliability and clinical concurrent validity. A different set of 17 early-to-moderate, treated PD (tested ON medication, and 17 age-matched CTR subjects were tested in the clinic to compare clinical balance tests with sway from inertial sensors. For reliability, the sensor was removed, subjects rested for 30 min, and the protocol was repeated. Thirteen sway measures (7 time-domain, 5 frequency-domain measures, and JERK were computed from the 2D time series acceleration (ACC data to determine the best metrics for a clinical balance test. Results Both center of pressure (COP and ACC measures differentiated sway between CTR and untreated PD. JERK and time-domain measures showed the best test-retest reliability (JERK ICC was 0.86 in PD and 0.87 in CTR; time-domain measures ICC ranged from 0.55 to 0.84 in PD and from 0.60 to 0.89 in CTR. JERK, all but one time-domain measure, and one frequency measure were significantly correlated with the clinical postural stability score (r ranged from 0.50 to 0.63, 0.01 Conclusions Based on these results, we recommend a subset of the most sensitive, reliable, and valid ISway measures to characterize posture control in PD: 1 JERK, 2 RMS amplitude and mean velocity from the time-domain measures, and 3 centroidal

  9. Haptic Cues for Balance: Use of a Cane Provides Immediate Body Stabilization.

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    Sozzi, Stefania; Crisafulli, Oscar; Schieppati, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Haptic cues are important for balance. Knowledge of the temporal features of their effect may be crucial for the design of neural prostheses. Touching a stable surface with a fingertip reduces body sway in standing subjects eyes closed (EC), and removal of haptic cue reinstates a large sway pattern. Changes in sway occur rapidly on changing haptic conditions. Here, we describe the effects and time-course of stabilization produced by a haptic cue derived from a walking cane. We intended to confirm that cane use reduces body sway, to evaluate the effect of vision on stabilization by a cane, and to estimate the delay of the changes in body sway after addition and withdrawal of haptic input. Seventeen healthy young subjects stood in tandem position on a force platform, with eyes closed or open (EO). They gently lowered the cane onto and lifted it from a second force platform. Sixty trials per direction of haptic shift (Touch → NoTouch, T-NT; NoTouch → Touch, NT-T) and visual condition (EC-EO) were acquired. Traces of Center of foot Pressure (CoP) and the force exerted by cane were filtered, rectified, and averaged. The position in space of a reflective marker positioned on the cane tip was also acquired by an optoelectronic device. Cross-correlation (CC) analysis was performed between traces of cane tip and CoP displacement. Latencies of changes in CoP oscillation in the frontal plane EC following the T-NT and NT-T haptic shift were statistically estimated. The CoP oscillations were larger in EC than EO under both T and NT ( p CoP displacement under both EC and EO. Latencies to changes in CoP oscillations were longer after addition (NT-T, about 1.6 s) than withdrawal (T-NT, about 0.9 s) of haptic input ( p balance control. Haptic input from a walking aid and its processing time should be considered when designing prostheses for locomotion.

  10. Thalamic cholinergic innervation and postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease.

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    Müller, Martijn L T M; Albin, Roger L; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J H; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of postural instability in Parkinson's disease remains poorly understood. Normal postural function depends in part on the ability of the postural control system to integrate visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory information. Degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus complex and their thalamic efferent terminals has been implicated in postural control deficits in Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of cholinergic terminal loss in thalamus and cortex, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, on postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease. We studied 124 subjects with Parkinson's disease (32 female/92 male; 65.5 ± 7.4 years old; 6.0 ± 4.2 years motor disease duration; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 2.4 ± 0.5) and 25 control subjects (10 female/15 male, 66.8 ± 10.1 years old). All subjects underwent (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 and (11)C-methylpiperidin-4-yl propionate acetylcholinesterase positron emission tomography and the sensory organization test balance platform protocol. Measures of dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal integrity were obtained, i.e. striatal vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 binding (distribution volume ratio) and thalamic and cortical acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rate per minute (k3), respectively. Total centre of pressure excursion (speed), a measure of total sway, and sway variability were determined for individual sensory organization test conditions. Based on normative data, principal component analysis was performed to reduce postural sensory organization functions to robust factors for regression analysis with the dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal data. Factor analysis demonstrated two factors with eigenvalues >2 that explained 52.2% of the variance, mainly reflecting postural sway during sensory organization test Conditions 1-3 and 5, respectively. Regression

  11. Spatial Orientation and Balance Control Changes Induced by Altered Gravito-Inertial Force Vectors

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    Kaufman, Galen D.; Wood, Scott J.; Gianna, Claire C.; Black, F. Owen; Paloski, William H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Seventeen healthy and eight vestibular deficient subjects were exposed to an interaural centripetal acceleration of 1 G (resultant 45 deg roll tilt of 1.4 G) on a 0.8 meter radius centrifuge for a period of 90 minutes in the dark. The subjects sat with head fixed upright, except every 4 of 10 minutes when instructed to rotate their head so that their nose and eyes pointed towards a visual point switched on every 3 to 5 seconds at random places (within +/- 30 deg) in the Earth horizontal plane. Motion sickness caused some subjects to limit their head movements during significant portions of the 90 minute period, and led three normal subjects to stop the test earlier. Eye movements, including directed saccades for subjective Earth- and head-referenced planes, were recorded before, during, and immediately after centrifugation using electro-oculography. Postural stability measurements were made before and within ten minutes after centrifugation. In normal subjects, postural sway and multisegment body kinematics were gathered during an eyes-closed head movement cadence (sway-referenced support platform), and in response to translational/rotational platform perturbations. A significant increase in postural sway, segmental motion amplitude and hip frequency was observed after centrifugation. This effect was short-lived, with a recovery time of several postural test trials. There were also asymmetries in the direction of post-centrifugation center of sway and head tilt which depended on the subject's orientation during the centrifugation adaptation period (left ear or right ear out). To delineate the effect of the magnitude of the gravito-inertial vector versus its direction during the adaptive centrifugation period, we tilted eight normal subjects in the roll axis at a 45 deg angle in the dark for 90 minutes without rotational motion. Their postural responses did not change following the period of tilt. Based on verbal reports, normal subjects overestimated roll

  12. Sport-specific balance.

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    Zemková, Erika

    2014-05-01

    This review includes the latest findings based on experimental studies addressing sport-specific balance, an area of research that has grown dramatically in recent years. The main objectives of this work were to investigate the postural sway response to different forms of exercise under laboratory and sport-specific conditions, to examine how this effect can vary with expertise, and to provide examples of the association of impaired balance with sport performance and/or increasing risk of injury. In doing so, sports where body balance is one of the limiting factors of performance were analyzed. While there are no significant differences in postural stability between athletes of different specializations and physically active individuals during standing in a standard upright position (e.g., bipedal stance), they have a better ability to maintain balance in specific conditions (e.g., while standing on a narrow area of support). Differences in magnitude of balance impairment after specific exercises (rebound jumps, repeated rotations, etc.) and mainly in speed of its readjustment to baseline are also observed. Besides some evidence on an association of greater postural sway with the increasing risk of injuries, there are many myths related to the negative influence of impaired balance on sport performance. Though this may be true for shooting or archery, findings have shown that in many other sports, highly skilled athletes are able to perform successfully in spite of increased postural sway. These findings may contribute to better understanding of the postural control system under various performance requirements. It may provide useful knowledge for designing training programs for specific sports.

  13. Postural adaptations to repeated optic flow stimulation in older adults

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    O’Connor, Kathryn W.; Loughlin, Patrick J.; Redfern, Mark S.; Sparto, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the processes of adaptation (changes in within-trial postural responses) and habituation (reductions in between-trial postural responses) to visual cues in older and young adults. Of particular interest were responses to sudden increases in optic flow magnitude. The postural sway of 25 healthy young adults and 24 healthy older adults was measured while subjects viewed anterior-posterior 0.4 Hz sinusoidal optic flow for 45 s. Three trials for each of three conditions were performed: 1) constant 12 cm optic flow amplitude (24 cm peak-to-peak), 2) constant 4 cm amplitude (8 cm p-t-p), and 3) a transition in amplitude from 4 to 12 cm. The average power of head sway velocity (Pvel) was calculated for consecutive 5 s intervals during the trial to examine the changes in sway within and between trials. A mixed factor repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effects of subject Group, Trial, and Interval on the Pvel. Pvel was greater in older adults in all conditions (p Pvel of the older adults decreased significantly between all 3 trials, but decreased only between trial 1 and 2 in young adults. While the responses of the young adults to the transition in optic flow from 4 to 12 cm did not significantly change, older adults had an increase in Pvel following the transition, ranging from 6.5 dB for the first trial to 3.4 dB for the third trial. These results show that older adults can habituate to repeated visual perturbation exposures; however, this habituation requires a greater number of exposures than young adults. This suggests aging impacts the ability to quickly modify the relative weighting of the sensory feedback for postural stabilization. PMID:18329878

  14. Lower limb joint alignment and postural control in elderly women

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    Míriam Raquel Meira Mainenti

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether quiet stance body sway is associated with ankle and knee joint angles in elderly women. Joint angles were measured using a manual goniometer and body sway was assessed using a force platform and four postural tasks with a combination of feet positions and eye condition. The sample (N = 58 showed the following angle values: 102 (100-104 for the tibiotarsal joint, 176 (174-180 for the subtalar joint, 184 (181-187 for knee flexion-extension, and 13 (10-15 for the Q-angle. Q-angle was significantly correlated (p < 0.05 with center of foot pressure (CP displacement area (r = 0.36, anteroposterior (SDy, r = 0.34 and lateral (SDx, r = 0.31 CP standard deviation, and anteroposterior CP range (r = 0.38 during the closed base, eyes opened trial (CBEO. The valgus group showed statistically higher values than the normal and varus groups for SDy (0.56 vs. 0.52 and 0.46 mm; p = 0.02, SDx (0.55 vs. 0.49 and 0.36 mm; p = 0.02 and anteroposterior range (3.32 vs. 2.78 and 2.38 mm; p = 0.01, CBEO. The displacement velocity of the CP was significantly higher for the asymmetric than the symmetric Q-angle group (8.0 vs. 5.3 mm/s – closed base, eyes closed trial. Knee alignment was correlated with measures of body sway in elderly women, but ankle alignment showed no correlation. Knee morphology should be considered an associated factor for quiet stance postural control.

  15. Effects of tetrahydrocannabinol on balance and gait in patients with dementia: A randomised controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Elsen, Geke Ah; Tobben, Lieke; Ahmed, Amir Ia; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Kramers, Cornelis; Marijnissen, Radboud M; Olde Rikkert, Marcel Gm; van der Marck, Marjolein A

    2017-02-01

    Oral tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is currently studied for its possible efficacy on dementia-related neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), but might lead to increased risk of falling. This was a randomised, double-blind, crossover study to evaluate the effects of THC on mobility in dementia patients. Eighteen community-dwelling patients ( M age =77 years) received 1.5 mg of oral THC twice daily and placebo, in random order, for three days, separated by a four-day washout. Balance and gait were assessed using SwayStar TM and GAITRite TM within two hours after administration, in two consecutive intervention periods, under the following conditions: standing with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC), preferred speed walking with and without a cognitive dual task. THC significantly increased sway during standing EC (roll angle 0.32[±0.6]°, p=0.05; pitch angle 1.04[±1.5]°, p=0.009; pitch velocity 1.96[±3.3]°/s, p=0.02), but not during standing EO. During preferred speed walking, THC increased stride length (4.3[±5.4] cm, p=0.005) and trunk sway (pitch angle 1.18[±1.6]°, p=0.005). No effects were observed during dual task walking. No differences in the number and type of adverse events were found, and no falls occurred after administration of THC. This study showed that 3 mg of THC per day has a benign adverse event profile regarding mobility and was well tolerated by community-dwelling dementia patients.

  16. Postural trials: expertise in rhythmic gymnastics increases control in lateral directions.

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    Calavalle, A R; Sisti, D; Rocchi, M B L; Panebianco, R; Del Sal, M; Stocchi, V

    2008-11-01

    The first aim of this paper was to investigate if expertise in rhythmic gymnastics influences postural performance even in an easy non-specific task such as bipedal posture. Rhythmic gymnastics is a unique female sport which encompasses aspects of both artistic gymnastics and ballet and includes the use of a small apparatus (rope, hoop, ball, clubs and ribbon). Most previous studies have shown that expertise achieved by artistic gymnasts and dancers improves postural steadiness only in the situations for which those athletes are trained. Literature has not yet compared rhythmic gymnasts to other athletes in terms of their postural strategies. Hence, the study presented herein tested a group of high level rhythmic gymnasts and a group of female university students, trained in other sports, in the bipedal posture under eyes open and closed conditions. A force platform was used to record body sway. (1) Distance from the centre of sway, (2) lateral and (3) antero-posterior displacements were analyzed in time and frequency domains. Comparing the two groups, it was found that rhythmic gymnasts had better strategies than students in simple postural tasks, especially in lateral directions and in the period from 0.05 to 2 s. The most interesting finding in this study is that rhythmic gymnastics training seems to have a direct effect on the ability to maintain bipedal posture, which may confirm the "transfer" hypothesis of rhythmic gymnastics expertise to bipedal postural sway, especially in medio-lateral displacements. This finding has never been reported in previous studies on artistic gymnasts and ballet dancers. Furthermore, the present study confirmed the visual dependence of all the athletes, irrespective of their disciplines, in their postural trials.

  17. [Assessment of influence of breath holding and hyperventilation on human postural stability with spectral analysis of stabilographic signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhov, M V; Makarenkova, E A; Mel'nikov, A A; Vikulov, A D

    2014-01-01

    The influence of breath holding and voluntary hyperventilation on the classic stabilometric parameters and the frequency characteristic of stabilographic signal were studied. We measured the stabilometric parameters on the force platform ("Ritm", Russia) on the healthy volunteers (n = 107) during quiet breath, voluntary hyperventilation (20 seconds) and maximal inspiratory breath holding (20 seconds). Respiratory frequency, respiratory amplitude and ventilation were estimated with strain gauge. We found that antero-posterior and medio-lateral sway amplitude and velocity as well as sway surface at breath-holding and at quiet breathing were the same, so breath holding didn't influence the postural stability. However the spectral parameters shifted to the high frequency range due to alteration of the respiratory muscles contractions during breath-holding versus quiet breath. Voluntary hyperventilation caused significant increase of all stabilographic indices that implied an impairment of postural stability, which was due to the increase of respiration frequency and amplitude. We also found that the spectral indices moved toward the high-frequency range with more pronounced degree of this shift versus breath holding. Besides, amplitudes of spectral peaks also increased. Perhaps such change of spectral indices was due to distortion of proprioceptive information because of increased excitability of nerve fibers during hyperventilation. Maximal inspiration breath holding causes strain of the postural control mechanisms that is reflected as elevation of postural sway frequency with no postural stability changes. Hyperventilation leads to the most prominent strain of balance function and decrease of steadiness that is manifested as increase of center of pressure oscillations amplitude and frequency.

  18. Balance and mobility training with or without concurrent cognitive training does not improve posture, but improves reaction time in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehu, Deborah; Paquet, Nicole; Lajoie, Yves

    2017-02-01

    The purpose was to determine whether balance and mobility training (BMT) or balance and mobility plus cognitive training (BMT+C) would reduce postural sway and reaction time (RT) and maintain these improvements after a 12-week follow-up in healthy older adults. Participants were allocated to the BMT (n=15; age: 70.2±3.2), BMT+C (n=14; age:68.7±5.5), or control group (n=13; age: 66.7±4.2). The BMT group trained one-on-one, 3×/wk for 12 weeks on a balance obstacle course. The BMT+C group trained one-on-one, 3×/week for 12 weeks on a balance obstacle course while completing cognitive tasks. Participants stood on a force plate for 30s in feet-apart (FA) and semi-tandem (ST) positions while completing simple RT and choice RT tasks at baseline, at the 12-week post-training, and at the 12-week follow-up. Participants were instructed to stand as still as possible while verbally responding as fast as possible to the auditory cues. No group differences in center of pressure (COP) Area, COP Velocity, or Sample Entropy of the COP displacement were shown after the training or 12-week follow-up, but the BMT and BMT+C showed faster RT after training and maintained these improvements at the 12-week follow-up compared to the control group. No differences in postural sway or RT emerged between the BMT and BMT+C groups. Both training groups improved RT after the interventions and sustained these improvements over 12 weeks, but showed no reductions in postural sway. Multi-task balance training likely results in reduced attention demand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Postural Stability of Patients with Schizophrenia during Challenging Sensory Conditions: Implication of Sensory Integration for Postural Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ya-Ling; Chen, Chiung-Ling; Lou, Shu-Zon; Wang, Wei-Tsan; Wu, Jui-Yen; Ma, Hui-Ing; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Postural dysfunctions are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and affect their daily life and ability to work. In addition, sensory functions and sensory integration that are crucial for postural control are also compromised. This study intended to examine how patients with schizophrenia coordinate multiple sensory systems to maintain postural stability in dynamic sensory conditions. Twenty-nine patients with schizophrenia and 32 control subjects were recruited. Postural stability of the participants was examined in six sensory conditions of different level of congruency of multiple sensory information, which was based on combinations of correct, removed, or conflicting sensory inputs from visual, somatosensory, and vestibular systems. The excursion of the center of pressure was measured by posturography. Equilibrium scores were derived to indicate the range of anterior-posterior (AP) postural sway, and sensory ratios were calculated to explore ability to use sensory information to maintain balance. The overall AP postural sway was significantly larger for patients with schizophrenia compared to the controls [patients (69.62±8.99); controls (76.53±7.47); t1,59 = -3.28, psensory conditions [F5,295 = 5.55, pSensory ratios were not significantly different between groups, although small and non-significant difference in inefficiency to utilize vestibular information was also noted. No significant correlations were found between postural stability and clinical characteristics. To sum up, patients with schizophrenia showed increased postural sway and a higher rate of falls during challenging sensory conditions, which was independent of clinical characteristics. Patients further demonstrated similar pattern and level of utilizing sensory information to maintain balance compared to the controls.

  20. Automatic postural response systems in individuals with congenital total blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, H; Yabe, K

    2001-07-01

    This study examined the effects of the absence of vision from birth on automatic postural responses to platform displacements during stance. Postural responses were induced by producing randomly four types of perturbations which consisted of forward and backward translations, and toe up and down rotations. Nine congenitally totally blind and nine sighted adults served as subjects. EMG signals were recorded from four muscles in the right leg, and reaction time to somatosensory stimuli generated by platform displacements was measured by pushing a hand-held button. To assess the ability to control postural balance, the root mean square (RMS) values for lateral and antero-posterior sway before, during, and after perturbations were calculated. The EMG amplitude in the gastrocnemius muscle of a blind subject was smaller than that of a sighted subject with eyes closed. No significant differences were found between blind and sighted subjects in EMG latencies of the lower extremity muscles in response to perturbations. The blind subjects had significantly faster reaction times to somatosensory stimuli triggered by platform displacements, but in toe down rotations no significant difference was found between blind and sighted subjects. The difference in the EMG latencies and reaction times between the two groups suggests that blindness from birth may not affect the spinal stretch reflex, but may affect a volitional act mediated through the motor cortex. There were also no significant differences in the RMS values for postural sway between blind and sighted subjects with eyes open or closed, although blind subjects swayed more after backward translations than did sighted subjects with eyes open. Results suggest that the ability to control postural balance during perturbations was not affected by vision loss from birth. Our findings suggest that the automatic postural response systems of humans are unaffected by the absence of vision from birth and are rather hard wired.

  1. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control. PMID:26528154

  2. Elderly Use Proprioception Rather than Visual and Vestibular Cues for Postural Motor Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmeier, Isabella Katharina; Dalin, Daniela; Maurer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Multiple factors have been proposed to contribute to the deficits of postural control in the elderly. They were summarized as sensory, motor, and higher-level adaptation deficits. Using a model-based approach, we aimed to identify which of these deficits mainly determine age-related changes in postural control. We analyzed postural control of 20 healthy elderly people with a mean age of 74 years. The findings were compared to data from 19 healthy young volunteers (mean age 28 years) and 16 healthy middle-aged volunteers (mean age 48 years). Postural control was characterized by spontaneous sway measures and measures of perturbed stance. Perturbations were induced by pseudorandom anterior-posterior tilts of the body support surface. We found that spontaneous sway amplitude and velocity were significantly larger, and sway frequencies were higher in elderly compared to young people. Body excursions as a function of tilt stimuli were clearly different in elderly compared to young people. Based on simple feedback model simulations, we found that elderly favor proprioceptive over visual and vestibular cues, other than younger subjects do. Moreover, we identified an increase in overall time delay challenging the feedback systems stability, and a decline in the amplitude of the motor feedback, probably representing weakness of the motor system. In general, these parameter differences between young and old may result from both deficits and compensation strategies in the elderly. Our model-based findings correlate well with deficits measured with clinical balance scores, which are widely used in clinical practice.

  3. Elderly rely on proprioception rather than on space cues when standing

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    Isabella Katharina Wiesmeier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple factors have been proposed to contribute to the deficits of postural control in the elderly. They were summarized as sensory, motor, and higher level adaptation deficits. As for the sensory deficits, known degradations include proprioceptive, visual, and vestibular channels. Using a model-based approach, we aimed to identify which of the sensory, motor and adaptation deficits mainly determine age-related changes in postural control.We analyzed postural control of 20 healthy elderly people with a mean age of 74 years. The findings were compared to data from 19 healthy young volunteers (mean age 28 years and 16 healthy middle-aged volunteers (mean age 48 years. Postural control was characterized by spontaneous sway measures and measures of perturbed stance. Perturbations were induced by pseudorandom anterior-posterior tilts of the body support surface. As observed in other studies, we found that spontaneous sway amplitude and velocity were significantly larger, and sway frequencies were higher in elderly compared to young people. Gain profiles as a function of stimulus frequencies, amplitudes, and visual conditions, a new measure based on the transfer functions between external stimuli and body responses, were clearly different in elderly compared to young people. Based on simple feedback model simulations, we found that elderly favor proprioceptive over space cues, other than younger subjects. This may indicate that the visual and vestibular inputs for posture degrade faster with age than the proprioceptive input does. Moreover, we identified an increase in overall time delay challenging the feedback systems stability, and a decline in the amplitude of the motor feedback, probably representing the aging of the motor system. In general, these parameter differences between young and old may result from both degradation processes and compensation strategies. Our model-based findings correlated well with clinical balance scores.

  4. Reliability of System Identification Techniques to Assess Standing Balance in Healthy Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasma, Jantsje H; Engelhart, Denise; Maier, Andrea B; Aarts, Ronald G K M; van Gerven, Joop M A; Arendzen, J Hans; Schouten, Alfred C; Meskers, Carel G M; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    System identification techniques have the potential to assess the contribution of the underlying systems involved in standing balance by applying well-known disturbances. We investigated the reliability of standing balance parameters obtained with multivariate closed loop system identification techniques. In twelve healthy elderly balance tests were performed twice a day during three days. Body sway was measured during two minutes of standing with eyes closed and the Balance test Room (BalRoom) was used to apply four disturbances simultaneously: two sensory disturbances, to the proprioceptive and the visual system, and two mechanical disturbances applied at the leg and trunk segment. Using system identification techniques, sensitivity functions of the sensory disturbances and the neuromuscular controller were estimated. Based on the generalizability theory (G theory), systematic errors and sources of variability were assessed using linear mixed models and reliability was assessed by computing indexes of dependability (ID), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC). A systematic error was found between the first and second trial in the sensitivity functions. No systematic error was found in the neuromuscular controller and body sway. The reliability of 15 of 25 parameters and body sway were moderate to excellent when the results of two trials on three days were averaged. To reach an excellent reliability on one day in 7 out of 25 parameters, it was predicted that at least seven trials must be averaged. This study shows that system identification techniques are a promising method to assess the underlying systems involved in standing balance in elderly. However, most of the parameters do not appear to be reliable unless a large number of trials are collected across multiple days. To reach an excellent reliability in one third of the parameters, a training session for participants is needed and at least seven trials of two minutes must be

  5. Reliability of System Identification Techniques to Assess Standing Balance in Healthy Elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantsje H Pasma

    Full Text Available System identification techniques have the potential to assess the contribution of the underlying systems involved in standing balance by applying well-known disturbances. We investigated the reliability of standing balance parameters obtained with multivariate closed loop system identification techniques.In twelve healthy elderly balance tests were performed twice a day during three days. Body sway was measured during two minutes of standing with eyes closed and the Balance test Room (BalRoom was used to apply four disturbances simultaneously: two sensory disturbances, to the proprioceptive and the visual system, and two mechanical disturbances applied at the leg and trunk segment. Using system identification techniques, sensitivity functions of the sensory disturbances and the neuromuscular controller were estimated. Based on the generalizability theory (G theory, systematic errors and sources of variability were assessed using linear mixed models and reliability was assessed by computing indexes of dependability (ID, standard error of measurement (SEM and minimal detectable change (MDC.A systematic error was found between the first and second trial in the sensitivity functions. No systematic error was found in the neuromuscular controller and body sway. The reliability of 15 of 25 parameters and body sway were moderate to excellent when the results of two trials on three days were averaged. To reach an excellent reliability on one day in 7 out of 25 parameters, it was predicted that at least seven trials must be averaged.This study shows that system identification techniques are a promising method to assess the underlying systems involved in standing balance in elderly. However, most of the parameters do not appear to be reliable unless a large number of trials are collected across multiple days. To reach an excellent reliability in one third of the parameters, a training session for participants is needed and at least seven trials of two

  6. Postural control and freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenstedt, Christian; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Witt, Karsten; Weisser, Burkhard; Fasano, Alfonso; Deuschl, Günther

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between freezing of gait (FOG) and postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We analyzed the impact of FOG on postural control. 31 PD patients with FOG (PD+FOG), 27 PD patients without FOG (PD-FOG) and 22 healthy control (HC) were assessed in the ON state. Postural control was measured with the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale and with center of pressure (COP) analysis during quiet stance and maximal voluntary forward/backward leaning. The groups were balanced concerning age, disease duration and disease severity. PD+FOG performed significantly worse in the FAB scale (21.8 ± 5.8) compared to PD-FOG (25.6 ± 5.0) and HC (34.9 ± 2.4) (mean ± SD, p < 0.01). PD+FOG had impaired ability to voluntary lean forward, difficulties to stand on foam with eyes closed and reduced limits of stability compared to PD-FOG (p < 0.05). During quiet stance the average anterior-posterior COP position was significantly displaced towards posterior in PD+FOG in comparison to PD-FOG and HC (p < 0.05). The COP position correlated with severity of FOG (p < 0.01). PD+FOG and PD-FOG did not differ in average COP sway excursion, sway velocity, sway regularity and postural control asymmetry. PD+FOG have reduced postural control compared to PD-FOG and HC. Our results show a relationship between the anterior-posterior COP position during quiet stance and FOG. The COP shift towards posterior in PD+FOG leads to a restricted precondition to generate forward progression during gait initiation. This may contribute to the occurrence of FOG or might be a compensatory strategy to avoid forward falls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Postural threat differentially affects the feedforward and feedback components of the vestibular-evoked balance response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Callum J; Tersteeg, M C A; Reynolds, Raymond F; Loram, Ian D

    2013-10-01

    Circumstances may render the consequence of falling quite severe, thus maximising the motivation to control postural sway. This commonly occurs when exposed to height and may result from the interaction of many factors, including fear, arousal, sensory information and perception. Here, we examined human vestibular-evoked balance responses during exposure to a highly threatening postural context. Nine subjects stood with eyes closed on a narrow walkway elevated 3.85 m above ground level. This evoked an altered psycho-physiological state, demonstrated by a twofold increase in skin conductance. Balance responses were then evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation. The sway response, which comprised a whole-body lean in the direction of the edge of the walkway, was significantly and substantially attenuated after ~800 ms. This demonstrates that a strong reason to modify the balance control strategy was created and subjects were highly motivated to minimise sway. Despite this, the initial response remained unchanged. This suggests little effect on the feedforward settings of the nervous system responsible for coupling pure vestibular input to functional motor output. The much stronger, later effect can be attributed to an integration of balance-relevant sensory feedback once the body was in motion. These results demonstrate that the feedforward and feedback components of a vestibular-evoked balance response are differently affected by postural threat. Although a fear of falling has previously been linked with instability and even falling itself, our findings suggest that this relationship is not attributable to changes in the feedforward vestibular control of balance. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Learning to balance on one leg: motor strategy and sensory weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dieën, Jaap H; van Leeuwen, Marloes; Faber, Gert S

    2015-11-01

    We investigated motor and sensory changes underlying learning of a balance task. Fourteen participants practiced balancing on one leg on a board that could freely rotate in the frontal plane. They performed six, 16-s trials standing on one leg on a stable surface (2 trials without manipulation, 2 with vestibular, and 2 with visual stimulation) and six trials on the balance board before and after a 30-min training. Center of mass (COM) movement, segment, and total angular momenta and board angles were determined. Trials on stable surface were compared with trials after training to assess effects of surface conditions. Trials pretraining and posttraining were compared to assess rapid (between trials pretraining) and slower (before and after training) learning, and sensory manipulation trials were compared with unperturbed trials to assess sensory weighting. COM excursions were larger on the unstable surface but decreased with practice, with the largest improvement over the pretraining trials. Changes in angular momentum contributed more to COM acceleration on the balance board, but with practice this decreased. Visual stimulation increased sway similarly in both surface conditions, while vestibular stimulation increased sway less on the balance board. With practice, the effects of visual and vestibular stimulation increased rapidly. Initially, oscillations of the balance board occurred at 3.5 Hz, which decreased with practice. The initial decrease in sway with practice was associated with upweighting of visual information, while later changes were associated with suppression of oscillations that we suggest are due to too high proprioceptive feedback gains. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The level of response to alcohol in daughters of alcoholics and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Mimy Y; Schuckit, Marc A; Smith, Tom L

    2005-07-01

    The low level of response (LR) to alcohol is a genetically influenced characteristic related to the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). This phenotype is found in men with a family history (FH) of alcoholism, predicts future AUDs, and has heritabilities as high as 60%. However, despite evidence of genetic influences for AUDs in both sexes, the majority of studies evaluating differences in LR across high- and low-risk groups have been conducted on males, and it is unclear how generalizable these results are to women. Twenty-five women who are family history positive (FHP) for alcohol dependence were matched with 25 women with no FH of alcoholism (FHN) on factors that may impact LR. Using an alcohol challenge paradigm, data on the reaction to a moderate dose of alcohol were gathered over a period of 3.5 h. Assessments included breath alcohol concentrations (BrACs), the Subjective High Assessment Scale (SHAS), as well as body sway or static ataxia. Family history positives reported lower subjective intoxication than FHNs. In addition, when body sway scores were corrected for skewness, FHPs had significantly lower scores on alcohol-related changes in lateral sway. These differences remained after considering the effects of drinking history and BrAC values. This study evaluated the LR to alcohol in the largest sample of alcohol challenges in matched FHP and FHN women to date. Overall, the findings are consistent with most data from earlier investigations of smaller sized samples of FHP women. The results suggest that, similar to sons of alcoholics, a low LR to alcohol might also be characteristic of daughters of alcoholics.

  10. Response to alcohol in daughters of alcoholics: a pilot study and a comparison with sons of alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, M A; Smith, T L; Kalmijn, J; Tsuang, J; Hesselbrock, V; Bucholz, K

    2000-01-01

    Drinking, but not alcohol-dependent, 18-29-year-old daughters of alcoholics (n = 38) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism were compared to 75 family-history-positive (FHP) men from the same families, and 68 family-history-negative (FHN) male controls. Subjects received 0.75 ml/kg of ethanol (for women), 0.9 ml/kg of ethanol (for men), and placebo, each of which was consumed over 8 min on different occasions. The breath-alcohol concentrations (BrAC) and reactions to alcohol [using the Subjective High Assessment Scale (SHAS) and body sway measures] were evaluated over 210 min. The results indicate that, despite slightly higher BrAC values for the FHP men, on the SHAS the FHP women and the FHP men demonstrated significantly lower scores than the FHN male controls, although the values for FHP men and women did not differ. On body sway, the FHP men showed evidence of less alcohol-related increases than FHN men, and there was a trend in the same direction for FHP women, but only early in the session (e.g. at 60 min). Pilot data for 11 FHN women revealed higher scores for both SHAS and body sway at 60 min, compared to FHP women, but, perhaps reflecting the small number of subjects, the family history differences were not significant. Overall, the results in FHP women resemble those for FHP men, and suggest that a low level of response to alcohol might also be a characteristic of daughters of alcoholics.

  11. Direct and indirect measurement of neuromuscular fatigue in Canadian football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Nick; Farthing, Jonathan P; Lanovaz, Joel L; Krentz, Joel R

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed the effects of a fatiguing game simulation (G-Sim) on the balance of collegiate Canadian football players. The purpose of the study was to evaluate postural control as a potential tool for monitoring neuromuscular fatigue (NMF) in collision-based team sports. Fifteen male Canadian football players were recruited (mean±SD: age 21.8±1.6 years, weight 97.6±14.7 kg). Indirect NMF measures (postural sway and countermovement jump (CMJ)) were performed 24 h before (TBase), immediately before (TPre) and after (TPost), and 24 h (T24) and 48 h after (T48) a Canadian football G-Sim. Peak isometric knee extensor torque of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and electrically evoked tetani at 20 Hz (P20) and 80 Hz (P80) were also recorded as direct NMF measures at TBase, TPre, TPost, and T48. At TPost, we observed significant declines in MVC, P20, and the MVC/P80 ratio (-15.3%, -15.7%, and -12.1%, respectively; n=12) along with reductions in CMJ takeoff velocity and peak power (-6.9% and -6.5%, respectively; n=12) and larger area of the center of pressure trajectory (95.2%; n=10) during a 60-s postural sway task. All variables were no longer different than baseline by T48. Acute neuromuscular impairment in this cohort is likely attributable to alterations in excitation-contraction coupling due to structural damage and central activation failure. Congruency between the direct and indirect measures of NMF suggests monitoring postural sway has the potential to identify both neuromuscular and somatosensory alterations induced by acute game-induced fatigue in collision-based team sports players.

  12. Referent control of the orientation of posture and movement in the gravitational field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullick, Aditi A; Turpin, Nicolas A; Hsu, Szu-Chen; Subramanian, Sandeep K; Feldman, Anatol G; Levin, Mindy F

    2018-02-01

    This study addresses the question of how posture and movement are oriented with respect to the direction of gravity. It is suggested that neural control levels coordinate spatial thresholds at which multiple muscles begin to be activated to specify a referent body orientation (RO) at which muscle activity is minimized. Under the influence of gravity, the body is deflected from the RO to an actual orientation (AO) until the emerging muscle activity and forces begin to balance gravitational forces and maintain body stability. We assumed that (1) during quiet standing on differently tilted surfaces, the same RO and thus AO can be maintained by adjusting activation thresholds of ankle muscles according to the surface tilt angle; (2) intentional forward body leaning results from monotonic ramp-and-hold shifts in the RO; (3) rhythmic oscillation of the RO about the ankle joints during standing results in body swaying. At certain sway phases, the AO and RO may transiently overlap, resulting in minima in the activity of multiple muscles across the body. EMG kinematic patterns of the 3 tasks were recorded and explained based on the RO concept that implies that these patterns emerge due to referent control without being pre-programmed. We also confirmed the predicted occurrence of minima in the activity of multiple muscles at specific body configurations during swaying. Results re-affirm previous rejections of model-based computational theories of motor control. The role of different descending systems in the referent control of posture and movement in the gravitational field is considered.

  13. Effect of a single session of ear acupuncture on pain intensity and postural control in individuals with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ushinohama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Ear Acupuncture (EA is a form of acupuncture in which needles are applied to the external ear and has been used in multiple painful conditions. Low back pain (LBP is highly prevalent in active individuals and causes high economic burden to health systems worldwide. LBP affects the person’s ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a single session of EA on pain intensity and body sway during postural tasks. Method Eighty adults with LBP and pain intensity equal to or greater than 4 (0-10 scale were randomly allocated (1:1 to EA group (EAG or placebo group (PG. Initially, the level of pain intensity was assessed. Next, participants stood still on a force plate either with feet in parallel or in semi-tandem and with eyes open or closed. Then, the EAG was treated with EA for 20 min and the PG was treated with detuned ultrasound. After the treatment, pain intensity was assessed again and the postural test was repeated. Pain intensity was the primary outcome and center of pressure sway area and speed were the secondary outcomes measured. Results Results revealed that pain intensity decreased in both groups after treatment, but decreased more in the EAG. For postural control, no effect of treatment and no interaction between treatment and postural condition on body sway were found. Conclusion Those findings indicate that EA is better than placebo to reduce pain, but neither treatment has any effect on postural control.

  14. Visuomotor Entrainment and the Frequency-Dependent Response of Walking Balance to Perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Francis, Carrie; Allen, Matt; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-08-26

    Visuomotor entrainment, or the synchronization of motor responses to visual stimuli, is a naturally emergent phenomenon in human standing. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence and resolution of visuomotor entrainment in walking and the frequency-dependent response of walking balance to perturbations. We used a virtual reality environment to manipulate optical flow in ten healthy young adults during treadmill walking. A motion capture system recorded trunk, sacrum, and heel marker trajectories during a series of 3-min conditions in which we perturbed a virtual hallway mediolaterally with systematic changes in the driving frequencies of perceived motion. We quantified visuomotor entrainment using spectral analyses and balance deficits using trunk sway, gait variability, and detrended fluctuation analyses (DFA). ML kinematics were highly sensitive to visual perturbations, and instinctively synchronized (i.e., entrained) to a broad range of driving frequencies of perceived ML motion. However, the influence of visual perturbations on metrics of walking balance was frequency-dependent and governed by their proximity to stride frequency. Specifically, we found that a driving frequency nearest to subjects' average stride frequency uniquely compromised trunk sway, gait variability, and step-to-step correlations. We conclude that visuomotor entrainment is a robust and naturally emerging phenomenon during human walking, involving coordinated and frequency-dependent adjustments in trunk sway and foot placement to maintain balance at the whole-body level. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the visuomotor control of walking balance is disrupted by visual perturbations and important reference values for the emergence of balance deficits due to age, injury, or disease.

  15. Optimized Experiment Design for Marine Systems Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Knudsen, Morten

    1999-01-01

    Simulation of maneuvring and design of motion controls for marine systems require non-linear mathematical models, which often have more than one-hundred parameters. Model identification is hence an extremely difficult task. This paper discusses experiment design for marine systems identification...... and proposes a sensitivity approach to solve the practical experiment design problem. The applicability of the sensitivity approach is demonstrated on a large non-linear model of surge, sway, roll and yaw of a ship. The use of the method is illustrated for a container-ship where both model and full-scale tests...

  16. [The battle against charlatanism: the institutionalization of scientific medicine in the province of Goiás].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Sônia Maria de

    2011-12-01

    The article centers on conflicts between the types of medicine practiced in nineteenth-century Goiás, when the discourse of scientific medicine imposed its presence and defined the spaces where physicians holding medical degrees could practice while precluding those without degrees, viewed as charlatans by the former. The analysis underscores the clashes triggered as academic medicine endeavored to hold sway over other healing arts, along with the challenges it encountered in establishing an exclusive claim to the practice of medical treatment. The careers of three physicians from the interior of Brazil serve to illustrate the slow process by which medicine achieved institutionalization.

  17. Using M and S to Improve Human Decision Making and Achieve Effective Problem Solving in an International Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Vanessa L.; Landess, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In the international arena, decision makers are often swayed away from fact-based analysis by their own individual cultural and political bias. Modeling and Simulation-based training can raise awareness of individual predisposition and improve the quality of decision making by focusing solely on fact vice perception. This improved decision making methodology will support the multinational collaborative efforts of military and civilian leaders to solve challenges more effectively. The intent of this experimental research is to create a framework that allows decision makers to "come to the table" with the latest and most significant facts necessary to determine an appropriate solution for any given contingency.

  18. Postural adaptations to repeated optic flow stimulation in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connor, Kathryn W.; Loughlin, Patrick J.; Redfern, Mark S.; Sparto, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the processes of adaptation (changes in within-trial postural responses) and habituation (reductions in between-trial postural responses) to visual cues in older and young adults. Of particular interest were responses to sudden increases in optic flow magnitude. The postural sway of 25 healthy young adults and 24 healthy older adults was measured while subjects viewed anterior-posterior 0.4 Hz sinusoidal optic flow for 45 s. Three trials for each of ...

  19. Prevalance and characteristics of epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd variants Groenendael and Tervueren born in Denmark 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Gulløv, Christina Hedal; Christensen, Stine Louise Krogh

    2008-01-01

    1995 and 2004. Furthermore, it was the intention to describe the clinical manifestation (seizure types and phenomenology) of epilepsy and to identify risk factors for euthanasia once the dog was diagnosed as having epilepsy. METHODS: All owners of Groenendael and Tervueren dogs born between January...... seizures. In four percent seizures were unclassifiable. The most commonly reported focal seizure phenomenology included ataxia, crawling, swaying, fearful behavior, salivation, excessive attention seeking and disorientation. In 16% of the cases, epilepsy led to euthanasia. Intact dogs with epilepsy had...

  20. The multitrace matrix model: An alternative to Connes NCG and IKKT model in 2 dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ydri, Badis, E-mail: ydri@stp.dias.ie

    2016-12-10

    We present a new multitrace matrix model, which is a generalization of the real quartic one matrix model, exhibiting dynamical emergence of a fuzzy two-sphere and its non-commutative gauge theory. This provides a novel and a much simpler alternative to Connes non-commutative geometry and to the IKKT matrix model for emergent geometry in two dimensions. However, in higher dimensions this mechanism is not known to exist and the systematic frameworks of NCG and IKKT are expected to hold sway.

  1. An Interview with Professor Roy Caldwell

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhary, Kuntal; Bhat, Prashant; Rosen, Jared; Naughton, Ida; Wang, Jingyan

    2013-01-01

    Envision the underwater world: vibrant coral, swaying seaweed, and lively creatures abound. However, the postcards and National Geographic covers that try to capture the beauty of this picturesque habitat can only represent it at one moment in time -- in reality, the landscape is hardly static, since many of its animals are capable of body modifications to change their shape and color. To understand the coloration and color vision of sea creatures, UC Berkeley Professor Roy L. Caldwell resear...

  2. A mathematical model for incorporating biofeedback into human postural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersal Tulga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofeedback of body motion can serve as a balance aid and rehabilitation tool. To date, mathematical models considering the integration of biofeedback into postural control have represented this integration as a sensory addition and limited their application to a single degree-of-freedom representation of the body. This study has two objectives: 1 to develop a scalable method for incorporating biofeedback into postural control that is independent of the model’s degrees of freedom, how it handles sensory integration, and the modeling of its postural controller; and 2 to validate this new model using multidirectional perturbation experimental results. Methods Biofeedback was modeled as an additional torque to the postural controller torque. For validation, this biofeedback modeling approach was applied to a vibrotactile biofeedback device and incorporated into a two-link multibody model with full-state-feedback control that represents the dynamics of bipedal stance. Average response trajectories of body sway and center of pressure (COP to multidirectional surface perturbations of subjects with vestibular deficits were used for model parameterization and validation in multiple perturbation directions and for multiple display resolutions. The quality of fit was quantified using average error and cross-correlation values. Results The mean of the average errors across all tactor configurations and perturbations was 0.24° for body sway and 0.39 cm for COP. The mean of the cross-correlation value was 0.97 for both body sway and COP. Conclusions The biofeedback model developed in this study is capable of capturing experimental response trajectory shapes with low average errors and high cross-correlation values in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions for all perturbation directions and spatial resolution display configurations considered. The results validate that biofeedback can be modeled as an additional

  3. Nintendo® Wii Fit based sleepiness tester detects impairment of postural steadiness due to 24 h of wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietäväinen, Aino; Gates, Fred K; Meriläinen, Antti; Mandel, Jeff E; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-12-01

    A field-usable sleepiness tester could reduce sleepiness related accidents. 15 subjects' postural steadiness was measured with a Nintendo(®) Wii Fit balance board every hour for 24 h. Body sway was quantified with complexity index, CI, and the correlation between CI and alertness predicted by a three-process model of sleepiness was calculated. The CI group average was 8.9 ± 1.3 for alert and 7.9 ± 1.4 for sleep deprived subjects (p Wii Fit board detects the impairment of postural steadiness. This may allow large scale sleepiness testing outside the laboratory setting. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  4. China's energy security, the Malacca dilemma and responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongxiang

    2011-01-01

    China's rapid economic growth has led to a huge increase in oil imports. This has raised great concern regarding its energy security because China depends on a single chokepoint, the Strait of Malacca, with nearly three-quarters of its oil imports flowing through the Strait. Given its strategic importance to China and China's little sway on the waterway, this viewpoint focuses mainly on China's concerns about and efforts at both demand and supply sides towards energy security, in particular regarding the Malacca dilemma, and puts potential Arctic oil and gas into that context.

  5. Vestibular Effects of a 7 Tesla MRI Examination Compared to 1.5 T and 0 T in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theysohn, Jens M.; Kraff, Oliver; Eilers, Kristina; Andrade, Dorian; Gerwig, Marcus; Timmann, Dagmar; Schmitt, Franz; Ladd, Mark E.; Ladd, Susanne C.; Bitz, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI (7 Tesla (T) and above) elicits more temporary side-effects compared to 1.5 T and 3 T, e.g. dizziness or “postural instability” even after exiting the scanner. The current study aims to assess quantitatively vestibular performance before and after exposure to different MRI scenarios at 7 T, 1.5 T and 0 T. Sway path and body axis rotation (Unterberger's stepping test) were quantitatively recorded in a total of 46 volunteers before, 2 minutes after, and 15 minutes after different exposure scenarios: 7 T head MRI (n = 27), 7 T no RF (n = 22), 7 T only B0 (n = 20), 7 T in & out B0 (n = 20), 1.5 T no RF (n = 20), 0 T (n = 15). All exposure scenarios lasted 30 minutes except for brief one minute exposure in 7 T in & out B0. Both measures were documented utilizing a 3D ultrasound system. During sway path evaluation, the experiment was repeated with eyes both open and closed. Sway paths for all long-lasting 7 T scenarios (normal, no RF, only B0) with eyes closed were significantly prolonged 2 minutes after exiting the scanner, normalizing after 15 minutes. Brief exposure to 7 T B0 or 30 minutes exposure to 1.5 T or 0 T did not show significant changes. End positions after Unterberger's stepping test were significantly changed counter-clockwise after all 7 T scenarios, including the brief in & out B0 exposure. Shorter exposure resulted in a smaller alteration angle. In contrast to sway path, reversal of changes in body axis rotation was incomplete after 15 minutes. 1.5 T caused no rotational changes. The results show that exposure to the 7 Tesla static magnetic field causes only a temporary dysfunction or “over-compensation” of the vestibular system not measurable at 1.5 or 0 Tesla. Radiofrequency fields, gradient switching, and orthostatic dysregulation do not seem to play a role. PMID:24658179

  6. Path Through the Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Middleton

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hillside’s tidal waves of yellow-green Break downward into full-grown stalks of wheat In which a peasant, shouldering his hoe Passes along a snaking narrow path -- A teeming place through which his hard thighs press And where his head just barely stays above The swaying grain, drunken in abundance, Farm buildings almost floating on the swells Beyond which sea gulls gliding white in air Fly down on out of sight to salty fields, Taking the channel fish off Normandy, A surfeit fit for Eden i...

  7. Sensorimotor Control in Individuals With Idiopathic Neck Pain and Healthy Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zoete, Rutger M J; Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Farrell, Scott F; Snodgrass, Suzanne J

    2017-06-01

    (1) To identify reported tests used to assess sensorimotor control in individuals with idiopathic neck pain and (2) to investigate whether these tests can quantify differences between individuals with idiopathic neck pain and healthy individuals. Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, MEDLINE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, and SPORTDiscus. Studies reporting sensorimotor outcomes in individuals with idiopathic neck pain or healthy individuals were identified. There were 1,677 records screened independently by 2 researchers for eligibility: 43 studies were included in the review, with 30 of these studies included in the meta-analysis. Methodologic quality was determined using the Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. Data were extracted using a standardized extraction table. Sensorimotor control was most commonly assessed by joint position error and postural sway. Pooled means for joint position error after cervical rotation in individuals with neck pain (range, 2.2°-9.8°) differed significantly (P=.04) compared with healthy individuals (range, 1.66°-5.1°). Postural sway with eyes open ranged from 4.85 to 10.5cm 2 (neck pain) and 3.5 to 6.6cm 2 (healthy) (P=.16), and postural sway with eyes closed ranged from 2.51 to 16.6cm 2 (neck pain) and 2.74 to 10.9cm 2 (healthy) (P=.30). Individual studies, but not meta-analysis, demonstrated differences between neck pain and healthy groups for postural sway. Other test conditions and other tests were not sufficiently investigated to enable pooling of data. The findings from this review suggest sensorimotor control testing may be clinically useful in individuals with idiopathic neck pain. However, results should be interpreted with caution because clinical differences were small; therefore, further cross-sectional research with larger samples is needed to determine the magnitude of the relation between

  8. Making difficult decisions how to be decisive and get the business done

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Peter J A

    2010-01-01

    You are faced with so many difficult decisions. Often your decision making seems random. It can be swayed by different situations and emotions. You need to be more rigorous in the way you make decisions and yet you have very little time to do so. Experience from others who have made tough decisions and a framework to help you do so would be invaluable. The courage to make decisions is sometimes a bit elusive. It is difficult to find the calmness to be able to make and live with those decisions. There is so much that can be learned from the experience of others. After working through this boo

  9. 5-HT1A receptor blockade targeting the basolateral amygdala improved stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation and retrieval in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardari, M; Rezayof, A; Zarrindast, M-R

    2015-08-06

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) 5-HT1A receptors in memory formation under stress. We also examined whether the blockade of these receptors is involved in stress-induced state-dependent memory. Adult male Wistar rats received cannula implants that bilaterally targeted the BLA. Long-term memory was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Behavioral stress was evoked by exposure to an elevated platform (EP) for 10, 20 and 30min. Post-training exposure to acute stress (30min) impaired the memory consolidation. In addition, pre-test exposure to acute stress-(20 and 30min) induced the impairment of memory retrieval. Interestingly, the memory impairment induced by post-training exposure to stress was restored in the animals that received 20- or 30-min pre-test stress exposure, suggesting stress-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Post-training BLA-targeted injection of a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (S)-WAY-100135 (2μg/rat), prevented the impairing effect of stress on memory consolidation. Pre-test injection of the same doses of (S)-WAY-100135 that was targeted to the BLA also reversed stress-induced memory retrieval impairment. It should be considered that post-training or pre-test BLA-targeted injection of (S)-WAY-100135 (0.5-2μg/rat) by itself had no effect on the memory formation. Moreover, pre-test injection of (S)-WAY-100135 (2μg/rat) that targeted the BLA inhibited the stress-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Taken together, our findings suggest that post-training or pre-test exposure to acute stress induced the impairment of memory consolidation, retrieval and state-dependent learning. The BLA 5-HT1A receptors have a critical role in learning and memory under stress. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Normal distribution of standing balance for healthy Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Ghasemi, Habib; Rahbek, Ole

    2013-01-01

    in children with orthopedic disabilities undergoing surgical procedures. Recent technology provides extremely usable sway analysis of balance parameters but a normal material for the standing balance of healthy children is lacking. Purpose/Aim of Study First, to assess standing balance in healthy Danish...... compared to open eyes (p=0,0000) and this difference was strongest in the lower grades. Girls had a significantly better balance than boys with open and closed eyes especially in the higher grades. Conclusions In this study we measured the effect of BMI, age, gender and visual information on standing...

  11. The "As-If" World of Nursing Practice: Nurses, Marketing, and Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Quinn; Malone, Ruth E

    The "as-if" world of nursing is a well-constructed, institutionally preserved and defended myth that asserts clinicians who are "just nurses" do not make decisions in the absence of "doctor's orders." Drawing on data from an ethnography exploring the interactions between nurses and industry, we explore the finding that many nurses did not identify as "decision makers" and were mystified by the attention of sales representatives. Many nurses experienced marketing as benign as there was no "decision" to sway. Nursing must deconstruct the "as-if" nondecisional myth by confronting conflicts of interest and owning fully its rightful clinical and advocacy roles. www.advancesinnursingscience.com.

  12. Influence of Visual Motion, Suggestion, and Illusory Motion on Self-Motion Perception in the Horizontal Plane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven David Rosenblatt

    Full Text Available A moving visual field can induce the feeling of self-motion or vection. Illusory motion from static repeated asymmetric patterns creates a compelling visual motion stimulus, but it is unclear if such illusory motion can induce a feeling of self-motion or alter self-motion perception. In these experiments, human subjects reported the perceived direction of self-motion for sway translation and yaw rotation at the end of a period of viewing set visual stimuli coordinated with varying inertial stimuli. This tested the hypothesis that illusory visual motion would influence self-motion perception in the horizontal plane. Trials were arranged into 5 blocks based on stimulus type: moving star field with yaw rotation, moving star field with sway translation, illusory motion with yaw, illusory motion with sway, and static arrows with sway. Static arrows were used to evaluate the effect of cognitive suggestion on self-motion perception. Each trial had a control condition; the illusory motion controls were altered versions of the experimental image, which removed the illusory motion effect. For the moving visual stimulus, controls were carried out in a dark room. With the arrow visual stimulus, controls were a gray screen. In blocks containing a visual stimulus there was an 8s viewing interval with the inertial stimulus occurring over the final 1s. This allowed measurement of the visual illusion perception using objective methods. When no visual stimulus was present, only the 1s motion stimulus was presented. Eight women and five men (mean age 37 participated. To assess for a shift in self-motion perception, the effect of each visual stimulus on the self-motion stimulus (cm/s at which subjects were equally likely to report motion in either direction was measured. Significant effects were seen for moving star fields for both translation (p = 0.001 and rotation (p0.1 for both. Thus, although a true moving visual field can induce self-motion, results of this

  13. Visual Vection does not Perturb Squatting Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Gilles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vision contributes fundamentally to the control of the standing posture. The illusion of self motion falsely perceived (vection increases postural sway while standing. In this paper we examine the effect of vection on both standing and deep squatting with the hypothesis that the squatting posture should not be disturbed by the conflict of sensory information due to vection. The results show that standing posture only was affected by the visual stimuli. The widespread use of squatting for work as well as rest could be due in part to this lack of effect of sensory perturbation on postural stability.

  14. Reliability, construct and discriminative validity of clinical testing in subjects with and without chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, René; Ris Hansen, Inge; Falla, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    -retest reliability in people with and without chronic neck pain. Moreover, construct and between-group discriminative validity of the tests were examined. METHODS: Twenty-one participants with chronic neck pain and 21 asymptomatic participants were included. Intra- and inter-reliability were evaluated for the Cranio......-Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT), Range of Movement (ROM), Joint Position Error (JPE), Gaze Stability (GS), Smooth Pursuit Neck Torsion Test (SPNTT), and neuromuscular control of the Deep Cervical Extensors (DCE). Test-retest reliability was assessed for Postural Control (SWAY) and Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) over...... neck pain....

  15. Long-term symptoms in dizzy patients examined in a university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goplen Frederik

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The long-term course of dizziness was investigated combining medical chart and survey data. The survey was undertaken median (interquartile range (IQR 4.6 (4.3 years after the initial medical examination. Methods Chart data comprised sex, age, diagnosis, symptom duration, postural sway and neck pain. Survey data comprised symptom severity assessed by the Vertigo Symptom Scale – Short Form (VSS-SF, and data regarding current state of dizziness, medication, neck pain and other chronic conditions. Results The sample consisted of 503 patients, the mean (standard deviation (SD age was 50.0 (11.6 years, women being slightly overrepresented (60%. Severe problems with dizziness (VSS-SF mean (SD 13.9, (10.8 were indicated in the total group and in 5 of 6 diagnostic sub-groups. Vertigo/balance- and autonomic/anxiety-related symptoms were present in all groups. Current dizziness was confirmed by 73% who had significantly more severe problems than the non-dizzy (VSS-SF mean (SD: 17.2 (10.1 versus 5.0 (7.3. Symptoms were related to vertigo/balance more than to autonomic/anxiety (test of interaction p Based on simple logistic regression analysis, sex, symptom duration, neck pain, sway and diagnoses predicted dizziness. Symptom duration and neck pain remained predictors in the adjusted analysis. Age, symptom duration, neck pain, sway and diagnoses predicted vertigo/balance-related dizziness in both regression analyses. Sex, neck pain and sway predicted development of autonomic/anxiety-related dizziness according to simple regression analysis, while only neck pain remained a significant predictor in the adjusted analysis. With respect to diagnosis, simple regression analysis showed significant reduced likelihood for development of dizziness in all vestibular sub-groups when compared to the non-otogenic dizziness group. With respect to vertigo/balance- and autonomic/anxiety-related symptoms, the implication of diagnostic belonging varied

  16. Vestibular effects of a 7 Tesla MRI examination compared to 1.5 T and 0 T in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens M Theysohn

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-field MRI (7 Tesla (T and above elicits more temporary side-effects compared to 1.5 T and 3 T, e.g. dizziness or "postural instability" even after exiting the scanner. The current study aims to assess quantitatively vestibular performance before and after exposure to different MRI scenarios at 7 T, 1.5 T and 0 T. Sway path and body axis rotation (Unterberger's stepping test were quantitatively recorded in a total of 46 volunteers before, 2 minutes after, and 15 minutes after different exposure scenarios: 7 T head MRI (n = 27, 7 T no RF (n = 22, 7 T only B0 (n = 20, 7 T in & out B0 (n = 20, 1.5 T no RF (n = 20, 0 T (n = 15. All exposure scenarios lasted 30 minutes except for brief one minute exposure in 7 T in & out B0. Both measures were documented utilizing a 3D ultrasound system. During sway path evaluation, the experiment was repeated with eyes both open and closed. Sway paths for all long-lasting 7 T scenarios (normal, no RF, only B0 with eyes closed were significantly prolonged 2 minutes after exiting the scanner, normalizing after 15 minutes. Brief exposure to 7 T B0 or 30 minutes exposure to 1.5 T or 0 T did not show significant changes. End positions after Unterberger's stepping test were significantly changed counter-clockwise after all 7 T scenarios, including the brief in & out B0 exposure. Shorter exposure resulted in a smaller alteration angle. In contrast to sway path, reversal of changes in body axis rotation was incomplete after 15 minutes. 1.5 T caused no rotational changes. The results show that exposure to the 7 Tesla static magnetic field causes only a temporary dysfunction or "over-compensation" of the vestibular system not measurable at 1.5 or 0 Tesla. Radiofrequency fields, gradient switching, and orthostatic dysregulation do not seem to play a role.

  17. Quantifying linguistic coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    task (Bahrami et al 2010, Fusaroli et al. 2012) we extend to linguistic coordination dynamical measures of recurrence employed in the analysis of sensorimotor coordination (such as heart-rate (Konvalinka et al 2011), postural sway (Shockley 2005) and eye-movements (Dale, Richardson and Kirkham 2012......). We employ nominal recurrence analysis (Orsucci et al 2005, Dale et al 2011) on the decision-making conversations between the participants. We report strong correlations between various indexes of recurrence and collective performance. We argue this method allows us to quantify the qualities...

  18. L’aventure du mot dans la crise ivoirienne : enrichissement lexical du français populaire ivoirien

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONAN Kouadio Michel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Côte d'Ivoire has gone through an unprecedented crisis that has shaken its socio-political fabric. This particular situation resulted in a change in language productions of political actors. When listening to the speeches, some people would be swayed by the language mode of their respective political leaders. Their speeches are often marked by the virility of the words that they contain. This article proposes a reflection on this situation by showing the peculiarity of some words that have shaped the linguistic productions of the Ivorian population in the recent years.

  19. The Landscape of the Dehesa in the Sierra Morena of Jaén (Spain) – the Transition from Traditional to New Land Uses

    OpenAIRE

    Antonia Paniza Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    This paper tracks the evolution of the area covered by the dehesa in Sierra Morena from the mid 20th century to the present day, in an attempt to identify those areas in which traditional land uses still hold sway and others in which new land uses are appearing in relation to emerging business activities. These new uses have brought about an important transformation in the landscape of the dehesa, which in some areas is being replaced by other more profitable forms of land use...

  20. Commentary on "Leadership, Production, and Exchange: An Evaluation of World-Systems Theory in a Global Context"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Lalone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As we expand and extend our applications of world-system theory, as we explore the shifting interplay between cores and peripheries, as we see boundaries emerge and dissolve, we also fix world-systems theory itself on the map table. What is its core? What are its peripheries, or would it claim that all human interactions fall within its sway?Thomas Hall, for example, does not take quite the entire map, but takes "intersocietal interaction" as the world-systems domain.

  1. Does a single session of high-intensity interval training provoke a transient elevated risk of falling in seniors and adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Hanssen, Henner; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Balance and strength training can reduce seniors' fall risk up to 50%. Available evidence suggests that acute bouts of neuromuscular and endurance exercise deteriorate postural control. High-intensity endurance training has been successfully applied in different populations. Thus, it seemed valuable to examine the acute effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on neuromuscular performance in seniors and young adults. The acute impact of a HIIT session on balance performance and muscle activity after exercise cessation and during post-exercise recovery was examined in young and old adults. We intended to investigate whether a transient exercise-induced fall-risk may occur in both groups. 20 healthy seniors (age 70 (SD 4) years) and young adults (age 27 (SD 3) years) were examined on 3 days. After exhaustive ramp-like treadmill testing in order to determine maximal heart rate (HRmax) on the first day, either a 4 × 4 min HIIT at 90% of HRmax or a control condition (CON) was randomly performed on the second and third day, respectively. Balance performance (postural sway) was assessed during single limb stance with open eyes (SLEO) and double limb stance with closed eyes (DLEC). EMG was recorded for the soleus (SOL), anterior tibialis (TIB), gastrocnemius (GM) and peroneus longus (PL) muscles at the dominant leg. All measures were collected before, immediately as well as 10, 30 and 45 min after HIIT and CON, respectively. Compared to CON, HIIT induced significant increases of postural sway immediately after exercise cessation during SLEO in both groups (adults: p HIIT (post: p = 0.003, Δ = +14% sway, 10 min post: p = 0.004, Δ = +18% sway). Muscle activity was increased during SLEO for TIB until 10 min post in seniors (0.008 HIIT in adults (p HIIT training may cause an acute 'open-fall-window' with a transient impairment of balance performance for at least 10 min after exercise cessation in both groups. Occluded vision in seniors seems to prolong this period

  2. IMPORTANCE OF RENEWABLE ENERGIES RESOURCES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF LOCAL COMMUNITIES IN THE CONTEXT OF EXISTING FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS ON THE EUROPEAN LEVEL

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan LAZÃR

    2010-01-01

    In the human history, the energy was the key development of human civilization, thus its future lies under the sway of energetic resources, a future that we can’t perceive separated from that of energy. The coal, oil and atom are a huge source of pollution or a significant threat to the future history of mankind. In this context, on the background of scientific and technical research development have been developed forms of energy derived from renewable natural resources (sun, water, wind), w...

  3. The effects of supervised Slack line Training on postural balance in judoists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, L.; Fernandez-Rio, J.; Fernandez-Garcia, B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. This study investigates the effects of Slackline on postural control and jumping performance in judoists. Methods. Fifteen judoists were randomly distributed into an experimental group (EG: N.=8, 16.0 +/- 1.73 years) and a control group (CG: N.=7, 15.43 +/- 2.23 years). While both groups...... followed the same judo training program during the 4 weeks of the study, the EG completed an additional supervised Slackline training (2 sessions per week of 60 min each one, for 4 weeks). Several key postural control parameters were assessed with a footscan baropodometric platform (sway length, ellipse...

  4. Computer Program for Calculating In-Flight Aircraft-Store Interface Reaction Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    DIRECTION LBS C* STOTAFT- TOTAL AFT SWAY BRACE LOAD LBS C* NX- ACCELLERATION X-DIRECTION C* NY- ACCELLERATION Y-DIRECTION C* NZ- ACCELLERATION Z-DIRECTION C... ACCELLERATION > X-DIRECTION (PHIDD) RAD/SECŖ’ READ (NUMIN,*) PHIDD WRITE (NUMOUT,*)’INPUT EXTERNAL ANGULAR ACCELLERATION > Y-DIRECTION (THEDD) RAD/SEC^2...8217 READ (NUMIN,*) THEDD WRITE (NUMOUT, *) ’INPUT EXTERNAL ANGULAR ACCELLERATION > Z-DIRECTION (PSIDD) RAD/SECŖ’ READ (NUMIN,*) PSIDD WRITE(NUMOUT

  5. Evaluation of postural steadiness before and after sedation: comparison of four nonlinear and three conventional measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietäväinen, A; Hæggström, E; Mandel, J E

    2014-01-01

    Sedative drugs decrease postural steadiness and increase the risk of injury from falls and accidents. The recovery rate is individual, making it hard to predict the patient's steadiness and hence safe discharge time. 103 outpatients sedated with midazolam and fentanyl were measured posturographically, before (PRE) and after (POST) endoscopy. The ability of conventional and nonlinear sway measures to separate the PRE and POST conditions were compared, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was used to quantify the significance of the separation. A nonlinear measure, fuzzy sample entropy, scored the largest AUC (AUC FSE  = 0.83, p < 0.0001). While the AUC FSE  was not significantly larger than the AUCs of conventional sway measures which offer easy quantification of postural steadiness, nonlinear measures provide more insight into the structure of postural control, which may help understand the effect of sedation on postural steadiness. This study is a step toward developing a tester that indicates a safe discharge time. (paper)

  6. Modulation of visually evoked postural responses by contextual visual, haptic and auditory information: a 'virtual reality check'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg F Meyer

    Full Text Available Externally generated visual motion signals can cause the illusion of self-motion in space (vection and corresponding visually evoked postural responses (VEPR. These VEPRs are not simple responses to optokinetic stimulation, but are modulated by the configuration of the environment. The aim of this paper is to explore what factors modulate VEPRs in a high quality virtual reality (VR environment where real and virtual foreground objects served as static visual, auditory and haptic reference points. Data from four experiments on visually evoked postural responses show that: 1 visually evoked postural sway in the lateral direction is modulated by the presence of static anchor points that can be haptic, visual and auditory reference signals; 2 real objects and their matching virtual reality representations as visual anchors have different effects on postural sway; 3 visual motion in the anterior-posterior plane induces robust postural responses that are not modulated by the presence of reference signals or the reality of objects that can serve as visual anchors in the scene. We conclude that automatic postural responses for laterally moving visual stimuli are strongly influenced by the configuration and interpretation of the environment and draw on multisensory representations. Different postural responses were observed for real and virtual visual reference objects. On the basis that automatic visually evoked postural responses in high fidelity virtual environments should mimic those seen in real situations we propose to use the observed effect as a robust objective test for presence and fidelity in VR.

  7. Modulation of Visually Evoked Postural Responses by Contextual Visual, Haptic and Auditory Information: A ‘Virtual Reality Check’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Georg F.; Shao, Fei; White, Mark D.; Hopkins, Carl; Robotham, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Externally generated visual motion signals can cause the illusion of self-motion in space (vection) and corresponding visually evoked postural responses (VEPR). These VEPRs are not simple responses to optokinetic stimulation, but are modulated by the configuration of the environment. The aim of this paper is to explore what factors modulate VEPRs in a high quality virtual reality (VR) environment where real and virtual foreground objects served as static visual, auditory and haptic reference points. Data from four experiments on visually evoked postural responses show that: 1) visually evoked postural sway in the lateral direction is modulated by the presence of static anchor points that can be haptic, visual and auditory reference signals; 2) real objects and their matching virtual reality representations as visual anchors have different effects on postural sway; 3) visual motion in the anterior-posterior plane induces robust postural responses that are not modulated by the presence of reference signals or the reality of objects that can serve as visual anchors in the scene. We conclude that automatic postural responses for laterally moving visual stimuli are strongly influenced by the configuration and interpretation of the environment and draw on multisensory representations. Different postural responses were observed for real and virtual visual reference objects. On the basis that automatic visually evoked postural responses in high fidelity virtual environments should mimic those seen in real situations we propose to use the observed effect as a robust objective test for presence and fidelity in VR. PMID:23840760

  8. Modulation of visually evoked postural responses by contextual visual, haptic and auditory information: a 'virtual reality check'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Georg F; Shao, Fei; White, Mark D; Hopkins, Carl; Robotham, Antony J

    2013-01-01

    Externally generated visual motion signals can cause the illusion of self-motion in space (vection) and corresponding visually evoked postural responses (VEPR). These VEPRs are not simple responses to optokinetic stimulation, but are modulated by the configuration of the environment. The aim of this paper is to explore what factors modulate VEPRs in a high quality virtual reality (VR) environment where real and virtual foreground objects served as static visual, auditory and haptic reference points. Data from four experiments on visually evoked postural responses show that: 1) visually evoked postural sway in the lateral direction is modulated by the presence of static anchor points that can be haptic, visual and auditory reference signals; 2) real objects and their matching virtual reality representations as visual anchors have different effects on postural sway; 3) visual motion in the anterior-posterior plane induces robust postural responses that are not modulated by the presence of reference signals or the reality of objects that can serve as visual anchors in the scene. We conclude that automatic postural responses for laterally moving visual stimuli are strongly influenced by the configuration and interpretation of the environment and draw on multisensory representations. Different postural responses were observed for real and virtual visual reference objects. On the basis that automatic visually evoked postural responses in high fidelity virtual environments should mimic those seen in real situations we propose to use the observed effect as a robust objective test for presence and fidelity in VR.

  9. The influence of peripheral neuropathy, gender, and obesity on the postural stability of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rangel, Aline; Aranda-Moreno, Catalina; Mantilla-Ochoa, Teresa; Zainos-Saucedo, Lylia; Jáuregui-Renaud, Kathrine

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of peripheral neuropathy, gender, and obesity on the postural stability of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 151 patients with no history of otology, neurology, or orthopaedic or balance disorders accepted to participate in the study. After a clinical interview and neuropathy assessment, postural stability was evaluated by static posturography (eyes open/closed on hard/soft surface) and the "Up & Go" test. During static posturography, on hard surface, the length of sway was related to peripheral neuropathy, gender, age, and obesity; on soft surface, the length of sway was related to peripheral neuropathy, gender, and age, the influence of neuropathy was larger in males than in females, and closing the eyes increased further the difference between genders. The mean time to perform the "Up & Go" test was 11.6 ± 2.2 sec, with influence of peripheral neuropathy, gender, and age. In order to preserve the control of static upright posture during conditions with deficient sensory input, male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with no history of balance disorders may be more vulnerable than females, and obesity may decrease the static postural control in both males and females.

  10. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Posture Control: The Role of Visual Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marco De Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the motor control during quiet stance in patients with established ankylosing spondylitis (AS and to evaluate the effect of visual input on the maintenance of a quiet posture. Methods. 12 male AS patients (mean age 50.1 ± 13.2 years and 12 matched healthy subjects performed 2 sessions of 3 trials in quiet stance, with eyes open (EO and with eyes closed (EC on a baropodometric platform. The oscillation of the centre of feet pressure (CoP was acquired. Indices of stability and balance control were assessed by the sway path (SP of the CoP, the frequency bandwidth (FB1 that includes the 80% of the area under the amplitude spectrum, the mean amplitude of the peaks (MP of the sway density curve (SDC, and the mean distance (MD between 2 peaks of the SDC. Results. In severe AS patients, the MD between two peaks of the SDC and the SP of the center of feet pressure were significantly higher than controls during both EO and EC conditions. The MP was significantly reduced just on EC. Conclusions. Ankylosing spondylitis exerts negative effect on postural stability, not compensable by visual inputs. Our findings may be useful in the rehabilitative management of the increased risk of falling in AS.

  11. Evaluation with stabilometric platform of balance disorders in osteoporosis patients. A proposal for a diagnostic protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Pina; Pratelli, Elisa; Petrai, Veronica; Postiglione, Marco; Zambelan, Giulia; Pasquetti, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disease with reduced bone mass and qualitative alterations of the bone, associated to increased risk of fracture. Pathogenesis of osteoporosis fractures is multifactorial. Main risk factor is falls (except for vertebral fragility fractures which occurs often in absence of trauma). Aging by itself produces physiological changes: muscular hypotrophy with asthenia, deficit of visus and hearing together with associated pathologies and multi-drug therapies. In osteoporosis patients with vertebral fractures posture change occurs which reduces balance. After clinical postural evaluation it is possible to carry out instrumental evaluation of posture with computerized methods such as stabilometry, baropodometry, dynanometry and gait analysis. Examination carried out with use of stabilometric computerized platform allows stabilometric (body sway assessment) as well as posturometric examination (center of pressure assessment during quiet standing). Fundamental parameters obtained are: position of the body center of gravity, area and shape of sway density curve and velocity variables. Protocol of evaluation includes assessment of examination in standard condition and in condition of temporary sensorial deprivation (to investigate the influence of various afferent systems on the maintenance of posture and balance). Accurate evaluation of postural control in osteoporosis patients constitutes a fundamental tool in fracture risk evaluation due to fall and in identification and correction of modifiable factors responsible for balance defect. This approach, together with adequate drug therapy, may lead to significant reduction of fractures in osteoporosis patients with subsequent reduction of hospitalization and residual consequent disabilities. PMID:22460016

  12. Comparison of the balance accelerometer measure and balance error scoring system in adolescent concussions in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Gabriel R; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Bellanca, Jennica L; Marchetti, Gregory F; Collins, Michael W; Whitney, Susan L

    2013-06-01

    High-technology methods demonstrate that balance problems may persist up to 30 days after a concussion, whereas with low-technology methods such as the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), performance becomes normal after only 3 days based on previously published studies in collegiate and high school athletes. To compare the National Institutes of Health's Balance Accelerometer Measure (BAM) with the BESS regarding the ability to detect differences in postural sway between adolescents with sports concussions and age-matched controls. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Forty-three patients with concussions and 27 control participants were tested with the standard BAM protocol, while sway was quantified using the normalized path length (mG/s) of pelvic accelerations in the anterior-posterior direction. The BESS was scored by experts using video recordings. The BAM was not able to discriminate between healthy and concussed adolescents, whereas the BESS, especially the tandem stance conditions, was good at discriminating between healthy and concussed adolescents. A total BESS score of 21 or more errors optimally identified patients in the acute concussion group versus healthy participants at 60% sensitivity and 82% specificity. The BAM is not as effective as the BESS in identifying abnormal postural control in adolescents with sports concussions. The BESS, a simple and economical method of assessing postural control, was effective in discriminating between young adults with acute concussions and young healthy people, suggesting that the test has value in the assessment of acute concussions.

  13. Shakespeare arean hypertexts in communist Bulgaria Shakespeare arean hypertexts in communist Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Shurbanov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the first days of the reception of Shakespeare’s work in Bulgaria during the second half of the nineteenth century down to the present time two of his tragedies, Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet, have held an unrivalled sway on the national stage and over the people’s minds. Another one, Othello, was produced very frequently in the beginning, though often by non-Bulgarian troupes, and yet another, Macbeth, was a set text at the schools for many decades but rarely took the fancy of theatre directors and audiences. Since the first days of the reception of Shakespeare’s work in Bulgaria during the second half of the nineteenth century down to the present time two of his tragedies, Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet, have held an unrivalled sway on the national stage and over the people’s minds. Another one, Othello, was produced very frequently in the beginning, though often by non-Bulgarian troupes, and yet another, Macbeth, was a set text at the schools for many decades but rarely took the fancy of theatre directors and audiences.

  14. Surface electromyography can quantify temporal and spatial patterns of activation of intrinsic human foot muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, E; Cooper, G; Reeves, N D; Hodson-Tole, E F

    2018-04-01

    Intrinsic foot muscles (IFM) are a crucial component within the human foot. Investigating their functioning can help understand healthy and pathological behaviour of foot and ankle, fundamental for everyday activities. Recording muscle activation from IFM has been attempted with invasive techniques, mainly investigating single muscles. Here we present a novel methodology, to investigate the feasibility of recording physiological surface EMG (sEMG) non-invasively and quantify patterns of activation across the whole plantar region of the foot. sEMG were recorded with a 13 × 5 array from the sole of the foot (n = 25) during two-foot stance, two-foot tiptoe and anterior/posterior sways. Physiological features of sEMG were analysed. During anterior/posterior epochs within the sway task, sEMG patterns were analysed in terms of signal amplitude (intensity) and structure (Sample Entropy) distribution, by evaluating the centre of gravity (CoG) of each topographical map. Results suggest signals are physiological and not affected by loading. Both amplitude and sample entropy CoG coordinates were grouped in one region and overlapped, suggesting that the region with highest amplitude corresponds with the most predictable signal. Therefore, both spatial and temporal features of IFM activation may be recorded non-invasively, providing opportunity for more detailed investigation of IFM function in healthy and patient populations. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Assessment of the postural control strategies used to play two Wii Fit™ videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, A; Glazebrook, C M; Martin, A J; Wong, W W N; Kim, A J W; Moody, K D; Salbach, N M; Steinnagel, B; Andrysek, J; Torres-Moreno, R; Zabjek, K F

    2012-07-01

    The Nintendo Wii Fit™ may provide an affordable alternative to traditional biofeedback or virtual reality systems for retraining or improving motor function in populations with impaired balance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate postural control strategies healthy individuals use to play Wii Fit™ videogames. Sixteen young adults played 10 trials of Ski Slalom and Soccer Heading respectively. Centre of pressure (COP) excursion and three-dimensional movement data were acquired to determine variability in medial-lateral COP sway and shoulder-pelvic movement. While there was no difference in medial-lateral COP variability between games during trial 1, there was a significant difference after 10 trials. COP sway increased (59-75 mm) for Soccer Heading while it decreased (67-33 mm) for Ski Slalom from trial 1 to trial 10. During Ski Slalom participants demonstrated decreased shoulder and pelvic movement combined with increased pelvic-shoulder coupling. Conversely, participants demonstrated greater initial shoulder tilt when playing Soccer Heading, with no reduction in pelvic rotation and tilt. Participants decreased pelvic and trunk movements when skiing, suggesting a greater contribution of lower extremity control while they primarily used a trunk strategy to play Soccer Heading. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Uses of guilt in the treatment of dehumanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Harvey

    2017-04-01

    It is likely that under the impact of impending Nazism, aggression theory in late Freud, as presented in Civilization and its Discontents (1930), left the entirety of guilt to self-punishment, thus retracting his view that love functions in the superego as remorse and restitution. This change however, essentially withdraws provision for treating victims of abuse, violence and terror. This paper proposes a paradigm shift that reframes Freud's late instinct theory into a theory of dehumanization by recovering reparative and relational components of guilt. This reframe has major implications for the position taken with regard to the role of witnessing and the moral imperative in recovery from dehumanizing experience, which orthodox psychoanalytic theory has essentially bypassed. It is propose that victim treatment, as case examples illustrate, reformulates guilt as drawing on the life instincts to revivify victims' humanity through analytic witnessing and acknowledgment. Indeed, unless breaches of humanity are confronted by a witness, the life instincts stay merely rhetorical, if not contradictory, by leaving the death instincts to grow unseen and, thus, unopposed. A two-fold formulation of guilt may better address and redress disorders of dehumanization, whereby 'death guilt' (under the sway of aggression) signifies the orthodox, irrevocable guilt of self-reproach for the bad we may have done, and 'life guilt' (under the sway of a moral imperative) the redeemable guilt for the good we have still to do. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  17. Validation of a robotic balance system for investigations in the control of human standing balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Billy L; Huryn, Thomas P; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that human body sway during standing approximates the mechanics of an inverted pendulum pivoted at the ankle joints. In this study, a robotic balance system incorporating a Stewart platform base was developed to provide a new technique to investigate the neural mechanisms involved in standing balance. The robotic system, programmed with the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, controlled the motion of the body in response to a change in applied ankle torque. The ability of the robotic system to replicate the load properties of standing was validated by comparing the load stiffness generated when subjects balanced their own body to the robot's mechanical load programmed with a low (concentrated-mass model) or high (distributed-mass model) inertia. The results show that static load stiffness was not significantly (p > 0.05) different for standing and the robotic system. Dynamic load stiffness for the robotic system increased with the frequency of sway, as predicted by the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, with the higher inertia being accurately matched to the load properties of the human body. This robotic balance system accurately replicated the physical model of standing and represents a useful tool to simulate the dynamics of a standing person. © 2011 IEEE

  18. Measuring (bio)physical tree properties using accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Hut, Rolf; Gentine, Pierre; Selker, John; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Trees play a crucial role in the water, carbon and nitrogen cycle on local, regional and global scales. Understanding the exchange of heat, water, and CO2 between trees and the atmosphere is important to assess the impact of drought, deforestation and climate change. Unfortunately, ground measurements of tree dynamics are often expensive, or difficult due to challenging environments. We demonstrate the potential of measuring (bio)physical properties of trees using robust and affordable acceleration sensors. Tree sway is dependent on e.g. mass and wind energy absorption of the tree. By measuring tree acceleration we can relate the tree motion to external loads (e.g. precipitation), and tree (bio)physical properties (e.g. mass). Using five months of acceleration data of 19 trees in the Brazilian Amazon, we show that the frequency spectrum of tree sway is related to mass, precipitation, and canopy drag. This presentation aims to show the concept of using accelerometers to measure tree dynamics, and we acknowledge that the presented example applications is not an exhaustive list. Further analyses are the scope of current research, and we hope to inspire others to explore additional applications.

  19. Cardiovascular and Postural Control Interactions during Hypergravity: Effects on Cerebral Autoregulation in Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Blaber, Andrew; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Beck, Arnaud; Avan, Paul; Bruner, Michelle; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance remains a problem upon return to Earth from the microgravity environment of spaceflight. A variety of conditions including hypovolemia, cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebral or peripheral vascular disease, or cardiac arrhythmias may result in syncope if the person remains upright. Current research indicates that there is a greater dependence on visual and somatosensory information at the beginning of space flight with a decreased otolith gain during prolonged space flight (Herault et al., 2002). The goal of the research is to further our understanding of the fundamental adaptive homeostatic mechanisms involved in gravity related changes in cardiovascular and postural function. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and postural sensory motor control systems in male and female participants before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of hyper-G were investigated. Hypotheses: 1) Activation of skeletal muscle pump will be directly related to the degree of orthostatic stress. 2) Simultaneous measurement of heart rate, blood pressure and postural sway will predict cardio-postural stability. Blood pressure and heart rate (means and variability), postural sway, center of pressure (COP), baroreflex function, calf blood flow, middle cerebral artery blood flow, non-invasive intracranial pressure measurements, and two-breath CO2 were measured. Results from the study will be used to provide an integrated insight into mechanisms of cardio-postural control and cerebral autoregulation, which are important aspects of human health in flights to Moon, Mars and distant planets.

  20. Postural stability in young adults with Down syndrome in challenging conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Bieć

    Full Text Available To evaluate postural control and performance in subjects with Down syndrome (SwDS, we measured postural sway (COP in quiet stance in four 20-second tests: with eyes open or closed and on hard or foam surface. Ten SwDS and eleven healthy subjects participated, aged 29.8 (4.8 and 28.4 (3.9, respectively. The time-series recorded with the sampling rate of 100 Hz were used to evaluate postural performance (COP amplitude and mean velocity and strategies (COP frequency, fractal dimension and entropy. There were no intergroup differences in the amplitude except the stance on foam pad with eyes open when SwDS had larger sway. The COP velocity and frequency were larger in SwDS than controls in all trials on foam pad. During stances on the foam pad SwDS increased fractal dimension showing higher complexity of their equilibrium system, while controls decreased sample entropy exhibiting more conscious control of posture in comparison to the stances on hard support surface. This indicated that each group used entirely different adjustments of postural strategies to the somatosensory challenge. It is proposed that the inferior postural control of SwDS results mainly from insufficient experience in dealing with unpredictable postural stimuli and deficit in motor learning.

  1. Greater Reduction of Balance as a Result of Increased Plantar Fascia Elasticity at Ovulation during the Menstrual Cycle.

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    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul

    2015-11-01

    One of the sexual hormones, estrogen, increases elasticity of human connective tissue such as the anterior cruciate ligament during the menstrual cycle in women. In the present investigation, the plantar fascia was investigated to see if there is a difference in elasticity with the menstrual cycle. Fifteen young healthy females in the age range of 18-35 years old with a regular menstrual cycle were tested twice throughout one full menstrual cycle; once during the early follicular phases and once at ovulation. Foot length, while standing on both feet and one foot were used to assess plantar fascia elasticity, ultrasound measured plantar fascia thickness while lying and standing, and posture sway and tremor using a balance platform during 8 different balance tests were assessed to see the impact of elasticity changes. Foot length increased significantly at ovulation compared to menstruation when standing on two feet (p = 0.03) and standing on one foot (p fascia in thinning per kilogram weight applied to the foot at ovulation compared to menstruation (p = 0.014). Associated with this increase in elasticity at ovulation, there was a reduction in balance in the most difficult balance tasks and an increase in tremor during ovulation (p fascia elasticity change during the menstrual cycle might have effects on posture sway and tremor, which could have a potential risk of falling. Therefore, healthy professionals working with young female adults should recognize these physiological effects.

  2. Visual Information and Support Surface for Postural Control in Visual Search Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia-Chun; Yang, Chih-Mei

    2016-10-01

    When standing on a reduced support surface, people increase their reliance on visual information to control posture. This assertion was tested in the current study. The effects of imposed motion and support surface on postural control during visual search were investigated. Twelve participants (aged 21 ± 1.8 years; six men and six women) stood on a reduced support surface (45% base of support). In a room that moved back and forth along the anteroposterior axis, participants performed visual search for a given letter in an article. Postural sway variability and head-room coupling were measured. The results of head-room coupling, but not postural sway, supported the assertion that people increase reliance on visual information when standing on a reduced support surface. Whether standing on a whole or reduced surface, people stabilized their posture to perform the visual search tasks. Compared to a fixed target, searching on a hand-held target showed greater head-room coupling when standing on a reduced surface. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Are increases in COP variability observed when participants are provided explicit verbal cues prior to COM stabilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Squair, Jordan W; Chua, Romeo; Inglis, J Timothy; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-09-01

    Previous research has shown that when the COM is stabilized without participant awareness, COP displacements increase. This finding suggests that postural sway under normal conditions may be exploratory and used as a means of acquiring sensory information. However, based on the theory that posture is controlled using internal models, it could be argued that increases in COP displacement reflect errors that arise as the central nervous system attempts to adapt the internal model used to control posture to the new conditions. The current study provided an explicit verbal cue to the participants indicating how and when COM stabilization would occur. Based on evidence suggesting that explicit verbal cues can reduce errors when the dynamics of the task are altered, we hypothesized that when participants were aware of COM stabilization, COP displacements would be reduced. However, we found that anterior-posterior COP displacements increased independent of cueing, suggesting that increases in COP displacements with locking were not the result of an attempt to adapt the internal model of postural control. The results provide further support for an exploratory role of postural sway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between static and dynamic balance abilities in Italian professional and youth league soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Massimiliano; Arippa, Federico; Leban, Bruno; Corona, Federica; Ibba, Gianfranco; Todde, Francesco; Scorcu, Marco

    2015-08-01

    To assess the existence of correlations between static and dynamic balance abilities in young and professional elite soccer players. Cross-sectional. Fifty-one elite players who regularly compete at national level divided into two groups: Professional (age 18-34, n = 20) and Under 15-17 (age 14-16, n = 31). Dynamic balance was assessed for the case of a single-leg landing task by means of vertical time to stabilization (TTS) and postural sway calculated on the basis of center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories (sway area, COP displacements in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction, COP path length). The same parameters were also measured for a 20 s one-legged stance to assess static balance abilities. No significant correlations were found between static and dynamic balance parameters except for TTS and COP displacements in the antero-posterior direction (r = 0.29, p = 0.003). Professional players are characterized by lower TTS in comparison with youth leagues players (0.767 vs. 1.188 s for the dominant limb, p balance in soccer players should be performed with both dynamic and static tests, considering that the postural control performances in the two cases are not related. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationships of Balance, Gait Performance, and Functional Outcome in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Comparison of Left and Right Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Priscila Garcia; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Brito, Christina Moran; Alfieri, Fábio Marcon; Rizzo Battistella, Linamara

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the balance by center of pressure (COP) and its relationship with gait parameters and functional independence in left (LH) and right (RH) chronic stroke patients. In this cross-sectional study, twenty-one hemiparetic stroke patients were assessed for Functional Independence Measure (FIM), balance with a force platform, and gait in the Motion Analysis Laboratory. The amplitudes of the COP in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were similar in both groups. The anteroposterior direction was greater than the mediolateral direction. Only the temporal parameters showed any statistically significant differences. The LH showed a significant correlation between stride length, step length, and gait velocity with COP velocity sway for the healthy and paretic lower limbs. In both groups, the area of COP was significantly correlated with stride length. Motor FIM was significantly correlated with the COP in the LH group. There was no difference in the performance of balance, gait, and functional independence between groups. The correlation of the COP sway area with stride length in both groups can serve as a guideline in the rehabilitation of these patients where training the static balance may reflect the improvement of the stride length.

  6. Visual Reliance for Balance Control in Older Adults Persists When Visual Information Is Disrupted by Artificial Feedback Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Sensory information from our eyes, skin and muscles helps guide and correct balance. Less appreciated, however, is that delays in the transmission of sensory information between our eyes, limbs and central nervous system can exceed several 10s of milliseconds. Investigating how these time-delayed sensory signals influence balance control is central to understanding the postural system. Here, we investigate how delayed visual feedback and cognitive performance influence postural control in healthy young and older adults. The task required that participants position their center of pressure (COP) in a fixed target as accurately as possible without visual feedback about their COP location (eyes-open balance), or with artificial time delays imposed on visual COP feedback. On selected trials, the participants also performed a silent arithmetic task (cognitive dual task). We separated COP time series into distinct frequency components using low and high-pass filtering routines. Visual feedback delays affected low frequency postural corrections in young and older adults, with larger increases in postural sway noted for the group of older adults. In comparison, cognitive performance reduced the variability of rapid center of pressure displacements in young adults, but did not alter postural sway in the group of older adults. Our results demonstrate that older adults prioritize vision to control posture. This visual reliance persists even when feedback about the task is delayed by several hundreds of milliseconds. PMID:24614576

  7. Real-time visual feedback of COM and COP motion properties differentially modifies postural control structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Melissa C; Molenaar, Peter C M; Slobounov, Semyon M; Newell, Karl M

    2017-01-01

    The experiment was setup to investigate the control of human quiet standing through the manipulation of augmented visual information feedback of selective properties of the motion of two primary variables in postural control: center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM). Five properties of feedback information were contrasted to a no feedback dual-task (watching a movie) control condition to determine the impact of visual real-time feedback on the coordination of the joint motions in postural control in both static and dynamic one-leg standing postures. The feedback information included 2D COP or COM position and macro variables derived from the COP and COM motions, namely virtual time-to-contact (VTC) and the COP-COM coupling. The findings in the static condition showed that the VTC and COP-COM coupling feedback conditions decreased postural motion more than the 2D COP or COM positional information. These variables also induced larger sway amplitudes in the dynamic condition showing a more progressive search strategy in exploring the stability limits. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) found that COP-COM coupling contributed less than the other feedback variables to the redundancy of the system reflected in the common variance between joint motions and properties of sway motion. The COP-COM coupling had the lowest weighting of the motion properties to redundancy under the feedback conditions but overall the qualitative pattern of the joint motion structures was preserved within the respective static and dynamic balance conditions.

  8. Relationships of Balance, Gait Performance, and Functional Outcome in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Comparison of Left and Right Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Garcia Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study compared the balance by center of pressure (COP and its relationship with gait parameters and functional independence in left (LH and right (RH chronic stroke patients. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, twenty-one hemiparetic stroke patients were assessed for Functional Independence Measure (FIM, balance with a force platform, and gait in the Motion Analysis Laboratory. Results. The amplitudes of the COP in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were similar in both groups. The anteroposterior direction was greater than the mediolateral direction. Only the temporal parameters showed any statistically significant differences. The LH showed a significant correlation between stride length, step length, and gait velocity with COP velocity sway for the healthy and paretic lower limbs. In both groups, the area of COP was significantly correlated with stride length. Motor FIM was significantly correlated with the COP in the LH group. Conclusion. There was no difference in the performance of balance, gait, and functional independence between groups. The correlation of the COP sway area with stride length in both groups can serve as a guideline in the rehabilitation of these patients where training the static balance may reflect the improvement of the stride length.

  9. The effects of posterior talar glide and dorsiflexion of the ankle plus mobilization with movement on balance and gait function in patient with chronic stroke: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Lim Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was to evaluate the effects of weight-bearing-based mobilization with movement (WBBMWM on balance and gait in stroke patients. Methods: Thirty stroke patients participated in this study. All individuals were randomly assigned to either WBMWM group (n = 15 or weight-bearing with placebo mobilization with movement group (control, n = 15. Individuals in the WBMWM group were trained for 10 glides of 5 sets a day, 5 times a week during 4 weeks. Furthermore, individuals in the control group were trained for 10 lunges of 5 sets a day, 5 times a week during 4 weeks. All individuals were measured weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT, static balance ability, timed up and go test (TUG, and dynamic gait index (DGI in before and after intervention. Results: The result showed that WBBMWM group and control group had significantly increased in WBLT, postural sway speed, total postural sway path length with eyes open and closed, TUG and DGI (P < 0.05. In particular, the WBMWM group showed significantly greater improvement than control group in WBLT, static balance measures, TUG, and DGI (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Therefore, WBMWM improved ankle range of motion, balance, and gait in stroke patients. These results suggest that WBBMWM is feasible and suitable for individuals with a stroke.

  10. Influence of meteorological elements on balance control and pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peultier, Laetitia; Lion, Alexis; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Zhang, Zheng; Rat, Anne-Christine; Gueguen, René; Paysant, Jean; Perrin, Philippe P.

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to determine if pain and balance control are related to meteorological modifications in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and thirteen patients with knee OA (mean age = 65 ± 9 years old, 78 women) participated in this study. Static posturography was performed, sway area covered and sway path traveled by the center of foot pressure being recorded under six standing postural conditions that combine three visual situations (eyes open, eyes closed, vision altered) with two platform situations (firm and foam supports). Knee pain score was assessed using a visual analog scale. Balance control and pain measurements recorded in the morning were correlated with the meteorological data. Morning and daily values for temperature, precipitation, sunshine, height of rain in 1 h, wind speed, humidity, and atmospheric pressure were obtained from the nearest data collecting weather station. The relationship between postural control, pain, and weather variations were assessed for each patient on a given day with multiple linear regressions. A decrease of postural stability was observed when atmospheric pressure and maximum humidity decreased in the morning ( p knee pain was more enhanced when it is warmer in the morning ( p < 0.05) and when it is wetter and warmer within a day ( p < 0.05). The relationship between weather, pain, and postural control can help patients and health professionals to better manage daily activities.

  11. Effects of Wii balance board exercises on balance after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puh, Urška; Majcen, Nia; Hlebš, Sonja; Rugelj, Darja

    2014-05-01

    To establish the effects of training on Wii balance board (WBB) after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction on balance. Included patient injured her posterior cruciate ligament 22 months prior to the study. Training on WBB was performed 4 weeks, 6 times per week, 30-45 min per day. Center of pressure (CoP) sway during parallel and one-leg stance, and body weight distribution in parallel stance were measured. Additionally, measurements of joint range of motion and limb circumferences were taken before and after training. After training, the body weight was almost equally distributed on both legs. Decrease in CoP sway was most significant for one-leg stance with each leg on compliant surface with eyes open and closed. The knee joint range of motion increased and limb circumferences decreased. According to the results of this single case report, we might recommend the use of WBB for balance training after PCL reconstruction. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  12. We-Measure: Toward a low-cost portable posturography for patients with multiple sclerosis using the commercial Wii balance board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Letizia; Stocchi, Luca; Patrignani, Maurizio; Sellitto, Giovanni; Giuliani, Manuela; Prosperini, Luca

    2015-12-15

    This study was aimed at investigating whether postural sway measures derived from a standard force platform were similar to those generated by a custom-written software ("We-Measure") acquiring and processing data from a commercial Nintendo balance board (BB). For this purpose, 90 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 50 healthy controls (HC) were tested in a single-day session with a reference standard force platform and a BB-based system. Despite its acceptable between-device agreement (tested by visual evaluation of Bland-Altman plot), the low-cost BB-based system tended to overestimate postural sway when compared to the reference standard force platform in both MS and HC groups (on average +30% and +54%, respectively). Between-device reliability was just adequate (MS: 66%, HC: 47%), while test-retest reliability was excellent (MS: 84%, HC: 88%). Concurrent validity evaluation showed similar performance between the reference standard force platform and the BB-based system in discriminating fallers and non-fallers among patients with MS. All these findings may encourage the use of this balance board-based new device in longitudinal study, rather than in cross-sectional design, thus providing a potential useful tool for multicenter settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Using motor imagery to study the neural substrates of dynamic balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murielle Ursulla Ferraye

    Full Text Available This study examines the cerebral structures involved in dynamic balance using a motor imagery (MI protocol. We recorded cerebral activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects imagined swaying on a balance board along the sagittal plane to point a laser at target pairs of different sizes (small, large. We used a matched visual imagery (VI control task and recorded imagery durations during scanning. MI and VI durations were differentially influenced by the sway accuracy requirement, indicating that MI of balance is sensitive to the increased motor control necessary to point at a smaller target. Compared to VI, MI of dynamic balance recruited additional cortical and subcortical portions of the motor system, including frontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and mesencephalic locomotor region, the latter showing increased effective connectivity with the supplementary motor area. The regions involved in MI of dynamic balance were spatially distinct but contiguous to those involved in MI of gait (Bakker et al., 2008; Snijders et al., 2011; Crémers et al., 2012, in a pattern consistent with existing somatotopic maps of the trunk (for balance and legs (for gait. These findings validate a novel, quantitative approach for studying the neural control of balance in humans. This approach extends previous reports on MI of static stance (Jahn et al., 2004, 2008, and opens the way for studying gait and balance impairments in patients with neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Is there a relationship between objective and subjective assessment of balance in elderly patients with instability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Izquierdo, Marcos; Santos-Pérez, Sofía; Del-Río-Valeiras, María; Lirola-Delgado, Antonio; Faraldo-García, Ana; Vaamonde-Sánchez-Andrade, Isabel; Gayoso-Diz, Pilar; Soto-Varela, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether a subjective questionnaire that measures the disability caused by balance disorders in daily life activities is correlated to objective assessment of balance in elderly patients with age-related instability. We included 37 subjects aged 65 years or more who presented balance disorders induced solely by age. Balance assessment was through the sensory organisation test and limits of stability of computerised dynamic posturography, the SwayStar system and the modified timed up and go test. The patients also completed the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) questionnaire. The SwayStar balance control index (BCI) was most significantly correlated to the DHI score and the score of its different scales. When we divided the patients into subgroups according to DHI score, we only found statistically significant differences in the BCI and number of falls. In our population of elderly patients with instability, there is practically no correlation between the DHI and the static balance assessment. However, there is greater correlation with the BCI, which could show that dynamic balance is perceived as more disabling for these patients. In this case, when designing a rehabilitation protocol we should focus more on dynamic activities such as gait.

  15. Healthy older adults balance pattern under dual task conditions: exploring the strategy and trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Zeynalzadeh Ghoochani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In line with health promotion plans, early intervention and fall prevention in geriatric population, it is important to study healthy individuals balance mechanisms. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of adding and removing visual input and dual task on elderly balance. Methods: Twenty healthy elderly recruited from four different senior citizen health club centers and from the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR participated in this analytic cross-sectional study. At USWR’s Motor Control Laboratory, the participants’ postural sway were assessed using force plate in 4 distinct double leg standing conditions with and without presence of visual input and Stroop dual task. Postural and Stroop variables were compared. Results: Findings indicated that when the elderly encountered with either dual task or absence of visual input, they can still manage the situation in a way that changes in sway parameter would not become significant. But, when these two conditions occurred simultaneously, the participant’s balance strategy fluctuated. Therefore, the mean velocity showed a significant difference between the "single quiet standing" condition and the condition of standing with eyes closed while the participants were answering Stroop dual task (Mean difference = -0.007, 95% CI = -0.012, -0.002. Conclusion: It appears that velocity parameter is sensitive to small changes, so it is recommended that researchers include this parameter in their future analyses. Balance in elderly can be manipulated by dual task and visual input deprivation.

  16. A standing posture is associated with increased susceptibility to the sound-induced flash illusion in fall-prone older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, John; Setti, Annalisa; Doheny, Emer P; Kenny, Rose Anne; Newell, Fiona N

    2014-02-01

    Recent research has provided evidence suggesting a link between inefficient processing of multisensory information and incidence of falling in older adults. Specifically, Setti et al. (Exp Brain Res 209:375-384, 2011) reported that older adults with a history of falling were more susceptible than their healthy, age-matched counterparts to the sound-induced flash illusion. Here, we investigated whether balance control in fall-prone older adults was directly associated with multisensory integration by testing susceptibility to the illusion under two postural conditions: sitting and standing. Whilst standing, fall-prone older adults had a greater body sway than the age-matched healthy older adults and their body sway increased when presented with the audio-visual illusory but not the audio-visual congruent conditions. We also found an increase in susceptibility to the sound-induced flash illusion during standing relative to sitting for fall-prone older adults only. Importantly, no performance differences were found across groups in either the unisensory or non-illusory multisensory conditions across the two postures. These results suggest an important link between multisensory integration and balance control in older adults and have important implications for understanding why some older adults are prone to falling.

  17. The effect of trunk coordination exercise on dynamic postural control using a Core Noodle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yuki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Masaaki

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the influence of trunk coordination exercise on dynamic postural control relative to postural sway. The effects of trunk coordination exercises were examined using a Core Noodle for the postural sway in healthy students who were assigned to an exercise or control group. The independent variable was the extent of exposure to Core Noodle exercise, and the dependent variable was dynamic postural control. A stabilometer, which measures dynamic postural control, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercises. In addition, center of gravity movements were assessed using a Gravicorder G-620 stabilometer in which the subject was asked to shift their center of gravity between 2 circles on a computer monitor. Pre- and post-intervention dynamic postural control was statistically evaluated between the exercise group and control group using the Mann-Whitney test. Finally, we investigated the application of these exercises for a stroke patient. For post-intervention, the envelop area, mean length of the pathways between 2 circles, and the number of circles were significantly higher in the exercise group. Trunk coordination exercise performed Core Noodle may be used to enhance the dynamic postural balance of healthy young adults, and it can also be adapted for stroke patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Balance reactions and eye-hand coordination in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, N; Bleck, E E; Rinsky, L A; Young, W

    1986-01-01

    We undertook this study to determine if subclinical postural control mechanisms were abnormal in idiopathic scoliosis. Ninety-one female patients and fifty-seven age-matched female controls were examined. We used a force plate ataxiometer to quantitate postural sway in the standing position and recorded the displacement and acceleration of the center of pressure during static stance and under perturbation with eyes opened and closed. A joystick-controlled video system was used to measure reaction time and eye-hand motor coordination. The scoliosis group demonstrated significantly less sway during two of the eight standing balance conditions and on the remaining balance tests there was a similar trend, albeit nonsignificant. The reaction time for the scoliosis group was also significantly slower, but the accuracy was not significantly worse. We noted no statistical differences between progressive and nonprogressive or between braced and unbraced patients. The subgroup of patients whose curves progressed despite bracing had a tendency to demonstrate greater stability on all standing tests. They also exhibited faster reaction times and less error in eye-hand coordination than other patient groups. No correlation existed between severity of curve and test performance. We found no indication of deficient balance in idiopathic scoliosis, and the tests could not predict curve progression.

  19. Neck pain and postural balance among workers with high postural demands - a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck pain is related to impaired postural balance among patients and is highly prevalent among workers with high postural demands, for example, cleaners. We therefore hypothesised, that cleaners with neck pain suffer from postural dysfunction. This cross-sectional study tested if cleaners with neck pain have an impaired postural balance compared with cleaners without neck pain. Methods Postural balance of 194 cleaners with (n = 85) and without (N = 109) neck pain was studied using three different tests. Success or failure to maintain the standing position for 30 s in unilateral stance was recorded. Participants were asked to stand on a force platform for 30 s in the Romberg position with eyes open and closed. The centre of pressure of the sway was calculated, and separated into a slow (rambling) and fast (trembling) component. Subsequently, the 95% confidence ellipse area (CEA) was calculated. Furthermore a perturbation test was performed. Results More cleaners with neck pain (81%) failed the unilateral stance compared with cleaners without neck pain (61%) (p neck pain in comparison with cleaners without neck pain in the Romberg position with eyes closed, but not with eyes open. Conclusions Postural balance is impaired among cleaners with neck pain and the current study suggests a particular role of the slow component of postural sway. Furthermore, the unilateral stance test is a simple test to illustrate functional impairment among cleaners with concurrent neck and low back pain. Trial registration ISRCTN96241850 PMID:21806796

  20. Simulation of Tsunami Resistance of a Pinus Thunbergii tree in Coastal Forest in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, K.; Suzuki, S.; Noguchi, H.; Hagino, H.

    2015-12-01

    Forests reduce fluid force of tsunami, whereas extreme tsunami sometimes breaks down the forest trees. It is difficult to estimate the interactive relationship between the fluid and the trees because fluid deform tree architecture and deformed tree changes flow field. Dynamic tree deformation and fluid behavior should be clarified by fluid-structure interaction analysis. For the initial step, we have developed dynamic simulation of tree sway and breakage caused by tsunami based on a vibrating system with multiple degrees of freedom. The target specie of the simulation was Japanese black pine (pinus thunbergii), which is major specie in the coastal forest to secure livelihood area from the damage by blown sand and salt in Japanese coastal area. For the simulation, a tree was segmented into 0.2 m long circular truncated cones. Turning moment induced by tsunami and self-weight was calculated at each segment bottom. Tree deformation was computed on multi-degree-of-freedom vibration equation. Tree sway was simulated by iterative calculation of the tree deformation with time step 0.05 second with temporally varied flow velocity of tsunami. From the calculation of bending stress and turning moment at tree base, we estimated resistance of a Pinus thunbergii tree from tsunami against tree breakage.

  1. Cooperative Learning and Interpersonal Synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Roy; Wijnants, Maarten L; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Bosman, Anna M T

    2017-04-01

    Cooperative learning has been shown to result in better task performance, compared to individual and competitive learning, and can lead to positive social effects. However, potential working mechanisms at a micro level remain unexplored. One potential working mechanism might be the level of interpersonal synchrony between cooperating individuals. It has been shown that increased levels of interpersonal synchrony are related to better cognitive performance (e.g., increased memory). Social factors also appear to be affected by the level of interpersonal synchrony, with more interpersonal synchrony leading to increased likeability. In the present study, interpersonal synchrony of postural sway and its relation to task performance and social factors (i.e., popularity, social acceptance, and likeability) was examined. To test this, 183 dyads performed a tangram task while each child stood on a Nintendo Wii Balance Board that recorded their postural sway. The results showed that lower levels of interpersonal synchrony were related to better task performance and those dyads who were on average more popular synchronized more. These results contradict previous findings. It is suggested that for task performance, a more loosely coupled system is better than a synchronized system. In terms of social competence, dyad popularity was associated with more interpersonal synchrony.

  2. Complexity and dynamics of switched human balance control during quiet standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Salam; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Loram, Ian

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we use a combination of numerical simulations, time series analysis, and complexity measures to investigate the dynamics of switched systems with noise, which are often used as models of human balance control during quiet standing. We link the results with complexity measures found in experimental data of human sway motion during quiet standing. The control model ensuring balance, which we use, is based on an act-and-wait control concept, that is, a human controller is switched on when a certain sway angle is reached. Otherwise, there is no active control present. Given a time series data, we determine how does it look a typical pattern of control strategy in our model system. We detect the switched nonlinearity in the system using a frequency analysis method in the absence of noise. We also analyse the effect of time delay on the existence of limit cycles in the system in the absence of noise. We perform the entropy and detrended fluctuation analyses in view of linking the switchings (and the dead zone) with the occurrences of complexity in the model system in the presence of noise. Finally, we perform the entropy and detrended fluctuation analyses on experimental data and link the results with numerical findings in our model example.

  3. Digital Posturography Games Correlate with Gross Motor Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Peter M; Calhoun, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to assess whether performance on posturography games correlates with the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) in children with cerebral palsy. Simple games using static posturography technology allowed subjects to control screen events via postural sway. Game performance was compared with GMFMs using correlation analysis in a convenience sample of nine girls and six boys with cerebral palsy. Likert scales were used to obtain subjective responses to the balance games. GMFM scores correlated with game performance, especially measures emphasizing rhythmic sway. Twelve of the 15 subjects enjoyed the game and asserted an interest in playing again. Digital posturography games engage children with cerebral palsy in balance tasks, provide visual feedback in a balance control task, and have the potential to increase autonomy in balance control training among pediatric patients with cerebral palsy. This approach can support the relationship between child and therapist. The potential for interactive posturography to complement the assessment and treatment of balance in cerebral palsy bears continuing study.

  4. Balance (perceived and actual) and preferred stance width during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, John; Hsiao, Katherine T; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2008-05-01

    Pregnant women often remark that their balance degrades during pregnancy; however, it appears that no studies have documented the gravida's perception of her balance nor measured direction-specific changes in balance throughout pregnancy or after delivery. Thirty women, fifteen pregnant and fifteen non-pregnant controls, were tested monthly and through 6-month postpartum. For each session, perceived degradation in sense of balance, laboratory-based balance measures, stance width, and the number of falls since the previous session were recorded. Laboratory-based balance measures, quantified by direction-specific measures of postural sway, were computed from ten 30s quiet-standing trials on a stationary force platform. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t-tests, and Pearson correlations were use to examine group and time effects. For the pregnant group, perceived balance degradation and stance width were highly correlated (r = 0.94). Both increased during pregnancy (P r > 0.72) and also decreased significantly between the third trimester and postpartum (P pregnancy, but increased after delivery. Contrary to recent work suggesting fall rates of 25%, only 13% of our subjects (n = 2) fell during pregnancy. Perceived degradation in balance during pregnancy was strongly related to increasing postural sway instability in the anterior-posterior direction. Lateral stability was maintained during pregnancy and likely accomplished by increasing stance width.

  5. Relationship between morphological and stabilographic variables in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Hilary M; Buchholz, Rachel; Nauwelaerts, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    A stabilogram plots movements of the centre of pressure (COP) in the horizontal plane. Derived stabilographic variables quantify postural balance, but it is not known if these variables are size dependent. The aims of this study were to determine which morphological variable was most representative of size, which stabilographic variables were most representative of balance and whether size normalisation improved estimates of postural performance. Croup height (0.93-1.77 m), mass (117-666 kg), base of support (BOS) length (0.74-1.18 m) and BOS width (0.22-0.45 m) were measured in 24 horses. Stabilographic variables describing craniocaudal (CC), mediolateral (ML) and resultant amplitudes, velocities and frequencies of COP motion were measured as the horses stood stationary for 15s with fore and hind hooves on separate force plates (960 Hz). Principal component analysis identified morphological and stabilographic components. Morphological variables were consolidated into a single size component that was represented by body mass. Five stabilographic components explained 91% of the variation in sway patterns and five representative stabilographic variables were identified: CC amplitude, CC velocity, CC frequency, ML amplitude and ML frequency. Mass was correlated with CC velocity and ML frequency, with larger horses having smaller CC velocities and slower ML sway frequencies. When horses were grouped by mass (small horses horses ≥ 400 kg), the within-group values for CC velocity and ML frequency were no longer correlated with mass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Second-Order Sum- and Difference-Frequency Wave Forces on the Motion Response of a Tension-Leg Platform Considering the Set-down Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Tang, Yougang; Li, Yan; Cai, Runbo

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the motion response of a tension-leg platform (TLP) under first- and second-order wave forces, including the mean-drift force, difference and sum-frequency forces. The second-order wave force is calculated using the full-field quadratic transfer function (QTF). The coupled effect of the horizontal motions, such as surge, sway and yaw motions, and the set-down motion are taken into consideration by the nonlinear restoring matrix. The time-domain analysis with 50-yr random sea state is performed. A comparison of the results of different case studies is made to assess the influence of second-order wave force on the motions of the platform. The analysis shows that the second-order wave force has a major impact on motions of the TLP. The second-order difference-frequency wave force has an obvious influence on the low-frequency motions of surge and sway, and also will induce a large set-down motion which is an important part of heave motion. Besides, the second-order sum-frequency force will induce a set of high-frequency motions of roll and pitch. However, little influence of second-order wave force is found on the yaw motion.

  7. Effects of plantar foot sensitivity manipulation on postural control of young adult and elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro S. Machado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Subjects with sensorial losses present balance deficits. Although such condition is often observed among elderly, there is discussion concerning the dependence on sensorial information for body sway control in the elderly without sensorial losses. Purpose: We investigated the effects of foot sensitivity manipulation on postural control during upright standing in young adults and independent elderly (n = 19/group. Methods: Plantar sensitivity was evaluated by esthesiometry, and speed of center of pressure shift data during upright posture were evaluated for each foot using a baropodometer while the subjects were standing with eyes open or closed. The young adult group was evaluated for center of pressure in normal conditions and after plantar sensitivity disturbance, by immersing their feet in water and ice. Results: Young adults did not show alterations in their center of pressure after sensorial perturbation and presented, even under sensorial perturbation, better postural control than elderly subjects. The elderly showed lower foot sensitivity and greater center of pressure oscillation than young adults. Conclusion: Elderly subjects seem to rely more on foot sensitivity for control of body sway than young adults. In the elderly, a clinical intervention to improve foot sensitivity may help in upright posture maintenance.

  8. 3 DOF Spherical Pendulum Oscillations with a Uniform Slewing Pivot Center and a Small Angle Assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Perig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses the derivation of a 3 DOF mathematical model of a spherical pendulum attached to a crane boom tip for uniform slewing motion of the crane. The governing nonlinear DAE-based system for crane boom uniform slewing has been proposed, numerically solved, and experimentally verified. The proposed nonlinear and linearized models have been derived with an introduction of Cartesian coordinates. The linearized model with small angle assumption has an analytical solution. The relative and absolute payload trajectories have been derived. The amplitudes of load oscillations, which depend on computed initial conditions, have been estimated. The dependence of natural frequencies on the transport inertia forces and gravity forces has been computed. The conservative system, which contains first time derivatives of coordinates without oscillation damping, has been derived. The dynamic analogy between crane boom-driven payload swaying motion and Foucault’s pendulum motion has been grounded and outlined. For a small swaying angle, good agreement between theoretical and averaged experimental results was obtained.

  9. Age-related changes in physical fall risk factors: results from a 3 year follow-up of community dwelling older adults in Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Marie-Louise; Pittaway, Jane K; Cuisick, Isobel; Rattray, Megan; Ahuja, Kiran D K

    2013-11-11

    As the population ages, fall rates are expected to increase, leading to a rise in accidental injury and injury-related deaths, and placing an escalating burden on health care systems. Sixty-nine independent community-dwelling adults (60-85 years, 18 males) had their leg strength, physical activity levels and their annual fall rate assessed at two timepoints over three years, (summer 2010 and summer 2013) monitoring balance. Force platform measures of medio-lateral sway range increased significantly under conditions of eyes open (mean difference MD 2.5 cm; 95% CI 2.2 to 2.8 cm) and eyes closed (MD 3.2 cm; 95% CI 2.8 to 3.6 cm), respectively (all p 0.26). Physical activity reduced significantly (MD -909 Cal/week; 95% CI -347 to -1,470 Cal/week; p = 0.002) during the course of the study. Participants maintained aerobic activities, however resistance and balance exercise levels decreased non-significantly. The likelihood of falling was higher at the end of the study compared to the first timepoint (odds ratio 1.93, 95% CI 0.94 to 3.94; p = 0.07). Results of this study indicate that despite maintenance of leg strength there was an increase in medio-lateral sway over a relatively short time frame, with higher than expected increases in fall rates.

  10. Spatial Orientation and Balance Control Changes Induced by Altered Gravito-Inertial Force Vectors in Vestibular Deficient Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Galen D.; Wood, Scott J.; Gianna, Claire C.; Black, F. Owen; Paloski, William H.

    2000-01-01

    Eight chronic vestibular deficient (VD) patients (bilateral N = 4, unilateral N = 4, ages 18-67 were exposed to an interaural centripetal acceleration of 1 G (resultant 45 degree roll tilt of 1.4 G) on a 0.8 meter radius centrifuge for up to 90 minutes in the dark. The patients sat with head fixed upright, except every 4 of 10 minutes when instructed to point their nose and eyes towards a visual target (switched on every 3 to 5 seconds at random places within plus or minus 30 deg) in the Earth horizontal plane. Eye movements, including directed saccades for subjective Earth-and head-referenced planes, were recorded before, during, and after centrifugation using electro-oculography. Postural sway was measured before and within ten minutes after centrifugation using a sway-referenced or earth-fixed support surface, and with or without a head movement sequence. The protocol was selected for each patient based on the most challenging condition in which the patient was able to maintain balance with eyes closed.

  11. Does the postural variable affect the determination of balance compensation level in vestibular schwannoma patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frère, Julien; Hoffmann, Charles P; Gauchard, Gérome C; Parietti-Winkler, Cécile

    2017-09-01

    Previous sensory organization test (SOT) outcomes provided evidences that the vestibular schwannoma (VS) removal led to acute and slow changes in the ability to use vestibular cues for balance control. However, the assumptions behind the equilibrium score (ES) are somewhat controversial within the literature. Therefore, we compared the time-course of balance control in eighteen VS patients across different postural variables. Analyses of variance and unsupervised clustering (k-means) were used to compare the whole dataset of four postural variables: ES, a modified ES which factored in the time before a fall (cES), the mean amplitude (MA) and the mean velocity (MV) of center of pressure displacements. Early after surgery, postural performances significantly decreased (p vestibular cues are predominant, with lower ES (12.5 ± 22.8%) and cES (26.6 ± 16.7%) and higher MA (27.7 ± 7.1 mm) and MV (95.2 ± 53.2 mm.s -1 ) than before or three months after surgery. For each postural variable, the k-means clustering divided the whole dataset into two clusters: cluster #1 corresponded to a SOT with low sway amplitude and cluster #2 with high sway amplitude and falls. Overall, whatever the selected postural variable, the main recovery profile of VS patients was highlighted, thus surpassing the ambiguities inherent of the ES calculation. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of galvanic vestibular feedback for a balance prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Activation of vestibular afferents by a bilateral bipolar galvanic vestibular stimulus (GVS) evokes medial-lateral (ML) body sway. By applying a GVS feedback signal that is a function of measured ML head motion, the potential exists for GVS to restore a useful vestibular contribution to ML balance control in vestibular-deficient subjects who remain responsive to GVS. A key to developing an effective balance prosthesis using GVS is to determine the functional relationship between GVS and its influence on the brain's internal estimate of head motion. We describe how a model-based interpretation of GVS-evoked body sway can be used to identify this functional relationship. Results indicate that the GVS-evoked internal motion estimate is effectively a low-pass filtered version of the GVS current. With preliminary data, we demonstrate that GVS feedback, compensated for the identified low-pass characteristics, can either remove the ability of a subject with normal vestibular function to use vestibular information for balance control, or can restore the ability of a subject with bilateral vestibular loss to maintain balance in a condition requiring vestibular information for balance control.

  13. Otolith and Vertical Canal Contributions to Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine: 1) how do normal subjects adjust postural movements in response to changing or altered otolith input, for example, due to aging? and 2) how do patients adapt postural control after altered unilateral or bilateral vestibular sensory inputs such as ablative inner ear surgery or ototoxicity, respectively? The following hypotheses are under investigation: 1) selective alteration of otolith input or abnormalities of otolith receptor function will result in distinctive spatial, frequency, and temporal patterns of head movements and body postural sway dynamics. 2) subjects with reduced, altered, or absent vertical semicircular canal receptor sensitivity but normal otolith receptor function or vice versa, should show predictable alterations of body and head movement strategies essential for the control of postural sway and movement. The effect of altered postural movement control upon compensation and/or adaptation will be determined. These experiments provide data for the development of computational models of postural control in normals, vestibular deficient subjects and normal humans exposed to unusual force environments, including orbital space flight.

  14. Utricular paresis and semicircular canal hyperactivity: a distinct otolith syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Simon I; Snapp, Hillary; Velandia, Sandra; Morgenstein, Kari

    2015-04-01

    Although combined utricular and canal paresis has been described previously, this is the first report of canal hyperactivity associated with utricular hypofunction. Unsteadiness and swaying were the most common symptoms, and patients with shorter duration of symptoms also had positional vertigo. We propose that this syndrome is a variant of utricular dysfunction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorders. To describe a syndrome of instability associated with utricular dysfunction and hyperactive caloric responses. The study comprised 11 consecutive patients exhibiting abnormalities of the eccentric subjective visual vertical test (e-SVV) and high responses during the caloric test of the videonystagmography (VNG). We carried out a review of symptoms, physical examination, and vestibular tests. There was no gender predilection or obvious etiology. The patients' main complaint included instability with linear symptoms (i.e., tilting, rocking, and swaying), with positional vertigo as a secondary symptom. Oculomotor testing, visual fixation index, and brain MRI were normal, excluding a central nervous system disorder. VNG was essentially normal except for hyperactive responses during the caloric testing in all patients. Abnormal e-SVV was found in 10 patients unilaterally and bilaterally in 1 patient. Abnormal oVEMP was found in seven of seven patients, further supporting a utricular site of lesion.

  15. Prediction of future falls in a community dwelling older adult population using instrumented balance and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C M; Gröger, I; Rupprecht, R; Marcar, V L; Gaßmann, K G

    2016-04-01

    The role of instrumented balance and gait assessment when screening for prospective fallers is currently a topic of controversial discussion. This study analyzed the association between variables derived from static posturography, instrumented gait analysis and clinical assessments with the occurrence of prospective falls in a sample of community dwelling older people. In this study 84 older people were analyzed. Based on a prospective occurrence of falls, participants were categorized into fallers and non-fallers. Variables derived from clinical assessments, static posturography and instrumented gait analysis were evaluated with respect to the association with the occurrence of prospective falls using a forward stepwise, binary, logistic regression procedure. Fallers displayed a significantly shorter single support time during walking while counting backwards, increased mediolateral to anteroposterior sway amplitude ratio, increased fast mediolateral oscillations and a larger coefficient (Coeff) of sway direction during various static posturography tests. Previous falls were insignificantly associated with the occurrence of prospective falls. Variables derived from posturography and instrumented gait analysis showed significant associations with the occurrence of prospective falls in a sample of community dwelling older adults.

  16. Healthy older adults balance pattern under dual task conditions: exploring the strategy and trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeynalzadeh Ghoochani, Bahareh; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Talebian, Saeed; Biglarian, Akbar; Zeinalzadeh, Afsaneh; Nazary-Moghadam, Salman; Derakhshanrad, Seyed Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: In line with health promotion plans, early intervention and fall prevention in geriatric population, it is important to study healthy individuals balance mechanisms. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of adding and removing visual input and dual task on elderly balance. Methods: Twenty healthy elderly recruited from four different senior citizen health club centers and from the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR) participated in this analytic cross-sectional study. At USWR's Motor Control Laboratory, the participants' postural sway were assessed using force plate in 4 distinct double leg standing conditions with and without presence of visual input and Stroop dual task. Postural and Stroop variables were compared. Results: Findings indicated that when the elderly encountered with either dual task or absence of visual input, they can still manage the situation in a way that changes in sway parameter would not become significant. But, when these two conditions occurred simultaneously, the participant's balance strategy fluctuated. Therefore, the mean velocity showed a significant difference between the "single quiet standing" condition and the condition of standing with eyes closed while the participants were answering Stroop dual task (Mean difference = -0.007, 95% CI = -0.012, -0.002). Conclusion: It appears that velocity parameter is sensitive to small changes, so it is recommended that researchers include this parameter in their future analyses. Balance in elderly can be manipulated by dual task and visual input deprivation.

  17. Effects of emotional videos on postural control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Arthur de Freitas; Palluel, Estelle; Olivier, Isabelle; Nougier, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    The link between emotions and postural control has been rather unexplored in children. The objective of the present study was to establish whether the projection of pleasant and unpleasant videos with similar arousal would lead to specific postural responses such as postural freezing, aversive or appetitive behaviours as a function of age. We hypothesized that postural sway would similarly increase with the viewing of high arousal videos in children and adults, whatever the emotional context. 40 children participated in the study and were divided into two groups of age: group 7-9 years (n=23; mean age=8 years ± 0.7) and group 10-12 years (n=17; mean age=11 years ± 0.7). 19 adults (mean age=25.8 years ± 4.4) also took part in the experiment. They viewed emotional videos while standing still on a force platform. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were analysed. Antero-posterior, medio-lateral mean speed and sway path length increased similarly with the viewing of high arousal movies in the younger, older children, and adults. Our findings suggest that the development of postural control is not influenced by the maturation of the emotional processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurobehavioral testing of subjects exposed residentially to groundwater contaminated from an aluminum die-casting plant and local referents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, K H; Warshaw, R H

    1993-08-01

    Residents adjoining a die-casting plant had excessive headaches, numbness of hands and feet, dizziness, blurred vision, staggering, sweating, abnormal heart rhythm, and depression, which led to measurements of neurobehavioral performance, affective status, and the frequency of symptoms. They had all been exposed via well water and proximity to the plant to volatile organic chemicals (VOC) and to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The 117 exposed women and men and 46 unexposed referents were studied together for simple and choice visual reaction time, body sway speed, blink reflex latency, color discrimination, Culture Fair (a nonverbal nonarithmetic intelligence test), recall of stories, figures, and numbers, cognitive and psychomotor control (slotted pegboard and trail making A and B), long-term memory, profile of mood states (POMS), and scores and frequencies of 34 symptoms. Choice reaction time, sway speed, and blink latency were impaired in both sexes of the exposed group and trail making B was impaired in exposed women. The POMS scores and frequencies of 30 of 34 symptoms were elevated in both sexes, compared to referents. Recall, long-term memory, psychomotor speed, and other cognitive function tests were reduced in exposed subjects and in the referents as compared to national referents. Neurophysiological impairment, and cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction and affective disorders, especially depression and excessive frequency of symptoms, were associated with the use of wells contaminated with VOCs, TCE and PCBs.

  19. Evaluation of a Smartphone-based audio-biofeedback system for improving balance in older adults--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, A; Mourcou, Q; Franco, C; Diot, B; Demongeot, J; Vuillerme, N

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a Smartphone-based audio-biofeedback (ABF) system for improving balance in older adults. This so-called "iBalance-ABF" system that we recetly developed is "all-inclusive" in the sense that its three main components of a balance prosthesis, (i) the sensory input unit, (ii) the processing unit, and (iii) the sensory output unit, are entirely embedded into the Smartphone. The underlying principle of this system is to supply the user with supplementary information about the medial-lateral (ML) trunk tilt relative to a predetermined adjustable "dead zone" through sound generation in earphones. Six healthy older adults voluntarily participated in this pilot study. Eyes closed, they were asked to stand upright and to sway as little as possible in two (parallel and tandem) stance conditions executed without and with the use of the iBalance-ABF system. Results showed that, without any visual information, the use of the Smartphone-based ABF allowed the older healthy adults to significantly decrease their ML trunk sway in the tandem stance posture and to mitigate the destabilizing effect induced by this particular stance. Although an extended study including a larger number of participants is needed to confirm these data, the present results are encouraging. They do suggest that Smartphone-based ABF system could be used for balance training and rehabilitation therapy in older adults.

  20. Lead effects on postural balance of children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Shukla, R.; Bornschein, R.L.; Dietrich, K.N. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (USA)); Keith, R. (Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The postural sway responses of 63 children with a mean age of 5.74 years were quantified with a Force Platform technique. The average maximum (max) blood lead (PbB) of these children during the first 5 years of life was 20.7 {mu}g/dL (range 9.2 to 32.5). The backward stepwise regression analysis for sway area response during the eyes-closed, no-foam test with all the covariates and confounders and the PbB parameters showed a significant relationship with peak or max PbB during the second year of life. These results are consistent with their previous study with a smaller group of children. The data have been analyzed to provide some insight into the role of various afferents for the maintenance of postural balance. The results suggests a hypothesis that if the max PbB had caused some level of impairment in the functional capacities or interconnectivity of the vestibular and/or proprioception systems at 2 years of age, then it is reasonable to assume that the redundancy in the postural afferent systems would naturally adapt to rely more on the remaining intact afferent system (in this case, vision).