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  1. Grid based calibration of SWAT hydrological models

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    D. Gorgan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The calibration and execution of large hydrological models, such as SWAT (soil and water assessment tool, developed for large areas, high resolution, and huge input data, need not only quite a long execution time but also high computation resources. SWAT hydrological model supports studies and predictions of the impact of land management practices on water, sediment, and agricultural chemical yields in complex watersheds. The paper presents the gSWAT application as a web practical solution for environmental specialists to calibrate extensive hydrological models and to run scenarios, by hiding the complex control of processes and heterogeneous resources across the grid based high computation infrastructure. The paper highlights the basic functionalities of the gSWAT platform, and the features of the graphical user interface. The presentation is concerned with the development of working sessions, interactive control of calibration, direct and basic editing of parameters, process monitoring, and graphical and interactive visualization of the results. The experiments performed on different SWAT models and the obtained results argue the benefits brought by the grid parallel and distributed environment as a solution for the processing platform. All the instances of SWAT models used in the reported experiments have been developed through the enviroGRIDS project, targeting the Black Sea catchment area.

  2. Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to model ecosystem services: A systematic review

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    Francesconi, Wendy; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Pérez-Miñana, Elena; Willcock, Simon P.; Quintero, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    SWAT, a watershed modeling tool has been proposed to help quantify ecosystem services. The concept of ecosystem services incorporates the collective benefits natural systems provide primarily to human beings. It is becoming increasingly important to track the impact that human activities have on the environment in order to determine its resilience and sustainability. The objectives of this paper are to provide an overview of efforts using SWAT to quantify ecosystem services, to determine the model's capability examining various types of services, and to describe the approach used by various researchers. A literature review was conducted to identify studies in which SWAT was explicitly used for quantifying ecosystem services in terms of provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural aspects. A total of 44 peer reviewed publications were identified. Most of these used SWAT to quantify provisioning services (34%), regulating services (27%), or a combination of both (25%). While studies using SWAT for evaluating ecosystem services are limited (approximately 1% of SWAT's peered review publications), and usage (vs. potential) of services by beneficiaries is a current model limitation, the available literature sets the stage for the continuous development and potential of SWAT as a methodological framework for quantifying ecosystem services to assist in decision-making.

  3. Impact of Spatial Scale on Calibration and Model Output for a Grid-based SWAT Model

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    Pignotti, G.; Vema, V. K.; Rathjens, H.; Raj, C.; Her, Y.; Chaubey, I.; Crawford, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The traditional implementation of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model utilizes common landscape characteristics known as hydrologic response units (HRUs). Discretization into HRUs provides a simple, computationally efficient framework for simulation, but also represents a significant limitation of the model as spatial connectivity between HRUs is ignored. SWATgrid, a newly developed, distributed version of SWAT, provides modified landscape routing via a grid, overcoming these limitations. However, the current implementation of SWATgrid has significant computational overhead, which effectively precludes traditional calibration and limits the total number of grid cells in a given modeling scenario. Moreover, as SWATgrid is a relatively new modeling approach, it remains largely untested with little understanding of the impact of spatial resolution on model output. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of user-defined input resolution on SWATgrid predictions in the Upper Cedar Creek Watershed (near Auburn, IN, USA). Original input data, nominally at 30 m resolution, was rescaled for a range of resolutions between 30 and 4,000 m. A 30 m traditional SWAT model was developed as the baseline for model comparison. Monthly calibration was performed, and the calibrated parameter set was then transferred to all other SWAT and SWATgrid models to focus the effects of resolution on prediction uncertainty relative to the baseline. Model output was evaluated with respect to stream flow at the outlet and water quality parameters. Additionally, output of SWATgrid models were compared to output of traditional SWAT models at each resolution, utilizing the same scaled input data. A secondary objective considered the effect of scale on calibrated parameter values, where each standard SWAT model was calibrated independently, and parameters were transferred to SWATgrid models at equivalent scales. For each model, computational requirements were evaluated

  4. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

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    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  5. Prediction of phosphorus loads in an artificially drained lowland catchment using a modified SWAT model

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    Bauwe, Andreas; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Lennartz, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Eutrophication is still one of the main environmental problems in the Baltic Sea. Currently, agricultural diffuse sources constitute the major portion of phosphorus (P) fluxes to the Baltic Sea and have to be reduced to achieve the HELCOM targets and improve the ecological status. Eco-hydrological models are suitable tools to identify sources of nutrients and possible measures aiming at reducing nutrient loads into surface waters. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to the Warnow river basin (3300 km2), the second largest watershed in Germany discharging into the Baltic Sea. The Warnow river basin is located in northeastern Germany and characterized by lowlands with a high proportion of artificially drained areas. The aim of this study were (i) to estimate P loadings for individual flow fractions (point sources, surface runoff, tile flow, groundwater flow), spatially distributed on sub-basin scale. Since the official version of SWAT does not allow for the modeling of P in tile drains, we tested (ii) two different approaches of simulating P in tile drains by changing the SWAT source code. The SWAT source code was modified so that (i) the soluble P concentration of the groundwater was transferred to the tile water and (ii) the soluble P in the soil was transferred to the tiles. The SWAT model was first calibrated (2002-2011) and validated (1992-2001) for stream flow at 7 headwater catchments at a daily time scale. Based on this, the stream flow at the outlet of the Warnow river basin was simulated. Performance statistics indicated at least satisfactory model results for each sub-basin. Breaking down the discharge into flow constituents, it becomes visible that stream flow is mainly governed by groundwater and tile flow. Due to the topographic situation with gentle slopes, surface runoff played only a minor role. Results further indicate that the prediction of soluble P loads was improved by the modified SWAT versions. Major sources of

  6. A GUIDED SWAT MODEL APPLICATION ON SEDIMENT YIELD MODELING IN PANGANI RIVER BASIN: LESSONS LEARNT

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    Preksedis M. Ndomba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to report on the lessons learnt from applying Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT in a well guided sediment yield modelling study. The study area is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB, the Nyumba Ya Mungu (NYM reservoir catchment, located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. It should be noted that, previous modeling exercises in the region applied SWAT with preassumption that inter-rill or sheet erosion was the dominant erosion type. In contrast, in this study SWAT model application was guided by results of analysis of high temporal resolution of sediment flow data and hydro-meteorological data. The runoff component of the SWAT model was calibrated from six-years (i.e. 1977¿1982 of historical daily streamflow data. The sediment component of the model was calibrated using one-year (1977-1988 daily sediment loads estimated from one hydrological year sampling programme (between March and November, 2005 rating curve. A long-term period over 37 years (i.e. 1969-2005 simulation results of the SWAT model was validated to downstream NYM reservoir sediment accumulation information. The SWAT model captured 56 percent of the variance (CE and underestimated the observed daily sediment loads by 0.9 percent according to Total Mass Control (TMC performance indices during a normal wet hydrological year, i.e., between November 1, 1977 and October 31, 1978, as the calibration period. SWAT model predicted satisfactorily the long-term sediment catchment yield with a relative error of 2.6 percent. Also, the model has identified erosion sources spatially and has replicated some erosion processes as determined in other studies and field observations in the PRB. This result suggests that for catchments where sheet erosion is dominant SWAT model may substitute the sediment-rating curve. However, the SWAT model could not capture the dynamics of sediment load delivery in some seasons to the catchment outlet.

  7. SWAT Modeling for Depression-Dominated Areas: How Do Depressions Manipulate Hydrologic Modeling?

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    Mohsen Tahmasebi Nasab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling hydrologic processes for depression-dominated areas such as the North American Prairie Pothole Region is complex and reliant on a clear understanding of dynamic filling-spilling-merging-splitting processes of numerous depressions over the surface. Puddles are spatially distributed over a watershed and their sizes, storages, and interactions vary over time. However, most hydrologic models fail to account for these dynamic processes. Like other traditional methods, depressions are filled as a required preprocessing step in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. The objective of this study was to facilitate hydrologic modeling for depression-dominated areas by coupling SWAT with a Puddle Delineation (PD algorithm. In the coupled PD-SWAT model, the PD algorithm was utilized to quantify topographic details, including the characteristics, distribution, and hierarchical relationships of depressions, which were incorporated into SWAT at the hydrologic response unit (HRU scale. The new PD-SWAT model was tested for a large watershed in North Dakota under real precipitation events. In addition, hydrologic modeling of a small watershed was conducted under two extreme high and low synthetic precipitation conditions. In particular, the PD-SWAT was compared against the regular SWAT based on depressionless DEMs. The impact of depressions on the hydrologic modeling of the large and small watersheds was evaluated. The simulation results for the large watershed indicated that SWAT systematically overestimated the outlet discharge, which can be attributed to the failure to account for the hydrologic effects of depressions. It was found from the PD-SWAT modeling results that at the HRU scale surface runoff initiation was significantly delayed due to the threshold control of depressions. Under the high precipitation scenario, depressions increased the surface runoff peak. However, the low precipitation scenario could not fully fill depressions to reach

  8. A simple rule based model for scheduling farm management operations in SWAT

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    Schürz, Christoph; Mehdi, Bano; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    For many interdisciplinary questions at the watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT; Arnold et al., 1998) has become an accepted and widely used tool. Despite its flexibility, the model is highly demanding when it comes to input data. At SWAT's core the water balance and the modeled nutrient cycles are plant growth driven (implemented with the EPIC crop growth model). Therefore, land use and crop data with high spatial and thematic resolution, as well as detailed information on cultivation and farm management practices are required. For many applications of the model however, these data are unavailable. In order to meet these requirements, SWAT offers the option to trigger scheduled farm management operations by applying the Potential Heat Unit (PHU) concept. The PHU concept solely takes into account the accumulation of daily mean temperature for management scheduling. Hence, it contradicts several farming strategies that take place in reality; such as: i) Planting and harvesting dates are set much too early or too late, as the PHU concept is strongly sensitivity to inter-annual temperature fluctuations; ii) The timing of fertilizer application, in SWAT this often occurs simultaneously on the same date in in each field; iii) and can also coincide with precipitation events. Particularly, the latter two can lead to strong peaks in modeled nutrient loads. To cope with these shortcomings we propose a simple rule based model (RBM) to schedule management operations according to realistic farmer management practices in SWAT. The RBM involves simple strategies requiring only data that are input into the SWAT model initially, such as temperature and precipitation data. The user provides boundaries of time periods for operation schedules to take place for all crops in the model. These data are readily available from the literature or from crop variety trials. The RBM applies the dates by complying with the following rules: i) Operations scheduled in the

  9. Regionalization of SWAT Model Parameters for Use in Ungauged Watersheds

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    Indrajeet Chaubey

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a steady shift towards modeling and model-based approaches as primary methods of assessing watershed response to hydrologic inputs and land management, and of quantifying watershed-wide best management practice (BMP effectiveness. Watershed models often require some degree of calibration and validation to achieve adequate watershed and therefore BMP representation. This is, however, only possible for gauged watersheds. There are many watersheds for which there are very little or no monitoring data available, thus the question as to whether it would be possible to extend and/or generalize model parameters obtained through calibration of gauged watersheds to ungauged watersheds within the same region. This study explored the possibility of developing regionalized model parameter sets for use in ungauged watersheds. The study evaluated two regionalization methods: global averaging, and regression-based parameters, on the SWAT model using data from priority watersheds in Arkansas. Resulting parameters were tested and model performance determined on three gauged watersheds. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies (NS for stream flow obtained using regression-based parameters (0.53–0.83 compared well with corresponding values obtained through model calibration (0.45–0.90. Model performance obtained using global averaged parameter values was also generally acceptable (0.4 ≤ NS ≤ 0.75. Results from this study indicate that regionalized parameter sets for the SWAT model can be obtained and used for making satisfactory hydrologic response predictions in ungauged watersheds.

  10. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Ecohydrological Model Circa 2015: Global Application Trends, Insights and Issues

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    Gassman, P. W.; Arnold, J. G.; Srinivasan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is one of the most widely used watershed-scale water quality models in the world. Over 2,000 peer-reviewed SWAT-related journal articles have been published and hundreds of other studies have been published in conference proceedings and other formats. The use of SWAT was initially concentrated in North America and Europe but has also expanded dramatically in other countries and regions during the past decade including Brazil, China, India, Iran, South Korea, Southeast Asia and eastern Africa. The SWAT model has proven to be a very flexible tool for investigating a broad range of hydrologic and water quality problems at different watershed scales and environmental conditions, and has proven very adaptable for applications requiring improved hydrologic and other enhanced simulation needs. We investigate here the various technological, networking, and other factors that have supported the expanded use of SWAT, and also highlight current worldwide simulation trends and possible impediments to future increased usage of the model. Examples of technological advances include easy access to web-based documentation, user-support groups, and SWAT literature, a variety of Geographic Information System (GIS) interface tools, pre- and post-processing calibration software and other software, and an open source code which has served as a model development catalyst for multiple user groups. Extensive networking regarding the use of SWAT has further occurred via internet-based user support groups, model training workshops, regional working groups, regional and international conferences, and targeted development workshops. We further highlight several important model development trends that have emerged during the past decade including improved hydrologic, cropping system, best management practice (BMP) and pollutant transport simulation methods. In addition, several current SWAT weaknesses will be addressed and key development needs will be

  11. Sediment management modelling in the Blue Nile Basin using SWAT model

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    G. D. Betrie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion/sedimentation is an immense problem that has threatened water resources development in the Nile river basin, particularly in the Eastern Nile (Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt. An insight into soil erosion/sedimentation mechanisms and mitigation methods plays an imperative role for the sustainable water resources development in the region. This paper presents daily sediment yield simulations in the Upper Blue Nile under different Best Management Practice (BMP scenarios. Scenarios applied in this paper are (i maintaining existing conditions, (ii introducing filter strips, (iii applying stone bunds (parallel terraces, and (iv reforestation. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT was used to model soil erosion, identify soil erosion prone areas and assess the impact of BMPs on sediment reduction. For the existing conditions scenario, the model results showed a satisfactory agreement between daily observed and simulated sediment concentrations as indicated by Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency greater than 0.83. The simulation results showed that applying filter strips, stone bunds and reforestation scenarios reduced the current sediment yields both at the subbasins and the basin outlets. However, a precise interpretation of the quantitative results may not be appropriate because some physical processes are not well represented in the SWAT model.

  12. Enabling Large Scale Fine Resolution Flood Modeling Using SWAT and LISFLOOD-FP

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    Liu, Z.; Rajib, A.; Merwade, V.

    2016-12-01

    Due to computational burden, most large scale hydrologic models are not created to generate streamflow hydrographs for lower order ungauged streams. Similarly, most flood inundation mapping studies are performed at major stream reaches. As a result, it is not possible to get reliable flow estimates and flood extents for vast majority of the areas where no stream gauging stations are available. The objective of this study is to loosely couple spatially distributed hydrologic model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), with a 1D/2D hydrodynamic model, LISFLOOD-FP, for large scale fine resolution flood inundation modeling. The model setup is created for the 491,000 km2 drainage area of the Ohio River Basin in the United States. In the current framework, SWAT model is calibrated with historical streamflow data over the past 80 years (1935-2014) to provide streamflow time-series for more than 100,000 NHDPlus stream reaches in the basin. The post-calibration evaluation shows that the simulated daily streamflow has a Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency in the range of 0.4-0.7 against observed records across the basin. Streamflow outputs from the calibrated SWAT are subsequently used to drive LISFLOOD-FP and routed along the streams/floodplain using the built-in subgrid solver. LISFLOOD-FP is set up for the Ohio River Basin using 90m digital elevation model, and is executed on high performance computing resources at Purdue University. The flood extents produced by LISFLOOD-FP show good agreement with observed inundation. The current modeling framework lays foundation for near real-time streamflow forecasting and prediction of time-varying flood inundation maps along the NHDPlus network.

  13. Advances in the application of the SWAT model for water resources management

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    Jayakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, R.; Santhi, C.; Arnold, J. G.

    2005-02-01

    Developments in computer technology have revolutionized the study of hydrologic systems and water resources management. Several computer-based hydrologic/water quality models have been developed for applications in hydrologic modelling and water resources studies. Distributed parameter models, necessary for basin-scale studies, have large input data requirements. Geographic information systems (GIS) and model-GIS interfaces aid the efficient creation of input data files required by such models. One such model available for the water resources professional is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a distributed parameter model developed by the United States Department of Agriculture. This paper describes some recent advances made in the application of SWAT and the SWAT-GIS interface for water resources management. Four case studies are presented. The Hydrologic Unit Model for the United States (HUMUS) project used SWAT to conduct a national-scale analysis of the effect of management scenarios on water quantity and quality. Integration of the SWAT model with rainfall data available from the WSR-88D radar network helps us to incorporate the spatial variability of rainfall into the modelling process. This study demonstrates the usefulness of radar rainfall data in distributed hydrologic studies and the potential of SWAT for application in flood analysis and prediction. A hydrologic modelling study of the Sondu river basin in Kenya using SWAT indicates the potential for application of the model in African watersheds and points to the need for development of better model input data sets in Africa, which are critical for detailed water resources studies. The application of SWAT for water quality analysis in the Bosque river basin, Texas demonstrates the strength of the model for analysing different management scenarios to minimize point and non-point pollution, and its potential for application in total maximum daily load (TMDL) studies.

  14. An Assessment of Mean Areal Precipitation Methods on Simulated Stream Flow: A SWAT Model Performance Assessment

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    Sean Zeiger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mean areal precipitation (MAP estimates are essential input forcings for hydrologic models. However, the selection of the most accurate method to estimate MAP can be daunting because there are numerous methods to choose from (e.g., proximate gauge, direct weighted average, surface-fitting, and remotely sensed methods. Multiple methods (n = 19 were used to estimate MAP with precipitation data from 11 distributed monitoring sites, and 4 remotely sensed data sets. Each method was validated against the hydrologic model simulated stream flow using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. SWAT was validated using a split-site method and the observed stream flow data from five nested-scale gauging sites in a mixed-land-use watershed of the central USA. Cross-validation results showed the error associated with surface-fitting and remotely sensed methods ranging from −4.5 to −5.1%, and −9.8 to −14.7%, respectively. Split-site validation results showed the percent bias (PBIAS values that ranged from −4.5 to −160%. Second order polynomial functions especially overestimated precipitation and subsequent stream flow simulations (PBIAS = −160 in the headwaters. The results indicated that using an inverse-distance weighted, linear polynomial interpolation or multiquadric function method to estimate MAP may improve SWAT model simulations. Collectively, the results highlight the importance of spatially distributed observed hydroclimate data for precipitation and subsequent steam flow estimations. The MAP methods demonstrated in the current work can be used to reduce hydrologic model uncertainty caused by watershed physiographic differences.

  15. Impact Assessment of Morphological Features on Watersheds Using SWAT Model

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    Kaya, S.; Kutukcu, A.

    2016-12-01

    Defining the morphological characteristics of a basin enables carrying out numerous hydrological assessments such as flow value of the basin. In this study the impacts of morphological features designated for the basins on the flow were analyzed. Related to the basin flow shape, drainage density, bifurcation ratio and texture ratio were evaluated using morphological parameters. In the study, Büyük Menderes River Basin and Gediz River Basin which extend across a long valley and flow into the Aegean Sea, were selected as the study area. In the calculation of morphometric parameters regarding the basins, DTM which has 10 m spatial resolution was used. DTM was used as input data for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool - SWAT model which makes significant contributions to the modelling of big basins for hydrologists. The flow value obtained as a result of operating the model facilitates to verify the conducted morphological analyses. On account of operating the model, hydrological parameters on the basis of sub basins were also obtained, which in return makes it possible to understand the hydrological reactions within the basin. The results of the conducted study can be effectively used for integrated watershed management which requires detailed hydrological parameters can be obtained using modern tools such as numerical models.

  16. Modeling crop water productivity using a coupled SWAT-MODSIM model

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    This study examines the water productivity of irrigated wheat and maize yields in Karkheh River Basin (KRB) in the semi-arid region of Iran using a coupled modeling approach consisting of the hydrological model (SWAT) and the river basin water allocation model (MODSIM). Dynamic irrigation requireme...

  17. Assessing Thermally Stressful Events in a Rhode Island Coldwater Fish Habitat Using the SWAT Model

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    Britta Chambers

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly important to recognize historical water quality trends so that the future impacts of climate change may be better understood. Climate studies have suggested that inland stream temperatures and average streamflow will increase over the next century in New England, thereby putting aquatic species sustained by coldwater habitats at risk. In this study we evaluated two different approaches for modeling historical streamflow and stream temperature in a Rhode Island, USA, watershed with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, using (i original SWAT and (ii SWAT plus a hydroclimatological model component that considers both hydrological inputs and air temperature. Based on daily calibration results with six years of measured streamflow and four years of stream temperature data, we examined occurrences of stressful conditions for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis using the hydroclimatological model. SWAT with the hydroclimatological component improved modestly during calibration (NSE of 0.93, R2 of 0.95 compared to the original SWAT (NSE of 0.83, R2 of 0.93. Between 1980–2009, the number of stressful events, a moment in time where high or low flows occur simultaneously with stream temperatures exceeding 21 °C, increased by 55% and average streamflow increased by 60%. This study supports using the hydroclimatological SWAT component and provides an example method for assessing stressful conditions in southern New England’s coldwater habitats.

  18. Rainfall-runoff modelling of Ajay river catchment using SWAT model

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    Kangsabanik, Subhadip; Murmu, Sneha

    2017-05-01

    The present study is based on SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) Model which integrates the GIS information with attribute database to estimate the runoff of Ajay River catchment. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a physically based distributed parameter model which has been developed to predict runoff, erosion, sediment and nutrient transport from agricultural watersheds under different management practices. The SWAT Model works in conjunction with Arc GIS. In the present study the catchment area has been delineated using the DEM (Digital Elevation Model) and then divided into 19 sub-basins. For preparation of landuse map the IRS-P6 LISS-III image has been used and the soil map is extracted from HWSD (Harmonized World Soil Database) Raster world soil map. The sub basins are further divided into 223 HRUs which stands for Hydrological Response Unit. Then by using 30 years of daily rainfall data and daily maximum and minimum temperature data SWAT simulation is done for daily, monthly and yearly basis to find out Runoff for corresponding Rainfall. The coefficient of correlation (r) for rainfall in a period and the corresponding runoff is found to be 0.9419.

  19. Simulating Flash Floods at Hourly Time-Step Using the SWAT Model

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    Laurie Boithias

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flash floods are natural phenomena with environmental, social and economic impacts. To date, few numerical models are able to simulate hydrological processes at catchment scale at a reasonable time scale to describe flash events with accurate details. Considering a ~810 km2 Mediterranean river coastal basin (southwestern France as a study case, the objective of the present study was to assess the ability of the sub-daily module of the lumped Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT to simulate discharge (1 time-continuously, by testing two sub-basin delineation schemes, two catchment sizes, and two output time-steps; and (2 at flood time-scale, by comparing the performances of SWAT to the performances of the event-based fully distributed MARINE model when simulating flash flood events. We showed that there was no benefit of decreasing the size of the minimum drainage area (e.g., from ~15 km2 down to ~1 km2 when delineating sub-basins in SWAT. We also showed that both the MARINE and SWAT models were equally able to reproduce peak discharge, flood timing and volume, and that they were both limited by rainfall and soil data. Hence, the SWAT model appears to be a reliable modelling tool to predict discharge over long periods of time in large flash-flood-prone basins.

  20. Modelling streamflow from two small South African experimental catchments using the SWAT model

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    Govender, M.; Everson, C. S.

    2005-02-01

    Increasing demand for timber products results in the expansion of commercial afforestation in South Africa. The conversion of indigenous seasonally dormant grassland to evergreen forests results in increased transpiration and ultimately a reduction in catchment runoff, creating a negative impact on the country's scarce water supplies. In order to assist managers in the decision-making processes it is important to be able to accurately assess and predict hydrological processes, and the impact that land use change will have on water resources. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) provides a means of performing these assessments. One of the key strengths of the SWAT model lies in its ability to model the relative impacts of changes in management practices, climate and vegetation on water quantity and quality.The aim of this study was to determine if the SWAT model could reasonably simulate hydrological processes in daily time steps from two small South African catchments. To verify the SWAT model a grassland (C VIgrass) and Pinus patula afforested catchment (C IIpine) were selected from the Cathedral Peak hydrological research station in the KwaZulu Natal Drakensberg mountains. These catchments were chosen because of the availability of detailed hydrological records and suitable land use.Observed and simulated streamflow for C VIgrass and C IIpine were compared. When model fits of observed and simulated streamflow for C VIgrass were acceptable, this parameter set was then used in the configuration of C IIpine. Results show that the model performs well for C VIgrass with reasonable agreement between modelled and observed data (R2 = 0.68). Comparisons for C IIpine show a total oversimulation of streamflow for the period 1950 to 1965, with deviations between observed and modelled data increasing from 1959 to 1965, due to the model not accounting for the increase in ET brought about by the maturing pine plantation.

  1. The modified SWAT model for predicting fecal coliforms in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed, USA.

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    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Kim, Joon Ha; Kim, Jung-Woo; Park, Mi-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    This study assessed fecal coliform contamination in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed in Massachusetts, USA using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) because bacteria are one of the major water quality parameters of concern. The bacteria subroutine in SWAT, considering in-stream bacteria die-off only, was modified in this study to include solar radiation-associated die-off and the contribution of wildlife. The result of sensitivity analysis demonstrates that solar radiation is one of the most significant fate factors of fecal coliform. A water temperature-associated function to represent the contribution of beaver activity in the watershed to fecal contamination improved prediction accuracy. The modified SWAT model provides an improved estimate of bacteria from the watershed. Our approach will be useful for simulating bacterial concentrations to provide predictive and reliable information of fecal contamination thus facilitating the implementation of effective watershed management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calibration and validation of the SWAT model for a forested watershed in coastal South Carolina

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    Devendra M. Amatya; Elizabeth B. Haley; Norman S. Levine; Timothy J. Callahan; Artur Radecki-Pawlik; Manoj K. Jha

    2008-01-01

    Modeling the hydrology of low-gradient coastal watersheds on shallow, poorly drained soils is a challenging task due to the complexities in watershed delineation, runoff generation processes and pathways, flooding, and submergence caused by tropical storms. The objective of the study is to calibrate and validate a GIS-based spatially-distributed hydrologic model, SWAT...

  3. Flow forecast by SWAT model and ANN in Pracana basin, Portugal

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    Demirel, M.C.; Venancio, Anabela; Kahya, Ercan

    2009-01-01

    This study provides a unique opportunity to analyze the issue of flow forecast based on the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) and artificial neural network (ANN) models. In last two decades, the ANNs have been extensively applied to various water resources system problems. In this study, the

  4. Anthropogenic factors as an element of uncertainty in hydrological modelling of water yield with SWAT

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    R. Corobov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2014 the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool model was used as a basis for follow-up investigations of Moldova’s small rivers potential flow. The first step of the study included the validation of SWAT for local conditions. As an experimental area, the Cogilnic River watershed was selected. Interim steps included the watershed delineation aimed to identify the subwatersheds and the Hydrological Response Units (small entities with the same characteristics of hydrologic soil type, land use and slopes. To address these tasks, the land cover, soil and slope layers, based on the Digital Elevation Model, were integrated in the SWAT environment. These thematic layers, alongside with long-term information on local monthly maximum and minimum temperatures and precipitation, enabled reflecting the differences in hydrological conditions and defining the watershed runoff. However, the validation of the modelling outputs, carried out through comparison of a simulated water yield from the studied watershed with actual Cogilnic streamflow measures, observed in 2010-2012, showed a great discrepancy between these parameters caused by anthropogenic loading on this small river. Thus, a ‘classical’ SWAT modelling needs to account for real environmental conditions and water use in the study area.

  5. Impacts of manure application on SWAT model outputs in the Xiangxi River watershed

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    Liu, Ruimin; Wang, Qingrui; Xu, Fei; Men, Cong; Guo, Lijia

    2017-12-01

    SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model has been widely used to simulate agricultural non-point source (ANPS) pollution; however, the impacts of livestock manure application on SWAT model outputs have not been well studied. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental effects of livestock manure application based on the SWAT model in the Xiangxi River watershed, which is one of the largest tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China. Three newly-built manure databases (NB) were created and applied to different subbasins based on the actual livestock manure discharging amount. The calibration and validation values of SWAT model outputs obtained from the NB manure application and the original mixed (OM) manure were compared. The study results are as follows: (1) The livestock industry of Xingshan County developed quickly between 2005 and 2015. The downstream of the Xiangxi River (Huangliang, Shuiyuesi and Xiakou) had the largest livestock amount, and largely accounted for manure, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) production (>50%). (2) The NB manure application resulted in less phosphorus pollution (1686.35 kg for ORGP and 31.70 kg for MINP) than the OM manure application. Compared with the upstream, the downstream was influenced more by the manure application. (3) The SWAT results obtained from the NB manure had a better calibration and validation values than those from the OM manure. For ORGP, R2 and NSE values were 0.77 and 0.65 for the NB manure calibration; and the same values for the OM manure were 0.72 and 0.61, respectively. For MINP, R2 values were 0.65 and 0.62 for the NB manure and the OM manure, and the NSE values were 0.60 and 0.58, respectively. The results indicated that the built-in fertilizer database in SWAT has its limitation because it is set up for the simulation in the USA. Thus, when livestock manure is considered in a SWAT simulation, a newly built fertilizer database needs to be set up to represent

  6. Application of WRF - SWAT OpenMI 2.0 based models integration for real time hydrological modelling and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaets, Andrey; Gonchukov, Leonid

    2014-05-01

    Intake of deterministic distributed hydrological models into operational water management requires intensive collection and inputting of spatial distributed climatic information in a timely manner that is both time consuming and laborious. The lead time of the data pre-processing stage could be essentially reduced by coupling of hydrological and numerical weather prediction models. This is especially important for the regions such as the South of the Russian Far East where its geographical position combined with a monsoon climate affected by typhoons and extreme heavy rains caused rapid rising of the mountain rivers water level and led to the flash flooding and enormous damage. The objective of this study is development of end-to-end workflow that executes, in a loosely coupled mode, an integrated modeling system comprised of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) atmospheric model and Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT 2012) hydrological model using OpenMI 2.0 and web-service technologies. Migration SWAT into OpenMI compliant involves reorganization of the model into a separate initialization, performing timestep and finalization functions that can be accessed from outside. To save SWAT normal behavior, the source code was separated from OpenMI-specific implementation into the static library. Modified code was assembled into dynamic library and wrapped into C# class implemented the OpenMI ILinkableComponent interface. Development of WRF OpenMI-compliant component based on the idea of the wrapping web-service clients into a linkable component and seamlessly access to output netCDF files without actual models connection. The weather state variables (precipitation, wind, solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity) are processed by automatic input selection algorithm to single out the most relevant values used by SWAT model to yield climatic data at the subbasin scale. Spatial interpolation between the WRF regular grid and SWAT subbasins centroid (which are

  7. SWAT Model Prediction of Phosphorus Loading in a South Carolina Karst Watershed with a Downstream Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra M. Amatya; Manoj K. Jha; Thomas M. Williams; Amy E. Edwards; Daniel R.. Hitchcock

    2013-01-01

    The SWAT model was used to predict total phosphorus (TP) loadings for a 1555-ha karst watershed—Chapel Branch Creek (CBC)—which drains to a lake via a reservoir-like embayment (R-E). The model was first tested for monthly streamflow predictions from tributaries draining three potential source areas as well as the downstream R-E, followed by TP loadings using data...

  8. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Improving streamflow simulations and forecasting performance of SWAT model by assimilating remotely sensed soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Amol; Ramsankaran, RAAJ

    2017-12-01

    This article presents a study carried out using EnKF based assimilation of coarser-scale SMOS soil moisture retrievals to improve the streamflow simulations and forecasting performance of SWAT model in a large catchment. This study has been carried out in Munneru river catchment, India, which is about 10,156 km2. In this study, an EnkF based new approach is proposed for improving the inherent vertical coupling of soil layers of SWAT hydrological model during soil moisture data assimilation. Evaluation of the vertical error correlation obtained between surface and subsurface layers indicates that the vertical coupling can be improved significantly using ensemble of soil storages compared to the traditional static soil storages based EnKF approach. However, the improvements in the simulated streamflow are moderate, which is due to the limitations in SWAT model in reflecting the profile soil moisture updates in surface runoff computations. Further, it is observed that the durability of streamflow improvements is longer when the assimilation system effectively updates the subsurface flow component. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that the passive microwave-based coarser-scale soil moisture products like SMOS hold significant potential to improve the streamflow estimates when assimilating into large-scale distributed hydrological models operating at a daily time step.

  10. Calibration and Validation of the SWAT2000 Watershed Model for Phosphorus Loading to the Cannonsville Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, B. A.; Shoemaker, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    A comprehensive modeling effort was undertaken to simulate phosphorus (P) loading to the Cannonsville Reservoir in upstate New York. The Cannonsville Reservoir is one of the City of New York's drinking water supply reservoirs and drains an 1178 km2 watershed that is predominantly agricultural (dairy farming) and forested. The occurrence of eutrophic conditions in the reservoir, due to excessive P loading, resulted in the reservoir being classified as `phosphorus restricted'. This classification restricts future economic growth in the watershed when the growth directly or indirectly increases P loadings. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT2000) was used to model the P loading to the reservoir in order to help investigate the effectiveness of proposed management options for reducing P loading. SWAT2000 is a distributed watershed model developed by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. This study is the first to apply SWAT2000 for P loading predictions in the Northeast US. SWAT2000 model development with respect to P focused initially on developing Cannonsville Watershed specific P inputs. Agricultural practices in the watershed were generalized, initial soil P levels were determined using aggregated watershed-wide soil P test results, manure spreading was based on the available manure masses as projected from local cattle population estimates and manure production characteristics were based on local manure studies. Ten years of daily P loading data were available for calibration and validation of the model. Additional bi-weekly sampling data of surface water P concentrations across the watershed were also utilized to test the spatial performance of the model. Comparison with measured data and further analysis of model equations showed that the model equations for sediment generation under snow melt conditions required modifications. In addition a number of P model parameters required calibration. Calibration results

  11. Assessment of soil erosion risk in Komering watershed, South Sumatera, using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsabilla, A.; Kusratmoko, E.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in land use watershed led to environmental degradation. Estimated loss of soil erosion is often difficult due to some factors such as topography, land use, climate and human activities. This study aims to predict soil erosion hazard and sediment yield using the Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) hydrological model. The SWAT was chosen because it can simulate the model with limited data. The study area is Komering watershed (806,001 Ha) in South Sumatera Province. There are two factors land management intervention: 1) land with agriculture, and 2) land with cultivation. These factors selected in accordance with the regulations of spatial plan area. Application of the SWAT demonstrated that the model can predict surface runoff, soil erosion loss and sediment yield. The erosion risk for each watershed can be classified and predicted its changes based on the scenarios which arranged. In this paper, we also discussed the relationship between the distribution of erosion risk and watershed's characteristics in a spatial perspective.

  12. Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources in Zarrinehrud Basin Using SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mansouri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluate impacts of climate change on temperature, rainfall and runoff in the future Using statistical model, LARS-WG, and conceptual hydrological model, SWAT. In order to the Zarrinehrud river basin, as the biggest catchment of the Lake Urmia basin was selected as a case study. At first, for the generation of future weather data in the basin, LARS-WG model was calibrated using meteorological data and then 14 models of AOGCM were applied and results of these models were downscaled using LARS-WG model in 6 synoptic stations for period of 2015 to 2030. SWAT model was used for evaluation of climate change impacts on runoff in the basin. In order to, the model was calibrated and validated using 6 gauging stations for period of 1987-2007 and the value of R2 was between 0.49 and 0.71 for calibration and between 0.54 and 0.77 for validation. Then by introducing average of downscaled results of AOGCM models to the SWAT, runoff changes of the basin were simulated during 2015-2030. Average of results of LARS-WG model indicated that the monthly mean of minimum and maximum temperatures will increase compared to the baseline period. Also monthly average of precipitation will decrease in spring season but will increase in summer and autumn. The results showed that in addition to the amount of precipitation, its pattern will change in the future period, too. The results of runoff simulation showed that the amount of inflow to the Zarrinehrud reservoir will reduce 28.4 percent compared to the baseline period.

  13. Baseflow simulation using SWAT model in an inland river basin in Tianshan Mountains, Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Baseflow is an important component in hydrological modeling. The complex streamflow recession process complicates the baseflow simulation. In order to simulate the snow and/or glacier melt dominated streamflow receding quickly during the high-flow period but very slowly during the low-flow period in rivers in arid and cold northwest China, the current one-reservoir baseflow approach in SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool model was extended by adding a slow- reacting reservoir and applying it to the Manas River basin in the Tianshan Mountains. Meanwhile, a digital filter program was employed to separate baseflow from streamflow records for comparisons. Results indicated that the two-reservoir method yielded much better results than the one-reservoir one in reproducing streamflow processes, and the low-flow estimation was improved markedly. Nash-Sutcliff efficiency values at the calibration and validation stages are 0.68 and 0.62 for the one-reservoir case, and 0.76 and 0.69 for the two-reservoir case. The filter-based method estimated the baseflow index as 0.60, while the model-based as 0.45. The filter-based baseflow responded almost immediately to surface runoff occurrence at onset of rising limb, while the model-based responded with a delay. In consideration of watershed surface storage retention and soil freezing/thawing effects on infiltration and recharge during initial snowmelt season, a delay response is considered to be more reasonable. However, a more detailed description of freezing/thawing processes should be included in soil modules so as to determine recharge to aquifer during these processes, and thus an accurate onset point of rising limb of the simulated baseflow.

  14. Impact of Uncertainty in SWAT Model Simulations on Consequent Decisions on Optimal Crop Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N.; Sudheer, K. P.; Raj, C.; Chaubey, I.

    2015-12-01

    The diminishing quantities of non-renewable forms of energy have caused an increasing interest in the renewable sources of energy, such as biofuel, in the recent years. However, the demand for biofuel has created a concern for allocating grain between the fuel and food industry. Consequently, appropriate regulations that limit grain based ethanol production have been developed and are put to practice, which resulted in cultivating perennial grasses like Switch grass and Miscanthus to meet the additional cellulose demand. A change in cropping and management practice, therefore, is essential to cater the conflicting requirement for food and biofuel, which has a long-term impact on the downstream water quality. Therefore it is essential to implement optimal cropping practices to reduce the pollutant loadings. Simulation models in conjunction with optimization procedures are useful in developing efficient cropping practices in such situations. One such model is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which can simulate both the water and the nutrient cycle, as well as quantify long-term impacts of changes in management practice in the watershed. It is envisaged that the SWAT model, along with an optimization algorithm, can be used to identify the optimal cropping pattern that achieves the minimum guaranteed grain production with less downstream pollution, while maximizing the biomass production for biofuel generation. However, the SWAT simulations do have a certain level of uncertainty that needs to be accounted for before making decisions. Therefore, the objectives of this study are twofold: (i) to understand how model uncertainties influence decision-making, and (ii) to develop appropriate management scenarios that account the uncertainty. The simulation uncertainty of the SWAT model is assessed using Shuffled Complex Evolutionary Metropolis Algorithm (SCEM). With the data collected from St. Joseph basin, IN, USA, the preliminary results indicate that model

  15. Modelling of hydrologic processes and potential response to climate change through the use of a multisite SWAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gül, G.O.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Hydrologic models that use components for integrated modelling of surface water and groundwater systems help conveniently simulate the dynamically linked hydrologic and hydraulic processes that govern flow conditions in watersheds. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is one such model...... that allows continuous simulations over long time periods in the land phase of the hydrologic cycle by incorporating surface water and groundwater interactions. This study provides a verified structure for the SWAT to evaluate existing flow regimes in a small-sized catchment in Denmark and examines a simple...... simulation to help quantify the effects of climate change on regional water quantities. SWAT can be regarded among the alternative hydrologic simulation tools applicable for catchments with similar characteristics and of similar sizes in Denmark. However, the modellers would be required to determine a proper...

  16. Simulating Crop Evapotranspiration Response under Different Planting Scenarios by Modified SWAT Model in an Irrigation District, Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    Full Text Available Modelling crop evapotranspiration (ET response to different planting scenarios in an irrigation district plays a significant role in optimizing crop planting patterns, resolving agricultural water scarcity and facilitating the sustainable use of water resources. In this study, the SWAT model was improved by transforming the evapotranspiration module. Then, the improved model was applied in Qingyuan Irrigation District of northwest China as a case study. Land use, soil, meteorology, irrigation scheduling and crop coefficient were considered as input data, and the irrigation district was divided into subdivisions based on the DEM and local canal systems. On the basis of model calibration and verification, the improved model showed better simulation efficiency than did the original model. Therefore, the improved model was used to simulate the crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios in the irrigation district. Results indicated that crop evapotranspiration decreased by 2.94% and 6.01% under the scenarios of reducing the planting proportion of spring wheat (scenario 1 and summer maize (scenario 2 by keeping the total cultivated area unchanged. However, the total net output values presented an opposite trend under different scenarios. The values decreased by 3.28% under scenario 1, while it increased by 7.79% under scenario 2, compared with the current situation. This study presents a novel method to estimate crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios using the SWAT model, and makes recommendations for strategic agricultural water management planning for the rational utilization of water resources and development of local economy by studying the impact of planting scenario changes on crop evapotranspiration and output values in the irrigation district of northwest China.

  17. Application of SWAT-HS, a lumped hillslope model to simulate hydrology in the Cannonsville Reservoir watershed, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Linh; Schneiderman, Elliot; Mukundan, Rajith; Moore, Karen; Owens, Emmet; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2017-04-01

    Surface runoff is the primary mechanism transporting substances such as sediments, agricultural chemicals, and pathogens to receiving waters. In order to predict runoff and pollutant fluxes, and to evaluate management practices, it is essential to accurately predict the areas generating surface runoff, which depend on the type of runoff: infiltration-excess runoff and saturation-excess runoff. The watershed of Cannonsville reservoir is part of the New York City water supply system that provides high quality drinking water to nine million people in New York City (NYC) and nearby communities. Previous research identified saturation-excess runoff as the dominant runoff mechanism in this region. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a promising tool to simulate the NYC watershed given its broad application and good performance in many watersheds with different scales worldwide, for its ability to model water quality responses, and to evaluate the effect of management practices on water quality at the watershed scale. However, SWAT predicts runoff based mainly on soil and land use characteristics, and implicitly considers only infiltration-excess runoff. Therefore, we developed a modified version of SWAT, referred to as SWAT-Hillslope (SWAT-HS), which explicitly simulates saturation-excess runoff by redefining Hydrological Response Units (HRUs) based on wetness classes with varying soil water storage capacities, and by introducing a surface aquifer with the ability to route interflow from "drier" to "wetter" wetness classes. SWAT-HS was first tested at Town Brook, a 37 km2 headwater watershed draining to the Cannonsville reservoir using a single sub-basin for the whole watershed. SWAT-HS performed well, and predicted streamflow yielded Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiencies of 0.68 and 0.87 at the daily and monthly time steps, respectively. More importantly, it predicted the spatial distribution of saturated areas accurately. Based on the good performance in the Town Brook

  18. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yuzhou [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang Minghua, E-mail: mhzhang@ucdavis.ed [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed. - Selected structural BMPs are recommended for reducing loads of OP pesticides.

  19. User's guide for simulation of waste treatment (SWAT) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macal, C.M.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a user's guide for the Simulation of Waste Treatment (SWAT) model computer code. (A detailed description of the logic and assumptions of the model was published previously.) A flow diagram depicting the logic of the SWAT computer code is included. Several river basins or regions can be simulated in a single computer run, with each region having numerous treatment plants. Treatment plants are simulated sequentially to reduce computer storage requirements. All input to the model is in the form of cards and all output is to a line printer. The code is written in FORTRAN IV and consists of approximately 3000 statements. Using the IBM 370/195 under OS, a Gl compiler requires a region of 220K. Execution time is under two minutes for a typical run for a river basin with 23 treatment plants, with each plant having an average of one technology modification over a simulation period of 25 years. In the first section of this report a brief description of the subroutines in the model is given along with an explanation of how the subroutines function in the context of the whole program. The third section indicates formatting for input data; sample input data for a test problem are also presented. Section 4 describes the output resulting from the sample input data. A program listing appears in the appendix.

  20. Modeling seasonal variability of fecal coliform in natural surface waters using the modified SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Kim, Minjeong; Pyo, JongCheol; Park, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Jung-Woo; Kim, Joon Ha

    2016-04-01

    Fecal coliforms are indicators of pathogens and thereby, understanding of their fate and transport in surface waters is important to protect drinking water sources and public health. We compiled fecal coliform observations from four different sites in the USA and Korea and found a seasonal variability with a significant connection to temperature levels. In all observations, fecal coliform concentrations were relatively higher in summer and lower during the winter season. This could be explained by the seasonal dominance of growth or die-off of bacteria in soil and in-stream. Existing hydrologic models, however, have limitations in simulating the seasonal variability of fecal coliform. Soil and in-stream bacterial modules of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model are oversimplified in that they exclude simulations of alternating bacterial growth. This study develops a new bacteria subroutine for the SWAT in an attempt to improve its prediction accuracy. We introduced critical temperatures as a parameter to simulate the onset of bacterial growth/die-off and to reproduce the seasonal variability of bacteria. The module developed in this study will improve modeling for environmental management schemes.

  1. Assessing the Water-Resources Potential of Istanbul by Using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT Hydrological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Cuceloglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties due to climate change and population growth have created a critical situation for many megacities. Investigating spatio-temporal variability of water resources is, therefore, a critical initial step for water-resource management. This paper is a first study on the evaluation of water-budget components of water resources in Istanbul using a high-resolution hydrological model. In this work, the water resources of Istanbul and surrounding watersheds were modeled using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, which is a continuous-time, semi-distributed, process-based model. The SWAT-CUP program was used for calibration/validation of the model with uncertainty analysis using the SUFI-2 algorithm over the period 1977–2013 at 25 gauge stations. The results reveal that the annual blue-water potential of Istanbul is 3.5 billion m3, whereas the green-water flow and storage are 2.9 billion m3 and 0.7 billion m3, respectively. Watersheds located on the Asian side of the Istanbul megacity yield more blue-water resources compared to the European side, and constitute 75% of the total potential water resources. The model highlights the water potential of the city under current circumstances and gives an insight into its spatial distribution over the region. This study provides a strong basis for forthcoming studies concerning better water-resources management practices, climate change and water-quality studies, as well as other socio-economic scenario analyses in the region.

  2. GIS-Based Hydrological Modelling Using Swat: Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrological modeling tools have been increasingly used worldwide in the management of water resources at watershed level. The application of these tools have been improved in recent time through the advent of remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques which enhance the use of spatially ...

  3. Calibration of SWAT model for woody plant encroachment using paired experimental watershed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Zou, Chris B.; Will, Rodney E.; Stebler, Elaine

    2015-04-01

    Globally, rangeland has been undergoing a transition from herbaceous dominated grasslands into tree or shrub dominated woodlands with great uncertainty of associated changes in water budget. Previous modeling studies simulated the impact of woody plant encroachment on hydrological processes using models calibrated and constrained primarily by historic streamflow from intermediate sized watersheds. In this study, we calibrated the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model), a widely used model for cropping and grazing systems, for a prolifically encroaching juniper species, eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), in the south-central Great Plains using species-specific biophysical and hydrological parameters and in situ meteorological forcing from three pairs of experimental watersheds (grassland versus eastern redcedar woodland) for a period of 3-years covering a dry-to-wet cycle. The multiple paired watersheds eliminated the potentially confounding edaphic and topographic influences from changes in hydrological processes related to woody encroachment. The SWAT model was optimized with the Shuffled complexes with Principal component analysis (SP-UCI) algorithm developed from the Shuffled Complexes Evolution (SCE_UA). The mean Nash-Sutcliff coefficient (NSCE) values of the calibrated model for daily and monthly runoff from experimental watersheds reached 0.96 and 0.97 for grassland, respectively, and 0.90 and 0.84 for eastern redcedar woodland, respectively. We then validated the calibrated model with a nearby, larger watershed undergoing rapid eastern redcedar encroachment. The NSCE value for monthly streamflow over a period of 22 years was 0.79. We provide detailed biophysical and hydrological parameters for tallgrass prairie under moderate grazing and eastern redcedar, which can be used to calibrate any model for further validation and application by the hydrologic modeling community.

  4. Evalution of Long-Term Impacts of Conservation Practice Within the Little River Watershed Using the SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SWAT model was used to simulate the long-term impacts of conservation practices implemented within the South Georgia Little River Watershed on streamflow hydrology and water quality. Typical practices which have been implemented within the watershed include nutrient management, residue manageme...

  5. Comparison of model performance and simulated water balance using NASIM and SWAT for the Wupper River Basin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorza, Paula; Nottebohm, Martin; Scheibel, Marc; aus der Beek, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Under the framework of the Horizon 2020 project BINGO (Bringing INnovation to onGOing water management), climate change impacts on the water cycle in the Wupper catchment area are being studied. With this purpose, a set of hydrological models in NASIM and SWAT have been set up, calibrated, and validated for past conditions using available data. NASIM is a physically-based, lumped, hydrological model based on the water balance equation. For the upper part of the Dhünn catchment area - Wupper River's main tributary - a SWAT model was also implemented. Observed and simulated discharge by NASIM and SWAT for the drainage area upstream of Neumühle hydrometric station (close to Große Dhünn reservoir's inlet) are compared. Comparison of simulated water balance for several hydrological years between the two models is also carried out. While NASIM offers high level of detail for modelling of complex urban areas and the possibility of entering precipitation time series at fine temporal resolution (e.g. minutely data), SWAT enables to study long-term impacts offering a huge variety of input and output variables including different soil properties, vegetation and land management practices. Beside runoff, also sediment and nutrient transport can be simulated. For most calculations, SWAT operates on a daily time step. The objective of this and future work is to determine catchment responses on different meteorological events and to study parameter sensitivity of stationary inputs such as soil parameters, vegetation or land use. Model performance is assessed with different statistical metrics (relative volume error, coefficient of determination, and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency).

  6. Pesticide transport to tile-drained fields in SWAT model – macropore flow and sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Shenglan; Trolle, Dennis; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    as a fraction of effective rainfall and transported to the tile drains directly. Macropore sediment transport is calculated similarly to the MACRO model (Jarvis et al., 1999). Mobile pesticide transport is calculated with a decay function with the flow, whereas sorbed pesticides transport is associated......Preferential flow and colloidal facilitated transport via macopores connected to tile drains are the main pathways for pesticide transport from agricultural areas to surface waters in some area. We developed a macropore flow module and a sediment transport module for the Soil and Water Assessment...... Tool (SWAT) to simulate transport of both mobile (e.g. Bentazon) and strongly sorbed (e.g. Diuron) pesticides in tile drains. Macropore flow is initiated when soil water content exceeds a threshold and rainfall intensity exceeds infiltration capacity. The amount of macropore flow is calculated...

  7. Modelling water-harvesting systems in the arid south of Tunisia using SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ouessar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In many arid countries, runoff water-harvesting systems support the livelihood of the rural population. Little is known, however, about the effect of these systems on the water balance components of arid watersheds. The objective of this study was to adapt and evaluate the GIS-based watershed model SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool for simulating the main hydrologic processes in arid environments. The model was applied to the 270-km2 watershed of wadi Koutine in southeast Tunisia, which receives about 200 mm annual rain. The main adjustment for adapting the model to this dry Mediterranean environment was the inclusion of water-harvesting systems, which capture and use surface runoff for crop production in upstream subbasins, and a modification of the crop growth processes. The adjusted version of the model was named SWAT-WH. Model evaluation was performed based on 38 runoff events recorded at the Koutine station between 1973 and 1985. The model predicted that the average annual watershed rainfall of the 12-year evaluation period (209 mm was split into ET (72%, groundwater recharge (22% and outflow (6%. The evaluation coefficients for calibration and validation were, respectively, R2 (coefficient of determination 0.77 and 0.44; E (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient 0.73 and 0.43; and MAE (Mean Absolute Error 2.6 mm and 3.0 mm, indicating that the model could reproduce the observed events reasonably well. However, the runoff record was dominated by two extreme events, which had a strong effect on the evaluation criteria. Discrepancies remained mainly due to uncertainties in the observed daily rainfall and runoff data. Recommendations for future research include the installation of additional rainfall and runoff gauges with continuous data logging and the collection of more field data to represent the soils and land use. In addition, crop growth and yield monitoring is needed for a proper evaluation of crop production, to

  8. Sediment trapping analysis of flood control reservoirs in Upstream Ciliwung River using SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofiq Ginanjar, Mirwan; Putra, Santosa Sandy

    2017-06-01

    The plans of Sukamahi dam and Ciawi dam construction for Jakarta flood risk reduction purpose had been proposed as feasible solutions to be implemented. However, the risk of the dam outlets clogging, caused by the sediment, is important to be anticipated. The prediction of the max sediment concentration in the reservoir is crucial for the dam operation planning. It is important to avoid the flood outlet tunnel clogging. This paper present a hydrologic sediment budget model of The Upstream Ciliwung River Basin, with flood control dam existence scenarios. The model was constructed within SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tools) plugin and run inside the QGIS framework. The free hydrological data from CFSR, soil data from FAO, and topographical data from CGIAR-CSI were implemented as the model input. The model resulted the sediment concentration dynamics of the Sukamahi and Ciawi reservoirs, on some suspended sediment parameter ranges. The sediment trapping efficiency was also computed by different possible dam capacity alternatives. The research findings will give a scientific decision making base for the river authority, in term of flood control dam planning, especially in The Upstream Ciliwung River Basin.

  9. Analysis of the spatial variation in the parameters of the SWAT model with application in Flanders, Northern Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Heuvelmans

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational applications of a hydrological model often require the prediction of stream flow in (future time periods without stream flow observations or in ungauged catchments. Data for a case-specific optimisation of model parameters are not available for such applications, so parameters have to be derived from other catchments or time periods. It has been demonstrated that for applications of the SWAT in Northern Belgium, temporal transfers of the parameters have less influence than spatial transfers on the performance of the model. This study examines the spatial variation in parameter optima in more detail. The aim was to delineate zones wherein model parameters can be transferred without a significant loss of model performance. SWAT was calibrated for 25 catchments that are part of eight larger sub-basins of the Scheldt river basin. Two approaches are discussed for grouping these units in zones with a uniform set of parameters: a single parameter approach considering each parameter separately and a parameter set approach evaluating the parameterisation as a whole. For every catchment, the SWAT model was run with the local parameter optima, with the average parameter values for the entire study region (Flanders, with the zones delineated with the single parameter approach and with the zones obtained by the parameter set approach. Comparison of the model performances of these four parameterisation strategies indicates that both the single parameter and the parameter set zones lead to stream flow predictions that are more accurate than if the entire study region were treated as one single zone. On the other hand, the use of zonal average parameter values results in a considerably worse model fit compared to local parameter optima. Clustering of parameter sets gives a more accurate result than the single parameter approach and is, therefore, the preferred technique for use in the parameterisation of ungauged sub-catchments as part of the

  10. Evaluation of existing and modified wetland equations in the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The drainage significantly alters flow and nutrient pathways in small watersheds and reliable simulation at this scale is needed for effective planning of nutrient reduction strategies. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been widely utilized for prediction of flow and nutrient loads, but...

  11. Modelling land use change across elevation gradients in district Swat, Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qasim, M.; Termansen, M.; Hubacek, K.; Fleskens, L.

    2013-01-01

    District Swat is part of the high mountain Hindu-Kush Himalayan region of Pakistan. Documentation and analysis of land use change in this region is challenging due to very disparate accounts of the state of forest resources and limited accessible data. Such analysis is, however, important due to

  12. Improving SWAT model performance in the upper Blue Nile Basin using meteorological data integration and subcatchment discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Erwin Isaac; Fleifle, Amr; Ludwig, Ralf; Disse, Markus

    2017-09-01

    The Blue Nile Basin is confronted by land degradation problems, insufficient agricultural production, and a limited number of developed energy sources. Hydrological models provide useful tools to better understand such complex systems and improve water resources and land management practices. In this study, SWAT was used to model the hydrological processes in the upper Blue Nile Basin. Comparisons between a Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) and a conventional ground weather dataset were done under two sub-basin discretization levels (30 and 87 sub-basins) to create an integrated dataset to improve the spatial and temporal limitations of both datasets. A SWAT error index (SEI) was also proposed to compare the reliability of the models under different discretization levels and weather datasets. This index offers an assessment of the model quality based on precipitation and evapotranspiration. SEI demonstrates to be a reliable additional and useful method to measure the level of error of SWAT. The results showed the discrepancies of using different weather datasets with different sub-basin discretization levels. Datasets under 30 sub-basins achieved Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (NS) values of -0.51, 0.74, and 0.84; p factors of 0.53, 0.66, and 0.70; and r factors of 1.11, 0.83, and 0.67 for the CFSR, ground, and integrated datasets, respectively. Meanwhile, models under 87 sub-basins achieved NS values of -1.54, 0.43, and 0.80; p factors of 0.36, 0.67, and 0.77; r factors of 0.93, 0.68, and 0.54 for the CFSR, ground, and integrated datasets, respectively. Based on the obtained statistical results, the integrated dataset provides a better model of the upper Blue Nile Basin.

  13. A multi basin SWAT model analysis of runoff and sedimentation in the Blue Nile, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Easton

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi basin analysis of runoff and erosion in the Blue Nile Basin, Ethiopia was conducted to elucidate sources of runoff and sediment. Erosion is arguably the most critical problem in the Blue Nile Basin, as it limits agricultural productivity in Ethiopia, degrades benthos in the Nile, and results in sedimentation of dams in downstream countries. A modified version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model was developed to predict runoff and sediment losses from the Ethiopian Blue Nile Basin. The model simulates saturation excess runoff from the landscape using a simple daily water balance coupled to a topographic wetness index in ways that are consistent with observed runoff processes in the basin. The spatial distribution of landscape erosion is thus simulated more correctly. The model was parameterized in a nested design for flow at eight and sediment at three locations in the basin. Subbasins ranged in size from 1.3 to 174 000 km2, and interestingly, the partitioning of runoff and infiltrating flow could be predicted by topographic information. Model predictions showed reasonable accuracy (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiencies ranged from 0.53–0.92 with measured data across all sites except Kessie, where the water budget could not be closed; however, the timing of flow was well captured. Runoff losses increased with rainfall during the monsoonal season and were greatest from areas with shallow soils and large contributing areas. Analysis of model results indicate that upland landscape erosion dominated sediment delivery to the main stem of the Blue Nile in the early part of the growing season when tillage occurs and before the soil was wetted up and plant cover was established. Once plant cover was established in mid August landscape erosion was negligible and sediment export was dominated by channel processes and re-suspension of landscape sediment deposited early in the growing season. These results imply that targeting small

  14. Spatial multiobjective optimization of agricultural conservation practices using a SWAT model and an evolutionary algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabotyagov, Sergey; Campbell, Todd; Valcu, Adriana; Gassman, Philip; Jha, Manoj; Schilling, Keith; Wolter, Calvin; Kling, Catherine

    2012-12-09

    Finding the cost-efficient (i.e., lowest-cost) ways of targeting conservation practice investments for the achievement of specific water quality goals across the landscape is of primary importance in watershed management. Traditional economics methods of finding the lowest-cost solution in the watershed context (e.g.,(5,12,20)) assume that off-site impacts can be accurately described as a proportion of on-site pollution generated. Such approaches are unlikely to be representative of the actual pollution process in a watershed, where the impacts of polluting sources are often determined by complex biophysical processes. The use of modern physically-based, spatially distributed hydrologic simulation models allows for a greater degree of realism in terms of process representation but requires a development of a simulation-optimization framework where the model becomes an integral part of optimization. Evolutionary algorithms appear to be a particularly useful optimization tool, able to deal with the combinatorial nature of a watershed simulation-optimization problem and allowing the use of the full water quality model. Evolutionary algorithms treat a particular spatial allocation of conservation practices in a watershed as a candidate solution and utilize sets (populations) of candidate solutions iteratively applying stochastic operators of selection, recombination, and mutation to find improvements with respect to the optimization objectives. The optimization objectives in this case are to minimize nonpoint-source pollution in the watershed, simultaneously minimizing the cost of conservation practices. A recent and expanding set of research is attempting to use similar methods and integrates water quality models with broadly defined evolutionary optimization methods(3,4,9,10,13-15,17-19,22,23,25). In this application, we demonstrate a program which follows Rabotyagov et al.'s approach and integrates a modern and commonly used SWAT water quality model(7) with a

  15. Assessment of land-use change on streamflow using GIS, remote sensing and a physically-based model, SWAT

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    J. Y. G. Dos Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the impact of the land-use changes between the periods 1967−1974 and 1997−2008 on the streamflow of Tapacurá catchment (northeastern Brazil using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model. The results show that the most sensitive parameters were the baseflow, Manning factor, time of concentration and soil evaporation compensation factor, which affect the catchment hydrology. The model calibration and validation were performed on a monthly basis, and the streamflow simulation showed a good level of accuracy for both periods. The obtained R2 and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values for each period were respectively 0.82 and 0.81 for 1967−1974, and 0.93 and 0.92 for the period 1997−2008. The evaluation of the SWAT model response to the land cover has shown that the mean monthly flow, during the rainy seasons for 1967−1974, decreased when compared to 1997−2008.

  16. Streamflow in the upper Mississippi river basin as simulated by SWAT driven by 20{sup th} century contemporary results of global climate models and NARCCAP regional climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takle, Eugene S.; Jha, Manoj; Lu, Er; Arritt, Raymond W.; Gutowski, William J. [Iowa State Univ. Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We use Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) when driven by observations and results of climate models to evaluate hydrological quantities, including streamflow, in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) for 1981-2003 in comparison to observed streamflow. Daily meteorological conditions used as input to SWAT are taken from (1) observations at weather stations in the basin, (2) daily meteorological conditions simulated by a collection of regional climate models (RCMs) driven by reanalysis boundary conditions, and (3) daily meteorological conditions simulated by a collection of global climate models (GCMs). Regional models used are those whose data are archived by the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). Results show that regional models correctly simulate the seasonal cycle of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow within the basin. Regional models also capture interannual extremes represented by the flood of 1993 and the dry conditions of 2000. The ensemble means of both the GCM-driven and RCM-driven simulations by SWAT capture both the timing and amplitude of the seasonal cycle of streamflow with neither demonstrating significant superiority at the basin level. (orig.)

  17. SWAT Model Application to Assess the Impact of Intensive Corn‐farming on Runoff, Sediments and Phosphorous loss from an Agricultural Watershed in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential future increase in corn-based biofuel may be expected to have a negative impact on water quality in streams and lakes of the Midwestern US due to increased agricultural chemicals usage. This study used the SWAT model to assess the impact of continuous-corn farming o...

  18. Runoff Simulation in the Upper Reaches of Heihe River Basin Based on the RIEMS–SWAT Model

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    Songbing Zou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the distributed hydrological simulations for complex mountain areas, large amounts of meteorological input parameters with high spatial and temporal resolutions are necessary. However, the extreme scarcity and uneven distribution of the traditional meteorological observation stations in cold and arid regions of Northwest China makes it very difficult in meeting the requirements of hydrological simulations. Alternatively, regional climate models (RCMs, which can provide a variety of distributed meteorological data with high temporal and spatial resolution, have become an effective solution to improve hydrological simulation accuracy and to further study water resource responses to human activities and global climate change. In this study, abundant and evenly distributed virtual weather stations in the upper reaches of the Heihe River Basin (HRB of Northwest China were built for the optimization of the input data, and thus a regional integrated environmental model system (RIEMS based on RCM and a distributed hydrological model of soil and water assessment tool (SWAT were integrated as a coupled climate–hydrological RIEMS-SWAT model, which was applied to simulate monthly runoff from 1995 to 2010 in the region. Results show that the simulated and observed values are close; Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency is higher than 0.65; determination coefficient (R2 values are higher than 0.70; percent bias is controlled within ±20%; and root-mean-square-error-observation standard deviation ratio is less than 0.65. These results indicate that the coupled model can present basin hydrological processes properly, and provide scientific support for prediction and management of basin water resources.

  19. Aplicación del modelo hidrológico-swat-en una microcuenca agrícola de La Pampa ondulada Application of the hydrologic model - swat - on a micro agricultural basin of the rolling Pampa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Behrends Kraemer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El modelado hidrológico es a menudo el primer paso en el desarrollo de sistemas de decisión espacial para identificaráreas vulnerables a la contaminación por nutrientes, pesticidas así como también a contaminantes biológicos. En este sentido el SWAT (Soil and Water Assesment Tool fue desarrollado para predecir impactos de las prácticas de manejo de las tierras en las aguas, sedimentos y agroquímicos en cuencas hidrográficas con diferentes suelos, usos y prácticas en largos períodos de tiempo. Aunque el mismo está siendo aplicado en todo el mundo, todavía no esta difundido su uso en la Argentina, no encontrándose al momento reportes al respecto. Este modelo se utilizó en una microcuenca agrícola de la Pampa Ondulada (Argentina y fue calibrado y validado utilizando los valores de escurrimientos medidos in situ. Se encontraron buenas eficiencias a escala diaria (R²: 0,55; R² ENS: 0,52 y pobres a escala mensual (R²: 0,34; R² ENS: 0,04. En la calibración, los escurrimientos fueron sobreestimados en un 31,8% y 32,6% para la escala mensual y diaria respectivamente, mientras que en la validación se sobreestimó un 42,5% para los valores mensuales y un 41,2% para los diarios. La aplicación del SWAT en esta microcuenca agrícola resultó auspiciosa y conduce a la inclusión de dicho modelo en futuros trabajos.A hydrological model is often the first step for the development of spatial decision systems in order to identify vulnerable areas to the pollution by nutrients, pesticides as well as biological contaminants. The SWAT model was developed to predict the impact of land management on water, agrochemicals and sediments in hydrographical basins with different soils, land uses and practices for long time periods. This model is being used all over the world but it has not been applied in Argentina until present. The SWAT model was used in an agricultural microbasin in the Rolling Pampa (Argentina and was calibrated and validated

  20. Quantifying the Contribution of On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems to Stream Discharge Using the SWAT Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C W; Radcliffe, D E; Risse, L M; Habteselassie, M; Mukundan, R; Jeong, J; Hoghooghi, N

    2014-03-01

    In the southeastern United States, on-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are widely used for domestic wastewater treatment. The degree to which OWTSs represent consumptive water use has been questioned in Georgia. The goal of this study was to estimate the effect of OWTSs on streamflow in a gauged watershed in Gwinnett County, Georgia using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) watershed-scale model, which includes a new OWTS algorithm. Streamflow was modeled with and without the presence of OWTSs. The model was calibrated using data from 1 Jan. 2003 to 31 Dec. 2006 and validated from 1 Jan. 2007 to 31 Dec. 2010 using the auto-calibration tool SWAT-CUP 4. The daily and monthly streamflow Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients were 0.49 and 0.71, respectively, for the calibration period and 0.37 and 0.68, respectively, for the validation period, indicating a satisfactory fit. Analysis of water balance output variables between simulations showed a 3.1% increase in total water yield at the watershed scale and a 5.9% increase at the subbasin scale for a high-density OWTS area. The percent change in water yield between simulations was the greatest in dry years, implying that the influence of OWTSs on the water yield is greatest under drought conditions. Mean OWTS water use was approximately 5.7% consumptive, contrary to common assumptions by water planning agencies in Georgia. Results from this study may be used by OWTS users and by watershed planners to understand the influence of OWTSs on water quantity within watersheds in this region. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Hydrological simulation in a basin of typical tropical climate and soil using the SWAT model part I: Calibration and validation tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donizete dos R. Pereira

    2016-09-01

    New hydrological insights: The SWAT model was qualified for simulating the Pomba River sub-basin in the sites where rainfall representation was reasonable to good. The model can be used in the simulation of maximum, average and minimum annual daily streamflow based on the paired t-test, contributing with the water resources management of region, although the model still needs to be improved, mainly in the representativeness of rainfall, to give better estimates of extreme values.

  2. Integrated modeling approach using SELECT and SWAT models to simulate source loading and in-stream conditions of fecal indicator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, T.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling of fate and transport of fecal bacteria in a watershed is generally a processed based approach that considers releases from manure, point sources, and septic systems. Overland transport with water and sediments, infiltration into soils, transport in the vadose zone and groundwater, die-off and growth processes, and in-stream transport are considered as the other major processes in bacteria simulation. This presentation will discuss a simulation of fecal indicator bacteria (E.coli) source loading and in-stream conditions of a non-tidal watershed (Cedar Bayou Watershed) in South Central Texas using two models; Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) and Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Furthermore, it will discuss a probable approach of bacteria source load reduction in order to meet the water quality standards in the streams. The selected watershed is listed as having levels of fecal indicator bacteria that posed a risk for contact recreation and wading by the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The SELECT modeling approach was used in estimating the bacteria source loading from land categories. Major bacteria sources considered were, failing septic systems, discharges from wastewater treatment facilities, excreta from livestock (Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Goat), excreta from Wildlife (Feral Hogs, and Deer), Pet waste (mainly from Dogs), and runoff from urban surfaces. The estimated source loads were input to the SWAT model in order to simulate the transport through the land and in-stream conditions. The calibrated SWAT model was then used to estimate the indicator bacteria in-stream concentrations for future years based on H-GAC's regional land use, population and household projections (up to 2040). Based on the in-stream reductions required to meet the water quality standards, the corresponding required source load reductions were estimated.

  3. Evaluation of non-point source pollution reduction by applying best management practices using a SWAT model and QuickBird high resolution satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, MiSeon; Park, GeunAe; Park, MinJi; Park, JongYoon; Lee, JiWan; Kim, SeongJoon

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the reduction effect of non-point source pollution by applying best management practices (BMPs) to a 1.21 km2 small agricultural watershed using a SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model. Two meter QuickBird land use data were prepared for the watershed. The SWAT was calibrated and validated using daily streamflow and monthly water quality (total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and suspended solids (SS)) records from 1999 to 2000 and from 2001 to 2002. The average Nash and Sutcliffe model efficiency was 0.63 for the streamflow and the coefficients of determination were 0.88, 0.72, and 0.68 for SS, TN, and TP, respectively. Four BMP scenarios viz. the application of vegetation filter strip and riparian buffer system, the regulation of Universal Soil Loss Equation P factor, and the fertilizing control amount for crops were applied and analyzed.

  4. Comparative analyses of hydrological responses of two adjacent watersheds to climate variability and change using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, Wells D.; Lang, Megan W.; Sharifi, Amir

    2018-01-01

    Water quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW) are expected to be exacerbated by climate variability and change. However, climate impacts on agricultural lands and resultant nutrient loads into surface water resources are largely unknown. This study evaluated the impacts of climate variability and change on two adjacent watersheds in the Coastal Plain of the CBW, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We prepared six climate sensitivity scenarios to assess the individual impacts of variations in CO2 concentration (590 and 850 ppm), precipitation increase (11 and 21 %), and temperature increase (2.9 and 5.0 °C), based on regional general circulation model (GCM) projections. Further, we considered the ensemble of five GCM projections (2085-2098) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario to evaluate simultaneous changes in CO2, precipitation, and temperature. Using SWAT model simulations from 2001 to 2014 as a baseline scenario, predicted hydrologic outputs (water and nitrate budgets) and crop growth were analyzed. Compared to the baseline scenario, a precipitation increase of 21 % and elevated CO2 concentration of 850 ppm significantly increased streamflow and nitrate loads by 50 and 52 %, respectively, while a temperature increase of 5.0 °C reduced streamflow and nitrate loads by 12 and 13 %, respectively. Crop biomass increased with elevated CO2 concentrations due to enhanced radiation- and water-use efficiency, while it decreased with precipitation and temperature increases. Over the GCM ensemble mean, annual streamflow and nitrate loads showed an increase of ˜ 70 % relative to the baseline scenario, due to elevated CO2 concentrations and precipitation increase. Different hydrological responses to climate change were observed from the two watersheds, due to contrasting land use and soil characteristics. The watershed with a larger percent of croplands demonstrated a greater increased rate of 5.2 kg N ha-1 in

  5. Comparative analyses of hydrological responses of two adjacent watersheds to climate variability and change using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, Wells; Lang, Megan W.; Sharifi, Amir

    2018-01-01

    Water quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW) are expected to be exacerbated by climate variability and change. However, climate impacts on agricultural lands and resultant nutrient loads into surface water resources are largely unknown. This study evaluated the impacts of climate variability and change on two adjacent watersheds in the Coastal Plain of the CBW, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We prepared six climate sensitivity scenarios to assess the individual impacts of variations in CO2concentration (590 and 850 ppm), precipitation increase (11 and 21 %), and temperature increase (2.9 and 5.0 °C), based on regional general circulation model (GCM) projections. Further, we considered the ensemble of five GCM projections (2085–2098) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario to evaluate simultaneous changes in CO2, precipitation, and temperature. Using SWAT model simulations from 2001 to 2014 as a baseline scenario, predicted hydrologic outputs (water and nitrate budgets) and crop growth were analyzed. Compared to the baseline scenario, a precipitation increase of 21 % and elevated CO2 concentration of 850 ppm significantly increased streamflow and nitrate loads by 50 and 52 %, respectively, while a temperature increase of 5.0 °C reduced streamflow and nitrate loads by 12 and 13 %, respectively. Crop biomass increased with elevated CO2 concentrations due to enhanced radiation- and water-use efficiency, while it decreased with precipitation and temperature increases. Over the GCM ensemble mean, annual streamflow and nitrate loads showed an increase of  ∼  70 % relative to the baseline scenario, due to elevated CO2 concentrations and precipitation increase. Different hydrological responses to climate change were observed from the two watersheds, due to contrasting land use and soil characteristics. The watershed with a larger percent of croplands demonstrated a greater

  6. Calibration and validation of SWAT model for estimating water balance and nitrogen losses in a small agricultural watershed in central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarzyńska Karolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT ver. 2005 was applied to study water balance and nitrogen load pathways in a small agricultural watershed in the lowlands of central Poland. The natural flow regime of the Zgłowiączka River was strongly modified by human activity (deforestation and installation of a subsurface drainage system to facilitate stable crop production. SWAT was calibrated for daily and monthly discharge and monthly nitrate nitrogen load. Model efficiency was tested using manual techniques (subjective and evaluation statistics (objective. Values of Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE, coefficient of determination (R2 and percentage of bias for daily/monthly discharge simulations and monthly load indicated good or very good fit of simulated discharge and nitrate nitrogen load to the observed data set. Model precision and accuracy of fit was proved in validation. The calibrated and validated SWAT was used to assess water balance and nitrogen fluxes in the watershed. According to the results, the share of tile drainage in water yield is equal to 78%. The model analysis indicated the most significant pathway of NO3-N to surface waters in the study area, namely the tile drainage combined with lateral flow. Its share in total NO3-N load amounted to 89%. Identification of nitrogen fluxes in the watershed is crucial for decision makers in order to manage water resources and to implement the most effective measures to limit diffuse pollution from arable land to surface waters.

  7. Evaluation of drought impact on groundwater recharge rate using SWAT and Hydrus models on an agricultural island in western Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clarifying the variations of groundwater recharge response to a changing non-stationary hydrological process is important for efficiently managing groundwater resources, particularly in regions with limited precipitation that face the risk of water shortage. However, the rate of aquifer recharge is difficult to evaluate in terms of large annual-variations and frequency of flood events. In our research, we attempt to simulate related groundwater recharge processes under variable climate conditions using the SWAT Model, and validate the groundwater recharge using the Hydrus Model. The results show that annual average groundwater recharge comprised approximately 33% of total precipitation, however, larger variation was found for groundwater recharge and surface runoff compared to evapotranspiration, which fluctuated with annual precipitation variations. The annual variation of groundwater resources is shown to be related to precipitation. In spatial variations, the upstream is the main surface water discharge area; the middle and downstream areas are the main groundwater recharge areas. Validation by the Hydrus Model shows that the estimated and simulated groundwater levels are consistent in our research area. The groundwater level shows a quick response to the groundwater recharge rate. The rainfall intensity had a great impact on the changes of the groundwater level. Consequently, it was estimated that large spatial and temporal variation of the groundwater recharge rate would be affected by precipitation uncertainty in future.

  8. Hydrologic Response Unit Routing in SWAT to Simulate Effects of Vegetated Filter Strip for South-Korean Conditions Based on VFSMOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Jae Lim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model has been used worldwide for many hydrologic and Non-Point Source (NPS Pollution analyses on a watershed scale. However, it has many limitations in simulating the Vegetative Filter Strip (VFS because it considers only ‘filter strip width’ when the model estimates sediment trapping efficiency and does not consider the routing of sediment with overland flow which is expected to maximize the sediment trapping efficiency from upper agricultural subwatersheds to lower spatially-explicit filter strips. Therefore, the SWAT overland flow option between landuse-subwatersheds with sediment routing capability was enhanced by modifying the SWAT watershed configuration and SWAT engine based on the numerical model VFSMOD applied to South-Korean conditions. The enhanced SWAT can simulate the VFS sediment trapping efficiency for South-Korean conditions in a manner similar to the desktop VFSMOD-w system. Due to this enhancement, SWAT is applicable to simulate the effects of overland flow from upper subwatersheds to reflect increased runoff volume at the lower subwatershed, which occurs in the field if no diversion channel is installed. In this study, the enhanced SWAT model was applied to small watersheds located at Jaun-ri in South-Korea to simulate a diversion channel and spatially-explicit VFS. Sediment can be reduced by 31%, 65%, and 68%, with a diversion channel, the VFS, and the VFS with diversion channel, respectively. The enhanced SWAT should be used in estimating site-specific effects on sediment reduction with diversion channels and VFS, instead of the currently available SWAT, which does not simulate sediment routing in overland flow and does not consider other sensitive factors affecting sediment reduction with VFS.

  9. Global sensitivity analysis of a SWAT model: comparison of the variance-based and moment-independent approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashadi Zadeh, Farkhondeh; Sarrazin, Fanny; Nossent, Jiri; Pianosi, Francesca; van Griensven, Ann; Wagener, Thorsten; Bauwens, Willy

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainty in parameters is a well-known reason of model output uncertainty which, undermines model reliability and restricts model application. A large number of parameters, in addition to the lack of data, limits calibration efficiency and also leads to higher parameter uncertainty. Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is a set of mathematical techniques that provides quantitative information about the contribution of different sources of uncertainties (e.g. model parameters) to the model output uncertainty. Therefore, identifying influential and non-influential parameters using GSA can improve model calibration efficiency and consequently reduce model uncertainty. In this paper, moment-independent density-based GSA methods that consider the entire model output distribution - i.e. Probability Density Function (PDF) or Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) - are compared with the widely-used variance-based method and their differences are discussed. Moreover, the effect of model output definition on parameter ranking results is investigated using Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and model bias as example outputs. To this end, 26 flow parameters of a SWAT model of the River Zenne (Belgium) are analysed. In order to assess the robustness of the sensitivity indices, bootstrapping is applied and 95% confidence intervals are estimated. The results show that, although the variance-based method is easy to implement and interpret, it provides wider confidence intervals, especially for non-influential parameters, compared to the density-based methods. Therefore, density-based methods may be a useful complement to variance-based methods for identifying non-influential parameters.

  10. Assessing the impacts of sustainable agricultural practices for water quality improvements in the Vouga catchment (Portugal) using the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, João; Roebeling, Peter; Rial-Rivas, María Ermitas

    2015-12-01

    The extensive use of fertilizers has become one of the most challenging environmental issues in agricultural catchment areas. In order to reduce the negative impacts from agricultural activities and to accomplish the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive we must consider the implementation of sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we assess sustainable agricultural practices based on reductions in N-fertilizer application rates (from 100% to 0%) and N-application methods (single, split and slow-release) across key agricultural land use classes in the Vouga catchment, Portugal. The SWAT model was used to relate sustainable agricultural practices, agricultural yields and N-NO3 water pollution deliveries. Results show that crop yields as well as N-NO3 exportation rates decrease with reductions in N-application rates and single N-application methods lead to lower crop yields and higher N-NO3 exportation rates as compared to split and slow-release N-application methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Macrophyte growth module for the SWAT model – impact of climate change and management on stream ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Shenglan; Trolle, Dennis; Erfurt, Jytte

    To access how multiple stressors affect the water quantity and quality and stream ecology at catchment scale under various management and climate change scenarios, we implemented macrophyte growth modules for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool version 2012 (SWAT). The macrophyte growth module ori...

  12. Process-based hydrological modeling using SWAT: The effect of permafrost on water resources in the large-scale river catchment Kharaa / Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsmann, L.; Geyer, T.; Karthe, D.; Priess, J.; Schweitzer, C.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to obtain a better understanding of hydrological processes in the semi-arid catchment of the Kharaa River in Northern Mongolia. The transient, physical-based model SWAT was set up using spatial datasets on soil, land use, climate, and stream network provided by the project "IWRM-MoMo" to (i.) simulate the water balance components of the basin and (ii.) to identify potential gaps in the input data. We found that the SWAT model satisfactorily reflects the hydrological processes in the catchment and simulates river runoff as a response to strong rainfall events as well as to snow and ice melt. To obtain correct runoff volumes during spring, permafrost has to be considered. Permafrost-influenced soils constrain water flow in the frozen layer, so that percolation out of the active layer is hampered (Woo 2011). This effect is reproduced in SWAT by assigning an impermeable layer in the subsurface to the areas dominated by permafrost. The simulations indicate that in these regions groundwater resources are limited as a consequence of impermeable ground ice. In addition, groundwater recharge rates in the catchment are generally low due to high evaporation rates (80-90 %). Consequently the base flow contribution is small. Further studies on the estimation of groundwater recharge rates should be carried out, since groundwater is an important resource for water supply. Model results indicate that the non-uniformity of the precipitation distribution was not sufficiently covered by the interpolated input data, so that precipitation and runoff volumes are partially over- or underestimated. Since precipitation defines the overall water availability in river catchments (Baumgartner 1982), additional climate records would considerably improve model outputs. As a consequence of large evapotranspiration losses, discharge as well as groundwater recharge estimates were identified to be highly sensitive to

  13. Simulation of lateral flow with SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calibration of the SWAT model for the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW) showed that percolation through the restrictive claypan layer, lateral flow above that layer, and redistribution of excess moisture up to the ground surface were not correctly simulated. In addition, surface runoff a...

  14. How to constrain multi-objective calibrations of the SWAT model using water balance components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Automated procedures are often used to provide adequate fits between hydrologic model estimates and observed data. While the models may provide good fits based upon numeric criteria, they may still not accurately represent the basic hydrologic characteristics of the represented watershed. Here we ...

  15. Evaluating the SWAT model for a low-gradient forested watershed in coastal South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Amatya; M.K. Jha.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the hydrology of low�]gradient forested watersheds on shallow, poorly drained soils of the coastal plain is a challenging task due to complexities in watershed delineation, microtopography, evapotranspiration, runoff generation processes and pathways including flooding and submergence caused by tropical storms, and complexity of vegetation species....

  16. Algorithm Theory - SWAT 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    issues of theoretical algorithmics and applications in various fields including graph algorithms, computational geometry, scheduling, approximation algorithms, network algorithms, data storage and manipulation, combinatorics, sorting, searching, online algorithms, optimization, etc.......This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 10th Scandinavian Workshop on Algorithm Theory, SWAT 2006, held in Riga, Latvia, in July 2006. The 36 revised full papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 154 submissions. The papers address all...

  17. A continental-scale hydrology and water quality model for Europe: Calibration and uncertainty of a high-resolution large-scale SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, K. C.; Rouholahnejad, E.; Vaghefi, S.; Srinivasan, R.; Yang, H.; Kløve, B.

    2015-05-01

    A combination of driving forces are increasing pressure on local, national, and regional water supplies needed for irrigation, energy production, industrial uses, domestic purposes, and the environment. In many parts of Europe groundwater quantity, and in particular quality, have come under sever degradation and water levels have decreased resulting in negative environmental impacts. Rapid improvements in the economy of the eastern European block of countries and uncertainties with regard to freshwater availability create challenges for water managers. At the same time, climate change adds a new level of uncertainty with regard to freshwater supplies. In this research we build and calibrate an integrated hydrological model of Europe using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) program. Different components of water resources are simulated and crop yield and water quality are considered at the Hydrological Response Unit (HRU) level. The water resources are quantified at subbasin level with monthly time intervals. Leaching of nitrate into groundwater is also simulated at a finer spatial level (HRU). The use of large-scale, high-resolution water resources models enables consistent and comprehensive examination of integrated system behavior through physically-based, data-driven simulation. In this article we discuss issues with data availability, calibration of large-scale distributed models, and outline procedures for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. The calibrated model and results provide information support to the European Water Framework Directive and lay the basis for further assessment of the impact of climate change on water availability and quality. The approach and methods developed are general and can be applied to any large region around the world.

  18. SWATMOD-PREP: Graphical user interface for preparing coupled SWAT-modflow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents SWATMOD-Prep, a graphical user interface that couples a SWAT watershed model with a MODFLOW groundwater flow model. The interface is based on a recently published SWAT-MODFLOW code that couples the models via mapping schemes. The spatial layout of SWATMOD-Prep guides the user t...

  19. An improved SWAT vegetation growth module and its evaluation for four tropical ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Tadesse; van Griensven, Ann; Taddesse Woldegiorgis, Befekadu; Bauwens, Willy

    2017-09-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a globally applied river basin ecohydrological model used in a wide spectrum of studies, ranging from land use change and climate change impacts studies to research for the development of the best water management practices. However, SWAT has limitations in simulating the seasonal growth cycles for trees and perennial vegetation in the tropics, where rainfall rather than temperature is the dominant plant growth controlling factor. Our goal is to improve the vegetation growth module of SWAT for simulating the vegetation variables - such as the leaf area index (LAI) - for tropical ecosystems. Therefore, we present a modified SWAT version for the tropics (SWAT-T) that uses a straightforward but robust soil moisture index (SMI) - a quotient of rainfall (P) and reference evapotranspiration (ETr) - to dynamically initiate a new growth cycle within a predefined period. Our results for the Mara Basin (Kenya/Tanzania) show that the SWAT-T-simulated LAI corresponds well with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI for evergreen forest, savanna grassland and shrubland. This indicates that the SMI is reliable for triggering a new annual growth cycle. The water balance components (evapotranspiration and streamflow) simulated by the SWAT-T exhibit a good agreement with remote-sensing-based evapotranspiration (ET-RS) and observed streamflow. The SWAT-T model, with the proposed vegetation growth module for tropical ecosystems, can be a robust tool for simulating the vegetation growth dynamics in hydrologic models in tropical regions.

  20. Advancing computational methods for calibration of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT): Application for modeling climate change impacts on water resources in the Upper Neuse Watershed of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Mehmet Bulent

    Watershed-scale hydrologic models are used for a variety of applications from flood prediction, to drought analysis, to water quality assessments. A particular challenge in applying these models is calibration of the model parameters, many of which are difficult to measure at the watershed-scale. A primary goal of this dissertation is to contribute new computational methods and tools for calibration of watershed-scale hydrologic models and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model, in particular. SWAT is a physically-based, watershed-scale hydrologic model developed to predict the impact of land management practices on water quality and quantity. The dissertation follows a manuscript format meaning it is comprised of three separate but interrelated research studies. The first two research studies focus on SWAT model calibration, and the third research study presents an application of the new calibration methods and tools to study climate change impacts on water resources in the Upper Neuse Watershed of North Carolina using SWAT. The objective of the first two studies is to overcome computational challenges associated with calibration of SWAT models. The first study evaluates a parallel SWAT calibration tool built using the Windows Azure cloud environment and a parallel version of the Dynamically Dimensioned Search (DDS) calibration method modified to run in Azure. The calibration tool was tested for six model scenarios constructed using three watersheds of increasing size (the Eno, Upper Neuse, and Neuse) for both a 2 year and 10 year simulation duration. Leveraging the cloud as an on demand computing resource allowed for a significantly reduced calibration time such that calibration of the Neuse watershed went from taking 207 hours on a personal computer to only 3.4 hours using 256 cores in the Azure cloud. The second study aims at increasing SWAT model calibration efficiency by creating an open source, multi-objective calibration tool using the Non

  1. A Guideline for Successful Calibration and Uncertainty Analysis for Soil and Water Assessment: A Review of Papers from the 2016 International SWAT Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim C. Abbaspour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of integrated hydrological models to manage a watershed’s water resources are increasingly finding their way into the decision-making processes. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT is a multi-process model integrating hydrology, ecology, agriculture, and water quality. SWAT is a continuation of nearly 40 years of modeling efforts conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS. A large number of SWAT-related papers have appeared in ISI journals, building a world-wide consensus around the model’s stability and usefulness. The current issue is a collection of the latest research using SWAT as the modeling tool. Most models must undergo calibration/validation and uncertainty analysis. Unfortunately, these sciences are not formal subjects of teaching in most universities and the students are often left to their own resources to calibrate their model. In this paper, we focus on calibration and uncertainty analysis highlighting some serious issues in the calibration of distributed models. A protocol for calibration is also highlighted to guide the users to obtain better modeling results. Finally, a summary of the papers published in this special issue is provided in the Appendix.

  2. Case Study: Effect of Climatic Characterization on River Discharge in an Alpine-Prealpine Catchment of the Spanish Pyrenees Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Palazón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The new challenges in assessment of water resources demand new approaches and tools, such as the use of hydrologic models, which could serve to assist managers in the prediction, planning and management of catchment water supplies in view of increased demand of water for irrigation and climatic change. Good characterization of the spatial patterns of climate variables is of paramount importance in hydrological modelling. This is especially so when modelling mountain environments which are characterized by strong altitudinal climate gradients. However, very often there is a poor distribution of climatic stations in these areas, which in many cases, results in under representation of high altitude areas with respect to climatic data. This results in the poor performance of the models. In the present study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model was applied to the Barasona reservoir catchment in the Central Spanish Pyrenees in order to assess the influence of different climatic characterizations in the monthly river discharges. Four simulations with different input data were assessed, using only the available climate data (A1; the former plus one synthetic dataset at a higher altitude (B1; and both plus the altitudinal climate gradient (A2 and B2. The model’s performance was evaluated against the river discharges for the representative periods of 2003–2005 and 1994–1996 by means of commonly used statistical measures. The best results were obtained using the altitudinal climate gradient alone (scenario A2. This study provided insight into the importance of taking into account the sources and the spatial distribution of weather data in modelling water resources in mountainous catchments.

  3. Comparison of SWAT and GeoWEPP model in predicting the impact of stone bunds on runoff and erosion processes in the Northern Ethiopian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelash, Nigus; Flagler, Jared; Renschler, Chris; Strohmeier, Stefan; Holzmann, Hubert; Feras, Ziadat; Addis, Hailu; Zucca, Claudio; Bayu, Wondimu; Klik, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Soil degradation is a major issue in the Ethiopian highlands which are most suitable for agriculture and, therefore, support a major part of human population and livestock. Heavy rainstorms during the rainy season in summer create soil erosion and runoff processes which affect soil fertility and food security. In the last years programs for soil conservation and afforestation were initiated by the Ethiopian government to reduce erosion risk, retain water in the landscape and improve crop yields. The study was done in two adjacent watersheds in the Northwestern highlands of Ethiopia. One of the watersheds is developed by soil and water conservation structures (stone bunds) in 2011 and the other one is without soil and water conservation structures. Spatial distribution of soil textures and other soil properties were determined in the field and in the laboratory and a soil map was derived. A land use map was evaluated based on satellite images and ground truth data. A Digital Elevation Model of the watershed was developed based on conventional terrestrial surveying using a total station. At the outlet of the watersheds weirs with cameras were installed to measure surface runoff. During each event runoff samples were collected and sediment concentration was analyzed. The objective of this study is 1) to assess the impact of stone bunds on runoff and erosion processes by using simulation models, and 2) to compare the performance of two soil erosion models in predicting the measurements. The selected erosion models were the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Geospatial Interface to the Water Erosion Prediction Project (GeoWEPP). The simulation models were calibrated/verified for the 2011-2013 periods and validated with 2014-2015 data. Results of this comparison will be presented.

  4. Models of current sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angst Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Densification of (semi-conducting particle agglomerates with the help of an electrical current is much faster and more energy efficient than traditional thermal sintering or powder compression. Therefore, this method becomes more and more common among experimentalists, engineers, and in industry. The mechanisms at work at the particle scale are highly complex because of the mutual feedback between current and pore structure. This paper extends previous modelling approaches in order to study mixtures of particles of two different materials. In addition to the delivery of Joule heat throughout the sample, especially in current bottlenecks, thermoelectric effects must be taken into account. They lead to segregation or spatial correlations in the particle arrangement. Various model extensions are possible and will be discussed.

  5. Fecal bacteria source characterization and sensitivity analysis of SWAT 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) version 2005 includes a microbial sub-model to simulate fecal bacteria transport at the watershed scale. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate methods to characterize fecal coliform bacteria (FCB) source loads and to assess the model sensitivity t...

  6. Adequacy of TRMM satellite rainfall data in driving the SWAT modeling of Tiaoxi catchment (Taihu lake basin, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Christakos, George; Ding, Xinxin; Wu, Jiaping

    2018-01-01

    Spatial rainfall data is an essential input to Distributed Hydrological Models (DHM), and a significant contributor to hydrological model uncertainty. Model uncertainty is higher when rain gauges are sparse, as is often the case in practice. Currently, satellite-based precipitation products increasingly provide an alternative means to ground-based rainfall estimates, in which case a rigorous product assessment is required before implementation. Accordingly, the twofold objective of this work paper was the real-world assessment of both (a) the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall product using gauge data, and (b) the TRMM product's role in forcing data for hydrologic simulations in the area of the Tiaoxi catchment (Taihu lake basin, China). The TRMM rainfall products used in this study are the Version-7 real-time 3B42RT and the post-real-time 3B42. It was found that the TRMM rainfall data showed a superior performance at the monthly and annual scales, fitting well with surface observation-based frequency rainfall distributions. The Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE) and the relative bias ratio (BIAS) were used to evaluate hydrologic model performance. The satisfactory performance of the monthly runoff simulations in the Tiaoxi study supports the view that the implementation of real-time 3B42RT allows considerable room for improvement. At the same time, post-real-time 3B42 can be a valuable tool of hydrologic modeling, water balance analysis, and basin water resource management, especially in developing countries or at remote locations in which rainfall gauges are scarce.

  7. Analysing the Effects of Forest Cover and Irrigation Farm Dams on Streamflows of Water-Scarce Catchments in South Australia through the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hanh Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To assist water resource managers with future land use planning efforts, the eco-hydrological model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT was applied to three catchments in South Australia that experience extreme low flow conditions. Particular land uses and management issues of interest included forest covers, known to affect water yields, and farm dams, known to intercept and change the hydrological dynamics in a catchment. The study achieved a satisfactory daily calibration when irrigation farm dams were incorporated in the model. For the catchment dominated by extreme low flows, a better daily simulation across a range of qualitative and quantitative metrics was gained using the base-flow static threshold optimization technique. Scenario analysis on effects of forest cover indicated an increase of surface flow and a reduction of base-flow when native eucalyptus lands were replaced by pastures and vice versa. A decreasing trend was observed for the overall water yield of catchments with more forest plantation due to the higher evapotranspiration (ET rate and the decline in surface flow. With regards to effects of irrigation farm dams, assessment on a daily time step suggested that a significant volume of water is stored in these systems with the water loss rate highest in June and July. On an annual basis, the model indicated that approximately 13.1% to 22.0% of water has been captured by farm dams for irrigation. However, the scenario analysis revealed that the purposes of use of farm dams rather than their volumetric capacities in the catchment determined the magnitude of effects on streamflows. Water extracted from farm dams for irrigation of orchards and vineyards are more likely to diminish streamflows than other land uses. Outputs from this study suggest that the water use restrictions from farm dams during recent drought periods were an effective tool to minimize impacts on streamflows.

  8. Quantifying the Uncertainty in Streamflow Predictions Using Swat for Brazos-Colorado Coastal Watershed, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, D.; Bhatia, N.; Srivastav, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is one of the most comprehensive hydrologic models to simulate streamflow for a watershed. The two major inputs for a SWAT model are: (i) Digital Elevation Models (DEM), and (ii) Land Use and Land Cover Maps (LULC). This study aims to quantify the uncertainty in streamflow predictions using SWAT for San Bernard River in Brazos-Colorado coastal watershed, Texas, by incorporating the respective datasets from different sources: (i) DEM data will be obtained from ASTER GDEM V2, GMTED2010, NHD DEM, and SRTM DEM datasets with ranging resolution from 1/3 arc-second to 30 arc-second, and (ii) LULC data will be obtained from GLCC V2, MRLC NLCD2011, NOAA's C-CAP, USGS GAP, and TCEQ databases. Weather variables (Precipitation and Max-Min Temperature at daily scale) will be obtained from National Climatic Data Centre (NCDC) and SWAT in-built STASGO tool will be used to obtain the soil maps. The SWAT model will be calibrated using SWAT-CUP SUFI-2 approach and its performance will be evaluated using the statistical indices of Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), ratio of Root-Mean-Square-Error to standard deviation of observed streamflow (RSR), and Percent-Bias Error (PBIAS). The study will help understand the performance of SWAT model with varying data sources and eventually aid the regional state water boards in planning, designing, and managing hydrologic systems.

  9. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Global Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, J.; Srinivasan, R; Neitsch, S. (ed.); George, C.; Abbaspour, K.; Hao, F.H.; van Griensven, A.; Gosain, A.; Debels, P.; N.W. Kim; Somura, H.; Ella, Victor B.; Leon, L.; Jintrawet, A.; Manuel R. Reyes

    2009-01-01

    Summary: SWAT,the Soil and Water Assessment Tool is a river basin, or watershed, scale model developed to predict the impact of land management practices on water, sediment and agricultural chemical yields in large complex watersheds with varying soils, land use and management conditions over long periods of time. [from the editors' preamble] LTRA-5 (Agroforestry and Sustainable Vegetable Production)

  10. Improving SWAT for simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Xuesong

    2016-11-01

    As a widely used watershed model for assessing impacts of anthropogenic and natural disturbances on water quantity and quality, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has not been extensively tested in simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems. Here, we examine SWAT simulations of evapotranspiration (ET), net primary productivity (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and plant biomass at ten AmeriFlux forest sites across the U.S. We identify unrealistic radiation use efficiency (Bio_E), large leaf to biomass fraction (Bio_LEAF), and missing phosphorus supply from parent material weathering as the primary causes for the inadequate performance of the default SWAT model in simulating forest dynamics. By further revising the relevant parameters and processes, SWAT’s performance is substantially improved. Based on the comparison between the improved SWAT simulations and flux tower observations, we discuss future research directions for further enhancing model parameterization and representation of water and carbon cycling for forests.

  11. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watershed using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Yeo, In-Young; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, W. Dean

    2017-01-01

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrate loads from agriculture. Accordingly, the question remains whether WCCs are sufficient to mitigate increased nutrient loads caused by FCCs. In this study, we assessed the impacts of FCCs on WCC nitrate reduction efficiency on the Coastal Plain of the CBW using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Three FCC scenarios (2085 – 2098) were prepared using General Circulation Models (GCMs), considering three Intergovernmnental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) greenhouse gas emission scenarios. We also developed six representative WCC implementation scenarios based on the most commonly used planting dates and species of WCCs in this region. Simulation results showed that WCC biomass increased by ~ 58 % under FCC scenarios, due to climate conditions conducive to the WCC growth. Prior to implementing WCCs, annual nitrate loads increased by ~ 43 % under FCC scenarios compared to the baseline scenario (2001 – 2014). When WCCs were planted, annual nitrate loads were substantially reduced by ~ 48 % and WCC nitrate reduction efficiency water ~ 5 % higher under FCC scenarios relative to the baseline. The increase rate of WCC nitrate reduction efficiency varied by FCC scenarios and WCC planting methods. As CO2 concentration was higher and winters were warmer under FCC scenarios, WCCs had greater biomass and therefore showed higher nitrate reduction efficiency. In response to FCC scenarios, the performance of less effective WCC practices (e.g., barley, wheat, and late planting) under the baseline indicated ~ 14 % higher increase rate of nitrate reduction efficiency compared to ones with better effectiveness under the baseline (e

  12. Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis of BMPs in controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution in China based on the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Jiawei; Yu, Wenwen; Shen, Zhenyao

    2014-12-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) have been widely used in managing agricultural nonpoint source pollution (ANSP) at the watershed level. Most BMPs are related to land use, tillage management, and fertilizer levels. In total, seven BMP scenarios (Reforest1, Reforest2, No Tillage, Contour tillage, and fertilizer level 1-4) that are related to these three factors were estimated in this study. The objectives were to investigate the effectiveness and cost-benefit of these BMPs on ANSP reduction in a large tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China, which are based on the simulation results of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. The results indicated that reforestation was the most economically efficient of all BMPs, and its net benefits were up to CNY 4.36×10(7) years(-1) (about USD 7.08×10(6) years(-1)). Regarding tillage practices, no tillage practice was more environmentally friendly than other tillage practices, and contour tillage was more economically efficient. Reducing the local fertilizer level to 0.8-fold less than that of 2010 can yield a satisfactory environmental and economic efficiency. Reforestation and fertilizer management were more effective in reducing total phosphorus (TP), whereas tillage management was more effective in reducing total nitrogen (TN). When CNY 10,000 (about USD 162) was applied to reforestation, no tillage, contour tillage, and an 0.8-fold reduction in the fertilizer level, then annual TN load can be reduced by 0.08, 0.16, 0.11, and 0.04 t and annual TP load can be reduced by 0.04, 0.02, 0.01 and 0.03 t, respectively. The cost-benefit (CB) ratios of the BMPs were as follows: reforestation (207 %) > contour tillage (129 %) > no tillage (114 %) > fertilizer management (96 and 89 %). The most economical and effective BMPs can be designated as follows: BMP1 (returning arable land with slopes greater than 25° to forests and those lands with slopes of 15-25° to orchards), BMP2 (implementing no tillage

  13. Improving the Performance of Temperature Index Snowmelt Model of SWAT by Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Onishi, Takeo; Hiramatsu, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results of the widely used temperature index snowmelt model are greatly influenced by input air temperature data. Spatially sparse air temperature data remain the main factor inducing uncertainties and errors in that model, which limits its applications. Thus, to solve this problem, we created new air temperature data using linear regression relationships that can be formulated based on MODIS land surface temperature data. The Soil Water Assessment Tool model, which includes an improved temperature index snowmelt module, was chosen to test the newly created data. By evaluating simulation performance for daily snowmelt in three test basins of the Amur River, performance of the newly created data was assessed. The coefficient of determination (R 2) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) were used for evaluation. The results indicate that MODIS land surface temperature data can be used as a new source for air temperature data creation. This will improve snow simulation using the temperature index model in an area with sparse air temperature observations. PMID:25165746

  14. An improved SWAT vegetation growth module and its evaluation for four tropical ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Alemayehu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT is a globally applied river basin ecohydrological model used in a wide spectrum of studies, ranging from land use change and climate change impacts studies to research for the development of the best water management practices. However, SWAT has limitations in simulating the seasonal growth cycles for trees and perennial vegetation in the tropics, where rainfall rather than temperature is the dominant plant growth controlling factor. Our goal is to improve the vegetation growth module of SWAT for simulating the vegetation variables – such as the leaf area index (LAI – for tropical ecosystems. Therefore, we present a modified SWAT version for the tropics (SWAT-T that uses a straightforward but robust soil moisture index (SMI – a quotient of rainfall (P and reference evapotranspiration (ETr – to dynamically initiate a new growth cycle within a predefined period. Our results for the Mara Basin (Kenya/Tanzania show that the SWAT-T-simulated LAI corresponds well with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LAI for evergreen forest, savanna grassland and shrubland. This indicates that the SMI is reliable for triggering a new annual growth cycle. The water balance components (evapotranspiration and streamflow simulated by the SWAT-T exhibit a good agreement with remote-sensing-based evapotranspiration (ET-RS and observed streamflow. The SWAT-T model, with the proposed vegetation growth module for tropical ecosystems, can be a robust tool for simulating the vegetation growth dynamics in hydrologic models in tropical regions.

  15. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  16. Improvement of the R-SWAT-FME framework to support multiple variables and multi-objective functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Application of numerical models is a common practice in the environmental field for investigation and prediction of natural and anthropogenic processes. However, process knowledge, parameter identifiability, sensitivity, and uncertainty analyses are still a challenge for large and complex mathematical models such as the hydrological/water quality model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). In this study, the previously developed R program language-SWAT-Flexible Modeling Environment (R-SWAT-FME) was improved to support multiple model variables and objectives at multiple time steps (i.e., daily, monthly, and annually). This expansion is significant because there is usually more than one variable (e.g., water, nutrients, and pesticides) of interest for environmental models like SWAT. To further facilitate its easy use, we also simplified its application requirements without compromising its merits, such as the user-friendly interface. To evaluate the performance of the improved framework, we used a case study focusing on both streamflow and nitrate nitrogen in the Upper Iowa River Basin (above Marengo) in the United States. Results indicated that the R-SWAT-FME performs well and is comparable to the built-in auto-calibration tool in multi-objective model calibration. Overall, the enhanced R-SWAT-FME can be useful for the SWAT community, and the methods we used can also be valuable for wrapping potential R packages with other environmental models.

  17. Calibration of Spatially Distributed Hydrological Processes and Model Parameters in SWAT Using Remote Sensing Data and an Auto-Calibration Procedure: A Case Study in a Vietnamese River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Thanh Ha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, evapotranspiration (ET and leaf area index (LAI were used to calibrate the SWAT model, whereas remotely sensed precipitation and other climatic parameters were used as forcing data for the 6300 km2 Day Basin, a tributary of the Red River in Vietnam. The efficacy of the Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2 parameter sensitivity and optimization model was tested with area specific remote sensing input parameters for every Hydrological Response Units (HRU, rather than with measurements of river flow representing a large set of HRUs, i.e., a bulk calibration. Simulated monthly ET correlations with remote sensing estimates showed an R2 = 0.71, Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency NSE = 0.65, and Kling Gupta Efficiency KGE = 0.80 while monthly LAI showed correlations of R2 = 0.59, NSE = 0.57 and KGE = 0.83 over a five-year validation period. Accumulated modelled ET over the 5-year calibration period amounted to 5713 mm compared to 6015 mm of remotely sensed ET, yielding a difference of 302 mm (5.3%. The monthly flow at two flow measurement stations were adequately estimated (R2 = 0.78 and 0.55, NSE = 0.71 and 0.63, KGE = 0.59 and 0.75 for Phu Ly and Ninh Binh, respectively. This outcome demonstrates the capability of SWAT model to obtain spatial and accurate simulation of eco-hydrological processes, also when rivers are ungauged and the water withdrawal system is complex.

  18. Development and application of SWAT to paddy rice district at watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuzhi; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Huicheng

    2010-05-01

    In irrigation district, especially in paddy rice fields, agricultural irrigation water use has a great influence on the natural water cycle process at watershed scale. In this study, SWAT model was modified to simulate irrigation water demand and quantify the irrigation return flow coefficient and the irrigation impact coefficient in paddy rice fields. Due to the lack of irrigation observed data, a multi-water source module was add to SWAT to build several feasible extraction scenarios, and a new algorithm of automatic irrigation application was implemented too. According to the simulation accuracy, the optimal scenario was selected to use in the new SWAT model, and then was applied to Changge Irrigation District in Hulan River Basin, northeast China. Comparisons between the enhanced model and old one were conducted at outlet cite, sifangtai. The results showed that the proposed SWAT has higher precision during calibration and validation periods, Nash coefficient of the simulated monthly flow was from 0.74 and 0.69 to 0.88 and 0.80 respectively. in addition, the annual averaged irrigation water and return water were 78 million m3 and 41 million m3, the irrigation return flow coefficient was 0.52, average consumption of irrigation water accounted for 10% of the total runoff. In general, the developed model had been greatly improved as compared to original model. Keywords: SWAT model, hydrological modeling, rice, irrigation return flow coefficient, irrigation impact coefficient

  19. Guidelines for using sensitivity analysis and auto-calibration tools for multi-gage or multi-step calibration in SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autocalibration of a water quality model such as SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) can be a powerful, labor-saving tool. When multi-gage or multi-pollutant calibration is desired, autocalibration is essential because the time involved in manual calibration becomes prohibitive. The ArcSWAT Interf...

  20. Application of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT Model on a small tropical island (Great River Watershed, Jamaica as a tool in Integrated Watershed and Coastal Zone Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orville P. Grey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Great River Watershed, located in north-west Jamaica, is critical for development, particularly for housing, tourism, agriculture, and mining. It is a source of sediment and nutrient loading to the coastal environment including the Montego Bay Marine Park. We produced a modeling framework using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and GIS. The calculated model performance statistics for high flow discharge yielded a Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE value of 0.68 and a R² value of 0.70 suggesting good measured and simulated (calibrated discharge correlation. Calibration and validation results for streamflow were similar to the observed streamflows. For the dry season the simulated urban landuse scenario predicted an increase in surface runoff in excess of 150%. During the wet season it is predicted to range from 98 to 234% presenting a significant risk of flooding, erosion and other environmental issues. The model should be used for the remaining 25 watersheds in Jamaica and elsewhere in the Caribbean. The models suggests that projected landuse changes will have serious impacts on available water (streamflow, stream health, potable water treatment, flooding and sensitive coastal ecosystems.

  1. Hydrology and sediment yield calibration for the Barasona reservoir catchment (Spain) using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazón, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Hydrological and soil erosion models, as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), have become very useful tools and increasingly serve as vital components of integrated environmental assessments that provide information outside of direct field experiments and causal observation. The purpose of this study was to improve the calibration of SWAT model to use it in an alpine catchment as a simulator of processes related to water quality and soil erosion. SWAT is spatially semi-distributed, agro-hydrological model that operates on a daily time step (as a minimum) at basin scale. It is designed to predict the impact of management on water, sediment and agricultural chemical yields in ungaged catchments. SWAT provides physically based algorithms as an option to define many of the important components of the hydrologic cycle. The input requirements of the model are used to describe the climate, soil properties, topography, vegetation, and land management practices. SWAT analyzes small or large catchments by discretising into sub-basins, which are then further subdivided into hydrological response units (HRUs) with homogeneous land use, soil type and slope. SWAT model (SWAT2009) coupled with a GIS interface (ArcSWAT), was applied to the Barasona reservoir catchment located in the central Spanish Pyrenees. The 1509 km2 agro-forestry catchment presents a mountain type climate, an altitudinal range close to 3000 meters and a precipitation variation close to 1000 mm/km. The mountainous characteristics of the catchment, in addition to the scarcity of climate data in the region, require specific calibration for some processes. Snowfall and snowmelt are significant processes in the hydrologic regime of the area and were calibrated in a previous work. In this work some of the challenges of the catchment to model with SWAT which affected the hydrology and the sediment yield simulation were performed as improvement of the previous calibration. Two reservoirs, a karst system which

  2. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation to Flow of Swat River and Glaciers in Hindu Kush Ranges, Swat District, Pakistan (2003-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifullah Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at the climate change impacts and adaptation to surface flow of Swat river and glacier resources in Swat river catchments area, Hindu Kush ranges, Northwest Pakistan. The data about temperature and precipitation have been collected from the Pakistan Meteorological Department, Karachi, whereas the Swat River flow data from the Irrigation Department, Peshawar, Khyber Pukhtunkhwa. Two types of climate that is humid and undifferentiated highlands prevail over the area. The total precipitation recorded has been 41.8inches (1061.7 millimeters with mean monthly precipitation of 3.5 inches (88.9 millimeters having a decrease of -0.1 inch (-2.8 millimeters. The area has been humid during 2004 and currently at the threshold of the sub-humid climates (20-40 inches. Kalam valley experiences cold long winters (7 months and short warm summers (5 months. The mean temperature reveals an increase of 0.90C, maximum temperature 0.40C and mean minimum temperature 0.50Celsius. This increase in the temperature of the area has caused water stress and retreat of glaciers and affected the permafrost condition at higher altitudes in the area. The annual flow of the Swat river is 192.2 cubic meter/seconds with a decline of -0.03 cubic m/sec from 2003 to 2013. The annual trend of water flow is directly proportional to precipitation and contrary to maximum temperature during 2003 to 2012 and shows converse condition till 2013. The decrease in the flow of Swat river seems both in winter and summer season. The glaciers and snow covered area of the Kalam valley decreases with passage of time and required mitigation. The vulnerability of the study area to climate change can be minimized by the construction of small reservoirs, river embankments, improvement in sewerage and sanitation, planning for flood water, and revision of the water management policy, implementation, and establishment of research and development funds.

  3. Assimilating Remotely Sensed Surface Soil Moisture into SWAT using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, a 1-D Ensemble Kalman Filter has been used to update the soil moisture states of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Experiments were conducted for the Cobb Creek Watershed in southeastern Oklahoma for 2006-2008. Assimilation of in situ data proved limited success in the ...

  4. Critical review of SWAT applications in the upper Nile basin countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Griensven

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT is an integrated river basin model that is widely applied within the Nile basin. Up to date, more than 20 peer-reviewed papers describe the use of SWAT for a variety of problems in the upper Nile basin countries, such as erosion modelling, land use and climate change impact modelling and water resources management. The majority of the studies are focused on locations in the tropical highlands in Ethiopia and around Lake Victoria. The popularity of SWAT is attributed to the fact that the tool is freely available and that it is readily applicable through the development of geographic information system (GIS based interfaces and its easy linkage to sensitivity, calibration and uncertainty analysis tools. The online and free availability of basic GIS data that are required for SWAT made its applicability more straightforward even in data-scarce areas. However, the easy use of SWAT may not always lead to appropriate models which is also a consequence of the quality of the available free databases in these regions. In this paper, we aim at critically reviewing the use of SWAT in the context of the modelling purpose and problem descriptions in the tropical highlands of the Nile basin countries. To evaluate the models that are described in journal papers, a number of criteria are used to evaluate the model set-up, model performances, physical representation of the model parameters, and the correctness of the hydrological model balance. On the basis of performance indicators, the majority of the SWAT models were classified as giving satisfactory to very good results. Nevertheless, the hydrological mass balances as reported in several papers contained losses that might not be justified. Several papers also reported the use of unrealistic parameter values. More worrying is that many papers lack this information. For this reason, most of the reported SWAT models have to be evaluated critically. An important gap is

  5. Critical review of the application of SWAT in the upper Nile Basin countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, A.; Ndomba, P.; Yalew, S.; Kilonzo, F.

    2012-03-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a hydrological simulation tool that is widely applied within the Nile basin. Up to date, more than 20 peer reviewed papers describe the use of SWAT for a variety of problems in the upper Nile basin countries, such as erosion modeling, land use modeling, climate change impact modeling and water resources management. The majority of the studies are clustered in the tropical highlands in Ethiopia and around Lake Victoria. The popularity of SWAT is attributed to the fact that the tool is freely available and that it is readily applicable through the development of Geographic Information System (GIS) based interfaces and its easy linkage to sensitivity, calibration and uncertainty analysis tools. The online and free availability of basic GIS data that are required for SWAT made its applicability more straight forward even in data scarce areas. However, the easy use of SWAT may not always lead to knowledgeable models. In this paper, we aim at critically reviewing the use of SWAT in the context of the modeling purpose and problem descriptions in the tropical highlands of the Nile Basin countries. A number of criteria are used to evaluate the model set-up, model performances, physical representation of the model parameters, and the correctness of the hydrological model balance. On the basis of performance indicators, the majority of the SWAT models were classified as giving satisfactory to very good results. Nevertheless, the hydrological mass balances as reported in several papers contained losses that might not be justified. Several papers also reported unrealistic parameter values. More worrying is that many papers lack this information. For this reason, it is difficult to give an overall positive evaluation to most of the reported SWAT models. An important gap is the lack of attention that is given to the vegetation and crop processes. None of the papers reported any adaptation to the crop parameters, or any crop related

  6. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  7. Sensitivity of different satellites gridded data over Brahmaputra Basin byusing Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Pradhanang, S. M.; Islam, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    More than half a billion people of India, China, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan are dependent on the water resources of the Brahmaputra river. With climatic and anthropogenic change of this basin region is becoming a cause of concern for future water management and sharing with transboundary riparian nations. To address such issues, robust watershed runoff modeling of the basin is essential. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a widely used semi-distributed watershed model that is capable of analyzing surface runoff, stream flow, water yield, sediment and nutrient transport in a large river basin such as Brahmaputra, but the performance of runoff the model depends on the accuracy of input precipitation datasets. But for a transboundary basin like Brahmaputra, precipitation gauge data from upstream areas is either not available or not accessible to the scientific communities. Satellite rainfall products are very effective where radar datasets are absent and conventional rain gauges are sparse. However, the sensitivity of the SWAT model to different satellite data products as well as hydrologic parameters for the Brahmaputra Basin are largely unknown. Thus in this study, a comparative analysis with different satellite data product has been made to assess the runoff using SWAT model. Here, datafrom three sources: TRMM, APHRDOTIE and GPCP were used as input precipitation satellite data set and ERA-Interim was used as input temperature dataset from 1998 to 2009. The main methods used in modeling the hydrologic processes in SWAT were curve number method for runoff estimating, Penman-Monteith method for PET and Muskingum method for channel routing. Our preliminary results have revealed thatthe TRMM data product is more accurate than APHRODITE and GPCP for runoff analysis. The coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies for both calibration and validation period from TRMM data are 0.83 and 0.72, respectively.

  8. FEST-C 1.3 & 2.0 for CMAQ Bi-directional NH3, Crop Production, and SWAT Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fertilizer Emission Scenario Tool for CMAQ (FEST-C) is developed in a Linux environment, a festc JAVA interface that integrates 14 tools and scenario management options facilitating land use/crop data processing for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system ...

  9. Current-driven flare and CME models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, D. B.

    2017-08-01

    Roles played by the currents in the impulsive phase of a solar flare and in a coronal mass ejection (CME) are reviewed. Solar flares are magnetic explosions: magnetic energy stored in unneutralized currents in coronal loops is released into energetic electrons in the impulsive phase and into mass motion in a CME. The energy release is due to a change in current configuration effectively reducing the net current path. A flare is driven by the electromotive force (EMF) due to the changing magnetic flux. The EMF drives a flare-associated current whose cross-field closure is achieved by redirection along field lines to the chromosphere and back. The essential roles that currents play are obscured in the "standard" model and are described incorrectly in circuit models. A semiquantitative treatment of the energy and the EMF is provided by a multicurrent model, in which the currents are constant and the change in the current paths is described by time-dependent inductances. There is no self-consistent model that includes the intrinsic time dependence, the EMF, the flare-associated current, and the internal energy transport during a flare. The current, through magnetic helicity, plays an important role in a CME, with twist converted into writhe allowing the kink instability plus reconnection to lead to a new closed loop and with the current-current force accelerating the CME through the torus instability.

  10. Eddy Current Model of Ball Lightning

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Eddy Current Model of Ball Lightning Calculations show that high-energy ball lightning may consist of a ball of plasma containing a large circular electric current arising as an eddy current generated by lightning. Synthetic ball lightning might serve as a method of plasma confinement for purposes of nuclear fusion. In this paper, three articles concerning ball lightning and the related phenomenon of large ball lightning are combined to provide insight into this rarely glimpsed occurrence.

  11. Continental scale modelling of geomagnetically induced currents

    OpenAIRE

    Sakharov Yaroslav; Prácser Ernö; Ádám Antal; Wik Magnus; Pirjola Risto; Viljanen Ari; Katkalov Juri

    2012-01-01

    The EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents) aims at deriving statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in the European high-voltage power grids. Such a continent-wide system of more than 1500 substations and transmission lines requires updates of the previous modelling, which has dealt with national grids in fairly small geographic areas. We present here how GIC modelling can be conveniently performed on a spherical surface with minor changes in the p...

  12. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Dipole–dipole interaction; relaxation; modeling; TSDC; activation energy; PVC; ABS. Abstract. The study of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) using the dipole–dipole interaction model is described in this work. The dipole–dipole interactionmodel (DDIM) determines the TSDC peak successfully ...

  13. Development of stream-subsurface flow module in sub-daily simulation of Escherichia coli using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjeong; Boithias, Laurie; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Silvera, Norbert; Thammahacksa, Chanthamousone; Latsachack, Keooudone; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Pierret, Alain; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Water contaminated with pathogenic bacteria poses a large threat to public health, especially in the rural areas in the tropics where sanitation and drinking water facilities are often lacking. Several studies have used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to predict the export of in-stream bacteria at a watershed-scale. However, SWAT is limited to in-stream processes, such as die-off, resuspension and, deposition; and it is usually implemented on a daily time step using the SCS Curve Number method, making it difficult to explore the dynamic fate and transport of bacteria during short but intense events such as flash floods in tropical humid montane headwaters. To address these issues, this study implemented SWAT on an hourly time step using the Green-Ampt infiltration method, and tested the effects of subsurface flow (LATQ+GWQ in SWAT) on bacterial dynamics. We applied the modified SWAT model to the 60-ha Houay Pano catchment in Northern Laos, using sub-daily rainfall and discharge measurements, electric conductivity-derived fractions of overland and subsurface flows, suspended sediments concentrations, and the number of fecal indicator organism Escherichia coli monitored at the catchment outlet from 2011 to 2013. We also took into account land use change by delineating the watershed with the 3-year composite land use map. The results show that low subsurface flow of less than 1 mm recovered the underestimation of E. coli numbers during the dry season, while high subsurface flow caused an overestimation during the wet season. We also found that it is more reasonable to apply the stream-subsurface flow interaction to simulate low in-stream bacteria counts. Using fecal bacteria to identify and understand the possible interactions between overland and subsurface flows may well also provide some insight into the fate of other bacteria, such as those involved in biogeochemical fluxes both in-stream and in the adjacent soils and hyporheic zones.

  14. current modelling in annular porous electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. Farrell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An equivalent circuit for an annular porous electrode is derived by reinterpreting the differential equations that approximate the distribution of voltage and current in such electrodes. The equivalent circuit is shown to provide useful physical interpretations of the secondary current distributions. Multi-loop circuit techniques are employed to obtain the current distributions within the circuit. The solutions are shown to compare well with the exact solutions of the model equations. In addition, the equivalent circuit approach is used to investigate the effect of curvature on the degree of polarization of the electrode.

  15. HPAC (Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability) jSWAT (Joint Seminar Wargaming Adjudication Tool) Integration; A Technical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Tool is an LOD developed software package (programmed in Java) that aims to facilitate the seminar wargaming process that Army currently uses to...For display, the jSWAT package name has been truncated from “com.classforge.jswat”. Similarly, the actual client and server classes...The above example places a sulphur hexafluoride sensor in the continental US. To place Sarin samplers on Kangaroo Island we might use the

  16. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Applicability on Nutrients Loadings Prediction in Mountainous Lower Bear Malad River (LBMR) Watershed, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salha, A. A.; Stevens, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The application of watershed simulation models is indispensable when pollution is generated by a nonpoint source. These models should be able to simulate large complex watersheds with varying soils, land use and management conditions over long periods of time. This study presents the application of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to investigate, manage, and research the transport and fate of nutrients in (Subbasin HUC 16010204) Lower Bear Malad River (LBMR) watershed, Box elder County, Utah. Water quality problems arise primarily from high phosphorus and total suspended sediment concentrations that were caused by increasing agricultural and farming activities and complex network of canals and ducts of varying sizes and carrying capacities that transport water (for farming and agriculture uses). Using the available input data (Digital Elevation Model (DEM), land use/Land cover (LULC), soil map and weather and climate data for 20 years (1990-2010) to predict the water quantity and quality of the LBMR watershed using a spatially distributed model version of hydrological ArcSWAT model (ArcSWAT 2012.10_1.14). No previous studies have been found in the literature regarding an in-depth simulation study of the Lower Bear Malad River (LBMR) watershed to simulate stream flow and to quantify the associated movement of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment. It is expected that the model mainly will predict monthly mean total phosphorus (TP) concentration and loadings in a mountainous LBRM watershed (steep Wellsville mountain range with peak of (2,857 m)) having into consideration the snow and runoff variables affecting the prediction process. The simulated nutrient concentrations were properly consistent with observations based on the R2 and Nash- Sutcliffe fitness factors. Further, the model will be able to manage and assess the land application in that area with corresponding to proper BMPs regarding water quality management. Keywords: Water Quality Modeling; Soil and

  17. SWATS: Diurnal Trends in the Soil Temperature Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Theisen, Adam [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-06-30

    During the processing of data for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ARMBE2D Value-Added Product (VAP), the developers noticed that the SWATS soil temperatures did not show a decreased temporal variability with increased depth with the new E30+ Extended Facilities (EFs), unlike the older EFs at ARM’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The instrument mentor analyzed the data and reported that all SWATS locations have shown this behavior but that the magnitude of the problem was greatest at EFs E31-E38. The data were analyzed to verify the initial assessments of: 1. 5 cm SWATS data were valid for all EFs and 15 cm soil temperature measurements were valid at all EFs other than E31-E38, 2. Use only nighttime SWATS soil temperature measurements to calculate daily average soil temperatures, 3. Since it seems likely that the soil temperature measurements below 15cm were affected by the solar heating of the enclosure at all but E31-38, and at all depths below 5cm at E31-38, individual measurements of soil temperature at these depths during daylight hours, and daily averages of the same, can ot be trusted on most (particularly sunny) days.

  18. Residues of cypermethrin and endosulfan in soils of Swat valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nafees

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Swat Valley was studied for two widely used pesticides; cypermethrin and endosulfan. A total of 63 soil samples were collected from 27 villages selected for this purpose. The collected soil samples were extracted with n-hexane, pesticides were separated, identified and quantified by a GC-ECD system. Endosulfan was 0.24 - 1.51 mg kg-1 and 0.13 - 12.67 mg kg-1 in rainfed and irrigated areas, respectively. The residual level of cypermethrin was comparatively high with a level of0.14 to 27.62 mg kg-1 and 0.05 to 73.75 mg kg-1 in rainfed and irrigated areas, respectively. For assessing the possible causes of pesticide residues in soil, 360 farmers were interviewed. It was found that both, cypermethrin and endosulfan, apart from agriculture were also widely misused for fishing in the entire stretch of River Swat and its tributaries. River Swat is used for irrigation in Swat Valley and this wide misuse of pesticides can also contribute to pesticide residue in soil.

  19. Malnutrition amongst Under-Five Years Children in Swat, Pakistan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... The incidence of malnutrition is about the same for both male and female children. Risk factors for malnutrition in the children include lack of education, teenage pregnancy, lack of immunization, and large family size. Keywords: Malnutrition, Gomezfs classification, Weaning time, Risk factors, Teenage pregnancy, Swat ...

  20. Current algebra, statistical mechanics and quantum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela Mendes, R.

    2017-11-01

    Results obtained in the past for free boson systems at zero and nonzero temperatures are revisited to clarify the physical meaning of current algebra reducible functionals which are associated to systems with density fluctuations, leading to observable effects on phase transitions. To use current algebra as a tool for the formulation of quantum statistical mechanics amounts to the construction of unitary representations of diffeomorphism groups. Two mathematical equivalent procedures exist for this purpose. One searches for quasi-invariant measures on configuration spaces, the other for a cyclic vector in Hilbert space. Here, one argues that the second approach is closer to the physical intuition when modelling complex systems. An example of application of the current algebra methodology to the pairing phenomenon in two-dimensional fermion systems is discussed.

  1. Continental scale modelling of geomagnetically induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakharov Yaroslav

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents aims at deriving statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in the European high-voltage power grids. Such a continent-wide system of more than 1500 substations and transmission lines requires updates of the previous modelling, which has dealt with national grids in fairly small geographic areas. We present here how GIC modelling can be conveniently performed on a spherical surface with minor changes in the previous technique. We derive the exact formulation to calculate geovoltages on the surface of a sphere and show its practical approximation in a fast vectorised form. Using the model of the old Finnish power grid and a much larger prototype model of European high-voltage power grids, we validate the new technique by comparing it to the old one. We also compare model results to measured data in the following cases: geoelectric field at the Nagycenk observatory, Hungary; GIC at a Russian transformer; GIC along the Finnish natural gas pipeline. In all cases, the new method works reasonably well.

  2. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Gitau, Margaret; Merwade, Venkatesh; Arnold, Jeffrey; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Hirschi, Michael; Engel, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991-2003) field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR) watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine) and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine). Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.65) and nitrate in tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.68) for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE = 0.00-0.32 and -0.29-0.06, respectively). The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE = 0.50-0.81) better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE = -0.11-0.49). The calibration provided reasonable parameter sets for the old and new routines in the LVR watershed, and the validation results showed that the new routine has the potential to accurately simulate hydrologic processes in mildly sloped watersheds.

  3. Assessing the efficacy of the SWAT auto-irrigation function to simulate Irrigation, evapotranspiration and crop response to irrigation management strategies of the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is widely used for simulation of hydrologic processes at various temporal and spatial scales. Less common are long-term simulation analyses of water balance components including agricultural management practices such as irrigation management. In the se...

  4. Current mathematical models for cancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Letizia; Lavezzi, Silvia Maria; Borella, Elisa; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Magni, Paolo; Poggesi, Italo

    2017-08-01

    Pharmacometric models represent the most comprehensive approaches for extracting, summarizing and integrating information obtained in the often sparse, limited, and less-than-optimally designed experiments performed in the early phases of oncology drug discovery. Whilst empirical methodologies may be enough for screening and ranking candidate drugs, modeling approaches are needed for optimizing and making economically viable the learn-confirm cycles within an oncology research program and anticipating the dose regimens to be investigated in the subsequent clinical development. Areas covered: Papers appearing in the literature of approximately the last decade reporting modeling approaches applicable to anticancer drug discovery have been listed and commented. Papers were selected based on the interest in the proposed methodology or in its application. Expert opinion: The number of modeling approaches used in the discovery of anticancer drugs is consistently increasing and new models are developed based on the current directions of research of new candidate drugs. These approaches have contributed to a better understanding of new oncological targets and have allowed for the exploitation of the relatively sparse information generated by preclinical experiments. In addition, they are used in translational approaches for guiding and supporting the choice of dosing regimens in early clinical development.

  5. Application of SWAT99.2 to sensitivity analysis of water balance components in unique plots in a hilly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-feng Dai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although many sensitivity analyses using the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT in a complex watershed have been conducted, little attention has been paid to the application potential of the model in unique plots. In addition, sensitivity analysis of percolation and evapotranspiration with SWAT has seldom been undertaken. In this study, SWAT99.2 was calibrated to simulate water balance components for unique plots in Southern China from 2000 to 2001, which included surface runoff, percolation, and evapotranspiration. Twenty-one parameters classified into four categories, including meteorological conditions, topographical characteristics, soil properties, and vegetation attributes, were used for sensitivity analysis through one-at-a-time (OAT sampling to identify the factor that contributed most to the variance in water balance components. The results were shown to be different for different plots, with parameter sensitivity indices and ranks varying for different water balance components. Water balance components in the broad-leaved forest and natural grass plots were most sensitive to meteorological conditions, less sensitive to vegetation attributes and soil properties, and least sensitive to topographical characteristics. Compared to those in the natural grass plot, water balance components in the broad-leaved forest plot demonstrated higher sensitivity to the maximum stomatal conductance (GSI and maximum leaf area index (BLAI.

  6. OpenMP-accelerated SWAT simulation using Intel C and FORTRAN compilers: Development and benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Seo Jin; Sugimura, Tak; Kim, Albert S.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a practical method to accelerate execution of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) using open (free) computational resources. The SWAT source code (rev 622) was recompiled using a non-commercial Intel FORTRAN compiler in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Linux platform, and newly named iOMP-SWAT in this study. GNU utilities of make, gprof, and diff were used to develop the iOMP-SWAT package, profile memory usage, and check identicalness of parallel and serial simulations. Among 302 SWAT subroutines, the slowest routines were identified using GNU gprof, and later modified using Open Multiple Processing (OpenMP) library in an 8-core shared memory system. In addition, a C wrapping function was used to rapidly set large arrays to zero by cross compiling with the original SWAT FORTRAN package. A universal speedup ratio of 2.3 was achieved using input data sets of a large number of hydrological response units. As we specifically focus on acceleration of a single SWAT run, the use of iOMP-SWAT for parameter calibrations will significantly improve the performance of SWAT optimization.

  7. Particle Models with Self Sustained Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, M.; De Masi, A.; Presutti, E.

    2017-06-01

    We present some computer simulations run on a stochastic cellular automaton (CA). The CA simulates a gas of particles which are in a channel,the interval [1, L] in Z, but also in "reservoirs" R_1 and R_2. The evolution in the channel simulates a lattice gas with Kawasaki dynamics with attractive Kac interactions; the temperature is chosen smaller than the mean field critical one. There are also exchanges of particles between the channel and the reservoirs and among reservoirs. When the rate of exchanges among reservoirs is in a suitable interval the CA reaches an apparently stationary state with a non zero current; for different choices of the initial condition the current changes sign. We have a quite satisfactory theory of the phenomenon but we miss a full mathematical proof.

  8. Assessment of Flood Frequency Alteration by Dam Construction via SWAT Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Eun Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impacts of the upstream Soyanggang and Chungju multi-purpose dams on the frequency of downstream floods in the Han River basin, South Korea. A continuous hydrological model, SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, was used to individually simulate regulated and unregulated daily streamflows entering the Paldang Dam, which is located at the outlet of the basin of interest. The simulation of the regulated flows by the Soyanggang and Chungju dams was calibrated with observed inflow data to the Paldang Dam. The estimated daily flood peaks were used for a frequency analysis, using the extreme Type-I distribution, for which the parameters were estimated via the L-moment method. This novel approach was applied to the study area to assess the effects of the dams on downstream floods. From the results, the two upstream dams were found to be able to reduce downstream floods by approximately 31% compared to naturally occurring floods without dam regulation. Furthermore, an approach to estimate the flood frequency based on the hourly extreme peak flow data, obtained by combining SWAT simulation and Sangal’s method, was proposed and then verified by comparison with the observation-based results. The increased percentage of floods estimated with hourly simulated data for the three scenarios of dam regulation ranged from 16.1% to 44.1%. The reduced percentages were a little higher than those for the daily-based flood frequency estimates. The developed approach allowed for better understanding of flood frequency, as influenced by dam regulation on a relatively large watershed scale.

  9. Surface CUrrents from a Diagnostic model (SCUD): Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SCUD data product is an estimate of upper-ocean velocities computed from a diagnostic model (Surface CUrrents from a Diagnostic model). This model makes daily...

  10. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-02

    Aug 2, 2007 ... where A is sample area, P0 the initial polarization and τ (T) the relaxation model used. Equation (2) gives the corrected. TSDC curve as. Icorr (T) = Cf. ∗. I (T). (3). The theoretical correction factor (Cf) is studied very inten- sively in order to get a complete picture about the correction factor behaviour along ...

  11. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991–2003 field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine. Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE  <  0.5 uncalibrated flow and nitrate loss results for a mildly sloped watershed with low runoff. The calibrated monthly tile flow, surface flow, nitrate-N in tile and surface flow, sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.65 and nitrate in tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.68 for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE  =  0.00–0.32 and −0.29–0.06, respectively. The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE  =  0.50–0.81 better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE  =  −0.11–0.49. The calibration

  12. Hydrological Modelling of Ganga River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, J.; Gosain, A. K.; Khosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Application of a hydrological model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to the Ganga basin having a total drainage area of around 1.08 M sq. km extending over Tibet, Nepal, India and Bangladesh has been made. The model is calibrated to determine the spatial deviations in runoff at sub-basin level, and to capture the water balance of the river basin. Manual calibration approach was used for calibrating the SWAT model by following multi-step procedure to get to the realistic present situation as close as possible. Simulations were then further made with and without proposed future projects to obtain various scenarios. The various statistical parameters used for the evaluation of the monthly runoff simulation showed that SWAT performed well in mimicking the monthly stream flow for Ganga River basin. The model under predicted the flows in the non-perennial region during non-monsoon season, due to low rainfall and regulated flows and seepage taking place from the reservoirs. The impacts of the interventions, both existing as well as proposed, on the water balance of the basin were evaluated and quantified. The derived results suggest that there is a substantial reduction in overall water resources availability in the study basin on account of the current level of development and further, future developments, as are being proposed, may require a careful study of their potential impact on currently sanctioned water use. The present study showcases that efficacy of the model for simulating the stream flow is admirable.

  13. An Improved Model Predictive Current Controller of Switched Reluctance Machines Using Time-Multiplexed Current Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingchu; Ling, Xiao; Huang, Yixiang; Gong, Liang; Liu, Chengliang

    2017-05-17

    This paper presents a fixed-switching-frequency model predictive current controller using multiplexed current sensor for switched reluctance machine (SRM) drives. The converter was modified to distinguish currents from simultaneously excited phases during the sampling period. The only current sensor installed in the converter was time division multiplexing for phase current sampling. During the commutation stage, the control steps of adjacent phases were shifted so that sampling time was staggered. The maximum and minimum duty ratio of pulse width modulation (PWM) was limited to keep enough sampling time for analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion. Current sensor multiplexing was realized without complex adjustment of either driver circuit nor control algorithms, while it helps to reduce the cost and errors introduced in current sampling due to inconsistency between sensors. The proposed controller is validated by both simulation and experimental results with a 1.5 kW three-phase 12/8 SRM. Satisfied current sampling is received with little difference compared with independent phase current sensors for each phase. The proposed controller tracks the reference current profile as accurately as the model predictive current controller with independent phase current sensors, while having minor tracking errors compared with a hysteresis current controller.

  14. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Current models of positive mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of positive mental health represents not merely the absence of mental disease but presence of high level of happiness and well-being. In this paper we mentioned shortly the earliest concept of mental health, presented by Marie Jahoda in the mid-twentieth century. After that, we described two traditions in understanding and researching of subjective well-being: hedonic and eudaimonic approach. First approach focuses on investigation of positive affects and happiness as emotional and life satisfaction as cognitive component of subjective well-being. Second tradition emphasizes potentials and competences that person develops to the highest level, in personal and social area. Both psychological and social well-being are core concept of positive mental health psychology, designated together as positive functioning. The psychological well-being comprises six dimensions: self-acceptance, positive relations with others, environmental mastery, autonomy, purpose of life and personal growth. Social well-being consists of five dimensions: social integration, social acceptance, social contribution, social actualization and social coherence. By integrating hedonic and eudaimonic well-being as well as absence of mental disease, Corey Keyes introduced concept of complete mental health. People with complete mental health have reported absence of disease during past year and presence of high level of emotional, psychological and social well-being (flourishing. People with incomplete mental health have also reported absence of mental disease but low level of positive functioning (languishing. Keyes thought there are people with complete and incomplete mental illness; both groups report presence of mental disease, but second group has high level of positive functioning. Models of positive mental health are widely used in research studies as well as in programs for prevention and promotion of mental health. .

  16. Ethnobotanical Study of Tehsil Kabal, Swat District, KPK, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 140 plants have been reported ethnobotanically from Tehsil Kabal, Swat District. These include the 133 plants (95% of angiosperms, 3 (2.14% of gymnosperms, and 2 (1.42% each of pteridophytes and fungi. The largest family is Lamiaceae represented by 11 species followed by Rosaceae represented by 9 species. Among angiosperms 76 (55.63% were herbs, 17 (12.78% were shrubs, and 40 (30.07% were trees; 127 plants (95.48% were dicot while 6 plants (4.51% were monocot. Most of the plants were used for more than one purpose. Generally the plants were used for medicinal, fuel, timber wood, food, and fodder for cattle purposes.

  17. Current-voltage model of LED light sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation is rarely used for dimming light-emitting diodes in polychromatic luminaires due to big color shifts caused by varying magnitude of LED driving current and nonlinear relationship between intensity of a diode and driving current. Current-voltage empirical model of light...

  18. Watershed-Scale Modeling of Land-Use and Altered Environment Impacts on Aquatic Weed Growth in the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David; Potter, Christopher; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-01-01

    model component. Plant response to the range of water quality factors, response times, and altered temperature and light regimes of the Delta have required gap-filling studies to provide model parameters. Delta-SWAT provides a tool for evaluating temporal and spatial effects of land-use and altered environments in the Delta and contributing watersheds on aquatic weed growth. Using Delta-SWAT for simulation modeling allows evaluation of historic and current conditions as well as consideration potential climate change and management practice outcomes. Delta-SWAT adds to the scientific understanding of dynamics in the Delta and enhances development of science-informed, management strategies and practices.

  19. Modeling the current distribution in HTS tapes with transport current and applied magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazawa, T.; Yazawa, Takashi; Rabbers, J.J.; Chevtchenko, O.A.; ten Haken, Bernard; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Maeda, Hideaki

    1999-01-01

    A numerical model is developed for the current distribution in a high temperature superconducting (HTS) tape, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2 Ca2Cu3Ox-Ag, subjected to a combination of a transport current and an applied magnetic field. This analysis is based on a two-dimensional formulation of Maxwell's equations in

  20. Biophysical models of larval dispersal in the Benguela Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We synthesise and update results from the suite of biophysical, larval-dispersal models developed in the Benguela Current ecosystem. Biophysical models of larval dispersal use outputs of physical hydrodynamic models as inputs to individual-based models in which biological processes acting during the larval life are ...

  1. Modelling a Three-Phase Current Source Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neukirchner László

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A current source inverter model has been developed in the given paper that is constructed from six LTI models for the different switching modes. The overall model is in a piecewise affine form that supports the use of model predictive control. The model has been verified against engineering expectations and its open-loop performance shows that it is a promising basis of model predictive control structures.

  2. Performance of salsnes water to algae treatment (swat) technology in a continuous mode for high algae recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Barragán, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Environmental technology. *KAR OK,.KONF MAI 2016* Many researchers consider efficient harvesting is the major bottleneck in cost efficient production of microalgae, contributing 20 – 30 % to total production cost. This thesis is the conclusion of a two years research project to develop Salsnes Water to Algae Treatment (SWAT) harvesting technology. SWAT uses two main processes: flocculation and filtration. The SWAT objectives were achieved, 95 % algae removal and p...

  3. Development of a Hydrologic Connectivity Dataset for SWAT Assessments in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. White

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Model-based water quality assessments are an important informer of conservation and environmental policy in the U.S. The recently completed national scale Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP is being replicated using an improved model populated with new and higher resolution data. National assessments are particularly difficult as models must operate with both a very large spatial extent (the contiguous U.S. while maintaining a level of granularity required to capture important small scale processes. In this research, we developed datasets to describe the hydrologic connectivity at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS 12-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC-12 level. Connectivity between 86,000 HUC-12s as provided by the Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD was evaluated and corrected. We also detailed a method to resolve the highly detailed National Hydrography Dataset (NHD stream segments within each HUC-12 into vastly simplified representative channel schemes suitable for use in the recently developed Soil and Water Assessment Tool + (SWAT+ model. This representative channel approach strikes a balance between computational complexity and accurate representation of the hydrologic system. These data will be tested in the upcoming CEAP II national assessment. Until then, all the WBD corrections and NHDPlus representative channel data are provided via the web for other researchers to evaluate and utilize.

  4. Current focusing and steering: modeling, physiology, and psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Ben H; Litvak, Leonid M

    2008-08-01

    Current steering and current focusing are stimulation techniques designed to increase the number of distinct perceptual channels available to cochlear implant (CI) users by adjusting currents applied simultaneously to multiple CI electrodes. Previous studies exploring current steering and current focusing stimulation strategies are reviewed, including results of research using computational models, animal neurophysiology, and human psychophysics. Preliminary results of additional neurophysiological and human psychophysical studies are presented that demonstrate the success of current steering strategies in stimulating auditory nerve regions lying between physical CI electrodes, as well as current focusing strategies that excite regions narrower than those stimulated using monopolar configurations. These results are interpreted in the context of perception and speech reception by CI users. Disparities between results of physiological and psychophysical studies are discussed. The differences in stimulation used for physiological and psychophysical studies are hypothesized to contribute to these disparities. Finally, application of current steering and focusing strategies to other types of auditory prostheses is also discussed.

  5. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giampieri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by Smith et al. (1980 and Ness et al. (1981, 1982, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. Connerney et al. (1983 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; planetary magnetospheres; plasma sheet

  6. A Comprehensive Entomological, Serological and Molecular Study of 2013 Dengue Outbreak of Swat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehangir Khan

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus play a fundamental role in transmission of dengue virus to humans. A single infected Aedes mosquito is capable to act as a reservoir/amplifier host for dengue virus and may cause epidemics via horizontal and vertical modes of dengue virus (DENV transmission. The present and future dengue development can be clarified by understanding the elements which help the dissemination of dengue transmission. The current study deals with molecular surveillance of dengue in addition to ecological and social context of 2013 dengue epidemics in Swat, Pakistan.Herein, we reported dengue vectors surveillance in domestic and peridomistic containers in public and private places in 7 dengue epidemic-prone sites in District Swat, Pakistan from July to November 2013. Using the Flaviviruses genus-specific reverse transcriptase (RT semi nested-PCR assay, we screened blood samples (N = 500 of dengue positive patients, 150 adult mosquito pools and 25 larval pools.The 34 adult and 7 larval mosquito pools were found positive. The adult positive pools comprised 30 pools of Ae. aegypti and 4 pools of Ae. albopictus, while among the 7 larval pools, 5 pools of Ae. aegypti and 2 pools of Ae. albopictus were positive. The detected putative genomes of dengue virus were of DENV-2 (35% in 14 mosquito pools & 39% in serum and DENV-3 (65% in 27 mosquito pools & 61% in serum. The higher vector density and dengue transmission rate was recorded in July and August (due to favorable conditions for vector growth. About 37% of Ae. aegpti and 34% Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were collected from stagnant water in drums, followed by drinking water tanks (23% & 26%, tires (20% & 18% and discarded containers (10% & 6%. Among the surveyed areas, Saidu was heavily affected (26% by dengue followed by Kanju (20% and Landikas (12%. The maximum infection was observed in the age group of 45 (25% years and was more in males (55.3% as compare to females (44.7%. The

  7. Better Insight Into Water Resources Management With Integrated Hydrodynamic And Water Quality Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debele, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Parlange, J.

    2004-12-01

    Models have long been used in water resources management to guide decision making and improve understanding of the system. Numerous models of different scales -spatial and temporal - are available. Yet, very few models manage to bridge simulations of hydrological and water quality parameters from both upland watershed and riverine system. Most water quality models, such as QUAL2E and EPD-RIV1 concentrate on the riverine system while CE-QUAL-W2 and WASP models focus on larger waterbodies, such as lakes and reservoirs. On the other hand, the original SWAT model, HSPF and other upland watershed hydrological models simulate agricultural (diffuse) pollution sources with limited number of processes incorporated to handle point source pollutions that emanate from industrial sectors. Such limitations, which are common in most hydrodynamic and water quality models undermine better understanding that otherwise could be uncovered by employing integrated hydrological and water quality models for both upland watershed and riverine system. The SWAT model is a well documented and verified hydrological and water quality model that has been developed to simulate the effects of various management scenarios on the health of the environment in terms of water quantity and quality. Recently, the SWAT model has been extended to include the simulation of hydrodynamic and water quality parameters in the river system. The extended SWAT model (ESWAT) has been further extended to run using diurnally varying (hourly) weather data and produce outputs at hourly timescales. This and other improvements in the ESWAT model have been documented in the current work. Besides, the results from two case studies in Texas will be reported.

  8. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, G.; Dougherty, M.

    2004-02-01

    . The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by smith80 and ness81,ness82, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. connerney83 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set. First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

  9. Combined kinetic and transport modeling of radiofrequency current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, R.; Giruzzi, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barbato, E. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    A numerical model for predictive simulations of radiofrequency current drive in magnetically confined plasmas is developed. It includes the minimum requirements for a self consistent description of such regimes, i.e., a 3-D ,kinetic equation for the electron distribution function, 1-D heat and current transport equations, and resonant coupling between velocity space and configuration space dynamics, through suitable wave propagation equations. The model finds its full application in predictive studies of complex current profile control scenarios in tokamaks, aiming at the establishment of internal transport barriers by the simultaneous use of various radiofrequency current drive methods. The basic properties of this non-linear numerical system are investigated and illustrated by simulations applied to reversed magnetic shear regimes obtained by Lower Hybrid and Electron Cyclotron current drive for parameters typical of the Tore Supra tokamak. (authors)

  10. A 3D fully coupled wave-current-sediment model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Shen, L.; Feddy, A.; Bennis, A. C.; Mouazé, D.; Chareyre, B.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of new energy sources, marine energy can contribute to diversification of energy mix. The study site is the Alderney Race where tidal velocities can exceed 4 meters per second. With this high current speeds, this site represents one of the best opportunities for exploitation of the tidal stream. Our aim is to investigate the influence of this high current speeds on the sediment transport. Modeling the sediment transport in the coastal environment requires an accurate prediction of current velocity and bottom shear stress. For that, the numerical wave-current model MARS-WW3 will be used to analyze the wave-current interaction and comparisons with experimental ADCP data will be presented. To simulate the non-cohesive sediment transport (such as sand, gravel or pebbles), this numerical model will be coupled with a discrete element model like YADE. In first time, the discrete model used will be validated with different tests cases. After, we will present the coupling MARS-WW3-YADE, in particular the expression and exchange of different forces exerted by the fluid flow on the sediments and by sediments on the fluid. Finally, simulations of the sediment transport will be shown and we will interest in particular to the influence of size and density of sediments. We also investigate the effects of tide and wave currents on the sediment displacement.

  11. Storm-time ring current: model-dependent results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Ganushkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point of the paper is to investigate how much the modeled ring current depends on the representations of magnetic and electric fields and boundary conditions used in simulations. Two storm events, one moderate (SymH minimum of −120 nT on 6–7 November 1997 and one intense (SymH minimum of −230 nT on 21–22 October 1999, are modeled. A rather simple ring current model is employed, namely, the Inner Magnetosphere Particle Transport and Acceleration model (IMPTAM, in order to make the results most evident. Four different magnetic field and two electric field representations and four boundary conditions are used. We find that different combinations of the magnetic and electric field configurations and boundary conditions result in very different modeled ring current, and, therefore, the physical conclusions based on simulation results can differ significantly. A time-dependent boundary outside of 6.6 RE gives a possibility to take into account the particles in the transition region (between dipole and stretched field lines forming partial ring current and near-Earth tail current in that region. Calculating the model SymH* by Biot-Savart's law instead of the widely used Dessler-Parker-Sckopke (DPS relation gives larger and more realistic values, since the currents are calculated in the regions with nondipolar magnetic field. Therefore, the boundary location and the method of SymH* calculation are of key importance for ring current data-model comparisons to be correctly interpreted.

  12. A Neuron Model Based Ultralow Current Sensor System for Bioapplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. M. Arifuzzman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultralow current sensor system based on the Izhikevich neuron model is presented in this paper. The Izhikevich neuron model has been used for its superior computational efficiency and greater biological plausibility over other well-known neuron spiking models. Of the many biological neuron spiking features, regular spiking, chattering, and neostriatal spiny projection spiking have been reproduced by adjusting the parameters associated with the model at hand. This paper also presents a modified interpretation of the regular spiking feature in which the firing pattern is similar to that of the regular spiking but with improved dynamic range offering. The sensor current ranges between 2 pA and 8 nA and exhibits linearity in the range of 0.9665 to 0.9989 for different spiking features. The efficacy of the sensor system in detecting low amount of current along with its high linearity attribute makes it very suitable for biomedical applications.

  13. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  14. Hydrological effects of the increased CO2 and climate change in the Upper Mississippi River Basin using a modified SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2012-01-01

    Increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate change may significantly impact the hydrological and meteorological processes of a watershed system. Quantifying and understanding hydrological responses to elevated ambient CO2 and climate change is, therefore, critical for formulating adaptive strategies for an appropriate management of water resources. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was applied to assess the effects of increased CO2 concentration and climate change in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB). The standard SWAT model was modified to represent more mechanistic vegetation type specific responses of stomatal conductance reduction and leaf area increase to elevated CO2 based on physiological studies. For estimating the historical impacts of increased CO2 in the recent past decades, the incremental (i.e., dynamic) rises of CO2 concentration at a monthly time-scale were also introduced into the model. Our study results indicated that about 1–4% of the streamflow in the UMRB during 1986 through 2008 could be attributed to the elevated CO2 concentration. In addition to evaluating a range of future climate sensitivity scenarios, the climate projections by four General Circulation Models (GCMs) under different greenhouse gas emission scenarios were used to predict the hydrological effects in the late twenty-first century (2071–2100). Our simulations demonstrated that the water yield would increase in spring and substantially decrease in summer, while soil moisture would rise in spring and decline in summer. Such an uneven distribution of water with higher variability compared to the baseline level (1961–1990) may cause an increased risk of both flooding and drought events in the basin.

  15. Quasi-equilibrium channel model of an constant current arc

    OpenAIRE

    Gerasimov Alexander V.; Kirpichnikov Alexander P.

    2003-01-01

    The rather simple method of calculation of electronic and gas temperature in the channel of arc of plasma generator is offered. This method is based on self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an electric arc. The method proposed enables to obtain radial allocation of gas and electronic temperatures in a non-conducting zone of an constant current arc, for prescribed parameters of discharge (current intensity and power of the discharge), with enough good precision. The results obtained...

  16. Dynamic modelling of tearing mode stabilization by RF current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giruzzi, G.; Zabiego, M.; Gianakon, T.A.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Cardinali, A. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati (Italy); Bernabei, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1998-12-31

    The theory of tearing mode stabilization in toroidal plasmas by RF-driven currents that are modulated in phase with the island rotation is investigated. A time scale analysis of the phenomena involved indicates that transient effects, such as finite time response of the driven currents, island rotation during the power pulses, and the inductive response of the plasma, are intrinsically important. A dynamic model of such effects is developed, based on a 3-D Fokker-Planck code coupled to both the electric field diffusion and the island evolution equations. Extensive applications to both Electron Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid current drive in ITER are presented. (author) 54 refs.

  17. Quasi-equilibrium channel model of an constant current arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rather simple method of calculation of electronic and gas temperature in the channel of arc of plasma generator is offered. This method is based on self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an electric arc. The method proposed enables to obtain radial allocation of gas and electronic temperatures in a non-conducting zone of an constant current arc, for prescribed parameters of discharge (current intensity and power of the discharge, with enough good precision. The results obtained can be used in model and engineering calculations to estimate gas and electronic temperatures in the channel of an arc plasma generator.

  18. Charged current universality in the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylov, A; Ramsey-Musolf, M J

    2002-02-18

    We compute the complete one-loop contributions to low-energy charged current weak interaction observables in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). We obtain the constraints on the MSSM parameter space which arise when precision low-energy charged current data are analyzed in tandem with measurements of the muon anomaly. While the data allow the presence of at least one light neutralino, they also imply a pattern of mass splittings among first and second generation sleptons and squarks which contradicts predictions of widely used models for supersymmetry-breaking mediation.

  19. Modelling of fission chambers in current mode—Analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabod, Sébastien; Fioni, Gabriele; Letourneau, Alain; Marie, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model is proposed to explain the functioning of fission chambers operated in current mode, even in very high neutron fluxes. The calibration curves are calculated as a function of basic physical parameters as fission rate, gas pressure and geometry of the chambers. The output current at saturation is precisely calculated, as well as the maximum voltage to be applied in order to avoid avalanche phenomena. The electric field distortion due to the space charge phenomena is also estimated. Within this model, the characteristic responses of fission chambers are correctly reproduced, in agreement with the experience feedback obtained at the ILL/Grenoble High-Flux Reactor.

  20. Environmental gamma radiation measurement in district Swat, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, T; Khan, K; Subhani, M S; Akhter, P; Jabbar, A

    2008-01-01

    External exposure to environmental gamma ray sources is an important component of exposure to the public. A survey was carried out to determine activity concentration levels and associated doses from (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs by means of high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry in the Swat district, famous for tourism. The mean concentrations for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be 50.4 +/- 0.7, 34.8 +/- 0.7 and 434.5 +/- 7.4 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in soil samples, which are slightly more than the world average values. However, (137)Cs was only found in the soil sample of Barikot with an activity concentration of 34 +/- 1.2 Bq kg(-1). Only (40)K was determined in vegetation samples with an average activity of 172.2 +/- 1.7 Bq kg(-1), whereas in water samples, all radionuclides were found below lower limits of detection. The radium equivalent activity in all soil samples is lower than the limit set in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development report (370 Bq kg(-1)). The value of the external exposure dose has been determined from the content of these radionuclides in soil. The average terrestrial gamma air absorbed dose rate was observed to be 62.4 nGy h(-1), which yields an annual effective dose of 0.08 mSv. The average value of the annual effective dose lies close to the global range of outdoor radiation exposure given in United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. However, the main component of the radiation dose to the population residing in the study area arises from cosmic ray due to high altitude.

  1. One-Dimensional Modelling of Marine Current Turbine Runaway Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Lundin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available If a turbine loses its electrical load, it will rotate freely and increase speed, eventually achieving that rotational speed which produces zero net torque. This is known as a runaway situation. Unlike many other types of turbine, a marine current turbine will typically overshoot the final runaway speed before slowing down and settling at the runaway speed. Since the hydrodynamic forces acting on the turbine are dependent on rotational speed and acceleration, turbine behaviour during runaway becomes important for load analyses during turbine design. In this article, we consider analytical and numerical models of marine current turbine runaway behaviour in one dimension. The analytical model is found not to capture the overshoot phenomenon, while still providing useful estimates of acceleration at the onset of runaway. The numerical model incorporates turbine wake build-up and predicts a rotational speed overshoot. The predictions of the models are compared against measurements of runaway of a marine current turbine. The models are also used to recreate previously-published results for a tidal turbine and applied to a wind turbine. It is found that both models provide reasonable estimates of maximum accelerations. The numerical model is found to capture the speed overshoot well.

  2. Comparison of methods for modelling geomagnetically induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Boteler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the geomagnetic hazard to power systems requires reliable modelling of the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC produced in the power network. This paper compares the Nodal Admittance Matrix method with the Lehtinen–Pirjola method and shows them to be mathematically equivalent. GIC calculation using the Nodal Admittance Matrix method involves three steps: (1 using the voltage sources in the lines representing the induced geoelectric field to calculate equivalent current sources and summing these to obtain the nodal current sources, (2 performing the inversion of the admittance matrix and multiplying by the nodal current sources to obtain the nodal voltages, (3 using the nodal voltages to determine the currents in the lines and in the ground connections. In the Lehtinen–Pirjola method, steps 2 and 3 of the Nodal Admittance Matrix calculation are combined into one matrix expression. This involves inversion of a more complicated matrix but yields the currents to ground directly from the nodal current sources. To calculate GIC in multiple voltage levels of a power system, it is necessary to model the connections between voltage levels, not just the transmission lines and ground connections considered in traditional GIC modelling. Where GIC flow to ground through both the high-voltage and low-voltage windings of a transformer, they share a common path through the substation grounding resistance. This has been modelled previously by including non-zero, off-diagonal elements in the earthing impedance matrix of the Lehtinen–Pirjola method. However, this situation is more easily handled in both the Nodal Admittance Matrix method and the Lehtinen–Pirjola method by introducing a node at the neutral point.

  3. A turbidity current model for real world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; Morales, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Traditional turbidity current models suffer from several drawbacks. Among them not preserving freshwater mass, a missing pressure term, or not including terms related to deposition, erosion and entrainment in the momentum equation. In Morales et al.(2009) a new turbidity current model was proposed trying to overcome all these drawbacks. This model takes into account the interaction between the turbidity current and the bottom, considering deposition and erosion effects as well as solid bedload transport of particles at the bed due to the current. Moreover, this model includes the effects of the deposition, erosion and water entrainment into the momentum equation,commonly neglected in this type of models and, finally, in the absence of water entrainment, freshwater mass in the turbidity current is preserved. Despite these improvements, the numerical results obtained by this model when applied to real river systems were not satisfactory due to the simple form of the friction term that was considered. In the present work we propose a different parameterization of this term, where bottom and interface fluid frictions are separately parameterized with more complex expressions. Moreover, the discretization of the deposition/erosion terms is now performed semi-implicitly which guarantees the positivity of the volumetric concentration of sediments in suspension and in the erodible sediment layer at the bed. The numerical simulations obtained with this new turbidity current model (component of HySEA numerical computing platform) greatly improve previous numerical results for simplified geometries as well as for real river systems. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. References: T. Morales, M. Castro, C. Parés, and E. Fernández-Nieto (2009). On

  4. A Predictive WFC3/IR Dark Current Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnquist, Ben; Baggett, Sylvia; Long, Knox S.

    2017-12-01

    The dark current in the WFC3/IR detector has remained stable at about 0.021 DN/s (0.049 e-/s) since launch; there are no long term increases or decreases. However, image-to-image variations in the full-frame dark current levels as high as 0.014 DN/s (0.032 e-/s) exist that have yet to be explained. These variations limit the accuracy of the dark calibration carried out by the CALWF3 pipeline. In an attempt to address this issue, we have examined the relationships of hundreds of HST telemetry parameters to the dark current level. We find that the dark variations depend on where HST is in relation to the Sun and that the rate of change of certain telemetry parameters, such as the input voltage to WFC3 and the IR detector electronics board temperature, throughout this day/night cycle correlate with the IR dark rate. Using reference pixel and input voltage information, we construct a full-frame WFC3/IR dark current model capable of predicting the dark rate in WFC3/IR observations. Tests show that this model reduces the error in the mean dark rate by more than a factor of two compared to the current superdark calibration method carried out by the CALWF3 pipeline. The shape of the dark current image is calibrated similarly using either of these calibration methods.

  5. Current State of the Art Historic Building Information Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, C.; Murphy, M.

    2017-08-01

    In an extensive review of existing literature a number of observations were made in relation to the current approaches for recording and modelling existing buildings and environments: Data collection and pre-processing techniques are becoming increasingly automated to allow for near real-time data capture and fast processing of this data for later modelling applications. Current BIM software is almost completely focused on new buildings and has very limited tools and pre-defined libraries for modelling existing and historic buildings. The development of reusable parametric library objects for existing and historic buildings supports modelling with high levels of detail while decreasing the modelling time. Mapping these parametric objects to survey data, however, is still a time-consuming task that requires further research. Promising developments have been made towards automatic object recognition and feature extraction from point clouds for as-built BIM. However, results are currently limited to simple and planar features. Further work is required for automatic accurate and reliable reconstruction of complex geometries from point cloud data. Procedural modelling can provide an automated solution for generating 3D geometries but lacks the detail and accuracy required for most as-built applications in AEC and heritage fields.

  6. CURRENT STATE OF THE ART HISTORIC BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dore

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In an extensive review of existing literature a number of observations were made in relation to the current approaches for recording and modelling existing buildings and environments: Data collection and pre-processing techniques are becoming increasingly automated to allow for near real-time data capture and fast processing of this data for later modelling applications. Current BIM software is almost completely focused on new buildings and has very limited tools and pre-defined libraries for modelling existing and historic buildings. The development of reusable parametric library objects for existing and historic buildings supports modelling with high levels of detail while decreasing the modelling time. Mapping these parametric objects to survey data, however, is still a time-consuming task that requires further research. Promising developments have been made towards automatic object recognition and feature extraction from point clouds for as-built BIM. However, results are currently limited to simple and planar features. Further work is required for automatic accurate and reliable reconstruction of complex geometries from point cloud data. Procedural modelling can provide an automated solution for generating 3D geometries but lacks the detail and accuracy required for most as-built applications in AEC and heritage fields.

  7. Modeling current climate conditions for forest pest risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank H. Koch; John W. Coulston

    2010-01-01

    Current information on broad-scale climatic conditions is essential for assessing potential distribution of forest pests. At present, sophisticated spatial interpolation approaches such as the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) are used to create high-resolution climatic data sets. Unfortunately, these data sets are based on 30-year...

  8. [Neither Descartes nor Freud? current pain models in psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, N; Egle, U T; von Känel, R

    2008-05-14

    Models explaining chronic pain based on the mere presence or absence of peripheral somatic findings or which view pain of psychological origin when there is no somatic explanation, have their shortcomings. Current scientific knowledge calls for distinct pain concepts, which integrate neurobiological and neuropsychological aspects of pain processing.

  9. Numerical modelling of wave current interactions at a local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Maria João; Pires-Silva, António A.; Benoit, Michel

    2013-08-01

    The present work is focused on the evaluation of wave-current interactions through numerical simulations of combined wave and current flows with the Code_Saturne (Archambeau et al., 2004), an advanced CFD solver based on the RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) equations. The objectives of this paper are twofold. Firstly, changes in the mean horizontal velocity and the horizontal-velocity amplitude profiles are studied when waves are superposed on currents. The influence of various first and second order turbulence closure models is addressed. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to the experimental data of Klopman (1994) and Umeyama (2005). Secondly, a more detailed study of the shear stresses and the turbulence viscosity vertical profile changes is also pursued when waves and currents interact. This analysis is completed using the data from Umeyama (2005). A relationship between a non-dimensional parameter involving the turbulence viscosity and the Ursell number is subsequently proposed.

  10. SWAT use of gridded observations for simulating runoff – a Vietnam river basin study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Vu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many research studies that focus on basin hydrology have applied the SWAT model using station data to simulate runoff. But over regions lacking robust station data, there is a problem of applying the model to study the hydrological responses. For some countries and remote areas, the rainfall data availability might be a constraint due to many different reasons such as lacking of technology, war time and financial limitation that lead to difficulty in constructing the runoff data. To overcome such a limitation, this research study uses some of the available globally gridded high resolution precipitation datasets to simulate runoff. Five popular gridded observation precipitation datasets: (1 Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards the Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE, (2 Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, (3 Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensing Information using Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN, (4 Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP, (5 a modified version of Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN2 and one reanalysis dataset, National Centers for Environment Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR are used to simulate runoff over the Dak Bla river (a small tributary of the Mekong River in Vietnam. Wherever possible, available station data are also used for comparison. Bilinear interpolation of these gridded datasets is used to input the precipitation data at the closest grid points to the station locations. Sensitivity Analysis and Auto-calibration are performed for the SWAT model. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE and Coefficient of Determination (R2 indices are used to benchmark the model performance. Results indicate that the APHRODITE dataset performed very well on a daily scale simulation of discharge having a good NSE of 0.54 and R2 of 0.55, when compared to the discharge simulation using station data (0

  11. Semiparametric modeling of grouped current duration data with preferential reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Alexander C; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Thoma, Marie; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2014-10-15

    Current duration data arise in cross-sectional studies from questions on the length of time from an initiating event to the time of interview. For example, in the National Survey on Family Growth, women who were considered at risk for pregnancy were asked (i) 'Are you currently attempting pregnancy?' and (ii) 'If yes, how many months have you been attempting to get pregnant?' The responses to (ii), referred to as the current durations, are length-biased because women with longer durations are more likely to answer yes to question (i) and therefore be included in the sample. Previous methods to analyze such data include continuous time nonparametric and parametric approaches. In this article, we propose a semiparametric Cox model and a piecewise constant baseline model (used to account for digit preference) to analyze grouped current duration data. We discuss and investigate through simulation studies, the robustness properties of the proposed methods when digit preference is present. Lastly, we present an analysis of the current duration data resulting from the 2002 National Survey on Family Growth. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Numerical verification of substrate current model in silicon IGFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faricelli, John; Gildenblat, Gennady

    1987-06-01

    With the advent of near and sub-micrometer scaled MOS devices, understanding the physics of substrate current generation has become more important. The results of extensive two-dimensional numerical simulation are presented in order to clarify the underlying physics of substrate current generation by weak avalanche in the drain region of IGFETs. We then use simulation to understand why one-dimensional analytic models for substrate current manage to describe this complicated generation mechanism in a reasonable fashion. In particular it is shown that the electron-hole pair production in short-channel devices is strongly localized close to the surface, which leads to the approximate agreement with one-dimensional models. A significant deviation from this pattern is found however for long channel devices and/or small gate voltages. The spatial distribution of the generation rate, current density and components of electric field is investigated for different impurity profiles and bias conditions. The results of the numerical simulation are compared with a one-dimensional model.

  13. Current Challenges in the First Principle Quantitative Modelling of the Lower Hybrid Current Drive in Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peysson Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Hybrid (LH wave is widely used in existing tokamaks for tailoring current density profile or extending pulse duration to steady-state regimes. Its high efficiency makes it particularly attractive for a fusion reactor, leading to consider it for this purpose in ITER tokamak. Nevertheless, if basics of the LH wave in tokamak plasma are well known, quantitative modeling of experimental observations based on first principles remains a highly challenging exercise, despite considerable numerical efforts achieved so far. In this context, a rigorous methodology must be carried out in the simulations to identify the minimum number of physical mechanisms that must be considered to reproduce experimental shot to shot observations and also scalings (density, power spectrum. Based on recent simulations carried out for EAST, Alcator C-Mod and Tore Supra tokamaks, the state of the art in LH modeling is reviewed. The capability of fast electron bremsstrahlung, internal inductance li and LH driven current at zero loop voltage to constrain all together LH simulations is discussed, as well as the needs of further improvements (diagnostics, codes, LH model, for robust interpretative and predictive simulations.

  14. SWAT.nz: New-Zeland-based "Sand Waves and Turbulence" experimental programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stephen; Nikora, Vladimir; Melville, Bruce; Goring, Derek; Clunie, Thomas; Friedrich, Heide

    2008-06-01

    The SWAT.nz ("New-Zealand-based Sand Waves and Turbulence") research programme was carried out to advance understanding of subaqueous sand waves. The programme was based around detailed measurements at varying scales of bed morphologies and associated flow fields as sand waves formed from plane-bed conditions and grew to equilibrium. This paper outlines the philosophy and details of the SWAT.nz programme, with the aim of providing insight into experiment and analysis design and methodologies for studies of highly-variable bed surfaces and flows. Example challenges addressed in the SWAT.nz programme include the measurement over large spatial domains of developing flow fields and three-dimensional bed morphology, including flow measurements below roughness (sand-wave) crests, and how to interpret the collected measurements. Insights into sand-wave dynamics that have arisen from the programme are presented to illustrate the values of the SWAT.nz programme and the developed methodologies. Results are presented in terms of mobile-bed processes, and flow-bed interaction and flow processes for fixed-bed roughness and erodible beds, respectively.

  15. Current animal models of bladder cancer: Awareness of translatability (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Xu, Ding; Pan, Chunwu; Ye, Min; Kang, Jian; Bai, Qiang; Qi, Jun

    2014-09-01

    Experimental animal models are crucial in the study of biological behavior and pathological development of cancer, and evaluation of the efficacy of novel therapeutic or preventive agents. A variety of animal models that recapitulate human urothelial cell carcinoma have thus far been established and described, while models generated by novel techniques are emerging. At present a number of reviews on animal models of bladder cancer comprise the introduction of one type of method, as opposed to commenting on and comparing all classifications, with the merits of a certain method being explicit but the shortcomings not fully clarified. Thus the aim of the present study was to provide a summary of the currently available animal models of bladder cancer including transplantable (which could be divided into xenogeneic or syngeneic, heterotopic or orthotopic), carcinogen-induced and genetically engineered models in order to introduce their materials and methods and compare their merits as well as focus on the weaknesses, difficulties in operation, associated problems and translational potential of the respective models. Findings of these models would provide information for authors and clinicians to select an appropriate model or to judge relevant preclinical study findings. Pertinent detection methods are therefore briefly introduced and compared.

  16. Analyses of PWR spent fuel composition using SCALE and SWAT code systems to find correction factors for criticality safety applications adopting burnup credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Sung; Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    The isotopic composition calculations were performed for 26 spent fuel samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor and 55 spent fuel samples from 7 PWR reactors using the SAS2H module of the SCALE4.4 code system with 27, 44 and 238 group cross-section libraries and the SWAT code system with the 107 group cross-section library. For the analyses of samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor, geometrical models were constructed for each of SCALE4.4/SAS2H and SWAT. For the analyses of samples from 7 PWR reactors, the geometrical model already adopted in the SCALE/SAS2H was directly converted to the model of SWAT. The four kinds of calculation results were compared with the measured data. For convenience, the ratio of the measured to calculated values was used as a parameter. When the ratio is less than unity, the calculation overestimates the measurement, and the ratio becomes closer to unity, they have a better agreement. For many important nuclides for burnup credit criticality safety evaluation, the four methods applied in this study showed good coincidence with measurements in general. More precise observations showed, however: (1) Less unity ratios were found for Pu-239 and -241 for selected 16 samples out of the 26 samples from the Obrigheim reactor (10 samples were deselected because their burnups were measured with Cs-137 non-destructive method, less reliable than Nd-148 method the rest 16 samples were measured with); (2) Larger than unity ratios were found for Am-241 and Cm-242 for both the 16 and 55 samples; (3) Larger than unity ratios were found for Sm-149 for the 55 samples; (4) SWAT was generally accompanied by larger ratios than those of SAS2H with some exceptions. Based on the measured-to-calculated ratios for 71 samples of a combined set in which 16 selected samples and 55 samples were included, the correction factors that should be multiplied to the calculated isotopic compositions were generated for a conservative estimate of the neutron multiplication factor

  17. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  18. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  19. Persistent current in an almost staggered Harper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasserman, A.; Berkovits, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the persistent current (PC) of a staggered Harper model, close to the half-filling. The Harper model is different than other one dimensional disordered systems which are always localized, since it is a quasi-periodic system with correlated disorder resulting in the fact that it can be in the metallic regime. Nevertheless, the PC for a wide range of parameters of the Harper model does not show typical metallic behavior, although the system is in the metallic regime. This is a result of the nature of the central band states, which are a hybridization of Gaussian states localized in superlattice points. When the superlattice is not commensurate with the system length, the PC behaves as an insulator. Thus even in the metallic regime a typical finite Harper model may exhibit a PC expected from an insulator.

  20. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  1. Validation of transport models in ASDEX Upgrade current ramps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietz, Sina; Hobirk, Joerg; Fable, Emiliano; Fischer, Rainer; Fuchs, Christoph; Pereverzev, Grigori; Ryter, Francois [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-07-01

    In order to prepare adequate ramp up and down scenarios for ITER, understanding the physics of transport during the current ramps is essential. The aim of the work was to assess the capability of several transport models to reproduce the experimental data during the current ramps. For this purpose, the calculated temperature profiles from different transport models, i.e. Coppi-Tang, Neo-Alcator, Bohm-Gyrobohm, critical gradient model and H98/2 scaling-based are compared to experimental temperature profiles under different conditions. The strong variation of the experimental electron temperature profiles are partly reproduced by the models. The importance of central and edge radiation will be emphasized, as well as the main transport properties of the models, especially in the case of strong local electron heating (ECRH). To investigate the control capabilities of a Tokamak, particularly with regard to ITER, the impact on global plasma parameters like the internal inductance and the stored energy is also investigated.

  2. Animal models of frailty: current applications in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane AE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alice E Kane,1 Sarah N Hilmer,2–4 John Mach,2–4 Sarah J Mitchell,5 Rafael de Cabo,5 Susan E Howlett1 1Department of Pharmacology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; 2Kolling Institute of Medical Research and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, 4Department of Aged Care, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: The ethical, logistical, and biological complications of working with an older population of people inherently limits clinical studies of frailty. The recent development of animal models of frailty, and tools for assessing frailty in animal models provides an invaluable opportunity for frailty research. This review summarizes currently published animal models of frailty including the interleukin-10 knock-out mouse, the mouse frailty phenotype assessment tool, and the mouse clinical frailty index. It discusses both current and potential roles of these models in research into mechanisms of frailty, interventions to prevent/delay frailty, and the effect of frailty on outcomes. Finally, this review discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of translating research findings from animals to humans. Keywords: mouse models, frailty index, frailty phenotype, IL-10 knock-out

  3. Watershed modeling tools and data for prognostic and diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambel-Leitao, P.; Brito, D.; Neves, R.

    2009-04-01

    's widely used in the world. Watershed models can be characterized by the high number of processes associated simulated. The estimation of these processes is also data intensive, requiring data on topography, land use / land cover, agriculture practices, soil type, precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, wind and radiation. Every year new data is being made available namely by satellite, that has allow to improve the quality of model input and also the calibration of the models (Galvão et. al, 2004b). Tools to cope with the vast amount of data have been developed: data formatting, data retrieving, data bases, metadata bases. The high number of processes simulated in watershed models makes them very wide in terms of output. The SWAT model outputs were modified to produce MOHID compliant result files (time series and HDF). These changes maintained the integrity of the original model, thus guarantying that results remain equal to the original version of SWAT. This allowed to output results in MOHID format, thus making it possible to immediately process it with MOHID visualization and data analysis tools (Chambel-Leitão et. al 2007; Trancoso et. al, 2009). Besides SWAT was modified to produce results files in HDF5 format, this allows the visualization of watershed properties (modeled by SWAT) in animated maps using MOHID GIS. The modified version of SWAT described here has been applied to various national and European projects. Results of the application of this modified version of SWAT to estimate hydrology and nutrients loads to estuaries and water bodies will be shown (Chambel-Leitão, 2008; Yarrow & Chambel-Leitão 2008; Chambel-Leitão et. al 2008; Yarrow & P. Chambel-Leitão, 2007; Yarrow & P. Chambel-Leitão, 2007; Coelho et. al., 2008). Keywords: Watershed models, SWAT, MOHID LAND, Hydrology, Nutrient Loads Arnold, J. G. and Fohrer, N. (2005). SWAT2000: current capabilities and research opportunities in applied watershed modeling. Hydrol. Process. 19, 563

  4. Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to assess land use impact on water resources in an East African watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tracy J.; Miller, Scott N.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryLand cover and land use changes in Kenya's Rift Valley have altered the hydrologic response of the River Njoro watershed by changing the partitioning of excess rainfall into surface discharge and groundwater recharge. The watershed contributes a significant amount of water to Lake Nakuru National Park, an internationally recognized Ramsar site, as well as groundwater supplies for local communities and the city of Nakuru. Three land use maps representing a 17-year period when the region underwent significant transitions served as inputs for hydrologic modeling using the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool, a GIS-based hydrologic modeling system. AGWA was used to parameterize the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a hydrologic model suitable for assessing the relative impact of land cover change on hydrologic response. The SWAT model was calibrated using observation data taken during the 1990s with high annual concordance. Simulation results showed that land use changes have resulted in corresponding increases in surface runoff and decreases in groundwater recharge. Hydrologic changes were highly variable both spatially and temporally, and the uppermost reaches of the forested highlands were most significantly affected. These changes have negative implications for the ecological health of the river system as well as Lake Nakuru and local communities.

  5. Status report on Corsica modeling for current drive scenario development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, T. A.; Crotinger, J.; Moller, J.M.; Pearlstein, L.D.

    1996-09-01

    This milestone report covers the progress and status of Corsica modeling for DIII-D experiments over the past year, since our previous report in September, 1995. During this time, we have concentrated on improvements to the code in support of our ability to do self-consistent, predictive modeling of DIII-D discharges. Our interest is in obtaining a tool, benchmarked with experimental data, for developing advanced tokamak operations scenarios including simulation and analysis of high performance negative central shear (NCS) discharges and control of the current profile evolution. Our major focus has been on installing and improving the neutral beam current drive mode in Corsica; this element is critical to modeling the evolution of DIII-D discharges. The NFREYA neutral beam deposition code was installed (starting with a version consistent with GA`s ONETWO code) and the capability for following particle orbits, including the effects of drifts, was added for determining the current driven by neutral beam -injection. In addition, improved methods for more easily integrating experimental profile measurements into the code operation and for calculating Z{sub eff} either from models or from impurity density measurements have been added. We have recently begun to turn on various transport models in our simulation of discharge evolution. We have concentrated on the NCS configuration and have simulated the evolution of two different high neutron reactivity discharges; an NCS discharge with L-mode edge and a single- null, weak NCS discharge from the JET/ITER/DIII-D equivalent shape experiments. Corsica simulation results for these discharges were presented at the EPS meeting in Kiev, Ukraine in June, 1996.

  6. Medical models of teleoncology: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Sabe

    2014-09-01

    Teleoncology has been adopted by many centers to provide cancer care closer to home for rural, remote, Indigenous and other disadvantaged people of our communities. A variety of medical models of teleoncology exist to provide various medical oncology services. While most centers use teleoncology to complement their face-to-face outreach services, some centers have replaced face-to-face with teleoncology models. Selection of patients and scheduling of clinics would depend on various factors including experience of the clinicians, complexity of treatment provided, capabilities and workforce of rural sites, and patient preferences. Many small studies reported high satisfaction rates of these models among patients and health professionals including Indigenous populations. One single center study reports that it is safe to supervise chemotherapy delivery remotely and many studies report cost savings to the health systems. Further studies on safety aspects of teleoncology are needed to further improve the current models. Future teleoncology models would need to include Web-based models, mobile technologies and remote chemotherapy supervision models so that patients from most rural towns could have at least some of their cancer care closer to home. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The spatial limitations of current neutral models of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rampal S Etienne

    Full Text Available The unified neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography is increasingly accepted as an informative null model of community composition and dynamics. It has successfully produced macro-ecological patterns such as species-area relationships and species abundance distributions. However, the models employed make many unrealistic auxiliary assumptions. For example, the popular spatially implicit version assumes a local plot exchanging migrants with a large panmictic regional source pool. This simple structure allows rigorous testing of its fit to data. In contrast, spatially explicit models assume that offspring disperse only limited distances from their parents, but one cannot as yet test the significance of their fit to data. Here we compare the spatially explicit and the spatially implicit model, fitting the most-used implicit model (with two levels, local and regional to data simulated by the most-used spatially explicit model (where offspring are distributed about their parent on a grid according to either a radially symmetric Gaussian or a 'fat-tailed' distribution. Based on these fits, we express spatially implicit parameters in terms of spatially explicit parameters. This suggests how we may obtain estimates of spatially explicit parameters from spatially implicit ones. The relationship between these parameters, however, makes no intuitive sense. Furthermore, the spatially implicit model usually fits observed species-abundance distributions better than those calculated from the spatially explicit model's simulated data. Current spatially explicit neutral models therefore have limited descriptive power. However, our results suggest that a fatter tail of the dispersal kernel seems to improve the fit, suggesting that dispersal kernels with even fatter tails should be studied in future. We conclude that more advanced spatially explicit models and tools to analyze them need to be developed.

  8. Modeling of leakage currents in high-k dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegert, Gunther Christian

    2012-03-15

    Leakage currents are one of the major bottlenecks impeding the downscaling efforts of the semiconductor industry. Two core devices of integrated circuits, the transistor and, especially, the DRAM storage capacitor, suffer from the increasing loss currents. In this perspective a fundamental understanding of the physical origin of these leakage currents is highly desirable. However, the complexity of the involved transport phenomena so far has prevented the development of microscopic models. Instead, the analysis of transport through the ultra-thin layers of high-permittivity (high-k) dielectrics, which are employed as insulating layers, was carried out at an empirical level using simple compact models. Unfortunately, these offer only limited insight into the physics involved on the microscale. In this context the present work was initialized in order to establish a framework of microscopic physical models that allow a fundamental description of the transport processes relevant in high-k thin films. A simulation tool that makes use of kinetic Monte Carlo techniques was developed for this purpose embedding the above models in an environment that allows qualitative and quantitative analyses of the electronic transport in such films. Existing continuum approaches, which tend to conceal the important physics behind phenomenological fitting parameters, were replaced by three-dimensional transport simulations at the level of single charge carriers. Spatially localized phenomena, such as percolation of charge carriers across pointlike defects, being subject to structural relaxation processes, or electrode roughness effects, could be investigated in this simulation scheme. Stepwise a self-consistent, closed transport model for the TiN/ZrO{sub 2} material system, which is of outmost importance for the semiconductor industry, was developed. Based on this model viable strategies for the optimization of TiN/ZrO{sub 2}/TiN capacitor structures were suggested and problem areas

  9. On the horizontal counter current model for multi fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Chan Eok; Sohn, Jong Joo [KEPCO E and C Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ransom, V. H. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Through the time/volume averaging technique, one can get the interfacial forces caused by the volume fraction gradients in the horizontal channel or horizontal counter current model (HCC). But, in reality, there are still very diverse differences in modeling the term and in applying the term in the computer programs. Table I shows five different results for the estimation of the period for the circular cavity filled with saturated water of 10Mpa, in which the vapor volume fraction is linearly perturbed with {proportional_to}=0.06(x/...0.5) from base value of 0.5 along the length x, as depicted in the Fig.1. The length (L) and the diameter (H) of the cavity are 10m and 0.5m respectively. It was found that the virtual mass coefficients, different models and mistakes in the documents are three main sources of the differences.

  10. Assessing the Efficacy of the SWAT Auto-Irrigation Function to Simulate Irrigation, Evapotranspiration, and Crop Response to Management Strategies of the Texas High Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the semi-arid Texas High Plains, the underlying Ogallala Aquifer is experiencing continuing decline due to long-term pumping for irrigation with limited recharge. Accurate simulation of irrigation and other associated water balance components are critical for meaningful evaluation of the effects of irrigation management strategies. Modelers often employ auto-irrigation functions within models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. However, some studies have raised concerns as to whether the function is able to adequately simulate representative irrigation practices. In this study, observations of climate, irrigation, evapotranspiration (ET, leaf area index (LAI, and crop yield derived from an irrigated lysimeter field at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory at Bushland, Texas were used to evaluate the efficacy of the SWAT auto-irrigation functions. Results indicated good agreement between simulated and observed daily ET during both model calibration (2001–2005 and validation (2006–2010 periods for the baseline scenario (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency; NSE ≥ 0.80. The auto-irrigation scenarios resulted in reasonable ET simulations under all the thresholds of soil water deficit (SWD triggers as indicated by NSE values > 0.5. However, the auto-irrigation function did not adequately represent field practices, due to the continuation of irrigation after crop maturity and excessive irrigation when SWD triggers were less than the static irrigation amount.

  11. Modeling Neutral-Current Neutrino Interactions in Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Cynthia; Scholberg, Kate; Conley, Erin; Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Studies of supernova neutrinos provide knowledge of neutrino oscillations and supernova physics. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will enable exploration of the three-flavor model of neutrino physics and solve questions in regards to the dynamics of supernova, the stability of matter, and matter-antimatter asymmetry. DUNE will use a Liquid Argon Time-Projection Chamber (LArTPC) which will be able to detect charged-current, neutral-current, and elastic-scattering interactions. The neutral current ν-40 Ar interaction leaves an excited 40 Ar nucleus that releases a 9.8 MeV gamma which is analyzed for the LArTPC. This project creates a smearing file for SNOwGLoBES, an event rate calculator, that corresponds to the DUNE detector simulation for this interaction. The expected number of neutral current supernova neutrino events in liquid 40 Ar is determined and the observable energy distribution is examined. NSF REU Program (NSF-PHY-1461204).

  12. The morpho-agronomic characterization study of Lens culinaris germplasm under salt marsh habitat in Swat, Pakistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabia Noor; Shujaul Mulk Khan; Fayaz Ahmad; Murtaza Hussain; Elsayed Fathi Abd_Allah; Abdulaziz A. Alqarawi; Abeer Hashem; Abdullah Aldubise

    2017-01-01

    The present research study evaluate and identify the most suitable and high yielding genotypes of Lens culinaris for the salt marsh habitat of Swat in moist temperate sort of agro climatic environment of Pakistan...

  13. MEPAS exposure model updates to meet current EPA guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software package developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a management tool to screen the many potential hazardous waste problems at DOE facilities across the country. The program considers both radioactive and chemical pollutants in estimating potential human health risks based on site-specific waste, environmental transport, and exposure characteristics. To support various DOE programs, recent modifications have been made to MEPAS to increase its applicability in analyzing the problems of mixed hazardous waste. Such analyses are needed to evaluate remediation options for mixed hazardous waste sites. This paper presents an overview of the MEPAS program and summarizes the current models used to translate environmental concentration values into projected intake by humans and, finally, into estimates of health risk. The recent modifications are described consistent with current EPA guidance for exposure and human health impact assessment.

  14. Modeling of current distribution on smooth and columnar platinum structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinola, Carlos F

    2011-01-17

    Studying the growth and stability of anisotropic or isotropic disordered surfaces in electrodeposition is of importance in catalytic electrochemistry. In some cases, the metallic nature of the electrode defines the topography and roughness, which are also controlled by the experimental time and applied external potential. Because of the experimental restrictions in conventional electrochemical techniques and ex situ electron microscopies, a theoretical model of the surface geometry could aid in understanding the electrodeposition process and current distributions. In spite of applying a complex theory such as dynamic scaling method or perturbation theories, the resolution of mixed mass-/charge-transfer equations (tertiary distribution) for the electrodeposition process would give reliable information. One of the main problems with this type of distribution is the mathematics when solving the spatial n-dimensional differential equations. Use of a primary current distribution is proposed here to simplify the differential equations; however it limits wide application of the first assumption. Distributions of concentration profile, current density, and electrode potential are presented here as a function of the distance normal to the surface for the cases of smooth and rough platinum growth. In the particular case of columnar surfaces, cycloid curves are used to model the electrode, from which the concentration profile is presented in a parameterized form after solving a first-type curvilinear integral. The concentration contour results in a combination of a trigonometric inverse function and a linear distribution leading to a negative concavity curve. The calculation of the current density and electrode potential contours also show trigonometric shapes exhibiting forbidden imaginary values only at the minimal values of the trochoid curve. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Animal models of transcranial direct current stimulation: Methods and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark P; Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Kronberg, Gregory; Ling, Doris; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of animal research using direct current stimulation (DCS) to our understanding of the physiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We comprehensively address experimental methodology in animal studies, broadly classified as: (1) transcranial stimulation; (2) direct cortical stimulation in vivo and (3) in vitro models. In each case advantages and disadvantages for translational research are discussed including dose translation and the overarching "quasi-uniform" assumption, which underpins translational relevance in all animal models of tDCS. Terminology such as anode, cathode, inward current, outward current, current density, electric field, and uniform are defined. Though we put key animal experiments spanning decades in perspective, our goal is not simply an exhaustive cataloging of relevant animal studies, but rather to put them in context of ongoing efforts to improve tDCS. Cellular targets, including excitatory neuronal somas, dendrites, axons, interneurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells are considered. We emphasize neurons are always depolarized and hyperpolarized such that effects of DCS on neuronal excitability can only be evaluated within subcellular regions of the neuron. Findings from animal studies on the effects of DCS on plasticity (LTP/LTD) and network oscillations are reviewed extensively. Any endogenous phenomena dependent on membrane potential changes are, in theory, susceptible to modulation by DCS. The relevance of morphological changes (galvanotropy) to tDCS is also considered, as we suggest microscopic migration of axon terminals or dendritic spines may be relevant during tDCS. A majority of clinical studies using tDCS employ a simplistic dose strategy where excitability is singularly increased or decreased under the anode and cathode, respectively. We discuss how this strategy, itself based on classic animal studies, cannot account for the

  16. Animal Models of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Methods and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark P.; Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Kronberg, Gregory; Ling, Doris; Parra, Lucas C.; Bikson, Marom

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of animal research using direct current stimulation (DCS) to our understanding of the physiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We comprehensively address experimental methodology in animal studies, broadly classified as: 1) transcranial stimulation; 2) direct cortical stimulation in vivo and 3) in vitro models. In each case advantages and disadvantages for translational research are discussed including dose translation and the overarching “quasi-uniform” assumption, which underpins translational relevance in all animal models of tDCS. Terminology such as anode, cathode, inward current, outward current, current density, electric field, and uniform are defined. Though we put key animal experiments spanning decades in perspective, our goal is not simply an exhaustive cataloging of relevant animal studies, but rather to put them in context of ongoing efforts to improve tDCS. Cellular targets, including excitatory neuronal somas, dendrites, axons, interneurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells are considered. We emphasize neurons are always depolarized and hyperpolarized such that effects of DCS on neuronal excitability can only be evaluated within subcellular regions of the neuron. Findings from animal studies on the effects of DCS on plasticity (LTP/LTD) and network oscillations are reviewed extensively. Any endogenous phenomena dependent on membrane potential changes are, in theory, susceptible to modulation by DCS. The relevance of morphological changes (galvanotropy) to tDCS is also considered, as we suggest microscopic migration of axon terminals or dendritic spines may be relevant during tDCS. A majority of clinical studies using tDCS employ a simplistic dose strategy where excitability is singularly increased or decreased under the anode and cathode, respectively. We discuss how this strategy, itself based on classic animal studies, cannot account for the

  17. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael R

    2015-06-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi.

  18. Maternal hypothyroidism: An overview of current experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-10-15

    Maternal hypothyroidism (MH) is the most common cause of transient congenital hypothyroidism. Different animal models are used for assessing developmental effects of MH in offspring. The severity and status of hypothyroidism in animal models must be a reflection of the actual conditions in humans. To obtain comparable results with different clinical conditions, which lead to MH in humans, several factors have been suggested for researchers to consider before designing the experimental models. Regarding development of fetal body systems during pregnancy, interference at different times provides different results and the appropriate time for induction of hypothyroidism should be selected based on accurate time of development of the system under assessment. Other factors that should be taken into consideration include, physiological and biochemical differences between humans and other species, thyroid hormone-independent effects of anti-thyroid drugs, circadian rhythms in TSH secretion, sex differences, physical and psychological stress. This review addresses essential guidelines for selecting and managing the optimal animal model for MH as well as discussing the pros and cons of currently used models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using SWAT and Fuzzy TOPSIS to Assess the Impact of Climate Change in the Headwaters of the Segura River Basin (SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Senent-Aparicio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Segura River Basin is one of the most water-stressed basins in Mediterranean Europe. If we add to the actual situation that most climate change projections forecast important decreases in water resource availability in the Mediterranean region, the situation will become totally unsustainable. This study assessed the impact of climate change in the headwaters of the Segura River Basin using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT with bias-corrected precipitation and temperature data from two Regional Climate Models (RCMs for the medium term (2041–2070 and the long term (2071–2100 under two emission scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Bias correction was performed using the distribution mapping approach. The fuzzy TOPSIS technique was applied to rank a set of nine GCM–RCM combinations, choosing the climate models with a higher relative closeness. The study results show that the SWAT performed satisfactorily for both calibration (NSE = 0.80 and validation (NSE = 0.77 periods. Comparing the long-term and baseline (1971–2000 periods, precipitation showed a negative trend between 6% and 32%, whereas projected annual mean temperatures demonstrated an estimated increase of 1.5–3.3 °C. Water resources were estimated to experience a decrease of 2%–54%. These findings provide local water management authorities with very useful information in the face of climate change.

  20. Penalized estimation for proportional hazards models with current status data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minggen; Li, Chin-Shang

    2017-12-30

    We provide a simple and practical, yet flexible, penalized estimation method for a Cox proportional hazards model with current status data. We approximate the baseline cumulative hazard function by monotone B-splines and use a hybrid approach based on the Fisher-scoring algorithm and the isotonic regression to compute the penalized estimates. We show that the penalized estimator of the nonparametric component achieves the optimal rate of convergence under some smooth conditions and that the estimators of the regression parameters are asymptotically normal and efficient. Moreover, a simple variance estimation method is considered for inference on the regression parameters. We perform 2 extensive Monte Carlo studies to evaluate the finite-sample performance of the penalized approach and compare it with the 3 competing R packages: C1.coxph, intcox, and ICsurv. A goodness-of-fit test and model diagnostics are also discussed. The methodology is illustrated with 2 real applications. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. High resolution modelling of the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Logemann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The northward inflow of Atlantic Water through Denmark Strait – the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC – is simulated with a numerical model of the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean. The model uses the technique of adaptive grid refinement which allows a high spatial resolution (1 km horizontal, 10 m vertical around Iceland. The model is used to assess time and space variability of volume and heat fluxes for the years 1997–2003. Passive tracers are applied to study origin and composition of NIIC water masses. The NIIC originates from two sources: the Irminger Current, flowing as part of the sub-polar gyre in 100–500 m depth along the Reykjanes Ridge and the shallow Icelandic coastal current, flowing north-westward on the south-west Icelandic shelf. The ratio of volume flux between the deep and shallow branch is around 2:1. The NIIC continues as a warm and saline branch northward through Denmark Strait where it entrains large amounts of polar water due to the collision with the southward flowing East Greenland Current. After passing Denmark Strait, the NIIC follows the coast line eastward being an important heat source for north Icelandic waters. At least 60% of the temporal temperature variability of north Icelandic waters is caused by the NIIC. The NIIC volume and heat transport is highly variable and depends strongly on the wind field north-east of Denmark Strait. Daily means can change from 1 Sv eastward to 2 Sv westward within a few days. Highest monthly mean transport rates occur in summer when winds from north are weak, whereas the volume flux is reduced by around 50% in winter. Summer heat flux rates can be even three times higher than in winter. The simulation also shows variability on the interannual scale. In particular weak winds from north during winter 2002/2003 combined with mild weather conditions south of Iceland led to anomalous high NIIC volume (+40% and heat flux (+60% rates. In this period, simulated north Icelandic

  2. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  3. Comparison of streamflow prediction skills from NOAH-MP/RAPID, VIC/RAPID and SWAT toward an ensemble flood forecasting framework over large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajib, M. A.; Tavakoly, A. A.; Du, L.; Merwade, V.; Lin, P.

    2015-12-01

    Considering the differences in how individual models represent physical processes for runoff generation and streamflow routing, use of ensemble output is desirable in an operational streamflow estimation and flood forecasting framework. To enable the use of ensemble streamflow, comparison of multiple hydrologic models at finer spatial resolution over a large domain is yet to be explored. The objective of this work is to compare streamflow prediction skills from three different land surface/hydrologic modeling frameworks: NOAH-MP/RAPID, VIC/RAPID and SWAT, over the Ohio River Basin with a drainage area of 491,000 km2. For a uniform comparison, all the three modeling frameworks share the same setup with common weather inputs, spatial resolution, and gauge stations being employed in the calibration procedure. The runoff output from NOAH-MP and VIC land surface models is routed through a vector-based river routing model named RAPID, that is set up on the high resolution NHDPlus reaches and catchments. SWAT model is used with its default tightly coupled surface-subsurface hydrology and channel routing components to obtain streamflow for each NHDPlus reach. Model simulations are performed in two modes, including: (i) hindcasting/calibration mode in which the models are calibrated against USGS daily streamflow observations at multiple locations, and (ii) validation mode in which the calibrated models are executed at 3-hourly time interval for historical flood events. In order to have a relative assessment on the model-specific nature of biases during storm events as well as dry periods, time-series of surface runoff and baseflow components at the specific USGS gauging locations are extracted from corresponding observed/simulated streamflow data using a recursive digital filter. The multi-model comparison presented here provides insights toward future model improvements and also serves as the first step in implementing an operational ensemble flood forecasting framework

  4. Supporting Current Energy Conversion Projects through Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. C.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    The primary goals of current energy conversion (CEC) technology being developed today are to optimize energy output and minimize environmental impact. CEC turbines generate energy from tidal and current systems and create wakes that interact with turbines located downstream of a device. The placement of devices can greatly influence power generation and structural reliability. CECs can also alter the environment surrounding the turbines, such as flow regimes, sediment dynamics, and water quality. These alterations pose potential stressors to numerous environmental receptors. Software is needed to investigate specific CEC sites to simulate power generation and hydrodynamic responses of a flow through a CEC turbine array so that these potential impacts can be evaluated. Moreover, this software can be used to optimize array layouts that yield the least changes to the environmental (i.e., hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics, and water quality). Through model calibration exercises, simulated wake profiles and turbulence intensities compare favorably to the experimental data and demonstrate the utility and accuracy of a fast-running tool for future siting and analysis of CEC arrays in complex domains. The Delft3D modeling tool facilitates siting of CEC projects through optimization of array layouts and evaluation of potential environmental effect all while provide a common "language" for academics, industry, and regulators to be able to discuss the implications of marine renewable energy projects. Given the enormity of any full-scale marine renewable energy project, it necessarily falls to modeling to evaluate how array operations must be addressed in an environmental impact statement in a way that engenders confidence in the assessment of the CEC array to minimize environmental effects.

  5. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  6. Semantic Web applications and tools for the life sciences: SWAT4LS 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Albert; Paschke, Adrian; Romano, Paolo; Marshall, M Scott; Splendiani, Andrea

    2012-01-25

    As Semantic Web technologies mature and new releases of key elements, such as SPARQL 1.1 and OWL 2.0, become available, the Life Sciences continue to push the boundaries of these technologies with ever more sophisticated tools and applications. Unsurprisingly, therefore, interest in the SWAT4LS (Semantic Web Applications and Tools for the Life Sciences) activities have remained high, as was evident during the third international SWAT4LS workshop held in Berlin in December 2010. Contributors to this workshop were invited to submit extended versions of their papers, the best of which are now made available in the special supplement of BMC Bioinformatics. The papers reflect the wide range of work in this area, covering the storage and querying of Life Sciences data in RDF triple stores, tools for the development of biomedical ontologies and the semantics-based integration of Life Sciences as well as clinicial data.

  7. Public Administration: Modernizing The Current Model Of State Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii V. Ohotskii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Applying the method of retrospective analysis the article deals with the process of forming the scientific fundamentals and the search by the international community of effective and adequate to the current stage of social development public administration system. The author attempts to analyze, in a number of cases in terms of models, features of public administration systems at different stages of historical development, drawing attention to reasons why the Soviet model of public administration did not manage to meet competition, did not provide the required social effect and as a natural result suffered a defeat in the global confrontation between the two social systems. Current models and theoretical concepts of public administration, especially the "new public administration", which became scientific basis for administrative reforms implemented in many countries, are the particular subject of scientific analysis. The author draws attention to major comprehensive characteristics of modern state public administration: making it impossible to absolutize principles of traditional hierarchy system of forced administration; globalization - gradual destruction of boundaries between national and international levels of administration, the growing role of supranational subjects of administration relations; informatization - increasing importance of information and communication technologies and of political networks: development of civil society, especially political parties and non-governmental organizations, growing public involvement in discussion and adoption of the most important administrative decisions; making the state policy more pluralistic and which will result in the formation of nonlinear - humanistic social consciousness as the intellectual basis of modern social governance. The author's position is that Russia is yet to solve the issue of choosing a public administration model that would be effective for further administrative

  8. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: MODERNIZING THE CURRENT MODEL OF STATE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii V. Ohotskii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Applying the method of retrospective analysis the article deals with the process of forming the scientific fundamentals and the search by the international community of effective and adequate to the current stage of social development public administration system. The author attempts to analyze, in a number of cases in terms of models, features of public administration systems at different stages of historical development, drawing attention to reasons why the Soviet model of public administration did not manage to meet competition, did not provide the required social effect and as a natural result suffered a defeat in the global confrontation between the two social systems. Current models and theoretical concepts of public administration, especially the "new public administration", which became scientific basis for administrative reforms implemented in many countries, are the particular subject of scientific analysis. The author draws attention to major comprehensive characteristics of modern state public administration: making it impossible to absolutize principles of traditional hierarchy system of forced administration; globalization - gradual destruction of boundaries between national and international levels of administration, the growing role of supranational subjects of administration relations; informatization - increasing importance of information and communication technologies and of political networks: development of civil society, especially political parties and non-governmental organizations, growing public involvement in discussion and adoption of the most important administrative decisions; making the state policy more pluralistic and which will result in the formation of nonlinear - humanistic social consciousness as the intellectual basis of modern social governance. The author's position is that Russia is yet to solve the issue of choosing a public administration model that would be effective for further administrative

  9. Lessons from the Current Japanese Triple Helix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Hosono

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since mid-1990s, the Japanese government has encouraged university-industry collaboration to foster innovations for economic growth. Learning from the American licensing model of technology transfer, Japanese Bay-Dole Act and TLO (Technology Licensing Organization Act were enacted in late 1990s. In addition, the corporatization of Japanese National Universities (JNUs in 2004 spurred their technology-transfer activities to obtain external funds. As a result, more than 50 TLOs has been established since FY1998, and also the number of patent application and licensed patents were increased at JUNs rapidly after FY2004. However, the licensing income has been stayed poor and some of TLOs were abolished. There are few evidences that the introduction of licensing model of technology transfer into Japan could contribute to innovation properly. Therefore, this study will try to clarify if licensing model of technology transfer work in Japan by analyzing the Japanese National University (JNU patent. There are 20,485 applied patent, which invented by JNU’s researcher(s from FY2004 to 2007. 38% of them were applied by solely by JNUs and 52% were by JNU and Private Firms etc. In the Japanese Patent Act, jointly applied patents are not licensed to the third party without the consent of co-applicant(s. Hence, more than half of the patent invented by JNU researchers is not basically used for patent licensing. Consequently, JNUs and TLOs face difficulties in patent licensing under the current Patent Act.

  10. Impacts of Climate and Land Use/Cover Change on Streamflow Using SWAT and a Separation Method for the Xiying River Basin in Northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the effects of climate change and land use/cover change (LUCC on streamflow promotes the long-term water planning and management in the arid regions of northwestern China. In this paper, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and a separation approach were used to evaluate and separate the effects of climate change and LUCC on streamflow in the Xiying River basin. The SWAT model was calibrated by the hydro-meteorological data from 1980–1989 to obtain the optimum parameters, which were validated by the subsequent application to the period between 1990–2008. Moreover, streamflow under several scenarios with different climate change and land use conditions in 1990–2008 and 2010–2069 were further investigated. Results indicate that, in the period of 1990–2008, the streamflow was dominated by climate change (i.e., changes in precipitation and temperature, which led to a 102.8% increase in the mean annual streamflow, whereas LUCC produced a decrease of 2.8%. Furthermore, in the future period of 2010–2039, the mean annual streamflow will decrease by 5.4% and 4.5% compared with the data of 1961–1990 under scenarios A2 and B2, respectively, while it will decrease by 21.2% and 16.9% in the period of 2040–2069, respectively.

  11. SWAT-MODSIM-PSO optimization of multi-crop planning in the Karkheh River Basin, Iran, under the impacts of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidoon, Majid; Koch, Manfred

    2018-02-24

    Agriculture is one of the environmental/economic sectors that may adversely be affected by climate change, especially, in already nowadays water-scarce regions, like the Middle East. One way to cope with future changes in absolute as well as seasonal (irrigation) water amounts can be the adaptation of the agricultural crop pattern in a region, i.e. by planting crops which still provide high yields and so economic benefits to farmers under such varying climate conditions. To do this properly, the whole cascade starting from climate change, effects on hydrology and surface water availability, subsequent effects on crop yield, agricultural areas available, and, finally, economic value of a multi-crop cultivation pattern must be known. To that avail, a complex coupled simulation-optimization tool SWAT-LINGO-MODSIM-PSO (SLMP) has been developed here and used to find the future optimum cultivation area of crops for the maximization of the economic benefits in five irrigation-fed agricultural plains in the south of the Karkheh River Basin (KRB) southwest Iran. Starting with the SWAT distributed hydrological model, the KR-streamflow as well as the inflow into the Karkheh-reservoir, as the major storage of irrigation water, is calibrated and validated, based on 1985-2004 observed discharge data. In the subsequent step, the SWAT-predicted streamflow is fed into the MODSIM river basin Decision Support System to simulate and optimize the water allocation between different water users (agricultural, environmental, municipal and industrial) under standard operating policy (SOP) rules. The final step is the maximization of the economic benefit in the five agricultural plains through constrained PSO (particle swarm optimization) by adjusting the cultivation areas (decision variables) of different crops (wheat, barley, maize and "others"), taking into account their specific prizes and optimal crop yields under water deficiency, with the latter computed in the LINGO

  12. Current models of care for disorders of sex development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakou, Andreas; Dessens, Arianne; Bryce, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    of 78 (63 %) clinicians, in 75 centres, from 38 countries responded to the survey. A formal national network for managing DSD was reported to exist in 12 (32 %) countries. The paediatric specialists routinely involved in the initial evaluation of a newborn included: endocrinologist (99 %), surgeon......BACKGROUND: To explore the current models of practice in centres delivering specialist care for children with disorders of sex development (DSD), an international survey of 124 clinicians, identified through DSDnet and the I-DSD Registry, was performed in the last quarter of 2014. RESULTS: A total...... hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency by 50 and 55 % clinicians, respectively. CONCLUSION: DSD centres report a high level of interaction at an international level, have access to specialist staff and are increasingly relying on molecular genetics for routine diagnostics. The quality of care provided...

  13. Atlantis model outputs - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  14. Current amplification models of sensorineurall and conductive hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main function of a hearing aid is to improve auditory and language abilities of hearing impaired users. The amplification model has to be adapted according to age, degree and type of hearing loss. The goal of this paper is to analyze the current amplification models of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss which can provide a high quality of speech perception and sounds at any degree of hearing loss. The BAHA is a surgically implantable system for treatment of conductive hearing loss that works through direct bone conduction. BAHA is used to help people with chronic ear infections, congenital external auditory canal atresia and single sided deafness who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. The last generation of hearing aid for sensorineural hearing loss is cochlear implant. Bimodal amplification improves binaural hearing. Hearing aids alone do not make listening easier in all situations. The things that can interfere with listening are background noises, distance from a sound and reverberation or echo. The device used most often today is the Frequency Modulated (FM system.

  15. Lessons from the Current Japanese Triple Helix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Hosono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since mid-1990s, the Japanese government has encouraged university-industry collaboration to foster innovations for economic growth. Learning from the American licensing model of technology transfer, Japanese Bay-Dole Act and TLO (Technology Licensing Organization Act were enacted in late 1990s. In addition, the corporatization of Japanese National Universities (JNUs in 2004 spurred their technology-transfer activities to obtain external funds. As a result, more than 50 TLOs has been established since FY1998, and also the number of patent application and licensed patents were increased at JUNs rapidly after FY2004. However, the licensing income has been stayed poor and some of TLOs were abolished. There are few evidences that the introduction of licensing model of technology transfer into Japan could contribute to innovation properly. Therefore, this study will try to clarify if licensing model of technology transfer work in Japan by analyzing the Japanese National University (JNU patent. There are 20,485 applied patent, which invented by JNU’s researcher(s from FY2004 to 2007. 38% of them were applied by solely by JNUs and 52% were by JNU and Private Firms etc. In the Japanese Patent Act, jointly applied patents are not licensed to the third party without the consent of co-applicant(s. Hence, more than half of the patent invented by JNU researchers is not basically used for patent licensing. Consequently, JNUs and TLOs face difficulties in patent licensing under the current Patent Act. Keywords: Technology Transfer, TLO, University Patent, Japan

  16. Temporal-spatial distribution of non-point source pollution in a drinking water source reservoir watershed based on SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of drinking water source reservoirs has a close relationship between regional economic development and people’s livelihood. Research on the non-point pollution characteristics in its watershed is crucial for reservoir security. Tang Pu Reservoir watershed was selected as the study area. The non-point pollution model of Tang Pu Reservoir was established based on the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool model. The model was adjusted to analyse the temporal-spatial distribution patterns of total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP. The results showed that the loss of TN and TP in the reservoir watershed were related to precipitation in flood season. And the annual changes showed an "M" shape. It was found that the contribution of loss of TN and TP accounted for 84.5% and 85.3% in high flow years, and for 70.3% and 69.7% in low flow years, respectively. The contributions in normal flow years were 62.9% and 63.3%, respectively. The TN and TP mainly arise from Wangtan town, Gulai town, and Wangyuan town, etc. In addition, it was found that the source of TN and TP showed consistency in space.

  17. Assessment of future climate change impacts on nonpoint source pollution in snowmelt period for a cold area using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Bian, Jianmin; Zhao, Yongsheng; Tang, Jie; Jia, Zhuo

    2018-02-05

    The source area of Liao River is a typical cold region in northeastern China, which experiences serious problems with agricultural nonpoint source pollution (NPS), it is important to understand future climate change impacts on NPS in the watershed. This issue has been investigated by coupling semi distributed hydrological model (SWAT), statistical downscaling model (SDSM) and global circulation model (GCMs). The results show that annual average temperature would rise by 2.1 °C (1.3 °C) in the 2080 s under scenario RCP8.5 (RCP4.5), and annual precipitation would increase by 67 mm (33 mm). The change in winter temperature and precipitation is most significant with an increase by 0.23 °C/10a (0.17 °C/10a) and 1.94 mm/10a (2.78 mm/10a). The future streamflow, TN and TP loads would decrease by 19.05% (10.59%), 12.27% (8.81%) and 10.63% (6.11%), respectively. Monthly average streamflow, TN and TP loads would decrease from March to November, and increase from December to February. This is because the increased precipitation and temperature in winter, which made the spring snowpack melting earlier. These study indicate the trends of nonpoint source pollution during the snowmelt period under climate change conditions, accordingly adaptation measures will be necessary.

  18. Drought Duration Biases in Current Global Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heewon; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Several droughts in the recent past are characterized by their increased duration and intensity. In particular, substantially prolonged droughts have brought major societal and economic losses in certain regions, yet climate change projections of such droughts in terms of duration is subject to large uncertainties. This study analyzes the biases of drought duration in state-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations from the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Drought durations are defined as negative precipitation anomalies and evaluated with three observation-based datasets in the period of 1901-2010. Large spread in biases of GCMs is commonly found in all regions, with particular strong biases in North East Brazil, Africa, Northern Australia, Central America, Central and Northern Europe, Sahel and Asia. Also in most regions, the interquartile range of bias lies below 0, meaning that the GCMs tend to underestimate drought durations. Meanwhile in some regions such as Western South America, the Amazon, Sahel, West and South Africa, and Asia, considerable inconsistency among the three observation-based datasets were found. These results indicate substantial uncertainties and errors in current GCMs for simulating drought durations as well as a large spread in observation-based datasets, both of which are found to be particularly strong in those regions that are often considered to be hot spots of projected future drying. The underlying sources of these uncertainties need to be identified in further study and will be applied to constrain GCM-based drought projections under climate change.

  19. Future integrated aquifer vulnerability assessment considering land use / land cover and climate change using DRASTIC and SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, W.; Engel, B.; Chaubey, I.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change causes significant changes to temperature regimes and precipitation patterns across the world. Such alterations in climate pose serious risks for not only inland freshwater ecosystems but also groundwater systems, and may adversely affect numerous critical services they provide to humans. All groundwater results from precipitation, and precipitation is affected by climate change. Climate change is also influenced by land use / land cover (LULC) change and vice versa. According to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports, climate change is caused by global warming which is generated by the increase of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the atmosphere. LULC change is a major driving factor causing an increase in GHG emissions. LULC change data (years 2006-2100) will be produced by the Land Transformation Model (LTM) which simulates spatial patterns of LULC change over time. MIROC5 (years 2006-2100) will be obtained considering GCMs and ensemble characteristics such as resolution and trend of temperature and precipitation which is a consistency check with observed data from local weather stations and historical data from GCMs output data. Thus, MIROC5 will be used to account for future climate change scenarios and relationship between future climate change and alteration of groundwater quality in this study. For efficient groundwater resources management, integrated aquifer vulnerability assessments (= intrinsic vulnerability + hazard potential assessment) are required. DRASTIC will be used to evaluate intrinsic vulnerability, and aquifer hazard potential will be evaluated by Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) which can simulate pollution potential from surface and transport properties of contaminants. Thus, for effective integrated aquifer vulnerability assessment for LULC and climate change in the Midwestern United States, future projected LULC and climate data from the LTM and GCMs will be incorporated with DRASTIC and SWAT. It is

  20. Organotypic liver culture models: meeting current challenges in toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCluyse, Edward L; Witek, Rafal P; Andersen, Melvin E; Powers, Mark J

    2012-07-01

    Prediction of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity in humans from in vitro data continues to be a significant challenge for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Generally, conventional in vitro hepatic model systems (i.e. 2-D static monocultures of primary or immortalized hepatocytes) are limited by their inability to maintain histotypic and phenotypic characteristics over time in culture, including stable expression of clearance and bioactivation pathways, as well as complex adaptive responses to chemical exposure. These systems are less than ideal for longer-term toxicity evaluations and elucidation of key cellular and molecular events involved in primary and secondary adaptation to chemical exposure, or for identification of important mediators of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. Progress in implementing a more effective strategy for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and human risk assessment depends on significant advances in tissue culture technology and increasing their level of biological complexity. This article describes the current and ongoing need for more relevant, organotypic in vitro surrogate systems of human liver and recent efforts to recreate the multicellular architecture and hemodynamic properties of the liver using novel culture platforms. As these systems become more widely used for chemical and drug toxicity testing, there will be a corresponding need to establish standardized testing conditions, endpoint analyses and acceptance criteria. In the future, a balanced approach between sample throughput and biological relevance should provide better in vitro tools that are complementary with animal testing and assist in conducting more predictive human risk assessment.

  1. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  2. Geomagnetically induced currents in Uruguay: Sensitivity to modelling parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, R.

    2016-11-01

    According to the traditional wisdom, geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) should occur rarely at mid-to-low latitudes, but in the last decades a growing number of reports have addressed their effects on high-voltage (HV) power grids at mid-to-low latitudes. The growing trend to interconnect national power grids to meet regional integration objectives, may lead to an increase in the size of the present energy transmission networks to form a sort of super-grid at continental scale. Such a broad and heterogeneous super-grid can be exposed to the effects of large GIC if appropriate mitigation actions are not taken into consideration. In the present study, we present GIC estimates for the Uruguayan HV power grid during severe magnetic storm conditions. The GIC intensities are strongly dependent on the rate of variation of the geomagnetic field, conductivity of the ground, power grid resistances and configuration. Calculated GIC are analysed as functions of these parameters. The results show a reasonable agreement with measured data in Brazil and Argentina, thus confirming the reliability of the model. The expansion of the grid leads to a strong increase in GIC intensities in almost all substations. The power grid response to changes in ground conductivity and resistances shows similar results in a minor extent. This leads us to consider GIC as a non-negligible phenomenon in South America. Consequently, GIC must be taken into account in mid-to-low latitude power grids as well.

  3. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  4. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    including, but not limited to, the Mei-Yu/Baiu sudden onset and withdrawal, low-level jet orientation and variability, and orographic forced rainfall. Under anthropogenic climate change many competing factors complicate making robust projections of monsoon changes. Without aerosol effects, increased land-sea temperature contrast suggests strengthened monsoon circulation due to climate change. However, increased aerosol emissions will reflect more solar radiation back to space, which may temper or even reduce the strength of monsoon circulations compared to the present day. A more comprehensive assessment is needed of the impact of black carbon aerosols, which may modulate that of other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Precipitation may behave independently from the circulation under warming conditions in which an increased atmospheric moisture loading, based purely on thermodynamic considerations, could result in increased monsoon rainfall under climate change. The challenge to improve model parameterizations and include more complex processes and feedbacks pushes computing resources to their limit, thus requiring continuous upgrades of computational infrastructure to ensure progress in understanding and predicting the current and future behavior of monsoons.

  5. OpenMP parallelization of a gridded SWAT (SWATG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Hou, Jinliang; Cao, Yongpan; Gu, Juan; Huang, Chunlin

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale, long-term and high spatial resolution simulation is a common issue in environmental modeling. A Gridded Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU)-based Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWATG) that integrates grid modeling scheme with different spatial representations also presents such problems. The time-consuming problem affects applications of very high resolution large-scale watershed modeling. The OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) parallel application interface is integrated with SWATG (called SWATGP) to accelerate grid modeling based on the HRU level. Such parallel implementation takes better advantage of the computational power of a shared memory computer system. We conducted two experiments at multiple temporal and spatial scales of hydrological modeling using SWATG and SWATGP on a high-end server. At 500-m resolution, SWATGP was found to be up to nine times faster than SWATG in modeling over a roughly 2000 km2 watershed with 1 CPU and a 15 thread configuration. The study results demonstrate that parallel models save considerable time relative to traditional sequential simulation runs. Parallel computations of environmental models are beneficial for model applications, especially at large spatial and temporal scales and at high resolutions. The proposed SWATGP model is thus a promising tool for large-scale and high-resolution water resources research and management in addition to offering data fusion and model coupling ability.

  6. Transformer core modeling for magnetizing inrush current investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yahiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The inrush currents generated during an energization of power transformer can reach very high values and may cause many problems in power system. This magnetizing inrush current which occurs at the time of energization of a transformer is due to temporary overfluxing in the transformer core. Its magnitude mainly depends on switching parameters such as the resistance of the primary winding and the point-on-voltage wave (switching angle. This paper describes a system for measuring the inrush current which is composed principally of an acquisition card (EAGLE, and LabVIEW code. The system is also capable of presetting various combinations of switching parameters for the energization of a 2 kVA transformer via an electronic card. Moreover, an algorithm for calculating the saturation curve is presented taking the iron core reactive losses into account, thereby producing a nonlinear inductance. This curve is used to simulate the magnetizing inrush current using the ATP-EMTP software.

  7. A Fine Resolution Model of the Leeuwin Current System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boedeker, Scott

    2001-01-01

    .../s to 1 cm/s in the LCS. The second experiment, which highlights the effect of annual wind forcing on a flat bottom with horizontally averaged climatology, portrays some classical features of eastern boundary currents...

  8. Birkeland Currents: A Force-Free Field-Aligned Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental vector calculus definition of a force-free, field-aligned current in space is expanded in cylindrical coordinates to directly obtain the Bessel partial differential equation that specifies the magnetic field created by such a current. This result is often called the Lundquist solution. A simple but detailed derivation is included here. The physical properties of the resulting intricate magnetic field structure are described. The cause of its characteristic counter-rotation and counter-flows are identified. The describ- ing equations are put into state-variable form and a step-wise approximation is applied. This solution reveals the primary effect of the force-free parameter, , as being a scale factor of radial distance. We show that: 1 both the axial and azimuthal magnetic and current density components cyclically reverse their directions with radial distance from the central axis of the current; 2 the magnetic field extends farther from the central axis within a force-free field than it would if produced by a current in a long straight conductor. The total magnetic field magnitude and current density are shown to vary inversely as the square root of r . For large r , outside the plasma, the azimuthal magnetic field is shown to vary as 1 = r . These results are shown to be consistent with laboratory and astronomical observations.

  9. Land use change modelling: current practice and research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Schot, P.; Dijst, M.J.; Veldkamp, A.

    2004-01-01

    Land use change models are tools to support the analysis of the causes and consequences of land use dynamics. Scenario analysis with land use models can support land use planning and policy. Numerous land use models are available, developed from different disciplinary backgrounds. This paper reviews

  10. A new 3D fully wave-current model MARS-WAVEWATCH : development, validation and application to the rip currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A.; Ardhuin, F.; Dumas, F.; Bonneton, P.

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of waves with three-dimensional current structure is investigated using a two-way coupled modelling system combining MARS3D (Lazure and Dumas 2008) with WAVEWATCH III (Tolman 2008, Ardhuin et al. 2009) , a wave model (NOAA/NCEP, Tolman 2008). After a basic validation in two dimensions, the flow model MARS3D was adapted with three options that solve for the total momentum (Mellor 2003, 2008) or the quasi-Eulerian momentum (Ardhuin et al. 2008b). Adiabatic model results show that, as expected from theory (Ardhuin et al. 2008a), the total momentum fluxes parameterized by Mellor are not self-consistent and can lead to very large errors (Bennis and Ardhuin 2010). We thus use the model option to solve for the quasi-Eulerian momentum, including sources of momentum and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The influence of these TKE sources is investigated in the case of the NSTS experiment (Thornton and Guza, 1986). The feedback of the currents on the waves is negligible in this case. The sources of TKE from wave breaking and wave bottom friction are found to have strong influence on the bottom friction, in a way consistent with the parameterizations by Longuet-Higgins (1970) and Mellor (2002). The complete model is then applied to a real case of a large rip current on the South-West coast of France (Bruneau et al., Cont. Shelf Res. 2009). The breaking of waves on the opposed current generates a strong coupling on the rip current that partially controls the strength of the current and it three-dimensional shape.

  11. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  12. Modeling Current Transfer from PV Modules Based on Meteorological Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Smith, Ryan; Kurtz, Sarah; Jordan, Dirk; Wohlgemuth, John

    2016-11-21

    Current transferred from the active cell circuit to ground in modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID) stress is analyzed with respect to meteorological data. Duration and coulombs transferred as a function of whether the module is wet (from dew or rain) or the extent of uncondensed surface humidity are quantified based on meteorological indicators. With this, functions predicting the mode and rate of coulomb transfer are developed for use in estimating the relative PID stress associated with temperature, moisture, and system voltage in any climate. Current transfer in a framed crystalline silicon module is relatively high when there is no condensed water on the module, whereas current transfer in a thin-film module held by edge clips is not, and displays a greater fraction of coulombs transferred when wet compared to the framed module in the natural environment.

  13. Understanding the Current 30-Year Shipbuilding Plan Through Three Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    HOW TO ANALYZE A DECISION Graham Alison broke new ground with his book Essence of Decision about the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis (1971). In his work...matter utilizing Graham Allison’s approach from his work, Essence of Decision. Through the lenses of rational actor model, organizational behavior model...the matter utilizing Graham Allison’s approach from his work, Essence of Decision. Through the lenses of rational actor model, organizational

  14. Application of alternating current impedance to fuel cell modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, T.E.

    1999-05-02

    AC impedance has provided a useful diagnostic tool in the Los Alamos polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) program. The author reviews the techniques he has used in ac impedance modeling. These techniques include equation implementation, model simplification and verification, least squares fitting, application of two-dimensional Laplace equation solvers handling complex interfacial boundary conditions, and interpretation of impedance features. The separate features of the complete electrode model are explained by analytic examples.

  15. Integrative systems modeling and multi-objective optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents a number of algorithms, tools, and methods for utilizing multi-objective optimization within integrated systems modeling frameworks. We first present innovative methods using a genetic algorithm to optimally calibrate the VELMA and SWAT ecohydrological ...

  16. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    golovchanskiy, I.A.; Bol'ginov, V.V.; Stolyarov, V.S.; Abramov, N.N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O.V.; Stolyarov, B.S.; Kupriyanov, M..Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Ryazanov, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal

  17. Covariance of light-front models: pair current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de; Frederico, T.; Naus, H.W.L.; Sauer, P.U.

    1999-01-01

    We compute the + component, i.e., j+ = j0 + j3, of the electromagnetic current of a composite spin-one two-fermion system for vanishing momentum transfer component q+ = q0 + q3. In particular, we extract the nonvanishing pair production amplitude on the light-front. It is a consequence of the

  18. The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Buell

    2008-09-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

  19. Current and Predicted Fertility using Poisson Regression Model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Our study which formulates a model to predict future fertility in Nigeria was basically conceived to fill the gap. Understanding population, its determinants, growth ...... extreme cases. In conclusion, it is evident from this study that. Poisson regression model is an applicable tool for predicting number of children a woman is.

  20. The Spatial Limitations of Current Neutral Models of Biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Rosindell, James

    2011-01-01

    The unified neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography is increasingly accepted as an informative null model of community composition and dynamics. It has successfully produced macro-ecological patterns such as species-area relationships and species abundance distributions. However, the models

  1. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  2. Current status of GFZ's operational Earth System model GFZESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Robert; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2017-04-01

    GFZ revised his operational Earth system model GFZESM to provide in quasi-real-time a consistent product data-set of gravity variations, Earth rotation excitation, and surface load deformations related to modeled atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrological mass re-distributions. ECMWFs ERA Interim and operational atmospheric data is reduced to a fixed defined high-resolution reference topography in order to avoid inconsistencies between different ECMWF model setups and due to routinely updated orography background models in the operational atmospheric data. Consistently with the new GRACE de-aliasing product AOD1B release 06 the modeled mass re-distributions from atmospheric surface pressure (ECMWF)and oceanic bottom pressure (calculated by the oceanic model MPIOM) are corrected for tidal signals and the inverse barometric effect over the ocean. In combination with the hydrological model LSDM, the following consistent set of operational products is provided daily: GRACE AOD1B release 06 spherical harmonic coefficients (d/o 180, 3h); Earth rotation excitation AAM (3h), OAM (3h), and HAM (24); non-tidal Loading Surface Deformations NTAL (0.5°, 3h), NTOL (0.5°, 3h), and HYDL(0.5°, 24h). In addition, 6-day forecasts for all the products are available.

  3. Testing Benjamin Graham’s net current asset value model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongsoo An

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to empirically test one of Graham’s investment methods based on the net current asset value (NCAV. The NCAV is truly unique, and conservative, and commonly known as the net-net method.  The ratio of the net current asset value to market value (NCAV/MV was employed in this study to test a stock’s performance comparing to the performance of S&P 500 as the market index. We used all stocks in Portfolio123 whose raw data were supplied by Compustat, Standard & Poors, Capital IQ, and Reuters for the period of January 2, 1999 to August 31, 2012. The overall results show that the firms with high net current asset values outperform the market. These results are strong in the up market. It can be argued that the firms with a high NCAV/MV ratio are likely to move toward their fundamental value and generate high excess return because its stock prices are now undervalued. The implications of the study are: (a a positive NCAV/MV ratio may be a good indicator of the underpriced security; (b investing in the growth period and avoiding the downturn period leads investors to earn much higher returns from the firms with a high NCAV/MV ratio; and (c The NCAV/MV strategy requires a longer holding period of the portfolio in order to generate excess returns.

  4. Analysis of Eddy Resolving Model of the California Current System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cipriano, Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution, multi-level, primitive equation ocean model is used to investigate the combined role of seasonal wind forcing, thermohaline gradients, and coastline irregularities on the formation...

  5. The Integrated Landscape Modeling partnership - Current status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; Scherff, Eric J.

    2016-01-28

    The Integrated Landscape Modeling (ILM) partnership is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify, evaluate, and develop models to quantify services derived from ecosystems, with a focus on wetland ecosystems and conservation effects. The ILM partnership uses the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) modeling platform to facilitate regional quantifications of ecosystem services under various scenarios of land-cover change that are representative of differing conservation program and practice implementation scenarios. To date, the ILM InVEST partnership has resulted in capabilities to quantify carbon stores, amphibian habitat, plant-community diversity, and pollination services. Work to include waterfowl and grassland bird habitat quality is in progress. Initial InVEST modeling has been focused on the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the United States; future efforts might encompass other regions as data availability and knowledge increase as to how functions affecting ecosystem services differ among regions.The ILM partnership is also developing the capability for field-scale process-based modeling of depressional wetland ecosystems using the Agricultural Policy/Environmental Extender (APEX) model. Progress was made towards the development of techniques to use the APEX model for closed-basin depressional wetlands of the PPR, in addition to the open systems that the model was originally designed to simulate. The ILM partnership has matured to the stage where effects of conservation programs and practices on multiple ecosystem services can now be simulated in selected areas. Future work might include the continued development of modeling capabilities, as well as development and evaluation of differing conservation program and practice scenarios of interest to partner agencies including the USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). When

  6. Current approaches to model extracellular electrical neural microstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eJoucla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, high-density microelectrode arrays provide unprecedented possibilities to precisely activate spatially well-controlled central nervous system (CNS areas. However, this requires optimizing stimulating devices, which in turn requires a good understanding of the effects of microstimulation on cells and tissues. In this context, modeling approaches provide flexible ways to predict the outcome of electrical stimulation in terms of CNS activation. In this paper, we present state-of-the-art modeling methods with sufficient details to allow the reader to rapidly build numerical models of neuronal extracellular microstimulation. These include 1 the computation of the electrical potential field created by the stimulation in the tissue, and 2 the response of a target neuron to this field. Two main approaches are described: First we describe the classical hybrid approach that combines the finite element modeling of the potential field with the calculation of the neuron’s response in a cable equation framework (compartmentalized neuron models. Then, we present a whole finite element approach allows the simultaneous calculation of the extracellular and intracellular potentials, by representing the neuronal membrane with a thin-film approximation. This approach was previously introduced in the frame of neural recording, but has never been implemented to determine the effect of extracellular stimulation on the neural response at a sub-compartment level. Here, we show on an example that the latter modeling scheme can reveal important sub-compartment behavior of the neural membrane that cannot be resolved using the hybrid approach. The goal of this paper is also to describe in detail the practical implementation of these methods to allow the reader to easily build new models using standard software packages. These modeling paradigms, depending on the situation, should help build more efficient high-density neural prostheses for CNS rehabilitation.

  7. Effects of HCV proteins in current HCV transgenic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jian; Wang, Jiangbin; Sallberg, Matii

    2010-02-01

    Hepatits C virus (HCV) is an enveloped virus with positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome that causes both acute and persistent infections associated with chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, which needs fully functional human hepatocytes for its development. Due to the strict human tropism of HCV, only human and higher primates such as chimpanzees have been receptive to HCV infection and development, cognition about pathophysiololgy and host immune responses of HCV infection is limited by lacking of simple laboratory models of infection for a long time. During the past decade, gene transfer approaches have been helpful to the understanding of the molecular basis of human disease. Transgenic cell lines, chimeric and transgenic animal models were developed and had been demonstrated their invaluable benefits. This review focuses on the existing HCV transgenic models and summarize the relative results about probable pathophysical changes induced by HCV proteins.

  8. Modeling of the influences of multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive on NTMs in rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Duan, Ping; Liu, Guangrui; Bian, Xingyu

    2017-02-01

    In this work, physical models of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) including bootstrap current and multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive model are applied. Based on the specific physical problems during the suppression of NTMs by driven current, this work compares the efficiency of continuous and modulated driven currents, and simulates the physical processes of multiple modulated driven currents on suppressing rotating magnetic island. It is found that when island rotates along the poloidal direction, the suppression ability of continuous driven current can be massively reduced due to current deposition outside the island separatrix and reverse deposition direction at the X point, which can be avoided by current drive modulation. Multiple current drive has a better suppressing effect than single current drive. This work gives realistic numerical simulations by optimizing the model and parameters based on the experiments, which could provide references for successful suppression of NTMs in future advanced tokamak such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

  9. The Current Status of Kinematic Solar Dynamo Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This review provides a historical overview of how research in kinematic solar dynamo modeling evolved during the last few decades and assesses the present state of research. The early pioneering papers assumed the dynamo to operate in the convection zone. It was suggested in the 1980s that the ...

  10. Current understanding of hypospadias: relevance of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Gerald R; Sinclair, Adriane; Risbridger, Gail; Hutson, John; Baskin, Laurence S

    2015-05-01

    Hypospadias is a congenital abnormality of the penile urethra with an incidence of approximately 1:200-1:300 male births, which has doubled over the past three decades. The aetiology of the overwhelming majority of hypospadias remains unknown but appears to be a combination of genetic susceptibility and prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors. Reliable animal models of hypospadias are required for better understanding of the mechanisms of normal penile urethral formation and hence hypospadias. Mice and/or rats are generally used for experimental modelling of hypospadias, however these do not fully reflect the human condition. To use these models successfully, researchers must understand the similarities and differences between mouse, rat and human penile anatomy as well as the normal morphogenetic mechanisms of penile development in these species. Despite some important differences, numerous features of animal and human hypospadias are shared: the prevalence of distal penile malformations; disruption of the urethral meatus; disruption of urethra-associated erectile bodies; and a common mechanism of impaired epithelial fusion events. Rat and mouse models of hypospadias are crucial to our understanding of hypospadias to ultimately reduce its incidence through better preventive strategies.

  11. The Current Status of Kinematic Solar Dynamo Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    kinematic solar dynamo modeling evolved during the last few decades and assesses the present state of research. .... towards the equator, early dynamo theorists used to choose their parameters in such a way that the inequality (5) was .... sunspots and weak magnetic fields in a unified way. We are, however, still far from.

  12. Dynamic causal models of neural system dynamics: current state ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-09-28

    Sep 28, 2006 ... Keywords. Dynamic causal modelling; EEG; effective connectivity; event-related potentials; fMRI; neural system ... In this article, we review the conceptual and mathematical basis of DCM and its implementation for functional magnetic resonance imaging data and event-related potentials. After introducing ...

  13. A self-discharge model of Lithium-Sulfur batteries based on direct shuttle current measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Stroe, Daniel Loan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef

    2016-01-01

    . A simple but comprehensive mathematical model of the Li-S battery cell self-discharge based on the shuttle current was developed and is presented. The shuttle current values for the model parameterization were obtained from the direct shuttle current measurements. Furthermore, the battery cell depth...

  14. Current state of the mass storage system reference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Robert

    1993-01-01

    IEEE SSSWG was chartered in May 1990 to abstract the hardware and software components of existing and emerging storage systems and to define the software interfaces between these components. The immediate goal is the decomposition of a storage system into interoperable functional modules which vendors can offer as separate commercial products. The ultimate goal is to develop interoperable standards which define the software interfaces, and in the distributed case, the associated protocols to each of the architectural modules in the model. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: IEEE SSSWG organization; IEEE SSSWG subcommittees & chairs; IEEE standards activity board; layered view of the reference model; layered access to storage services; IEEE SSSWG emphasis; and features for MSSRM version 5.

  15. Higher Order Geometrical Modeling and Higher Order Field/Current Modeling in FEM, MoM, and PO Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Notaros, Branislav M; Ilic, Milan M; Djordjevic, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    ...), method of moments (MoM), and physical optics (PO). The simulations combine higher order geometrical modeling and higher order field/current modeling, which is referred to as double-higher-order modeling...

  16. HD 96446: a puzzle for current models of magnetospheres?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, C.; Landstreet, J. D.; Alecian, E.; Owocki, S.; Kochukhov, O.; Bohlender, D.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    Context. Oblique magnetic dipole fields have been detected in Bp stars for several decades, and more recently also in normal massive stars. In the past decade, it has been established that stellar magnetospheres form through the channelling and confinement of an outflowing stellar wind by the stellar magnetic field. This explains specific properties of magnetic massive stars, such as their rotationally modulated photometric light curve, Hα emission, UV spectra, and X-ray emission. Aims: In the framework of the MiMeS (Magnetism in Massive Stars) project, four HARPSpol observations of the magnetic Bp star HD 96446 have been obtained. HD 96446 is very similar to σ Ori E, the prototype of centrifugally supported rigidly rotating magnetospheres (CM) and is therefore a perfect target to study the validity of this model. Methods: We first updated the basic parameters of HD 96446 and studied its spectral variability. We then analysed the HARPSpol spectropolarimetric observations using the LSD (Least-Squares Deconvolution) technique to derive the longitudinal magnetic field and Zeeman signatures in various types of lines. With LTE spectrum modelling, we derived constraints on the field modulus, the rotational velocity, and the inclination angle, and measured non-solar abundances of several elements which we checked with NLTE modelling. Finally, we calculated the magnetic confinement and Alfvén and Kepler radii from the stellar magnetic field and rotation properties, and we examined the various types of magnetospheres that may be present around HD 96446. Results: We find radial velocity variations with a period around 2.23 h, that we attribute to β Cep-type p-mode pulsations. We detect clear direct magnetic Stokes V signatures with slightly varying values of the longitudinal magnetic field, typical of an oblique dipole rotator, and show that these signatures are not much perturbed by the radial velocity variations. The magnetic confinement parameter and Alfvén radius in

  17. Is it appropriate to model turbidity currents with the Three-Equation Model?

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Peng; He, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Three-Equation Model (TEM) was developed in the 1980s to model turbidity currents (TCs) and has been widely used ever since. However, its physical justification was questioned because self-accelerating TCs simulated with the steady TEM seemed to violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance. This violation was considered as a result of very strong sediment erosion that consumes more turbulent kinetic energy than is produced. To confine bed erosion and thus remedy this issue, the Four-Equation Model (FEM) was introduced by assuming a proportionality between the bed shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy. Here we analytically proof that self-accelerating TCs simulated with the original steady TEM actually never violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance, provided that the bed drag coefficient is not unrealistically low. We find that stronger bed erosion, surprisingly, leads to more production of turbulent kinetic energy due to conversion of potential energy of eroded material into kinetic energy of ...

  18. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and behavioral models of smoking addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige eFraser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While few studies have applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to smoking addiction, existing work suggests that the intervention holds promise for altering the complex system by which environmental cues interact with cravings to drive behavior. Imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS studies suggest that increased dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC activation and integrity may be associated with increased resistance to smoking cues. Anodal tDCS of the DLPFC, believed to boost activation, reduces cravings in response to these cues. The finding that noninvasive stimulation modifies cue induced cravings has profound implications for understanding the processes underlying addiction and relapse. TDCS can also be applied to probe mechanisms underlying and supporting nicotine addiction, as was done in a pharmacologic study that applied nicotine, tDCS, and TMS paired associative stimulation to find that stopping nicotine after chronic use induces a reduction in plasticity, causing difficulty in breaking free from association between cues and cravings. This mini-review will place studies that apply tDCS to smokers in the context of research involving the neural substrates of nicotine addiction.

  19. Current Methods of Natural Hazards Communication used within Catastrophe Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawber, C.; Latchman, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the field of catastrophe modelling, natural hazards need to be explained every day to (re)insurance professionals so that they may understand estimates of the loss potential of their portfolio. The effective communication of natural hazards to city professionals requires different strategies to be taken depending on the audience, their prior knowledge and respective backgrounds. It is best to have at least three sets of tools in your arsenal for a specific topic, 1) an illustration/animation, 2) a mathematical formula and 3) a real world case study example. This multi-faceted approach will be effective for those that learn best by pictorial means, mathematical means or anecdotal means. To show this we will use a set of real examples employed in the insurance industry of how different aspects of natural hazards and the uncertainty around them are explained to city professionals. For example, explaining the different modules within a catastrophe model such as the hazard, vulnerability and loss modules. We highlight how recent technology such as 3d plots, video recording and Google Earth maps, when used properly can help explain concepts quickly and easily. Finally we also examine the pitfalls of using overly-complicated visualisations and in general how counter-intuitive deductions may be made.

  20. Modeling and control of the output current of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a dynamic Matlab SIMULINK model of the relationship between the fuel cell current set point of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell system and the output current of the system is developed. The model contains an estimated fuel cell model, based on a polarization curve and assumed first order...

  1. Modeling of the electron distribution based on bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on PLT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.

    1985-03-01

    Lower hybrid current drive requires the generation of a high energy electron tail anisotropic in velocity. Measurements of bremsstrahlung emission produced by this tail are compared with the calculated emission from reasonable model distributions. The physical basis and the sensitivity of this modeling process are described and the plasma properties of current driven discharges which can be derived from the model are discussed.

  2. On a shallow water model for the simulation of turbidity currents

    OpenAIRE

    Morales de Luna, Tomás; Castro-Díaz, M.J.; Parés Madroñal, C.; Fernández-Nieto, Enrique D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for hyperpycnal plumes or turbidity currents that takes into account the interaction between the turbidity current and the bottom, considering deposition and erosion effects as well as solid transport of particles at the bed load due to the current. Water entrainment from the ambient water in which the turbidity current plunges is also considered. Motion of ambient water is neglected and the rigid lid assumption is considered. The model is obtained as a depth-average system...

  3. Short-run and Current Analysis Model in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Anghelache

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the short-run statistic indicators is a compulsory requirement implied in the current analysis. Therefore, there is a system of EUROSTAT indicators on short run which has been set up in this respect, being recommended for utilization by the member-countries. On the basis of these indicators, there are regular, usually monthly, analysis being achieved in respect of: the production dynamic determination; the evaluation of the short-run investment volume; the development of the turnover; the wage evolution: the employment; the price indexes and the consumer price index (inflation; the volume of exports and imports and the extent to which the imports are covered by the exports and the sold of trade balance. The EUROSTAT system of indicators of conjuncture is conceived as an open system, so that it can be, at any moment extended or restricted, allowing indicators to be amended or even removed, depending on the domestic users requirements as well as on the specific requirements of the harmonization and integration. For the short-run analysis, there is also the World Bank system of indicators of conjuncture, which is utilized, relying on the data sources offered by the World Bank, The World Institute for Resources or other international organizations statistics. The system comprises indicators of the social and economic development and focuses on the indicators for the following three fields: human resources, environment and economic performances. At the end of the paper, there is a case study on the situation of Romania, for which we used all these indicators.

  4. Diversity and use of ethno-medicinal plants in the region of Swat, North Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naveed; Rashid, Abdur; Murad, Waheed; Bergmeier, Erwin

    2013-04-15

    Due to its diverse geographical and habitat conditions, northern Pakistan harbors a wealth of medicinal plants. The plants and their traditional use are part of the natural and cultural heritage of the region. This study was carried out to document which medicinal plant species and which plant parts are used in the region of Swat, which syndrome categories are particularly concerned, and which habitat spectrum is frequented by collectors. Finally, we assessed to which extent medicinal plants are vulnerable due to collection and habitat destruction. An ethnobotanical survey was undertaken in the Miandam area of Swat, North Pakistan. Data were collected through field assessment as well as from traditional healers and locals by means of personal interviews and semi-structured questionnaires. A total of 106 ethno-medicinal plant species belonging to 54 plant families were recorded. The most common growth forms were perennial (43%) and short-lived herbs (23%), shrubs (16%), and trees (15%). Most frequently used plant parts were leaves (24%), fruits (18%) and subterranean parts (15%). A considerable proportion of the ethno-medicinal plant species and remedies concerns gastro-intestinal disorders. The remedies were mostly prepared in the form of decoction or powder and were mainly taken orally. Eighty out of 106 ethno-medicinal plants were indigenous. Almost 50% of the plants occurred in synanthropic vegetation while slightly more than 50% were found in semi-natural, though extensively grazed, woodland and grassland vegetation. Three species (Aconitum violaceum, Colchicum luteum, Jasminum humile) must be considered vulnerable due to excessive collection. Woodlands are the main source for non-synanthropic indigenous medicinal plants. The latter include many range-restricted taxa and plants of which rhizomes and other subterranean parts are dug out for further processing as medicine. Medicinal plants are still widely used for treatment in the area of Swat. Some species of

  5. Modelling and analysis of the transformer current resonance in dual active bridge converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zian; Shen, Zhan; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Due to the parasitic capacitances of the transformer and inductor in Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converters, resonance happens in the transformer currents. This high frequency resonant current flowing into the full bridges will worsen their soft-switching performance and thereby reduce its efficiency....... In order to study the generation mechanism of this current resonance, the impedance of the transformer and inductor with parasitic components is modelled in this digest. Then, based on the impedance model, an approach is proposed to mitigate the current resonance. Finally, both the impedance model...... and the current resonance mitigation approach are verified by simulated results....

  6. Blended learning in anesthesia education: current state and future model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Jaya; Kurup, Viji

    2012-12-01

    Educators in anesthesia residency programs across the country are facing a number of challenges as they attempt to integrate blended learning techniques in their curriculum. Compared with the rest of higher education, which has made advances to varying degrees in the adoption of online learning anesthesiology education has been sporadic in the active integration of blended learning. The purpose of this review is to discuss the challenges in anesthesiology education and relevance of the Universal Design for Learning framework in addressing them. There is a wide chasm between student demand for online education and the availability of trained faculty to teach. The design of the learning interface is important and will significantly affect the learning experience for the student. This review examines recent literature pertaining to this field, both in the realm of higher education in general and medical education in particular, and proposes the application of a comprehensive learning model that is new to anesthesiology education and relevant to its goals of promoting self-directed learning.

  7. Persistent current and Drude weight for the one-dimensional Hubbard model from current lattice density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, A; Sanvito, S

    2012-02-08

    The Bethe ansatz local density approximation (LDA) to lattice density functional theory (LDFT) for the one-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model is extended to current-LDFT (CLDFT). The transport properties of mesoscopic Hubbard rings threaded by a magnetic flux are then systematically investigated by this scheme. In particular we present calculations of ground state energies, persistent currents and Drude weights for both a repulsive homogeneous and a single impurity Hubbard model. Our results for the ground state energies in the metallic phase compare favorably well with those obtained with numerically accurate many-body techniques. Also the dependence of the persistent currents on the Coulomb and the impurity interaction strength, and on the ring size are all well captured by LDA-CLDFT. Our study demonstrates the value of CLDFT in describing the transport properties of one-dimensional correlated electron systems. As its computational overheads are rather modest, we propose this method as a tool for studying problems where both disorder and interaction are present.

  8. Thin embedded current sheets: Cluster observations of ion kinetic structure and analytical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic structure of embedded thin horizontal current sheets is investigated. Current density estimated by curlometer technique is in general agreement with a sum of electron and proton currents. Embedding of observed thin current sheets in the much wider plasma sheet is apparent in the current density profiles. Ion velocity distributions consist of two parts: the cold non-drifting core likely belongs to the plasma sheet background, while the hotter asymmetric "wings" carry the main portion of the current. Oxygen ions (if present and higher-energy tails of distribution function can contribute up to 30% of the total current. We compared current density profiles across sheets with three typical current sheet models. Models which allow embedding, describe observed structures equally well at the level of experimental accuracy.

  9. Heavy metals in agricultural soils and crops and their health risks in Swat District, northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kifayatullah; Lu, Yonglong; Khan, Hizbullah; Ishtiaq, Muhammad; Khan, Sardar; Waqas, Muhammad; Wei, Luo; Wang, Tieyu

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the concentrations of heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in agricultural soils and crops (fruits, grains and vegetable) and their possible human health risk in Swat District, northern Pakistan. Cd concentration was found higher than the limit (0.05 mg/kg) set by world health organization in 95% fruit and 100% vegetable samples. Moreover, the concentrations of Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn in the soils were shown significant correlations with those in the crops. The metal transfer factor (MTF) was found highest for Cd followed by Cr>Ni>Zn>Cu>Mn, while the health risk assessment revealed that there was no health risk for most of the heavy metals except Cd, which showed a high level of health risk index (HRI⩾10E-1) that would pose a potential health risk to the consumers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing ways to combat eutrophication in a Chinese drinking water reservoir using SWAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders; Trolle, Dennis; Me, W

    2013-01-01

    Across China, nutrient losses associated with agricultural production and domestic sewage have triggered eutrophication, and local managers are challenged to comply with drinking water quality requirements. Evidently, the improvement of water quality should be targeted holistically and encompass...... both point sources and surface activities within the watershed of a reservoir. We expanded the ordinary Soil Water Assessment Tool – (SWAT) with a widely used empirical equation to estimate total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in lakes and reservoirs. Subsequently, we examined the effects of changes...... in land and livestock management and sewage treatment on nutrient export and derived consequences for water quality in the Chinese subtropical Kaiping (Dashahe) drinking water reservoir (supplying 0.4 million people). The critical load of TP was estimated to 13.5 tonnes yr–1 in order to comply...

  11. IMPROVING MODEL OF CHANNEL AIRBORN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM OF ALTERNATING CURRENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Artemenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to math modeling of channel of alternating current airborne electrical power-supply system. Mathematical modeling of generator, voltage regulator, constant speed drive is considered.

  12. Positive feedback : exploring current approaches in iterative travel demand model implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the models that TxDOTs Transportation Planning and Programming Division (TPP) developed are : traditional three-step models (i.e., trip generation, trip distribution, and traffic assignment) that are sequentially : applied. A limitation...

  13. Modelling and analysis of the transformer current resonance in dual active bridge converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zian; Shen, Zhan; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Due to the parasitic capacitances of the transformer and inductor in Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converters, resonance happens in the transformer currents. This high frequency resonant current flowing into the full bridges will worsen their soft-switching performance and thereby reduce its efficiency....... In order to study the generation mechanism of this current resonance, the impedance of the transformer and inductor with parasitic components is modelled in this digest. Then, based on the impedance model, an approach is proposed to mitigate the current resonance. Finally, both the impedance model...

  14. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 100-231 Tg yr-1 [1] and for which the Boreal and Arctic regions make a significant contribution [2, 3]. The recent review by Melton et al. [4] has provided a summary of the current state of knowledge on the modelling of wetlands and the outcome of the WETCHIMP model intercomparison exercise. Melton et al. found a large variation in the wetland areas and associated methane emissions from the participating models and varying responses to climate change. In this paper, we report results from offline runs of two land surface models over Scandinavia (JULES, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator [5, 6] and HYBRID8 [7]), using the same driving meteorological dataset (CRU-NCEP) for the period from January 1980 to December 2010. Although the two land surface models are very different, both models have used a TOPMODEL approach to derive the wetland area and have similar parameterisations of the methane wetland emissions. We find that both models give broadly similar results. They underestimate the wetland areas over Northern Scandinavia, compared to remote sensing and map-based datasets of wetlands [8]. This leads to lower predicted methane emissions compared to those observed on the ground and from aircraft [9]. We will present these findings and identify possible reasons for the underprediction. We will show the sensitivity to using the observed wetland areas to improve the methane emission estimates. References [1] Denman, K., et al.,: Couplings Between Changes in the Climate System and Biogeochemistry, In Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, 2007; [2] Smith, L. C., et al.: Siberian peatlands a net carbon sink and global methane source since the early

  15. Analysis and Modeling of Circulating Current in Two Parallel-Connected Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Gohil, Ghanshyamsinh Vijaysinh; Bede, Lorand

    2015-01-01

    this model, the circulating current between two parallel-connected inverters is analysed in this study. The peak and root mean square (rms) values of the normalised circulating current are calculated for different PWM methods, which makes this analysis a valuable tool to design a filter for the circulating......-width modulation (PWM). However, the interleaved PWM causes a circulating current between the inverters, which in turn causes additional losses. A model describing the dynamics of the circulating current is presented in this study which shows that the circulating current depends on the common-mode voltage. Using...... current. The peak and rms values of the circulating current are plotted for different PWM methods, and a discontinuous PWM is identified which offers the minimum peak and rms value of the circulating current. Experimental results are presented to verify the analysis....

  16. Evaluation of flow regime of turbidity currents entering Dez Reservoir using extended shallow water model

    OpenAIRE

    Valery Ivanovich ELFIMOV; Hamid KHAKZAD

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the performance of the extended shallow water model (ESWM) in evaluation of the flow regime of turbidity currents entering the Dez Reservoir was investigated. The continuity equations for fluid and particles and the Navier-Stokes equations govern the entire flow of turbidity currents. The shallow water equations governing the flow of the depositing phase of turbidity currents are derived from these equations. A case study was conducted on the flow regime of turbidity currents e...

  17. Predictive model for wave-induced currents and 3D beach evolution based on FAVOR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Kuroiwa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of a numerical model using the fractional area/volume obstacle representation (FAVOR method for predicting a nearshore current field bounded by complicated geometric shapes, and a three-dimensional (3D beach evolution was described in this article. The 3D model was first tested against three cases to simulate the nearshore current fields around coastal structures, a river mouth, and a large scale cusp bathymetry. Then, the morphodynamic model tests, which are adopting the nearshore current model, were applied for the computations of beach evolution around a detached breakwater and two groins. It was confirmed that the presented model associated with the FAVOR method was useful to predict the nearshore current field in the vicinity of the complicated geometric shapes. Finally, the model was applied to a tombolo formation in a field site of Kunnui fishery port, which is located in Hokkaido, Japan.

  18. Development of a Coupled Ocean-Hydrologic Model to Simulate Pollutant Transport in Singapore Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive agricultural, economic and industrial activities in Singapore and Malaysia have made our coastal areas under high risk of water pollution. A coupled ocean-hydrologic model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of flow and pollutant transport in Singapore coastal waters. The hydrologic SWAT model is coupled with the coastal ocean SUNTANS model by outputting streamflow and pollutant concentrations from the SWAT model and using them as inputs for the SUNTANS model at common boundary points. The coupled model is calibrated with observed sea surface elevations and velocities, and high correlation coefficients that exceed 0.97 and 0.91 are found for sea surface elevations and velocities, respectively. The pollutants are modeled as Gaussian passive tracers, and are released at five upstream locations in Singapore coastal waters. During the Northeast monsoon, pollutants released in Source 1 (Johor River), Source 2 (Tiram River), Source 3 (Layang River) and Source 4 (Layau River) enter the Singapore Strait after 4 days of release and reach Sentosa Island within 9 days. Meanwhile, pollutants released in Source 5 (Kallang River) reach Sentosa Island after 4 days. During the Southwest monsoon, the dispersion time is roughly doubled, with pollutants from Sources 1 - 4 entering the Singapore Strait only after 12 days of release due to weak currents.

  19. Suggested improvements for ship-installation collision risk models to reflect current collision avoidance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Flohberger, Margaret Loudon

    2010-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology Accurate quantification of risks for vessel-to-platform collisions has been a goal of the petroleum industry for many years; however, technological advances in collision avoidance systems have not been reflected in current models. Additionally, new modeling theories have been developed which capture the complexities of modern socio-technical systems. This paper recommends that a new collision model be developed to reflect current collision...

  20. Suggested improvements for ship-installation collision risk models to reflect current collision avoidance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Flohberger, Margaret Loudon

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of risks for vessel-to-platform collisions has been a goal of the petroleum industry for many years; however, technological advances in collision avoidance systems have not been reflected in current models. Additionally, new modeling theories have been developed which capture the complexities of modern socio-technical systems. This paper recommends that a new collision model be developed to reflect current collision avoidance systems. Today’s navigati...

  1. Higher-spin currents in the Gross-Neveu model at 1/n{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manashov, A.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Skvortsov, E.D. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Lebedev Institue of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    We calculate the anomalous dimensions of higher-spin currents, both singlet and non-singlet, in the Gross - Neveu model at the 1/n{sup 2} order. It was conjectured that in the critical regime this model is dual to a higher-spin gauge theory on AdS{sub 4}. The AdS/CFT correspondence predicts that the masses of higher-spin fields correspond to the scaling dimensions of the singlet currents in the Gross - Neveu model.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Eddy-Current Loss for a New Induction Heating Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new induction heating device is presented in this paper. This device can convert mechanical energy into heat energy by utilizing eddy currents, which are induced by rotating permanent magnets. A mathematical model is established for estimating eddy-current loss of the device. The distribution of induced currents and the resultant magnetic field intensity are considered in the process of modeling the eddy-current loss and so is the mutual influence of the electric field between neighborhood pole projection areas. Particularly, the skin effect is considered by correcting the numerical integral domain of eddy current density, which has great effect on the calculating results. Based on specific examples, the effectiveness and correctness of proposed model are proved by finite element analysis. The results show that the mathematical model can provide important reference for design and structure optimization of the device.

  3. Magnetic mapping and Birkeland currents in the Toffoletto-Hill and Tsyganenko magnetosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cheng; Hill, T. W.; Toffoletto, F. R.

    1994-09-01

    We investigate the mapping of magnetic flux tubes between the high-latitude ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere, using the Toffoletto and Hill (1989) theoretical model and the Tsyganenko (1987, 1989) empirical models. In all models, strong distortion of flux tubes occurs near the magnetopause and in the distant tail. These effects are illustrated for various interplanetary magnetic field directions in the Toffoletto and Hill (1989) model and for various Kp values in the Tsyganenko (1987, 1989) model. We calculate the Birkeland current that is actually present in each model (from Ampere's law), as well as the Birkeland current that would be implied if the model were in magnetostatic equilibrium with isotropic plasma pressure (from the Vasyliunas equation). Comparison of the actual and implied Birkeland currents indicates that no physically significant Birkeland current is included in any of the models tested. Each model contains a 'noise' component of Birkeland current that is, however, much smaller in magnitude than the 'real' Birkeland currents that remain to be included.

  4. Magnetic mapping and Birkeland currents in the Toffoletto-Hill and Tsyganenko magnetosphere models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, C.; Hill, T.W. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Toffoletto, F.R. [La Trobe Univ., Victoria (Australia)

    1994-09-01

    The authors investigate the mapping of magnetic flux tubes between the high-latitude ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere, using the Toffoletto and Hill theoretical model and the Tsyganenko empirical models. In all models, strong distortion of flux tubes occurs near the magnetopause and in the distant tail. These effects are illustrated for various interplanetary magnetic field directions in the Toffoletto and Hill model and for various Kp values in the Tsyganenko model. The authors calculate the Birkeland current that is actually present in each model (from Ampere`s law), as well as the Birkeland current that would be implied if the model were in magnetostatic equilibrium with isotropic plasma pressure (from the Vasyliunas equation). Comparison of the actual and implied Birkeland currents indicates that no physically significant Birkeland current is included in any of the models tested. Each model contains a {open_quotes}noise{close_quotes} component of Birkeland current that is, however, much smaller in magnitude that the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} Birkeland currents that remain to be included. 31 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Overview of the Current State-of-the-Art for Bioaccumulation Models in Marine Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Weijs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Information regarding the (toxicokinetics of a chemical in organisms can be integrated in mathematical equations thereby creating bioaccumulation models. Such models can reconstruct previous exposure scenarios, provide a framework for current exposures and predict future situations. As such, they are gaining in popularity for risk assessment purposes. Since marine mammals are protected, the modeling process is different and more difficult to complete than for typical model organisms, such as rodents. This review will therefore discuss the currently available models for marine mammals, address statistical issues and knowledge gaps, highlight future perspectives and provide general do’s and don’ts.

  6. Enhanced QSAR models for drug-triggered inhibition of the main cardiac ion currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniowska, Barbara; Mendyk, Aleksander; Szlęk, Jakub; Kołaczkowski, Michał; Polak, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The currently changing cardiac safety testing paradigm suggests, among other things, a shift towards using in silico models of cellular electrophysiology and assessment of a concomitant block of multiple ion channels. In this study, a set of four enhanced QSAR models have been developed: for the rapid delayed rectifying potassium current (IKr), slow delayed rectifying potassium current (IKs), peak sodium current (INa) and late calcium current (ICaL), predicting ion currents changes for the specific in vitro experiment from the 2D structure of the compounds. The models are a combination of both in vitro study parameters and physico-chemical descriptors, which is a novel approach in drug-ion channels interactions modeling. Their predictive power assessed in the enhanced, more demanding than standard procedure, 10-fold cross validation was reasonably high. Rough comparison with published pure in silico hERG interaction models shows that the quality of the model predictions does not differ from other models available in the public domain, however, it takes its advantage in accounting for inter-experimental settings variability. Developed models are implemented in the Cardiac Safety Simulator, a commercially available platform enabling the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of the drugs proarrhythmic effect and ECG simulation. A more comprehensive assessment of the effects of the compounds on ion channels allows for making more informed decisions regarding the risk - and thus avoidance - of exclusion of potentially safe and effective drugs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Modeling of switching regulator power stages with and without zero-inductor-current dwell time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, F. C. Y.; Yu, Y.

    1979-01-01

    State-space techniques are employed to derive accurate models for the three basic switching converter power stages: buck, boost, and buck/boost operating with and without zero-inductor-current dwell time. A generalized procedure is developed which treats the continuous-inductor-current mode without dwell time as a special case of the discontinuous-current mode when the dwell time vanishes. Abrupt changes of system behavior, including a reduction of the system order when the dwell time appears, are shown both analytically and experimentally. Merits resulting from the present modeling technique in comparison with existing modeling techniques are illustrated.

  8. THE MATHEMATIC MODEL OF POTENTIAL RELAXATION IN COULOSTATIC CONDITIONS FOR LIMITING DIFFUSION CURRENT CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Kapitonov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of coulostatic relaxation of the potential for solid metallic electrode was presented. The solution in the case of limiting diffusion current was obtained. On the basis of this model the technique of concentration measurements for heavy metal ions in diluted solutions was suggested. The model adequacy was proved by experimental data.

  9. Single-layer skull approximations perform well in transcranial direct current stimulation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2013-01-01

    In modeling the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation, the representation of the skull is an important factor. In a spherical model, we compared a realistic skull modeling approach, in which the skull consisted of three isotropic layers, to anisotropic and isotropic single-layer

  10. A Closer Evaluation of Current Methods in Psychiatric Assessments: A Challenge for the Biopsychosocial Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tavakoli, Hamid R.

    2009-01-01

    The biopsychosocial model, the current method in psychiatric assessments, is reviewed and critiqued. The history and original intents leading to the conception of the biopsychosocial model are briefly discussed. Five inherent problems with the use of the biopsychosocial model in psychiatric assessments and training programs are presented. Two alternative approaches are discussed and promoted for clinical, educational, and research practices in medicine.

  11. A closer evaluation of current methods in psychiatric assessments: a challenge for the biopsychosocial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Hamid R

    2009-02-01

    The biopsychosocial model, the current method in psychiatric assessments, is reviewed and critiqued. The history and original intents leading to the conception of the biopsychosocial model are briefly discussed. Five inherent problems with the use of the biopsychosocial model in psychiatric assessments and training programs are presented. Two alternative approaches are discussed and promoted for clinical, educational, and research practices in medicine.

  12. Operational prediction of rip currents using numerical model and nearshore bathymetry from video images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, L.; Van Ormondt, M.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    Rip currents are one of the most dangerous coastal hazards for swimmers. In order to minimize the risk, a coastal operational-process based-model system can be utilized in order to provide forecast of nearshore waves and currents that may endanger beach goers. In this paper, an operational model for rip current prediction by utilizing nearshore bathymetry obtained from video image technique is demonstrated. For the nearshore scale model, XBeach1 is used with which tidal currents, wave induced currents (including the effect of the wave groups) can be simulated simultaneously. Up-to-date bathymetry will be obtained using video images technique, cBathy 2. The system will be tested for the Egmond aan Zee beach, located in the northern part of the Dutch coastline. This paper will test the applicability of bathymetry obtained from video technique to be used as input for the numerical modelling system by comparing simulation results using surveyed bathymetry and model results using video bathymetry. Results show that the video technique is able to produce bathymetry converging towards the ground truth observations. This bathymetry validation will be followed by an example of operational forecasting type of simulation on predicting rip currents. Rip currents flow fields simulated over measured and modeled bathymetries are compared in order to assess the performance of the proposed forecast system.

  13. A new parametrized model of the global horizontal and vertical ionospheric current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils; Reistad, Jone P.; Tenfjord, Paul; Snekvik, Kristian; Østgaard, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    We present a newly developed global empirical model of the ionospheric magnetic disturbance field, and the associated horizontal and vertical currents. The field is represented in terms of spherical harmonics, parametrized in terms of solar wind drivers, dipole tilt angle, and the F10.7 index. The model parameters are estimated by using magnetic field measurements from ESA's CHAMP and Swarm missions. The model represents an improvement compared to other empirical models of ionospheric currents by the following three characteristics: 1) Distortions due to Earth's main magnetic field are taken into account and essentially corrected for by use of magnetic apex coordinates. This allows us to interpret resulting currents independently of longitudinal, hemispheric, and temporal variations in the Earth's magnetic field. 2) We do not impose any symmetry between hemispheres, so that inter-hemispheric differences can be investigated. 3) We estimate both the Birkeland currents (and its closure) and the horizontal divergence-free currents (the equivalent current) simultaneously. They can be combined to calculate the true height-integrated horizontal current. This is only possible, without additional data or assumptions, because we use magnetic field measurements from low Earth orbit. In this presentation we compare modeled magnetic field perturbations at ground and in space with independent observations. We find that the total field aligned currents in the model are very well correlated with the total currents measured by AMPERE. We also show that, on time scales of > 1h, the model is well correlated with measured ground magnetic field perturbations. Neither AMPERE nor any ground magnetometers were used to estimate model coefficients.

  14. A numerical shallow-water model for gravity currents for a wide range of density differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki A.; Koyaguchi, Takehiro; Suzuki, Yujiro J.

    2017-12-01

    Gravity currents with various contrasting densities play a role in mass transport in a number of geophysical situations. The ratio of the density of the current, ρ c, to the density of the ambient fluid, ρ a, can vary between 100 and 103. In this paper, we present a numerical method of simulating gravity currents for a wide range of ρ c/ ρ a using a shallow-water model. In the model, the effects of varying ρ c/ ρ a are taken into account via the front condition (i.e., factors describing the balance between the driving pressure and the ambient resistance pressure at the flow front). Previously, two types of numerical models have been proposed to solve the front condition. These are referred to here as the Boundary Condition (BC) model and the Artificial Bed (AB) model. The front condition is calculated as a boundary condition at each time step in the BC model, whereas it is calculated by setting a thin artificial bed ahead of the front in the AB model. We assessed the BC and AB models by comparing their numerical results with the analytical results for a simple case of homogeneous currents. The results from the BC model agree well with the analytical results when ρ c/ ρ a≲102, but the model tends to overestimate the speed of the front position when ρ c/ρ a≳102. In contrast, the AB model generates good approximations of the analytical results for ρ c/ρ a≳ 102, given a sufficiently small artificial bed thickness, but fails to reproduce the analytical results when ρ c/ ρ a≲102. Therefore, we propose a numerical method in which the BC model is used for currents with ρ c/ ρ a≲102 and the AB model is used for currents with ρ c/ρ a≳ 102.

  15. Improved Model for Increased Surface Recombination Current in Irradiated Bipolar Junction Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, H. J.; Vermeire, B.; Campola, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Current gain degradation in irradiated bipolar junction transistors is primarily due to excess base current caused by enhanced carrier recombination in the emitter-base space-charge region (SCR). Radiation-induced traps at the interface between silicon and the bipolar base oxide facilitate the recombination process primarily above the sensitive emitter-base junction. This leads to an increase in surface recombination current in the SCR, which is a non-ideal component of the BJT's base current characteristic under active bias conditions. In this paper, we derive a precise analytical model for surface recombination current that captures bias dependencies typically omitted from traditional models. This improved model is validated by comparisons to these traditional approaches.

  16. Harmonic current prediction by impedance modeling of grid-tied inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Heverton A.; Freijedo, Francisco D.; Silva, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    and harmonic voltage profiles. Results reinforce that impedance models can represent with relatively accuracy the harmonic current emitted by the PV plants at the point of common coupling (PCC). Lastly, a stress test is performed to show how a variation in the harmonic voltage phase angle impacts the PV plant...... impedance models when used in harmonic integration studies. It is aimed to estimate the harmonic current contribution as a function of the background harmonic voltages components. Time domain simulations based on detailed and average models are compared with the impedance model developed in frequency domain....... In grids with harmonic voltages, impedance models can predict the current distortion for all active power injection scenarios. Furthermore, measurements in a 1.4 MW PV plant connected in a distributed grid are used to validate the simulation based on impedance models during different power injections...

  17. Currents, HF Radio-derived, SF Bay Outlet, Normal Model, Zonal, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data is the zonal component of ocean surface currents derived from High Frequency Radio-derived measurements, with missing values filled in by a normal model....

  18. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  19. Currents, HF Radio-derived, Ano Nuevo, Normal Model, Zonal, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data is the zonal component of ocean surface currents derived from High Frequency Radio-derived measurements, with missing values filled in by a normal model....

  20. Physical oceanography - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  1. Comprehensive estimation model of MERGE: adaptation to current state of world economy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boris Vadimovich Digas; Valeriy Lvovich Rozenberg

    2013-01-01

    .... The main attention in work is paid to the MERGE model adaptation to a world economy current state, and analysis of possible trajectories of economic development of Russia and studying of consequences...

  2. Modeling Studies of Wind and Thermohaline Forcing on the California Current System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vance, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    A high-resolution, multi-level, primitive equation model is initialized with climatological data to study the combined effects of wind and thermohaline forcing on the ocean circulation of the California Current System (CCS...

  3. Currents, HF Radio-derived, Monterey Bay, Normal Model, Zonal, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data is the zonal component of ocean surface currents derived from High Frequency Radio-derived measurements, with missing values filled in by a normal model....

  4. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  5. Analysis and reduction of the spurious current in a class of multiphase lattice Boltzmann models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiaowen

    2006-04-01

    We show that the spurious current present near a curved interface in a class of multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) models is due to the insufficient isotropy of the discrete gradient operator. A method of obtaining highly isotropic gradient operators on a lattice is given. Numerical simulations show that both the magnitude and the spatial extent of the spurious current are significantly reduced as gradient operators of increasingly higher order of isotropy is adopted in multiphase LB models.

  6. On Calculating the Current-Voltage Characteristic of Multi-Diode Models for Organic Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Ken; Valluri, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an alternative formulation of the exact calculation of the current-voltage characteristic of solar cells which have been modeled with a lumped parameters equivalent circuit with one or two diodes. Such models, for instance, are suitable for describing organic solar cells whose current-voltage characteristic curve has an inflection point, also known as an S-shaped anomaly. Our formulation avoids the risk of numerical overflow in the calculation. It is suitable for implementation in ...

  7. Evaluation of the current state of mechanistic aquatic biogeochemical modeling: citation analysis and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhonditsis, George B; Adams-Vanharn, Barbara A; Nielsen, Leah; Stow, Craig A; Reckhow, Kenneth H

    2006-11-01

    We examined the factors that determine the citations of 153 mechanistic aquatic biogeochemical modeling papers published from 1990 to 2002. Our analysis provides overwhelming evidence that ocean modeling is a dynamic area of the current modeling practice. Models developed to gain insight into the ocean carbon cycle/marine biogeochemistry are most highly cited, the produced knowledge is exported to other cognitive disciplines, and oceanic modelers are less reluctant to embrace technical advances (e.g., assimilation schemes) and more critically increase model complexity. Contrary to our predictions, model application for environmental management issues on a local scale seems to have languished; the pertinent papers comprise a smaller portion of the published modeling literature and receive lower citations. Given the critical planning information that these models aim to provide, we hypothesize that the latter finding probably stems from conceptual weaknesses, methodological omissions, and an evident lack of haste from modelers to adopt new ideas in their repertoire when addressing environmental management issues. We also highlight the lack of significant association between citation frequency and model complexity, model performance, implementation of conventional methodological steps during model development (e.g., validation, sensitivity analysis), number of authors, and country of affiliation. While these results cast doubt on the rationale of the current modeling practice, the fact that the Fasham et al. (1990) paper has received over 400 citations probably dictates what should be done from the modeling community to meet the practical need for attractive and powerful modeling tools.

  8. Comparisons of purely topological model, betweenness based model and direct current power flow model to analyze power grid vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Min

    2013-06-01

    This paper selects three frequently used power grid models, including a purely topological model (PTM), a betweennness based model (BBM), and a direct current power flow model (DCPFM), to describe three different dynamical processes on a power grid under both single and multiple component failures. Each of the dynamical processes is then characterized by both a topology-based and a flow-based vulnerability metrics to compare the three models with each other from the vulnerability perspective. Taking as an example, the IEEE 300 power grid with line capacity set proportional to a tolerance parameter tp, the results show non-linear phenomenon: under single node failures, there exists a critical value of tp = 1.36, above which the three models all produce identical topology-based vulnerability results and more than 85% nodes have identical flow-based vulnerability from any two models; under multiple node failures that each node fails with an identical failure probability fp, there exists a critical fp = 0.56, above which the three models produce almost identical topology-based vulnerability results at any tp ≥ 1, but producing identical flow-based vulnerability results only occurs at fp = . In addition, the topology-based vulnerability results can provide a good approximation for the flow-based vulnerability under large fp, and the priority of PTM and BBM to better approach the DCPFM for vulnerability analysis mainly depends on the value of fp. Similar results are also found for other failure types, other system operation parameters, and other power grids.

  9. Evaluation of wind induced currents modeling along the Southern Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohluly, Asghar; Esfahani, Fariba Sadat; Montazeri Namin, Masoud; Chegini, Fatemeh

    2018-02-01

    To improve our understanding of the Caspian Sea hydrodynamics, its circulation is simulated with special focus on wind-driven currents of its southern basin. The hydrodynamic models are forced with a newly developed fine resolution wind field to increase the accuracy of current modeling. A 2D shallow water equation model and a 3D baroclinic model are applied separately to examine the performance of each model for specific applications in the Caspian Sea. The model results are validated against recent field measurements including AWAC and temperature observations in the southern continental shelf region. Results show that the 2D model is able to well predict the depth-averaged current speed in storm conditions in narrow area of southern coasts. This finding suggests physical oceanographers apply 2D modeling as a more affordable method for extreme current speed analysis at the continental shelf region. On the other hand the 3D model demonstrates a better performance in reproducing monthly mean circulation and hence is preferable for surface circulation of Caspian Sea. Monthly sea surface circulation fields of the southern basin reveal a dipole cyclonic-anticyclonic pattern, a dominant eastward current along the southern coasts which intensifies from May to November and a dominant southward current along the eastern coasts in all months except February when the flow is northward. Monthly mean wind fields exhibit two main patterns including a north-south pattern occurring at warm months and collision of two wind fronts especially in the cold months. This collision occurs on a narrow region at the southern continental shelf regions. Due to wind field complexities, it leads to a major source of uncertainty in predicting the wind-driven currents. However, this source of uncertainty is significantly alleviated by applying a fine resolution wind field.

  10. Electric Transfer Function Model of Switched Reluctance Motors and the Model-Based Current Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroki; Komaki, Ryoko; Naitoh, Haruo; Yamaba, Akira; Katoh, Hiroki

    This paper presents a current control design for switched reluctance motors (SRMs). The electric transfer characteristic of the motors is studied first. Their transfer function is brought out to be represented by a pure resistive component, which is not constant but varies depending on the motor current and speed. The current control design for SRMs follows the classical design technique used for dc machines, where the zero of PI controller cancels the pole of Ls+R. Because the transfer function of SRMs does not have any poles, an I controller is suitable for them. The integral gain should be adjusted in order to compensate the non-linearity, that is, the variation in the equivalent resistor of the SRMs' transfer function. The values of the integral gain are tuned and tabulated for the motor speed and current. Simulation and experiment demonstrate that the current and speed of the SRMs presents good responses without dependence on the motor speed and current.

  11. Average circulation, seasonal cycle, and mesoscale dynamics of the Peru Current System: A modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penven, P.; Echevin, V.; Pasapera, J.; Colas, F.; Tam, J.

    2005-10-01

    The Humboldt Current System is the most productive of the eastern boundary currents. In the northern part, the Peru Current System (PCS) is located between 5°S and 20°S. Along the Peruvian coast, an equatorward wind forces a strong coastal upwelling. A high resolution model is designed to investigate the mean circulation, the seasonal cycle, and the mesoscale dynamics for the PCS. The model is able to reproduce the equatorward Peru Coastal Current (PCC), the Peru Chile Under-Current (PCUC) which follows the shelf break towards the pole, and the Peru-Chile Counter-Current (PCCC) which flows directly towards the south and veers to the west around 15°S. While the upper part of the PCUC is close to the surface and might even outcrop as a counter current, the bottom part follows ? isolines. The PCCC appears to be directly forced by the cyclonic wind stress curl. The model is able to produce the upwelling front, the cold water tongue which extends toward the equator and the equatorial front as described in the literature. Model seasonal changes in SST and SSH are compared to measurements. For the central PCS, model EKE is 10% to 30% lower than the observations. The model eddy diameters follow a strong equatorward increase. The injection length scales, derived from the energy spectra, strongly correlate to the Rossby radius of deformation, confirming the predominant role of baroclinic instability. At 3°S, the model solution appears to switch from a turbulent oceanic regime to an equatorial regime dominated by zonal currents.

  12. Plant species and communities assessment in interaction with edaphic and topographic factors; an ecological study of the mount Eelum District Swat, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current analyses of vegetation were aimed to study the different effects of environmental variables and plant species and communities interaction to these variables, identified threats to local vegetation and suggestion for remedial measures in the Mount Eelum, Swat, Pakistan. For assessment of environmental variability quantitative ecological techniques were used through quadrats having sizes of 2 × 2, 5 × 5 and 10 × 10 m2 for herbs, shrubs and trees respectively. Result of the present study revealed 124 plant species in the study area. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was used to analyze the ecological gradient of vegetation. The environmental data and species abundance were used in CANOCO software version 4.5. The presence absence data of plant species were elaborated with Cluster and Two Way Cluster Analysis techniques using PC-ORD version 5 to show different species composition that resulted in five plant communities. Findings indicate that elevation, aspect and soil texture are the strongest variables that have significant effect on species composition and distribution of various communities shown with P value 0.0500. It is recommended to protect and use sensibly whole of the Flora normally and rare species particularly in the region.

  13. Charged-current inclusive neutrino cross sections in the SuperScaling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, M. V., E-mail: martin.inrne@gmail.com [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); Megias, G. D.; Caballero, J. A. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); González-Jiménez, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Barbaro, M. B. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Antonov, A. N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Moya de Guerra, E.; Udías, J. M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain)

    2016-03-25

    SuperScaling model (SuSA) predictions to neutrino-induced charged-current π{sup +} production in the Δ-resonance region are explored under MiniBooNE experimental conditions. The SuSA charged-current π{sup +} results are in good agreement with data on neutrino flux-averaged double-differential cross sections. The SuSA model for quasielastic scattering and its extension to the pion production region are used for predictions of charged-current inclusive neutrino-nucleus cross sections. Results are also compared with the T2K experimental data for inclusive scattering.

  14. A nowcast model for tides and tidal currents in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Smith, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) installed Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) in San Francisco Bay, California to provide observations of tides, tidal currents, and meteorological conditions. PORTS data are used for optimizing vessel operations, increasing margin of safety for navigation, and guiding hazardous material spill prevention and response. Because tides and tidal currents in San Francisco Bay are extremely complex, limited real-time observations are insufficient to provide spatial resolution for variations of tides and tidal currents. To fill the information gaps, a highresolution, robust, semi-implicit, finite-difference nowcast numerical model has been implemented for San Francisco Bay. The model grid and water depths are defined on coordinates based on Mercator projection so the model outputs can be directly superimposed on navigation charts. A data assimilation algorithm has been established to derive the boundary conditions for model simulations. The nowcast model is executed every hour continuously for tides and tidal currents starting from 24 hours before the present time (now) covering a total of 48 hours simulation. Forty-eight hours of nowcast model results are available to the public at all times through the World Wide Web (WWW). Users can view and download the nowcast model results for tides and tidal current distributions in San Francisco Bay for their specific applications and for further analysis.

  15. A self-consistent model for estimating the critical current of superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño, V.; Sirois, F.; Takayasu, M.; Vojenciak, M.; Kario, A.; Grilli, F.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, there is growing interest in using superconducting wires or tapes for the design and manufacture of devices such as cables, coils, rotating machinery, transformers, and fault current limiters, among others. Their high current capacity has made them the candidates of choice for manufacturing compact and light cables and coils that can be used in the large-scale power applications described above. However, the performance of these cables and coils is limited by their critical current, which is determined by several factors, including the conductor’s material properties and the geometric layout of the device itself. In this work we present a self-consistent model for estimating the critical current of superconducting devices. This is of large importance when the operating conditions are such that the self-field produced by the current is a significant fraction of the total field. The model is based on the asymptotic limit when time approaches infinity of Faraday’s equation written in terms of the magnetic vector potential. It uses a continuous E-J relationship and takes the angular dependence of the critical current density on the magnetic flux density into account. The proposed model is used to estimate the critical current of superconducting devices such as cables, coils, and coils made of transposed cables with very high accuracy. The high computing speed of this model makes it an ideal candidate for design optimization.

  16. Test of electical resistivity and current diffusion modelling on MAST and JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, D. L.; Challis, C. D.; Jenkins, I.; Hawkes, N. C.; Lupelli, I.; Michael, C.; de Bock, M. F. M.; the MAST Team; contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the MAST and JET tokamaks intended to compare the electrical resistivity of the plasma with theoretical formulations. The tests consist of obtaining motional stark effect (MSE) measurements in MHD-free plasmas during plasma current ramp-up (JET and MAST), ramp-down (MAST) and in stationary state (JET and MAST). Simulations of these plasmas are then performed in which the current profile evolution is calculated according to the poloidal field diffusion equation (PFDE) with classical or neoclassical resistivity. Synthetic MSE data are produced in the simulations for direct comparison with the experimental data. It is found that the toroidal current profile evolution modelled using neoclassical resistivity did not match the experimental observations on either device during current ramp-up or ramp-down as concluded from comparison of experimental and synthetic MSE profiles. In these phases, use of neoclassical resistivity in the modelling systematically overestimates the rate of current profile evolution. During the stationary state however, the modelled toroidal current profile matched experimental observations to a high degree of accuracy on both devices using neoclassical resistivity. Whilst no solution to the mismatch in the dynamic phases of the plasma is proposed, it is suggested that some physical process other than MHD which is not captured by the simple diffusive model of current profile evolution is responsible.

  17. Estimating reservoir sedimentation using bathymetric differencing and hydrologic modeling in data scarce Koga watershed, Upper Blue Nile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demesew Alemaw Mhiret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Modeling sediment accumulation in constructed reservoirs is hampered by lack of historic sediment concentration data in developing countries. Existing models simulate sediment concentration using data generated from sediment rating curves usually defined as a power function of the form S = aQb This often results in residual errors that are not identically distributed throughout the range of stream flow values adding to uncertainty in sediment modeling practices. This research measure accumulated sediment in Koga dam in the upper Blue Nile Basin and use the result to validate a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT sediment model that uses sediment data from rating curves. Bathymetric differencing of the original and current storage digital elevation models (DEMs indicate that the sediment was accumulating at a rate of 5 ton/ha/year while a calibrated SWAT model resulted in 8.6 ton/ha/year. Given the complicated sediment transport processes that are not fully understood and comparable rates reported in recent studies these results are satisfactory. Keywords: Reservoir sedimentation, Koga reservoir, bathymetry

  18. Method of controlling illumination device based on current-voltage model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    across and current through the LED and the means for generating the activation signal is adapted to generate the activating signal based on the voltage, the current and a current- voltage model related to LED. The current-voltage model defines a relationship between the current, the voltage......The present invention relates to an illumination device comprising a number of LEDs, means for receiving an input signal, means for generating an activation signal for at least one of the LEDs based on the input signal. The illumination device comprises further means for obtaining the voltage...... and the colorimetric properties of said light emitted by LED. The present invention relates also to a method of controlling and a meted of calibrating such illumination device....

  19. Computational electromagnetics and model-based inversion a modern paradigm for eddy-current nondestructive evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbagh, Harold A; Sabbagh, Elias H; Aldrin, John C; Knopp, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    Computational Electromagnetics and Model-Based Inversion: A Modern Paradigm for Eddy Current Nondestructive Evaluation describes the natural marriage of the computer to eddy-current NDE. Three distinct topics are emphasized in the book: (a) fundamental mathematical principles of volume-integral equations as a subset of computational electromagnetics, (b) mathematical algorithms applied to signal-processing and inverse scattering problems, and (c) applications of these two topics to problems in which real and model data are used. By showing how mathematics and the computer can solve problems more effectively than current analog practices, this book defines the modern technology of eddy-current NDE. This book will be useful to advanced students and practitioners in the fields of computational electromagnetics, electromagnetic inverse-scattering theory, nondestructive evaluation, materials evaluation and biomedical imaging. Users of eddy-current NDE technology in industries as varied as nuclear power, aerospace,...

  20. Mishal: A Case Study of a Deradicalization and Emancipation Program in SWAT Valley, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Azam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nestled in the SWAT valley lies Pakistan’s earliest known deradicalization initiative for former militants, the Mishal Deradicalization and Emancipation Program (DREP. The Deradicalization program was launched following a military operation in 2009 against the Pakistan wing of the Taliban, namely, the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP. The program aimed to deradicalize and rehabilitate arrested militants, with what officials claim is a 99 percent success rate and with more than 2,500 former Taliban fighters now ‘reformed’. The program abides by a ‘no blood on hand’ policy, whereby it only takes in militants who have not caused any bodily harm to others. In this paper, we analyze the deradicalization program and highlight the limits and challenges it faces. The paper also highlights the common individual and environmental factors among the beneficiary population of the deradicalization program. This study finds that most participants of the program belonged to large or broken families with weak socio-economic profiles. Additionally, these individuals had very little technical knowledge of religion. This study also finds that the program is more oriented towards re-integration rather than deradicalization due to its policy of inducting only low and mid-level cadre militants. The program also has other severe limitations including lack of credible religious scholars, limited financial and human resources.

  1. Economically and ecologically important plant communities in high altitude coniferous forest of Malam Jabba, Swat, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Hassan; Al Yemeni, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    A study on the economically important plant communities was carried out during summer 2008 in various parts of Malam Jabba valley, Swat. The principal aim of the study was phytosociological evaluation with special reference to the occurrence of commercially important medicinal plant species in coniferous forest of the study area. Secondly to prepare ethnobotanical inventory of the plant resources of the area, as well as to evaluate the conservation status of important medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) through rapid vulnerable assessment (RVA) procedure. The study documented 90 species of ethnobotanical importance, out of these 71 spp used as medicinal plant, 20 spp fodder plant, 10 spp vegetables, 14 spp wild fruit, 18 spp fuel wood, 9 spp furniture and agricultural tools, 9 spp thatching, fencing and hedges, 4 spp honey bee, 2 spp evil eyes, 2 spp religious and 3 spp as poison. Phytosociologically six plant communities were found, comprising five herbs-shrubs-trees communities and one meadow community. Further study is, therefore, required to quantify the availability of species and to suggest suitable method for their production and conservation. Recommendations are also given in the spheres of training in identification, sustainable collection, value addition, trade monitoring and cooperative system of marketing.

  2. Gate leakage current partitioning in nanoscale double gate MOSFETs, using compact analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandy, Ghader; Lime, François; Cerdeira, Antonio; Estrada, Magali; Garduño, Salvador Ivan; Iñiguez, Benjamin

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a compact gate leakage current partitioning model for nanoscale Double Gate (DG) MOSFETs, using analytical models of the direct tunneling gate leakage current. Gate leakage current becomes important and an essential aspect of MOSFET modeling as the gate oxide thickness is scaled down to 1 nm and below in advanced CMOS processes. We considered an ideal interface (ideal case without an interfacial layer) and two layers high k dielectric materials as gate insulators. In the case of two layers, a thin layer of SiO2 as an interfacial layer is considered. The results of the gate current partitioning components into drain and source show good agreement with 2D TCAD numerical device simulation (Silvaco Atlas).

  3. 3-D direct current resistivity anisotropic modelling by goal-oriented adaptive finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Qiu, Lewen; Tang, Jingtian; Wu, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiao; Zhou, Zilong

    2018-01-01

    Although accurate numerical solvers for 3-D direct current (DC) isotropic resistivity models are current available even for complicated models with topography, reliable numerical solvers for the anisotropic case are still an open question. This study aims to develop a novel and optimal numerical solver for accurately calculating the DC potentials for complicated models with arbitrary anisotropic conductivity structures in the Earth. First, a secondary potential boundary value problem is derived by considering the topography and the anisotropic conductivity. Then, two a posteriori error estimators with one using the gradient-recovery technique and one measuring the discontinuity of the normal component of current density are developed for the anisotropic cases. Combing the goal-oriented and non-goal-oriented mesh refinements and these two error estimators, four different solving strategies are developed for complicated DC anisotropic forward modelling problems. A synthetic anisotropic two-layer model with analytic solutions verified the accuracy of our algorithms. A half-space model with a buried anisotropic cube and a mountain-valley model are adopted to test the convergence rates of these four solving strategies. We found that the error estimator based on the discontinuity of current density shows better performance than the gradient-recovery based a posteriori error estimator for anisotropic models with conductivity contrasts. Both error estimators working together with goal-oriented concepts can offer optimal mesh density distributions and highly accurate solutions.

  4. Modelling of the forming devices of high-current pulsed accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Dmitrieva, V. V.; Kornev, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    The report provides a comparison of the mathematical model of the forming devices of high-current pulsed accelerators based on the solution of unsteady problems for electric circuits with the distributed parameters and the model implementing direct calculation methods obtained on the basis of operator transformations.

  5. Modeling surf zone tracer plumes: 1. Waves, mean currents, and low-frequency eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, Falk; Clark, David B.; Guza, R. T.

    2011-11-01

    A model that accurately simulates surf zone waves, mean currents, and low-frequency eddies is required to diagnose the mechanisms of surf zone tracer transport and dispersion. In this paper, a wave-resolving time-dependent Boussinesq model is compared with waves and currents observed during five surf zone dye release experiments. In a companion paper, Clark et al. (2011) compare a coupled tracer model to the dye plume observations. The Boussinesq model uses observed bathymetry and incident random, directionally spread waves. For all five releases, the model generally reproduces the observed cross-shore evolution of significant wave height, mean wave angle, bulk directional spread, mean alongshore current, and the frequency-dependent sea surface elevation spectra and directional moments. The largest errors are near the shoreline where the bathymetry is most uncertain. The model also reproduces the observed cross-shore structure of rotational velocities in the infragravity (0.004 surf zone. The model-data agreement for sea swell waves, low-frequency eddies, and mean currents suggests that the model is appropriate for simulating surf zone tracer transport and dispersion.

  6. On The Estimation of Parameters of Thick Current Shell Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the first time the five parameters required to fully describe the Onwumechili\\'s composite thick current shell model format of equatorial electrojet have been evaluated from a single autonomous set of ground data at solar minimum. The non-linear model was applied to four data points, each with a pair of simultaneously ...

  7. A hydrodynamic model of nearshore waves and wave-induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khaled Seif

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In This study develops a quasi-three dimensional numerical model of wave driven coastal currents with accounting the effects of the wave-current interaction and the surface rollers. In the wave model, the current effects on wave breaking and energy dissipation are taken into account as well as the wave diffraction effect. The surface roller associated with wave breaking was modeled based on a modification of the equations by Dally and Brown (1995 and Larson and Kraus (2002. Furthermore, the quasi-three dimensional model, which based on Navier-Stokes equations, was modified in association with the surface roller effect, and solved using frictional step method. The model was validated by data sets obtained during experiments on the Large Scale Sediment Transport Facility (LSTF basin and the Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS. Then, a model test against detached breakwater was carried out to investigate the performance of the model around coastal structures. Finally, the model was applied to Akasaki port to verify the hydrodynamics around coastal structures. Good agreements between computations and measurements were obtained with regard to the cross-shore variation in waves and currents in nearshore and surf zone.

  8. Tuition Elasticity of the Demand for Higher Education among Current Students: A Pricing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Glenn A.; Whipple, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A pricing model is offered, based on retention of current students, that colleges can use to determine appropriate tuition. A computer-based model that quantifies the relationship between tuition elasticity and projected net return to the college was developed and applied to determine an appropriate tuition rate for a small, private liberal arts…

  9. Maximum smoothed likelihood estimation and smoothed maximum likelihood estimation in the current status model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneboom, P.; Jongbloed, G.; Witte, B.I.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the distribution function, the density and the hazard rate of the (unobservable) event time in the current status model. A well studied and natural nonparametric estimator for the distribution function in this model is the nonparametric maximum likelihood

  10. Ecosystem Modeling in the South Central US: A Synthesis of Current Models toward the Development of Coupled Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem services and products are the foundation of sustainability for regional and global economy since we are directly or indirectly dependent on the ecosystem services like food, livestock, water, air, wildlife etc. It has been increasingly recognized that for sustainability concerns, the conservation problems need to be addressed in the context of entire ecosystems. This approach known as the ecosystem approach is fundamental to managing earth's finite resources since it addresses the interactions that link biotic systems, of which human, flora and fauna are integral parts, with the physical systems on which they depend. This approach is even more vital in the 21st century with formidable increasing human population and rapid changes in global environment. This study is being conducted to find the state of the science of ecosystem models in the South-Central region of US. The propose of the project is to conduct a systematic review and synthesize relevant information on the current state of the science of ecosystem modeling in the South-Central region of US toward coupling these models with climate, agronomic, hydrologic, economic or management models to better represent ecosystem dynamics as affected by climate change and human activities; and hence gain more reliable predictions of future ecosystem functions and service in the region. Better understandings of such processes will increase our ability to predict the ecosystem responses and feedbacks to environmental and human induced change in the region so that decision makers can make an informed management decisions of the ecosystem.

  11. Automatic J–A Model Parameter Tuning Algorithm for High Accuracy Inrush Current Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xishan Wen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inrush current simulation plays an important role in many tasks of the power system, such as power transformer protection. However, the accuracy of the inrush current simulation can hardly be ensured. In this paper, a Jiles–Atherton (J–A theory based model is proposed to simulate the inrush current of power transformers. The characteristics of the inrush current curve are analyzed and results show that the entire inrush current curve can be well featured by the crest value of the first two cycles. With comprehensive consideration of both of the features of the inrush current curve and the J–A parameters, an automatic J–A parameter estimation algorithm is proposed. The proposed algorithm can obtain more reasonable J–A parameters, which improve the accuracy of simulation. Experimental results have verified the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  12. A plug flow reactor model of a vanadium redox flow battery considering the conductive current collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, S.; Suriyah, M. R.; Leibfried, T.

    2017-08-01

    A lumped-parameter model for vanadium redox flow batteries, which use metallic current collectors, is extended into a one-dimensional model using the plug flow reactor principle. Thus, the commonly used simplification of a perfectly mixed cell is no longer required. The resistances of the cell components are derived in the in-plane and through-plane directions. The copper current collector is the only component with a significant in-plane conductance, which allows for a simplified electrical network. The division of a full-scale flow cell into 10 layers in the direction of fluid flow represents a reasonable compromise between computational effort and accuracy. Due to the variations in the state of charge and thus the open circuit voltage of the electrolyte, the currents in the individual layers vary considerably. Hence, there are situations, in which the first layer, directly at the electrolyte input, carries a multiple of the last layer's current. The conventional model overestimates the cell performance. In the worst-case scenario, the more accurate 20-layer model yields a discharge capacity 9.4% smaller than that computed with the conventional model. The conductive current collector effectively eliminates the high over-potentials in the last layers of the plug flow reactor models that have been reported previously.

  13. A Boussinesq-type model simulating wave and wave-induced current fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonaris, Georgios; Memos, Constantine

    2015-04-01

    A two-dimensional high order Boussinesq-type model is developed able to simulate wave propagation in the coastal zone. The model reproduces very accurately the linear dispersion up to the traditional limit of deep water, kd ≈ 3, and it is derived to embed enhanced nonlinear characteristics compared to its weakly nonlinear counterparts. In particular the description of the nonlinear amplitude dispersion is improved over the entire depth range. In order to form an integrated tool the model was extended to the surf and swash zones. The model is also capable of estimating satisfactorily the wave-induced depth-averaged current field. Due to its nonlinear character, this estimation is possible without the need to decouple the wave and current motion as imposed by the traditional spitting method. This capability is of great importance, not only because of the saving of computational time, but also because the wave-current interaction can be also taken into account. In addition, the undertow effect is included in the cross-shore current computations. The model's response to the wave-current interaction is checked through the simulation of a demanding test including a rip channel. In addition, both 1DH and 2DH model's versions were validated against a variety of experimental tests including plane beaches and submerged bars. The agreement, in general, is found fairly good and most of the nearshore phenomena are adequately described.

  14. A Continuous Current Model of Accumulation Mode (Junctionless) Cylindrical Surrounding-Gate Nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Shi; Liu, Xi; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-03-01

    A continuous current model of accumulation mode or so-called junctionless (JL) cylindrical surrounding-gate Si Nanowire metal-oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) is proposed. The model is based on an approximated solution of Poisson's equation considering both body doping and mobile charge concentrations. It is verified by comparing with three-dimensional simulation results using SILVACO Atlas TCAD which shows good agreement. Without any empirical fitting parameters, the proposed continuous current model of JL SRG MOSFETs is valid for all the operation regions.

  15. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Honecker, Johanna

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved...... gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from...... as quantified quality measures associated with the 23 GOCE gravity models....

  16. A New Method for Coupling the Potential Field Source Surface and the Schatten Current Sheet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    Current Sheet Magnetic Model for the Solar Corona,” Cosmic Elecdyn., 2, 1971, pp. 232-245. [8] Fry, C. D., M. Dryer , Z. Smith, W. Sun, C. S. Deehr...with other models, to predict the global solar wind out past earth days in advance. It is routinely used for both AF and civilian space weather... solar radii above the Sun’s surface and (2) the Schatten Current Sheet (SCS) model used to project the solution out into the hypersonic interplanetary

  17. Automated MRI segmentation for individualized modeling of current flow in the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when utilizing available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on an individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach. A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8, including an improved tissue probability map and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on four healthy subjects and seven stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets.Main results. The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly.Significance. Fully

  18. High-resolution Modeling Assisted Design of Customized and Individualized Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikson, Marom; Rahman, Asif; Datta, Abhishek; Fregni, Felipe; Merabet, Lotfi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low-intensity currents facilitating or inhibiting spontaneous neuronal activity. tDCS is attractive since dose is readily adjustable by simply changing electrode number, position, size, shape, and current. In the recent past, computational models have been developed with increased precision with the goal to help customize tDCS dose. The aim of this review is to discuss the incorporation of high-resolution patient-specific computer modeling to guide and optimize tDCS. Methods In this review, we discuss the following topics: (i) The clinical motivation and rationale for models of transcranial stimulation is considered pivotal in order to leverage the flexibility of neuromodulation; (ii) The protocols and the workflow for developing high-resolution models; (iii) The technical challenges and limitations of interpreting modeling predictions, and (iv) Real cases merging modeling and clinical data illustrating the impact of computational models on the rational design of rehabilitative electrotherapy. Conclusions Though modeling for non-invasive brain stimulation is still in its development phase, it is predicted that with increased validation, dissemination, simplification and democratization of modeling tools, computational forward models of neuromodulation will become useful tools to guide the optimization of clinical electrotherapy. PMID:22780230

  19. The great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger) as a good model for cold-induced browning of intra-abdominal white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Zhu, Tengteng; Ke, Shanshan; Fang, Na; Irwin, David M; Lei, Ming; Zhang, Junpeng; Shi, Huizhen; Zhang, Shuyi; Wang, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Inducing beige fat from white adipose tissue (WAT) is considered to be a shortcut to weight loss and increasingly becoming a key area in research into treatments for obesity and related diseases. However, currently, animal models of beige fat are restricted to rodents, where subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT, benign WAT) is more liable to develop into the beige fat under specific activators than the intra-abdominal adipose tissue (aWAT, malignant WAT) that is the major source of obesity related diseases in humans. Here we induced beige fat by cold exposure in two species of bats, the great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger) and the rickett's big-footed bat (Myotis ricketti), and compared the molecular and morphological changes with those seen in the mouse. Expression of thermogenic genes (Ucp1 and Pgc1a) was measured by RT-qPCR and adipocyte morphology examined by HE staining at three adipose locations, sWAT, aWAT and iBAT (interscapular brown adipose tissue). Expression of Ucp1 and Pgc1a was significantly upregulated, by 729 and 23 fold, respectively, in aWAT of the great roundleaf bat after exposure to 10°C for 7 days. Adipocyte diameters of WATs became significantly reduced and the white adipocytes became brown-like in morphology. In mice, similar changes were found in the sWAT, but much lower amounts of changes in aWAT were seen. Interestingly, the rickett's big-footed bat did not show such a tendency in beige fat. The great roundleaf bat is potentially a good animal model for human aWAT browning research. Combined with rodent models, this model should be helpful for finding therapies for reducing harmful aWAT in humans.

  20. Operational oil spill trajectory modelling using HF radar currents: A northwest European continental shelf case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Ana J; Sanchez, Jorge; Chiri, Helios; Ferrer, María I; Cárdenas, Mar; Gallego, Alejandro; Castanedo, Sonia; Medina, Raúl; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Berx, Barbara; Turrell, William R; Hughes, Sarah L

    2017-06-15

    This paper presents a novel operational oil spill modelling system based on HF radar currents, implemented in a northwest European shelf sea. The system integrates Open Modal Analysis (OMA), Short Term Prediction algorithms (STPS) and an oil spill model to simulate oil spill trajectories. A set of 18 buoys was used to assess the accuracy of the system for trajectory forecast and to evaluate the benefits of HF radar data compared to the use of currents from a hydrodynamic model (HDM). The results showed that simulated trajectories using OMA currents were more accurate than those obtained using a HDM. After 48h the mean error was reduced by 40%. The forecast skill of the STPS method was valid up to 6h ahead. The analysis performed shows the benefits of HF radar data for operational oil spill modelling, which could be easily implemented in other regions with HF radar coverage. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling the drain current and its equation parameters for lightly doped symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, Mini; Chatterjee, Arun Kumar

    2015-04-01

    A 2D model for the potential distribution in silicon film is derived for a symmetrical double gate MOSFET in weak inversion. This 2D potential distribution model is used to analytically derive an expression for the subthreshold slope and threshold voltage. A drain current model for lightly doped symmetrical DG MOSFETs is then presented by considering weak and strong inversion regions including short channel effects, series source to drain resistance and channel length modulation parameters. These derived models are compared with the simulation results of the SILVACO (Atlas) tool for different channel lengths and silicon film thicknesses. Lastly, the effect of the fixed oxide charge on the drain current model has been studied through simulation. It is observed that the obtained analytical models of symmetrical double gate MOSFETs are in good agreement with the simulated results for a channel length to silicon film thickness ratio greater than or equal to 2.

  2. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giampieri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by Smith et al. (1980 and Ness et al. (1981, 1982, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. Connerney et al. (1983 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set.

    First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; planetary magnetospheres; plasma sheet

  3. Skill Testing a Three-Dimensional Global Tide Model to Historical Current Meter Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    surface elevation, taken from, for instance, the 102 pelagic tide gauges used by Shum et al. [1997], hydrodynamic barotropic tide models which assim...within the 9 point instrument neighbor- hood. In order to provide a baseline for comparison of the ability of the model velocity field to accurately...velocity field using the best-fit from a 9 point neighborhood and the TPXO7.2 velocity at the model value nearest to the current meter latitude and

  4. Simplified Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Permanent Magnet Brushless Direct Current Motors for Sensorless Operation

    OpenAIRE

    E. Kaliappan; C. Chellamuthu

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: In this study, a simplified modeling and experimental analysis of Permanent Magnet Brushless DC (PMBLDC) motors for Sensorless operation using MATLAB/SIMULINK. This model provides a mechanism for monitoring and controlling the voltage, current, speed and torque response. Approach: BLDC motor is modeled as sub-blocks. The inverter and switching function are implemented as S-function builder block. The Sensorless scheme employs direct back emf based zero crossing detection te...

  5. Mathematical and numerical models for eddy currents and magnetostatics with selected applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaz, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This monograph addresses fundamental aspects of mathematical modeling and numerical solution methods of electromagnetic problems involving low frequencies, i.e. magnetostatic and eddy current problems which are rarely presented in the applied mathematics literature. In the first part, the authors introduce the mathematical models in a realistic context in view of their use for industrial applications. Several geometric configurations of electric conductors leading to different mathematical models are carefully derived and analyzed, and numerical methods for the solution of the obtained problem

  6. Current-voltage relation for thin tunnel barriers: Parabolic barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim; Brandbyge, Mads

    2004-01-01

    We derive a simple analytic result for the current-voltage curve for tunneling of electrons through a thin uniform insulating layer modeled by a parabolic barrier. Our model, which goes beyond the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation, is applicable also in the limit of highly transparant...... barriers subject to high voltages, and thus provides a more realistic description for this situation compared to the widely used rectangular barrier model. ©2004 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Evaluating two numerical advection schemes in HYCOM for eddy-resolving modelling of the Agulhas Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Backeberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A 4th order advection scheme is applied in a nested eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM of the greater Agulhas Current system for the purpose of testing advanced numerics as a means for improving the model simulation for eventual operational implementation. Model validation techniques comparing sea surface height variations, sea level skewness and variogram analyses to satellite altimetry measurements quantify that generally the 4th order advection scheme improves the realism of the model simulation. The most striking improvement over the standard 2nd order momentum advection scheme, is that the southern Agulhas Current is simulated as a well-defined meandering current, rather than a train of successive eddies. A better vertical structure and stronger poleward transports in the Agulhas Current core contribute toward a better southwestward penetration of the current, and its temperature field, implying a stronger Indo-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange. It is found that the transport, and hence this exchange, is sensitive to the occurrences of mesoscale features originating upstream in the Mozambique Channel and southern East Madagascar Current, and that the improved HYCOM simulation is well suited for further studies of these inter-actions.

  8. Simulations of the Arctic Boundary Current in an eddy-resolving global ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Y.; Nurser, A. J. G.; Bacon, S.; Coward, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is shielded from winds by sea ice and is strongly stratified, resulting in extremely low mixing rates. In this quiescent ocean, currents along the continental shelves become the principal dynamical features of the circulation. Observations and model results suggest the existence of a fast oceanic current in the Arctic Ocean, the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC). The current flows counterclockwise (cyclonically) along the shelf break of the Siberian, Alaskan and Canadian Arctic shelves all way around the Arctic Ocean margins, leaving through western Fram Strait, and taking about two decades to complete the circuit (Aksenov et al., 2011). Simulations with an eddy-resolving global 1/12 degree NEMO model show that the ACBC consists of several jets with the fastest flow occurring at the shelf break. We compare the models results with observations and examine mechanisms driving the ACBC. Through the analysis of the NEMO simulations performed with eddy-resolving, eddy-permitting and non-eddying model configurations we investigate the effect of resolution on the current. Reference Aksenov, Y., V. V. Ivanov, A. J. G. Nurser, S. Bacon, I. V. Polyakov, A. C. Coward, A. C. Naveira-Garabato, and A. Beszczynska-Moeller (2011), The Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current, J. Geophys. Res., 116, C09017, doi:10.1029/2010JC006637.

  9. Modeling surf zone-inner shelf exchange: Interaction of rip currents and stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    Transient rip currents on alongshore uniform beaches develop from the coalescence of surf zone eddies, exchanging tracers between the surf zone and the potentially stratified inner shelf. The interaction of stratification and transient rip currents has not yet been investigated. Surf zone eddies responsible for transient rip currents are generated by short-crested wave breaking, a process included in wave-resolving (WR) Boussinesq models. However, WR models are depth-integrated and cannot account for stratification and vertically sheared flows. Wave-averaged (WA) models can simulate these processes, but cannot create surf zone eddies. A combination of WR and WA models is required to accurately simulate surf zone-inner shelf exchange. Here, WR depth-integrated Boussinessq model funwaveC is coupled to the stratification and depth-resolving WA Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. The surf zone eddy generation forcing is extracted from a funwaveC simulation of normally incident waves on a planar beach, and provided to COAWST as a depth-uniform surf zone force. COAWST model simulations resolving the surf zone to mid-shelf are conducted with surf zone eddy forcing, idealistic surface heating/cooling, stratification, and Coriolis effects. These simulations provide three-dimensional evolution of velocity and temperature, diagnosed to quantify the role of surf zone eddy forcing in surf zone-inner shelf exchange. The impact of stratification on rip currents and exchange is studied by varying the stratification. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  10. Changing head model extent affects finite element predictions of transcranial direct current stimulation distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Schwartz, Benjamin; Sadleir, Rosalind J.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. In this study, we determined efficient head model sizes relative to predicted current densities in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Approach. Efficiency measures were defined based on a finite element (FE) simulations performed using nine human head models derived from a single MRI data set, having extents varying from 60%-100% of the original axial range. Eleven tissue types, including anisotropic white matter, and three electrode montages (T7-T8, F3-right supraorbital, Cz-Oz) were used in the models. Main results. Reducing head volume extent from 100% to 60%, that is, varying the model’s axial range from between the apex and C3 vertebra to one encompassing only apex to the superior cerebellum, was found to decrease the total modeling time by up to half. Differences between current density predictions in each model were quantified by using a relative difference measure (RDM). Our simulation results showed that {RDM} was the least affected (a maximum of 10% error) for head volumes modeled from the apex to the base of the skull (60%-75% volume). Significance. This finding suggested that the bone could act as a bioelectricity boundary and thus performing FE simulations of tDCS on the human head with models extending beyond the inferior skull may not be necessary in most cases to obtain reasonable precision in current density results.

  11. SEAFLOOR MORPHOLOGY INFLUENCES ON CURRENT CONDITION IN A SUNDA STRAIT BRIDGE PROJECT USING NUMERICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franto Novico

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been more than 50 years since the idea to construct the bridge of Sunda Strait was inspirited by Prof. Sedyatmo. This issued is very important due to accelerate the economic growth between Sumatera Island and Java Island which is known as the densest population in the Indonesia. However, until today the bridge is still not construct yet because the high budget and the lack of technical data are still being problems. One of the most important data is current condition along the Sunda Strait. Unfortunately, no one has been clearly studied about current condition along Sunda Strait. Therefore, the information about current condition would be completed to fulfil the lack of data and information. The RV Geomarine I, as a research vessel conducted the survey in October 2012 that one of the objectives is to get the impression about the current condition around the bridge plan. Attaching echo sounder of bathy 1500 to get the depth profile and applied the RD Instrument ADCP Mobile Workhorse Monitor 300 kHz to collect the real current data and analyze the current using numerical model by Mike 21 were carried out to describe the condition of the current around the bridge proposed. In addition, the detail flexible mesh of hydrodynamic model is applied along bridge plan to analyse the current condition that caused by seafloor morphology. Based on the ADCP data it would be seen that the highest velocity record of the current occurs at October 18th 2012 at line 19 with the value 2.63 m/sec. Nevertheless, the numerical model shown the highest current velocity occurs around the northwest of Sangiang Island where the speed attains more than 4.59 m/sec.

  12. Modeling, Simulation, and Experiment of Switched Reluctance Ocean Current Generator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents nonlinear simulation model of switched reluctance (SR ocean current generator system on MATLAB/SIMULINK with describing the structure of generator system. The developed model is made up of main model, rotor position calculation module, controller module, gate module, power converter module, phase windings module, flux-linkage module, torque module, and power calculation module. The magnetization curves obtained by two-dimensional finite-element electromagnetic field calculation and the conjugated magnetic energy graphics obtained from the three-dimensional graphics of flux linkage are stored in the “Lookup Table” modules on MATLAB/SIMULINK. The hardware of the developed three-phase 12/8 structure SR ocean current generator system prototype with the experimental platform is presented. The simulation of the prototype is performed by the developed models, and the experiments have been carried out under the same condition with different output power, turn-off angle, and rotor speed. The simulated phase current waveforms agree well with the tested phase current waveforms experimentally. The simulated output voltage curves agree well with the tested output voltage curves experimentally. It is shown that the developed nonlinear simulation model of the three-phase 12/8 structure SR ocean current generator system is valid.

  13. A comparison of single- and multi-site calibration and validation: a case study of SWAT in the Miyun Reservoir watershed, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jianwen; Shen, Zhenyao; Yan, Tiezhu

    2017-09-01

    An essential task in evaluating global water resource and pollution problems is to obtain the optimum set of parameters in hydrological models through calibration and validation. For a large-scale watershed, single-site calibration and validation may ignore spatial heterogeneity and may not meet the needs of the entire watershed. The goal of this study is to apply a multi-site calibration and validation of the Soil andWater Assessment Tool (SWAT), using the observed flow data at three monitoring sites within the Baihe watershed of the Miyun Reservoir watershed, China. Our results indicate that the multi-site calibration parameter values are more reasonable than those obtained from single-site calibrations. These results are mainly due to significant differences in the topographic factors over the large-scale area, human activities and climate variability. The multi-site method involves the division of the large watershed into smaller watersheds, and applying the calibrated parameters of the multi-site calibration to the entire watershed. It was anticipated that this case study could provide experience of multi-site calibration in a large-scale basin, and provide a good foundation for the simulation of other pollutants in followup work in the Miyun Reservoir watershed and other similar large areas.

  14. On the seasonal variability and eddies in the North Brazil Current: insights from model intercomparison experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnier, Bernard; Reynaud, Thierry; Beckmann, Aike; Böning, Claus; Molines, Jean-Marc; Barnard, Sally; Jia, Yanli

    The time dependent circulation of the North Brazil Current is studied with three numerical ocean circulation models, which differ by the vertical coordinate used to formulate the primitive equations. The models are driven with the same surface boundary conditions and their horizontal grid-resolution (isotropic, 1/3° at the equator) is in principle fine enough to permit the generation of mesoscale eddies. Our analysis of the mean seasonal currents concludes that the volume transport of the North Brazil Current (NBC) at the equator is principally determined by the strength of the meridional overturning, and suggests that the return path of the global thermohaline circulation is concentrated in the NBC. Models which simulate a realistic overturning at 24°N of the order of 16-18 Sv also simulate a realistic NBC transport of nearly 35 Sv comparable to estimates deduced from the most recent observations. In all models, the major part of this inflow of warm waters from the South Atlantic recirculates in the zonal equatorial current system, but the models also agree on the existence of a permanent coastal mean flow to the north-west, from the equator into the Carribean Sea, in the form of a continuous current or a succession of eddies. Important differences are found between models in their representation of the eddy field. The reasons invoked are the use of different subgrid-scale parameterisations, and differences in stability of the NBC retroflection loop because of differences in the representation of the effect of bottom friction according to the vertical coordinate that is used. Finally, even if differences noticed between models in the details of the seasonal mean circulation and water mass properties could be explained by differences in the eddy field, nonetheless the major characteristics (mean seasonal currents, volume and heat transports) appears to be at first order driven by the strength of the thermohaline circulation.

  15. A High-resolution Model of Field-aligned Currents Through Empirical Orthogonal Functions Analysis (MFACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Luehr, Hermann; Sorbalo, Eugen; Blagau, Adrian; Le, Guan; Lu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Ten years of CHAMP magnetic field measurements are integrated into MFACE, a model of field-aligned currents (FACs) using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). EOF1 gives the basic Region-1/Region-2 pattern varying mainly with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component. EOF2 captures separately the cusp current signature and By-related variability. Compared to existing models, MFACE yields significantly better spatial resolution, reproduces typically observed FAC thickness and intensity, improves on the magnetic local time (MLT) distribution, and gives the seasonal dependence of FAC latitudes and the NBZ current signature. MFACE further reveals systematic dependences on By, including 1) Region-1/Region-2 topology modifications around noon; 2) imbalance between upward and downward maximum current density; 3) MLT location of the Harang discontinuity. Furthermore, our procedure allows quantifying response times of FACs to solar wind driving at the bow shock nose: we obtain 20 minutes and 35-40 minutes lags for the FAC density and latitude, respectively.

  16. A refined nonlinear averaged model for constant frequency current mode controlled PWM converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Francis D.; Chen, Jesse E.

    1991-10-01

    A refined, duo-mode model for current programmed buck converters is presented. The refined model uses a form of the current mode control law which is truly invariant with respect to operating conditions. That is, it is valid for both transient and steady-state operating conditions regardless of the converter operating mode, which could be etiher continuous conduction mode (CCM) or discontinuous conduction mode (DCM). The large-signal transient response predicted using the refined average model is shown to be virtually indistinguishable, in an average sense, from that predicted using a pulse-by-pulse simulation. The refined model is shown to exhibit improved high-frequency accuracy in both time and frequency domains. The model has been implemented in SPICE 2G6 and runs with default analysis options.

  17. Strategic Petroleum Reserve equation of state model development : current performance against measured data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-01

    This report documents the progression of crude oil phase behavior modeling within the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve vapor pressure program during the period 2004-2009. Improvements in quality control on phase behavior measurements in 2006 coupled with a growing body of degasification plant operations data have created a solid measurement baseline that has served to inform and significantly improve project understanding on phase behavior of SPR oils. Systematic tuning of the model based on proven practices from the technical literature have shown to reduce model bias and match observed data very well, though this model tuning effort is currently in process at SPR and based on preliminary data. The current report addresses many of the steps that have helped to build a strong baseline of data coupled with sufficient understanding of model features so that calibration is possible.

  18. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  19. Model-guided control of hippocampal discharges by local direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Faten; Modolo, Julien; Recher, Fanny; Dieuset, Gabriel; Biraben, Arnaud; Benquet, Pascal; Wendling, Fabrice

    2017-05-10

    Neurostimulation is an emerging treatment for drug-resistant epilepsies when surgery is contraindicated. Recent clinical results demonstrate significant seizure frequency reduction in epileptic patients, however the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect are largely unknown. This study aimed at gaining insights into local direct current stimulation (LDCS) effects on hyperexcitable tissue, by i) analyzing the impact of electrical currents locally applied on epileptogenic brain regions, and ii) characterizing currents achieving an "anti-epileptic" effect (excitability reduction). First, a neural mass model of hippocampal circuits was extended to accurately reproduce the features of hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPD) observed in a mouse model of epilepsy. Second, model predictions regarding current intensity and stimulation polarity were confronted to in vivo mice recordings during LDCS (n = 8). The neural mass model was able to generate realistic hippocampal discharges. Simulation of LDCS in the model pointed at a significant decrease of simulated HPD (in duration and occurrence rate, not in amplitude) for cathodal stimulation, which was successfully verified experimentally in epileptic mice. Despite the simplicity of our stimulation protocol, these results contribute to a better understanding of clinical benefits observed in epileptic patients with implanted neurostimulators. Our results also provide further support for model-guided design of neuromodulation therapy.

  20. Modeling Bubble Flow and Current Density Distribution in an Alkaline Electrolysis Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandra S. Jupudi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bubbles on the current density distribution over the electrodes of an alkaline electrolyzer cell is studied using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. Model includes Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow methodology to model the multiphase flow of Hydrogen and Oxygen with water and the behavior of each phase is accounted for using first principle. Hydrogen/Oxygen evolution, flow field and current density distribution are incorporated in the model to account for the complicated physics involved in the process. Fluent 6.2 is used to solve two-phase flow and electrochemistry is incorporated using UDF (User Defined Function feature of Fluent. Model is validated with mesh refinement study and by comparison with experimental measurements. Model is found to replicate the effect of cell voltage and inter-electrode gap (distance between the electrodes on current density accurately. Further, model is found to capture the existence of optimum cell height. The validated model is expected to be a very useful tool in the design and optimization of alkaline electrolyzer cells.

  1. Structure of high latitude currents in global magnetospheric-ionospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltberger, M; Rigler, E. J.; Merkin, V; Lyon, J. G

    2016-01-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model we examine the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns. Each resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval which contained two high speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results obtained from the Weimer 2005 computing using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and narrow. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths also results in the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) pattern being concentrated in higher latitudes. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 and CPCP are quite similar at the higher resolution indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  2. Over-current characteristics of superconducting model cable using YBCO coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, A. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: atsushi@waseda.jp; Wang, X.; Ueda, H. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yagi, M.; Mukoyama, S. [Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., Ecology and Energy Laboratory, Ichihara 290-8555 (Japan); Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan); Shiohara, Y. [International Superconductivity Technology Center, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-10-13 Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    For the application to power transmission cables, a number of YBCO tapes would be assembled and wound in spiral on a Cu-former. YBCO tapes and the Cu-former are connected in parallel and they might be subjected to short-circuit fault currents 10-30 times the operating current. In this study, we constructed a 1 m long YBCO model cable. Over-current with a peak of 31.5 kArms and a duration of 2.0 s, which was established by JEC (Japanese Electrotechnical Committee), was applied to this cable in a liquid nitrogen bath. The redistribution of the transport current between YBCO tapes and the Cu-former were examined by using Hall sensors. The numerical simulations were carried out using a newly developed computer program based on the 3D finite element method (FEM) in order to clarify the over-current characteristics in the cable. From the comparison of the experimental and simulation results, the validity of the developed computer program was confirmed. Therefore, we performed the simulations of a 10 m long model cable when carrying a fault current of 31.5 kArms applied for a durations of 2.0 s, and also estimated the influence of the cross-section area of the Cu-former and the Cu shield layer on the thermal behavior of the model cable by using the developed computer program.

  3. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is an important natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystem function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. We conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4) SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5) SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.

  4. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Franz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH, which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  5. Modelling of sediment transport and morphological evolution under the combined action of waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Guilherme; Delpey, Matthias T.; Brito, David; Pinto, Lígia; Leitão, Paulo; Neves, Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    Coastal defence structures are often constructed to prevent beach erosion. However, poorly designed structures may cause serious erosion problems in the downdrift direction. Morphological models are useful tools to predict such impacts and assess the efficiency of defence structures for different scenarios. Nevertheless, morphological modelling is still a topic under intense research effort. The processes simulated by a morphological model depend on model complexity. For instance, undertow currents are neglected in coastal area models (2DH), which is a limitation for simulating the evolution of beach profiles for long periods. Model limitations are generally overcome by predefining invariant equilibrium profiles that are allowed to shift offshore or onshore. A more flexible approach is described in this paper, which can be generalised to 3-D models. The present work is based on the coupling of the MOHID modelling system and the SWAN wave model. The impacts of different designs of detached breakwaters and groynes were simulated in a schematic beach configuration following a 2DH approach. The results of bathymetry evolution are in agreement with the patterns found in the literature for several existing structures. The model was also tested in a 3-D test case to simulate the formation of sandbars by undertow currents. The findings of this work confirmed the applicability of the MOHID modelling system to study sediment transport and morphological changes in coastal zones under the combined action of waves and currents. The same modelling methodology was applied to a coastal zone (Costa da Caparica) located at the mouth of a mesotidal estuary (Tagus Estuary, Portugal) to evaluate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport both in calm water conditions and during events of highly energetic waves. The MOHID code is available in the GitHub repository.

  6. Modelling the potential transport of tropical fish larvae in the Leeuwin Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, A.; Slawinski, D.; Feng, M.; Hutchins, B.; Fearns, P.

    2011-12-01

    Application of an individual-based particle tracking model to the migration of tropical fish larvae along the continental shelf between the Houtman Abrolhos Islands and Rottnest Island (Western Australia) has shown that there is potential for the southwards advection of passive particles/larvae in the Leeuwin Current system throughout the year. However, seasonal variations in the prevailing wind field result in corresponding seasonal changes in the surface current flow (both alongshore and cross-shelf) on the continental shelf, leading to a pulse of modelled particles arriving at Rottnest Island during the autumn months. This matches, within a month, the observed April/May peak in annual recruitment of 2 species of damselfish ( Abudefduf sexfasciatus and A. vaigiensis), at the time when the Leeuwin Current is strengthening. It is assumed that the larvae are in the uppermost 20 m of the water column and that there are no vertical diurnal movements. The model has a 10 km grid spacing, and so can resolve some of the current gradients across the continental shelf. Comparison of the modelled near-surface currents with ADCP measurements at 2 current mooring sites as well as with a broader range of historical current measurements off south-western Australia indicates that the alongshore net transport is reasonably well reproduced by the model, whereas agreement with the cross-shelf flow is not as good (this may be partly attributed to the paucity of high-quality near-surface current measurements in the area of study). Because of limitations in our knowledge of the swimming ability, choice of swimming direction and habitat selection of larval fish, as well as the inability of the model to reproduce the small-scale circulation around Rottnest Island, the swimming capacity of the late-stage larval fish is not specifically included; they are considered as potential settlers once they have reached within 20 km of the Island. The observed inter-annual variability in recruitment

  7. Multiscale Modeling in Computational Biomechanics: Determining Computational Priorities and Addressing Current Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawhai, Merryn; Bischoff, Jeff; Einstein, Daniel R.; Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent; Reinbolt, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    Abstract In this article, we describe some current multiscale modeling issues in computational biomechanics from the perspective of the musculoskeletal and respiratory systems and mechanotransduction. First, we outline the necessity of multiscale simulations in these biological systems. Then we summarize challenges inherent to multiscale biomechanics modeling, regardless of the subdiscipline, followed by computational challenges that are system-specific. We discuss some of the current tools that have been utilized to aid research in multiscale mechanics simulations, and the priorities to further the field of multiscale biomechanics computation.

  8. Weak Interaction Models with New Quarks and Right-handed Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, F. A.; Zee, A.; Kingsley, R. L.; Treiman, S. B.

    1975-06-01

    We discuss various weak interaction issues for a general class of models within the SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory framework, with special emphasis on the effects of right-handed, charged currents and of quarks bearing new quantum numbers. In particular we consider the restrictions on model building which are imposed by the small KL - KS mass difference and by the .I = = rule; and we classify various possibilities for neutral current interactions and, in the case of heavy mesons with new quantum numbers, various possibilities for mixing effects analogous to KL - KS mixing.

  9. Current computational modelling trends in craniomandibular biomechanics and their clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, A G

    2011-03-01

    Computational models of interactions in the craniomandibular apparatus are used with increasing frequency to study biomechanics in normal and abnormal masticatory systems. Methods and assumptions in these models can be difficult to assess by those unfamiliar with current practices in this field; health professionals are often faced with evaluating the appropriateness, validity and significance of models which are perhaps more familiar to the engineering community. This selective review offers a foundation for assessing the strength and implications of a craniomandibular modelling study. It explores different models used in general science and engineering and focuses on current best practices in biomechanics. The problem of validation is considered at some length, because this is not always fully realisable in living subjects. Rigid-body, finite element and combined approaches are discussed, with examples of their application to basic and clinically relevant problems. Some advanced software platforms currently available for modelling craniomandibular systems are mentioned. Recent studies of the face, masticatory muscles, tongue, craniomandibular skeleton, temporomandibular joint, dentition and dental implants are reviewed, and the significance of non-linear and non-isotropic material properties is emphasised. The unique challenges in clinical application are discussed, and the review concludes by posing some questions which one might reasonably expect to find answered in plausible modelling studies of the masticatory apparatus. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Total kinetic energy in four global eddying ocean circulation models and over 5000 current meter records

    KAUST Repository

    Scott, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the total kinetic energy (TKE) in four global eddying ocean circulation simulations with a global dataset of over 5000, quality controlled, moored current meter records. At individual mooring sites, there was considerable scatter between models and observations that was greater than estimated statistical uncertainty. Averaging over all current meter records in various depth ranges, all four models had mean TKE within a factor of two of observations above 3500. m, and within a factor of three below 3500. m. With the exception of observations between 20 and 100. m, the models tended to straddle the observations. However, individual models had clear biases. The free running (no data assimilation) model biases were largest below 2000. m. Idealized simulations revealed that the parameterized bottom boundary layer tidal currents were not likely the source of the problem, but that reducing quadratic bottom drag coefficient may improve the fit with deep observations. Data assimilation clearly improved the model-observation comparison, especially below 2000. m, despite assimilated data existing mostly above this depth and only south of 47°N. Different diagnostics revealed different aspects of the comparison, though in general the models appeared to be in an eddying-regime with TKE that compared reasonably well with observations. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Combined action potential- and dynamic-clamp for accurate computational modelling of the cardiac IKr current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Chiara; Altomare, Claudia; Bennati, Marco; Furini, Simone; Zaza, Antonio; Severi, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    In the present work Action-Potential clamp (APC) and Dynamic clamp (DC) were used in combination in order to optimize the Luo-Rudy (LRd) mathematical formulation of the guinea-pig rapid delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr), and to validate the optimized model. To this end, IKr model parameters were adjusted to fit the experimental E4031-sensitive current (IE4031) recorded under APC in guinea-pig myocytes. Currents generated by LRd model (ILRd) and the optimized one (IOpt) were then compared by testing their suitability to replace IE4031 under DC. Under APC, ILRd was significantly larger than IE4031 (mean current densities 0.51±0.01 vs 0.21±0.05pA/pF; p<0.001), mainly because of different rectification. IOpt mean density (0.17±0.01pA/pF) was similar to the IE4031 one (NS); moreover, IOpt accurately reproduced IE4031 distribution along the different AP phases. Models were then compared under DC by blocking native IKr (5μM E4031) and replacing it with ILRd or IOpt. Whereas injection of ILRd overshortened AP duration (APD90) (by 25% of its pre-block value), IOpt injection restored AP morphology and duration to overlap pre-block values. This study highlights the power of APC and DC for the identification of reliable formulations of ionic current models. An optimized model of IKr has been obtained which fully reversed E4031 effects on the AP. The model strongly diverged from the widely used Luo-Rudy formulation; this can be particularly relevant to the in silico analysis of AP prolongation caused by IKr blocking or alterations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Contributions for the modelling of submarine cables – current density and simplified modelling of wired layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth; Ebdrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article researches two topics relevant for the development of accurate formulae able to estimate the ampacity of HVAC submarine cables. Simplified formulae for estimating the current density distribution, which can be used for theoretical analyses, are developed and compared with the exact...

  13. Modeling and analysis of sub-surface leakage current in nano-MOSFET under cutoff regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Yashu; Rai, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    The high leakage current in nano-meter regimes is becoming a significant portion of power dissipation in nano-MOSFET circuits as threshold voltage, channel length, and gate oxide thickness are scaled down to nano-meter range. Precise leakage current valuation and meticulous modeling of the same at nano-meter technology scale is an increasingly a critical work in designing the low power nano-MOSFET circuits. We present a specific compact model for sub-threshold regime leakage current in bulk driven nano-MOSFETs. The proposed logical model is instigated and executed into the latest updated PTM bulk nano-MOSFET model and is found to be in decent accord with technology-CAD simulation data. This paper also reviews various transistor intrinsic leakage mechanisms for nano-MOSFET exclusively in weak inversion, like drain-induced barricade lowering (DIBL), gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL), gate oxide tunneling (GOT) leakage etc. The root cause of the sub-surface leakage current is mainly due to the nano-scale short channel length causing source-drain coupling even in sub-threshold domain. Consequences leading to carriers triumphing the barricade between the source and drain. The enhanced model effectively considers the following parameter dependence in the account for better-quality value-added results like drain-to-source bias (VDS), gate-to-source bias (VGS), channel length (LG), source/drain junction depth (Xj), bulk doping concentration (NBULK), and operating temperature (Top).

  14. Non-Hydrostatic Modelling of Waves and Currents over Subtle Bathymetric Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, E.; Mulligan, R. P.; McNinch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Localized areas with high rates of shoreline erosion on beaches, referred to as erosional hotspots, can occur near clusters of relict shore-oblique sandbars. Wave transformation and wave-driven currents over these morphological features could provide an understanding of the hydrodynamic-morphologic coupling mechanism that connects them to the occurrence of erosional hotspots. To investigate this, we use the non-hydrostatic SWASH model that phase-resolves the free surface and fluid motions throughout the water column, allowing for high resolution of wave propagation and breaking processes. In this study we apply a coupled system of nested models including SWAN over a large domain of the North Carolina shelf with smaller nested SWASH domains in areas of interest to determine the hydrodynamic processes occurring over shore oblique bars. In this presentation we focus on a high resolution grid (10 vertical layers, 10 m horizontal resolution) applied to the Duck region with model validation from acoustic wave and current data, and observations from the Coastal Lidar And Radar Imaging System (CLARIS). By altering the bathymetry input for each model run based on bathymetric surveys and comparing the predicted and observed wave heights and current profiles, the effects of subtle bathymetric perturbations have on wave refraction, wave breaking, surf zone currents and vorticity are investigated. The ability to predict wave breaking and hydrodynamics with a non-hydrostatic model may improve our understanding of surf zone dynamics in relation to morphologic conditions.

  15. Community Participation, Dengue Fever Prevention and Control Practices in Swat, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, Abdul; Ullah, Asad; Shah, Mussawar; Mussawar, Arsalan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of community participation in prevention of dengue fever in The Swat district located in the Northern area of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, which experienced a dengue fever outbreak in August, 2013. A total number of 8,963 dengue cases with 0.4% case fatality ratio were registered during the outbreak. A sample size of 354 respondents were proportionally allocated to each residential colony and then randomly selected. The association of independent variable (Community participation) and dependent variable (practices for control) were tested by using Chi Square test. Results regarding perception of practices for dengue control with community participation showed that: practices for control had significant association with organization of people to eradicate dengue mosquitoes (p=0.00), community leaders (p=0.04), community efforts (p≤0.01), use of insecticides by community people (p=0.00) and involvement of community people in awareness campaign (p=0.00). Similarly, significant associations were found between practices for control and community shared information during dengue outbreak (p=0.00), community link with health department, NGO, Other agencies (p=0.02). We conclude that the spread of dengue epidemic was aided by the ignorance, laziness of the community people and government agencies. However, the people, religious scholars, leaders and government agencies were not organized to participate in dengue prevention and eradication, hence, the chances of dengue infection increased in community. The study recommends mobilizing local communities and activating local leadership with active participation of Government and non-government organizations for initiation of preventive strategies.

  16. Are Underlying Assumptions of Current Animal Models of Human Stroke Correct: from STAIRs to High Hurdles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Renée J; Jickling, Glen C; Sharp, Frank R

    2011-06-01

    Animal models of acute ischemic stroke have been criticized for failing to translate to human stroke. Nevertheless, animal models are necessary to improve our understanding of stroke pathophysiology and to guide the development of new stroke therapies. The rabbit embolic clot model is one animal model that has led to an effective therapy in human acute ischemic stroke, namely tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We propose that potential compounds that demonstrate efficacy in non-rabbit animal models of acute ischemic stroke should also be tested in the rabbit embolic blood clot model and, where appropriate, compared to tPA prior to investigation in humans. Furthermore, the use of anesthesia needs to be considered as a major confounder in animal models of acute ischemic stroke, and death should be included as an outcome measure in animal stroke studies. These steps, along with the current STAIRs recommendations, may improve the successful translation of experimental therapies to clinical stroke treatments.

  17. Tunneling Current of Electron in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Bipolar Transistor Model Using Transfer Matrix Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, A. K.; Hasanah, L.; Rusdiana, D.; Aminudin, A.; Suhendi, E.

    2017-03-01

    The tunneling current of n-p-n bipolar junction transistor AGNR-based is modeled with semi-numerical method. The exponential solution from Schrödinger equation is used and solved analytically. The potential profile of n-p-n BJT divided into several segments in the numerical method. Then, the solved analytical result is used in the numerical method to compute the electron transmittance. Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) is the numerical method used to compute the electron transmittance. From the calculated transmittance the tunneling current can be computed by using Landauer formula with aid of Gauss-Legendre Quadrature (GLQ). Next, the tunneling current is computed with several change of variables which are base-emitter voltage (VBE), base-collector voltage (VBC), temperature and the AGNR’s width. The computed tunneling current shows that the larger value of applied voltage for both VBE and VBC results in larger value of tunneling current. At the lower temperature, the current is larger. The computed tunneling current shows that at wider width of AGNR, the current is also larger. This is due to the decreased band-gap energy (Eg) because of the wider width of AGNR.

  18. Evaluation of flow regime of turbidity currents entering Dez Reservoir using extended shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Ivanovich ELFIMOV

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of the extended shallow water model (ESWM in evaluation of the flow regime of turbidity currents entering the Dez Reservoir was investigated. The continuity equations for fluid and particles and the Navier-Stokes equations govern the entire flow of turbidity currents. The shallow water equations governing the flow of the depositing phase of turbidity currents are derived from these equations. A case study was conducted on the flow regime of turbidity currents entering the Dez Reservoir in Iran from January 2002 to July 2003. Facing a serious sedimentation problem, the dead storage of the Dez Reservoir will be full in the coming 10 years, and the inflowing water in the hydropower conduit system is now becoming turbid. Based on the values of the dimensionless friction number ( and dimensionless entrainment number ( of turbidity currents, and the coefficient of determination between the observed and predicted deposit depths (R2 = 0.86 for the flow regime of negligible friction and negligible entrainment (NFNE, the flow regime of turbidity currents coming into the Dez Reservoir is considered to be NFNE. The results suggest that the ESWM is an appropriate approach for evaluation of the flow regime of turbidity currents in dam reservoirs where the characteristics of turbidity currents, such as the deposit depth, must be evaluated.

  19. Evaluation of Distributed Model Structures in Catchment Scale Modeling to Capture Heterogeneous Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julich, S.; Breuer, L.; Vaché, K. B.; Frede, H.

    2007-12-01

    The ability of a model to capture dominant ecological and hydrological processes is a prerequisite for the use of the model in studying impacts of landuse change on the water balance and nutrient fluxes from a watershed. However, in many cases, available model structures do not adequately represent processes of interest. In these cases, a pragmatic response is to revise the structure to better represent key processes. In this paper we outline a model application strategy designed to inject additional realism into a commonly applied model structure. Here we focus on the SWAT model in an application to the mesoscale (514 km 2) Wetter catchment, in central Germany. The catchment is characterized by a heterogeneous landscape structure and characteristics. The southwestern part is formed by a low mountain range with shallow soils over bedrock and steep slopes. Here lateral subsurface stormflow appears to be the dominant runoff generation process. The central and north- eastern regions of the basin are characterized by deep loess born soils and shallow slopes. We hypothesize that the much larger storage potential of the soils promotes vertical infiltration and storage, and that lateral runoff is much less significant. We utilize a variety of SWAT versions to evaluate the potential effects of this hypothesis on the capacity of the model to capture the measured runoff response. Our results indicate that the original SWAT- structure as well as the SWAT-G structure (which was applied to other low mountain catchments in Germany) are not able to acceptably represent the hydrograph. However, a hybrid of the two structures, specifically designed to reflect differences between the mountainous regions and the more gentle topography does result in a satisfactory representation of the hydrograph. The inclusion of elements from of both model structures (original SWAT and SWAT-G) seems to be the best way to reflect our hydrological process understanding, producing results which

  20. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation and transcranial pulsed current stimulation: a computer based high-resolution modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhishek; Dmochowski, Jacek P; Guleyupoglu, Berkan; Bikson, Marom; Fregni, Felipe

    2013-01-15

    The field of non-invasive brain stimulation has developed significantly over the last two decades. Though two techniques of noninvasive brain stimulation--transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--are becoming established tools for research in neuroscience and for some clinical applications, related techniques that also show some promising clinical results have not been developed at the same pace. One of these related techniques is cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), a class of transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS). In order to understand further the mechanisms of CES, we aimed to model CES using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived finite element head model including cortical and also subcortical structures. Cortical electric field (current density) peak intensities and distributions were analyzed. We evaluated different electrode configurations of CES including in-ear and over-ear montages. Our results confirm that significant amounts of current pass the skull and reach cortical and subcortical structures. In addition, depending on the montage, induced currents at subcortical areas, such as midbrain, pons, thalamus and hypothalamus are of similar magnitude than that of cortical areas. Incremental variations of electrode position on the head surface also influence which cortical regions are modulated. The high-resolution modeling predictions suggest that details of electrode montage influence current flow through superficial and deep structures. Finally we present laptop based methods for tPCS dose design using dominant frequency and spherical models. These modeling predictions and tools are the first step to advance rational and optimized use of tPCS and CES. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling and character analyzing of current-controlled memristors with fractional kinetic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Gangquan; Diao, Lijie; Zhu, Jianwei; Lei, Yuhang; Babajide, Oresanya; Zhang, Yanbin

    2017-07-01

    Memristors have come into limelight again after it was realized by HP researchers. This paper proposes a memristor model which can be called fractional-order current-controlled memristor, and it is more general and comprehensive. We introduce the fractional integral/differential to the current-controlled memristor model and model memristor with fractional kinetic of charge transport. An interesting phenomena found out is that the I-V characteristic is a triple-loop curve (0 fractional order α and time(t), and it reach saturation faster when 0 orders α and frequencies ω, which increase with α increasing and ω decreasing. More importantly, the memristors can't reach the Rmax in some cases. Energy loss of the model is analyzed, and the I-P curves isn't origin-symmetric when 0 < α < 1 which is very different with curves when α = 1 .

  2. Modeling the Current and Future Distribution of Treeline Species in the Nepal Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, P. K.; Cairns, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the current distribution of treeline species is important for predicting their future distribution in the landscape. Many studies have indicated that treeline will advance with climate change. Treeline advance will result in a loss of alpine biodiversity because the advancing treeline will fragment alpine ecosystems. A species distribution modeling approach using predicted climate data can increase our understanding of how treeline species will expand their range in the future. We used the Maxent model to predict the current and future distributions of three dominant treeline species, Abies spectabilis, Betula utilis, and Pinus wallichiana, of the Nepal Himalaya. The Maxent model predicted that the distribution of treeline species will change significantly under future climate change scenarios. The range of these treeline species will expand northward or upslope in response to future climate change. The model also indicated that temperature-related climatic variables are the most important determinants of the distribution of treeline species.

  3. Semiparametric bayes' proportional odds models for current status data with underreporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianming; Dunson, David B

    2011-09-01

    Current status data are a type of interval-censored event time data in which all the individuals are either left or right censored. For example, our motivation is drawn from a cross-sectional study, which measured whether or not fibroid onset had occurred by the age of an ultrasound exam for each woman. We propose a semiparametric Bayesian proportional odds model in which the baseline event time distribution is estimated nonparametrically by using adaptive monotone splines in a logistic regression model and the potential risk factors are included in the parametric part of the mean structure. The proposed approach has the advantage of being straightforward to implement using a simple and efficient Gibbs sampler, whereas alternative semiparametric Bayes' event time models encounter problems for current status data. The model is generalized to allow systematic underreporting in a subset of the data, and the methods are applied to an epidemiologic study of uterine fibroids. © 2010, The International Biometric Society.

  4. Fluid modeling of radio frequency and direct currents in a biased magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S. [IJL-P2M UMR 7198 CNRS, F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy, IJL, P2M-Faculte des Sciences, Vandoeuvre les Nancy 54506 (France); Kubic, M.; Gunn, J.; Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-04-15

    This model aims at simulating a magnetized plasma column connected on one side to a probe and on the other side to an ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating) antenna. This is a double probe modeling of a plasma flux tube exchanging perpendicular currents: rf polarization current and dc currents (inertia, viscous, and friction) perpendicular to the magnetic field. A self consistent solution for the rectified potential and the density is obtained under the assumptions of flute hypothesis, inertialess electrons, and no collision in parallel direction. The main effect of rf biasing on the antenna side is to shift the IV characteristic so that the floating potential can be increased up to ln(I{sub 0}(eV{sub rf}/(k{sub B}T{sub e}))), with I{sub 0} the modified Bessel function of the first kind. On the contrary, the effect of dc currents is to decrease the plasma potential and the sheath potential which can be lower than 3k{sub B}T{sub e}/e or even be negative. Experimental characteristics are well matched by the 1D fluid code and exhibit very high negative currents (more than 30 j{sub i} the ion saturation current) for high positive biasing of the probe and for long flux tube (10 m). The non-saturation of the electron current is here due to high transverse transport enhanced by convective fluxes and dc currents able to bring an amount of density around the biased flux tube. During comparisons with experiments, the floating potential measured by a reciprocating probe is recovered by the code revealing that for a 120 V measured peak potential on the probe, the rf potential on the ICRH antenna is twice this value. Finally, the density profile can be flattened or steepened as a function of the transverse dc current direction.

  5. Terminator field-aligned current system: A new finding from model-assimilated data set (MADS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Gardner, L. C.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2013-12-01

    Physics-based data assimilation models have been recognized by the space science community as the most accurate approach to specify and forecast the space weather of the solar-terrestrial environment. The model-assimilated data sets (MADS) produced by these models constitute an internally consistent time series of global three-dimensional fields whose accuracy can be estimated. Because of its internal consistency of physics and completeness of descriptions on the status of global systems, the MADS has also been a powerful tool to identify the systematic errors in measurements, reveal the missing physics in physical models, and discover the important dynamical physical processes that are inadequately observed or missed by measurements due to observational limitations. In the past years, we developed a data assimilation model for the high-latitude ionospheric plasma dynamics and electrodynamics. With a set of physical models, an ensemble Kalman filter, and the ingestion of data from multiple observations, the data assimilation model can produce a self-consistent time-series of the complete descriptions of the global high-latitude ionosphere, which includes the convection electric field, horizontal and field-aligned currents, conductivity, as well as 3-D plasma densities and temperatures, In this presentation, we will show a new field-aligned current system discovered from the analysis of the MADS produced by our data assimilation model. This new current system appears and develops near the ionospheric terminator. The dynamical features of this current system will be described and its connection to the active role of the ionosphere in the M-I coupling will be discussed.

  6. Evaluating the Progenitor Cells of Ovarian Cancer: Analysis of Current Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    King, Shelby M.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2011-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Progress on effective diagnostics and therapeutics for this disease are hampered by ambiguity as to the cellular origins of this histotype of ovarian cancer, as well as limited suitable animal models to analyze early stages of disease. In this report, we will review current animal models with respect to the two proposed progenitor cells for serous ovarian cancer, the ovarian surface epithelium and the fallopian tube e...

  7. Seasonal prediction of the Leeuwin Current using the POAMA dynamical seasonal forecast model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendon, Harry H.; Wang, Guomin [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology, PO Box 1289, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    The potential for predicting interannual variations of the Leeuwin Current along the west coast of Australia is addressed. The Leeuwin Current flows poleward against the prevailing winds and transports warm-fresh tropical water southward along the coast, which has a great impact on local climate and ecosystems. Variations of the current are tightly tied to El Nino/La Nina (weak during El Nino and strong during La Nina). Skilful seasonal prediction of the Leeuwin Current to 9-month lead time is achieved by empirical downscaling of dynamical coupled model forecasts of El Nino and the associated upper ocean heat content anomalies off the north west coast of Australia from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA) seasonal forecast system. Prediction of the Leeuwin Current is possible because the heat content fluctuations off the north west coast are the primary driver of interannual annual variations of the current and these heat content variations are tightly tied to the occurrence of El Nino/La Nina. POAMA can skilfully predict both the occurrence of El Nino/La Nina and the subsequent transmission of the heat content anomalies from the Pacific onto the north west coast. (orig.)

  8. Semiparametric probit models with univariate and bivariate current-status data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Qin, Jing

    2017-04-24

    Multivariate current-status data are frequently encountered in biomedical and public health studies. Semiparametric regression models have been extensively studied for univariate current-status data, but most existing estimation procedures are computationally intensive, involving either penalization or smoothing techniques. It becomes more challenging for the analysis of multivariate current-status data. In this article, we study the maximum likelihood estimations for univariate and bivariate current-status data under the semiparametric probit regression models. We present a simple computational procedure combining the expectation-maximization algorithm with the pool-adjacent-violators algorithm for solving the monotone constraint on the baseline function. Asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood estimators are investigated, including the calculation of the explicit information bound for univariate current-status data, as well as the asymptotic consistency and convergence rate for bivariate current-status data. Extensive simulation studies showed that the proposed computational procedures performed well under small or moderate sample sizes. We demonstrate the estimation procedure with two real data examples in the areas of diabetic and HIV research. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  9. A modeling study of the time-averaged electric currents in the vicinity of isolated thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Kevin T.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Baginski, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough examination of the results of a time-dependent computer model of a dipole thunderstorm revealed that there are numerous similarities between the time-averaged electrical properties and the steady-state properties of an active thunderstorm. Thus, the electrical behavior of the atmosphere in the vicinity of a thunderstorm can be determined with a formulation similar to what was first described by Holzer and Saxon (1952). From the Maxwell continuity equation of electric current, a simple analytical equation was derived that expresses a thunderstorm's average current contribution to the global electric circuit in terms of the generator current within the thundercloud, the intracloud lightning current, the cloud-to-ground lightning current, the altitudes of the charge centers, and the conductivity profile of the atmosphere. This equation was found to be nearly as accurate as the more computationally expensive numerical model, even when it is applied to a thunderstorm with a reduced conductivity thundercloud, a time-varying generator current, a varying flash rate, and a changing lightning mix.

  10. Modeling of Interfilament Coupling Currents and Their Effect on Magnet Quench Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Chlachidze, G; Maciejewski, M; Sabbi, G; Stoynev, S E; Verweij, A

    2016-01-01

    Variations in the transport current of a superconducting magnet cause several types of transitory losses. Due to its relatively short time constant, usually of the order of a few tens of milliseconds, interfilament coupling loss can have a significant effect on the coil protection against overheating after a quench. This loss is deposited in the strands and can facilitate a more homogeneous transition to the normal state of the coil turns. Furthermore, the presence of local interfilament coupling currents reduces the magnet's differential inductance, which in turn provokes a faster discharge of the transport current. The lumped-element dynamic electrothermal model of a superconducting magnet has been developed to reproduce these effects. Simulations are compared to experimental electrical transients and found in good agreement. After its validation, the model can be used for predicting the performance of quench protection systems based on energy extraction, quench heaters, the newly developed coupling-loss-in...

  11. Model and performance of current sensor observers for a doubly fed induction generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Yang, Chao; Hu, Yaogang

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a stator and rotor current observer for a doubly fed induction generator. First, the dynamic models of the wind turbine drive train are presented, and the vector control strategies of a doubly fed induction generator for the rotor-side and grid-side converters are described....

  12. Mission Command: Reconciling the ARFORGEN Model with Training Doctrine and the Current Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    Training Units and Developing Leaders . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mission Command, Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN), Training Management , Current Operating...of their training. Lastly, exercise mentorship and empower tactical leaders instead of management through metrics and data points in order to...training management , and the ARFORGEN process. Next, this paper will briefly review examples of force generation models and training studies to provide a

  13. Reducing power losses caused by ionic shortcut currents in reverse electrodialysis stacks by a validated model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.; Post, J. W.; Saakes, M.; Metz, S. J.; Harmsen, G. J.

    2008-01-01

    Both in electrodialysis and in reverse electrodialysis ionic shortcut currents through feed and drain channels cause a considerable loss in efficiency. Model calculations based on an equivalent electric system of a reverse electrodialysis stack reveal that the effect of these salt bridges could be

  14. Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior Secondary School Students' Performance in Current Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyan, Ademola Olatide; Omosewo, Esther O.; Nwankwo, Levi I.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior School Students' Performance in Current Electricity. It was a quasi experimental study of non- randomized, non equivalent pre-test post-test control group design. Three research questions were answered and corresponding three research hypotheses were tested…

  15. Applicability of video-derived bathymetry estimates to nearshore current model predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radermacher, M.; Wengrove, M.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Holman, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of swimmer safety, coastal managers desire accurate nearshore current predictions obtained from numerical models. To this end, detailed and up-to-date bathymetry is a necessity. Remote sensing techniques for bathymetry estimation are a promising solution. The focus of this paper is

  16. Numerical modelling of tides and tidal currents in the Gulf of Kutch

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    An application of a two-dimensional tidal model to study the tidal regime in the Gulf of Kutch is made. This is with a view to synthesise various information on tides and currents that are available in the Gulf. A comparison of surface elevations...

  17. Load Torque Compensator for Model Predictive Direct Current Control in High Power PMSM Drive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preindl, Matthias; Schaltz, Erik

    2010-01-01

    the use of a current controller which takes into account the discrete states of the inverter, e.g. DTC or a more modern approach: Model Predictive Direct Current Control (MPDCC). Moreover overshoots and oscillations in the speed are not desired in many applications, since they lead to mechanical stress......In drive systems the most used control structure is the cascade control with an inner torque, i.e. current and an outer speed control loop. The fairly small converter switching frequency in high power applications, e.g. wind turbines lead to modest speed control performance. An improvement bring...... behaviour. It compensates the load torque influence on the speed control setting a feed forward torque value, i.e. current reference value. The benefits are twice. The speed controller reaches immediately the speed reference value avoiding offsets which must be compensated by the weak integrator. Moreover...

  18. Reliability of Current Biokinetic and Dosimetric Models for Radionuclides: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Meck, Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot study of the reliability of the biokinetic and dosimetric models currently used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as predictors of dose per unit internal or external exposure to radionuclides. The study examines the feasibility of critically evaluating the accuracy of these models for a comprehensive set of radionuclides of concern to the NRC. Each critical evaluation would include: identification of discrepancies between the models and current databases; characterization of uncertainties in model predictions of dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; characterization of variability in dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; and evaluation of prospects for development of more accurate models. Uncertainty refers here to the level of knowledge of a central value for a population, and variability refers to quantitative differences between different members of a population. This pilot study provides a critical assessment of models for selected radionuclides representing different levels of knowledge of dose per unit exposure. The main conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) To optimize the use of available NRC resources, the full study should focus on radionuclides most frequently encountered in the workplace or environment. A list of 50 radionuclides is proposed. (2) The reliability of a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide (i.e., an estimate of dose per unit intake) may depend strongly on the specific application. Multiple characterizations of the uncertainty in a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide may be needed for different forms of the radionuclide and different levels of information of that form available to the dose analyst. (3) A meaningful characterization of variability in dose per unit intake of a radionuclide requires detailed information on the biokinetics of the radionuclide and hence is not feasible for many infrequently

  19. Continuum Modeling of Inductor Hysteresis and Eddy Current Loss Effects in Resonant Circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pries, Jason L. [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Burress, Timothy A. [ORNL

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents experimental validation of a high-fidelity toroid inductor modeling technique. The aim of this research is to accurately model the instantaneous magnetization state and core losses in ferromagnetic materials. Quasi–static hysteresis effects are captured using a Preisach model. Eddy currents are included by coupling the associated quasi-static Everett function to a simple finite element model representing the inductor cross sectional area. The modeling technique is validated against the nonlinear frequency response from two different series RLC resonant circuits using inductors made of electrical steel and soft ferrite. The method is shown to accurately model shifts in resonant frequency and quality factor. The technique also successfully predicts a discontinuity in the frequency response of the ferrite inductor resonant circuit.

  20. Current Animal Models of Postoperative Spine Infection and Potential Future Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eStavrakis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Implant related infection following spine surgery is a devastating complication for patients and can potentially lead to significant neurological compromise, disability, morbidity, and even mortality. This paper provides an overview of the existing animal models of postoperative spine infection and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each model. In addition there is discussion regarding potential modifications to these animal models to better evaluate preventative and treatment strategies for this challenging complication. Current models are effective in simulating surgical procedures but fail to evaluate infection longitudinally using multiple techniques. Potential future modifications to these models include using advanced imaging technologies to evaluate infection, use of bioluminescent bacterial species, and testing of novel treatment strategies against multiple bacterial strains. There is potential to establish a postoperative spine infection model using smaller animals, such as mice, as these would be a more cost-effective screening tool for potential therapeutic interventions.

  1. Current Animal Models of Postoperative Spine Infection and Potential Future Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakis, A I; Loftin, A H; Lord, E L; Hu, Y; Manegold, J E; Dworsky, E M; Scaduto, A A; Bernthal, N M

    2015-01-01

    Implant related infection following spine surgery is a devastating complication for patients and can potentially lead to significant neurological compromise, disability, morbidity, and even mortality. This paper provides an overview of the existing animal models of postoperative spine infection and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each model. In addition, there is discussion regarding potential modifications to these animal models to better evaluate preventative and treatment strategies for this challenging complication. Current models are effective in simulating surgical procedures but fail to evaluate infection longitudinally using multiple techniques. Potential future modifications to these models include using advanced imaging technologies to evaluate infection, use of bioluminescent bacterial species, and testing of novel treatment strategies against multiple bacterial strains. There is potential to establish a postoperative spine infection model using smaller animals, such as mice, as these would be a more cost-effective screening tool for potential therapeutic interventions.

  2. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei REN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models using different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  3. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models with different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  4. Impact of including surface currents on simulation of Indian Ocean variability with the POAMA coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Mei; Wang, Guomin; Hendon, Harry H.; Alves, Oscar [Bureau of Meteorology, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Impacts on the coupled variability of the Indo-Pacific by including the effects of surface currents on surface stress are explored in four extended integrations of an experimental version of the Bureau of Meteorology's coupled seasonal forecast model POAMA. The first pair of simulations differs only in their treatment of momentum coupling: one version includes the effects of surface currents on the surface stress computation and the other does not. The version that includes the effect of surface currents has less mean-state bias in the equatorial Pacific cold tongue but produces relatively weak coupled variability in the Tropics, especially that related to the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The version without the effects of surface currents has greater bias in the Pacific cold tongue but stronger IOD and ENSO variability. In order to diagnose the role of changes in local coupling from changes in remote forcing by ENSO for causing changes in IOD variability, a second set of simulations is conducted where effects of surface currents are included only in the Indian Ocean and only in the Pacific Ocean. IOD variability is found to be equally reduced by inclusion of the local effects of surface currents in the Indian Ocean and by the reduction of ENSO variability as a result of including effects of surface currents in the Pacific. Some implications of these results for predictability of the IOD and its dependence on ENSO, and for ocean subsurface data assimilation are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Long-Term Agroecosystem Research in the Central Mississippi River Basin: SWAT Simulation of Flow and Water Quality in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffaut, Claire; John Sadler, E; Ghidey, Fessehaie; Anderson, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Starting in 1971, stream flow and climatologic data have been collected in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed, which is part of the Central Mississippi River Basin (CMRB) Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) site. Since 1992, water quality and socio-economic data have complemented these data sets. Previous modeling efforts highlighted the challenges created by the presence of a claypan. Specific changes were introduced in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) (i) to better simulate percolation through and saturation above the claypan and (ii) to simulate the spatial and temporal distributions of the timing of field operations throughout the watershed. Our objectives were to document the changes introduced into the code, demonstrate that these changes improved simulation results, describe the model's parameterization, calibration, and validation, and assess atrazine [6-chloro--ethyl-'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine] management practices in the hydrologic context of claypan soils. Model calibration was achieved for 1993 to 2010 at a daily time step for flow and at a monthly time step for water quality constituents. The new percolation routines ensured correct balance between surface runoff and groundwater. The temporal heterogeneity of atrazine application ensured the correct frequency of daily atrazine loads. Atrazine incorporation by field cultivation resulted in a 17% simulated reduction in atrazine load without a significant increase in sediment yields. Reduced atrazine rates produced proportional reductions in simulated atrazine transport. The model can be used to estimate the impact of other drivers, e.g., changing aspects of climate, land use, cropping systems, tillage, or management practices, in this context. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Quantitative modelling of the closure of meso-scale parallel currents in the nightside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12 January 2000, during a northward IMF period, two successive conjunctions occur between the CUTLASS SuperDARN radar pair and the two satellites Ørsted and FAST. This situation is used to describe and model the electrodynamic of a nightside meso-scale arc associated with a convection shear. Three field-aligned current sheets, one upward and two downward on both sides, are observed.

    Based on the measurements of the parallel currents and either the conductance or the electric field profile, a model of the ionospheric current closure is developed along each satellite orbit. This model is one-dimensional, in a first attempt and a two-dimensional model is tested for the Ørsted case. These models allow one to quantify the balance between electric field gradients and ionospheric conductance gradients in the closure of the field-aligned currents.

    These radar and satellite data are also combined with images from Polar-UVI, allowing for a description of the time evolution of the arc between the two satellite passes. The arc is very dynamic, in spite of quiet solar wind conditions. Periodic enhancements of the convection and of electron precipitation associated with the arc are observed, probably associated with quasi-periodic injections of particles due to reconnection in the magnetotail. Also, a northward shift and a reorganisation of the precipitation pattern are observed, together with a southward shift of the convection shear.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  7. Quantitative modelling of the closure of meso-scale parallel currents in the nightside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12 January 2000, during a northward IMF period, two successive conjunctions occur between the CUTLASS SuperDARN radar pair and the two satellites Ørsted and FAST. This situation is used to describe and model the electrodynamic of a nightside meso-scale arc associated with a convection shear. Three field-aligned current sheets, one upward and two downward on both sides, are observed. Based on the measurements of the parallel currents and either the conductance or the electric field profile, a model of the ionospheric current closure is developed along each satellite orbit. This model is one-dimensional, in a first attempt and a two-dimensional model is tested for the Ørsted case. These models allow one to quantify the balance between electric field gradients and ionospheric conductance gradients in the closure of the field-aligned currents. These radar and satellite data are also combined with images from Polar-UVI, allowing for a description of the time evolution of the arc between the two satellite passes. The arc is very dynamic, in spite of quiet solar wind conditions. Periodic enhancements of the convection and of electron precipitation associated with the arc are observed, probably associated with quasi-periodic injections of particles due to reconnection in the magnetotail. Also, a northward shift and a reorganisation of the precipitation pattern are observed, together with a southward shift of the convection shear. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  8. Multi-terminal direct-current grids modeling, analysis, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Nilanjan; Majumder, Rajat; Yazdani, Amirnaser

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive modeling, analysis, and control design framework for multi-terminal direct current (MTDC) grids is presented together with their interaction with the surrounding AC networks and the impact on overall stability. The first book of its kind on the topic of multi-terminal DC (MTDC) grids  Presents a comprehensive modeling framework for MTDC grids which is compatible with the standard AC system modeling for stability studies Includes modal analysis and study of the interactions between the MTDC grid and the surrounding AC systems Addresses the problems of autonomous power sharing an

  9. Stohastic Model for Loads on Offshore Structures from Wave, Wind, Current and Water Elevation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Sterndorff, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    For code-based LRFD and for reliability-based assessment of offshore structures such as steel platforms it is essential that consistent stochastic models for the main metocean parameters are available. The most important metocean parameters are the significant wave height, maximum individual wave...... height, maximum crest height, wind speed, current speed and water elevation. In this paper a consistent stochastic model for these parameters is formulated, where the relevant directional dependence is included. For code-based LRFD assessment it is shown how the stochastic models can be used to determine...... characteristic values, partial safety factors, directional factors and load combination factors relevant for Central North Sea conditions....

  10. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... an Earth albedo model, based on reflectivity data from NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer project, has been published. In this paper the proposed model is presented, and the model is sought validated by comparing simulated data with telemetry from the Danish Ørsted satellite. A novel method...

  11. Charge and spin current statistics of the open Hubbard model with weak coupling to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buča, Berislav; Prosen, Tomaž

    2017-05-01

    Based on generalization and extension of our previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 067201 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.067201] to multiple independent Markovian baths we will compute the charge and spin current statistics of the open Hubbard model with weak system-bath coupling up to next-to-leading order in the coupling parameter. Only the next-to-leading and higher orders depend on the Hubbard interaction parameter. The physical results are related to those for the XXZ model in the analogous setup implying a certain universality, which potentially holds in this class of nonequilibrium models.

  12. Numerical modeling of submarine turbidity currents over erodible beds using unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Infante Sedano, Julio Ángel; Mohammadian, Abdolmajid

    2017-05-01

    Second-order central-upwind schemes proposed by Bryson et al. (2011) for the Saint-Venant system have two very attractive properties: well-balanced and positivity preserving, which are originally designed for constant fluid density and fixed beds in Bryson et al. (2011). For the turbidity current system with variable density over erodible beds, such desired properties can be obtained by developing a well-balanced and positivity preserving central-upwind scheme following the ideas in Bryson et al. (2011). To this end, in this paper, a coupled numerical model for two-dimensional depth-averaged turbidity current system over erodible beds is developed using finite volume method on triangular grids. The proposed numerical model is second-order accurate in space using piecewise linear reconstruction and third-order accurate in time using a strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta method. Applying the central-upwind method to estimate numerical fluxes through cell interfaces, the model can successfully deal with sharp gradients in turbidity flows. The developed numerical model can preserve the well-balanced property over irregular bottom, guarantee the non-negative turbidity current depth over erodible beds, and preserving the positivity of suspended sediment. These features of the developed numerical model and its robustness and accuracy are demonstrated in several numerical tests.

  13. 3D MHD modelling of low current-high voltage dc plasma torch under restrike mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebouvier, A.; Delalondre, C.; Fresnet, F.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of the gliding arc behaviour of a dc plasma torch operating with air under low current and high voltage conditions. The low current leads to instabilities and difficulties with simulating the process because the magnetic field is not sufficient to constrict the arc. The model is 3D, time dependent and the MHD equations are solved using CFD software Code_Saturne®. Although the arc is definitively non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), the LTE assumption is considered as a first approach. The injection of air is tangential. A hot gas channel reattachment model has been used to simulate the restriking process of the arc root. After the description of the model, the most appropriate electrical voltage breakdown parameter has been selected in comparing with experimental results. A typical operating point is then studied in detail and shows the helical shape of the arc discharge in the nozzle. Finally, the mass flow rate and the current have been varied in the range 0.16-0.5 g s-1 and 100-300 mA, respectively, corresponding to typical glidarc operating points of our experimental plasma torch. The model shows good consistency with experimental data in terms of global behaviour, arc length, mean voltage and glidarc frequency.

  14. Modeling and simulation of multilevel current source inverter based on SIMetrix/SIMPLIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianyu; Bao, Weibing; Fang, Weizhong; Ma, Xiushui

    2011-05-01

    Based on analysis of operational principle of single-phase multilevel current source inverter (MCSI), a novel method for modeling and simulation of MCSI system was proposed. In SIMetrix/SIMPLIS, the simulation model of a kind of singlephase 5-level CSI was developed by using hierarchy design. In the control system, the multi-carrier PWM modulation strategy was adopted, the current balance control for intermediate DC-link inductor was implemented on the principle of redundant switching combinations. The reasonability and validity were testified by the coincidence of the simulation results and theoretical analysis. This novel method is also suitable for modeling other power electronics inverters and offers a new thinking for designing actual power electronic circuits.

  15. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly doped DG MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Pradipta; Syamal, Binit; Koley, Kalyan; Dutta, Arka; Sarkar, C. K.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a drain current model for double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (DG MOSFETs) based on a new velocity saturation model that accounts for short-channel velocity saturation effect independently in the front and the back gate controlled channels under asymmetric front and back gate bias and oxide thickness. To determine the front and the back-channel velocity saturation, drain-induced barrier lowering is evaluated by effective gate voltages at the front and back gates obtained from surface potential at the threshold condition after considering symmetric and asymmetric front and back oxide thickness. The model also incorporates surface roughness scattering and ionized impurity scattering to estimate drain current for heavily / lightly doped channel for short-channel asymmetric DG MOSFET and a good agreement has been achieved with TCAD simulations, with a relative error of around 3-7%.

  16. Simultaneous calibration of surface flow and baseflow simulations: A revisit of the SWAT model calibration framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate analysis of water flow pathways from rainfall to streams is critical for simulating water use, climate change impact, and contaminant transport. In this study, we developed a new scheme to simultaneously calibrate surface flow (SF) and baseflow (BF) simulations of Soil and Water Assessment ...

  17. Inclusion of Riparian Wetland Module (RWM) into the SWAT model for assessment of wetland hydrological benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands are an integral part of many agricultural watersheds. They provide multiple ecosystem functions, such as improving water quality, mitigating flooding, and serving as natural habitats. Those functions are highly depended on wetland hydrological characteristics and their connectivity to the d...

  18. Sensitivity analysis of a forest gap model concerning current and future climate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasch, P.; Suckow, F.; Buerger, G.; Lindner, M.

    1998-07-01

    The ability of a forest gap model to simulate the effects of climate variability and extreme events depends on the temporal resolution of the weather data that are used and the internal processing of these data for growth, regeneration and mortality. The climatological driving forces of most current gap models are based on monthly means of weather data and their standard deviations, and long-term monthly means are used for calculating yearly aggregated response functions for ecological processes. In this study, the results of sensitivity analyses using the forest gap model FORSKA{sub -}P and involving climate data of different resolutions, from long-term monthly means to daily time series, including extreme events, are presented for the current climate and for a climate change scenario. The model was applied at two sites with differing soil conditions in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany. The sensitivity of the model concerning climate variations and different climate input resolutions is analysed and evaluated. The climate variability used for the model investigations affected the behaviour of the model substantially. (orig.)

  19. A refined regional modeling approach for the Corn Belt - Experiences and recommendations for large-scale integrated modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Gassman, Philip W.; Jha, Manoj K.; Kling, Catherine L.; Campbell, Todd; Srinivasan, Raghavan; White, Michael; Arnold, Jeffrey G.

    2015-05-01

    Nonpoint source pollution from agriculture is the main source of nitrogen and phosphorus in the stream systems of the Corn Belt region in the Midwestern US. This region is comprised of two large river basins, the intensely row-cropped Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) and Ohio-Tennessee River Basin (OTRB), which are considered the key contributing areas for the Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. Thus, in this area it is of utmost importance to ensure that intensive agriculture for food, feed and biofuel production can coexist with a healthy water environment. To address these objectives within a river basin management context, an integrated modeling system has been constructed with the hydrologic Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model, capable of estimating river basin responses to alternative cropping and/or management strategies. To improve modeling performance compared to previous studies and provide a spatially detailed basis for scenario development, this SWAT Corn Belt application incorporates a greatly refined subwatershed structure based on 12-digit hydrologic units or 'subwatersheds' as defined by the US Geological Service. The model setup, calibration and validation are time-demanding and challenging tasks for these large systems, given the scale intensive data requirements, and the need to ensure the reliability of flow and pollutant load predictions at multiple locations. Thus, the objectives of this study are both to comprehensively describe this large-scale modeling approach, providing estimates of pollution and crop production in the region as well as to present strengths and weaknesses of integrated modeling at such a large scale along with how it can be improved on the basis of the current modeling structure and results. The predictions were based on a semi-automatic hydrologic calibration approach for large-scale and spatially detailed modeling studies, with the use of the Sequential

  20. Model simulations of dense bottom currents in the Western Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Janssen, Frank; Bolding, Karsten; Umlauf, Lars; Rennau, Hannes

    2009-01-01

    Only recently, medium intensity inflow events into the Baltic Sea have gained more awareness because of their potential to ventilate intermediate layers in the Southern Baltic Sea basins. With the present high-resolution model study of the Western Baltic Sea a first attempt is made to obtain model based realistic estimates of turbulent mixing in this area where dense bottom currents resulting from medium intensity inflow events are weakened by turbulent entrainment. The numerical model simulation which is carried out using the General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM) during nine months in 2003 and 2004 is first validated by means of three automatic stations at the Drogden and Darss Sills and in the Arkona Sea. In order to obtain good agreement between observations and model results, the 0.5×0.5 nautical mile bathymetry had to be adjusted in order to account for the fact that even at that scale many relevant topographic features are not resolved. Current velocity, salinity and turbulence observations during a medium intensity inflow event through the Øresund are then compared to the model results. Given the general problems of point to point comparisons between observations and model simulations, the agreement is fairly good with the characteristic features of the inflow event well represented by the model simulations. Two different bulk measures for mixing activity are then introduced, the vertically integrated decay of salinity variance, which is equal to the production of micro-scale salinity variance, and the vertically integrated turbulent salt flux, which is related to an increase of potential energy due to vertical mixing of stably stratified flow. Both measures give qualitatively similar results and identify the Drogden and Darss Sills as well as the Bornholm Channel as mixing hot spots. Further regions of strong mixing are the dense bottom current pathways from these sills into the Arkona Sea, areas around Kriegers Flak (a shoal in the western Arkona Sea

  1. Ring Current Modeling of the March 2013 Storm with RAM-SCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Jeffery, C. A.; Delzanno, G. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The transport in realistic electric and magnetic fields plays an important role in energizing and redistributing ring current ions and electrons in the inner magnetosphere. On the other hand, scattering by plasma waves, specifically whistler mode chorus, has received considerable attention in recent modeling and data analysis studies due to the dual role these waves play for both the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons. To investigate the high variability of energetic particle fluxes during the 17-18 March 2013 storm, we use our ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM) two-way coupled with a 3-D equilibrium code (SCB) that calculates self-consistently the magnetic field in force balance with the anisotropic ring current plasma pressure. We simulate wave-particle interactions using the global distribution of chorus wave intensity reconstructed from the low-altitude measurements made by multiple POES satellites. We compare the simulated pitch angle distributions of ring current electrons and ions with measured fluxes from the Van Allen Probes. The combined effects from time-dependent transport and scattering by plasma waves on ring current dynamics are evaluated.

  2. The morpho-agronomic characterization study of Lens culinaris germplasm under salt marsh habitat in Swat, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Rabia; Mulk Khan, Shujaul; Ahmad, Fayaz; Hussain, Murtaza; Abd Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A; Hashem, Abeer; Aldubise, Abdullah

    2017-11-01

    The present research study evaluate and identify the most suitable and high yielding genotypes of Lens culinaris for the salt marsh habitat of Swat in moist temperate sort of agro climatic environment of Pakistan. A total of fourteen genotypes were cultivated and analyzed through Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). These genotypes were AZRC-4, NL-2, NL4, NL-5, NL-6, NARC-11-1, NARC-11-2, NARC-11-3, NARC-11-4, 09503, 09505, 09506, P.Masoor-09 and Markaz-09. Different parameters i.e., germination rate, flowering, physiological maturity, plant height, biological grain yield, seed weight, pods formation and its height, pods per plants and protein content were focused specially throughout the study. Preliminary the Lentil genotypes have significant variability in all the major morpho-agronomic traits. The days to germination, 50% flowering and 100 seed weight ranged from 7 to 9, 110 to 116 days, and from 5.4 to 7.3 gm respectively. Biological yield and grain yield ranged from 5333 to 9777 kg ha-1 and 1933 to 3655 kg ha-1 respectively. Whereas, protein contents ranged from 23.21% to 28.45%. It was concluded that the genotype AZRC-4 is better varity in terms of grain yield plus in 100 seed weight and moreover, 09506 genotype was significant under salt marsh habitat in early maturing for the Swat Valley, Pakistan.

  3. Estimation of friction parameters in gravity currents by data assimilation in a model hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wirth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the last in a series of three investigating the friction laws and their parametrisation in idealised gravity currents in a rotating frame. Results on the dynamics of a gravity current (Wirth, 2009 and on the estimation of friction laws by data assimilation (Wirth and Verron, 2008 are combined to estimate the friction parameters and discriminate between friction laws in non-hydrostatic numerical simulations of gravity current dynamics, using data assimilation and a reduced gravity shallow water model.

    I demonstrate, that friction parameters and laws in gravity currents can be estimated using data assimilation. The results clearly show that friction follows a linear Rayleigh law for small Reynolds numbers and the estimated value agrees well with the analytical value obtained for non-accelerating Ekman layers. A significant and sudden departure towards a quadratic drag law at an Ekman layer based Reynolds number of around 800 is shown, in agreement with classical laboratory experiments. The drag coefficient obtained compares well to friction values over smooth surfaces. I show that data assimilation can be used to determine friction parameters and discriminate between friction laws and that it is a powerful tool in systematically connecting models within a model hierarchy.

  4. Development and application of an oil spill model with wave-current interactions in coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, WeiJun; Hao, Yanni; Zhang, Li; Xu, Tiaojian; Ren, Xiaozhong; Cao, Feng; Wang, Shoudong

    2014-07-15

    The present paper focuses on developing a numerical oil spill model that incorporates the full three-dimensional wave-current interactions for a better representation of the spilled oil transport mechanics in complicated coastal environments. The incorporation of surface wave effects is not only imposing a traditional drag coefficient formulation at the free surface, but also the 3D momentum equations are adjusted to include the impact of the vertically dependent radiation stresses on the currents. Based on the current data from SELFE and wave data from SWAN, the oil spill model utilizes oil particle method to predict the trajectory of individual droplets and the oil concentration. Compared with the observations in Dalian New Port oil spill event, the developed model taking into account wave-current coupling administers to giving better conformity than the one without. The comparisons demonstrates that 3D radiation stress impacts the spill dynamics drastically near the sea surface and along the coastline, while having less impact in deeper water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Model Predictive Control with Integral Action for Current Density Profile Tracking in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Z. O.; Wehner, W. P.; Schuster, E.; Boyer, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Active control of the toroidal current density profile may play a critical role in non-inductively sustained long-pulse, high-beta scenarios in a spherical torus (ST) configuration, which is among the missions of the NSTX-U facility. In this work, a previously developed physics-based control-oriented model is embedded in a feedback control scheme based on a model predictive control (MPC) strategy to track a desired current density profile evolution specified indirectly by a desired rotational transform profile. An integrator is embedded into the standard MPC formulation to reject various modeling uncertainties and external disturbances. Neutral beam powers, electron density, and total plasma current are used as actuators. The proposed MPC strategy incorporates various state and actuator constraints directly into the control design process by solving a constrained optimization problem in real-time to determine the optimal actuator requests. The effectiveness of the proposed controller in regulating the current density profile in NSTX-U is demonstrated in closed-loop nonlinear simulations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. A SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF THREE-PHASE BANK OF CURRENT TRANSFORMERS IN THE DYNAMIC SIMULATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Novash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article presents and substantiates a simplified mathematical simulation model realization technique for a three-phase bank of current transformers (CT based on their nameplate data. The secondary windings and load of the current transformers form a Y-connected circuit with neutral conductor. Consistent with the presented technique the simplified mathematical simulation realizes in the dynamic-modeling environment of MatLab–Simulink–SimPowerSystems. This simulation allows obtaining the secondary current curve shape entering only the nameplate data of the CT being simulated. Thus, the simulation under consideration enables the assessment of technical feasibility of the CT from viewpoint of correct functioning of the relay protective devices during transient processes in the electric energy systems.Employing the model, the authors conduct computational experiments simulating the CT typical operating modes: short-circuit current passage with presence/absence of the direct component and short-circuit current passage with presence of the direct component and residual magnetic induction of the CT. The paper examines the modes of automatic re-closing failure at different stages of the breaker closure with oscillograms drawn illustrating each characteristic case.The authors compare two methods for the CT iron magnetization-curve assigning: manual approximation and the Ollendorf-formula approximation. Relying on this comparison they conclude on feasability of application of the magnetization-curve approximating function for the CT operating analysis during transient processes in the electric energy systems. An elaborated user-friendly graphic interface provides a means of visual assigning the CT nominal parameters, the residual magnetic induction, and the method of the transformer iron magnetization curve approximation. The results of conducted computational experiments prove feasibility of the CT-bank simulation model.

  7. Current transport modeling and experimental study of THz room temperature ballistic deflection transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Vikas; Margala, Martin; Yu, Qiaoyan; Ampadu, Paul; Guarino, Gregg; Sobolewski, Roman

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, two different theoretical models, Comsol Multiphysics™ (a Finite Element Analysis tool), and a field solver Atlas/Blaze from Silvaco, are compared qualitatively to study the effect of the deflector position, its size and electric field on the charge transport and its distribution along the channel, resulting in current outputs and leakages in ballistic deflection transistors (BDT). Silvaco simulations and experimental results were then used to study the lateral charge transport as a result of variation in electric field distribution, which controls the charge current along the channel in BDT. The electric field dependence of gain is also studied with experimental and theoretical results.

  8. Current transport modeling and experimental study of THz room temperature ballistic deflection transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Vikas; Margala, Martin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA, 01854 (United States); Yu Qiaoyan; Ampadu, Paul; Guarino, Gregg; Sobolewski, Roman, E-mail: vikas_kaushal@student.uml.ed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, NY, 14627 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In this paper, two different theoretical models, Comsol Multiphysics{sup TM} (a Finite Element Analysis tool), and a field solver Atlas/Blaze from Silvaco, are compared qualitatively to study the effect of the deflector position, its size and electric field on the charge transport and its distribution along the channel, resulting in current outputs and leakages in ballistic deflection transistors (BDT). Silvaco simulations and experimental results were then used to study the lateral charge transport as a result of variation in electric field distribution, which controls the charge current along the channel in BDT. The electric field dependence of gain is also studied with experimental and theoretical results.

  9. Modeling current-voltage charateristics of proteorhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin: towards an optoelectronics based on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Reggiani, Lino

    2016-10-18

    Current-voltage characteristics of metal-protein-metal structures made of proteorhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin are modeled by using a percolation-like approach. Starting from the tertiary structure pertaining to the single protein, an analogous resistance network is created. Charge transfer inside the network is described as a sequential tunneling mechanism and the current is calculated for each value of the given voltage. The theory is validated with available experiments, in dark and light. The role of the tertiary structure of the single protein and of the mechanisms responsible for the photo-activity is discussed.

  10. Lightning Return Stroke Current Analysis Using Electromagnetic Models and the 3D-FDTD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaddour Arzag

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The three dimensions finite difference time domain method (3D-FDTD is employed to calculate lightning return stoke current distributions in a vertical lightning channel. The latter is excited at its bottom by a lumped current source above a flat perfectly conducting ground. In this study four lightning return stroke electromagnetic models are used. The calculating approach, which is based on Taflove formulation of the 3D-FDTD method combined to the UPML boundary conditions, is implemented on Matlab environment. For validation needs, the obtained lightning return stroke space and time distributions are compared with others taken from specialized literature.

  11. A model of the telluric current eddy: a case from eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Jun; Du, Xuebin

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic induction in the Earth’s interior is an important contributor to the near-Earth geomagnetic and telluric current. The telluric current induced by geomagnetic storms generates secondary geoelectric storms. This motionally induced geoelectric field can be detected in the sea or inland and has potential for electrical soundings of the Earth. This work is aimed at gaining an understanding of the distribution of the current signal due to geomagnetic storms. In this paper, by comparing the geoelectric field during storms and at quiet times, as well as comparing the telluric current calculation results of eastern China and local stations, the following conclusions are obtained. (1) A large range of amplitude change ratios of geoelectric storms is affected by latitude: the amplitude ratio rises at higher latitudes, and the high-frequency composition of geoelectric storms is more complicated than that of geomagnetic storms. (2) The storm creates a large area of electromagnetic fluctuations, and influences the distribution of the telluric current. (3) On the basis of previous studies, a spatial eddy current model is used, which can explain the observation phenomena well. At the same time, a further study direction is put forward on Earth’s electromagnetism.

  12. A self-discharge model of Lithium-Sulfur batteries based on direct shuttle current measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knap, Vaclav; Stroe, Daniel-Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej; Purkayastha, Rajlakshmi; Propp, Karsten; Teodorescu, Remus; Schaltz, Erik

    2016-12-01

    In the group of post Lithium-ion batteries, Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) batteries attract a high interest due to their high theoretical limits of the specific capacity of 1672 Ah kg-1 and specific energy of around 2600 Wh kg-1. However, they suffer from polysulfide shuttle, a specific phenomenon of this chemistry, which causes fast capacity fade, low coulombic efficiency, and high self-discharge. The high self-discharge of Li-S batteries is observed in the range of minutes to hours, especially at a high state of charge levels, and makes their use in practical applications and testing a challenging process. A simple but comprehensive mathematical model of the Li-S battery cell self-discharge based on the shuttle current was developed and is presented. The shuttle current values for the model parameterization were obtained from the direct shuttle current measurements. Furthermore, the battery cell depth-of-discharge values were recomputed in order to account for the influence of the self-discharge and provide a higher accuracy of the model. Finally, the derived model was successfully validated against laboratory experiments at various conditions.

  13. Theoretical model of the tunneling current between a metallic tip and a ferroelectric material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Ravi; Yost, Andrew; Chien, Teyu

    We present a model to calculate the tunneling current for a ferroelectric (FE) material in a metal/vacuum/Ferroelectric tunneling junction. Using this model, we try to explore the effect of the FE dipole orientation's direction on I - V spectrum using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The STM tunneling current for non-FE materials depends upon various factors such as tip -sample distance (vacuum gap), temperature, density of states (DOS) of tip and of sample, and tip-sample bias. FE materials have internal electric dipoles giving rise to internal and external electric fields. The electric field induced by these dipoles will distort the fermi level as a function of depth in the material. In our model, the Fermi level is assumed to be inclined with a slope as a function of the depth. The slope depends upon the orientation and the strength of the electric dipole moment. In this model we use the WKB method accounting for the slope of the fermi level to calculate the tunneling probability from tip to different depths then summing all contributions to obtain the total current as a function of tip-sample bias, i.e. I - V curves. School of Energy Resources, University of Wyoming.

  14. An improved substrate current model for ultra-thin gate oxide MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin-An; Hao, Yue; Yu, Chun-Li; Han, Feng-Yan

    2006-03-01

    In existing substrate current Isub models for short channel MOSFETs, the new model of the characteristic ionization length l or the velocity saturation region length Ld has been developed by using the polynomial fitting method in order to represent the variation of maximum electric field Em with bias voltages in channel. This work proposes a bias-voltage- and gate-length-dependent parameter η which was previously treated as a process-dependent constant, aimed at obtaining an accurate expression of Em to increase the accuracy of Isub model for ultra-deep submicron devices with ultra-thin gate oxides. This new method overcomes the complicated modeling of characteristic ionization length l, and avoids the extractions of different fitting constant η corresponding to different devices. It also warrants the unique extraction of impact ionization coefficients Ai and Bi. Compared with some existing Isub models, the improved one presents more excellent agreements with the experiments of ultra-thin gate oxide ( tox = 1.24 nm) LDD NMOSFETs on 90 nm CMOS technology, especially in the high electric field region. Meanwhile, the new Isub model accurately simulates the shift of the peak of substrate current along the gate bias axis with the shortening of gate length which usually occurs in ultra-thin gate oxide devices, helpful to the lifetime prediction of sub-100 nm devices.

  15. Three-dimensional model-observation comparison in the Loop Current region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosburg, K. C.; Donohue, K. A.; Chassignet, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution ocean models are required for hurricane and oil spill pathway predictions, and to enhance the dynamical understanding of circulation dynamics. Output from the 1/25° data-assimilating Gulf of Mexico HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM31.0) is compared to daily full water column observations from a moored array, with a focus on Loop Current path variability and upper-deep layer coupling during eddy separation. Array-mean correlation was 0.93 for sea surface height, and 0.93, 0.63, and 0.75 in the thermocline for temperature, zonal, and meridional velocity, respectively. Peaks in modeled eddy kinetic energy were consistent with observations during Loop Current eddy separation, but with modeled deep eddy kinetic energy at half the observed amplitude. Modeled and observed LC meander phase speeds agreed within 8% and 2% of each other within the 100 - 40 and 40 - 20 day bands, respectively. The model reproduced observed patterns indicative of baroclinic instability, that is, a vertical offset with deep stream function leading upper stream function in the along-stream direction. While modeled deep eddies differed slightly spatially and temporally, the joint development of an upper-ocean meander along the eastern side of the LC and the successive propagation of upper-deep cyclone/anticylone pairs that preceded separation were contained within the model solution. Overall, model-observation comparison indicated that HYCOM31.0 could provide insight into processes within the 100 - 20 day band, offering a larger spatial and temporal window than observational arrays.

  16. Thermal Modelling Analysis of Spiral Wound Supercapacitor under Constant-Current Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Li, Liwei; Yin, Huaixian; Zhang, Tiezhu; Wan, Wubo

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional modelling approach is used to study the effects of operating and ambient conditions on the thermal behaviour of the spiral wound supercapacitor. The transient temperature distribution during cycling is obtained by using the finite element method with an implicit predictor-multicorrector algorithm. At the constant current of 2A, the results show that the maximum temperature appears in core area. After 5 cycles, the maximum temperature is 34.5°C, while in steady state, it’s up to 42.5°C. This paper further studies the relationship between the maximum temperature and charge-discharge current. The maximum temperature will be more than 60°C after 5 cycles at the current of 4A, and cooling measurements should be taken at that time. It can provide thoughts on inner temperature field distribution and structure design of the spiral wound supercapacitor in working process. PMID:26444687

  17. Modeling and Controller Design of PV Micro Inverter without Using Electrolytic Capacitors and Input Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faa Jeng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the modeling and controller design of a novel two-stage photovoltaic (PV micro inverter (MI that eliminates the need for an electrolytic capacitor (E-cap and input current sensor. The proposed MI uses an active-clamped current-fed push-pull DC-DC converter, cascaded with a full-bridge inverter. Three strategies are proposed to cope with the inherent limitations of a two-stage PV MI: (i high-speed DC bus voltage regulation using an integrator to deal with the 2nd harmonic voltage ripples found in single-phase systems; (ii inclusion of a small film capacitor in the DC bus to achieve ripple-free PV voltage; (iii improved incremental conductance (INC maximum power point tracking (MPPT without the need for current sensing by the PV module. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed system.

  18. [Housing quality and its health impact in Italy: current knowledge, methodological issues, new evaluation models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Lorenzo; Capolongo, Stefano; Flacco, Maria Elena; Manzoli, Lamberto; Buffoli, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    A literature search was performed to evaluate the current state of knowledge regarding housing quality in Italy and the adequacy of methods used to assess it. The simple adoption of current criteria required by national and local legislation for the evaluation of dwellings seems to be inadequate, because some crucial parameters, including radon testing and evaluation of accessibility are not considered. Also, current assessment methods have been used exclusively at the local level, and the health impact of housing quality in Italy has never been estimated. There is a strong need for more sensitive methods of evaluation of indoor environments, to be validated on large and representative samples. The authors discuss two possible alternative models which may ensure a multifactorial, holistic assessment of the quality of housing spaces, also by including an evaluation of psycho-social components.

  19. Thermal Modelling Analysis of Spiral Wound Supercapacitor under Constant-Current Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Li, Liwei; Yin, Huaixian; Zhang, Tiezhu; Wan, Wubo

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional modelling approach is used to study the effects of operating and ambient conditions on the thermal behaviour of the spiral wound supercapacitor. The transient temperature distribution during cycling is obtained by using the finite element method with an implicit predictor-multicorrector algorithm. At the constant current of 2A, the results show that the maximum temperature appears in core area. After 5 cycles, the maximum temperature is 34.5°C, while in steady state, it's up to 42.5°C. This paper further studies the relationship between the maximum temperature and charge-discharge current. The maximum temperature will be more than 60°C after 5 cycles at the current of 4A, and cooling measurements should be taken at that time. It can provide thoughts on inner temperature field distribution and structure design of the spiral wound supercapacitor in working process.

  20. No-net-rotation model of current plate velocities incorporating plate motion model NUVEL-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, Donald F.; Gordon, Richard G.

    1991-01-01

    NNR-NUVEL1 is presented which is a model of plate velocities relative to the unique reference frame defined by requiring no-net-rotation of the lithosphere while constraining relative plate velocities to equal those in global plate motion model NUVEL-1 (DeMets et al., 1990). In NNR-NUVEL1, the Pacific plate rotates in a right-handed sense relative to the no-net-rotation reference frame at 0.67 deg/m.y. about 63 deg S, 107 deg E. At Hawaii the Pacific plate moves relative to the no-net-rotation reference frame at 70 mm/yr, which is 25 mm/yr slower than the Pacific plate moves relative to the hotspots. Differences between NNR-NUVEL1 and HS2-NUVEL1 are described. The no-net-rotation reference frame differs significantly from the hotspot reference frame. If the difference between reference frames is caused by motion of the hotspots relative to a mean-mantle reference frame, then hotspots beneath the Pacific plate move with coherent motion towards the east-southeast. Alternatively, the difference between reference frames can show that the uniform drag, no-net-torque reference frame, which is kinematically equivalent to the no-net-rotation reference frame, is based on a dynamically incorrect premise.

  1. No-net-rotation model of current plate velocities incorporating plate motion model NUVEL-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, Donald F.; Gordon, Richard G.

    1991-11-01

    NNR-NUVEL1 is presented which is a model of plate velocities relative to the unique reference frame defined by requiring no-net-rotation of the lithosphere while constraining relative plate velocities to equal those in global plate motion model NUVEL-1 (DeMets et al., 1990). In NNR-NUVEL1, the Pacific plate rotates in a right-handed sense relative to the no-net-rotation reference frame at 0.67 deg/m.y. about 63 deg S, 107 deg E. At Hawaii the Pacific plate moves relative to the no-net-rotation reference frame at 70 mm/yr, which is 25 mm/yr slower than the Pacific plate moves relative to the hotspots. Differences between NNR-NUVEL1 and HS2-NUVEL1 are described. The no-net-rotation reference frame differs significantly from the hotspot reference frame. If the difference between reference frames is caused by motion of the hotspots relative to a mean-mantle reference frame, then hotspots beneath the Pacific plate move with coherent motion towards the east-southeast. Alternatively, the difference between reference frames can show that the uniform drag, no-net-torque reference frame, which is kinematically equivalent to the no-net-rotation reference frame, is based on a dynamically incorrect premise.

  2. Parallelization of a hydrological model using the message passing interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Li, Tiejian; Sun, Liqun; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the natural processes, hydrological models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) are becoming larger and more complex with increasing computation time. Additionally, other procedures such as model calibration, which may require thousands of model iterations, can increase running time and thus further reduce rapid modeling and analysis. Using the widely-applied SWAT as an example, this study demonstrates how to parallelize a serial hydrological model in a Windows® environment using a parallel programing technology—Message Passing Interface (MPI). With a case study, we derived the optimal values for the two parameters (the number of processes and the corresponding percentage of work to be distributed to the master process) of the parallel SWAT (P-SWAT) on an ordinary personal computer and a work station. Our study indicates that model execution time can be reduced by 42%–70% (or a speedup of 1.74–3.36) using multiple processes (two to five) with a proper task-distribution scheme (between the master and slave processes). Although the computation time cost becomes lower with an increasing number of processes (from two to five), this enhancement becomes less due to the accompanied increase in demand for message passing procedures between the master and all slave processes. Our case study demonstrates that the P-SWAT with a five-process run may reach the maximum speedup, and the performance can be quite stable (fairly independent of a project size). Overall, the P-SWAT can help reduce the computation time substantially for an individual model run, manual and automatic calibration procedures, and optimization of best management practices. In particular, the parallelization method we used and the scheme for deriving the optimal parameters in this study can be valuable and easily applied to other hydrological or environmental models.

  3. Modeling the Spin Motor Current of the International Space Station's Control Moment Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) attitude control is provided by two means: The Russian Segment uses thrusters and the U.S. Segment uses double-gimbaled control moment gyroscopes (CMG). CMGs are used as momentum exchange devices, providing non propulsive attitude control for the vehicle. The CMGs are very important for the ISS program because, first, they save propellant - which needs to be transferred to the Station in special cargo vehicles - and, second, they provide the microgravity environment on the Station - which is necessary for scientific experiments planned for the ISS mission. Since 2002, when one of the CMG on the ISS failed, all CMGs are closely monitored. High gimbal rates, vibration spikes, unusual variations of spin motor current and bearing temperatures are of great concern, since these parameters are the CMG health indicators. The telemetry analysis of these and some other CMG parameters is used to determine constrains and make changes to the CMGs operation on board. These CMG limitations, in turn, may limit the ISS attitude control capabilities and may be critical to ISS operation. Therefore, it is important to know whether the CMG parameter is nominal or out of family, and why. The goal of this project is to analyze an important CMG parameter - spin motor current. Some operational decisions are made now based on the spin motor current signatures. The spin motor current depends on gimbal rates, ISS rates, and spin bearing friction. The spin bearing friction in turn depends on the bearing temperatures, wheel rates, normal load - which is a function of gimbal and wheel rates - lubrication, etc. The first task of this project is to create a spin motor current mathematical model based on CMG dynamics model and the current knowledge on bearing friction in microgravity.

  4. Modeling space-charge-limited currents in organic semiconductors: Extracting trap density and mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2011-11-28

    We have developed and have applied a mobility edge model that takes drift and diffusion currents to characterize the space-charge-limited current in organic semiconductors into account. The numerical solution of the drift-diffusion equation allows the utilization of asymmetric contacts to describe the built-in potential within the device. The model has been applied to extract information of the distribution of traps from experimental current-voltage measurements of a rubrene single crystal from Krellner showing excellent agreement across several orders of magnitude in the current. Although the two contacts are made of the same metal, an energy offset of 580 meV between them, ascribed to differences in the deposition techniques (lamination vs evaporation) was essential to correctly interpret the shape of the current-voltage characteristics at low voltage. A band mobility of 0.13cm 2V-1s-1 for holes is estimated, which is consistent with transport along the long axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. The total density of traps deeper than 0.1 eV was 2.2×1016cm -3. The sensitivity analysis and error estimation in the obtained parameters show that it is not possible to accurately resolve the shape of the trap distribution for energies deeper than 0.3 eV or shallower than 0.1 eV above the valence-band edge. The total number of traps deeper than 0.3 eV, however, can be estimated. Contact asymmetry and the diffusion component of the current play an important role in the description of the device at low bias and are required to obtain reliable information about the distribution of deep traps. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  5. Current models broadly neglect specific needs of biodiversity conservation in protected areas under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, Mungla; Ibisch, Pierre L; Moloney, Kirk A; Jeltsch, Florian

    2011-05-03

    Protected areas are the most common and important instrument for the conservation of biological diversity and are called for under the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity. Growing human population densities, intensified land-use, invasive species and increasing habitat fragmentation threaten ecosystems worldwide and protected areas are often the only refuge for endangered species. Climate change is posing an additional threat that may also impact ecosystems currently under protection. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to include the potential impact of climate change when designing future nature conservation strategies and implementing protected area management. This approach would go beyond reactive crisis management and, by necessity, would include anticipatory risk assessments. One avenue for doing so is being provided by simulation models that take advantage of the increase in computing capacity and performance that has occurred over the last two decades.Here we review the literature to determine the state-of-the-art in modeling terrestrial protected areas under climate change, with the aim of evaluating and detecting trends and gaps in the current approaches being employed, as well as to provide a useful overview and guidelines for future research. Most studies apply statistical, bioclimatic envelope models and focus primarily on plant species as compared to other taxa. Very few studies utilize a mechanistic, process-based approach and none examine biotic interactions like predation and competition. Important factors like land-use, habitat fragmentation, invasion and dispersal are rarely incorporated, restricting the informative value of the resulting predictions considerably. The general impression that emerges is that biodiversity conservation in protected areas could benefit from the application of modern modeling approaches to a greater extent than is currently reflected in the scientific literature. It is particularly true that

  6. Effect of microscopic modeling of skin in electrical and thermal analysis of transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-12-21

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation scheme where a small current is delivered to the brain via two electrodes attached to the scalp. The electrode design is an important topic, not only as regards efficacy, but also from a safety perspective, as tDCS may be related to skin lesions that are sometimes observed after stimulation. Previous computational models of tDCS have omitted the effects of microscopic structures in the skin, and the different soak conditions of the electrodes, and model validation has been limited. In this study, multiphysics and multiscale analysis are proposed to demonstrate the importance of microscopic modeling of the skin, in order to clarify the effects of the internal electric field, and to examine temperature elevation around the electrodes. This novel microscopic model of the skin layer took into consideration the effect of saline/water penetration in hair follicles and sweat ducts on the field distribution around the electrodes. The temperature elevation in the skin was then computed by solving the bioheat equation. Also, a multiscale model was introduced to account for macroscopic and microscopic tissues of the head and skin, which was validated by measurement of the head resistance during tDCS. As a result, the electric field in the microscopic model of the skin was less localized when the follicles/ducts were filled with saline instead of hair or tap water. Temperature elevation was also lessened with saline, in comparison with other substances. Saline, which may penetrate the hair follicles and sweat ducts, suppressed the field concentration around the electrodes. For conventional magnitudes of current injection, and a head resistance of less than 10 kΩ, the temperature elevation in the skin when using saline-soaked electrodes was low, less than 0.1 °C, and unlikely to cause adverse thermal effects.

  7. A multi-model assessment of the impact of currents, waves and wind in modelling surface drifters and oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dominicis, M.; Bruciaferri, D.; Gerin, R.; Pinardi, N.; Poulain, P. M.; Garreau, P.; Zodiatis, G.; Perivoliotis, L.; Fazioli, L.; Sorgente, R.; Manganiello, C.

    2016-11-01

    Validation of oil spill forecasting systems suffers from a lack of data due to the scarcity of oil slick in situ and satellite observations. Drifters (surface drifting buoys) are often considered as proxy for oil spill to overcome this problem. However, they can have different designs and consequently behave in a different way at sea, making it not straightforward to use them for oil spill model validation purposes and to account for surface currents, waves and wind when modelling them. Stemming from the need to validate the MEDESS4MS (Mediterranean Decision Support System for Marine Safety) multi-model oil spill prediction system, which allows access to several ocean, wave and meteorological operational model forecasts, an exercise at sea was carried out to collect a consistent dataset of oil slick satellite observations, in situ data and trajectories of different type of drifters. The exercise, called MEDESS4MS Serious Game 1 (SG1), took place in the Elba Island region (Western Mediterranean Sea) during May 2014. Satellite images covering the MEDESS4MS SG1 exercise area were acquired every day and, in the case an oil spill was observed from satellite, vessels of the Italian Coast Guard (ITCG) were sent in situ to confirm the presence of the pollution. During the exercise one oil slick was found in situ and drifters, with different water-following characteristics, were effectively deployed into the oil slick and then monitored in the following days. Although it was not possible to compare the oil slick and drifter trajectories due to a lack of satellite observations of the same oil slick in the following days, the oil slick observations in situ and drifters trajectories were used to evaluate the quality of MEDESS4MS multi-model currents, waves and winds by using the MEDSLIK-II oil spill model. The response of the drifters to surface ocean currents, different Stokes drift parameterizations and wind drag has been examined. We found that the surface ocean currents

  8. Current diffusion and normal zone propagation inside the aluminum stabilized superconductor of ATLAS model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; Pellegatta, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2003-01-01

    The normal zone propagation inside the B/sub O/ model coil of the ATLAS Toroidal magnet has been measured over a large range of applied currents. Typical values for the longitudinal propagation vary from 0.3 to 15 m/s at 8 and 24 kA, respectively. A new analytical expression for the longitudinal quench propagation inside superconducting cables is presented. It describes the propagation inside superconducting wires as well as the propagation inside large stabilized superconductors. It is found that in the limit case of high currents, the stabilizer functions only as a heat-sink. The model is compared to experimental data and a good correlation is found. (10 refs).

  9. A relativistic model of electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in tokamak plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Liu Y.R.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A fully relativistic model of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD efficiency based on the adjoint function techniques is considered. Numerical calculations of the current drive efficiency in a tokamak by using the variational approach are performed. A fully relativistic extension of the variational principle with the modified basis functions for the Spitzer function with momentum conservation in the electron-electron collision is described in general tokamak geometry. The model developed has generalized that of Marushchenko’s (N.B . Marushchenko, et al. Fusion Sci. & Tech., 2009, which is extended for arbitrary temperatures and covers exactly the asymptotic for u ≫ 1 when Z → ∞, and suitable for ray-tracing calculations.

  10. Role of the lower hybrid spectrum in the current drive modeling for DEMO scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Santini, F.; Amicucci, L.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Galli, A.; Mirizzi, F.; Napoli, F.; Panaccione, L.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    The active control of the radial current density profile is one of the major issues of thermonuclear fusion energy research based on magnetic confinement. The lower hybrid current drive could in principle be used as an efficient tool. However, previous understanding considered the electron temperature envisaged in a reactor at the plasma periphery too large to allow penetration of the coupled radio frequency (RF) power due to strong Landau damping. In this work, we present new numerical results based on quasilinear theory, showing that the injection of power spectra with different {n}// widths of the main lobe produce an RF-driven current density profile spanning most of the outer radial half of the plasma ({n}// is the refractive index in a parallel direction to the confinement magnetic field). Plasma kinetic profiles envisaged for the DEMO reactor are used as references. We demonstrate the robustness of the modeling results concerning the key role of the spectral width in determining the lower hybrid-driven current density profile. Scans of plasma parameters are extensively carried out with the aim of excluding the possibility that any artefact of the utilised numerical modeling would produce any novelty. We neglect here the parasitic effect of spectral broadening produced by linear scattering due to plasma density fluctuations, which mainly occurs for low magnetic field devices. This effect will be analyzed in other work that completes the report on the present breakthrough.

  11. Generalized SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Pt. 2; From current to constituent quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, U.; Lutz, M.; Klimt, S.; Weise, W. (Regensburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik 1 - Theoretische Physik)

    1990-10-08

    We investigate the properties of constituent quarks, i.e. quarks dressed by their strong interactions, in a generalized Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with N{sub f}=3 flavours. In the Hartree-Fock approximation, the step from structureless current quarks to massive constituent quarks is made through dynamical mass generation which implies spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking. We study, in particular, the quark scalar, vector and axial vector currents within this framework. We demonstrate that, a low energy and momentum transfers, single valence quarks are strongly screened by quark-antiquark polarization effects. For the electromagnetic currents, we recover relationships familiar from the vector meson dominance model. For the axial current, screening by J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} quark-antiquark modes leads to an effective quark axial vector constant g{sub A}<1 which satisfies the Goldberger-Treiman relation at the quark level. The spin content of the proton is also discussed in this framework. We calculate quark magnetic moments and electromagnetic form factors and discuss their related sizes. (orig.).

  12. Current induced torques and interfacial spin-orbit coupling: Semiclassical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Haney, Paul M.

    2013-05-07

    In bilayer nanowires consisting of a ferromagnetic layer and a nonmagnetic layer with strong spin-orbit coupling, currents create torques on the magnetization beyond those found in simple ferromagnetic nanowires. The resulting magnetic dynamics appear to require torques that can be separated into two terms, dampinglike and fieldlike. The dampinglike torque is typically derived from models describing the bulk spin Hall effect and the spin transfer torque, and the fieldlike torque is typically derived from a Rashba model describing interfacial spin-orbit coupling. We derive a model based on the Boltzmann equation that unifies these approaches. We also consider an approximation to the Boltzmann equation, the drift-diffusion model, that qualitatively reproduces the behavior, but quantitatively differs in some regimes. We show that the Boltzmann equation with physically reasonable parameters can match the torques for any particular sample, but in some cases, it fails to describe the experimentally observed thickness dependencies.

  13. Flavour-changing neutral currents making and breaking the standard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archilli, F; Bettler, M-O; Owen, P; Petridis, K A

    2017-06-07

    The standard model of particle physics is our best description yet of fundamental particles and their interactions, but it is known to be incomplete. As yet undiscovered particles and interactions might exist. One of the most powerful ways to search for new particles is by studying processes known as flavour-changing neutral current decays, whereby a quark changes its flavour without altering its electric charge. One example of such a transition is the decay of a beauty quark into a strange quark. Here we review some intriguing anomalies in these decays, which have revealed potential cracks in the standard model-hinting at the existence of new phenomena.

  14. A bounce-averaged kinetic model of the ring current ion population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Kozyra, J. U.; Khazanov, G. V.; Nagy, A. F.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Fok, M.-C.

    1994-01-01

    A bounced-averaged ring current kinetic model for arbitrary pitch angle, including losses due to charge exchange and Coulomb collisions along ion drift paths, is developed and solved numerically. Results from simplifield model runs, intended to illustrate the effects of adiabatic drifts and collisional losses on the proton population, are presented. The processes of: (1) particle acceleration under the conditions of time-independent magnetospheric electric fields; (2) a predominant loss of particles with small pitch angles due to charge exchange; and (3) a buildup of a low-energy population caused by the Coulomb drag energy degradation, are discussed.

  15. Small-signal model of a decoupled double synchronous reference frame current controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowlatabadi, Mohammadkazem Bakhshizadeh; Hjerrild, Jester; Kocewiak, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    The converter behavior in harmonic studies or harmonic stability analysis can be evaluated by its output impedance. In order to overcome the nonlinearities introduced by the PLL, linearized models around the operating point are typically used. However, in the case of an imbalance in the system...... the dq signals are not dc anymore, and therefore, linearization cannot be done. In this paper a Decoupled Double Synchronous Frame PLL is used to eliminate the oscillations in the dq frame signals. The small signal model of this PLL including an unbalanced current controller is presented in this paper....

  16. Efficient non-hydrostatic modelling of 3D wave-induced currents using a subgrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnsdorp, Dirk P.; Smit, Pieter B.; Zijlema, Marcel; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.

    2017-08-01

    Wave-induced currents are an ubiquitous feature in coastal waters that can spread material over the surf zone and the inner shelf. These currents are typically under resolved in non-hydrostatic wave-flow models due to computational constraints. Specifically, the low vertical resolutions adequate to describe the wave dynamics - and required to feasibly compute at the scales of a field site - are too coarse to account for the relevant details of the three-dimensional (3D) flow field. To describe the relevant dynamics of both wave and currents, while retaining a model framework that can be applied at field scales, we propose a two grid approach to solve the governing equations. With this approach, the vertical accelerations and non-hydrostatic pressures are resolved on a relatively coarse vertical grid (which is sufficient to accurately resolve the wave dynamics), whereas the horizontal velocities and turbulent stresses are resolved on a much finer subgrid (of which the resolution is dictated by the vertical scale of the mean flows). This approach ensures that the discrete pressure Poisson equation - the solution of which dominates the computational effort - is evaluated on the coarse grid scale, thereby greatly improving efficiency, while providing a fine vertical resolution to resolve the vertical variation of the mean flow. This work presents the general methodology, and discusses the numerical implementation in the SWASH wave-flow model. Model predictions are compared with observations of three flume experiments to demonstrate that the subgrid approach captures both the nearshore evolution of the waves, and the wave-induced flows like the undertow profile and longshore current. The accuracy of the subgrid predictions is comparable to fully resolved 3D simulations - but at much reduced computational costs. The findings of this work thereby demonstrate that the subgrid approach has the potential to make 3D non-hydrostatic simulations feasible at the scale of a

  17. Current Studies of Acupuncture in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Hee Kyoung; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Park, Yeon-Cheol; Seo, Byung-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is generally accepted as a safe and harmless treatment option for alleviating pain. To explore the pain mechanism, numerous animal models have been developed to simulate specific human pain conditions, including cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). In this study, we analyzed the current research methodology of acupuncture for the treatment of CIBP. We electronically searched the PubMed database for animal studies published from 2000 onward using these search terms: (bone cancer OR can...

  18. Biquaternionic Model of Electro-Gravimagnetic Field, Charges and Currents. Law of Inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeyeva, Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    One the base of Maxwell and Dirac equations the one biquaternionic model of electro-gravimagnetic (EGM) fields is considered. The closed system of biquaternionic wave equations is constructed for determination of free system of electric and gravimagnetic charges and currents and generated by them EGM-field. By using generalized functions theory the fundamental and regular solutions of this system are determined and some of them are considered (spinors, plane waves, shock EGMwaves and others). The properties of these solutions are investigated.

  19. High-resolution modelling of waves, currents and sediment transport in the Catalan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Grifoll, Manel; Pallares, Elena; Espino, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    In order to investigate coastal shelf dynamics, a sequence of high resolution multi-scale models have been implemented for the Catalan shelf (North-western Mediterranean Sea). The suite consists of a set of increasing-resolution nested models, based on the circulation model ROMS (Regional Ocean Modelling System), the wave model SWAN (Simulation Waves Nearshore) and the sediment transport model CSTM (Community Sediment Transport Model), covering different ranges of spatial (from ~1 km at shelf-slope regions to ~40 m around river mouth or local beaches) and temporal scales (from storms events to seasonal variability). Contributions in the understanding of local processes such as along-shelf dynamics in the inner-shelf, sediment dispersal from the river discharge or bi-directional wave-current interactions under different synoptic conditions and resolution have been obtained using the Catalan Coast as a pilot site. Numerical results have been compared with "ad-hoc" intensive field campaigns, data from observational models and remote sensing products. The results exhibit acceptable agreement with observations and the investigation has allowed developing generic knowledge and more efficient (process-based) strategies for the coastal and shelf management.

  20. Dynamics of wave-current-surge interactions in Lake Michigan: A model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Miaohua; Xia, Meng

    2017-02-01

    Wave, storm surge dynamics, and wave-current-surge interactions (WCSI) were investigated by applying a pair of unstructured-grid-based models to Lake Michigan under two strong wind events. The effects of wind field sources, wind drag coefficient bulk formula, and parameterizations of the bottom friction term were explored to understand lake dynamics. Two wave models were calibrated by using alternative wave physics settings under the 2011 northeasterly wind event. Forced by the southwesterly wind event in 2013, the calibrated models using the atmosphere-ocean fully coupled Climate Forecast System Version 2 wind field were further validated. It is found that the northwesterly winds induced 0.57 m setup near the southwestern coast, whereas the southwesterly winds produced 0.28 m setup and -0.43 m setdown near the northern and southwestern coasts, respectively. The WCSI mostly influence waves and storm surge in shallow-water areas near coasts and islands through depth-induced breaking, current-induced frequency shift and refraction, and wave-induced setup/setdown through wave radiation stress. Owing to the adoption of different discretization algorithms and bottom friction formulations, the modeled storm surge and waves exhibit some variation between the paired models. Even though the storm surge difference with and without WCSI is smaller than that between the two WCSI-coupled models, both circulation models adopt WCSI considering their consistent improvement on model accuracy under both wind events. The analysis of water transport indicates that wind speed, direction, and coastal geometry and bathymetry are also important factors in storm surge.

  1. Unified Drain Current Model of Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons with Uniaxial Strain and Quantum Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EngSiew Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified current-voltage I-V model of uniaxial strained armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs incorporating quantum confinement effects is presented in this paper. The I-V model is enhanced by integrating both linear and saturation regions into a unified and precise model of AGNRs. The derivation originates from energy dispersion throughout the entire Brillouin zone of uniaxial strained AGNRs based on the tight-binding approximation. Our results reveal the modification of the energy band gap, carrier density, and drain current upon strain. The effects of quantum confinement were investigated in terms of the quantum capacitance calculated from the broadening density of states. The results show that quantum effect is greatly dependent on the magnitude of applied strain, gate voltage, channel length, and oxide thickness. The discrepancies between the classical calculation and quantum calculation were also measured and it has been found to be as high as 19% drive current loss due to the quantum confinement. Our finding which is in good agreement with the published data provides significant insight into the device performance of uniaxial strained AGNRs in nanoelectronic applications.

  2. Modelling the electric field and the current density generated by cerebellar transcranial DC stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Marta; Rossi, Elena; Ferrucci, Roberta; Liorni, Ilaria; Priori, Alberto; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum (or cerebellar tDCS) modulates working memory, changes cerebello-brain interaction, and affects locomotion in humans. Also, the use of tDCS has been proposed for the treatment of disorders characterized by cerebellar dysfunction. Nonetheless, the electric field (E) and current density (J) spatial distributions generated by cerebellar tDCS are unknown. This work aimed to estimate E and J distributions during cerebellar tDCS. Computational electromagnetics techniques were applied in three human realistic models of different ages and gender. The stronger E and J occurred mainly in the cerebellar cortex, with some spread (up to 4%) toward the occipital cortex. Also, changes by ±1cm in the position of the active electrode resulted in a small effect (up to 4%) in the E and J spatial distribution in the cerebellum. Finally, the E and J spreads to the brainstem and the heart were negligible, thus further supporting the safety of this technique. Despite inter-individual differences, our modeling study confirms that the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS. Modeling approach reveals that during cerebellar tDCS the current spread to other structures outside the cerebellum is unlike to produce functional effects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Resuspension events in a micro-tidal shallow bay using coupled wave-current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoll, Manel; Cerralbo, Pablo; Solà, Laura; Espino, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution we investigate the observed resuspension events in Alfacs Bay (semi-enclosed bay in The Ebro Delta, NW Mediterranean Sea) using a wave-current coupled model. This bay is characterized by a micro-tidal environment and a relevant seiche activity which may lead velocities more than 50 cm·s-1. A set of ADCP and OBS moored at sea bottom were used to acquire hydrodynamic and optical information. The time-series observations showed an evident relation between seiche activity and the sediment resuspension events. The implementation of a wave-current coupled model shows a strong spatial variability in terms of combined bottom stress. Significant wave hight of 0.4 m are modeled during energetic wind events. A significant correlation between the resuspension events and the combined bottom stress are observed. The numerical results reveal two different mechanism to explain the resuspension events observed: during the Seiche episodes the combined bottom stresses are controlled by the current-induced bottom stress. Otherwise during strong winds the combined bottom stress are controlled by the wave-induced bottom stress.

  4. Control of trachoma in Australia: a model based evaluation of current interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Shattock

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the only high-income country in which endemic trachoma persists. In response, the Australian Government has recently invested heavily towards the nationwide control of the disease.A novel simulation model was developed to reflect the trachoma epidemic in Australian Aboriginal communities. The model, which incorporates demographic, migration, mixing, and biological heterogeneities, was used to evaluate recent intervention measures against counterfactual past scenarios, and also to assess the potential impact of a series of hypothesized future intervention measures relative to the current national strategy and intensity. The model simulations indicate that, under the current intervention strategy and intensity, the likelihood of controlling trachoma to less than 5% prevalence among 5-9 year-old children in hyperendemic communities by 2020 is 31% (19%-43%. By shifting intervention priorities such that large increases in the facial cleanliness of children are observed, this likelihood of controlling trachoma in hyperendemic communities is increased to 64% (53%-76%. The most effective intervention strategy incorporated large-scale antibiotic distribution programs whilst attaining ambitious yet feasible screening, treatment, facial cleanliness and housing construction targets. Accordingly, the estimated likelihood of controlling trachoma in these communities is increased to 86% (76%-95%.Maintaining the current intervention strategy and intensity is unlikely to be sufficient to control trachoma across Australia by 2020. However, by shifting the intervention strategy and increasing intensity, the likelihood of controlling trachoma nationwide can be significantly increased.

  5. Control of Trachoma in Australia: A Model Based Evaluation of Current Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattock, Andrew J.; Gambhir, Manoj; Taylor, Hugh R.; Cowling, Carleigh S.; Kaldor, John M.; Wilson, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Australia is the only high-income country in which endemic trachoma persists. In response, the Australian Government has recently invested heavily towards the nationwide control of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel simulation model was developed to reflect the trachoma epidemic in Australian Aboriginal communities. The model, which incorporates demographic, migration, mixing, and biological heterogeneities, was used to evaluate recent intervention measures against counterfactual past scenarios, and also to assess the potential impact of a series of hypothesized future intervention measures relative to the current national strategy and intensity. The model simulations indicate that, under the current intervention strategy and intensity, the likelihood of controlling trachoma to less than 5% prevalence among 5–9 year-old children in hyperendemic communities by 2020 is 31% (19%–43%). By shifting intervention priorities such that large increases in the facial cleanliness of children are observed, this likelihood of controlling trachoma in hyperendemic communities is increased to 64% (53%–76%). The most effective intervention strategy incorporated large-scale antibiotic distribution programs whilst attaining ambitious yet feasible screening, treatment, facial cleanliness and housing construction targets. Accordingly, the estimated likelihood of controlling trachoma in these communities is increased to 86% (76%–95%). Conclusions/Significance Maintaining the current intervention strategy and intensity is unlikely to be sufficient to control trachoma across Australia by 2020. However, by shifting the intervention strategy and increasing intensity, the likelihood of controlling trachoma nationwide can be significantly increased. PMID:25860143

  6. Analytical model of gate leakage current through bilayer oxide stack in advanced MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Rathin; Maiti, Biswajit; Mallik, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    A compact model for gate tunneling current in advanced nano-scale MOSFET has been developed on the basis of both direct and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling through dual layer Silicon oxide-Hafnium oxide stack used as gate dielectric. Calculation includes the effect of different subbands of the semiconductor conduction band those arise due to quantum confinement of charge carriers in the oxide-substrate interface. Effect of charge trapping in the bulk of the oxides and at the localized energy levels at different interfaces of the oxides has also been taken into consideration. Tunneling probability as a function of gate bias has been determined considering Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation to account for varying potential profile. Probability amplitude of an electron for tunneling has been calculated by solving Schrodinger equations at different regions in the effective mass approximation model of class I crystal interface. Tunneling current as a function of effective oxide thickness and gate bias estimated in this model shows substantial reduction in gate leakage current if HfO2 as high-k dielectric is used along with 1 nm thick SiO2 with almost negligible change in threshold voltage.

  7. Funny current and cardiac rhythm: insights from HCN knockout mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko eBaruscotti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the adult animal the sinoatrial node (SAN rhythmically generates a depolarizing wave that propagates to the rest of the heart. However, the SAN is more than a simple clock; it is a clock that adjusts its pace according to the metabolic requirements of the organism. The Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated channels (HCN1-4 are the structural component of the funny (If channels; in the SAN the If current is the main driving electrical force of the diastolic depolarization and the HCN4 is the most abundant isoform. The generation of HCN KO mouse models has advanced the understanding of the role of these channels in cardiac excitability. The HCN4 KO models that were first developed allowed either global or cardiac-specific constitutive ablation of HCN4 channels, and resulted in embryonic lethality. A further progress was made with the development of three separate inducible HCN4 KO models; in one model KO was induced globally in the entire organism, in a second, ablation occurred only in HCN4-expressing cells, and finally in a third model KO was confined to cardiac cells. Unexpectedly, the three models yielded different results; similarities and differences among these models will be presented and discussed. The functional effects of HCN2 and HCN3 knockout models and transgenic HCN4 mouse models will also be discussed.In conclusion, HCN KO/transgenic models have allowed to evaluate the functional role of the If currents in intact animals as well as in single SAN cells isolated from the same animals. This opportunity is therefore unique since it allows to 1 verify the contribution of specific HCN isoforms to cardiac activity in intact animals, and 2 to compare these results to those obtained in single cell experiments. These combined studies were not possible prior to the development of KO models. Finally, these models represent critical tools to improve our understanding of the molecular basis of some inheritable arrhythmic human

  8. A descriptive model for the critical current as a function of axial strain in Bi-2212/Ag wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haken, Bernard; Godeke, A.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Schuver, Henk-Jan

    1996-01-01

    A descriptive model is presented for the critical current of a Bi-2212 conductor that is axially deformed. This model is based on previously published critical current measurements on axially compressed and elongated Bi-2212 wires. The validity of the model is investigated by applying an additional

  9. Stress-induced electric current fluctuations in rocks: a superstatistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We recorded spontaneous electric current flow in non-piezoelectric Carrara marble samples during triaxial deformation. Mechanical data, ultrasonic velocities and acoustic emissions were acquired simultaneously with electric current to constrain the relationship between electric current flow, differential stress and damage. Under strain-controlled loading, spontaneous electric current signals (nA) were generated and sustained under all conditions tested. In dry samples, a detectable electric current arises only during dilatancy and the overall signal is correlated with the damage induced by microcracking. Our results show that fracture plays a key role in the generation of electric currents in deforming rocks (Cartwright-Taylor et al., in prep). We also analysed the high-frequency fluctuations of these electric current signals and found that they are not normally distributed - they exhibit power-law tails (Cartwright-Taylor et al., 2014). We modelled these distributions with q-Gaussian statistics, derived by maximising the Tsallis entropy. This definition of entropy is particularly applicable to systems which are strongly correlated and far from equilibrium. Good agreement, at all experimental conditions, between the distributions of electric current fluctuations and the q-Gaussian function with q-values far from one, illustrates the highly correlated, fractal nature of the electric source network within the samples and provides further evidence that the source of the electric signals is the developing fractal network of cracks. It has been shown (Beck, 2001) that q-Gaussian distributions can arise from the superposition of local relaxations in the presence of a slowly varying driving force, thus providing a dynamic reason for the appearance of Tsallis statistics in systems with a fluctuating energy dissipation rate. So, the probability distribution for a dynamic variable, u under some external slow forcing, β, can be obtained as a superposition of temporary local

  10. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-01-01

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the “all parallel” shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the “separated loop” shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same. PMID:28587137

  11. Self-Consistent Ring Current/Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D.

    2006-12-01

    The self-consistent treatment of ring current (RC) ion dynamics and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, which are thought to exert important influences on dynamic ion evolution and are an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. For example, the EMIC waves cause the RC decay on a time scale of about one hour or less during the main phase of storms. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies ~1 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is a critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in global dynamic modeling of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model will be presented, focusing mainly on the dynamics of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We will also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  12. Critical current and cryogenic stability modelling of filamentary MgB2 conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glowacki, B.A.; Majoros, M.; Tanaka, K.

    2006-01-01

    The modelling of a single filament, 6 filaments and 19 filaments MgB(2) conductors was performed for two limiting cases: a) isothermal conditions considering J(c)(B) dependence, b) considering heating effects but with J(c) magnetic field independent. As a starting point of the modelling in case a......(c) in range of electric fields E % 10 mu V/cm. The isothermal modelling with J(c) independent on magnetic field, case b), gave the results more close to the experimental ones. From the modelling of the heating effects we conclude that the cryogenic stability of the used Cu/SUS316/MgB(2), Fe/MgB(2) and Cu....../MgCu(2)/MgB(2) wires is adequate. The stabilizing copper layer can take all the current up to the onset of film boiling of LHe where the current starts to decrease with increasing electric field, i.e. at this point the differential resistivity of the Cu/SUS316/MgB(2) wire starts to become negative...

  13. Humanized mouse as an appropriate model for accelerated global HIV research and vaccine development: current trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeh, Bartholomew Okechukwu; Furuta, Yasuhide; Habu, Josiah Bitrus; Ogbadu, Lucy

    2016-09-23

    Humanized mouse models currently have seen improved development and have received wide applications. Its usefulness is observed in cell and tissue transplant involving basic and applied human disease research. In this article, the development of a new generation of humanized mice was discussed as well as their relevant application in HIV disease. Furthermore, current techniques employed to overcome the initial limitations of mouse model were reviewed. Highly immunodeficient mice which support cell and tissue differentiation and do not reject xenografts are indispensable for generating additional appropriate models useful in disease study, this phenomenom deserves emphases, scientific highlight and a definitive research focus. Since the early 2000s, a series of immunodeficient mice appropriate for generating humanized mice has been successively developed by introducing the IL-2Rγnull gene (e.g. NOD/SCID/γcnull and Rag2nullγcnull mice) through various genomic approaches. These mice were generated by genetically introducing human cytokine genes into NOD/SCID/γcnull and Rag2nullγcnull mouse backgrounds. The application of these techniques serves as a quick and appropriate mechanistic model for basic and therapeutic investigations of known and emerging infections.

  14. Modelling rip current flow and bather escape strategies across a transverse bar and rip channel morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, R. Jak; Castelle, Bruno; Brander, Robert W.; Scott, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    Rip currents are a hazard to bathers on surf beaches worldwide, yet due to logistical and ethical concerns there has been minimal examination of how bathers caught in them should attempt to escape. This study presents the first numerical model of simulated bathers escaping from a rip current. An understanding of the underlying coastal geomorphology and hydrodynamics form a critical basis for the model, with the intention that outcomes of the model should be evaluated from a physical science perspective. Field observations of a transverse bar rip channel were used as model inputs. Escape simulations were performed with moderate energy (Hs ≈ 1 m), oblique offshore wave forcing, used to generate two non-stationary, asymmetric flow fields (dominant surfzone exits and dominant recirculation). The model treats bathers as particles that move with the underlying flow, with an additional swimming velocity added, iterating until a safety condition, based on depth and current speed, is satisfied or until a maximum time limit is reached. Simulations compared the strategies of ;stay afloat; and various fixed swim directions, using two bather heights and four swim speeds (up to 0.4 m/s). The overall optimal escape strategy was to swim parallel in the direction of alongshore flow. Time to safety was less for: (i) recirculating flow; (ii) taller bathers; and (iii) greater swim speeds. Across all simulations, 44% of ;floaters; reached safety within 10 min, while 80% of slow swimmers (0.2 m/s) succeeded in the same time interval. This suggests that slow sustainable swimming may be a preferable escape action to floating. Optimal swim direction varied with start location, from onshore (near the shoreline), parallel to shore (mid-rip channel) and diagonally onshore (outer rip channel). At lower swim speeds, the optimal swim direction had greater dependence on the underlying flow field, as opposed to distance to safety, therefore choice of direction is more complex for slower swimmers

  15. Avaliação da carga mental de trabalho e do desempenho de medidas de mensuração: NASA TLX e SWAT Evaluation of mental workload and performance measurement: NASA TLX and SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane de Souza Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avalia a carga mental para atividades desempenhadas em empresa catarinense de soluções em energia e busca comparar os resultados da carga mental de trabalho encontrada a partir de dois métodos de mensuração atualmente mais usados - NASA TLX e SWAT. Por meio deste estudo avaliou-se a carga mental exigida tanto pela atividade de montagem manual, quanto de montagem automática de placas eletrônicas. Os resultados da avaliação da carga mental evidenciaram que entre as duas formas de execução da atividade, as exigências mentais mostram-se maiores na atividade de montagem manual. Os métodos de avaliação da carga mental aplicados em estudos da ergonomia possibilitam conhecer as capacidades e limitações do trabalhador, características da organização do trabalho e facilitam a apresentação quantitativa e qualitativa dos resultados. A comparação do desempenho entre os dois métodos de avaliação da carga mental, também se mostrou como uma investigação pertinente para o campo da ergonomia, já que são poucos os estudos comparativos em relação ao desempenho dos métodos. Na comparação do desempenho geral entre os dois métodos, o método NASA TLX possibilita avaliar a carga mental analisando diversas dimensões da situação de trabalho e apresenta vantagens quando comparado ao SWAT, pois pode ser facilmente aplicado e mostrou-se com maior aceitação por parte dos avaliados.This study evaluates the mental workload in some activities in an electricity generation company in Santa Catarina, Brazil and compares the mental workload measurements obtained using two commonly used measurement methods- NASA TLX and SWAT. The mental workload required by both manual and automated assembly of circuit boards was evaluated. The evaluation of the mental workload showed that comparing these two types of activities, the mental requirements appear to be higher during manual assembly tasks. The methods for assessing the mental

  16. An eddy-current model for three-dimensional nondestructive evaluation of advanced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a rigorous electromagnetic model and an inversion algorithm for the three-dimensional NDE of advanced composite materials. This approach extends Victor Technologies' work in eddy-current NDE of conventional metals, and allows one to determine in localized regions the fiber-resin ratio in graphite-epoxy, and to determine those anomalies, e.g., delaminations, broken fibers, moisture content, etc., that can be reconstructed by our inversion method. In developing the model, we apply rigorous electromagnetic theory to determine a Green's function for a slab of anisotropic composite material, and then determine the integral relations for the forward and inverse problems using the Green's function. We will give examples of the solution of forward problems using this model.

  17. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT GENERATION IN A MICROBIAL FUEL CELL INOCULATED WITH MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Teleken

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFC are electrochemical devices that utilize the ability of some microorganisms to oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons resulting from their metabolism to an insoluble acceptor. The goal of the present study was to model the kinetics of electrical current generation from an MFC inoculated with marine sediment. For this purpose, a differential equation system was used, including the Nernst-Monod relationship and Ohm's Law, to describe the microbial metabolism and the mechanism of extracellular electron transfer (EET, respectively. The experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis were properly described by the model. It was concluded that marine microorganisms preferably use a direct mechanism of EET by means of nanowires to establish the electrochemical contact with the anode. The mathematical modeling could help understand MFC operation and, consequently, contribute to improving power generation from this source.

  18. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  19. Current plate velocities relative to the hotspots incorporating the NUVEL-1 global plate motion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Alice E.; Gordon, Richard G.

    1990-01-01

    The NUVEL-1 model of current global relative plate velocities is presently incorporated into HS2-NUVEL1, a global model for plate velocities relative to hotspots; the results thus obtained are compared with those of the AM1-2 model of hotspot-relative plate velocities. While there are places in which plate velocities relative to the hotspots differ between HS2-NUVEL1 and AM1-2 by tens of degrees in direction and 15 mm/yr in speed, the hotspot Euler vectors differ with 95 percent confidence only for the Arabian and Indian plates. Plates attached to subducting slabs move faster relative to the hotspots than do plates without slabs.

  20. Current plate velocities relative to the hotspots incorporating the NUVEL-1 global plate motion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Alice E.; Gordon, Richard G.

    1990-07-01

    The NUVEL-1 model of current global relative plate velocities is presently incorporated into HS2-NUVEL1, a global model for plate velocities relative to hotspots; the results thus obtained are compared with those of the AM1-2 model of hotspot-relative plate velocities. While there are places in which plate velocities relative to the hotspots differ between HS2-NUVEL1 and AM1-2 by tens of degrees in direction and 15 mm/yr in speed, the hotspot Euler vectors differ with 95 percent confidence only for the Arabian and Indian plates. Plates attached to subducting slabs move faster relative to the hotspots than do plates without slabs.

  1. Current challenges facing the assessment of the allergenic capacity of food allergens in animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; van Bilsen, Jolanda; Głogowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    validated as predictive and none are currently suitable to test the allergenic potential of new foods. Here, the design of various animal models are reviewed, including among others considerations of species and strain, diet, route of administration, dose and formulation of the test protein, relevant...... produced using new technologies and production processes, insects, algae, duckweed, or agricultural products from third countries, creates the opportunity for development of new food allergies, and this in turn has driven the need to develop test methods capable of characterizing the allergenic potential...... of novel food proteins. There is no doubt that robust and reliable animal models for the identification and characterization of food allergens would be valuable tools for safety assessment. However, although various animal models have been proposed for this purpose, to date, none have been formally...

  2. Saikosaponin a mediates the anticonvulsant properties in the HNC models of AE and SE by inhibiting NMDA receptor current and persistent sodium current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Hong Yu

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, yet its treatment remains unsatisfactory. Saikosaponin a (SSa, a triterpene saponin derived from Bupleurum chinensis DC., has been demonstrated to have significant antiepileptic activity in a variety of epilepsy models in vivo. However, the electrophysiological activities and mechanisms of the antiepileptic properties of SSa remain unclear. In this study, whole-cell current-clamp recordings were used to evaluate the anticonvulsant activities of SSa in the hippocampal neuronal culture (HNC models of acquired epilepsy (AE and status epilepticus (SE. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were used to evaluate the modulation effects of SSa on NMDA-evoked current and sodium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons. We found that SSa effectively terminated spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SREDs in the HNC model of AE and continuous epileptiform high-frequency bursts (SE in the HNC model of SE, in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC(50 of 0.42 µM and 0.62 µM, respectively. Furthermore, SSa significantly reduced the peak amplitude of NMDA-evoked current and the peak current amplitude of I(NaP. These results suggest for the first time that the inhibitions of NMDA receptor current and I(NaP may be the underlying mechanisms of SSa's anticonvulsant properties, including the suppression of SREDs and SE in the HNC models of AE and SE. In addition, effectively abolishing the refractory SE implies that SSa may be a potential anticonvulsant candidate for the clinical treatment of epilepsy.

  3. Long-time and large-distance asymptotic behavior of the current-current correlators in the non-linear Schroedinger model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Terras, V. [CNRS, ENS Lyon (France). Lab. de Physique

    2010-12-15

    We present a new method allowing us to derive the long-time and large-distance asymptotic behavior of the correlations functions of quantum integrable models from their exact representations. Starting from the form factor expansion of the correlation functions in finite volume, we explain how to reduce the complexity of the computation in the so-called interacting integrable models to the one appearing in free fermion equivalent models. We apply our method to the time-dependent zero-temperature current-current correlation function in the non-linear Schroedinger model and compute the first few terms in its asymptotic expansion. Our result goes beyond the conformal field theory based predictions: in the time-dependent case, other types of excitations than the ones on the Fermi surface contribute to the leading orders of the asymptotics. (orig.)

  4. Can current models of accommodation and vergence predict accommodative behavior in myopic children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Irving, Elizabeth L; Bobier, William R

    2014-08-01

    Investigations into the progression of myopia in children have long considered the role of accommodation as a cause and solution. Myopic children show high levels of accommodative adaptation, coupled with accommodative lag and high response AC/A (accommodative convergence per diopter of accommodation). This pattern differs from that predicted by current models of interaction between accommodation and vergence, where weakened reflex responses and a high AC/A would be associated with a low not high levels of accommodative adaptation. However, studies of young myopes were limited to only part of the accommodative vergence synkinesis and the reciprocal components of vergence adaptation and convergence accommodation were not studied in tandem. Accordingly, we test the hypothesis that the accommodative behavior of myopic children is not predicted by current models and whether that departure is explained by differences in the accommodative plant of the myopic child. Responses to incongruent stimuli (-2D, +2D adds, 10 prism diopter base-out prism) were investigated in 28 myopic and 25 non-myopic children aged 7-15 years. Subjects were divided into phoria groups - exo, ortho and eso based upon their near phoria. The school aged myopes showed high levels of accommodative adaptation but with reduced accommodation and high AC/A. This pattern is not explained by current adult models and could reflect a sluggish gain of the accommodative plant (ciliary muscle and lens), changes in near triad innervation or both. Further, vergence adaptation showed a predictable reciprocal relationship with the high accommodative adaptation, suggesting that departures from adult models were limited to accommodation not vergence behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dosage considerations for transcranial direct current stimulation in children: a computational modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Kilaru Kessler

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is being widely investigated in adults as a therapeutic modality for brain disorders involving abnormal cortical excitability or disordered network activity. Interest is also growing in studying tDCS in children. Limited empirical studies in children suggest that tDCS is well tolerated and may have a similar safety profile as in adults. However, in electrotherapy as in pharmacotherapy, dose selection in children requires special attention, and simple extrapolation from adult studies may be inadequate. Critical aspects of dose adjustment include 1 differences in neurophysiology and disease, and 2 variation in brain electric fields for a specified dose due to gross anatomical differences between children and adults. In this study, we used high-resolution MRI derived finite element modeling simulations of two healthy children, ages 8 years and 12 years, and three healthy adults with varying head size to compare differences in electric field intensity and distribution. Multiple conventional and high-definition tDCS montages were tested. Our results suggest that on average, children will be exposed to higher peak electrical fields for a given applied current intensity than adults, but there is likely to be overlap between adults with smaller head size and children. In addition, exposure is montage specific. Variations in peak electrical fields were seen between the two pediatric models, despite comparable head size, suggesting that the relationship between neuroanatomic factors and bioavailable current dose is not trivial. In conclusion, caution is advised in using higher tDCS doses in children until 1 further modeling studies in a larger group shed light on the range of exposure possible by applied dose and age and 2 further studies correlate bioavailable dose estimates from modeling studies with empirically tested physiologic effects, such as modulation of motor evoked potentials after stimulation.

  6. Dosage Considerations for Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Children: A Computational Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Minhas, Preet; Woods, Adam J.; Rosen, Alyssa; Gorman, Casey; Bikson, Marom

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is being widely investigated in adults as a therapeutic modality for brain disorders involving abnormal cortical excitability or disordered network activity. Interest is also growing in studying tDCS in children. Limited empirical studies in children suggest that tDCS is well tolerated and may have a similar safety profile as in adults. However, in electrotherapy as in pharmacotherapy, dose selection in children requires special attention, and simple extrapolation from adult studies may be inadequate. Critical aspects of dose adjustment include 1) differences in neurophysiology and disease, and 2) variation in brain electric fields for a specified dose due to gross anatomical differences between children and adults. In this study, we used high-resolution MRI derived finite element modeling simulations of two healthy children, ages 8 years and 12 years, and three healthy adults with varying head size to compare differences in electric field intensity and distribution. Multiple conventional and high-definition tDCS montages were tested. Our results suggest that on average, children will be exposed to higher peak electrical fields for a given applied current intensity than adults, but there is likely to be overlap between adults with smaller head size and children. In addition, exposure is montage specific. Variations in peak electrical fields were seen between the two pediatric models, despite comparable head size, suggesting that the relationship between neuroanatomic factors and bioavailable current dose is not trivial. In conclusion, caution is advised in using higher tDCS doses in children until 1) further modeling studies in a larger group shed light on the range of exposure possible by applied dose and age and 2) further studies correlate bioavailable dose estimates from modeling studies with empirically tested physiologic effects, such as modulation of motor evoked potentials after stimulation. PMID:24086698

  7. Modelization of the Current and Future Habitat Suitability of Rhododendron ferrugineum Using Potential Snow Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Komac

    Full Text Available Mountain areas are particularly sensitive to climate change. Species distribution models predict important extinctions in these areas whose magnitude will depend on a number of different factors. Here we examine the possible impact of climate change on the Rhododendron ferrugineum (alpenrose niche in Andorra (Pyrenees. This species currently occupies 14.6 km2 of this country and relies on the protection afforded by snow cover in winter. We used high-resolution climatic data, potential snow accumulation and a combined forecasting method to obtain the realized niche model of this species. Subsequently, we used data from the high-resolution Scampei project climate change projection for the A2, A1B and B1 scenarios to model its future realized niche model. The modelization performed well when predicting the species's distribution, which improved when we considered the potential snow accumulation, the most important variable influencing its distribution. We thus obtained a potential extent of about 70.7 km(2 or 15.