WorldWideScience

Sample records for swat ii effect

  1. Slope effects on SWAT modeling in a mountainous basin

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub López, Cristina; Pérez Foguet, Agustí

    2013-01-01

    The soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) is a distributed basin model that includes the option of defining spatial discretization in terms of terrain slope. Influence of terrain slope in runoff results from mountain basins is a determining factor in its simulation results; however, its use as a criterion for basin discretization and for the parameter calibration has not yet been analyzed. In this study, this influence is analyzed for calibrations using two different cases. Ten discretization...

  2. Trail Creek II: Modeling Flow and E. Coli Concentrations in a Small Urban Stream using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, D. E.; Saintil, T.

    2017-12-01

    Pathogens are one of the leading causes of stream and river impairment in the State of Georgia. The common presence of fecal bacteria is driven by several factors including rapid population growth stressing pre-existing and ageing infrastructure, urbanization and poor planning, increase percent imperviousness, urban runoff, municipal discharges, sewage, pet/wildlife waste and leaky septic tanks. The Trail Creek watershed, located in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia covers about 33 km2. Stream segments within Trail Creek violate the GA standard due to high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) modeling software was used to predict E. coli bacteria concentrations during baseflow and stormflow. Census data from the county was used for human and animal population estimates and the Fecal Indicator Tool to generate the number of colony forming units of E. Coli for each source. The model was calibrated at a daily time step with one year of monitored streamflow and E. coli bacteria data using SWAT-CUP and the SUFI2 algorithm. To simulate leaking sewer lines, we added point sources in the five subbasins in the SWAT model with the greatest length of sewer line within 50 m of the stream. The flow in the point sources were set to 5% of the stream flow and the bacteria count set to that of raw sewage (30,000 cfu/100 mL). The calibrated model showed that the average load during 2003-2013 at the watershed outlet was 13 million cfu per month. Using the calibrated model, we simulated scenarios that assumed leaking sewers were repaired in one of the five subbasins with point sources. The reduction ranged from 10 to 46%, with the largest reduction in subbasin in the downtown area. Future modeling work will focus on the use of green infrastructure to address sources of bacteria.

  3. Applications of the SWAT Model Special Section: Overview and Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman, Philip W; Sadeghi, Ali M; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has emerged as one of the most widely used water quality watershed- and river basin-scale models worldwide, applied extensively for a broad range of hydrologic and/or environmental problems. The international use of SWAT can be attributed to its flexibility in addressing water resource problems, extensive networking via dozens of training workshops and the several international conferences that have been held during the past decade, comprehensive online documentation and supporting software, and an open source code that can be adapted by model users for specific application needs. The catalyst for this special collection of papers was the 2011 International SWAT Conference & Workshops held in Toledo, Spain, which featured over 160 scientific presentations representing SWAT applications in 37 countries. This special collection presents 22 specific SWAT-related studies, most of which were presented at the 2011 SWAT Conference; it represents SWAT applications on five different continents, with the majority of studies being conducted in Europe and North America. The papers cover a variety of topics, including hydrologic testing at a wide range of watershed scales, transport of pollutants in northern European lowland watersheds, data input and routing method effects on sediment transport, development and testing of potential new model algorithms, and description and testing of supporting software. In this introduction to the special section, we provide a synthesis of these studies within four main categories: (i) hydrologic foundations, (ii) sediment transport and routing analyses, (iii) nutrient and pesticide transport, and (iv) scenario analyses. We conclude with a brief summary of key SWAT research and development needs. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Effects of soil data resolution on SWAT model stream flow and water quality predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geza, Mengistu; McCray, John E

    2008-08-01

    The prediction accuracy of agricultural nonpoint source pollution models such as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) depends on how well model input spatial parameters describe the characteristics of the watershed. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of different soil data resolutions on stream flow, sediment and nutrient predictions when used as input for SWAT. SWAT model predictions were compared for the two US Department of Agriculture soil databases with different resolution, namely the State Soil Geographic database (STATSGO) and the Soil Survey Geographic database (SSURGO). Same number of sub-basins was used in the watershed delineation. However, the number of HRUs generated when STATSGO and SSURGO soil data were used is 261 and 1301, respectively. SSURGO, with the highest spatial resolution, has 51 unique soil types in the watershed distributed in 1301 HRUs, while STATSGO has only three distributed in 261 HRUS. As a result of low resolution STATSGO assigns a single classification to areas that may have different soil types if SSURGO were used. SSURGO included Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) with soil types that were generalized to one soil group in STATSGO. The difference in the number and size of HRUs also has an effect on sediment yield parameters (slope and slope length). Thus, as a result of the discrepancies in soil type and size of HRUs stream flow predicted was higher when SSURGO was used compared to STATSGO. SSURGO predicted less stream loading than STATSGO in terms of sediment and sediment-attached nutrients components, and vice versa for dissolved nutrients. When compared to mean daily measured flow, STATSGO performed better relative to SSURGO before calibration. SSURGO provided better results after calibration as evaluated by R(2) value (0.74 compared to 0.61 for STATSGO) and the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of Efficiency (NSE) values (0.70 and 0.61 for SSURGO and STATSGO, respectively) although both are in the same satisfactory

  5. Transferability of SWAT Models between SWAT2009 and SWAT2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mijin; Yen, Haw; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Jeong, Jaehak

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has experienced upgrades with enhanced functionalities and modeling capacities as it gets to the current version, SWAT2012. Changes in the SWAT code on a specific process may result in propagating influences in the output of other related processes. In this study, the characteristic significance of the enhancements in SWAT code was investigated using the two recent versions, SWAT2009 and SWAT2012. Using a global optimization technique, each model was calibrated for flow, sediment, and nutrient and then tested for transferability of parameters between the models. Results indicate that flow and water quality output were well calibrated with both models. However, the calibrated parameters determined by SWAT2009 and SWAT2012 were noticeably different, due mostly to the enhancements made in SWAT2012. Our results indicate that only the stream flow result was reliable when the models were upgraded or downgraded between the two versions after calibration. Sediment prediction was marginally reliable. SWAT parameters were nontransferrable if nutrient was the main output. The differences are due to various reasons, such as disparities in algorithms at the process level and propagation of the resulting uncertainty into higher-order processes. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Hydrologic Response Unit Routing in SWAT to Simulate Effects of Vegetated Filter Strip for South-Korean Conditions Based on VFSMOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Jae Lim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model has been used worldwide for many hydrologic and Non-Point Source (NPS Pollution analyses on a watershed scale. However, it has many limitations in simulating the Vegetative Filter Strip (VFS because it considers only ‘filter strip width’ when the model estimates sediment trapping efficiency and does not consider the routing of sediment with overland flow which is expected to maximize the sediment trapping efficiency from upper agricultural subwatersheds to lower spatially-explicit filter strips. Therefore, the SWAT overland flow option between landuse-subwatersheds with sediment routing capability was enhanced by modifying the SWAT watershed configuration and SWAT engine based on the numerical model VFSMOD applied to South-Korean conditions. The enhanced SWAT can simulate the VFS sediment trapping efficiency for South-Korean conditions in a manner similar to the desktop VFSMOD-w system. Due to this enhancement, SWAT is applicable to simulate the effects of overland flow from upper subwatersheds to reflect increased runoff volume at the lower subwatershed, which occurs in the field if no diversion channel is installed. In this study, the enhanced SWAT model was applied to small watersheds located at Jaun-ri in South-Korea to simulate a diversion channel and spatially-explicit VFS. Sediment can be reduced by 31%, 65%, and 68%, with a diversion channel, the VFS, and the VFS with diversion channel, respectively. The enhanced SWAT should be used in estimating site-specific effects on sediment reduction with diversion channels and VFS, instead of the currently available SWAT, which does not simulate sediment routing in overland flow and does not consider other sensitive factors affecting sediment reduction with VFS.

  7. Modeling Miscanthus in the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) to simulate its water quality effects as a bioenergy crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tze Ling; Eheart, J Wayland; Cai, Ximing; Miguez, Fernando

    2010-09-15

    There is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy and feedstock for second-generation cellulosic biofuels. The primary objective of this study is to estimate the potential effects on riverine nitrate load of cultivating Miscanthus x giganteus in place of conventional crops. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is used to model miscanthus growth and streamwater quality in the Salt Creek watershed in Illinois. SWAT has a built-in crop growth component, but, as miscanthus is relatively new as a potentially commercial crop, data on the SWAT crop growth parameters for the crop are lacking. This leads to the second objective of this study, which is to estimate those parameters to facilitate the modeling of miscanthus in SWAT. Results show a decrease in nitrate load that depends on the percent land use change to miscanthus and the amount of nitrogen fertilizer applied to the miscanthus. Specifically, assuming a nitrogen fertilization rate for miscanthus of 90 kg-N/ha, a 10%, 25%, and 50% land use change to miscanthus will lead to decreases in nitrate load of about 6.4%, 16.5%, and 29.6% at the watershed outlet, respectively. Likewise, nitrate load may be reduced by lowering the fertilizer application rate, but not proportionately. When fertilization drops from 90 to 30 kg-N/ha the difference in nitrate load decrease is less than 1% when 10% of the watershed is miscanthus and less than 6% when 50% of the watershed is miscanthus. It is also found that the nitrate load decrease from converting less than half the watershed to miscanthus from corn and soybean in 1:1 rotation surpasses that from converting the whole watershed to just soybean.

  8. Comment on “Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, J. G.; Sammons, N. B.; Manowitz, David H.; Thomson, Allison M.; Williams, J.R.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the authors comment on several mistakes made in a journal paper "Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop" published on Environmental Scienece & Technology, based on field measurements from Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems, and published literature. Our comment has led to the development of another version of SWAT to include better process based description of radiation use efficiency and root-shoot growth.

  9. Application of SWAT to assess the effects of land use change in the Murchison Bay catchment in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a versatile model presently used worldwide to evaluate water quality and hydrological concerns under varying land use and environmental conditions. In this study, SWAT was used to simulate streamflow and to estimate sediment yield and nutrients loss from ...

  10. Integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya; Hirakawa, Naohiro; Iwasaki, Tomohiko.

    1997-11-01

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. It enables us to analyze the burnup problem using neutron spectrum depending on environment of irradiation, combining SRAC which is Japanese standard thermal reactor analysis code system and ORIGEN2 which is burnup code widely used all over the world. SWAT makes effective cross section library based on results by SRAC, and performs the burnup analysis with ORIGEN2 using that library. SRAC and ORIGEN2 can be called as external module. SWAT has original cross section library on based JENDL-3.2 and libraries of fission yield and decay data prepared from JNDC FP Library second version. Using these libraries, user can use latest data in the calculation of SWAT besides the effective cross section prepared by SRAC. Also, User can make original ORIGEN2 library using the output file of SWAT. This report presents concept and user's manual of SWAT. (author)

  11. Hydrological effects of the increased CO2 and climate change in the Upper Mississippi River Basin using a modified SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2012-01-01

    Increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate change may significantly impact the hydrological and meteorological processes of a watershed system. Quantifying and understanding hydrological responses to elevated ambient CO2 and climate change is, therefore, critical for formulating adaptive strategies for an appropriate management of water resources. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was applied to assess the effects of increased CO2 concentration and climate change in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB). The standard SWAT model was modified to represent more mechanistic vegetation type specific responses of stomatal conductance reduction and leaf area increase to elevated CO2 based on physiological studies. For estimating the historical impacts of increased CO2 in the recent past decades, the incremental (i.e., dynamic) rises of CO2 concentration at a monthly time-scale were also introduced into the model. Our study results indicated that about 1–4% of the streamflow in the UMRB during 1986 through 2008 could be attributed to the elevated CO2 concentration. In addition to evaluating a range of future climate sensitivity scenarios, the climate projections by four General Circulation Models (GCMs) under different greenhouse gas emission scenarios were used to predict the hydrological effects in the late twenty-first century (2071–2100). Our simulations demonstrated that the water yield would increase in spring and substantially decrease in summer, while soil moisture would rise in spring and decline in summer. Such an uneven distribution of water with higher variability compared to the baseline level (1961–1990) may cause an increased risk of both flooding and drought events in the basin.

  12. Algorithm Theory - SWAT 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 10th Scandinavian Workshop on Algorithm Theory, SWAT 2006, held in Riga, Latvia, in July 2006. The 36 revised full papers presented together with 3 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 154 submissions. The papers address all...

  13. ROLE OF WATERSHED SUBDIVISION ON MODELING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES WITH SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distributed parameter watershed models are often used for evaluating the effectiveness of various best management practices (BMPs). Streamflow, sediment, and nutrient yield predictions of a watershed model can be affected by spatial resolution as dictated by watershed subdivisio...

  14. Pesticide modelling for a small catchment using SWAT-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Narayanan; White, Sue M; Worrall, Fred; Whelan, Mick J

    2006-01-01

    Pesticides in stream flow from the 142 ha Colworth catchment in Bedfordshire, UK were monitored from October 1999 to December 2000. About 47% of the catchment is tile-drained and different pesticides and cropping patterns have recently been evaluated in terms of their effect on nutrient and pesticide losses to the stream. The data from Colworth were used to test soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) 2000 predictions of pesticide concentrations at the catchment outlet. A sound model set-up to carry out pesticide modelling was created by means of hydrological modelling with proper simulation of crop growth and evapotranspiration. The pesticides terbuthylazine, terbutryn, cyanazine and bentazone were modelled. There was close agreement between SWAT-predicted pesticide concentration values and observations. Scenario trials were conducted to explore management options for reducing pesticide loads arriving at the catchment outlet. The results obtained indicate that SWAT can be used as a tool to understand pesticide behavior at the catchment scale.

  15. Effect of farmyard manure, mineral fertilizers and mung bean residues on some microbiological properties of eroded soil in district Swat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naeem

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of organic and inorganic fertilizers and mung bean residues on improving microbiological properties of eroded lands of District Swat, North West Frontier Province (NWFP Pakistan under wheat-mung bean-wheat cropping system during 2006 to 2008. The experiment was laid out in RCBD split-plot arrangement. Mung bean was grown and a basal dose of 25-60 kg N-P2O5 ha-1 was applied. After mung bean harvest, three residues management practices, i.e., R+ (mung bean residues incorporated into soil, R- (mung bean residues removed and F (fallow were performed in the main-plots. Sub-plot factor consisted of six fertilizer treatments for wheat crop i.e., T1 (control, T2 (120 kg N ha-1, T3 (120-90-0 kg N-P2O5-K2O ha-1, T4 (120-90-60 kg N-P2O5-K2O ha-1, T5 (90-90-60 kg N-P2O5-K2O + 10 t FYM ha-1 and T6 (60-90-60 kg N-P2O5- K2O + 20 t FYM ha-1. The results showed that microbial activity, microbial biomass-C and-N, mineralizable C and N were highest with T6 as well as with the incorporation of mung bean residues (R+. Compared with control, T6 increased microbial biomass C, N, mineralizable C and N by 33.8, 164.1, 35.5 and 110.6% at surface and 38.4, 237.5, 38.7 and 124.1% at sub-surface soil, respectively, while R+ compared with fallow increased these properties by 33.7, 47.4, 21.4 and 32.2% at surface and 36.8, 51, 21.9 and 35.4% at sub-surface soil, respectively. Inclusion of mung bean with its residues incorporated and application of 20 t FYM ha-1 and reducing inorganic N fertilizer to 60 kg N ha-1 for wheat is recommended for improving microbiological properties of slightly eroded lands

  16. Validation of SWAT+ at field level and comparison with previous SWAT models in simulating hydrologic quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAO, J.; White, M. J.; Bieger, K.; Yen, H.; Arnold, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been adopted by many researches to assess water quantity and quality in watersheds around the world. As the demand increases in facilitating model support, maintenance, and future development, the SWAT source code and data have undergone major modifications over the past few years. To make the model more flexible in terms of interactions of spatial units and processes occurring in watersheds, a completely revised version of SWAT (SWAT+) was developed to improve SWAT's ability in water resource modelling and management. There are only several applications of SWAT+ in large watersheds, however, no study pays attention to validate the new model at field level and assess its performance. To test the basic hydrologic function of SWAT+, it was implemented in five field cases across five states in the U.S. and compared the SWAT+ created results with that from the previous models at the same fields. Additionally, an automatic calibration tool was used to test which model is easier to be calibrated well in a limited number of parameter adjustments. The goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of SWAT+ in simulating stream flow on field level at different geographical locations. The results demonstrate that SWAT+ demonstrated similar performance with previous SWAT model, but the flexibility offered by SWAT+ via the connection of different spatial objects can result in a more accurate simulation of hydrological processes in spatial, especially for watershed with artificial facilities. Autocalibration shows that SWAT+ is much easier to obtain a satisfied result compared with the previous SWAT. Although many capabilities have already been enhanced in SWAT+, there exist inaccuracies in simulation. This insufficiency will be improved with advancements in scientific knowledge on hydrologic process in specific watersheds. Currently, SWAT+ is prerelease, and any errors are being addressed.

  17. Analysing the Effects of Forest Cover and Irrigation Farm Dams on Streamflows of Water-Scarce Catchments in South Australia through the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hanh Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To assist water resource managers with future land use planning efforts, the eco-hydrological model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT was applied to three catchments in South Australia that experience extreme low flow conditions. Particular land uses and management issues of interest included forest covers, known to affect water yields, and farm dams, known to intercept and change the hydrological dynamics in a catchment. The study achieved a satisfactory daily calibration when irrigation farm dams were incorporated in the model. For the catchment dominated by extreme low flows, a better daily simulation across a range of qualitative and quantitative metrics was gained using the base-flow static threshold optimization technique. Scenario analysis on effects of forest cover indicated an increase of surface flow and a reduction of base-flow when native eucalyptus lands were replaced by pastures and vice versa. A decreasing trend was observed for the overall water yield of catchments with more forest plantation due to the higher evapotranspiration (ET rate and the decline in surface flow. With regards to effects of irrigation farm dams, assessment on a daily time step suggested that a significant volume of water is stored in these systems with the water loss rate highest in June and July. On an annual basis, the model indicated that approximately 13.1% to 22.0% of water has been captured by farm dams for irrigation. However, the scenario analysis revealed that the purposes of use of farm dams rather than their volumetric capacities in the catchment determined the magnitude of effects on streamflows. Water extracted from farm dams for irrigation of orchards and vineyards are more likely to diminish streamflows than other land uses. Outputs from this study suggest that the water use restrictions from farm dams during recent drought periods were an effective tool to minimize impacts on streamflows.

  18. SWAT Modeling for Depression-Dominated Areas: How Do Depressions Manipulate Hydrologic Modeling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Tahmasebi Nasab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling hydrologic processes for depression-dominated areas such as the North American Prairie Pothole Region is complex and reliant on a clear understanding of dynamic filling-spilling-merging-splitting processes of numerous depressions over the surface. Puddles are spatially distributed over a watershed and their sizes, storages, and interactions vary over time. However, most hydrologic models fail to account for these dynamic processes. Like other traditional methods, depressions are filled as a required preprocessing step in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. The objective of this study was to facilitate hydrologic modeling for depression-dominated areas by coupling SWAT with a Puddle Delineation (PD algorithm. In the coupled PD-SWAT model, the PD algorithm was utilized to quantify topographic details, including the characteristics, distribution, and hierarchical relationships of depressions, which were incorporated into SWAT at the hydrologic response unit (HRU scale. The new PD-SWAT model was tested for a large watershed in North Dakota under real precipitation events. In addition, hydrologic modeling of a small watershed was conducted under two extreme high and low synthetic precipitation conditions. In particular, the PD-SWAT was compared against the regular SWAT based on depressionless DEMs. The impact of depressions on the hydrologic modeling of the large and small watersheds was evaluated. The simulation results for the large watershed indicated that SWAT systematically overestimated the outlet discharge, which can be attributed to the failure to account for the hydrologic effects of depressions. It was found from the PD-SWAT modeling results that at the HRU scale surface runoff initiation was significantly delayed due to the threshold control of depressions. Under the high precipitation scenario, depressions increased the surface runoff peak. However, the low precipitation scenario could not fully fill depressions to reach

  19. Assessing Thermally Stressful Events in a Rhode Island Coldwater Fish Habitat Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Chambers

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly important to recognize historical water quality trends so that the future impacts of climate change may be better understood. Climate studies have suggested that inland stream temperatures and average streamflow will increase over the next century in New England, thereby putting aquatic species sustained by coldwater habitats at risk. In this study we evaluated two different approaches for modeling historical streamflow and stream temperature in a Rhode Island, USA, watershed with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, using (i original SWAT and (ii SWAT plus a hydroclimatological model component that considers both hydrological inputs and air temperature. Based on daily calibration results with six years of measured streamflow and four years of stream temperature data, we examined occurrences of stressful conditions for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis using the hydroclimatological model. SWAT with the hydroclimatological component improved modestly during calibration (NSE of 0.93, R2 of 0.95 compared to the original SWAT (NSE of 0.83, R2 of 0.93. Between 1980–2009, the number of stressful events, a moment in time where high or low flows occur simultaneously with stream temperatures exceeding 21 °C, increased by 55% and average streamflow increased by 60%. This study supports using the hydroclimatological SWAT component and provides an example method for assessing stressful conditions in southern New England’s coldwater habitats.

  20. SWAT Check: A Screening Tool to Assist Users in the Identification of Potential Model Application Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J; Harmel, R Daren; Arnold, Jeff G; Williams, Jimmy R

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a basin-scale hydrologic model developed by the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. SWAT's broad applicability, user-friendly model interfaces, and automatic calibration software have led to a rapid increase in the number of new users. These advancements also allow less experienced users to conduct SWAT modeling applications. In particular, the use of automated calibration software may produce simulated values that appear appropriate because they adequately mimic measured data used in calibration and validation. Autocalibrated model applications (and often those of unexperienced modelers) may contain input data errors and inappropriate parameter adjustments not readily identified by users or the autocalibration software. The objective of this research was to develop a program to assist users in the identification of potential model application problems. The resulting "SWAT Check" is a stand-alone Microsoft Windows program that (i) reads selected SWAT output and alerts users of values outside the typical range; (ii) creates process-based figures for visualization of the appropriateness of output values, including important outputs that are commonly ignored; and (iii) detects and alerts users of common model application errors. By alerting users to potential model application problems, this software should assist the SWAT community in developing more reliable modeling applications. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Revised SWAT. The integrated burnup calculation code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kiyosumi, Takehide [The Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. This report shows an outline and a user's manual of revised SWAT. This revised SWAT includes expansion of functions, increasing supported machines, and correction of several bugs reported from users of previous SWAT. (author)

  2. Revised SWAT. The integrated burnup calculation code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Kiyosumi, Takehide

    2000-07-01

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. This report shows an outline and a user's manual of revised SWAT. This revised SWAT includes expansion of functions, increasing supported machines, and correction of several bugs reported from users of previous SWAT. (author)

  3. Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis of BMPs in controlling agricultural nonpoint source pollution in China based on the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Jiawei; Yu, Wenwen; Shen, Zhenyao

    2014-12-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) have been widely used in managing agricultural nonpoint source pollution (ANSP) at the watershed level. Most BMPs are related to land use, tillage management, and fertilizer levels. In total, seven BMP scenarios (Reforest1, Reforest2, No Tillage, Contour tillage, and fertilizer level 1-4) that are related to these three factors were estimated in this study. The objectives were to investigate the effectiveness and cost-benefit of these BMPs on ANSP reduction in a large tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China, which are based on the simulation results of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. The results indicated that reforestation was the most economically efficient of all BMPs, and its net benefits were up to CNY 4.36×10(7) years(-1) (about USD 7.08×10(6) years(-1)). Regarding tillage practices, no tillage practice was more environmentally friendly than other tillage practices, and contour tillage was more economically efficient. Reducing the local fertilizer level to 0.8-fold less than that of 2010 can yield a satisfactory environmental and economic efficiency. Reforestation and fertilizer management were more effective in reducing total phosphorus (TP), whereas tillage management was more effective in reducing total nitrogen (TN). When CNY 10,000 (about USD 162) was applied to reforestation, no tillage, contour tillage, and an 0.8-fold reduction in the fertilizer level, then annual TN load can be reduced by 0.08, 0.16, 0.11, and 0.04 t and annual TP load can be reduced by 0.04, 0.02, 0.01 and 0.03 t, respectively. The cost-benefit (CB) ratios of the BMPs were as follows: reforestation (207 %) > contour tillage (129 %) > no tillage (114 %) > fertilizer management (96 and 89 %). The most economical and effective BMPs can be designated as follows: BMP1 (returning arable land with slopes greater than 25° to forests and those lands with slopes of 15-25° to orchards), BMP2 (implementing no tillage

  4. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watershed using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Yeo, In-Young; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, W. Dean

    2017-01-01

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrate loads from agriculture. Accordingly, the question remains whether WCCs are sufficient to mitigate increased nutrient loads caused by FCCs. In this study, we assessed the impacts of FCCs on WCC nitrate reduction efficiency on the Coastal Plain of the CBW using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Three FCC scenarios (2085 – 2098) were prepared using General Circulation Models (GCMs), considering three Intergovernmnental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) greenhouse gas emission scenarios. We also developed six representative WCC implementation scenarios based on the most commonly used planting dates and species of WCCs in this region. Simulation results showed that WCC biomass increased by ~ 58 % under FCC scenarios, due to climate conditions conducive to the WCC growth. Prior to implementing WCCs, annual nitrate loads increased by ~ 43 % under FCC scenarios compared to the baseline scenario (2001 – 2014). When WCCs were planted, annual nitrate loads were substantially reduced by ~ 48 % and WCC nitrate reduction efficiency water ~ 5 % higher under FCC scenarios relative to the baseline. The increase rate of WCC nitrate reduction efficiency varied by FCC scenarios and WCC planting methods. As CO2 concentration was higher and winters were warmer under FCC scenarios, WCCs had greater biomass and therefore showed higher nitrate reduction efficiency. In response to FCC scenarios, the performance of less effective WCC practices (e.g., barley, wheat, and late planting) under the baseline indicated ~ 14 % higher increase rate of nitrate reduction efficiency compared to ones with better effectiveness under the baseline (e

  5. Modeling the Effects of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Loads Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoghooghi, Nahal; Radcliffe, David E; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Jeong, Jaehak

    2017-05-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrogen (N) pollution in both surface and ground waters. In metropolitan Atlanta, GA, >26% of homes are on OWTSs. In a previous article, we used the Soil Water Assessment Tool to model the effect of OWTSs on stream flow in the Big Haynes Creek Watershed in metropolitan Atlanta. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of OWTSs, including failing systems, on nitrate as N (NO-N) load in the same watershed. Big Haynes Creek has a drainage area of 44 km with mainly urban land use (67%), and most of the homes use OWTSs. A USGS gauge station where stream flow was measured daily and NO-N concentrations were measured monthly was used as the outlet. The model was simulated for 12 yr. Overall, the model showed satisfactory daily stream flow and NO-N loads with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.62 and 0.58 for the calibration period and 0.67 and 0.33 for the validation period at the outlet of the Big Haynes Watershed. Onsite wastewater treatment systems caused an average increase in NO-N load of 23% at the watershed scale and 29% at the outlet of a subbasin with the highest density of OWTSs. Failing OWTSs were estimated to be 1% of the total systems and did not have a large impact on stream flow or NO-N load. The NO-N load was 74% of the total N load in the watershed, indicating the important effect of OWTSs on stream loads in this urban watershed. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Grid based calibration of SWAT hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gorgan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The calibration and execution of large hydrological models, such as SWAT (soil and water assessment tool, developed for large areas, high resolution, and huge input data, need not only quite a long execution time but also high computation resources. SWAT hydrological model supports studies and predictions of the impact of land management practices on water, sediment, and agricultural chemical yields in complex watersheds. The paper presents the gSWAT application as a web practical solution for environmental specialists to calibrate extensive hydrological models and to run scenarios, by hiding the complex control of processes and heterogeneous resources across the grid based high computation infrastructure. The paper highlights the basic functionalities of the gSWAT platform, and the features of the graphical user interface. The presentation is concerned with the development of working sessions, interactive control of calibration, direct and basic editing of parameters, process monitoring, and graphical and interactive visualization of the results. The experiments performed on different SWAT models and the obtained results argue the benefits brought by the grid parallel and distributed environment as a solution for the processing platform. All the instances of SWAT models used in the reported experiments have been developed through the enviroGRIDS project, targeting the Black Sea catchment area.

  7. SWAT4.0 - The integrated burnup code system driving continuous energy Monte Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and deterministic calculation code SRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashima, Takao; Suyama, Kenya; Takada, Tomoyuki

    2015-03-01

    There have been two versions of SWAT depending on details of its development history: the revised SWAT that uses the deterministic calculation code SRAC as a neutron transportation solver, and the SWAT3.1 that uses the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP or MCNP5 for the same purpose. It takes several hours, however, to execute one calculation by the continuous energy Monte Carlo code even on the super computer of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Moreover, two-dimensional burnup calculation is not practical using the revised SWAT because it has problems on production of effective cross section data and applying them to arbitrary fuel geometry when a calculation model has multiple burnup zones. Therefore, SWAT4.0 has been developed by adding, to SWAT3.1, a function to utilize the deterministic code SARC2006, which has shorter calculation time, as an outer module of neutron transportation solver for burnup calculation. SWAT4.0 has been enabled to execute two-dimensional burnup calculation by providing an input data template of SRAC2006 to SWAT4.0 input data, and updating atomic number densities of burnup zones in each burnup step. This report describes outline, input data instruction, and examples of calculations of SWAT4.0. (author)

  8. Experiments on injection performance of SMART ECC facility using SWAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Il; Cho, Seok; Ko, Yung Joo; Min, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kwon, Tae Soon; Yi, Sung Jae; Lee, Won Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), an advanced integrated PWR is now in the under developing stages by KAERI. Such integral PWR excludes large-size piping of the primary system of conventional PWR and incorporates the SGs into RPV, which means no LBLOCA could occur in SMART. Therefore, the SBLOCA is considered as a major DBA (Design Basis Accident) in SMART and it is mainly analyzed by using TASS/SMR computer code. The TASS/SMR code should be validated using experimental data from both Integral Effect Test and Separate Effect Test facilities. To investigate injection performance of the ECC system, on SET facility, named as SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility), has been constructed at KAERI. The SWAT simulates the geometric configurations of the SG-side upper downcomer annulus and ECCSs of those of SMART. It is designed based on the modified linear scaling method with a scaling ratio of 1/5, to preserve the geometrical similarity and minimize gravitational distortion. The purpose of the SWAT tests is to investigate the safety injection performance, such as the ECC bypass in the downcomer and the penetration rate in the core during the SBLOCA, and hence to produce experimental data to validate and the prediction capability of safety analysis codes, TASS/SMR

  9. A fully integrated SWAT-MODFLOW hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and MODFLOW models are being used worldwide for managing surface and groundwater water resources. The SWAT models hydrological processes occurring at the surface including shallow aquifers, while MODFLOW simulate groundwater processes. However, neither SWAT ...

  10. SWAT2: The improved SWAT code system by incorporating the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Hiroki; Suyama, Kenya; Okuno, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    SWAT is a code system, which performs the burnup calculation by the combination of the neutronics calculation code, SRAC95 and the one group burnup calculation code, ORIGEN2.1. The SWAT code system can deal with the cell geometry in SRAC95. However, a precise treatment of resonance absorptions by the SRAC95 code using the ultra-fine group cross section library is not directly applicable to two- or three-dimensional geometry models, because of restrictions in SRAC95. To overcome this problem, SWAT2 which newly introduced the continuous energy Monte Carlo code, MVP into SWAT was developed. Thereby, the burnup calculation by the continuous energy in any geometry became possible. Moreover, using the 147 group cross section library called SWAT library, the reactions which are not dealt with by SRAC95 and MVP can be treated. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality safety benchmark problems Phase-IB (PWR, a single pin cell model) and Phase-IIIB (BWR, fuel assembly model) were calculated as a verification of SWAT2, and the results were compared with the average values of calculation results of burnup calculation code of each organization. Through two benchmark problems, it was confirmed that SWAT2 was applicable to the burnup calculation of the complicated geometry. (author)

  11. Impact assessment of salt iodization on the prevalence of goiter in district Swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, J.; Zahoor-Ullah; Paracha, P.I.; Lutfullah, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: To eliminate Iodine Deficiency Disorders, (IDD) universal salt iodization is the widely practiced intervention. District Swat (a hilly area of NWFP, highly endemic for IDDs is selected as a first model district of the province for salt iodization program. Objectives: To find out the proportion of the families using iodized salt, iodine contents of the salts used by the families, urinary iodine levels in school children and the effect on goiter prevalence in Swat selected as a model district in 1998. Subject and Methods: The study was conducted in 960 children of both sexes, age 8-10 years in primary schools of district Swat in the year 2000. A replicate model used for base line study in 1998 was adopted. The students were clinically examined for goiter using palpation method. 960 edible salt samples for its iodine content and 240 urine samples for iodine level were analysed. Results: The overall goiter prevalence was found to be 52 and 45% in boys and girls respectively. 23% salt samples were found un-iodized, while in 25.6% the iodine content was less than 7ppm. The results revealed 18% decrease in total goiter rate and 35% increase in the use of iodized salt from the base line survey conducted in 1998, in school children of district Swat. Conclusions: The study revealed that since the area of Swat is still highly endemic for Iodine Deficiency Disorders, sustained efforts are required to ensure 100% salt iodization. (author)

  12. The modified SWAT model for predicting fecal coliforms in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Kim, Joon Ha; Kim, Jung-Woo; Park, Mi-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    This study assessed fecal coliform contamination in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed in Massachusetts, USA using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) because bacteria are one of the major water quality parameters of concern. The bacteria subroutine in SWAT, considering in-stream bacteria die-off only, was modified in this study to include solar radiation-associated die-off and the contribution of wildlife. The result of sensitivity analysis demonstrates that solar radiation is one of the most significant fate factors of fecal coliform. A water temperature-associated function to represent the contribution of beaver activity in the watershed to fecal contamination improved prediction accuracy. The modified SWAT model provides an improved estimate of bacteria from the watershed. Our approach will be useful for simulating bacterial concentrations to provide predictive and reliable information of fecal contamination thus facilitating the implementation of effective watershed management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of phosphorus loads in an artificially drained lowland catchment using a modified SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwe, Andreas; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Lennartz, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Eutrophication is still one of the main environmental problems in the Baltic Sea. Currently, agricultural diffuse sources constitute the major portion of phosphorus (P) fluxes to the Baltic Sea and have to be reduced to achieve the HELCOM targets and improve the ecological status. Eco-hydrological models are suitable tools to identify sources of nutrients and possible measures aiming at reducing nutrient loads into surface waters. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to the Warnow river basin (3300 km2), the second largest watershed in Germany discharging into the Baltic Sea. The Warnow river basin is located in northeastern Germany and characterized by lowlands with a high proportion of artificially drained areas. The aim of this study were (i) to estimate P loadings for individual flow fractions (point sources, surface runoff, tile flow, groundwater flow), spatially distributed on sub-basin scale. Since the official version of SWAT does not allow for the modeling of P in tile drains, we tested (ii) two different approaches of simulating P in tile drains by changing the SWAT source code. The SWAT source code was modified so that (i) the soluble P concentration of the groundwater was transferred to the tile water and (ii) the soluble P in the soil was transferred to the tiles. The SWAT model was first calibrated (2002-2011) and validated (1992-2001) for stream flow at 7 headwater catchments at a daily time scale. Based on this, the stream flow at the outlet of the Warnow river basin was simulated. Performance statistics indicated at least satisfactory model results for each sub-basin. Breaking down the discharge into flow constituents, it becomes visible that stream flow is mainly governed by groundwater and tile flow. Due to the topographic situation with gentle slopes, surface runoff played only a minor role. Results further indicate that the prediction of soluble P loads was improved by the modified SWAT versions. Major sources of

  14. Case Study: Effect of Climatic Characterization on River Discharge in an Alpine-Prealpine Catchment of the Spanish Pyrenees Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Palazón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The new challenges in assessment of water resources demand new approaches and tools, such as the use of hydrologic models, which could serve to assist managers in the prediction, planning and management of catchment water supplies in view of increased demand of water for irrigation and climatic change. Good characterization of the spatial patterns of climate variables is of paramount importance in hydrological modelling. This is especially so when modelling mountain environments which are characterized by strong altitudinal climate gradients. However, very often there is a poor distribution of climatic stations in these areas, which in many cases, results in under representation of high altitude areas with respect to climatic data. This results in the poor performance of the models. In the present study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model was applied to the Barasona reservoir catchment in the Central Spanish Pyrenees in order to assess the influence of different climatic characterizations in the monthly river discharges. Four simulations with different input data were assessed, using only the available climate data (A1; the former plus one synthetic dataset at a higher altitude (B1; and both plus the altitudinal climate gradient (A2 and B2. The model’s performance was evaluated against the river discharges for the representative periods of 2003–2005 and 1994–1996 by means of commonly used statistical measures. The best results were obtained using the altitudinal climate gradient alone (scenario A2. This study provided insight into the importance of taking into account the sources and the spatial distribution of weather data in modelling water resources in mountainous catchments.

  15. The SWAT approach for pipeline watercourse crossings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasper, Steve [WorleyParsons Calgary, Pipeline Systems Business Unit, Calgary, AB (Canada)], email: steve.jasper@worleyparsons.com; Harris, Jason D. [Triton Environmental Consultants Ltd., Terrace, British Columbia (Canada)], email: jharris@triton-env.com; Doering, Raymond [Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines, Calgary, AB (Canada)], email: raymond.doering@enbridge.com

    2010-07-01

    In a pipeline project, watercourse crossings are an important environmental and technical challenge. In identifying the best crossing location and method, many factors must be taken into account such as fish habitat, access, geotechnical and hydrological issues. The aim of this paper is to present a program used in a major pipeline project to assess crossings of sensitive watercourses. This program was implemented in the Enbridge Northern Gateway project which extends from Bruderheim, Alberta, to Kitimat, British Columbia, crossing over 750 watercourses. A sensitive watercourse assessment (SWAT) team composed of a fisheries biologist, a pipeline watercourse construction specialist and other personnel carried out assessments on the 200 sensitive watercourses identified. This program led to recommendations to shift the crossing location at 40% of the sensitive sites. This project showed that setting up a SWAT team be helpful in choosing the best location, method and construction timing for a crossing.

  16. Using StorAge Selection Functions to Improve Simulation of Groundwater Nitrate Lag Times in the SWAT Modeling Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, D. C.; Fuka, D.; Cho, C.; Ball, W. P.; Easton, Z. M.; Harman, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Intensive agriculture and atmospheric deposition have dramatically increased the input of reactive nitrogen into many watersheds worldwide. Reactive nitrogen can leach as nitrate into groundwater, which is stored and eventually released over years to decades into surface waters, potentially degrading water quality. To simulate the fate and transport of groundwater nitrate, many researchers and practitioners use the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) or an enhanced version of SWAT that accounts for topographically-driven variable source areas (TopoSWAT). Both SWAT and TopoSWAT effectively assume that nitrate in the groundwater reservoir is well-mixed, which is known to be a poor assumption at many sites. In this study, we describe modifications to TopoSWAT that (1) relax the assumption of groundwater well-mixedness, (2) more flexibly parameterize groundwater transport as a time-varying distribution of travel times using the recently developed theory of rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions, and (3) allow for groundwater age to be represented by position on the hillslope or hydrological distance from the stream. The approach conceptualizes the groundwater aquifer as a population of water parcels entering as recharge with a particular nitrate concentration, aging as they move through storage, and eventually exiting as baseflow. The rSAS function selects the distribution of parcel ages that exit as baseflow based on a parameterized probability distribution; this distribution can be adjusted to preferentially select different distributions of young and old parcels in storage so as to reproduce (in principle) any form of transport. The modified TopoSWAT model (TopoSWAT+rSAS) is tested at a small agricultural catchment in the Eastern Shore, MD with an extensive hydrologic and hydrochemical data record for calibration and evaluation. The results examine (1) the sensitivity of TopoSWAT+rSAS modeling of nitrate transport to assumptions about the distribution of travel

  17. Regionalization of SWAT Model Parameters for Use in Ungauged Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajeet Chaubey

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a steady shift towards modeling and model-based approaches as primary methods of assessing watershed response to hydrologic inputs and land management, and of quantifying watershed-wide best management practice (BMP effectiveness. Watershed models often require some degree of calibration and validation to achieve adequate watershed and therefore BMP representation. This is, however, only possible for gauged watersheds. There are many watersheds for which there are very little or no monitoring data available, thus the question as to whether it would be possible to extend and/or generalize model parameters obtained through calibration of gauged watersheds to ungauged watersheds within the same region. This study explored the possibility of developing regionalized model parameter sets for use in ungauged watersheds. The study evaluated two regionalization methods: global averaging, and regression-based parameters, on the SWAT model using data from priority watersheds in Arkansas. Resulting parameters were tested and model performance determined on three gauged watersheds. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies (NS for stream flow obtained using regression-based parameters (0.53–0.83 compared well with corresponding values obtained through model calibration (0.45–0.90. Model performance obtained using global averaged parameter values was also generally acceptable (0.4 ≤ NS ≤ 0.75. Results from this study indicate that regionalized parameter sets for the SWAT model can be obtained and used for making satisfactory hydrologic response predictions in ungauged watersheds.

  18. A simple rule based model for scheduling farm management operations in SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürz, Christoph; Mehdi, Bano; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    For many interdisciplinary questions at the watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT; Arnold et al., 1998) has become an accepted and widely used tool. Despite its flexibility, the model is highly demanding when it comes to input data. At SWAT's core the water balance and the modeled nutrient cycles are plant growth driven (implemented with the EPIC crop growth model). Therefore, land use and crop data with high spatial and thematic resolution, as well as detailed information on cultivation and farm management practices are required. For many applications of the model however, these data are unavailable. In order to meet these requirements, SWAT offers the option to trigger scheduled farm management operations by applying the Potential Heat Unit (PHU) concept. The PHU concept solely takes into account the accumulation of daily mean temperature for management scheduling. Hence, it contradicts several farming strategies that take place in reality; such as: i) Planting and harvesting dates are set much too early or too late, as the PHU concept is strongly sensitivity to inter-annual temperature fluctuations; ii) The timing of fertilizer application, in SWAT this often occurs simultaneously on the same date in in each field; iii) and can also coincide with precipitation events. Particularly, the latter two can lead to strong peaks in modeled nutrient loads. To cope with these shortcomings we propose a simple rule based model (RBM) to schedule management operations according to realistic farmer management practices in SWAT. The RBM involves simple strategies requiring only data that are input into the SWAT model initially, such as temperature and precipitation data. The user provides boundaries of time periods for operation schedules to take place for all crops in the model. These data are readily available from the literature or from crop variety trials. The RBM applies the dates by complying with the following rules: i) Operations scheduled in the

  19. Impacts of manure application on SWAT model outputs in the Xiangxi River watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Wang, Qingrui; Xu, Fei; Men, Cong; Guo, Lijia

    2017-12-01

    SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model has been widely used to simulate agricultural non-point source (ANPS) pollution; however, the impacts of livestock manure application on SWAT model outputs have not been well studied. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental effects of livestock manure application based on the SWAT model in the Xiangxi River watershed, which is one of the largest tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China. Three newly-built manure databases (NB) were created and applied to different subbasins based on the actual livestock manure discharging amount. The calibration and validation values of SWAT model outputs obtained from the NB manure application and the original mixed (OM) manure were compared. The study results are as follows: (1) The livestock industry of Xingshan County developed quickly between 2005 and 2015. The downstream of the Xiangxi River (Huangliang, Shuiyuesi and Xiakou) had the largest livestock amount, and largely accounted for manure, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) production (>50%). (2) The NB manure application resulted in less phosphorus pollution (1686.35 kg for ORGP and 31.70 kg for MINP) than the OM manure application. Compared with the upstream, the downstream was influenced more by the manure application. (3) The SWAT results obtained from the NB manure had a better calibration and validation values than those from the OM manure. For ORGP, R2 and NSE values were 0.77 and 0.65 for the NB manure calibration; and the same values for the OM manure were 0.72 and 0.61, respectively. For MINP, R2 values were 0.65 and 0.62 for the NB manure and the OM manure, and the NSE values were 0.60 and 0.58, respectively. The results indicated that the built-in fertilizer database in SWAT has its limitation because it is set up for the simulation in the USA. Thus, when livestock manure is considered in a SWAT simulation, a newly built fertilizer database needs to be set up to represent

  20. A generalized methodology for identification of threshold for HRU delineation in SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, J.; Sudheer, K.; Chaubey, I.; Raj, C.

    2016-12-01

    The distributed hydrological model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a comprehensive hydrologic model widely used for making various decisions. The simulation accuracy of the distributed hydrological model differs due to the mechanism involved in the subdivision of the watershed. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) considers sub-dividing the watershed and the sub-basins into small computing units known as 'hydrologic response units (HRU). The delineation of HRU is done based on unique combinations of land use, soil types, and slope within the sub-watersheds, which are not spatially defined. The computations in SWAT are done at HRU level and are then aggregated up to the sub-basin outlet, which is routed through the stream system. Generally, the HRUs are delineated by considering a threshold percentage of land use, soil and slope are to be given by the modeler to decrease the computation time of the model. The thresholds constrain the minimum area for constructing an HRU. In the current HRU delineation practice in SWAT, the land use, soil and slope of the watershed within a sub-basin, which is less than the predefined threshold, will be surpassed by the dominating land use, soil and slope, and introduce some level of ambiguity in the process simulations in terms of inappropriate representation of the area. But the loss of information due to variation in the threshold values depends highly on the purpose of the study. Therefore this research studies the effects of threshold values of HRU delineation on the hydrological modeling of SWAT on sediment simulations and suggests guidelines for selecting the appropriate threshold values considering the sediment simulation accuracy. The preliminary study was done on Illinois watershed by assigning different thresholds for land use and soil. A general methodology was proposed for identifying an appropriate threshold for HRU delineation in SWAT model that considered computational time and accuracy of the simulation

  1. A multi-objective approach to improve SWAT model calibration in alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Ye; Marcolini, Giorgia; Disse, Markus; Chiogna, Gabriele

    2018-04-01

    Multi-objective hydrological model calibration can represent a valuable solution to reduce model equifinality and parameter uncertainty. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is widely applied to investigate water quality and water management issues in alpine catchments. However, the model calibration is generally based on discharge records only, and most of the previous studies have defined a unique set of snow parameters for an entire basin. Only a few studies have considered snow observations to validate model results or have taken into account the possible variability of snow parameters for different subbasins. This work presents and compares three possible calibration approaches. The first two procedures are single-objective calibration procedures, for which all parameters of the SWAT model were calibrated according to river discharge alone. Procedures I and II differ from each other by the assumption used to define snow parameters: The first approach assigned a unique set of snow parameters to the entire basin, whereas the second approach assigned different subbasin-specific sets of snow parameters to each subbasin. The third procedure is a multi-objective calibration, in which we considered snow water equivalent (SWE) information at two different spatial scales (i.e. subbasin and elevation band), in addition to discharge measurements. We tested these approaches in the Upper Adige river basin where a dense network of snow depth measurement stations is available. Only the set of parameters obtained with this multi-objective procedure provided an acceptable prediction of both river discharge and SWE. These findings offer the large community of SWAT users a strategy to improve SWAT modeling in alpine catchments.

  2. Simulating Landscape Sediment Transport Capacity by Using a Modified SWAT Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonumá, Nadia B; Rossi, Colleen G; Arnold, Jeffrey G; Reichert, José M; Minella, Jean P; Allen, Peter M; Volk, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Sediment delivery from hillslopes to rivers is spatially variable and may lead to long-term delays between initial erosion and related sediment yield at the watershed outlet. Consideration of spatial variability is important for developing sound strategies for water quality improvement and soil protection at the watershed scale. Hence, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was modified and tested in this study to simulate the landscape transport capacity of sediment. The study area was the steeply sloped Arroio Lino watershed in southern Brazil. Observed sediment yield data at the watershed outlet were used to calibrate and validate a modified SWAT model. For the calibration period, the modified model performed better than the unaltered SWAT2009 version; the models achieved Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) values of 0.7 and -0.1, respectively. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies were less for the validation period, but the modified model's NSE was higher than the unaltered model (-1.4 and -12.1, respectively). Despite the relatively low NSE values, the results of this first test are promising because the model modifications lowered the percent bias in sediment yield from 73 to 18%. Simulation results for the modified model indicated that approximately 60% of the mobilized soil is deposited along the landscape before it reaches the river channels. This research demonstrates the modified model's ability to simulate sediment yield in watersheds with steep slopes. The results suggest that integration of the sediment deposition routine in SWAT increases accuracy in steeper areas while significantly improving its ability to predict the spatial distribution of sediment deposition areas. Further work is needed regarding (i) improved strategies for spatially distributed sediment transport measurements (for improving process knowledge and model evaluation) and (ii) extensive model tests in other well instrumented experimental watersheds with differing topographic configurations

  3. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yuzhou; Zhang Minghua

    2009-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed. - Selected structural BMPs are recommended for reducing loads of OP pesticides.

  4. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yuzhou [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang Minghua, E-mail: mhzhang@ucdavis.ed [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed. - Selected structural BMPs are recommended for reducing loads of OP pesticides.

  5. Modelling of hydrologic processes and potential response to climate change through the use of a multisite SWAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gül, G.O.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Hydrologic models that use components for integrated modelling of surface water and groundwater systems help conveniently simulate the dynamically linked hydrologic and hydraulic processes that govern flow conditions in watersheds. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is one such model...... that allows continuous simulations over long time periods in the land phase of the hydrologic cycle by incorporating surface water and groundwater interactions. This study provides a verified structure for the SWAT to evaluate existing flow regimes in a small-sized catchment in Denmark and examines a simple...... simulation to help quantify the effects of climate change on regional water quantities. SWAT can be regarded among the alternative hydrologic simulation tools applicable for catchments with similar characteristics and of similar sizes in Denmark. However, the modellers would be required to determine a proper...

  6. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuzhou; Zhang, Minghua

    2009-12-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed.

  7. Geomorphological hazards in Swat valley, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, A.

    1999-01-01

    This study attempts to describe, interpret and analyze, in depth, the varied geomorphological hazards and their impacts prevailing in the swat valley locate in the northern hilly and mountainous regions of Pakistan. The hills and mountains re zones of high geomorphological activity with rapid rates of weathering, active tectonic activities, abundant precipitation, rapid runoff and heavy sediment transport. Due to the varied topography, lithology, steep slope, erodible soil, heavy winter snowfall and intensive rainfall in the spring and summer seasons, several kinds of geomorphological hazards, such as geomorphic gravitational hazards, Fluvial hazards, Glacial hazards, Geo tectonic hazards, are occurring frequently in swat valley. Amongst them, geomorphic gravitational hazards, such as rock fall rock slide, debris slide mud flow avalanches, are major hazards in mountains and hills while fluvial hazards and sedimentation are mainly confined to the alluvial plain and lowlands of the valley. The Getechtonic hazards, on the other hand, have wide spread distribution in the valley the magnitude and occurrence of each king of hazard is thus, varied according to intensity of process and physical geographic environment. This paper discusses the type distribution and damage due to the various geomorphological hazards and their reduction treatments. The study would to be of particular importance and interest to both natural and social scientists, as well as planner, environmentalists and decision-makers for successful developmental interventions in the region. (author)

  8. SWAT Model Configuration, Calibration and Validation for Lake Champlain Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to develop phosphorus loading estimates for sources in the Lake Champlain Basin. This document describes the model setup and parameterization, and presents calibration results.

  9. Scaling and design report of ECC performance test facility (SWAT) of SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seok; Ko, Yong Ju; Cho, Young Il; Kim, Jeong Tak; Choi, Nam Hyun; Shin Yong Chul; Park, Choon Kyong; Kwon, Tae Soon; Lee, Sung Jae

    2010-12-01

    SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility) was designed by 1/5 scaling ratio using the modified linear scaling method. The design characteristics of the SMART such that the elevation of RCP suction nozzles is the same with that of the ECC injection nozzles are maintained to reduce a distortion caused by the gravitational effect. Thermal hydraulic phenomena in a test facility designed by the modified linear scaling method can be simulated more accurately than those by the full-height and reduced area scaling method. The main part of the test section is SG-side upper down-comer. The boundary conditions are saturated steam and water flow condition and drain flow rate to control the collapsed water level in the down-comer. The test data of the SWAT can produce the well-defined boundary condition to validate the thermal hydraulic analysis code for the SMART

  10. Scaling and design report of ECC performance test facility (SWAT) of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seok; Ko, Yong Ju; Cho, Young Il; Kim, Jeong Tak; Choi, Nam Hyun; Shin Yong Chul; Park, Choon Kyong; Kwon, Tae Soon; Lee, Sung Jae [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility) was designed by 1/5 scaling ratio using the modified linear scaling method. The design characteristics of the SMART such that the elevation of RCP suction nozzles is the same with that of the ECC injection nozzles are maintained to reduce a distortion caused by the gravitational effect. Thermal hydraulic phenomena in a test facility designed by the modified linear scaling method can be simulated more accurately than those by the full-height and reduced area scaling method. The main part of the test section is SG-side upper down-comer. The boundary conditions are saturated steam and water flow condition and drain flow rate to control the collapsed water level in the down-comer. The test data of the SWAT can produce the well-defined boundary condition to validate the thermal hydraulic analysis code for the SMART

  11. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watersheds using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrat...

  12. Spatial and temporal changes of water quality, and SWAT modeling of Vosvozis river basin, North Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskidis, Ioannis; Gikas, Georgios D; Pisinaras, Vassilios; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A

    2010-09-01

    The results of an investigation of the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of Vosvozis river in Northern Greece is presented. For the purposes of this study, three gaging stations were installed along Vosvozis river, where water quantity and quality measurements were conducted for the period August 2005 to November 2006. Water discharge, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO) and electrical conductivity (EC) were measured in situ using appropriate equipment. The collected water samples were analyzed in the laboratory for the determination of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium nitrogen, total Kjeldalh nitrogen (TKN), orthophosphate (OP), total phosphorus (TP), COD, and BOD. Agricultural diffuse sources provided the major source of nitrate nitrogen loads during the wet period. During the dry period (from June to October), the major nutrient (N, P) and COD, BOD sources were point sources. The trophic status of Vosvozis river during the monitoring period was determined as eutrophic, based on Dodds classification scheme. Moreover, the SWAT model was used to simulate hydrographs and nutrient loads. SWAT was validated with the measured data. Predicted hydrographs and pollutographs were plotted against observed values and showed good agreement. The validated model was used to test eight alternative scenarios concerning different cropping management approaches. The results of these scenarios indicate that nonpoint source pollution is the prevailing type of pollution in the study area. The SWAT model was found to satisfactorily simulate processes in ephemeral river basins and is an effective tool in water resources management.

  13. Improving streamflow simulations and forecasting performance of SWAT model by assimilating remotely sensed soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Amol; Ramsankaran, RAAJ

    2017-12-01

    This article presents a study carried out using EnKF based assimilation of coarser-scale SMOS soil moisture retrievals to improve the streamflow simulations and forecasting performance of SWAT model in a large catchment. This study has been carried out in Munneru river catchment, India, which is about 10,156 km2. In this study, an EnkF based new approach is proposed for improving the inherent vertical coupling of soil layers of SWAT hydrological model during soil moisture data assimilation. Evaluation of the vertical error correlation obtained between surface and subsurface layers indicates that the vertical coupling can be improved significantly using ensemble of soil storages compared to the traditional static soil storages based EnKF approach. However, the improvements in the simulated streamflow are moderate, which is due to the limitations in SWAT model in reflecting the profile soil moisture updates in surface runoff computations. Further, it is observed that the durability of streamflow improvements is longer when the assimilation system effectively updates the subsurface flow component. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that the passive microwave-based coarser-scale soil moisture products like SMOS hold significant potential to improve the streamflow estimates when assimilating into large-scale distributed hydrological models operating at a daily time step.

  14. Application of the SWAT model to the Xiangjiang river watershed in subtropical central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiao; Li, Yong; Wang, Kelin; Wu, Jinshui

    2013-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was applied to simulate the water balance in the Xiangjiang river watershed for current and planning scenarios of land uses. The model was first calibrated for the period from 1998 to 2002 and then validated for the period from 2003 to 2007 using the observed stream flow data from four monitoring gages within the watershed. The determination coefficient of linear regression of the observed and simulated monthly stream flows (R(2)) and their Nash-Sutcliffe Index (NSI) was used to evaluate model performance. All values of R(2) and NSI were above 0.8 and ranged from 0.82 to 0.92, which indicates that the SWAT model was capable of simulating the stream flow in the Xiangjiang river watershed. The calibrated and validated SWAT model was then applied to study the hydrological response of three land use change scenarios. Runoff was reduced by increasing the areas of forest and grassland while simultaneously decreasing the areas of agricultural and urban land. In the recent and future land use planning for the Xiangjiang river watershed, the hydrological effect should be considered in regional water management and erosion control.

  15. Improving the spatial representation of basin hydrology and flow processes in the SWAT model

    OpenAIRE

    Rathjens, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation aims at improving the spatial representation of basin hydrology and flow processes in the SWAT model. Die vorliegende Dissertation stellt die methodischen Grundlage zur räumlich differenzierten Modellierung mit dem Modell SWAT dar.

  16. Evaluating watershed protection programs in New York City's Cannonsville Reservoir source watershed using SWAT-HS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, L.; Mukundan, R.; Moore, K. E.; Owens, E. M.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    New York City (NYC)'s reservoirs supply over one billion gallons of drinking water each day to over nine million consumers in NYC and upstate communities. The City has invested more than $1.5 billion in watershed protection programs to maintain a waiver from filtration for the Catskill and Delaware Systems. In the last 25 years, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) has implemented programs in cooperation with upstate communities that include nutrient management, crop rotations, improvement of barnyards and manure storage, implementing tertiary treatment for Phosphorus (P) in wastewater treatment plants, and replacing failed septic systems in an effort to reduce P loads to water supply reservoirs. There have been several modeling studies evaluating the effect of agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) on P control in the Cannonsville watershed in the Delaware System. Although these studies showed that BMPs would reduce dissolved P losses, they were limited to farm-scale or watershed-scale estimates of reduction factors without consideration of the dynamic nature of overland flow and P losses from variable source areas. Recently, we developed the process-based SWAT-Hillslope (SWAT-HS) model, a modified version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) that can realistically predict variable source runoff processes. The objective of this study is to use the SWAT-HS model to evaluate watershed protection programs addressing both point and non-point sources of P. SWAT-HS predicts streamflow very well for the Cannonsville watershed with a daily Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) of 0.85 at the watershed outlet and NSE values ranging from 0.56 - 0.82 at five other locations within the watershed. Based on good hydrological prediction, we applied the model to predict P loads using detailed P inputs that change over time due to the implementation of watershed protection programs. Results from P model predictions provide improved projections of P

  17. A new R-SWAT Decision Making Framework for the Efficient Allocation of Best Management Practices

    OpenAIRE

    UDIAS MOINELO ANGEL; MALAGO ANNA; REYNAUD ARNAUD; PASTORI MARCO; VIGIAK OLGA; BOURAOUI Faycal

    2015-01-01

    The work presents and illustrates the application of R-SWAT-DM, a new R framework designed for Decision Making (DM), related to the implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs), for restoring and protecting the good ecological status of freshwater bodies. R-SWAT-DM combines the use of the SWAT watershed model, the spatial representation of BMPs and an economic component. The SWAT model served as the nonpoint source pollution estimator for current conditions (base line) as well as for sc...

  18. Interpretation of Landscape Scale SWAT Model Outputs in the Western Lake Erie Basin: Potential Implications for Conservation Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. V. V.; Behrman, K. D.; Atwood, J. D.; White, M. J.; Norfleet, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    There is substantial interest in understanding how conservation practices and agricultural management impact water quality, particularly phosphorus dynamics, in the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB). In 2016, the US and Canada accepted total phosphorus (TP) load targets recommended by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement Annex 4 Objectives and Targets Task Team; these were 6,000 MTA delivered to Lake Erie and 3,660 MTA delivered to WLEB. Outstanding challenges include development of metrics to determine achievement of these goals, establishment of sufficient monitoring capacity to assess progress, and identification of appropriate conservation practices to achieve the most cost-effective results. Process-based modeling can help inform decisions to address these challenges more quickly than can system observation. As part of the NRCS-led Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to predict impacts of conservation practice adoption reported by farmers on TP loss and load delivery dynamics in WLEB. SWAT results suggest that once the conservation practices in place in 2003-06 and 2012 are fully functional, TP loads delivered to WLEB will average 3,175 MTA and 3,084 MTA, respectively. In other words, SWAT predicts that currently adopted practices are sufficient to meet Annex 4 TP load targets. Yet, WLEB gauging stations show Annex 4 goals are unmet. There are several reasons the model predictions and current monitoring efforts are not in agreement: 1. SWAT assumes full functionality of simulated conservation practices; 2. SWAT does not simulate changing management over time, nor impacts of past management on legacy loads; 3. SWAT assumes WLEB hydrological system equilibrium under simulated management. The SWAT model runs used to construct the scenarios that informed the Annex 4 targets were similarly constrained by model assumptions. It takes time for a system to achieve equilibrium when management changes and it

  19. Utilization of Electronic Learning System in Swat Rural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazir Ahmed Sangi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As developments in electronic technologies i.e. personal computers, laptops, tablets, mobiles and wearable devices, the way of learning is also changing. Therefore, utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT has great important role in schools and colleges. ICT is using by students, teachers and societies in District Swat, KP, Pakistan in the form of mobiles internet (for social contact and chat, computers internet (for knowledge exploration and entertainment and multimedia (for teaching and learning. One of the difficulties involved in rural areas’ students of District Swat is that they cannot join class rooms due to their poor livelihood condition and far away from schools and colleges. Especially most of the females of rural areas of Swat do not come to schools and colleges for their family tradition and culture. Various questions were examined in every aspect of educational technologies in this study. We surveyed 50 responded randomly at District Swat from different schools and colleges and discovered that the responded were generally positive and have great interest about e-learning in Swat. The use of proposed electronic system for the learning, the literacy rate will increase in rural areas and students will achieve their individual goals.

  20. Analisis Laju Sedimen DAS Serayu Hulu dengan Menggunakan Model SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Christanto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Wilayah DAS Serayu Hulu merupakan DAS prioritas yang memerlukan langkah pengelolaan yang komprehensif. Aplikasi model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT dapat digunakan sebagai media untuk  perencanaan konservasi ataupun evaluasi respon DAS (debit aliran permukaan, sedimen dan pencemaran sungai. Tujuan utama dari penelitian ini adalah menjalankan model SWAT di DAS Serayu Hulu untuk mengetahui laju sedimen di wilayah ini. Pemodelan SWAT membutuhkan sejumlah input parameter berupa relief, tanah, tutupan lahan dan pengelolaan lahan. Pedogeomorfologi digunakan sebagai batas satuan tanah karena tidak tersedianya peta tanah di wilayah penelitian. Hasil Penerapan model SWAT di DAS Serayu Hulu menghasilkan nilai yang cukup memuaskan, hal ini ditunjukkan nilai R2 mencapai 0,94. Hasil pemodelan SWAT dengan menggunakan data selama 10 tahun (2004-2013 menunjukkan bahwa DAS Serayu Hulu memiliki rerata hasil sedimen sebesar 1.926.900 ton/tahun. Sub DAS 8,9 11, 17, 18, dan 19 merupakan penghasil sedimen tertinggi di DAS Serayu Hulu dengan hasil sedimen 43.931– 121.434 ton/ha/tahun.

  1. SWAT-based streamflow and embayment modeling of Karst-affected Chapel branch watershed, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra Amatya; M. Jha; A.E. Edwards; T.M. Williams; D.R. Hitchcock

    2011-01-01

    SWAT is a GIS-based basin-scale model widely used for the characterization of hydrology and water quality of large, complex watersheds; however, SWAT has not been fully tested in watersheds with karst geomorphology and downstream reservoir-like embayment. In this study, SWAT was applied to test its ability to predict monthly streamflow dynamics for a 1,555 ha karst...

  2. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  3. Evaluation of alternative surface runoff accounting procedures using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    For surface runoff estimation in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model, the curve number (CN) procedure is commonly adopted to calculate surface runoff by utilizing antecedent soil moisture condition (SCSI) in field. In the recent version of SWAT (SWAT2005), an alternative approach is ava...

  4. Effect of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) on Pb(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium-derived materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Biosorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) from binary metal solutions onto the algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal industrial waste and a waste-based composite material was investigated at pH 5.3, in a batch system. Binary Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) solutions have been tested. For the same equilibrium concentrations of both metal ions (1 mmol l(-1)), approximately 66, 85 and 86% of the total uptake capacity of the biosorbents is taken by lead ions in the systems Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II), respectively. Two-metal results were fitted to a discrete and a continuous model, showing the inhibition of the primary metal biosorption by the co-cation. The model parameters suggest that Cd(II) and Zn(II) have the same decreasing effect on the Pb(II) uptake capacity. The uptake of Pb(II) was highly sensitive to the presence of Cu(II). From the discrete model it was possible to obtain the Langmuir affinity constant for Pb(II) biosorption. The presence of the co-cations decreases the apparent affinity of Pb(II). The experimental results were successfully fitted by the continuous model, at different pH values, for each biosorbent. The following sequence for the equilibrium affinity constants was found: Pb>Cu>Cd approximately Zn.

  5. Fecal bacteria source characterization and sensitivity analysis of SWAT 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) version 2005 includes a microbial sub-model to simulate fecal bacteria transport at the watershed scale. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate methods to characterize fecal coliform bacteria (FCB) source loads and to assess the model sensitivity t...

  6. Pesticide transport simulation in a tropical catchment by SWAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannwarth, M.A.; Sangchan, W.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Lamers, M.; Ingwersen, J.; Ziegler, A.D.; Streck, T.

    2014-01-01

    The application of agrochemicals in Southeast Asia is increasing in rate, variety and toxicity with alarming speed. Understanding the behavior of these different contaminants within the environment require comprehensive monitoring programs as well as accurate simulations with hydrological models. We used the SWAT hydrological model to simulate the fate of three different pesticides, one of each usage type (herbicide, fungicide and insecticide) in a mountainous catchment in Northern Thailand. Three key parameters were identified: the sorption coefficient, the decay coefficient and the coefficient controlling pesticide percolation. We yielded satisfactory results simulating pesticide load dynamics during the calibration period (NSE: 0.92–0.67); the results during the validation period were also acceptable (NSE: 0.61–0.28). The results of this study are an important step in understanding the modeling behavior of these pesticides in SWAT and will help to identify thresholds of worst-case scenarios in order to assess the risk for the environment. - Highlights: • We performed a global LH-sensitivity analysis of all pesticide related parameters. • Key physical parameters are associated to percolation, degradation and sorption. • We simulated the measured loads of three different pesticides. • We performed an uncertainty analysis of all pesticide simulations. • All Pesticides differed considerably in their sensitivity and simulation behavior. - Pesticide load simulations of three pesticides were modeled by SWAT, providing clues on how to handle pesticides in future SWAT studies

  7. Validating soil phosphorus routines in the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus transfer from agricultural soils to surface waters is an important environmental issue. Commonly used models like SWAT have not always been updated to reflect improved understanding of soil P transformations and transfer to runoff. Our objective was to validate the ability of the P routin...

  8. SWATS: Diurnal Trends in the Soil Temperature Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Theisen, Adam [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-06-30

    During the processing of data for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ARMBE2D Value-Added Product (VAP), the developers noticed that the SWATS soil temperatures did not show a decreased temporal variability with increased depth with the new E30+ Extended Facilities (EFs), unlike the older EFs at ARM’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The instrument mentor analyzed the data and reported that all SWATS locations have shown this behavior but that the magnitude of the problem was greatest at EFs E31-E38. The data were analyzed to verify the initial assessments of: 1. 5 cm SWATS data were valid for all EFs and 15 cm soil temperature measurements were valid at all EFs other than E31-E38, 2. Use only nighttime SWATS soil temperature measurements to calculate daily average soil temperatures, 3. Since it seems likely that the soil temperature measurements below 15cm were affected by the solar heating of the enclosure at all but E31-38, and at all depths below 5cm at E31-38, individual measurements of soil temperature at these depths during daylight hours, and daily averages of the same, can ot be trusted on most (particularly sunny) days.

  9. Residues of cypermethrin and endosulfan in soils of Swat valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nafees

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Swat Valley was studied for two widely used pesticides; cypermethrin and endosulfan. A total of 63 soil samples were collected from 27 villages selected for this purpose. The collected soil samples were extracted with n-hexane, pesticides were separated, identified and quantified by a GC-ECD system. Endosulfan was 0.24 - 1.51 mg kg-1 and 0.13 - 12.67 mg kg-1 in rainfed and irrigated areas, respectively. The residual level of cypermethrin was comparatively high with a level of0.14 to 27.62 mg kg-1 and 0.05 to 73.75 mg kg-1 in rainfed and irrigated areas, respectively. For assessing the possible causes of pesticide residues in soil, 360 farmers were interviewed. It was found that both, cypermethrin and endosulfan, apart from agriculture were also widely misused for fishing in the entire stretch of River Swat and its tributaries. River Swat is used for irrigation in Swat Valley and this wide misuse of pesticides can also contribute to pesticide residue in soil.

  10. Environmental gamma radiation measurement in District Swat (Pakistan))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbar, T.; Khan, K.; Akhter, P.; Jabbar, A.; Subhani, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    External exposure to environmental gamma ray sources is an important component of exposure to the public. A survey was carried out to determine activity concentration levels and associated doses from 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs by means of high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry in the Swat district, famous for tourism. The mean concentrations for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were found to be 50.4 ± 0.7, 34.8 ± 0.7 and 434.5 ± 7.4 Bq kg -1 , respectively, in soil samples, which are slightly more than the world average values. However, 137 Cs was only found in the soil sample of Barikot with an activity concentration of 34 ± 1.2 Bq kg -1 . Only 40 K was determined in vegetation samples with an average activity of 172.2 ± 1.7 Bq kg -1 , whereas in water samples, all radionuclides were found below lower limits of detection. The radium equivalent activity in all soil samples is lower than the limit set in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development report (370 Bq kg -1 ). The value of the external exposure dose has been determined from the content of these radionuclides in soil. The average terrestrial gamma air absorbed dose rate was observed to be 62.4 nGy h -1 , which yields an annual effective dose of 0.08 mSv. The average value of the annual effective dose lies close to the global range of outdoor radiation exposure given in United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. However, the main component of the radiation dose to the population residing in the study area arises from cosmic ray due to high altitude. (authors)

  11. Role of Facilities Available and Un-Available in Attracting of Tourist in Swat Valley Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Jalaluddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural landscape is an important resource for mountainous regions and play crucial role in tourism development. Tourism play a key role in economic development of a country. Developing tourist areas is the key to meet the expectations of mountain inhabitants, tourists, and the general public outside of mountainous areas. In order to know tourist perception, problems, and role of landscape & horticulture plants in the field of tourism. A research study entitled “Role of facilities available and un-available in attracting of tourist in swat valley Pakistan “The data was collected from the respondents through a questionnaire survey and analyzed using percentages, frequencies and Chi-square test (where applicable. The analyzed data revealed that most of the respondent (55 % considered natural green environment as a reason for their visit and 67 % respondents wanted to visit with their friends and were satisfied with the tourist area, respectively. Most of the respondent (39 % observed throwing of surplus food as major waste materials which turned the beautiful green environment into unattractive environment. Most of the visitors (52 % dislike un-cleanliness of the locality, 74% respondents felt ill effect due to deforestation.53 % tourist disagree with the current maintenance of the locality by tourism department. The most missed facilities were non availability of dustbins and children playing areas. 75 % respondents agreed with the fact that most of the people (local inhabitants as well as tourist were unaware with regard to maintenance activities of the area 15.7 % respondent agreed that road system should be improved to access most of the greenery in the locality, respectively to aware local people and tourist regarding maintenance of the locality will improve tourism in Swat valley. The studies need to be develop for the improvement of existing as well as artificial landscape of the tourist area (Kalam and Malamjabba of Swat valley.

  12. SWAT3.1 - the integrated burnup code system driving continuous energy Monte Carlo codes MVP and MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Takada, Tomoyuki; Ryufuku, Susumu; Okuno, Hiroshi; Murazaki, Minoru; Ohkubo, Kiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT is a system that combines neutronics calculation code SRAC,which is widely used in Japan, and point burnup calculation code ORIGEN2. It has been used to evaluate the composition of the uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and the fission products in the spent nuclear fuel. Based on this idea, the integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT3.1 was developed by combining the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP and MCNP, and ORIGEN2. This enables us to treat the arbitrary fuel geometry and to generate the effective cross section data to be used in the burnup calculation with few approximations. This report describes the outline, input data instruction and several examples of the calculation. (author)

  13. Evaluation of best management practices under intensive irrigation using SWAT model

    OpenAIRE

    Dechmi, Farida; Skhiri, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Land management practices such as conservation tillage and optimum irrigation are routinely used to reduce non-point source pollution and improve water quality. The calibrated and validated SWAT-IRRIG model is the first modified SWAT version that reproduces well the irrigation return flows (IRF) when the irrigation source is outside of the watershed. The application of this SWAT version in intensive irrigated systems permits to better evaluate the best management practices (BMPs) in such syst...

  14. Watershed Modeling with ArcSWAT and SUFI2 In Cisadane Catchment Area: Calibration and Validation of River Flow Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Ridwansyah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of natural resources utilization as a result of population growth and economic development has caused severe damage on the watershed. The impacts of natural disasters such as floods, landslides and droughts become more frequent. Cisadane Catchment Area is one of 108 priority watershed in Indonesia. SWAT is currently applied world wide and considered as a versatile model that can be used to integrate multiple environmental processes, which support more effective watershed management and the development of better informed policy decision. The objective of this study is to examine the applicability of SWAT model for modeling mountainous catchments, focusing on Cisadane catchment Area in west Java Province, Indonesia. The SWAT model simulation was done for the periods of 2005 – 2010 while it used landuse information in 2009. Methods of Sequential Uncertainty Fitting ver. 2 (SUFI2 and combine with manual calibration were used in this study to calibrate a rainfall-runoff. The Calibration is done on 2007 and the validation on 2009, the R2 and Nash Sutchliffe Efficiency (NSE of the calibration were 0.71 and 0.72 respectively and the validation are 0.708 and 0.7 respectively. The monthly average of surface runoff and total water yield from the simulation were 27.7 mm and 2718.4 mm respectively. This study showed SWAT model can be a potential monitoring tool especially for watersheds in Cisadane Catchment Area or in the tropical regions. The model can be used for another purpose, especially in watershed management.

  15. OpenMP-accelerated SWAT simulation using Intel C and FORTRAN compilers: Development and benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Seo Jin; Sugimura, Tak; Kim, Albert S.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a practical method to accelerate execution of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) using open (free) computational resources. The SWAT source code (rev 622) was recompiled using a non-commercial Intel FORTRAN compiler in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Linux platform, and newly named iOMP-SWAT in this study. GNU utilities of make, gprof, and diff were used to develop the iOMP-SWAT package, profile memory usage, and check identicalness of parallel and serial simulations. Among 302 SWAT subroutines, the slowest routines were identified using GNU gprof, and later modified using Open Multiple Processing (OpenMP) library in an 8-core shared memory system. In addition, a C wrapping function was used to rapidly set large arrays to zero by cross compiling with the original SWAT FORTRAN package. A universal speedup ratio of 2.3 was achieved using input data sets of a large number of hydrological response units. As we specifically focus on acceleration of a single SWAT run, the use of iOMP-SWAT for parameter calibrations will significantly improve the performance of SWAT optimization.

  16. INCIDENCE OF NAMATODE PARASITES IN COMMERCIAL LAYERS IN SWAT

    OpenAIRE

    R.S. Sayyed, M.S. Phulan1, W.M. Bhatti1, M. Pardehi and Shamsher Ali

    2000-01-01

    Research was conducted on 400 guts of commercial layers collected from various shops at District Swat during April to September 1998. Out of 400 guts, 36 per cent were positive for nematodes, Mixed infestation of nematodes and cestodes was found in 4.75 per cent layers. Incidence rate of Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Subulura brumpli was 25.75, 8.25 and 2 per cent, respectively.

  17. INCIDENCE OF NAMATODE PARASITES IN COMMERCIAL LAYERS IN SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Sayyed, M.S. Phulan1, W.M. Bhatti1, M. Pardehi and Shamsher Ali

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Research was conducted on 400 guts of commercial layers collected from various shops at District Swat during April to September 1998. Out of 400 guts, 36 per cent were positive for nematodes, Mixed infestation of nematodes and cestodes was found in 4.75 per cent layers. Incidence rate of Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Subulura brumpli was 25.75, 8.25 and 2 per cent, respectively.

  18. Response of tomato cultivars to different organic fertilizers under agro-climatic conditions of mingora, Swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousafzai, S.K.; Khan, S.M.; Khan, J.; Khan, S.A.; Hussain, I.; Naz, I.

    2016-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at Agricultural Research Institute (ARI) Mingora, Swat during 2013 to study the effect of different organic fertilizers of tomato cultivars under the agro-climatic conditions of Mingora, Swat. The experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with split plot arrangements having four treatments with three replications. Almost all the traits showed significant differences for organic fertilizers and varieties, while their interactions had a varied response. The analyzed data showed that poultry manure gave maximum yield (24.65 t ha/sup -1/), followed by FYM (24.38 t ha/sup -1/) and mushroom compost (24.11 t ha/sup -1/ ) while minimum was recorded in plots where no organic fertilizer was used. The results revealed that cultivar, Rio Grand showed maximum number of plant survival percentage (98.33 percent), days to flowering (40.73), number of flowers plant/sup -1/ (6.23), number of fruit plant (25.67), fruit 3 weight (8.84 kg), number of leaves plant/sup -1/ (83.66), fruit size (64.70 cm/sup 3/) and total yield (25.67 t ha/sup -1/ ) in Farm Yard Manure (FYM). Considering the overall performance, it was found that the tomato cultivar Rio Grand was promising for yield and other characters where FYM was applied. (author)

  19. SWAT meta-modeling as support of the management scenario analysis in large watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzellino, A; Çevirgen, S; Giupponi, C; Parati, P; Ragusa, F; Salvetti, R

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, numerous models and modeling techniques have been developed to simulate nonpoint source pollution effects. Most models simulate the hydrological, chemical, and physical processes involved in the entrainment and transport of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides. Very often these models require a distributed modeling approach and are limited in scope by the requirement of homogeneity and by the need to manipulate extensive data sets. Physically based models are extensively used in this field as a decision support for managing the nonpoint source emissions. A common characteristic of this type of model is a demanding input of several state variables that makes the calibration and effort-costing in implementing any simulation scenario more difficult. In this study the USDA Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model the Venice Lagoon Watershed (VLW), Northern Italy. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) network was trained on SWAT simulations and used as a meta-model for scenario analysis. The MLP meta-model was successfully trained and showed an overall accuracy higher than 70% both on the training and on the evaluation set, allowing a significant simplification in conducting scenario analysis.

  20. Characterization of emerald from Gujar Kili, Swat, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.A.; Akram, M.; Khattak, N.U.; Khan, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    The green gem variety of beryl family having Cr as colouring agent is known as emerald. Thirteen emerald occurrences are known from northern Pakistan. These occurrences are in Mohamand Agency, Bajuar Agency, Swat District, Indus Kohistan and Gilgit which are located exclusively in the metamorphosed ophiolitic melange of the Indus Suture Zone. The ophiolitic rocks of this suture are the source of Cr which colours the beryl to make it emerald. Studies have been carried out for the characterisation of emerald from one locality, Gujar Kili in Swat district, using petrographic, XRD, XRF and fission track techniques. The Gujar Kili emerald is of green to deep green colour good quality gemstone and contains inclusions in some cases. In general, the Gujar Kili emerald has high Mg, Fe, Cr, V and Al values as compared to average composition of natural emeralds of Swat District. Two mineralogical phases, namely beryl and chrysoberyl have been identified in the four Gujar Kili samples analysed by us. The XRD data for the beryl and chrysoberyl is also presented. The Cr which colours the beryl to make it emerald, does not substitute any element in the beryl structure, rather it is present as an impurity in the crystal matrix. A new etchant to reveal fission tracks in a very short time is also being reported in this paper. (author)

  1. Incorporating rainfall uncertainty in a SWAT model: the river Zenne basin (Belgium) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolessa Leta, Olkeba; Nossent, Jiri; van Griensven, Ann; Bauwens, Willy

    2013-04-01

    The European Union Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD) called its member countries to achieve a good ecological status for all inland and coastal water bodies by 2015. According to recent studies, the river Zenne (Belgium) is far from this objective. Therefore, an interuniversity and multidisciplinary project "Towards a Good Ecological Status in the river Zenne (GESZ)" was launched to evaluate the effects of wastewater management plans on the river. In this project, different models have been developed and integrated using the Open Modelling Interface (OpenMI). The hydrologic, semi-distributed Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is hereby used as one of the model components in the integrated modelling chain in order to model the upland catchment processes. The assessment of the uncertainty of SWAT is an essential aspect of the decision making process, in order to design robust management strategies that take the predicted uncertainties into account. Model uncertainty stems from the uncertainties on the model parameters, the input data (e.g, rainfall), the calibration data (e.g., stream flows) and on the model structure itself. The objective of this paper is to assess the first three sources of uncertainty in a SWAT model of the river Zenne basin. For the assessment of rainfall measurement uncertainty, first, we identified independent rainfall periods, based on the daily precipitation and stream flow observations and using the Water Engineering Time Series PROcessing tool (WETSPRO). Secondly, we assigned a rainfall multiplier parameter for each of the independent rainfall periods, which serves as a multiplicative input error corruption. Finally, we treated these multipliers as latent parameters in the model optimization and uncertainty analysis (UA). For parameter uncertainty assessment, due to the high number of parameters of the SWAT model, first, we screened out its most sensitive parameters using the Latin Hypercube One-factor-At-a-Time (LH-OAT) technique

  2. PEMODELAN DAERAH TANGKAPAN AIR WADUK KELILING DENGAN MODEL SWAT (Keliling Reservoir Catchment Area Modeling Using SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuku Ferijal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to model watershed area of Keliling Reservoir using SWAT model. The reservoir is located in Aceh Besar District, Province of Aceh. The model was setup using 90m x 90m digital elevation model, land use data extracted from remote sensing data and soil characteristic obtained from laboratory analysis on soil samples. Model was calibrated using observed daily reservoir volume and the model performance was analyzed using RMSE-observations standard deviation ratio (RSR, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE and percent bias (PBIAS. The model delineated the study area into 3,448 Ha having 13 subwatersheds and 76 land units (HRUs. The watershed is mostly covered by forest (53% and grassland (31%. The analysis revealed the 10 most sensitive parameters i.e. GW_DELAY, CN2, REVAPMN, ALPHA_BF, SOL_AWC, GW_REVAP, GWQMN, CH_K2 and ESCO. Model performances were categorized into very good for monthly reservoir volume with ENS 0.95, RSR 0.23, and PBIAS 2.97. The model performance decreased when it used to analyze daily reservoir inflow with ENS 0.55, RSR 0.67, and PBIAS 3.46. Keywords: Keliling Reservoir, SWAT, Watershed   ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk untuk memodelkan daerah tangkapan air Waduk Keliling dengan menggunakan Model SWAT. Waduk Keliling terletak di Kabupaten Aceh Besar, Propinsi Aceh. Dalam penelitian ini Model SWAT dikembangkan berdasarkan data digital elevasi model resolusi 90 m x90 m, tata guna lahan yang diperoleh dari intepretasi citra satelit dan data soil dari hasil analisa sampel tanah yang diperoleh di daerah penelitian. Model dikalibrasi dengan data volume waduk dan kinerja model dianalisa menggunakan parameter rasio akar rata-rata kuadrat error dan standard deviasi observasi (RSR, efesiensi Nash-Sutcliffe (NSE dan persentase bias (PBIAS. Hasil deleniasi untuk daerah penelitian menghasilkan suatu DAS dengan luas 3,448 Ha dan memiliki 13 Sub DAS yang dikelompokkan menjadi 76 unit lahan. Sebagian besar wilayah study

  3. Effect of triptolide on proliferation and apoptosis of angiotensin II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The effect of triptolide (TPL) on cardiac fibroblasts (CFbs) and cardiac fibrosis remain unknown till now. This study was conducted to explore the effects of TPL on proliferation and apoptosis of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced CFbs. Materials and Methods: Ang II was used to promote proliferation of CFbs.

  4. Improving SWAT for simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    As a widely used watershed model for assessing impacts of anthropogenic and natural disturbances on water quantity and quality, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has not been extensively tested in simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems. Here, we examine SWAT simulations of evapotranspiration (ET), net primary productivity (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and plant biomass at ten AmeriFlux forest sites across the U.S. We identify unrealistic radiation use efficiency (Bio-E), large leaf to biomass fraction (Bio-LEAF), and missing phosphorus supply from parent material weathering as the primary causes for the inadequate performance of the default SWAT model in simulating forest dynamics. By further revising the relevant parameters and processes, SWAT's performance is substantially improved. Based on the comparison between the improved SWAT simulations and flux tower observations, we discuss future research directions for further enhancing model parameterization and representation of water and carbon cycling for forests. - Graphical abstract: Evaluating and improving SWAT simulations of water and carbon cycling over ten AmeriFlux sites across the United States. - Highlights: • The default forest parameterization in SWAT results in inadequate simulations of water and carbon. • Radiation use efficiency, leaf to biomass fraction, and parent material weathering processes are modified. • Revised SWAT provides improved simulations of evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange

  5. Improving SWAT for simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qichun [Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Lab, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Zhang, Xuesong, E-mail: xuesong.zhang@pnnl.gov [Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Lab, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    As a widely used watershed model for assessing impacts of anthropogenic and natural disturbances on water quantity and quality, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has not been extensively tested in simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems. Here, we examine SWAT simulations of evapotranspiration (ET), net primary productivity (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and plant biomass at ten AmeriFlux forest sites across the U.S. We identify unrealistic radiation use efficiency (Bio-E), large leaf to biomass fraction (Bio-LEAF), and missing phosphorus supply from parent material weathering as the primary causes for the inadequate performance of the default SWAT model in simulating forest dynamics. By further revising the relevant parameters and processes, SWAT's performance is substantially improved. Based on the comparison between the improved SWAT simulations and flux tower observations, we discuss future research directions for further enhancing model parameterization and representation of water and carbon cycling for forests. - Graphical abstract: Evaluating and improving SWAT simulations of water and carbon cycling over ten AmeriFlux sites across the United States. - Highlights: • The default forest parameterization in SWAT results in inadequate simulations of water and carbon. • Radiation use efficiency, leaf to biomass fraction, and parent material weathering processes are modified. • Revised SWAT provides improved simulations of evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange.

  6. The Pennsylvania Phosphorus Index and TopoSWAT: A comparison of transport components and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The regional Chesapeake Bay Conservation Innovation Grant Initiative includes comparison of TopoSWAT results and Phosphorus Index (P Index) evaluations of eight study watersheds throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. While similarities exist between the P Index and TopoSWAT, further comparison of ...

  7. Modeling the impact of nitrogen fertilizer application and tile drain configuration on nitrate leaching using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was revised to improve the partitioning of runoff and tile drainage in poorly drained soils by modifying the algorithm for computing the soil moisture retention parameter. In this study, the revised SWAT model was used to evaluate the sensitivity a...

  8. Using expert knowledge of the hydrological system to constrain multi-objective calibration of SWAT models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SWAT model is a helpful tool to predict hydrological processes in a study catchment and their impact on the river discharge at the catchment outlet. For reliable discharge predictions, a precise simulation of hydrological processes is required. Therefore, SWAT has to be calibrated accurately to ...

  9. SWATMOD-PREP: Graphical user interface for preparing coupled SWAT-modflow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents SWATMOD-Prep, a graphical user interface that couples a SWAT watershed model with a MODFLOW groundwater flow model. The interface is based on a recently published SWAT-MODFLOW code that couples the models via mapping schemes. The spatial layout of SWATMOD-Prep guides the user t...

  10. Validation of integrated burnup code system SWAT2 by the analyses of isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, K.; Mochizuki, H.; Okuno, H.; Miyoshi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides validation results of SWAT2, the revised version of SWAT, which is a code system combining point burnup code ORIGEN2 and continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP, by the analysis of post irradiation examinations (PIEs). Some isotopes show differences of calculation results between SWAT and SWAT2. However, generally, the differences are smaller than the error of PIE analysis that was reported in previous SWAT validation activity, and improved results are obtained for several important fission product nuclides. This study also includes comparison between an assembly and a single pin cell geometry models. (authors)

  11. Agroecology and biodiversity of the catchment area of Swat River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, H.; Ahmed, R.

    2003-01-01

    Agroecological studies of the of the Swat River catchment area showed that the terrestrial ecosystem of the area is divided into subtropical, humid temperate, cool temperate, cold temperate, subalpine, alpine and cold desert zones. Indicator species along with their altitudinal limits are specified for each zone. Unplanned population growth, agriculture extension, habitat losses, deforestation, environmental pollution and unwise use of natural resources are threats to the natural biodiversity of these zones. Its severity is very evident in the subtropical and humid temperate zones. The losses encountered to the biodiversity of the area under the influence of various anthropogenic stresses are highlighted. (author)

  12. Assessing ways to combat eutrophication in a Chinese drinking water reservoir using SWAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders; Trolle, Dennis; Me, W

    2013-01-01

    Across China, nutrient losses associated with agricultural production and domestic sewage have triggered eutrophication, and local managers are challenged to comply with drinking water quality requirements. Evidently, the improvement of water quality should be targeted holistically and encompass...... in land and livestock management and sewage treatment on nutrient export and derived consequences for water quality in the Chinese subtropical Kaiping (Dashahe) drinking water reservoir (supplying 0.4 million people). The critical load of TP was estimated to 13.5 tonnes yr–1 in order to comply...... both point sources and surface activities within the watershed of a reservoir. We expanded the ordinary Soil Water Assessment Tool – (SWAT) with a widely used empirical equation to estimate total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in lakes and reservoirs. Subsequently, we examined the effects of changes...

  13. Application of the SWAT model to an endorheic watershed in the Central Spanish Pre-Pyrenees: Methodological approach and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Leticia; White, Sue; Navas, Ana; López-Vicente, Manuel; Palazón, Leticia

    2013-04-01

    Modelling runoff and sediment transport at watershed scale are key tools to predict hydrological and sediment processes, identify soil sediment sources and estimate sediment yield, with the purpose of better managing soil and water resources. This study aims to apply the SWAT model in an endorheic watershed in the Central Spanish Pre-Pyrenees, where there have been a number of previous field-based studies on sediment sources and transfers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a process based semi-distributed watershed scale hydrologic model, which can provide a high level of spatial detail by allowing the watershed to be divided into sub-basins. This study addresses the challenge of applying the SWAT model to an endorheic watershed that drains to a central lake, without external output, and without a network of permanent rivers. In this case it has been shown that the SWAT model does not correctly reproduce the stream network when using automatic watershed delineation, even with a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (5 x 5 metres). For this purpose, different approaches needed to be considered, such as i) user-defined watersheds and streams, ii) burning in a stream network or iii) modelling each sub-watershed separately. The objective of this study was to develop a new methodological approach for correctly simulating the main hydrological processes in an endorheic and complex karst watershed of the Spanish Pre-Pyrenees. The Estanque de Arriba Lake watershed (74 ha) is an endorheic system located in the Spanish Central Pre-Pyrenees. This watershed holds a small and permanent lake of fresh water (1.7 ha) and is a Site of Community Importance (European NATURA 2000 network). The study area is characterized by an abrupt topography with altitude range between 679 and 862 m and an average slope gradient of 24 %. Steep slopes (> 24 %) occupy the northern part of the watershed, whereas gentle slopes (

  14. Hydrosedimentological modeling of watershed in southeast Brazil, using SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Calijuri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative evaluation of soil loss due to erosion, of water loss and of load sediments that reach water bodies is fundamental to the environmental planning of a watershed, contributing to the process of decision for best options for soil tillage and water quality maintenance. Estimates of these data have been accomplished throughout the world using empiric or conceptual models. Besides being economically viable in scenarios development, environmental models may contribute to the location of critical areas, leading to emergency contention operations caused by erosive processes. Among these models, we highlight the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool which was applied in São Bartolomeu watershed, located in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil, to identify areas of greater sensitivity to erosion considering the soil type and land use. To validate the model, 10 experimental plots were installed in the dominant crops of the watershed between 2006 and 2008, for monitoring the runoff and soil losses under natural rainfall. Field results and simulations showed the SWAT efficiency for sediment yield and soil losses estimations, as they are influenced by factors such as soil moisture, rainfall intensity, soil type and land use (dominated by Oxisols, Ultisols, Inceptisols and Entisols. These losses can be reduced significantly by improving crops management of. A simulation scenario replacing pastures cover by Eucalyptus was introduced, which significantly reduced soil loss in many parts of the watershed.

  15. Sodium-water reaction test facility (SWAT-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Hisashi; Ukechi, Kazutoshi; Sasakura, Kazutake; Kusunoki, Junichi

    1976-01-01

    In the development of the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), the steam generator (SG) is considered one of the most important components. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is now promoting the research and development of the SG system used with the prototype fast breeder reactor ''Monju''. In this research, the phenomena of the sodium-water reaction in the SG are the key which must be investigated for the solution of problems. The test facility (SWAT-3) simulating Monju's SG on the scale of 1/2.5 was designed, fabricated and installed by IHI at Oarai Engineering Center of PNC, its pre-operation being accomplished in February 1975. The purpose of SWAT-3 is summarized as follows: (1) To perform an overall test on the safety of Monju's SG and intermediate heat transport system under the design condition against sodium-water reaction accidents. (2) To investigate the damage of the SG structure caused by the sodium-water reaction, and the possibility of repair and recovery operations. The first test was accomplished successfully on June 9, 1975. As a result of the test, the fundamental function of this test facility was proven to be satisfactory as expected. (auth.)

  16. Characterizing snowmelt regime of the river swat - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Snowmelt generates 70 to 80% of runoff of Indus River and its tributaries. Forecasting snowmelt generated flow is important for water management, reservoir operation and channel diversion. River Swat being not direct contributor to the existing reservoirs remained out of focus for characterizing its snowmelt regime. Thirty years (1971-2000) data of upper Swat catchment above Kalam gauging station was acquired from WAPDA. Normal monthly values over the period and average monthly values of each year were determined for stream flow, precipitation and temperature together with average monthly values of weighted and maximum temperature. Snowmelt regime was ascertained from plot of normal values of flow, precipitation and temperature. Using temperature index approach, average monthly flow over the snowmelt months (April, May and June) in terms of mm depth over the catchment was regressed on all the temperature indices using exponential, power and third degree polynomial functions. Tmax was found the best index for snowmelt with R2 as 0.902 for the third degree polynomial function. Runoff coefficient (ROC) for the total precipitation was conceptualized and through iteration was found as T max 100. The optimized value of ROC was used to segregate rain induced and snowmelt induced runoff. The segregated snowmelt induced runoff was again regressed on Tmax using the same function which slightly improved R2 to 0.916. The model was tested for four years of data and forecasted flow was found reasonable in the context of simplicity of the approach. (author)

  17. Streamflow data assimilation in SWAT model using Extended Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leqiang; Nistor, Ioan; Seidou, Ousmane

    2015-12-01

    The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is coupled with the Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) model in the streamflow assimilation of the upstream Senegal River in West Africa. Given the large number of distributed variables in SWAT, only the average watershed scale variables are included in the state vector and the Hydrological Response Unit (HRU) scale variables are updated with the a posteriori/a priori ratio of their watershed scale counterparts. The Jacobian matrix is calculated numerically by perturbing the state variables. Both the soil moisture and CN2 are significantly updated in the wet season, yet they have opposite update patterns. A case study for a large flood forecast shows that for up to seven days, the streamflow forecast is moderately improved using the EKF-subsequent open loop scheme but significantly improved with a newly designed quasi-error update scheme. The former has better performances in the flood rising period while the latter has better performances in the recession period. For both schemes, the streamflow forecast is improved more significantly when the lead time is shorter.

  18. A GUIDED SWAT MODEL APPLICATION ON SEDIMENT YIELD MODELING IN PANGANI RIVER BASIN: LESSONS LEARNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preksedis Marco Ndomba

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to report on the lessons learnt from applying Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT in a well guided sediment yield modelling study. The study area is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB, the Nyumba Ya Mungu (NYM reservoir catchment, located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. It should be noted that, previous modeling exercises in the region applied SWAT with preassumption that inter-rill or sheet erosion was the dominant erosion type. In contrast, in this study SWAT model application was guided by results of analysis of high temporal resolution of sediment flow data and hydro-meteorological data. The runoff component of the SWAT model was calibrated from six-years (i.e. 1977–1982 of historical daily streamflow data. The sediment component of the model was calibrated using one-year (1977–1988 daily sediment loads estimated from one hydrological year sampling programme (between March and November, 2005 rating curve. A long-term period over 37 years (i.e. 1969–2005 simulation results of the SWAT model was validated to downstream NYM reservoir sediment accumulation information. The SWAT model captured 56 percent of the variance (CE and underestimated the observed daily sediment loads by 0.9 percent according to Total Mass Control (TMC performance indices during a normal wet hydrological year, i.e., between November 1, 1977 and October 31, 1978, as the calibration period. SWAT model predicted satisfactorily the long-term sediment catchment yield with a relative error of 2.6 percent. Also, the model has identified erosion sources spatially and has replicated some erosion processes as determined in other studies and field observations in the PRB. This result suggests that for catchments where sheet erosion is dominant SWAT model may substitute the sediment-rating curve. However, the SWAT model could not capture the dynamics of sediment load delivery in some seasons to the catchment outlet.

  19. A GUIDED SWAT MODEL APPLICATION ON SEDIMENT YIELD MODELING IN PANGANI RIVER BASIN: LESSONS LEARNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preksedis M. Ndomba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to report on the lessons learnt from applying Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT in a well guided sediment yield modelling study. The study area is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB, the Nyumba Ya Mungu (NYM reservoir catchment, located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. It should be noted that, previous modeling exercises in the region applied SWAT with preassumption that inter-rill or sheet erosion was the dominant erosion type. In contrast, in this study SWAT model application was guided by results of analysis of high temporal resolution of sediment flow data and hydro-meteorological data. The runoff component of the SWAT model was calibrated from six-years (i.e. 1977¿1982 of historical daily streamflow data. The sediment component of the model was calibrated using one-year (1977-1988 daily sediment loads estimated from one hydrological year sampling programme (between March and November, 2005 rating curve. A long-term period over 37 years (i.e. 1969-2005 simulation results of the SWAT model was validated to downstream NYM reservoir sediment accumulation information. The SWAT model captured 56 percent of the variance (CE and underestimated the observed daily sediment loads by 0.9 percent according to Total Mass Control (TMC performance indices during a normal wet hydrological year, i.e., between November 1, 1977 and October 31, 1978, as the calibration period. SWAT model predicted satisfactorily the long-term sediment catchment yield with a relative error of 2.6 percent. Also, the model has identified erosion sources spatially and has replicated some erosion processes as determined in other studies and field observations in the PRB. This result suggests that for catchments where sheet erosion is dominant SWAT model may substitute the sediment-rating curve. However, the SWAT model could not capture the dynamics of sediment load delivery in some seasons to the catchment outlet.

  20. Hydrologic and atrazine simulation of the Cedar Creek Watershed using the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, M; Heathman, G C; Norton, L D; Engel, B

    2007-01-01

    One of the major factors contributing to surface water contamination in agricultural areas is the use of pesticides. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a hydrologic model capable of simulating the fate and transport of pesticides in an agricultural watershed. The SWAT model was used in this study to estimate stream flow and atrazine (2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine) losses to surface water in the Cedar Creek Watershed (CCW) within the St. Joseph River Basin in northeastern Indiana. Model calibration and validation periods consisted of five and two year periods, respectively. The National Agricultural Statistics Survey (NASS) 2001 land cover classification and the Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) database were used as model input data layers. Data from the St. Joseph River Watershed Initiative and the Soil and Water Conservation Districts of Allen, Dekalb, and Noble counties were used to represent agricultural practices in the watershed which included the type of crops grown, tillage practices, fertilizer, and pesticide application rates. Model results were evaluated based on efficiency coefficient values, standard statistical measures, and visual inspection of the measured and simulated hydrographs. The Nash and Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficients (E(NS)) for monthly and daily stream flow calibration and validation ranged from 0.51 to 0.66. The E(NS) values for atrazine calibration and validation ranged from 0.43 to 0.59. All E(NS) values were within the range of acceptable model performance standards. The results of this study indicate that the model is an effective tool in capturing the dynamics of stream flow and atrazine concentrations on a large-scale agricultural watershed in the midwestern USA.

  1. ANALISIS CURAH HUJAN DAN DEBIT MODEL SWAT DENGAN METODE MOVING AVERAGE DI DAS CILIWUNG HULU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defri Satiya Zuma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Watershed can be regarded as a hydrological system that has a function in transforming rainwater as an input into outputs such as flow and sediment. The transformation of inputs into outputs has specific forms and properties. The transformation involves many processes, including processes occurred on the surface of the land, river basins, in soil and aquifer. This study aimed to apply the SWAT model  in  Ciliwung Hulu Watershed, asses the effect of average rainfall  on 3 days, 5 days, 7 days and 10 days of the hydrological characteristics in Ciliwung Hulu Watershed. The correlation coefficient (r between rainfall and discharge was positive, it indicated that there was an unidirectional relationship between rainfall and discharge in the upstream, midstream and downstream of the watershed. The upper limit ratio of discharge had a downward trend from upstream to downstream, while the lower limit ratio of  discharge had an upward trend from upstream to downstream. It showed that the discharge peak in Ciliwung  Hulu Watershed from upstream to downstream had a downward trend while the baseflow from upstream to downstream had an upward trend. It showed that the upstream of Ciliwung Hulu Watershed had the highest ratio of discharge peak  and baseflow so it needs the soil and water conservations and technical civil measures. The discussion concluded that the SWAT model could be well applied in Ciliwung Hulu Watershed, the most affecting average rainfall on the hydrological characteristics was the average rainfall of 10 days. On average  rainfall of 10 days, all components had contributed maximally for river discharge.

  2. Evaluation of dentoskeletal effects of Farmand functional appliance (Fa II) on class II malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yassaei S.; Aghili H.; Razeghi D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aim: Functional appliances refer to a variety of removable or fixed appliances designed to alter the mandibular position both sagitally and vertically, resulting in orthodontic and orthopedic changes. Despite the long history of functional appliances, there is still much controversy related to their effectiveness and mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental and skeletal effects of Fa II in patients with class II malocclusion due to mandibular deficiency.Mate...

  3. Simulation of agricultural non-point source pollution in Xichuan by using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Linan; Zuo, Jiane; Liu, Fenglin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Cao, Qiguang

    2018-02-01

    This paper evaluated the applicability of using SWAT to access agricultural non-point source pollution in Xichuan area. In order to build the model, DEM, soil sort and land use map, climate monitoring data were collected as basic database. The SWAT model was calibrated and validated for the SWAT was carried out using streamflow, suspended solids, total phosphorus and total nitrogen records from 2009 to 2011. Errors, coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient were considered to evaluate the applicability. The coefficient of determination were 0.96, 0.66, 0.55 and 0.66 for streamflow, SS, TN, and TP, respectively. Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient were 0.93, 0.5, 0.52 and 0.63, respectively. The results all meet the requirements. It suggested that the SWAT model can simulate the study area.

  4. Improving SWAT for simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Xuesong

    2016-11-01

    As a widely used watershed model for assessing impacts of anthropogenic and natural disturbances on water quantity and quality, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has not been extensively tested in simulating water and carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems. Here, we examine SWAT simulations of evapotranspiration (ET), net primary productivity (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and plant biomass at ten AmeriFlux forest sites across the U.S. We identify unrealistic radiation use efficiency (Bio_E), large leaf to biomass fraction (Bio_LEAF), and missing phosphorus supply from parent material weathering as the primary causes for the inadequate performance of the default SWAT model in simulating forest dynamics. By further revising the relevant parameters and processes, SWAT’s performance is substantially improved. Based on the comparison between the improved SWAT simulations and flux tower observations, we discuss future research directions for further enhancing model parameterization and representation of water and carbon cycling for forests.

  5. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  6. Ethnobotanical Study of Tehsil Kabal, Swat District, KPK, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 140 plants have been reported ethnobotanically from Tehsil Kabal, Swat District. These include the 133 plants (95% of angiosperms, 3 (2.14% of gymnosperms, and 2 (1.42% each of pteridophytes and fungi. The largest family is Lamiaceae represented by 11 species followed by Rosaceae represented by 9 species. Among angiosperms 76 (55.63% were herbs, 17 (12.78% were shrubs, and 40 (30.07% were trees; 127 plants (95.48% were dicot while 6 plants (4.51% were monocot. Most of the plants were used for more than one purpose. Generally the plants were used for medicinal, fuel, timber wood, food, and fodder for cattle purposes.

  7. Evaluation of non-point source pollution reduction by applying best management practices using a SWAT model and QuickBird high resolution satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, MiSeon; Park, GeunAe; Park, MinJi; Park, JongYoon; Lee, JiWan; Kim, SeongJoon

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the reduction effect of non-point source pollution by applying best management practices (BMPs) to a 1.21 km2 small agricultural watershed using a SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model. Two meter QuickBird land use data were prepared for the watershed. The SWAT was calibrated and validated using daily streamflow and monthly water quality (total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and suspended solids (SS)) records from 1999 to 2000 and from 2001 to 2002. The average Nash and Sutcliffe model efficiency was 0.63 for the streamflow and the coefficients of determination were 0.88, 0.72, and 0.68 for SS, TN, and TP, respectively. Four BMP scenarios viz. the application of vegetation filter strip and riparian buffer system, the regulation of Universal Soil Loss Equation P factor, and the fertilizing control amount for crops were applied and analyzed.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF WATER BALANCE OF A WATERSHED USING SWAT MODEL FOR WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra George; Sathian, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    An attempt has been made in this study to assess the hydrological behavior of the Kurumali sub basin of Karuvannur river basin using SWAT model and other geospatial technologies. All the thematic maps and attribute information of the watershed have been collected from various Government agencies. SWAT model has been set up for the Kurumali sub basin by inputting the digital thematic maps, physical properties of soil and climatic parameters. Total area of the watershed corresponding to the out...

  9. SWAT application in intensive irrigation systems: Model modification, calibration and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Dechmi, Farida; Burguete, Javier; Skhiri, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a well established, distributed, eco-hydrologic model. However, using the study case of an agricultural intensive irrigated watershed, it was shown that all the model versions are not able to appropriately reproduce the total streamflow in such system when the irrigation source is outside the watershed. The objective of this study was to modify the SWAT2005 version for correctly simulating the main hydrological processes. Crop yield, total streamfl...

  10. Rainfall estimation in SWAT: An alternative method to simulate orographic precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, L.; Olías, M.; Izquierdo, T.; Cerón, J. C.; Fernández de Villarán, R.

    2014-02-01

    The input of water from precipitation is one of the most important aspects of a hydrologic model because it controls the basin's water budget. The model should reproduce the amount and distribution of rainfall in the basin, spatially and temporally. SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) is one of the most widely used hydrologic models. In this paper the rainfall estimation in SWAT is revised, focusing on the treatment of orographic precipitation. SWAT was applied to the Odiel river basin (SW Spain), with a surface of 2300 km2. Results show that SWAT does not reflect reallisticaly the spatial distribution of rainfall in the basin. In relation to orographic precipitation, SWAT estimates the daily precipitation in elevation bands by adding a constant amount to the recorded precipitation in the rain gauge, which depends on the increase in precipitation with altitude and the difference between the mean elevation of each band and the elevation of the recording gauge. This does not reflect rainfall in the subbasin because the increase in precipitation with altitude actually it is not constant, but depends on the amount of rainfall. An alternative methodology to represent the temporal distribution of orographic precipitation is proposed. After simulation, the deviation of runoff volume using the SWAT elevation bands was appreciably higher than that obtained with the proposed methodology.

  11. Parameterization and Uncertainty Analysis of SWAT model in Hydrological Simulation of Chaohe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, M.; Zhang, J.; Guo, B. B.

    2017-12-01

    As a typical distributed hydrological model, the SWAT model also has a challenge in calibrating parameters and analysis their uncertainty. This paper chooses the Chaohe River Basin China as the study area, through the establishment of the SWAT model, loading the DEM data of the Chaohe river basin, the watershed is automatically divided into several sub-basins. Analyzing the land use, soil and slope which are on the basis of the sub-basins and calculating the hydrological response unit (HRU) of the study area, after running SWAT model, the runoff simulation values in the watershed are obtained. On this basis, using weather data, known daily runoff of three hydrological stations, combined with the SWAT-CUP automatic program and the manual adjustment method are used to analyze the multi-site calibration of the model parameters. Furthermore, the GLUE algorithm is used to analyze the parameters uncertainty of the SWAT model. Through the sensitivity analysis, calibration and uncertainty study of SWAT, the results indicate that the parameterization of the hydrological characteristics of the Chaohe river is successful and feasible which can be used to simulate the Chaohe river basin.

  12. Calibration and validation of SWAT model for estimating water balance and nitrogen losses in a small agricultural watershed in central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarzyńska Karolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT ver. 2005 was applied to study water balance and nitrogen load pathways in a small agricultural watershed in the lowlands of central Poland. The natural flow regime of the Zgłowiączka River was strongly modified by human activity (deforestation and installation of a subsurface drainage system to facilitate stable crop production. SWAT was calibrated for daily and monthly discharge and monthly nitrate nitrogen load. Model efficiency was tested using manual techniques (subjective and evaluation statistics (objective. Values of Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE, coefficient of determination (R2 and percentage of bias for daily/monthly discharge simulations and monthly load indicated good or very good fit of simulated discharge and nitrate nitrogen load to the observed data set. Model precision and accuracy of fit was proved in validation. The calibrated and validated SWAT was used to assess water balance and nitrogen fluxes in the watershed. According to the results, the share of tile drainage in water yield is equal to 78%. The model analysis indicated the most significant pathway of NO3-N to surface waters in the study area, namely the tile drainage combined with lateral flow. Its share in total NO3-N load amounted to 89%. Identification of nitrogen fluxes in the watershed is crucial for decision makers in order to manage water resources and to implement the most effective measures to limit diffuse pollution from arable land to surface waters.

  13. Evaluation of dentoskeletal effects of Farmand functional appliance (Fa II on class II malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassaei S.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Functional appliances refer to a variety of removable or fixed appliances designed to alter the mandibular position both sagitally and vertically, resulting in orthodontic and orthopedic changes. Despite the long history of functional appliances, there is still much controversy related to their effectiveness and mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental and skeletal effects of Fa II in patients with class II malocclusion due to mandibular deficiency.Materials and Methods: In this before-after clinical trial, 35 patients with class II div I malocclusion were selected. These samples were under treatment with Fa II appliance for 11 months. The range of age of females was 10-13 years and males 11-14 years. Combination analysis was used to determine skeletal and dental effects. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences of mean value pre and post treatment. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: There was significant difference between pre and post treatment in respect to posterior and anterior facial height, eruption of upper and lower posterior teeth, eruption of upper anterior teeth, mandibular body length, ANB angle, IMPA and 1 to SN. No significant difference was observed between pre and post treatment regarding facial growth.Conclusion: Treatment with Fa II functional appliance leads to significant alterations in dental and skeletal elements of craniofacial complex and improvement of dental and jaws relationship.

  14. Annual theme report (October 2007 to September 2008) for the environmental impact (SWAT modeling) component of "Agroforestry and Sustainable Vegetable Production in Southeast Asian Watersheds" project

    OpenAIRE

    Ella, Victor B.

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of the Environmental Impact (SWAT Modeling) component of this SANREM CRSP project in year 3 was highlighted by further work on SWAT model development in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam. In all three countries, additional input data have been collected over the past year for SWAT modeling purposes. Data Elevation Models (DEMs), land use maps and soil maps have also been prepared in all three countries. In the Philippines, SWAT model has been developed for assessing the hy...

  15. Determination of static and dynamic reactivity effects in KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, C.

    1987-11-01

    In the frame of a pre-study of the KNK II test program two series of experiments related to inherent safety characteristics of sodium cooled breeder reactors have been elaborated, which are one basis for the performance of experiments of the Loss Of Flow (LOF) type and the Loss Of Heat Sink (LOHS) type. Tests of this type at KNK II would -different from the earlier tests at RAPSODIE and EBR-II- provide a demonstration of the inherently safe performance in case of a significantly non-zero Doppler effect. With a suitable execution, the foreseen series of experiments allow, as explained in this report, a substantial separation of the reactivity contributions and the determination of reactivity effects, i.e. the time constants of the recouplings. The performance and evaluation of these experiments with respect to the inherent safety potential will once more underline the distinguished role of KNK II for the development of fast breeders [de

  16. Duality symmetries and the Type II string effective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergshoeff, E.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the duality symmetries of Type II string effective actions in nine, ten and eleven dimensions. As a by-product we give a covariant action underlying the ten-dimensional Type IIB supergravity theory. We apply duality symmetries to construct dyonic Type II string solutions in six dimensions and their reformulation as solutions of the ten-dimensional Type IIB theory in ten dimensions. (orig.)

  17. SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team): A Model for Land Grant Institutions and Cooperative Extension Systems to Conduct Street Tree Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowett, F.D.; Bassuk, N.L.

    2012-01-01

    SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team) is a program affiliated with Cornell University and Extension founded to conduct street tree inventories in New York State communities with 10,000 residents or fewer, a group of communities underserved in community forestry planning. Between 2002 and 2010, SWAT conducted 40 inventories, and data from these…

  18. Uncertainty of SWAT model at different DEM resolutions in a large mountainous watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peipei; Liu, Ruimin; Bao, Yimeng; Wang, Jiawei; Yu, Wenwen; Shen, Zhenyao

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this study was to enhance understanding of the sensitivity of the SWAT model to the resolutions of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) based on the analysis of multiple evaluation indicators. The Xiangxi River, a large tributary of Three Gorges Reservoir in China, was selected as the study area. A range of 17 DEM spatial resolutions, from 30 to 1000 m, was examined, and the annual and monthly model outputs based on each resolution were compared. The following results were obtained: (i) sediment yield was greatly affected by DEM resolution; (ii) the prediction of dissolved oxygen load was significantly affected by DEM resolutions coarser than 500 m; (iii) Total Nitrogen (TN) load was not greatly affected by the DEM resolution; (iv) Nitrate Nitrogen (NO₃-N) and Total Phosphorus (TP) loads were slightly affected by the DEM resolution; and (v) flow and Ammonia Nitrogen (NH₄-N) load were essentially unaffected by the DEM resolution. The flow and dissolved oxygen load decreased more significantly in the dry season than in the wet and normal seasons. Excluding flow and dissolved oxygen, the uncertainties of the other Hydrology/Non-point Source (H/NPS) pollution indicators were greater in the wet season than in the dry and normal seasons. Considering the temporal distribution uncertainties, the optimal DEM resolutions for flow was 30-200 m, for sediment and TP was 30-100 m, for dissolved oxygen and NO₃-N was 30-300 m, for NH₄-N was 30 to 70 m and for TN was 30-150 m. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling riverine nitrate export from an East-Central Illinois watershed using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; McIsaac, G F; David, M B; Louwers, C A L

    2007-01-01

    Reliable water quality models are needed to forecast the water quality consequences of different agricultural nutrient management scenarios. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), version 2000, was applied to simulate streamflow, riverine nitrate (NO(3)) export, crop yield, and watershed nitrogen (N) budgets in the upper Embarras River (UER) watershed in east-central Illinois, which has extensive maize-soybean cultivation, large N fertilizer input, and extensive tile drainage. During the calibration (1994-2002) and validation (1985-1993) periods, SWAT simulated monthly and annual stream flows with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients (E) ranging from 0.67 to 0.94 and R(2) from 0.75 to 0.95. For monthly and annual NO(3) loads, E ranged from -0.16 to 0.45 and R(2) from 0.36 to 0.74. Annual maize and soybean yields were simulated with relative errors ranging from -10 to 6%. The model was then used to predict the changes in NO(3) output with N fertilizer application rates 10 to 50% lower than original application rates in UER. The calibrated SWAT predicted a 10 to 43% decrease in NO(3) export from UER and a 6 to 38% reduction in maize yield in response to the reduction in N fertilizer. The SWAT model markedly overestimated NO(3) export during major wet periods. Moreover, SWAT estimated soybean N fixation rates considerably greater than literature values, and some simulated changes in the N cycle in response to fertilizer reduction seemed to be unrealistic. Improving these aspects of SWAT could lead to more reliable predictions in the water quality outcomes of nutrient management practices in tile-drained watersheds.

  20. Developing a Resource for Implementing ArcSWAT Using Global Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, M.; Caraballo Álvarez, I. O.; Mueller, C.; Palacios, S. L.; Schmidt, C.; Milesi, C.; Palmer-Moloney, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    This project developed a comprehensive user manual outlining methods for adapting and implementing global datasets for use within ArcSWAT for international and worldwide applications. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a hydrologic model that looks at a number of hydrologic variables including runoff and the chemical makeup of water at a given location on the Earth's surface using Digital Elevation Models (DEM), land cover, soil, and weather data. However, the application of ArcSWAT for projects outside of the United States is challenging as there is no standard framework for inputting global datasets into ArcSWAT. This project aims to remove this obstacle by outlining methods for adapting and implementing these global datasets via the user manual. The manual takes the user through the processes of data conditioning while providing solutions and suggestions for common errors. The efficacy of the manual was explored using examples from watersheds located in Puerto Rico, Mexico and Western Africa. Each run explored the various options for setting up a ArcSWAT project as well as a range of satellite data products and soil databases. Future work will incorporate in-situ data for validation and calibration of the model and outline additional resources to assist future users in efficiently implementing the model for worldwide applications. The capacity to manage and monitor freshwater availability is of critical importance in both developed and developing countries. As populations grow and climate changes, both the quality and quantity of freshwater are affected resulting in negative impacts on the health of the surrounding population. The use of hydrologic models such as ArcSWAT can help stakeholders and decision makers understand the future impacts of these changes enabling informed and substantiated decisions.

  1. Evaluation of nutrient retention in vegetated filter strips using the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçi, Alper

    2017-11-01

    Nutrient fluxes in stream basins need to be controlled to achieve good water quality status. In stream basins with intensive agricultural activities, nutrients predominantly come from diffuse sources. Therefore, best management practices (BMPs) are increasingly implemented to reduce nutrient input to streams. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of vegetated filter strip (VFS) application as an agricultural BMP. For this purpose, SWAT is chosen, a semi-distributed water quality assessment model that works at the watershed scale, and applied on the Nif stream basin, a small-sized basin in Western Turkey. The model is calibrated with an automated procedure against measured monthly discharge data. Nutrient loads for each sub-basin are estimated considering basin-wide data on chemical fertilizer and manure usage, population data for septic tank effluents and information about the land cover. Nutrient loads for 19 sub-basins are predicted on an annual basis. Average total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads are estimated as 47.85 t/yr and 13.36 t/yr for the entire basin. Results show that VFS application in one sub-basin offers limited retention of nutrients and that a selection of 20-m filter width is most effective from a cost-benefit perspective.

  2. Anomalous Nernst effect in type-II Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhodip; Tewari, Sumanta

    2018-01-01

    Topological Weyl semimetals (WSM), a new state of quantum matter with gapless nodal bulk spectrum and open Fermi arc surface states, have recently sparked enormous interest in condensed matter physics. Based on the symmetry and fermiology, it has been proposed that WSMs can be broadly classified into two types, type-I and type-II Weyl semimetals. While the undoped, conventional, type-I WSMs have point like Fermi surface and vanishing density of states (DOS) at the Fermi energy, the type-II Weyl semimetals break Lorentz symmetry explicitly and have tilted conical spectra with electron and hole pockets producing finite DOS at the Fermi level. The tilted conical spectrum and finite DOS at Fermi level in type-II WSMs have recently been shown to produce interesting effects such as a chiral anomaly induced longitudinal magnetoresistance that is strongly anisotropic in direction and a novel anomalous Hall effect. In this work, we consider the anomalous Nernst effect in type-II WSMs in the absence of an external magnetic field using the framework of semi-classical Boltzmann theory. Based on both a linearized model of time-reversal breaking WSM with a higher energy cut-off and a more realistic lattice model, we show that the anomalous Nernst response in these systems is strongly anisotropic in space, and can serve as a reliable signature of type-II Weyl semimetals in a host of magnetic systems with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry.

  3. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.; Chottova, O.; Kubankova, V.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the efficacy of chymotrypsin in pancreatin prepared by the separation of enzymes from an activated pancreas extract, in the same sample in which the content of lipids was increased to 16.55%, and in pancreatin prepared by drying an incompletely activated ground pancreas were compared with the effect of radiation on crystaline lyophilized chymotrypsin. The working conditions were identical with those described in the previous communication, all samples possessed nearly identical humidity on irradiation. The efficacy of chymotrypsin was determined by the method of PhBs 3, ethyl ester L-tyrosine hydrochloride being used as the substrate. The results were statistically evaluated and after calculation for dried lipid-free substance represented in graphs. The sequence of the loss of efficacy in pancreatin corresponded to the sequence of the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy found in the previous communication. The lowest remaining efficacy was found in crystalline lyophilized chymotrypsin. Percent losses of chymotrypsin efficacy in pancreatin determined by the synthetic substrate were in good agreement with the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy of the same samples determined by casein. (author)

  4. Use of Decision Tables to Simulate Management in SWAT+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G. Arnold

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Decision tables have been used for many years in data processing and business applications to simulate complex rule sets. Several computer languages have been developed based on rule systems and they are easily programmed in several current languages. Land management and river–reservoir models simulate complex land management operations and reservoir management in highly regulated river systems. Decision tables are a precise yet compact way to model the rule sets and corresponding actions found in these models. In this study, we discuss the suitability of decision tables to simulate management in the river basin scale Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT+ model. Decision tables are developed to simulate automated irrigation and reservoir releases. A simple auto irrigation application of decision tables was developed using plant water stress as a condition for irrigating corn in Texas. Sensitivity of the water stress trigger and irrigation application amounts were shown on soil moisture and corn yields. In addition, the Grapevine Reservoir near Dallas, Texas was used to illustrate the use of decision tables to simulate reservoir releases. The releases were conditioned on reservoir volumes and flood season. The release rules as implemented by the decision table realistically simulated flood releases as evidenced by a daily Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE of 0.52 and a percent bias of −1.1%. Using decision tables to simulate management in land, river, and reservoir models was shown to have several advantages over current approaches, including: (1 mature technology with considerable literature and applications; (2 ability to accurately represent complex, real world decision-making; (3 code that is efficient, modular, and easy to maintain; and (4 tables that are easy to maintain, support, and modify.

  5. [Impact of changes in land use and climate on the runoff in Liuxihe Watershed based on SWAT model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-zhi; Zhang, Zheng-dong; Meng, Jin-hua

    2015-04-01

    SWAT model, an extensively used distributed hydrological model, was used to quantitatively analyze the influences of changes in land use and climate on the runoff at watershed scale. Liuxihe Watershed' s SWAT model was established and three scenarios were set. The calibration and validation at three hydrological stations of Wenquan, Taipingchang and Nangang showed that the three factors of Wenquan station just only reached the standard in validated period, and the other two stations had relative error (RE) 0.8 and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency valve (Ens) > 0.75, suggesting that SWAT model was appropriate for simulating runoff response to land use change and climate variability in Liuxihe watershed. According to the integrated scenario simulation, the annual runoff increased by 11.23 m3 x s(-1) from 2001 to 2010 compared with the baseline period from 1991 to 2000, among which, the land use change caused an annual runoff reduction of 0.62 m3 x s(-1), whereas climate variability caused an annual runoff increase of 11.85 m3 x s(-1). Apparently, the impact of climate variability was stronger than that of land use change. On the other hand, the scenario simulation of extreme land use showed that compared with the land use in 2000, the annual runoff of the farmland scenario and the grassland scenario increased by 2.7% and 0.5% respectively, while that of the forest land scenario were reduced by 0.7%, which suggested that forest land had an ability of diversion closure. Furthermore, the scenario simulation of climatic variability indicated that the change of river runoff correlated positively with precipitation change (increase of 11.6% in annual runoff with increase of 10% in annual precipitation) , but negatively with air temperature change (reduction of 0.8% in annual runoff with increase of 1 degrees C in annual mean air temperature), which showed that the impact of precipitation variability was stronger than that of air temperature change. Therefore, in face of climate

  6. Hydrology and sediment yield calibration for the Barasona reservoir catchment (Spain) using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazón, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Hydrological and soil erosion models, as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), have become very useful tools and increasingly serve as vital components of integrated environmental assessments that provide information outside of direct field experiments and causal observation. The purpose of this study was to improve the calibration of SWAT model to use it in an alpine catchment as a simulator of processes related to water quality and soil erosion. SWAT is spatially semi-distributed, agro-hydrological model that operates on a daily time step (as a minimum) at basin scale. It is designed to predict the impact of management on water, sediment and agricultural chemical yields in ungaged catchments. SWAT provides physically based algorithms as an option to define many of the important components of the hydrologic cycle. The input requirements of the model are used to describe the climate, soil properties, topography, vegetation, and land management practices. SWAT analyzes small or large catchments by discretising into sub-basins, which are then further subdivided into hydrological response units (HRUs) with homogeneous land use, soil type and slope. SWAT model (SWAT2009) coupled with a GIS interface (ArcSWAT), was applied to the Barasona reservoir catchment located in the central Spanish Pyrenees. The 1509 km2 agro-forestry catchment presents a mountain type climate, an altitudinal range close to 3000 meters and a precipitation variation close to 1000 mm/km. The mountainous characteristics of the catchment, in addition to the scarcity of climate data in the region, require specific calibration for some processes. Snowfall and snowmelt are significant processes in the hydrologic regime of the area and were calibrated in a previous work. In this work some of the challenges of the catchment to model with SWAT which affected the hydrology and the sediment yield simulation were performed as improvement of the previous calibration. Two reservoirs, a karst system which

  7. Single-objective vs. multi-objective autocalibration in modelling total suspended solids and phosphorus in a small agricultural watershed with SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolomanana, Santatriniaina Denise; Lessard, Paul; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    To obtain greater precision in modelling small agricultural watersheds, a shorter simulation time step is beneficial. A daily time step better represents the dynamics of pollutants in the river and provides more realistic simulation results. However, with a daily evaluation performance, good fits are rarely obtained. With the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE) method embedded in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), two calibration approaches are available, single-objective or multi-objective optimization. The goal of the present study is to evaluate which approach can improve the daily performance with SWAT, in modelling flow (Q), total suspended solids (TSS) and total phosphorus (TP). The influence of weights assigned to the different variables included in the objective function has also been tested. The results showed that: (i) the model performance depends not only on the choice of calibration approach, but essentially on the influential parameters; (ii) the multi-objective calibration estimating at once all parameters related to all measured variables is the best approach to model Q, TSS and TP; (iii) changing weights does not improve model performance; and (iv) with a single-objective optimization, an excellent water quality modelling performance may hide a loss of performance of predicting flows and unbalanced internal model components.

  8. OWR/RTNS-II low exposure spectral effects experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1985-05-01

    The first RTNS-II irradiation of the Low Exposure Spectral Experiment has been completed. The dosimetry has been analyzed, and expressions have been determined that fit the data very well. The effects of including the angular variation of the neutron spectrum were investigated

  9. Evapotranspiration management based on the application of SWAT for balancing water consumption: A case study in Guantao, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Gan, Hong

    2018-06-01

    Rapid social and economic development results in increased demand for water resources. This can lead to the unsustainable development and exploitation of water resources which in turn causes significant environmental problems. Conventional water resource management approaches, such as supply and demand management strategies, frequently fail to restore regional water balance. This paper introduces the concept of water consumption balance, the balance between actual evapotranspiration (ET) and target ET, and establishes a framework to realize regional water balance. The framework consists of three stages: (1) determination of target ET and actual ET; (2) quantification of the water-saving requirements for the region; and (3) reduction of actual ET by implementing various water saving management strategies. Using this framework, a case study was conducted for Guantao County, China. The SWAT model was utilized to aid in the selection of the best water saving management strategy by comparing the ET of different irrigation methods and crop pattern adjustments. Simulation results revealed that determination of SWAT model parameters using remote sensing ET is feasible and that the model is a valuable tool for ET management. Irrigation was found to have a greater influence on the ET of winter wheat as compared to that of maize, indicating that reduction in winter wheat cultivation is the most effective way to reduce regional ET. However, the effect of water-saving irrigation methods on the reduction of ET was not obvious. This indicates that it would be difficult to achieve regional ET reduction using water-saving irrigation methods only. Furthermore, selecting the best water saving management strategy by relying solely on the amount of reduced ET was insufficient, because it ignored the impact of water conservation measures on the livelihood of the agricultural community. Incorporating these considerations with our findings, we recommend changing the current irrigation

  10. Improvement of the R-SWAT-FME framework to support multiple variables and multi-objective functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Application of numerical models is a common practice in the environmental field for investigation and prediction of natural and anthropogenic processes. However, process knowledge, parameter identifiability, sensitivity, and uncertainty analyses are still a challenge for large and complex mathematical models such as the hydrological/water quality model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). In this study, the previously developed R program language-SWAT-Flexible Modeling Environment (R-SWAT-FME) was improved to support multiple model variables and objectives at multiple time steps (i.e., daily, monthly, and annually). This expansion is significant because there is usually more than one variable (e.g., water, nutrients, and pesticides) of interest for environmental models like SWAT. To further facilitate its easy use, we also simplified its application requirements without compromising its merits, such as the user-friendly interface. To evaluate the performance of the improved framework, we used a case study focusing on both streamflow and nitrate nitrogen in the Upper Iowa River Basin (above Marengo) in the United States. Results indicated that the R-SWAT-FME performs well and is comparable to the built-in auto-calibration tool in multi-objective model calibration. Overall, the enhanced R-SWAT-FME can be useful for the SWAT community, and the methods we used can also be valuable for wrapping potential R packages with other environmental models.

  11. Comparison of MODIS and SWAT evapotranspiration over a complex terrain at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiodun, Olanrewaju O.; Guan, Huade; Post, Vincent E. A.; Batelaan, Okke

    2018-05-01

    In most hydrological systems, evapotranspiration (ET) and precipitation are the largest components of the water balance, which are difficult to estimate, particularly over complex terrain. In recent decades, the advent of remotely sensed data based ET algorithms and distributed hydrological models has provided improved spatially upscaled ET estimates. However, information on the performance of these methods at various spatial scales is limited. This study compares the ET from the MODIS remotely sensed ET dataset (MOD16) with the ET estimates from a SWAT hydrological model on graduated spatial scales for the complex terrain of the Sixth Creek Catchment of the Western Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australia. ET from both models was further compared with the coarser-resolution AWRA-L model at catchment scale. The SWAT model analyses are performed on daily timescales with a 6-year calibration period (2000-2005) and 7-year validation period (2007-2013). Differences in ET estimation between the SWAT and MOD16 methods of up to 31, 19, 15, 11 and 9 % were observed at respectively 1, 4, 9, 16 and 25 km2 spatial resolutions. Based on the results of the study, a spatial scale of confidence of 4 km2 for catchment-scale evapotranspiration is suggested in complex terrain. Land cover differences, HRU parameterisation in AWRA-L and catchment-scale averaging of input climate data in the SWAT semi-distributed model were identified as the principal sources of weaker correlations at higher spatial resolution.

  12. Code modernization and modularization of APEX and SWAT watershed simulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) and APEX (Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender) are respectively large and small watershed simulation models derived from EPIC Environmental Policy Integrated Climate), a field-scale agroecology simulation model. All three models are coded in FORTRAN an...

  13. High Y-chromosomal differentiation among ethnic groups of Dir and Swat districts, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Inam; Olofsson, Jill K.; Margaryan, Ashot

    2017-01-01

    The ethnic groups that inhabit the mountainous Dir and Swat districts of northern Pakistan are marked by high levels of cultural and phenotypic diversity. To obtain knowledge of the extent of genetic diversity in this region, we investigated Y-chromosomal diversity in five population samples repr...

  14. Modelling land use change across elevation gradients in district Swat, Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qasim, M.; Termansen, M.; Hubacek, K.; Fleskens, L.

    2013-01-01

    District Swat is part of the high mountain Hindu-Kush Himalayan region of Pakistan. Documentation and analysis of land use change in this region is challenging due to very disparate accounts of the state of forest resources and limited accessible data. Such analysis is, however, important due to

  15. Modeling crop water productivity using a coupled SWAT-MODSIM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the water productivity of irrigated wheat and maize yields in Karkheh River Basin (KRB) in the semi-arid region of Iran using a coupled modeling approach consisting of the hydrological model (SWAT) and the river basin water allocation model (MODSIM). Dynamic irrigation requireme...

  16. Pathogen Transport and Fate Modeling in the Upper Salem River Watershed Using SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) is a dynamic watershed model that is applied to simulate the impact of land management practices on water quality over a continuous period. The Upper Salem River, located in Salem County New Jersey, is listed by the New Jersey Department of ...

  17. Calibration and validation of the SWAT model for a forested watershed in coastal South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra M. Amatya; Elizabeth B. Haley; Norman S. Levine; Timothy J. Callahan; Artur Radecki-Pawlik; Manoj K. Jha

    2008-01-01

    Modeling the hydrology of low-gradient coastal watersheds on shallow, poorly drained soils is a challenging task due to the complexities in watershed delineation, runoff generation processes and pathways, flooding, and submergence caused by tropical storms. The objective of the study is to calibrate and validate a GIS-based spatially-distributed hydrologic model, SWAT...

  18. Comparison of HSPF and SWAT models performance for runoff and sediment yield prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sangjun; Brannan, Kevin M; Mostaghimi, Saied; Kim, Sang Min

    2007-09-01

    A watershed model can be used to better understand the relationship between land use activities and hydrologic/water quality processes that occur within a watershed. The physically based, distributed parameter model (SWAT) and a conceptual, lumped parameter model (HSPF), were selected and their performance were compared in simulating runoff and sediment yields from the Polecat Creek watershed in Virginia, which is 12,048 ha in size. A monitoring project was conducted in Polecat Creek watershed during the period of October 1994 to June 2000. The observed data (stream flow and sediment yield) from the monitoring project was used in the calibration/validations of the models. The period of September 1996 to June 2000 was used for the calibration and October 1994 to December 1995 was used for the validation of the models. The outputs from the models were compared to the observed data at several sub-watershed outlets and at the watershed outlet of the Polecat Creek watershed. The results indicated that both models were generally able to simulate stream flow and sediment yields well during both the calibration/validation periods. For annual and monthly loads, HSPF simulated hydrologic and sediment yield more accurately than SWAT at all monitoring sites within the watershed. The results of this study indicate that both the SWAT and HSPF watershed models performed sufficiently well in the simulation of stream flow and sediment yield with HSPF performing moderately better than SWAT for simulation time-steps greater than a month.

  19. Evapotranspiration and Precipitation inputs for SWAT model using remotely sensed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of numerical models, such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (or SWAT), to accurately represent the partition of the water budget and describe sediment loads and other pollutant conditions related to water quality strongly depends on how well spatiotemporal variability in precipitatio...

  20. Hydrologic evaluation of a Mediterranean watershed using the SWAT model with multiple PET estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Penman-Monteith method suggested by the Food Agricultural Organization in the Irrigation and drainage paper 56 (FAO-56 P-M) was used to evaluate surface runoff and sediment yield predictions by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model at the outlet of an experimental watershed in Sicily. ...

  1. Simulation of a low-gradient Coastal Plain watershed using the SWAT landscape model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate representation of landscape processes in natural resource models requires distributed representation of basin hydrology and transport processes. To better represent these processes, a landscape version of the SWAT model has been developed. The model has been modified to represent the runo...

  2. The modified SWAT model for predicting fecal coliform in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal contamination has been an issue for water quality because fecal coliform bacteria are used as an indicator organism to detect pathogens in water. In order to assess fecal contamination in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed in Massachusetts, USA, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a comm...

  3. Flow forecast by SWAT model and ANN in Pracana basin, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirel, M.C.; Venancio, Anabela; Kahya, Ercan

    2009-01-01

    This study provides a unique opportunity to analyze the issue of flow forecast based on the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) and artificial neural network (ANN) models. In last two decades, the ANNs have been extensively applied to various water resources system problems. In this study, the

  4. Spatial Mapping of Agricultural Water Productivity Using the SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokal, Rajesh Tulshiram; Gorantiwar, S. D.; Kothari, Mahesh; Bhakar, S. R.; Nandwana, B. P.

    2015-03-01

    The Sina river basin is facing both episodic and chronic water shortages due to intensive irrigation development. The main objective of this study was to characterize the hydrologic processes of the Sina river basin and assess crop water productivity using the distributed hydrologic model, SWAT. In the simulation year (1998-1999), the inflow to reservoir from upstream side was the major contributor to the reservoir accounting for 92 % of the total required water release for irrigation purpose (119.5 Mm3), while precipitation accounted for 4.1 Mm3. Annual release of water for irrigation was 119.5 Mm3 out of which 54 % water was diverted for irrigation purpose, 26 % was wasted as conveyance loss, average discharge at the command outlet was estimated as 4 % and annual average ground-water recharge coefficient was in the range of 13-17 %. Various scenarios involving water allocation rule were tested with the goal of increasing economic water productivity values in the Sina Irrigation Scheme. Out of those, only most benefited allocation rule is analyzed in this paper. Crop yield varied from 1.98 to 25.9 t/ha, with the majority of the area between 2.14 and 2.78 t/ha. Yield and WP declined significantly in loamy soils of the irrigation command. Crop productivity in the basin was found in the lower range when compared with potential and global values. The findings suggested that there was a potential to improve further. Spatial variations in yield and WP were found to be very high for the crops grown during rabi season, while those were low for the crops grown during kharif season. The crop yields and WP during kharif season were more in the lower reach of the irrigation commands, where loamy soil is more concentrated. Sorghum in both seasons was most profitable. Sorghum fetched net income fivefold that of sunflower, two and half fold of pearl millet and one and half fold of mung beans as far as crop during kharif season were concerned and it fetched fourfold that of

  5. Runoff Simulation in the Upper Reaches of Heihe River Basin Based on the RIEMS–SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songbing Zou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the distributed hydrological simulations for complex mountain areas, large amounts of meteorological input parameters with high spatial and temporal resolutions are necessary. However, the extreme scarcity and uneven distribution of the traditional meteorological observation stations in cold and arid regions of Northwest China makes it very difficult in meeting the requirements of hydrological simulations. Alternatively, regional climate models (RCMs, which can provide a variety of distributed meteorological data with high temporal and spatial resolution, have become an effective solution to improve hydrological simulation accuracy and to further study water resource responses to human activities and global climate change. In this study, abundant and evenly distributed virtual weather stations in the upper reaches of the Heihe River Basin (HRB of Northwest China were built for the optimization of the input data, and thus a regional integrated environmental model system (RIEMS based on RCM and a distributed hydrological model of soil and water assessment tool (SWAT were integrated as a coupled climate–hydrological RIEMS-SWAT model, which was applied to simulate monthly runoff from 1995 to 2010 in the region. Results show that the simulated and observed values are close; Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency is higher than 0.65; determination coefficient (R2 values are higher than 0.70; percent bias is controlled within ±20%; and root-mean-square-error-observation standard deviation ratio is less than 0.65. These results indicate that the coupled model can present basin hydrological processes properly, and provide scientific support for prediction and management of basin water resources.

  6. Quantifying the Contribution of On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems to Stream Discharge Using the SWAT Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C W; Radcliffe, D E; Risse, L M; Habteselassie, M; Mukundan, R; Jeong, J; Hoghooghi, N

    2014-03-01

    In the southeastern United States, on-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are widely used for domestic wastewater treatment. The degree to which OWTSs represent consumptive water use has been questioned in Georgia. The goal of this study was to estimate the effect of OWTSs on streamflow in a gauged watershed in Gwinnett County, Georgia using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) watershed-scale model, which includes a new OWTS algorithm. Streamflow was modeled with and without the presence of OWTSs. The model was calibrated using data from 1 Jan. 2003 to 31 Dec. 2006 and validated from 1 Jan. 2007 to 31 Dec. 2010 using the auto-calibration tool SWAT-CUP 4. The daily and monthly streamflow Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients were 0.49 and 0.71, respectively, for the calibration period and 0.37 and 0.68, respectively, for the validation period, indicating a satisfactory fit. Analysis of water balance output variables between simulations showed a 3.1% increase in total water yield at the watershed scale and a 5.9% increase at the subbasin scale for a high-density OWTS area. The percent change in water yield between simulations was the greatest in dry years, implying that the influence of OWTSs on the water yield is greatest under drought conditions. Mean OWTS water use was approximately 5.7% consumptive, contrary to common assumptions by water planning agencies in Georgia. Results from this study may be used by OWTS users and by watershed planners to understand the influence of OWTSs on water quantity within watersheds in this region. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Evaluating Uncertainty of Runoff Simulation using SWAT model of the Feilaixia Watershed in China Based on the GLUE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Huang, G.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, distributed hydrological models have been widely used in storm water management, water resources protection and so on. Therefore, how to evaluate the uncertainty of the model reasonably and efficiently becomes a hot topic today. In this paper, the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) model is constructed for the study area of China's Feilaixia watershed, and the uncertainty of the runoff simulation is analyzed by GLUE method deeply. Taking the initial parameter range of GLUE method as the research core, the influence of different initial parameter ranges on model uncertainty is studied. In this paper, two sets of parameter ranges are chosen as the object of study, the first one (range 1) is recommended by SWAT-CUP and the second one (range 2) is calibrated by SUFI-2. The results showed that under the same number of simulations (10,000 times), the overall uncertainty obtained by the range 2 is less than the range 1. Specifically, the "behavioral" parameter sets for the range 2 is 10000 and for the range 1 is 4448. In the calibration and the validation, the ratio of P-factor to R-factor for range 1 is 1.387 and 1.391, and for range 2 is 1.405 and 1.462 respectively. In addition, the simulation result of range 2 is better with the NS and R2 slightly higher than range 1. Therefore, it can be concluded that using the parameter range calibrated by SUFI-2 as the initial parameter range for the GLUE is a way to effectively capture and evaluate the simulation uncertainty.

  8. Neuroprotective Effects and Mechanisms of Curcumin–Cu(II and –Zn(II Complexes Systems and Their Pharmacological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Shun Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the main form of dementia and has a steadily increasing prevalence. As both oxidative stress and metal homeostasis are involved in the pathogenesis of AD, it would be interesting to develop a dual function agent, targeting the two factors. Curcumin, a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, is an antioxidant and can also chelate metal ions. Whether the complexes of curcumin with metal ions possess neuroprotective effects has not been evaluated. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the complexes of curcumin with Cu(II or Zn(II on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced injury and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The use of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells, a widely used neuronal cell model system, was adopted. It was revealed that curcumin–Cu(II complexes systems possessed enhanced O2·–-scavenging activities compared to unchelated curcumin. In comparison with unchelated curcumin, the protective effects of curcumin–Cu(II complexes systems were stronger than curcumin–Zn(II system. Curcumin–Cu(II or –Zn(II complexes systems significantly enhanced the superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities and attenuated the increase of malondialdehyde levels and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities, in a dose-dependent manner. The curcumin–Cu(II complex system with a 2:1 ratio exhibited the most significant effect. Further mechanistic study demonstrated that curcumin–Cu(II or –Zn(II complexes systems inhibited cell apoptosis via downregulating the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB pathway and upregulating Bcl-2/Bax pathway. In summary, the present study found that curcumin–Cu(II or –Zn(II complexes systems, especially the former, possess significant neuroprotective effects, which indicates the potential advantage of curcumin as a promising agent against AD and deserves further study.

  9. Neuroprotective Effects and Mechanisms of Curcumin-Cu(II) and -Zn(II) Complexes Systems and Their Pharmacological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fa-Shun; Sun, Jian-Long; Xie, Wen-Hai; Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2017-12-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main form of dementia and has a steadily increasing prevalence. As both oxidative stress and metal homeostasis are involved in the pathogenesis of AD, it would be interesting to develop a dual function agent, targeting the two factors. Curcumin, a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa , is an antioxidant and can also chelate metal ions. Whether the complexes of curcumin with metal ions possess neuroprotective effects has not been evaluated. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the complexes of curcumin with Cu(II) or Zn(II) on hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced injury and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The use of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, a widely used neuronal cell model system, was adopted. It was revealed that curcumin-Cu(II) complexes systems possessed enhanced O₂ ·- -scavenging activities compared to unchelated curcumin. In comparison with unchelated curcumin, the protective effects of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes systems were stronger than curcumin-Zn(II) system. Curcumin-Cu(II) or -Zn(II) complexes systems significantly enhanced the superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities and attenuated the increase of malondialdehyde levels and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities, in a dose-dependent manner. The curcumin-Cu(II) complex system with a 2:1 ratio exhibited the most significant effect. Further mechanistic study demonstrated that curcumin-Cu(II) or -Zn(II) complexes systems inhibited cell apoptosis via downregulating the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway and upregulating Bcl-2/Bax pathway. In summary, the present study found that curcumin-Cu(II) or -Zn(II) complexes systems, especially the former, possess significant neuroprotective effects, which indicates the potential advantage of curcumin as a promising agent against AD and deserves further study.

  10. Effects of type II thyroplasty on adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji; Minoda, Ryosei; Kodama, Narihiro

    2010-04-01

    Type II thyroplasty, or laryngeal framework surgery, is based on the hypothesis that the effect of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) on the voice is due to excessively tight closure of the glottis, hampering phonation. Most of the previous, partially effective treatments have aimed to relieve this tight closure, including recurrent laryngeal nerve section or avulsion, extirpation of the adductor muscle, and botulinum toxin injection, which is currently the most popular. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of type II thyroplasty on aerodynamic and acoustic findings in patients with AdSD. Case series. University hospital. Ten patients with AdSD underwent type II thyroplasty between August 2006 and December 2008. Aerodynamic and acoustic analyses were performed prior to and six months after surgery. Mean flow rates (MFRs) and voice efficiency were evaluated with a phonation analyzer. Jitter, shimmer, the harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), standard deviation of the fundamental frequency (SDF0), and degree of voice breaks (DVB) were measured from each subject's longest sustained phonation sample of the vowel /a/. Voice efficiency improved significantly after surgery. No significant difference was found in the MFRs between before and after surgery. Jitter, shimmer, HNR, SDF0, and DVB improved significantly after surgery. Treatment of AdSD with type II thyroplasty significantly improved aerodynamic and acoustic findings. The results of this study suggest that type II thyroplasty provides relief from voice strangulation in patients with AdSD. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analisis Debit Sungai Dengan Menggunakan Model SWAT pada DAS Cipasauran, Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulana Ibrahim Rau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Total water demand at non industrial and industrial region in Cilegon is increasing. With its water production capacity of 2,000 l/s, PT Krakatau Tirta Industri cannot fulfill the amount number of demand from the industrial and domestic sectors at Cilegon. To cover the shortage of water supply of ±600 l/s, PT KTI requires taking water from Cipasauran Watershed. The objective of this study was to analyze river discharge of Cipasauran Watershed using SWAT model. Input data such as soil characteristics, climate data, landuse, and hydrology data at the area of the watershed were gathered and put at the data input file. In SWAT simulation, 4 processes were done, i.e. watershed delineation, hydrological response unit (HRU forming, data process and SWAT simulation, and visualization process. The result showed that the daily and monthly calibration process crossed 84% and 83% with the 95PPU area, with daily and monthly p-factor value of 0.84 and 0.83. Thus, calibrated model result was valid, though R2 and NS value were not satisfied. Using the validated SWAT model, the daily discharge in Cipasauran Watershed was about 0 - 3.309 m3/s, whereas the monthly discharge was 0.648 - 3.266m3/s. This showed that daily and monthly PT KTI’s water demand of 0.6 m3/s were fulfilled about 98.22% and 100%. Within the future time, the SWAT model could be potentially used as an assessment for predictive scenarios. However, to gain optimum results, well-observed and precise data is highly required, especially for such calibrations and validations.

  12. Modeling phosphorus in the Lake Allatoona watershed using SWAT: I. Developing phosphorus parameter values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, D E; Lin, Z; Risse, L M; Romeis, J J; Jackson, C R

    2009-01-01

    Lake Allatoona is a large reservoir north of Atlanta, GA, that drains an area of about 2870 km2 scheduled for a phosphorus (P) total maximum daily load (TMDL). The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been widely used for watershed-scale modeling of P, but there is little guidance on how to estimate P-related parameters, especially those related to in-stream P processes. In this paper, methods are demonstrated to individually estimate SWAT soil-related P parameters and to collectively estimate P parameters related to stream processes. Stream related parameters were obtained using the nutrient uptake length concept. In a manner similar to experiments conducted by stream ecologists, a small point source is simulated in a headwater sub-basin of the SWAT models, then the in-stream parameter values are adjusted collectively to get an uptake length of P similar to the values measured in the streams in the region. After adjusting the in-stream parameters, the P uptake length estimated in the simulations ranged from 53 to 149 km compared to uptake lengths measured by ecologists in the region of 11 to 85 km. Once the a priori P-related parameter set was developed, the SWAT models of main tributaries to Lake Allatoona were calibrated for daily transport. Models using SWAT P parameters derived from the methods in this paper outperformed models using default parameter values when predicting total P (TP) concentrations in streams during storm events and TP annual loads to Lake Allatoona.

  13. Impact of Phosphorus Levels and Seed Rates on Growth and Yield of Late Sown Maize on High Elevation in Swat, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, M.; Khan, A. A.; Khattak, I.; Naveed, S.

    2015-01-01

    After nitrogen, phosphorus (P) is required by the plants relatively in large quantity and is the second most important crop nutrient that increases productivity of maize (Zea mays L.). An experiment on effect of different P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ levels and seed rates on growth and yield of late sown maize cv. Baber on high elevation during kharif season, was conducted at Farmer Field School, Swat, Pakistan during summer 2012. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design having three replications. Sowing was done one month late (July 15) than the optimum time of sowing. Optimum time of sowing on high elevation in Swat, Pakistan starts from May 15 to June 15. Four levels of P/sub 2/O/sub 5/(0, 25, 50 and 75 kg ha/sup -1/) and four seed rates (10, 20, 30 and 40 kg ha/sup -1/) were used. A subplot size of 3m x 4.5m was used. Each subplot was consisted of six rows having 75 cm row-to-row distance with row length of 3 m. Sowing of 40 kg seed ha/sup -1/ treated with 75kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ ha/sup -1/ gave optimum cob length (19 cm), plant height (179.19 cm), 1000 grain weight (192.83 g) and grain yield (2712 kg ha/sup -1/). While maximum grain cob/sup -1/(375 ) was given by 30 kg seed ha/sup -1/ treated with 75 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5/. On the basis of the above results, among the tested seed rate 40 kg ha/sup -1/ treated with 75 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is recommended for late sowing on high elevation under the agro-ecological conditions of Swat valley. (author)

  14. Evaluating Impacts of climate and land use changes on streamflow using SWAT and land use models based CESM1-CAM5 Climate scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu Ping; Lin, Yu Pin; Lien, Wan Yu

    2015-04-01

    Climate change projects have various levels of impacts on hydrological cycles around the world. The impact of climate change and uncertainty of climate projections from general circulation models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) which has been just be released in Taiwan, 2014. Since the streamflow run into ocean directly due to the steep terrain and the rainfall difference between wet and dry seasons is apparent; as a result, the allocation water resource reasonable is very challenge in Taiwan, particularly under climate change. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of climate and land use changes on a small watershed in Taiwan. The AR5 General Circulation Models(GCM) output data was adopted in this study and was downscaled from the monthly to the daily weather data as the input data of hydrological model such as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model in this study. The spatially explicit land uses change model, the Conservation of Land Use and its Effects at Small regional extent (CLUE-s), was applied to simulate land use scenarios in 2020-2039. Combined climate and land use change scenarios were adopted as input data of the hydrological model, the SWAT model, to estimate the future streamflows. With the increasing precipitation, increasing urban area and decreasing agricultural and grass land, the annual streamflow in the most of twenty-three subbasins were also increased. Besides, due to the increasing rainfall in wet season and decreasing rainfall in dry season, the difference of streamflow between wet season and dry season are also increased. This result indicates a more stringent challenge on the water resource management in future. Therefore, impacts on water resource caused by climate change and land use change should be considered in water resource planning for the Datuan river watershed. Keywords: SWAT, GCM, CLUE-s, streamflow, climate change, land use change

  15. Effectiveness of Braun's enteroanastomosis in B II-resected stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindecken, K.D.; Salm, B.

    1993-01-01

    With the aid of hepatobiliary sequence scintigraphy (HBSS) a functional analysis was obtained form 30 patients, subsequent to gastric surgery - after Billroth II with entero-anastomosis - which showed a suprisingly high rate of reflux into the residual stomach, in 16 out of these 30 patients. The high-grade HBSS data with regard to the biliary reflux proportions after gastric surgery and the low-grade effectiveness of Braun's entero-anastomosis are clearly evidenced. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Search for Quasi-isodynamic Effects in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of quasi-isodynamics effects (QID) in the TJ-II helical axis Stellarator has been explored maintaining the present setting for the toroidal field coils (TFC). In order to do this it has been necessary to implement a new method of calculation, using real space coordinates to follow the particle trajectories, instated the Boozer coordinates as was usual formerly. The result for the exploration of the flexibility diagram of TJ-II, including magnetic axis a shift effects, has been negative. It seems that there are not useful QID regions in TJ-II with the present setting of TFC carrying equal currents in all coils. Nevertheless, in spite of this negative result, the calculation in real space and, mainly, the grater number of configurations analysed, have produced a series of new important results, some of them unexpected. The influence of rational surfaces is very important. Optima and minima of confinement alternate at both sides of the rational values (mainly for the 1/2 by period) in a way very similar to the radial electric field resonance cases. This effect originates in the peculiar orbit topology in the presence of diffusion. Some lines of study are proposed to deal with this problem. Finally, the negative result of the QID search suggests the convenience to start a similar search without the restriction of equal currents on all the TEC. (Author) 18 refs

  17. Critical review of SWAT applications in the upper Nile basin countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Griensven

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT is an integrated river basin model that is widely applied within the Nile basin. Up to date, more than 20 peer-reviewed papers describe the use of SWAT for a variety of problems in the upper Nile basin countries, such as erosion modelling, land use and climate change impact modelling and water resources management. The majority of the studies are focused on locations in the tropical highlands in Ethiopia and around Lake Victoria. The popularity of SWAT is attributed to the fact that the tool is freely available and that it is readily applicable through the development of geographic information system (GIS based interfaces and its easy linkage to sensitivity, calibration and uncertainty analysis tools. The online and free availability of basic GIS data that are required for SWAT made its applicability more straightforward even in data-scarce areas. However, the easy use of SWAT may not always lead to appropriate models which is also a consequence of the quality of the available free databases in these regions. In this paper, we aim at critically reviewing the use of SWAT in the context of the modelling purpose and problem descriptions in the tropical highlands of the Nile basin countries. To evaluate the models that are described in journal papers, a number of criteria are used to evaluate the model set-up, model performances, physical representation of the model parameters, and the correctness of the hydrological model balance. On the basis of performance indicators, the majority of the SWAT models were classified as giving satisfactory to very good results. Nevertheless, the hydrological mass balances as reported in several papers contained losses that might not be justified. Several papers also reported the use of unrealistic parameter values. More worrying is that many papers lack this information. For this reason, most of the reported SWAT models have to be evaluated critically. An important gap is

  18. Baseflow simulation using SWAT model in an inland river basin in Tianshan Mountains, Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Baseflow is an important component in hydrological modeling. The complex streamflow recession process complicates the baseflow simulation. In order to simulate the snow and/or glacier melt dominated streamflow receding quickly during the high-flow period but very slowly during the low-flow period in rivers in arid and cold northwest China, the current one-reservoir baseflow approach in SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool model was extended by adding a slow- reacting reservoir and applying it to the Manas River basin in the Tianshan Mountains. Meanwhile, a digital filter program was employed to separate baseflow from streamflow records for comparisons. Results indicated that the two-reservoir method yielded much better results than the one-reservoir one in reproducing streamflow processes, and the low-flow estimation was improved markedly. Nash-Sutcliff efficiency values at the calibration and validation stages are 0.68 and 0.62 for the one-reservoir case, and 0.76 and 0.69 for the two-reservoir case. The filter-based method estimated the baseflow index as 0.60, while the model-based as 0.45. The filter-based baseflow responded almost immediately to surface runoff occurrence at onset of rising limb, while the model-based responded with a delay. In consideration of watershed surface storage retention and soil freezing/thawing effects on infiltration and recharge during initial snowmelt season, a delay response is considered to be more reasonable. However, a more detailed description of freezing/thawing processes should be included in soil modules so as to determine recharge to aquifer during these processes, and thus an accurate onset point of rising limb of the simulated baseflow.

  19. Adapting SWAT hillslope erosion model to predict sediment concentrations and yields in large Basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigiak, Olga; Malagó, Anna; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean

    2015-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is used worldwide for water quality assessment and planning. This paper aimed to assess and adapt SWAT hillslope sediment yield model (Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation, MUSLE) for applications in large basins, i.e. when spatial data is coarse and model units are large; and to develop a robust sediment calibration method for large regions. The Upper Danube Basin (132,000km(2)) was used as case study representative of large European Basins. The MUSLE was modified to reduce sensitivity of sediment yields to the Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) size, and to identify appropriate algorithms for estimating hillslope length (L) and slope-length factor (LS). HRUs gross erosion was broadly calibrated against plot data and soil erosion map estimates. Next, mean annual SWAT suspended sediment concentrations (SSC, mg/L) were calibrated and validated against SSC data at 55 gauging stations (622 station-years). SWAT annual specific sediment yields in subbasin reaches (RSSY, t/km(2)/year) were compared to yields measured at 33 gauging stations (87station-years). The best SWAT configuration combined a MUSLE equation modified by the introduction of a threshold area of 0.01km(2) where L and LS were estimated with flow accumulation algorithms. For this configuration, the SSC residual interquartile was less than +/-15mg/L both for the calibration (1995-2004) and the validation (2005-2009) periods. The mean SSC percent bias for 1995-2009 was 24%. RSSY residual interquartile was within +/-10t/km(2)/year, with a mean RSSY percent bias of 12%. Residuals showed no bias with respect to drainage area, slope, or spatial distribution. The use of multiple data types at multiple sites enabled robust simulation of sediment concentrations and yields of the region. The MUSLE modifications are recommended for use in large basins. Based on SWAT simulations, we present a sediment budget for the Upper Danube Basin. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Příprava podkladů pro modelování odtoku a odnosu látek v prostředí SWAT

    OpenAIRE

    HOMOLKA, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is dealing with preparation bases for modelation draining and carrying materials in SWAT model. Thesis includes literature search about basis of SWAT model, SWAT development, preferences and imprefections of this model. It?s also going over various modelations and general division. Further describes necessary input data, their types and requirements without which would be impossible to complete this task. I?ve chosen Jenín stream basin located near village Jenín which is ...

  1. Automating calibration, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of complex models using the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME): SWAT as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, S.

    2012-01-01

    Parameter optimization and uncertainty issues are a great challenge for the application of large environmental models like the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which is a physically-based hydrological model for simulating water and nutrient cycles at the watershed scale. In this study, we present a comprehensive modeling environment for SWAT, including automated calibration, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities through integration with the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME). To address challenges (e.g., calling the model in R and transferring variables between Fortran and R) in developing such a two-language coupling framework, 1) we converted the Fortran-based SWAT model to an R function (R-SWAT) using the RFortran platform, and alternatively 2) we compiled SWAT as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL). We then wrapped SWAT (via R-SWAT) with FME to perform complex applications including parameter identifiability, inverse modeling, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in the R environment. The final R-SWAT-FME framework has the following key functionalities: automatic initialization of R, running Fortran-based SWAT and R commands in parallel, transferring parameters and model output between SWAT and R, and inverse modeling with visualization. To examine this framework and demonstrate how it works, a case study simulating streamflow in the Cedar River Basin in Iowa in the United Sates was used, and we compared it with the built-in auto-calibration tool of SWAT in parameter optimization. Results indicate that both methods performed well and similarly in searching a set of optimal parameters. Nonetheless, the R-SWAT-FME is more attractive due to its instant visualization, and potential to take advantage of other R packages (e.g., inverse modeling and statistical graphics). The methods presented in the paper are readily adaptable to other model applications that require capability for automated calibration, and sensitivity and uncertainty

  2. Development of experimental method for self-wastage behavior in sodium-water reaction. Development of test rig (SWAT-2R) and study for experimental procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yuta; Shimoyama, Kazuhito; Kurihara, Akikazu

    2014-07-01

    In case of water leak from a penetrated crack on a tube of steam generator in the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR), self-wastage, that increases the size of leak, may take place by corrosion related to chemical reaction between sodium and water. If the self-wastage continues in a certain period of time, the intact tube bundle may be damaged as a result of enlarged leak. For the safety evaluation of the accident, JAEA has been developing the analytical method of self-wastage using the multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code. Experiments conducted so far used mainly crack-type test pieces. However, reproducibility was limited and it was difficult to evaluate individual effects of the phenomena in detail. This report describes the development of new experimental rig (SWAT-2R). SWAT-2R enables to examine corrosion effecting factors that were ambiguous in the previous studies. The report includes description of development of micro-leak test piece, examination of experimental procedure. The results will provide fundamental data for validation of the self-wastage analytical method. (author)

  3. Semantic Web applications and tools for the life sciences: SWAT4LS 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Albert; Paschke, Adrian; Romano, Paolo; Marshall, M Scott; Splendiani, Andrea

    2012-01-25

    As Semantic Web technologies mature and new releases of key elements, such as SPARQL 1.1 and OWL 2.0, become available, the Life Sciences continue to push the boundaries of these technologies with ever more sophisticated tools and applications. Unsurprisingly, therefore, interest in the SWAT4LS (Semantic Web Applications and Tools for the Life Sciences) activities have remained high, as was evident during the third international SWAT4LS workshop held in Berlin in December 2010. Contributors to this workshop were invited to submit extended versions of their papers, the best of which are now made available in the special supplement of BMC Bioinformatics. The papers reflect the wide range of work in this area, covering the storage and querying of Life Sciences data in RDF triple stores, tools for the development of biomedical ontologies and the semantics-based integration of Life Sciences as well as clinicial data.

  4. Differential Effect of Solution Conditions on the Conformation of the Actinoporins Sticholysin II and Equinatoxin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDSON V.F. FAUTH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinoporins are a family of pore-forming proteins with hemolytic activity. The structural basis for such activity appears to depend on their correct folding. Such folding encompasses a phosphocholine binding site, a tryptophan-rich region and the activity-related N-terminus segment. Additionally, different solution conditions are known to be able to influence the pore formation by actinoporins, as for Sticholysin II (StnII and Equinatoxin II (EqtxII. In this context, the current work intends to characterize the influence of distinct solution conditions in the conformational behavior of these proteins through molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The obtained data offer structural insights into actinoporins dynamics in solution, characterizing its conformational behavior at the atomic level, in accordance with previous experimental data on StnII and EqtxII hemolytic activities.

  5. Study of Beam-Beam Effects at PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narsky, I

    2004-01-01

    Using a self-consistent three-dimensional simulation running on parallel supercomputers, we have modeled the beam-beam interaction at the PEP-II asymmetric e + e - collider. To provide guidance for luminosity improvement, we scanned the tunes and currents in both rings and computed their impact on the luminosity and transverse beam sizes. We also studied the effects of colliding the beams with a small crossing angle. Where possible, the code was benchmarked against experimental measurements of luminosity and beam sizes, yielding an acceptable agreement

  6. Hydrological modeling of the Simly Dam watershed (Pakistan) using GIS and SWAT model

    OpenAIRE

    Shimaa M. Ghoraba

    2015-01-01

    Modern mathematical models have been developed for studying the complex hydrological processes of a watershed and their direct relation to weather, topography, geology and land use. In this study the hydrology of Simly Dam watershed located in Saon River basin at the north-east of Islamabad is modeled, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). It aims to simulate the stream flow, establish the water balance and estimate the monthly volume inflow to Simly Dam in order to help the manage...

  7. Estimating shallow groundwater recharge in the headwaters of the Liverpool Plains using SWAT

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, H.; Cornish, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    Metadata only record A physically based catchment model (SWAT) was used for recharge estimation in the headwaters of the Liverpool Plains in NSW, Australia. The study used water balance modelling at the catchment scale to derive parameters for long-term recharge estimation. The derived parameters were further assessed at a subcatchment scale. Modelling results suggest that recharge occurs only in wet years, and is dominated by a few significant years or periods. The results were matched by...

  8. Estimation of transported pollutant load in Ardila catchment using the SWAT model

    OpenAIRE

    DURÃO, A.; LEITÃO, P.; BRITO, D.; FERNANDES, R.M.; NEVES, R.; MORAIS, M.

    2011-01-01

    Excess of organic matter and nutrients in the water body promotes algae blooms, which can accelerate the eutrophication process, situation often observed in the Ardila river. This river was identified as very polluted and classified as critical for Alqueva-Pedrogão System. The aim of this study was to estimate the transported nutrients load in a transboundary catchment using the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model and to determine the contribution off nutrients load in the entire catc...

  9. Experiences on removal of sodium-water reaction products in SWAT-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Hiroi, H.; Sato, M.; Otaka, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes experiences and information concerning the removal of sodium water reaction products (SMRP) obtained through large leak tests of the Steam Generator Safety Test Facility (SWAT-3) at PNC/OEC, which were conducted to validate the safety design of steam generators of a prototype LMFBR Monju. The following three problems are discussed here: (1) drainability of SWRP, (2) removal of SWRP by using a cold trap, and (3) steam cleaning of SWRP. (author)

  10. SWAT Model Prediction of Phosphorus Loading in a South Carolina Karst Watershed with a Downstream Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra M. Amatya; Manoj K. Jha; Thomas M. Williams; Amy E. Edwards; Daniel R.. Hitchcock

    2013-01-01

    The SWAT model was used to predict total phosphorus (TP) loadings for a 1555-ha karst watershed—Chapel Branch Creek (CBC)—which drains to a lake via a reservoir-like embayment (R-E). The model was first tested for monthly streamflow predictions from tributaries draining three potential source areas as well as the downstream R-E, followed by TP loadings using data...

  11. Comparison of MODIS and SWAT evapotranspiration over a complex terrain at different spatial scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Abiodun

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In most hydrological systems, evapotranspiration (ET and precipitation are the largest components of the water balance, which are difficult to estimate, particularly over complex terrain. In recent decades, the advent of remotely sensed data based ET algorithms and distributed hydrological models has provided improved spatially upscaled ET estimates. However, information on the performance of these methods at various spatial scales is limited. This study compares the ET from the MODIS remotely sensed ET dataset (MOD16 with the ET estimates from a SWAT hydrological model on graduated spatial scales for the complex terrain of the Sixth Creek Catchment of the Western Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australia. ET from both models was further compared with the coarser-resolution AWRA-L model at catchment scale. The SWAT model analyses are performed on daily timescales with a 6-year calibration period (2000–2005 and 7-year validation period (2007–2013. Differences in ET estimation between the SWAT and MOD16 methods of up to 31, 19, 15, 11 and 9 % were observed at respectively 1, 4, 9, 16 and 25 km2 spatial resolutions. Based on the results of the study, a spatial scale of confidence of 4 km2 for catchment-scale evapotranspiration is suggested in complex terrain. Land cover differences, HRU parameterisation in AWRA-L and catchment-scale averaging of input climate data in the SWAT semi-distributed model were identified as the principal sources of weaker correlations at higher spatial resolution.

  12. Pesticide transport to tile-drained fields in SWAT model – macropore flow and sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Shenglan; Trolle, Dennis; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Tool (SWAT) to simulate transport of both mobile (e.g. Bentazon) and strongly sorbed (e.g. Diuron) pesticides in tile drains. Macropore flow is initiated when soil water content exceeds a threshold and rainfall intensity exceeds infiltration capacity. The amount of macropore flow is calculated...... to macropore sediment transport. Simulated tile drain discharge, sediment and pesticide loads are calibrated against data from intensively monitored tile-drained fields and streams in Denmark....

  13. [Nitrogen non-point source pollution identification based on ArcSWAT in Changle River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ou-Ping; Sun, Si-Yang; Lü, Jun

    2013-04-01

    The ArcSWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model was adopted for Non-point source (NPS) nitrogen pollution modeling and nitrogen source apportionment for the Changle River watershed, a typical agricultural watershed in Southeast China. Water quality and hydrological parameters were monitored, and the watershed natural conditions (including soil, climate, land use, etc) and pollution sources information were also investigated and collected for SWAT database. The ArcSWAT model was established in the Changle River after the calibrating and validating procedures of the model parameters. Based on the validated SWAT model, the contributions of different nitrogen sources to river TN loading were quantified, and spatial-temporal distributions of NPS nitrogen export to rivers were addressed. The results showed that in the Changle River watershed, Nitrogen fertilizer, nitrogen air deposition and nitrogen soil pool were the prominent pollution sources, which contributed 35%, 32% and 25% to the river TN loading, respectively. There were spatial-temporal variations in the critical sources for NPS TN export to the river. Natural sources, such as soil nitrogen pool and atmospheric nitrogen deposition, should be targeted as the critical sources for river TN pollution during the rainy seasons. Chemical nitrogen fertilizer application should be targeted as the critical sources for river TN pollution during the crop growing season. Chemical nitrogen fertilizer application, soil nitrogen pool and atmospheric nitrogen deposition were the main sources for TN exported from the garden plot, forest and residential land, respectively. However, they were the main sources for TN exported both from the upland and paddy field. These results revealed that NPS pollution controlling rules should focus on the spatio-temporal distribution of NPS pollution sources.

  14. Multivariate Bias Correction Procedures for Improving Water Quality Predictions from the SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S.; Libera, D.

    2017-12-01

    Water quality observations are usually not available on a continuous basis for longer than 1-2 years at a time over a decadal period given the labor requirements making calibrating and validating mechanistic models difficult. Further, any physical model predictions inherently have bias (i.e., under/over estimation) and require post-simulation techniques to preserve the long-term mean monthly attributes. This study suggests a multivariate bias-correction technique and compares to a common technique in improving the performance of the SWAT model in predicting daily streamflow and TN loads across the southeast based on split-sample validation. The approach is a dimension reduction technique, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) that regresses the observed multivariate attributes with the SWAT model simulated values. The common approach is a regression based technique that uses an ordinary least squares regression to adjust model values. The observed cross-correlation between loadings and streamflow is better preserved when using canonical correlation while simultaneously reducing individual biases. Additionally, canonical correlation analysis does a better job in preserving the observed joint likelihood of observed streamflow and loadings. These procedures were applied to 3 watersheds chosen from the Water Quality Network in the Southeast Region; specifically, watersheds with sufficiently large drainage areas and number of observed data points. The performance of these two approaches are compared for the observed period and over a multi-decadal period using loading estimates from the USGS LOADEST model. Lastly, the CCA technique is applied in a forecasting sense by using 1-month ahead forecasts of P & T from ECHAM4.5 as forcings in the SWAT model. Skill in using the SWAT model for forecasting loadings and streamflow at the monthly and seasonal timescale is also discussed.

  15. Stream II-V5: Revision Of Stream II-V4 To Account For The Effects Of Rainfall Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.

    2010-01-01

    STREAM II-V4 is the aqueous transport module currently used by the Savannah River Site emergency response Weather Information Display (WIND) system. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) was used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. STREAM II-V4 predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM II-V4. STREAM II-V4 has been revised to account for the effects of a storm event. The steps used in this method are: (1) generate rainfall hyetographs as a function of total rainfall in inches (or millimeters) and rainfall duration in hours; (2) generate watershed runoff flow based on the rainfall hyetographs from step 1; (3) calculate the variation of stream segment volume (cross section) as a function of flow from step 2; (4) implement the results from steps 2 and 3 into the STREAM II model. The revised model (STREAM II-V5) will find the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations.

  16. Assessing the Efficacy of the SWAT Auto-Irrigation Function to Simulate Irrigation, Evapotranspiration, and Crop Response to Management Strategies of the Texas High Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the semi-arid Texas High Plains, the underlying Ogallala Aquifer is experiencing continuing decline due to long-term pumping for irrigation with limited recharge. Accurate simulation of irrigation and other associated water balance components are critical for meaningful evaluation of the effects of irrigation management strategies. Modelers often employ auto-irrigation functions within models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. However, some studies have raised concerns as to whether the function is able to adequately simulate representative irrigation practices. In this study, observations of climate, irrigation, evapotranspiration (ET, leaf area index (LAI, and crop yield derived from an irrigated lysimeter field at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory at Bushland, Texas were used to evaluate the efficacy of the SWAT auto-irrigation functions. Results indicated good agreement between simulated and observed daily ET during both model calibration (2001–2005 and validation (2006–2010 periods for the baseline scenario (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency; NSE ≥ 0.80. The auto-irrigation scenarios resulted in reasonable ET simulations under all the thresholds of soil water deficit (SWD triggers as indicated by NSE values > 0.5. However, the auto-irrigation function did not adequately represent field practices, due to the continuation of irrigation after crop maturity and excessive irrigation when SWD triggers were less than the static irrigation amount.

  17. Hydrological modeling of the Simly Dam watershed (Pakistan using GIS and SWAT model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimaa M. Ghoraba

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern mathematical models have been developed for studying the complex hydrological processes of a watershed and their direct relation to weather, topography, geology and land use. In this study the hydrology of Simly Dam watershed located in Saon River basin at the north-east of Islamabad is modeled, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. It aims to simulate the stream flow, establish the water balance and estimate the monthly volume inflow to Simly Dam in order to help the managers to plan and handle this important reservoir. The ArcSWAT interface implemented in the ArcGIS software was used to delineate the study area and its sub-components, combine the data layers and edit the model database. The model was calibrated from 1990 to 2001 and evaluated from 2002 to 2011. Based on four recommended statistical coefficients, the evaluation indicates a good performance for both calibration and validation periods and acceptable agreement between measured and simulated values of both annual and monthly scale discharge. The water balance components were correctly estimated and the Simly Dam inflow was successfully reproduced with Coefficient of Determination (R2 of 0.75. These results revealed that if properly calibrated, SWAT model can be used efficiently in semi-arid regions to support water management policies.

  18. SWAT application in intensive irrigation systems: Model modification, calibration and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechmi, Farida; Burguete, Javier; Skhiri, Ahmed

    2012-11-01

    SummaryThe Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a well established, distributed, eco-hydrologic model. However, using the study case of an agricultural intensive irrigated watershed, it was shown that all the model versions are not able to appropriately reproduce the total streamflow in such system when the irrigation source is outside the watershed. The objective of this study was to modify the SWAT2005 version for correctly simulating the main hydrological processes. Crop yield, total streamflow, total suspended sediment (TSS) losses and phosphorus load calibration and validation were performed using field survey information and water quantity and quality data recorded during 2008 and 2009 years in Del Reguero irrigated watershed in Spain. The goodness of the calibration and validation results was assessed using five statistical measures, including the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE). Results indicated that the average annual crop yield and actual evapotranspiration estimations were quite satisfactory. On a monthly basis, the values of NSE were 0.90 (calibration) and 0.80 (validation) indicating that the modified model could reproduce accurately the observed streamflow. The TSS losses were also satisfactorily estimated (NSE = 0.72 and 0.52 for the calibration and validation steps). The monthly temporal patterns and all the statistical parameters indicated that the modified SWAT-IRRIG model adequately predicted the total phosphorus (TP) loading. Therefore, the model could be used to assess the impacts of different best management practices on nonpoint phosphorus losses in irrigated systems.

  19. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the Des Moines River, Iowa using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F

    2009-10-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km(2) in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed.

  1. Assessment of soil erosion risk in Komering watershed, South Sumatera, using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsabilla, A.; Kusratmoko, E.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in land use watershed led to environmental degradation. Estimated loss of soil erosion is often difficult due to some factors such as topography, land use, climate and human activities. This study aims to predict soil erosion hazard and sediment yield using the Soil and Water Assessment Tools (SWAT) hydrological model. The SWAT was chosen because it can simulate the model with limited data. The study area is Komering watershed (806,001 Ha) in South Sumatera Province. There are two factors land management intervention: 1) land with agriculture, and 2) land with cultivation. These factors selected in accordance with the regulations of spatial plan area. Application of the SWAT demonstrated that the model can predict surface runoff, soil erosion loss and sediment yield. The erosion risk for each watershed can be classified and predicted its changes based on the scenarios which arranged. In this paper, we also discussed the relationship between the distribution of erosion risk and watershed's characteristics in a spatial perspective.

  2. SWAT-MODSIM-PSO optimization of multi-crop planning in the Karkheh River Basin, Iran, under the impacts of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidoon, Majid; Koch, Manfred

    2018-07-15

    Agriculture is one of the environmental/economic sectors that may adversely be affected by climate change, especially, in already nowadays water-scarce regions, like the Middle East. One way to cope with future changes in absolute as well as seasonal (irrigation) water amounts can be the adaptation of the agricultural crop pattern in a region, i.e. by planting crops which still provide high yields and so economic benefits to farmers under such varying climate conditions. To do this properly, the whole cascade starting from climate change, effects on hydrology and surface water availability, subsequent effects on crop yield, agricultural areas available, and, finally, economic value of a multi-crop cultivation pattern must be known. To that avail, a complex coupled simulation-optimization tool SWAT-LINGO-MODSIM-PSO (SLMP) has been developed here and used to find the future optimum cultivation area of crops for the maximization of the economic benefits in five irrigation-fed agricultural plains in the south of the Karkheh River Basin (KRB) southwest Iran. Starting with the SWAT distributed hydrological model, the KR-streamflow as well as the inflow into the Karkheh-reservoir, as the major storage of irrigation water, is calibrated and validated, based on 1985-2004 observed discharge data. In the subsequent step, the SWAT-predicted streamflow is fed into the MODSIM river basin Decision Support System to simulate and optimize the water allocation between different water users (agricultural, environmental, municipal and industrial) under standard operating policy (SOP) rules. The final step is the maximization of the economic benefit in the five agricultural plains through constrained PSO (particle swarm optimization) by adjusting the cultivation areas (decision variables) of different crops (wheat, barley, maize and "others"), taking into account their specific prizes and optimal crop yields under water deficiency, with the latter computed in the LINGO

  3. Transforming SWAT for continental-scale high-resolution modeling of floodplain dynamics: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajib, A.; Merwade, V.; Liu, Z.; Lane, C.; Golden, H. E.; Tavakoly, A. A.; Follum, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    There have been many initiatives to develop frameworks for continental-scale modeling and mapping floodplain dynamics. The choice of a model for such needs should be governed by its suitability to be executed in high performance cyber platforms, ability to integrate supporting hydraulic/hydrodynamic tools, and ability to assimilate earth observations. Furthermore, disseminating large volume of outputs for public use and interoperability with similar frameworks should be considered. Considering these factors, we have conducted a series of modeling experiments and developed a suite of cyber-enabled platforms that have transformed Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) into an appropriate model for use in a continental-scale, high resolution, near real-time flood information framework. Our first experiment uses a medium size watershed in Indiana, USA and attempts burning-in a high resolution, National Hydrography Dataset Plus(NHDPlus) into the SWAT model. This is crucial with a view to make the outputs comparable with other global/national initiatives. The second experiment is built upon the first attempt to add a modified landscape representation in the model which differentiates between the upland and floodplain processes. Our third experiment involves two separate efforts: coupling SWAT with a hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP and a new generation, low complexity hydraulic model AutoRoute. We have executed the prototype "loosely-coupled" models for the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River Basin in the USA, encompassing 1 million square km drainage area and nearly 0.2 million NHDPlus river reaches. The preliminary results suggest reasonable accuracy for both streamflow and flood inundation. In this presentation, we will also showcase three cyber-enabled platforms, including SWATShare to run and calibrate large scale SWAT models online using high performance computational resources, HydroGlobe to automatically extract and assimilate multiple remotely sensed earth observations in

  4. Potensi bambu swat (gigantochloa verticillata sebagai material karbon aktif untuk adsorbed natural gas (ANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Ngakan Ketut Putra Negara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Bambu merupakan material biomassa yang banyak diteliti, diproduksi sebagai karbon aktif dan diaplikasikan di berbagaibidang kehidupan. Namun sangat sedikit bahkan hampir tidak ditemukan referensi yang membahas kegunaan karbonaktif dari bambusebagai adsorbent untuk Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG. Penelitian ini difokuskan untukmengkarakterisasai dan menevaluasi potensi bambu swat (Gigantochloa verticillata sebagai material dasar karbon aktifuntuk aplikasi ANG. Pengujian yang dilakukan meliputi uji proximate, uji ultimate, uji komposisi kimia dan pengamatanstruktur mikro. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa bambuswat memiliki kandungan lignin 22,9920%, selulosa44,2247%, volatile 88’32%, carbon 43,42%,ash 1,83%, silica (1,8664% dan nitrogen 1,7065%. Bambu swat memilikiikatan pembuluh yang terdiri atas satu ikatan pembuluh (xilem dan floem dan dua ikatan serat yang terletak di sebelahdalam dan luar dari ikatan pembuluh.Secara umum dapat dikatakan bahwa bamboo jenis ini memiliki kandungansellulosa, volatile dan karbon yang cukup tinggi serta ash, silica, hydrogen dan nitrogen yang rendah sehinggabambuswat sangat berpotensi digunakan sebagai material sumber karbon aktif.Kata kunci: Karbon aktif, bambu swat, ANG, lignin, sellulosa, analisa ultimate dan proximates Abstract: Bamboo is a biomass material widely researched, produced as activated carbon and applied in various life fields.However, very little or almost no references were found with regard to utilization of bamboo activated carbon asadsorbent for Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG. This study is concerned to characterize and evaluate potency of bambooswat (Gigantochloa verticillata as aprecursor of activated carbon for ANG application. Examinations conducted wereproximate, ultimate, chemical composisition tests and microstructure observation. The results showed that bambooswathave a lignin content 22.9920%, cellulose 44.2247%, volatile 88.32%, carbon 43.42%, ash 1.83%, silica 1.8664% andnitrogen

  5. Radial electrical field effects in TJ-II. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the radial electric field upon the neoclassical transport coefficients of TJ-II helical axis Stellarator has been calculated as well on the microwave heating stage (ECRH) as on the neutral injection one (NBI). The influence of the solutions for the self-consistent ambipolar field on confinement times and temperatures has been studied by means of a zero-dimensional energy balance. The simultaneous presence of two roots, the electronic and the ionic one, is observed for the ECRH phase, while for NBI only the ionic root appears, although with a strong field intensity that could produce a favourable effect on confinement. The interest and need of the extension of these calculations to include radial profile effects by using spatial dependent transport codes in stressed

  6. Ionizing radiation: levels and effects. Volume II. Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The genetic effects of ionizing radiation were last reviewed comprehensively by the Committee in its 1966 report (575), whereas the particular problem of the induction of chromosome aberrations by irradiation of human somatic cells was reviewed in the Committee's 1969 report (576). The present review will consider the further experimental data that have been obtained since these reports. Of the recent advances in human genetics, those concerning the occurrence and transmission of translocations have particular relevance to the problem of estimating risks, and will be discussed in the last section of this review.

  7. Effect of Phosphorylation and Copper(II or Iron(II Ions Enrichment on Some Physicochemical Properties of Spelt Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Rożnowski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper provides an assessment of the effect of saturation of spelt starch and monostarch phosphate with copper or iron ions on selected physicochemical properties of the resulting modified starches. Native and modified spelt starch samples were analyzed for selected mineral element content using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS. Thermodynamic properties were measured using DSC, and pasting properties by RVA. Flow curves of 5% pastes were plotted and described using the Herschel-Bulkley model. The structure recovery ratio was measured. AAS analysis established the presence of iron(II and copper(II ions in the samples of modified starches and that potassium and magnesium ions had leached from them. In comparison to unfortified samples, enriching native starch with copper(II ions decreases value of all temperatures of phase transformation about 1.3-2.7 °C, but in case of monostarch phosphates bigger changes (2.8-3.7 °C were observed. Fortified native spelt starch with copper(II ions caused increasing the final viscosity of paste from 362 to 429 mPa·s. However, presence iron(II ions in samples caused reduced its final viscosity by 170 (spelt starch and 103 mPa·s (monostarch phosphate. Furthermore, enriching monostarch phosphate contributed to reduce degree of structure recovery of pastes from 70.9% to 66.6% in case of copper(II ions and to 59.9% in case of iron(II ions.

  8. Memory effects and peak effect in type II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, G.; Luna, D.; Eismann, B.; Bettachini, V.; Bekeris, V.

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of experimental and theoretical work has been devoted to understand memory effects (ME) in the solid vortex lattice (VL) but has remained, however, controversial until now. In the vicinity of the anomaly known as the peak effect (PE) both the VL mobility and the measured critical current density are found to be dependent of the dynamical history of the sample, in both low T c (LTS) and high T c (HTS) superconductors. Experiments in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) crystals have shown that the mobility of the VL increases after assisting the system with a symmetric AC field (or current) of moderated amplitude. On the other hand, after an asymmetric AC field assists vortices, the VL becomes less mobile. These features indicate that ME in these samples cannot be ascribed to an equilibration process, but probably are related to the organization of the lattice after nearest neighbor re-accommodation or induced plastic VL deformation. Recently, we have shown evidence that in YBCO the PE is a dynamic anomaly observed in the non-linear response, and is absent in the Labusch constant derived from the linear Campbell regime. However, this behavior seems not to be extensive to other systems as the traditional LTS NbSe 2 . In this work, the AC response in the PE region of NbSe 2 and YBCO samples are presented and compared. Very salient differences both in the linear and non-linear response as well as in the ME characteristics indicate that a different physics governs the PE phenomena in each case

  9. Application of WRF - SWAT OpenMI 2.0 based models integration for real time hydrological modelling and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaets, Andrey; Gonchukov, Leonid

    2014-05-01

    Intake of deterministic distributed hydrological models into operational water management requires intensive collection and inputting of spatial distributed climatic information in a timely manner that is both time consuming and laborious. The lead time of the data pre-processing stage could be essentially reduced by coupling of hydrological and numerical weather prediction models. This is especially important for the regions such as the South of the Russian Far East where its geographical position combined with a monsoon climate affected by typhoons and extreme heavy rains caused rapid rising of the mountain rivers water level and led to the flash flooding and enormous damage. The objective of this study is development of end-to-end workflow that executes, in a loosely coupled mode, an integrated modeling system comprised of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) atmospheric model and Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT 2012) hydrological model using OpenMI 2.0 and web-service technologies. Migration SWAT into OpenMI compliant involves reorganization of the model into a separate initialization, performing timestep and finalization functions that can be accessed from outside. To save SWAT normal behavior, the source code was separated from OpenMI-specific implementation into the static library. Modified code was assembled into dynamic library and wrapped into C# class implemented the OpenMI ILinkableComponent interface. Development of WRF OpenMI-compliant component based on the idea of the wrapping web-service clients into a linkable component and seamlessly access to output netCDF files without actual models connection. The weather state variables (precipitation, wind, solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity) are processed by automatic input selection algorithm to single out the most relevant values used by SWAT model to yield climatic data at the subbasin scale. Spatial interpolation between the WRF regular grid and SWAT subbasins centroid (which are

  10. Future integrated aquifer vulnerability assessment considering land use / land cover and climate change using DRASTIC and SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, W.; Engel, B.; Chaubey, I.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change causes significant changes to temperature regimes and precipitation patterns across the world. Such alterations in climate pose serious risks for not only inland freshwater ecosystems but also groundwater systems, and may adversely affect numerous critical services they provide to humans. All groundwater results from precipitation, and precipitation is affected by climate change. Climate change is also influenced by land use / land cover (LULC) change and vice versa. According to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports, climate change is caused by global warming which is generated by the increase of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the atmosphere. LULC change is a major driving factor causing an increase in GHG emissions. LULC change data (years 2006-2100) will be produced by the Land Transformation Model (LTM) which simulates spatial patterns of LULC change over time. MIROC5 (years 2006-2100) will be obtained considering GCMs and ensemble characteristics such as resolution and trend of temperature and precipitation which is a consistency check with observed data from local weather stations and historical data from GCMs output data. Thus, MIROC5 will be used to account for future climate change scenarios and relationship between future climate change and alteration of groundwater quality in this study. For efficient groundwater resources management, integrated aquifer vulnerability assessments (= intrinsic vulnerability + hazard potential assessment) are required. DRASTIC will be used to evaluate intrinsic vulnerability, and aquifer hazard potential will be evaluated by Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) which can simulate pollution potential from surface and transport properties of contaminants. Thus, for effective integrated aquifer vulnerability assessment for LULC and climate change in the Midwestern United States, future projected LULC and climate data from the LTM and GCMs will be incorporated with DRASTIC and SWAT. It is

  11. Bunch lengthening and related effects in SPEAR II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.; Servranckx, R.; Sabersky, A.P.; Gareyte, J.; Fischer, G.E.; Chao, A.W.; Donald, M.H.R.

    1977-03-01

    In recent years, electron storage ring designers have become aware of the problems caused by the interaction of short, high current bunches with their environment. Important effects are: (1) energy loss can cause local overheating of chamber components; (2) additional rf power is required due to overall energy loss; (3) the increased energy spread requires increased aperture; (4) destructive instabilities could occur. Anomalous bunch lengthening and energy spread, the spectroscopy of longitudinal modes and the shift of synchronous phase were simultaneously measured in order to study the dynamics of the interaction. From the data obtained at SPEAR II one is led to a model of coupling impedance which should be useful in the design of any electron ring

  12. A multi basin SWAT model analysis of runoff and sedimentation in the Blue Nile, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Easton

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi basin analysis of runoff and erosion in the Blue Nile Basin, Ethiopia was conducted to elucidate sources of runoff and sediment. Erosion is arguably the most critical problem in the Blue Nile Basin, as it limits agricultural productivity in Ethiopia, degrades benthos in the Nile, and results in sedimentation of dams in downstream countries. A modified version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model was developed to predict runoff and sediment losses from the Ethiopian Blue Nile Basin. The model simulates saturation excess runoff from the landscape using a simple daily water balance coupled to a topographic wetness index in ways that are consistent with observed runoff processes in the basin. The spatial distribution of landscape erosion is thus simulated more correctly. The model was parameterized in a nested design for flow at eight and sediment at three locations in the basin. Subbasins ranged in size from 1.3 to 174 000 km2, and interestingly, the partitioning of runoff and infiltrating flow could be predicted by topographic information. Model predictions showed reasonable accuracy (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiencies ranged from 0.53–0.92 with measured data across all sites except Kessie, where the water budget could not be closed; however, the timing of flow was well captured. Runoff losses increased with rainfall during the monsoonal season and were greatest from areas with shallow soils and large contributing areas. Analysis of model results indicate that upland landscape erosion dominated sediment delivery to the main stem of the Blue Nile in the early part of the growing season when tillage occurs and before the soil was wetted up and plant cover was established. Once plant cover was established in mid August landscape erosion was negligible and sediment export was dominated by channel processes and re-suspension of landscape sediment deposited early in the growing season. These results imply that targeting small

  13. Resonant Effects in Neutral beam Moderation at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.; Fuentes, C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fast ion losses in neutral beam moderation at TJ-II is analysed theoretically, in particular the influence of resonant effects and the radial electric field dependence. The direct losses show strong resonant effects when the ratio of the poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities pass near the values -4/3, -2 or 0. These effects are visible as strong maxima on the loss fractions and also as characteristic trajectory behaviours. The delayed losses present resonant effects also, generally at intermediate energies (5 to 20 KeV for 40 keV injection). Near the resonances the population of passing particles in these losses is very high and the loss fraction can equal or even surpass the direct losses. In these delayed losses the particles concentrate along vertical strips on the loss cone diagrams of roughly constant parallel velocity. This parallel velocity increases with the electric field, the loss maxima are reached usually when the pitch and energy of these strips are near the initial injection values. The trapped particle population in these delayed losses is maximal at null electric and decreases with the field intensity for both potential signs. The corresponding final energies are usually low (1 to 5 keV). Except at extreme potentials, where the -4 resonance can appear, no resonant effects are observed for this population. The resonance ordering is similar for all configurations and follows reasonably the predictions of a simple model. The extreme configurations are dominated by the effects of the 0 and -2 resonances, giving very high loss fractions even for null electric field. In contrast the intermediate configurations, near the Reference one, do not present resonant effects and the losses are moderate at low potentials. Only above 2000 v the resonant effects start to appear. (Author) 11 refs

  14. Guidelines for using sensitivity analysis and auto-calibration tools for multi-gage or multi-step calibration in SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autocalibration of a water quality model such as SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) can be a powerful, labor-saving tool. When multi-gage or multi-pollutant calibration is desired, autocalibration is essential because the time involved in manual calibration becomes prohibitive. The ArcSWAT Interf...

  15. Advancing representation of hydrologic processes in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) through integration of the TOPographic MODEL (TOPMODEL) features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the integration of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model and the TOPographic MODEL (TOPMODEL) features for enhancing the physical representation of hydrologic processes. In SWAT, four hydrologic processes, which are surface runoff, baseflow, groundwater re-evaporation and deep aquifer percolation, are modeled by using a group of empirical equations. The empirical equations usually constrain the simulation capability of relevant processes. To replace these equations and to model the influences of topography and water table variation on streamflow generation, the TOPMODEL features are integrated into SWAT, and a new model, the so-called SWAT-TOP, is developed. In the new model, the process of deep aquifer percolation is removed, the concept of groundwater re-evaporation is refined, and the processes of surface runoff and baseflow are remodeled. Consequently, three parameters in SWAT are discarded, and two new parameters to reflect the TOPMODEL features are introduced. SWAT-TOP and SWAT are applied to the East River basin in South China, and the results reveal that, compared with SWAT, the new model can provide a more reasonable simulation of the hydrologic processes of surface runoff, groundwater re-evaporation, and baseflow. This study evidences that an established hydrologic model can be further improved by integrating the features of another model, which is a possible way to enhance our understanding of the workings of catchments.

  16. Calibration and validation of the SWAT model for predicting daily ET over irrigated crops in the Texas High Plains using lysimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a widely used watershed model for simulating stream flow, overland flow, sediment, pesticide, and bacterial loading in response to management practices. All SWAT processes are directly dependent upon the accurate representation of hydrology. Evapotranspiratio...

  17. Improvement and application of the PCPF-1@SWAT2012 model for predicting pesticide transport: A case study of the Sakura River watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Le Hoang; Boulange, Julien; Iwafune, Takashi; Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Watanabe, Hirozumi

    2018-04-15

    The PCPF-1@SWAT model was previously developed to simulate the fate and transport of rice pesticide in watersheds. However, the current model is deficient in characterize the rice paddy area and is incompatible with the ArcSWAT2012 program. In this study, we modified original PCPF1@SWAT model to develop new PCPF1@SWAT2012 model to address the deficiency of rice paddy area and utilizing the ArcSWAT2012 program. Next, the new model was applied in Sakura River watershed, Ibaraki, Japan in order to simulate the transport of four herbicides including mefenacet, pretilachlor, bensulfuron-methyl and imazosulfuron. The result showed that the simulated water flow rate by the PCPF1@SWAT2012 was well predicted with the observed data. The calculated NSE (0.73) and PBIAS (-20.38), suggested the satisfactory performance of the model. Besides, the concentrations of herbicides simulated by the PCPF-1@SWAT2012 model were in good agreement with the observed data. Statistical indices, NSE and RMSE estimated for mefenacet (0.69 and 0.18), pretilachlor (0.86 and 0.18), bensulfuronmethyl (0.46 and 0.21) and imazosulfuron (0.64 and 0.28) indicated satisfactory predictions, respectively. The PCPF-1@SWAT2012 model is capable of well simulating the water flow rate and transport of herbicides in given watershed, comprising different land use types, including rice paddy area. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Calibration and validation of the SWAT model for predicting daily ET for irrigated crops in the Texas High Plains using lysimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been used to assess the impacts of alternative agricultural management practices on non-point source pollution in watersheds of various topography and scale throughout the world. Water balance is the driving force behind all processes of SWAT, as i...

  19. CP-violation and Todd effects at lep-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, A.; Masso, E.; Rujula, A. de

    1991-01-01

    LEP-II will be a tool study CP-violation in processes involving vector bosons, and will test in particular the CP properties of the coupling of photons and Z's to W-pairs. While it is difficult to observe truly CP-odd effects, it is easy to measure T-odd ones. The latter can originate from CP-violation, or from radiative corrections involving the absorptive part of the scattering amplitude. T-odd effects are interesting in themselves, in that they accurately test the standard model and are sensitive to its unmeasured ingredients, such as the WW→WW scattering amplitude of the masses of the top quark and the elementary scalar. The prediction of the standard T-odd effects is a necessary stepping stone in the search for an honest-to-goodness violation of CP in the pure gauge sector. We thoroughly analyse the T-odd observables in the e + e - →W + W - process within the standard model, as well as the extra effects to be expected if the γW + W - and/or ZW + W - vertices were to violate CP in a non-standard fashion. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis of poly(aminopropyl/methyl)silsesquioxane particles as effective Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Yin, Qiangfeng; Xin, Zhong; Li, Yang; Han, Ting

    2011-11-30

    Poly(aminopropyl/methyl)silsesquioxane (PAMSQ) particles have been synthesized by a one-step hydrolytic co-condensation process using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) as precursors in the presence of base catalyst in aqueous medium. The amino functionalities of the particles could be controlled by adjusting the organosilanes feed ratio. The compositions of the amino-functionalized polysilsesquioxanes were confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The strong adsorbability of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions onto PAMSQ particles was systematically examined. The effect of adsorption time, initial metal ions concentration and pH of solutions was studied to optimize the metal ions adsorbability of PAMSQ particles. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process well fits the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Adsorption phenomena appeared to follow Langmuir isotherm. The PAMSQ particles demonstrate the highest Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorption capacity of 2.29 mmol/g and 1.31 mmol/g at an initial metal ions concentration of 20mM, respectively. The PAMSQ particles demonstrate a promising application in the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lattice Effects Due to High Currents in PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, F.-J.; Smith, H.; Turner, J.L.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The very high beam currents in the PEP-II B-Factory have caused many expected and unexpected effects: Synchrotron light fans move the beam pipe and cause dispersion; higher order modes cause excessive heating, e-clouds around the positron beam blow up its beam size. Here we describe an effect where the measured dispersion of the beam in the Low Energy Ring (LER) is different at high and at low beam currents. The dispersion was iteratively lowered by making anti-symmetric orbit bumps in many sextupole duplets, checking each time with a dispersion measurement where a dispersive kick is generated. This can be done parasitically during collisions. It was a surprise when checking the low current characterization data that there is a change. Subsequent high and low current measurements confirmed the effect. One source was believed to be located far away from any synchrotron radiation in the middle of a straight (PR12), away from sextupoles and skew quadrupoles and created a dispersion wave of about 70 mm at high current while at low current it is negligible

  2. Evaluating the Efficiency of a Multi-core Aware Multi-objective Optimization Tool for Calibrating the SWAT Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Izaurralde, R. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zong, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-08-20

    The efficiency of calibrating physically-based complex hydrologic models is a major concern in the application of those models to understand and manage natural and human activities that affect watershed systems. In this study, we developed a multi-core aware multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithm (MAMEOA) to improve the efficiency of calibrating a worldwide used watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)). The test results show that MAMEOA can save about 1-9%, 26-51%, and 39-56% time consumed by calibrating SWAT as compared with sequential method by using dual-core, quad-core, and eight-core machines, respectively. Potential and limitations of MAMEOA for calibrating SWAT are discussed. MAMEOA is open source software.

  3. Effects of urotensin II receptor antagonist, GSK1440115, in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison D Portnoy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urotensin II (U-II is highly expressed in the human lung and has been implicated in regulating respiratory physiology in preclinical studies. Our objective was to test antagonism of the urotensin receptor (UT by GSK1440115, a novel, competitive and selective inhibitor of the UT receptor, as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of asthma. Methods: Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK of single doses of GSK1440115 (1–750 mg were assessed in a Phase I, placebo-controlled study in 70 healthy subjects. In a Phase Ib study, 12 asthmatic patients were randomized into a 2-period, single-blind crossover study and treated with single doses of 750 mg GSK1440115 or placebo and given a methacholine challenge. Results: Administration of GSK1440115 was safe and well-tolerated in healthy subjects and asthmatic patients. In both studies, there was a high degree of variability in the observed PK following oral dosing with GSK1440115 at all doses. There was a marked food effect in healthy subjects at the 50 mg dose. In the presence of food at the 750 mg dose, the time to maximal concentration was between 2 and 6 hours and the terminal half-life was short at approximately 2 hours. All asthmatic patients maintained greater than the predicted concentration levels necessary to achieve predicted 96% receptor occupancy for >=3 hours (between 4-7 hours post-dose. There were no apparent trends or relationships between the systemic plasma exposure of GSK1440115 and pharmacodynamic endpoints, PC20 after methacholine challenge and FEV1, in asthmatics. Conclusion: While GSK1440115 was safe and well-tolerated, it did not induce bronchodilation in asthmatics, or protect against methacholine-induced bronchospasm, suggesting that acute UT antagonism is not likely to provide benefit as an acute bronchodilator in this patient population.

  4. High-Frequency H-1 NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn-II and Pb-II Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb-II Hydrides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Marek, R.; Straka, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 20 (2016), s. 10302-10309 ISSN 0020-1669 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrides of TlI and PbII * high-frequency 1H chemical shifts * relativistic effects Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.857, year: 2016

  5. Ethiopian Central Rift Valley basin hydrologic modelling using HEC-HMS and ArcSWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Ferrer, Jordi; Candela, Lucila; Pérez-Foguet, Agustí

    2013-04-01

    An Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) shall be applied to achieve a sustainable development, to increase population incomes without affecting lives of those who are highly dependent on the environment. First step should be to understand water dynamics at basin level, starting by modeling the basin water resources. For model implementation, a large number of data and parameters are required, but those are not always available, especially in some developing countries where different sources may have different data, there is lack of information on data collection, etc. The Ethiopian Central Rift Valley (CRV) is an endorheic basin covering an area of approximately 10,000 km2. For the period 1996-2005, the average annual volume of rainfall accounted for 9.1 Mm3, and evapotranspiration for 8 Mm3 (Jansen et al., 2007). From the environmental point of view, basin ecosystems are endangered due to human activities. Also, poverty is widespread all over the basin, with population mainly living from agriculture on a subsistence economy. Hence, there is an urgent need to set an IWRM, but datasets required for water dynamics simulation are not too reliable. In order to reduce uncertainty of numerical simulation, two semi-distributed open software hydrologic models were implemented: HEC-HMS and ArcSWAT. HEC-HMS was developed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACoE) Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) to run precipitation-runoff simulations for a variety of applications in dendritic watershed systems. ArcSWAT includes the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, Arnold et al., 1998) model developed for the USDA Agricultural Research Service into ArcGIS (ESRI®). SWAT was developed to assess the impact of land management practices on large complex watersheds with varying soils, land use and management conditions over long periods of time (Neitsch et al., 2005). According to this, ArcSWAT would be the best option for IWRM implementation in the basin. However

  6. Spatiotemporal impacts of LULC changes on hydrology from the perspective of runoff generation mechanism using SWAT model with evolving parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Chang, J.; Luo, L.

    2017-12-01

    It is of great importance for water resources management to model the truly hydrological process under changing environment, especially under significant changes of underlying surfaces like the Wei River Bain (WRB) where the subsurface hydrology is highly influenced by human activities, and to systematically investigate the interactions among LULC change, streamflow variation and changes in runoff generation process. Therefore, we proposed the idea of evolving parameters in hydrological model (SWAT) to reflect the changes in physical environment with different LULC conditions. Then with these evolving parameters, the spatiotemporal impacts of LULC changes on streamflow were quantified, and qualitative analysis was conducted to further explore how LULC changes affect the streamflow from the perspective of runoff generation mechanism. Results indicate the following: 1) evolving parameter calibration is not only effective but necessary to ensure the validity of the model when dealing with significant changes in underlying surfaces due to human activities. 2) compared to the baseline period, the streamflow in wet seasons increased in the 1990s but decreased in the 2000s. While at yearly and dry seasonal scales, the streamflow decreased in both two decades; 3) the expansion of cropland is the major contributor to the reduction of surface water component, thus causing the decline in streamflow at yearly and dry seasonal scales. While compared to the 1990s, the expansions of woodland in the middle stream and grassland in the downstream are the main stressors that increased the soil water component, thus leading to the more decline of the streamflow in the 2000s.

  7. The effect of serum angiotensin II and angiotensin II type 1 receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    2012-06-18

    Jun 18, 2012 ... case-control cross sectional study which included 24 patients with pLN ..... significantly high levels (1000-fold) of Ang II .... initial validation of the Systemic Lupus International ... Fyhrquist F, Metsärinne K, Tikkanen I. Role of.

  8. Test results of Run-1 and Run-2 in steam generator safety test facility (SWAT-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, A.; Yatabe, Toshio; Tanabe, Hiromi; Hiroi, Hiroshi

    2003-07-01

    Large leak sodium-water reaction tests were carried out using SWAT-1 rig and SWAT-3 facility in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) O-arai Engineering Center to obtain the data on the design of the prototype LMFBR Monju steam generator against a large leak accident. This report provides the results of SWAT-3 Runs 1 and 2. In Runs 1 and 2, the heat transfer tube bundle of the evaporator, fabricated by TOSHIBA/IHI, were used, and the pressure relief line was located at the top of evaporator. The water injection rates in the evaporator were 6.7 kg/s and 14.2 (initial)-9.7 kg/s in Runs 1 and 2 respectively, which corresponded to 3.3 tubes and 7.1 (initial)-4.8 tubes failure in actual size system according to iso-velocity modeling. Approximately two hundreds of measurement points were provided to collect data such as pressure, temperature, strain, sodium level, void, thrust load, acceleration, displacement, flow rate, and so on in each run. Initial spike pressures were 1.13 MPa and 2.62 MPa nearest to injection point in Runs 1 and 2 respectively, and the maximum quasi-steady pressures in evaporator were 0.49 MPa and 0.67 MPa in Runs 1 and 2. No secondary tube failure was observed. The rupture disc of evaporator (RD601) burst at 1.1s in Run-1 and at 0.7s in Run-2 after water injected, and the pressure relief system was well-functioned though a few items for improvement were found. (author)

  9. Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources in Zarrinehrud Basin Using SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mansouri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluate impacts of climate change on temperature, rainfall and runoff in the future Using statistical model, LARS-WG, and conceptual hydrological model, SWAT. In order to the Zarrinehrud river basin, as the biggest catchment of the Lake Urmia basin was selected as a case study. At first, for the generation of future weather data in the basin, LARS-WG model was calibrated using meteorological data and then 14 models of AOGCM were applied and results of these models were downscaled using LARS-WG model in 6 synoptic stations for period of 2015 to 2030. SWAT model was used for evaluation of climate change impacts on runoff in the basin. In order to, the model was calibrated and validated using 6 gauging stations for period of 1987-2007 and the value of R2 was between 0.49 and 0.71 for calibration and between 0.54 and 0.77 for validation. Then by introducing average of downscaled results of AOGCM models to the SWAT, runoff changes of the basin were simulated during 2015-2030. Average of results of LARS-WG model indicated that the monthly mean of minimum and maximum temperatures will increase compared to the baseline period. Also monthly average of precipitation will decrease in spring season but will increase in summer and autumn. The results showed that in addition to the amount of precipitation, its pattern will change in the future period, too. The results of runoff simulation showed that the amount of inflow to the Zarrinehrud reservoir will reduce 28.4 percent compared to the baseline period.

  10. An Assessment of Mean Areal Precipitation Methods on Simulated Stream Flow: A SWAT Model Performance Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Zeiger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mean areal precipitation (MAP estimates are essential input forcings for hydrologic models. However, the selection of the most accurate method to estimate MAP can be daunting because there are numerous methods to choose from (e.g., proximate gauge, direct weighted average, surface-fitting, and remotely sensed methods. Multiple methods (n = 19 were used to estimate MAP with precipitation data from 11 distributed monitoring sites, and 4 remotely sensed data sets. Each method was validated against the hydrologic model simulated stream flow using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. SWAT was validated using a split-site method and the observed stream flow data from five nested-scale gauging sites in a mixed-land-use watershed of the central USA. Cross-validation results showed the error associated with surface-fitting and remotely sensed methods ranging from −4.5 to −5.1%, and −9.8 to −14.7%, respectively. Split-site validation results showed the percent bias (PBIAS values that ranged from −4.5 to −160%. Second order polynomial functions especially overestimated precipitation and subsequent stream flow simulations (PBIAS = −160 in the headwaters. The results indicated that using an inverse-distance weighted, linear polynomial interpolation or multiquadric function method to estimate MAP may improve SWAT model simulations. Collectively, the results highlight the importance of spatially distributed observed hydroclimate data for precipitation and subsequent steam flow estimations. The MAP methods demonstrated in the current work can be used to reduce hydrologic model uncertainty caused by watershed physiographic differences.

  11. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Ecohydrological Model Circa 2015: Global Application Trends, Insights and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman, P. W.; Arnold, J. G.; Srinivasan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is one of the most widely used watershed-scale water quality models in the world. Over 2,000 peer-reviewed SWAT-related journal articles have been published and hundreds of other studies have been published in conference proceedings and other formats. The use of SWAT was initially concentrated in North America and Europe but has also expanded dramatically in other countries and regions during the past decade including Brazil, China, India, Iran, South Korea, Southeast Asia and eastern Africa. The SWAT model has proven to be a very flexible tool for investigating a broad range of hydrologic and water quality problems at different watershed scales and environmental conditions, and has proven very adaptable for applications requiring improved hydrologic and other enhanced simulation needs. We investigate here the various technological, networking, and other factors that have supported the expanded use of SWAT, and also highlight current worldwide simulation trends and possible impediments to future increased usage of the model. Examples of technological advances include easy access to web-based documentation, user-support groups, and SWAT literature, a variety of Geographic Information System (GIS) interface tools, pre- and post-processing calibration software and other software, and an open source code which has served as a model development catalyst for multiple user groups. Extensive networking regarding the use of SWAT has further occurred via internet-based user support groups, model training workshops, regional working groups, regional and international conferences, and targeted development workshops. We further highlight several important model development trends that have emerged during the past decade including improved hydrologic, cropping system, best management practice (BMP) and pollutant transport simulation methods. In addition, several current SWAT weaknesses will be addressed and key development needs will be

  12. Integrasi Model SWAT dan SIG dalam Upaya Menekan Laju Erosi DAD Deli, Sumatera Utara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riki Rahmad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan simulasi model SWAT dalam menghitung besarnya laju erosi DAS, menguji kesesuaian model dalam memprediksi erosi, serta menentukan skenario penggunaan lahan yang paling optimal menurunkan laju erosi. Penelitian ini dilakukan di DAS Deli, Sumatera Utara. Pada penelitian ini analisis SWAT dilakukan dengan bantuan Sistem Informasi Geografi (SIG melalui 4 proses yaitu delineasi, pembentukan Hydrological Response Unit (HRU, pengolahan data dan simulasi, serta proses visualisasi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan besarnya erosi rata-rata DAS Deli adalah 410,72 ton/ha/tahun. Hasil ini menunjukkan DAS Deli termasuk kedalam Tingkat Bahaya Erosi (TBE kategori Berat dengan kriteria sangat berat 37,04%, berat 17,07%, sedang 21,46%, ringan 17,38%, dan sangat ringan 7,04%. Uji validasi model menunjukkan bahwa ada hubungan positif antara debit model dan observasi dimana persentase perbedaan nilainya sangat kecil yang artinya besarnya debit model hampir sangat mendekati besarnya debit observasi, serta model dikategorikan sangat baik dalam melakukan simulasi debit aliran harian pada Sungai Deli. Metode skenario adalah berdasarkan analisis TBE. Hasil skenario penggunaan lahan berhasil menurunkan laju erosi DAS Deli 34,78% menjadi 267,88 ton/ha/tahun. This study aims to conduct SWAT model simulation calculation of the rate of erosion of the watershed, testing the suitability of the model in predicting erosion, land use scenarios and determine the most optimal decrease the rate of erosion. This research was conducted in the watershed Deli, North Sumatra. In this study, SWAT analysis performed with the help of Geographical Information Systems (GIS through 4 delineation process, namely, the establishment of Hydrological Response Unit (HRU, data processing and simulation, as well as the visualization process. The results show the average amount of erosion DAS Deli is 410.72 ton/ha/year. These results indicate DAS Deli included into

  13. Comparison of angiotensin II (Ang II) effects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and lower esophageal sphincter smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Satish; Fan, Ya-Ping; Puri, Rajinder N

    2002-03-22

    Studies were performed to compare the actions of Ang II in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) vs. lower esophageal sphincter (LES) smooth muscles in vitro, in opossum and rabbit. Studies also were carried out in isolated smooth muscle cells. In opossum, Ang II produced no discernible effects in the IAS, but did produce a concentration-dependent contraction in the LES. Conversely, in the rabbit, while Ang II caused a modest response in the LES, it caused a significant contraction in the IAS. The contractile responses of Ang II in the opossum LES were mostly resistant to different neurohumoral antagonists but were antagonized by AT1 antagonist losartan. AT2 antagonist PD 123,319, rather than inhibiting, prolonged the contractile action of Ang II. The contractile actions of Ang II in the opossum LES were not modified by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin 1 x 10(-6) M) but were partially attenuated by the PKC inhibitor H-7 (1 x 10(-6) M), Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine (1 x 10(-5) M), Rho kinase inhibitor HA-1077 (1 x 10(-7) M) or p(44/42) MAP kinase inhibitor PD 98059 (5 x 10(-5) M). The combination of HA-1077 and H-7 did not cause an additive attenuation of Ang II responses. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors. We conclude that Ang lI-induced contraction of sphincteric smooth muscle occurs primarily by the activation of AT1 receptors at the smooth muscle cells and involves multiple pathways, influx of Ca2+, and PKC, Rho kinase and p(44/42) MAP kinase.

  14. Behavioral effects of type II pyrethroid cyhalothrin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, D. Abbud; Palermo-Neto, J.

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids such as cyhalothrin are extensively used in agriculture for the control of a broad range of ectoparasites in farm animals. It has been suggested that type II pyrethroids might induce anxiogenic-like effects in laboratory animals. The present study was undertaken to investigate a possible anxiogenic-like outcome of cyhalothrin in rats. Adult male rats were orally dosed for 7 days with 1.0, 3.0, or 7.0 mg/kg/day of cyhalothrin, present in a commercial formulation (Grenade Coopers do Brazil S.A.). The neurobehavioral changes induced by cyhalothrin as well as those produced on corticosterone serum levels were measured 24 h after the last treatment. Picrotoxin (1.0 mg/kg) was also acutely used as a positive control for anxiety. Results showed that cyhalothrin: (1) induced some signs and symptoms of intoxication that included salivation, tremors, and liquid feces; (2) reduced total locomotor activity in the open-field; (3) reduced the percentage of time spent in open-field central zones; (4) increased immobility time in the open-field; (5) reduced the percentage of time spent in plus-maze open arms exploration; (6) reduced the time spent in social interactions, and (7) increased the levels of serum corticosterone. The behavioral changes reported for cyhalothrin (3.0 mg/kg/day) were similar of those induced by picrotoxin. The no effect level dose obtained for cyhalothrin in this study was 1.0 mg/kg/day. These results provide experimental evidence that cyhalothrin induces anxiety-like symptoms, with this effect being dose-related. Thus, anxiety must be included among the several signs and symptoms of pesticide intoxication

  15. Micellar effect on metal-ligand complexes of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II with citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageswara Rao Gollapalli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical speciation of citric acid complexes of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II was investigated pH-metrically in 0.0-2.5% anionic, cationic and neutral micellar media. The primary alkalimetric data were pruned with SCPHD program. The existence of different binary species was established from modeling studies using the computer program MINIQUAD75. Alkalimetric titrations were carried out in different relative concentrations (M:L:X = 1:2:5, 1:3:5, 1:5:3 of metal (M to citric acid. The selection of best chemical models was based on statistical parameters and residual analysis. The species detected were MLH, ML2, ML2H and ML2H2. The trend in variation of stability constants with change in mole fraction of the medium is explained on the basis of electrostatic and non-electrostatic forces. Distributions of the species with pH at different compositions of micellar media are also presented.

  16. Effect of hepatocyte growth factor and angiotensin II on rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ai-Lan [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Ou, Cai-Wen [The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); He, Zhao-Chu [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Qi-Cai [Experimental Medical Research Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Dong, Qi [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Min-Sheng [Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-10-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The combined effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and Ang II on cardiomyocytes is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the effect of HGF on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and to explore the combined effect of HGF and Ang II on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cardiomyocytes were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and cultured in vitro. Cells were treated with Ang II (1 µM) alone, HGF (10 ng/mL) alone, and Ang II (1 µM) plus HGF (10 ng/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. The amount of [{sup 3}H]-leucine incorporation was then measured to evaluate protein synthesis. The mRNA levels of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic factor were determined by real-time PCR to evaluate the presence of fetal phenotypes of gene expression. The cell size of cardiomyocytes was also studied. Ang II (1 µM) increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Similar to Ang II, treatment with 1 µM HGF promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Moreover, the combination of 1 µM Ang II and 10 ng/mL HGF clearly induced a combined pro-hypertrophy effect on cardiomyocytes. The present study demonstrates for the first time a novel, combined effect of HGF and Ang II in promoting cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  17. Radiation effects on II-VI compound-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Dusi, W; Auricchio, N; Chirco, P; Zanarini, M; Siffert, P; Fougeres, P

    2002-01-01

    The performance of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to a radiation source can be strongly altered by the interaction of the ionizing particles and the material. Up to now, few experimental data are available on the response of II-VI compound detectors to different types of radiation sources. We have carried out a thorough investigation on the effects of gamma-rays, neutrons and electron irradiation both on CdTe : Cl and Cd sub 0 sub . sub 9 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 1 Te detectors. We have studied the detector response after radiation exposure by means of dark current measurements and of quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep traps present in the material have been characterized by means of PICTS (photo-induced current transient spectroscopy) analyses, which allow to determine the trap apparent activation energy and capture cross-section. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation doses has been monitored for all the different types of radiati...

  18. Application of genetic algorithm to land use optimization for non-point source pollution control based on CLUE-S and SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingrui; Liu, Ruimin; Men, Cong; Guo, Lijia

    2018-05-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) was combined with the Conversion of Land Use and its Effect at Small regional extent (CLUE-S) model to obtain an optimized land use pattern for controlling non-point source (NPS) pollution. The performance of the combination was evaluated. The effect of the optimized land use pattern on the NPS pollution control was estimated by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model and an assistant map was drawn to support the land use plan for the future. The Xiangxi River watershed was selected as the study area. Two scenarios were used to simulate the land use change. Under the historical trend scenario (Markov chain prediction), the forest area decreased by 2035.06 ha, and was mainly converted into paddy and dryland area. In contrast, under the optimized scenario (genetic algorithm (GA) prediction), up to 3370 ha of dryland area was converted into forest area. Spatially, the conversion of paddy and dryland into forest occurred mainly in the northwest and southeast of the watershed, where the slope land occupied a large proportion. The organic and inorganic phosphorus loads decreased by 3.6% and 3.7%, respectively, in the optimized scenario compared to those in the historical trend scenario. GA showed a better performance in optimized land use prediction. A comparison of the land use patterns in 2010 under the real situation and in 2020 under the optimized situation showed that Shennongjia and Shuiyuesi should convert 1201.76 ha and 1115.33 ha of dryland into forest areas, respectively, which represented the greatest changes in all regions in the watershed. The results of this study indicated that GA and the CLUE-S model can be used to optimize the land use patterns in the future and that SWAT can be used to evaluate the effect of land use optimization on non-point source pollution control. These methods may provide support for land use plan of an area.

  19. Soil transmitted helminthiasis in different occupational groups in Swat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wali; Nisa, Noorun; Khan, Aly

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of geohelminth parasites in farmers, education concerned and shepherd of Swat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. A total of 1041 stool samples were examined from January 2006 to December 2008 using direct smear (Normal saline and Lugol's Iodine solution) the concentration methods and procedures. Seven hundred and sixty three (73.2%) individuals were found infected with one or more than one geohelminth parasites. Four hundred and eighteen (54.7%) were infected with single parasite and three hundred forty five (45.3%) with multiple infections. Ascaris lumbricoides 460 (53.0%), Trichuris trichura 228 (26.2%), Enterobius vermicularis 123 (14.1%) and Ancylostoma duedenale 56 (6.45%) were detected. The adults were found more parasitized than children and males were more infected than females. Shepherds were found more infected than farmers and education concerned. Although Swat is an area with poor hygiene located in temperate zone near the border of Afghanistan and China. The prevalence of reported geohelminth parasites here compared with the same studies is unexpectedly high. These types of studies should continue time to time to know the hazardous of such parasitic infections for the betterment of the human health.

  20. Small hydropower spot prediction using SWAT and a diversion algorithm, case study: Upper Citarum Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardhana, Hadi; Arya, Doni Khaira; Hadihardaja, Iwan K.; Widyaningtyas, Riawan, Edi; Lubis, Atika

    2017-11-01

    Small-Scale Hydropower (SHP) had been important electric energy power source in Indonesia. Indonesia is vast countries, consists of more than 17.000 islands. It has large fresh water resource about 3 m of rainfall and 2 m of runoff. Much of its topography is mountainous, remote but abundant with potential energy. Millions of people do not have sufficient access to electricity, some live in the remote places. Recently, SHP development was encouraged for energy supply of the places. Development of global hydrology data provides opportunity to predict distribution of hydropower potential. In this paper, we demonstrate run-of-river type SHP spot prediction tool using SWAT and a river diversion algorithm. The use of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) with input of CFSR (Climate Forecast System Re-analysis) of 10 years period had been implemented to predict spatially distributed flow cumulative distribution function (CDF). A simple algorithm to maximize potential head of a location by a river diversion expressing head race and penstock had been applied. Firm flow and power of the SHP were estimated from the CDF and the algorithm. The tool applied to Upper Citarum River Basin and three out of four existing hydropower locations had been well predicted. The result implies that this tool is able to support acceleration of SHP development at earlier phase.

  1. Development of Web-Based RECESS Model for Estimating Baseflow Using SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwanjae Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater has received increasing attention as an important strategic water resource for adaptation to climate change. In this regard, the separation of baseflow from streamflow and the analysis of recession curves make a significant contribution to integrated river basin management. The United States Geological Survey (USGS RECESS model adopting the master-recession curve (MRC method can enhance the accuracy with which baseflow may be separated from streamflow, compared to other baseflow-separation schemes that are more limited in their ability to reflect various watershed/aquifer characteristics. The RECESS model has been widely used for the analysis of hydrographs, but the applications using RECESS were only available through Microsoft-Disk Operating System (MS-DOS. Thus, this study aims to develop a web-based RECESS model for easy separation of baseflow from streamflow, with easy applications for ungauged regions. RECESS on the web derived the alpha factor, which is a baseflow recession constant in the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, and this variable was provided to SWAT as the input. The results showed that the alpha factor estimated from the web-based RECESS model improved the predictions of streamflow and recession. Furthermore, these findings showed that the baseflow characteristics of the ungauged watersheds were influenced by the land use and slope angle of watersheds, as well as by precipitation and streamflow.

  2. Evaluation of the applicability of the SWAT model in an arid piedmont plain oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Li, Changyou; Zhang, Chengfu; Shi, Xiaohong; Bourque, Charles P-A; Zhao, Shengnan

    2016-01-01

    Hetao Oasis is located in a typical piedmont alluvial plain bounded by the Langshan Mountain Range in the north, desert in the west, and the Yellow River in the south. Agricultural activities within the oasis significantly impact the hydrological cycle and water quality in downstream locations. The research uses the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for a piedmont plain by defining the watershed boundary as coinciding with the natural mountain ridge, the border between the oasis and the desert, and the Yellow River. The model simulates water discharge with coefficient of determination and a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency of 0.78 and 0.62 during model calibration, and 0.75 and 0.69 during model validation, suggesting that delineation of the watershed as carried out in this research is suitable for piedmont plain topography. From the results, the mountains contribute 28.4% to the water discharge at the outlet of the watershed, and water-use efficiency of irrigated water is about 40%, which is consistent with field-based measurements. Methodologies used in delineating watershed boundaries and parameterizing SWAT provide a solid foundation for water balance studies in other regions of the world with similar topography.

  3. Modification of SWAT model for simulation of organic matter in Korean watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Ho; Jung, Kwang-Wook; Gyeong Yoon, Chun

    2012-01-01

    The focus of water quality modeling of Korean streams needs to be shifted from dissolved oxygen to algae or organic matter. In particular, the structure of water quality models should be modified to simulate the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), which is a key factor in calculating total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) in Korea, using 5-day BOD determined in the laboratory (Bottle BOD(5)). Considering the limitations in simulating organic matter under domestic conditions, we attempted to model total organic carbon (TOC) as well as BOD by using a watershed model. For this purpose, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was modified and extended to achieve better correspondence between the measured and simulated BOD and TOC concentrations. For simulated BOD in the period 2004-2008, the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient increased from a value of -2.54 to 0.61. Another indicator of organic matter, namely, the simulated TOC concentration showed that the modified SWAT adequately reflected the observed values. The improved model can be used to predict organic matter and hence, may be a potential decision-making tool for TMDLs. However, it needs further testing for longer simulation periods and other catchments.

  4. Applicability of the SWAT model for hydrologic simulation in Paraopeba river basin, MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fonseca Durães

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The SWAT model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool was applied for simulating the hydrologic pattern of Paraopeba river basin, in Minas Gerais state, under different land use and occupation scenarios, looking to support basin management actions. The model parameters were calibrated and validated, with respect to the data observed from 1983 to 2005. The basin was assessed at the ‘Porto do Mesquita’ gauging station and change in land use and occupation was based on the annual growth scenarios proposed in the partial report of Paraopeba basin’s master plan. The model was found to be highly sensitive to baseflow, its main calibration variable. Statistical analyses produced a Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient above 0.75, which is considered good and acceptable. The SWAT model provided satisfactory results in simulating hydrologic pattern under different scenarios of land use change, demonstrating that it can be applied for forecasting discharge in the aforesaid basin. The current land use scenario provided a peak discharge simulation of 1250 m³ s-1, while in years 2019 and 2029 peak discharge simulations were 1190 m³ s-1 and 1230 m³ s-1 respectively. The 2019 scenario provided the best results with respect to baseflow increase and peak discharge reduction.

  5. Historical Streamflow Series Analysis Applied to Furnas HPP Reservoir Watershed Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane de Souza Dias

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the operation of the Furnas Hydropower Plant (HPP reservoir, located in the Grande River Basin, has been threatened due to a significant reduction in inflow. In the region, hydrological modelling tools are being used and tested to support decision making and water sustainability. In this study, the streamflow was modelled in the area of direct influence of the Furnas HPP reservoir, and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model performance was verified for studies in the region. Analyses of sensitivity and uncertainty were undertaken using the Sequential Uncertainty Fitting algorithm (SUFI-2 with a Calibration Uncertainty Program (SWAT-CUP. The hydrological modelling, at a monthly scale, presented good results in the calibration (NS 0.86, with a slight reduction of the coefficient in the validation period (NS 0.64. The results suggested that this tool could be applied in future hydrological studies in the region of study. With the consideration that special attention should be given to the historical series used in the calibration and validation of the models. It is important to note that this region has high demands for water resources, primarily for agricultural use. Water demands must also be taken into account in future hydrological simulations. The validation of this methodology led to important contributions to the management of water resources in regions with tropical climates, whose climatological and geological reality resembles the one studied here.

  6. Estimation of PWR spent fuel composition using SCALE and SWAT code systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kenya, Suyama; Hiroshi, Okuno [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    The isotopic composition calculations were performed for 26 spent fuel samples from Obrigheim PWR reactor and 55 spent fuel samples from 7 PWR reactors using SCALE4.4 SAS2H with 27, 44 and 238 group cross-section libraries and SWAT with 107 group cross-section library. For convenience, the ratio of the measured to calculated value was used as a parameter. The four kinds of the calculation results were compared with the measured data. For many important nuclides for burnup credit criticality safety evaluation, the four methods applied in this study showed good coincidence with measurements in general. More precise observations showed the following results. Less unity ratios were found for Pu-239 and -241 for selected 16 samples out of the 26 samples from Obrigheim reactor. Larger than unity ratios were found for Am-241 for both the 16 and 55 samples. Larger than unity ratios were found for Sm-149 for the 55 samples. In the case of 26 sample SWAT was generally accompanied by larger ratios than those of SAS2H with some exceptions. Based on the measured-to-calculated ratios for 71 samples of a combined set in which 16 selected samples and 55 samples were included, the correction factors that should be multiplied to the calculated isotopic compositions were generated for a conservative estimate of the neutron multiplication factor of a system containing PWR spent fuel, taking burnup credit into account.

  7. DEM Resolution Impact on the Estimation of the Physical Characteristics of Watersheds by Using SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waranyu Buakhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A digital elevation model (DEM is an important spatial input for automatic extraction of topographic parameters for the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of DEM resolution (from 5 to 90 m on the delineation process of a SWAT model with two types of watershed characteristics (flat area and mountain area and three sizes of watershed area (about 20,000, 200,000, and 1,500,000 hectares. The results showed that the total lengths of the streamline, main channel slope, watershed area, and area slope were significantly different when using the DEM datasets to delineate. Delineation using the SRTM DEM (90 m, ASTER DEM (30 m, and LDD DEM (5 m for all watershed characteristics showed that the watershed sizes and shapes obtained were only slightly different, whereas the area slopes obtained were significantly different. The total lengths of the generated streams increased when the resolution of the DEM used was higher. The stream slopes obtained using the small area sizes were insignificant, whereas the slopes obtained using the large area sizes were significantly different. This suggests that water resource model users should use the ASTER DEM as opposed to a finer resolution DEM for model input to save time for the model calibration and validation.

  8. Onions in the farming systems of the Swat Valley, Northern Pakistan : Implications for research and extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defoer, T.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Onion cultivation in Swat Valley, Northern Pakistan, is increasingly becoming important, replacing wheat in the Rabi (winter season. The area increased from 1000 ha in 1986 to 3000 ha in 1991. Due to its relatively recent importance as a cash crop, information on : (1 management practices, (2 factors determining yields, and (3 the economics of onion cultivation, was hardly available. A diagnostic study organized in 1991 addresses these issues. Its results indicate that onion yields and the economics of onion cultivation are significantly affected by : (1 high seed rates in nurseries, (2 use of poorly drained basin type nurseries, (3 late transplanting, (4 high weed infestation in onion fields, and (5 early harvesting. Despite the 67 % higher input costs, induced by seed rates 20 times higher as usually recommended, onion cultivation in Swat Valley is attractive. Net benefits amount to approximately Rs. 45000 (1800 US$ per ha or 2 times as high as the net benefits per ha of wheat cultivation.

  9. Quantification of spatial temporal variability of snow cover and hydro-climatic variables based on multi-source remote sensing data in the Swat watershed, Hindukush Mountains, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Muhammad Naveed; Ding, Yongjian; Shangguan, Donghui; Liu, Junguo; Ahmad, Ijaz; Ijaz, Muhammad Wajid; Khan, Muhammad Imran

    2018-02-01

    The northern part of Hindukush Mountains has a perplexing environment due to the influence of adjacent mountains of Himalaya, Karakoram, and Tibetan Plateau. Although reliable evidences of climate change are available; however, a clear knowledge of snow cover dynamics in the context of climate change is missing for this region. In this study, we used various remotely sensed (TRMM precipitation product, while MODIS temperature and snow cover products) and gauge-based datasets to quantify the spatiotemporal variability of climatic variables and their turn effects over the snow cover area (SCA) and river discharge in the Swat watershed, northern Hindukush Mountains, Pakistan. The Mann-Kendall method and Sen's slope estimator were used to estimate the trends in SCA and hydro-climatic variables, at 5% significant level (P = 0.05). Results show that the winter and springs temperatures have increased (at the rate of 0.079 and 0.059 °C year-1, respectively), while decreasing in the summer and autumn (at the rate of 0.049 and 0.070 °C year-1, respectively). Basin-wide increasing tendency of precipitation was identified with a highest increasing rate of 3.563 mm year-1 in the spring season. A decreasing trend in the winter SCA (at the rate of -0.275% year-1) and increasing trends in other seasons were identified. An increasing tendency of river discharge on annual and seasonal scales was also witnessed. The seasonal variations in discharge showed significant positive and negative relationships with temperature and SCA, respectively. We conclude that the future variations in the temperature and SCA in the higher altitudes of the Swat watershed could substantially affect the seasonality of the river discharge. Moreover, it implies that the effect of ongoing global warming on the SCA in the snowmelt-dominated river basins needs to be considered for sustainable regional planning and management of water resources, hydropower production, and downstream irrigation scheduling.

  10. Assessment of terrain slope influence in SWAT modeling of Andean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, C.; Pérez-Foguet, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrological processes in the Andean Region are difficult to model. Large range of altitudes involved (from over 4000 meters above sea level, masl, to zero) indicates the high variability of rainfall, temperature and other climate variables. Strong runoff and extreme events as landslides and floods are the consequence of high slopes of terrain, especially in the upper part of the basins. Strong seasonality of rain and complex ecosystems (vulnerable to climate changes and anthropogenic activities) helps these processes. Present study focuses in a particular watershed from Peruvian Andes, the Jequetepeque River. The distributed watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is applied to model run-off and sediments transport through the basin with data from 1997 to 2006. Specifically, the study focuses in the assessment of the influence of considering terrain slope variation in the definition of Hydrographical Response Units within SWAT. The Jequetepeque watershed (4 372.5 km2) is located in the north part of Peru. River flows east to west, to the Pacific Ocean. Annual average precipitation ranges from 0 to 1100 mm and altitude from 0 to 4188 masl. The "Gallito Ciego" reservoir (400 masl) separates upper-middle part from lower part of the watershed. It stores water for supplying the people from the big cities on the coast and for extensive agriculture uses. Upper-middle part of the watershed covers 3564.8 km2. It ranges from 400 to 4188 masl in no more that 80 km, with slopes up to 20%. Main activities are agricultural and livestock and mining and about 80% of the population are rural. Annual mean temperature drops from 25.4 °C at the reservoir to less than 4 °C in the upper part. Also the highest rainfall variability is found in the upper-middle part of the watershed. Erosion produced by extreme events like 1997/98 "el Niño" Phenomenon is silting the reservoir faster than expected. Moreover, anthropogenic activities like agriculture and

  11. Modeling of discharge and sediment transport through the SWAT model in the basin of Harraza (Northwest of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Hallouz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to model discharge and solid erosion quantification through a small agricultural watershed by applying the SWAT model (Soil and Water Assessment Tools on the Wadi Harraza’s basin of which is part of Wadi Cheliff’s basin, with an average altitude of 500 m, drains an area of 568 sq km. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, version 2009 model integrated with Geographic Information System (ArcGIS, version 10.0 were used to simulate the discharge and sediment concentration of Wadi Harraza’s basin for the period from 2004 to 2009. Model calibration and validation were performed for monthly time periods using Sequential Uncertainty Fitting 2 (SUFI-2, version 2 within SWAT-CUP. Our calibration and validation outputs for monthly simulation showed a good model performance for discharges. Thus the evolution of the average total annual sediment in the Wadi Harraza’s basin which will be deposited in the Wadi Cheliff, is estimated at 54.24 t ha−1. Keywords: SWAT model, Basin, Wadi Harraza, SUFI-2, Discharges, Sediment

  12. PATHOGEN TRANSPORT AND FATE MODELING IN THE UPPER SALEM RIVER WATERSHED USING SWAT MODEL - PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simulation of the fate and transport of pathogen contamination was conducted with SWAT for the Upper Salem River Watershed, located in Salem County, New Jersey. This watershed is 37 km2 and land uses are predominantly agricultural. The watershed drains to a 32 km str...

  13. Assessment of Riparian Buffer Impacts Within the Little River Watershed in Georgia USA with the SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer based hydrologic and water quality models have proven to be useful tools for examining alternative management scenarios and their impact on the environment. This examination can be an important component of watershed-scale evaluations. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), is a water...

  14. The Impacts of Different Meteorology Data Sets on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the SWAT Watershed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated how different meteorology data sets impacts nitrogen fate and transport responses in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We used two meteorology data sets: National Climatic Data Center (observed) and Mesoscale Model 5/Weather Research ...

  15. Macrophyte growth module for the SWAT model – impact of climate change and management on stream ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Shenglan; Trolle, Dennis; Erfurt, Jytte

    To access how multiple stressors affect the water quantity and quality and stream ecology at catchment scale under various management and climate change scenarios, we implemented macrophyte growth modules for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool version 2012 (SWAT). The macrophyte growth module...

  16. Development of a station based climate database for SWAT and APEX assessments in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality simulation models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Agricultural Policy EXtender (APEX) are widely used in the U.S. These models require large amounts of spatial and tabular data to simulate the natural world. Accurate and seamless daily climatic data are critical...

  17. Effects of angiotensin II and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption in the rat proximal tubule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatsudthipong, V.; Chan, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    Microperfusion of proximal convoluted tubule(PCT) and peritubular capillaries was performed to examine the effects of angiotensin II(Ang II) and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption. Bicarbonate was determined by microcalorimetry and C-14 inulin was used as a volume marker. The rates of bicarbonate absorption (JHCO 3 ) was 143 peq/min x mm and fluid absorption(Jv) was 2.70 nl/min x mm, when PCT and capillary perfusate contained normal Ringer solution. Addition of Ang II (10 -6 M) to the capillary perfusate caused reductions of JHCO 3 and Jv by 35%. A similar effect was observed when ionomycin was added to the capillary perfusate. Ang II antagonist, (Sar 1 , Ile 8 )-Angiotensin II(10 -6 M), completely blocked the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO 3 . Removal of calcium from both luminal and capillary perfusate did not change the effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO 3 . Our results indicate that Ang II inhibits the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the proximal tubule via interacting with angiotensin receptor. The mechanism of Ang II action may involve mobilization of intracellular calcium

  18. Modeling Fate and Transport of Fecal Coliform Bacteria Using SWAT 2005 (Case Study: Jajrood River Watershed, Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrebi, M.; Tajrishy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Jajrood River watershed is one of the main drinking water resources of the capital city of Tehran, Iran. In addition it has been available as many recreational usages especially in the warm months. As a result of being located near one of the crowded cities of the world, a variety of microbial pollutions is commonly perceived in the Jajrood River. Among them, there are strong concerns about fecal coliform bacteria concentration. This article aimed to model fate and transport of fecal coliform bacteria in Jajrood River watershed using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model version 2005. Potential pollutant sources in the study area were detected and quantified for modeling purposes. In spite of being lack of knowledge about bacteria die-off rate in small river bodies, as well as in other watershed-based forms, fecal coliform bacteria die-off rates were estimated using both laboratory and field data investigations with some simplifications. The SWAT model was calibrated over an extended time period (1997-2002) for this watershed. The river flow calibrated using SUFI-2 software and resulted in a very good outputs (R2=0.82, E=0.81). Furthermore SWAT model was validated over January 2003 to September 2005 in the study area and has resulted in good outputs (R2=0.61, E=0.57). This research illustrates SWAT 2005 capability to model fecal coliform bacteria in a populated watershed, and deals with most of watershed microbial pollution sources that are usually observed in developing countries. Fecal coliform concentration simulation results were mostly in the same order in comparison with real data. However, Differences were judged to be related to lack of input data. In this article different aspects of SWAT capabilities for modeling of fecal coliform bacteria concentration will be reviewed and it will present new insights in bacteria modeling procedures especially for mountainous, high populated and small sized watersheds.

  19. Hall-effect electric fields in semiconducting rings. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodzha, L.V.; Emets, Yu.P.; Stril'ko, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    A calculation is presented for the current density distribution in a semiconducting ring with two electrodes symmetrically located on the outer boundary (system II, Fig. 1). The difference between this electrode position and that on the ring considered previously (system I) leads to substantial changes in the shape of the electric field

  20. Temporal diagnostic analysis of the SWAT model to detect dominant periods of poor model performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Björn; Reusser, Dominik E.; Fohrer, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Hydrological models generally include thresholds and non-linearities, such as snow-rain-temperature thresholds, non-linear reservoirs, infiltration thresholds and the like. When relating observed variables to modelling results, formal methods often calculate performance metrics over long periods, reporting model performance with only few numbers. Such approaches are not well suited to compare dominating processes between reality and model and to better understand when thresholds and non-linearities are driving model results. We present a combination of two temporally resolved model diagnostic tools to answer when a model is performing (not so) well and what the dominant processes are during these periods. We look at the temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivities and model performance to answer this question. For this, the eco-hydrological SWAT model is applied in the Treene lowland catchment in Northern Germany. As a first step, temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivities are analyzed using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity test (FAST). The sensitivities of the eight model parameters investigated show strong temporal variations. High sensitivities were detected for two groundwater (GW_DELAY, ALPHA_BF) and one evaporation parameters (ESCO) most of the time. The periods of high parameter sensitivity can be related to different phases of the hydrograph with dominances of the groundwater parameters in the recession phases and of ESCO in baseflow and resaturation periods. Surface runoff parameters show high parameter sensitivities in phases of a precipitation event in combination with high soil water contents. The dominant parameters give indication for the controlling processes during a given period for the hydrological catchment. The second step included the temporal analysis of model performance. For each time step, model performance was characterized with a "finger print" consisting of a large set of performance measures. These finger prints were clustered into

  1. Impacts of Irrigation Practices on Groundwater Recharge in Mississippi Delta Using coupled SWAT-MODFLOW Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Feng, G.; Han, M.; Jenkins, J.; Ouyang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Lower Mississippi River alluvial plain (refers to as MS Delta), located in the northwest state of Mississippi, is one of the most productive agricultural region in the U.S. The primary crops grown in this region are soybean, corn, cotton, and rice. Approximately 80% water from the alluvial aquifer in MS Delta are withdrawn for irrigation, which makes it the most used aquifer in the State. As a result, groundwater level has declined > 6 m since 1970, which threaten the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in this region. The objectives of this study were to: 1) couple the SWAT and MODFLOW then calibrate and validate the incorporated model outputs for stream flow, groundwater level and evapotranspiration (ET) in MS Delta; 2) simulate the groundwater recharge as affected by a) conventional irrigation scheme, b) no irrigation scheme, c) ET based and soil moisture based full irrigation schedules using all groundwater, and d) ET and soil moisture based full irrigation schedule using different percentages of surface and ground water. Results indicated that the coupled model performed well during the calibration and validation for daily stream flow at three USGS gauge stations. (R2=0.7; Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) varied from 0.6 to 0.7; Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) ranged from 20 to 27 m3/s). The values of determination coefficient R2 for groundwater level were 0.95 for calibration and 0.88 for validation, their NSE values were 0.99 and 0.93, respectively. The values of RMSE for groundwater level during the calibration and validation period were 0.51 and 0.59 m. The values of R2, NSE and RMSE between SWAT-MODFLOW simulated actual evapotranspiration (ET) and remote sensing evapotranspiration (ET) were 0.52, 0.51 and 28.1 mm. The simulated total average monthly groundwater recharge had lower values of 19 mm/month in the crop season than 30 mm/month in the crop off-growing season. The SWAT-MODFLOW can be a useful tool for not only simulating the recharge in MS

  2. Developing Land Use Land Cover Maps for the Lower Mekong Basin to Aid SWAT Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, J.; Bolten, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation discusses research to develop Land Use Land Cover (LULC) maps for the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB). Funded by a NASA ROSES Disasters grant, the main objective was to produce updated LULC maps to aid the Mekong River Commission's (MRC's) Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrologic model. In producing needed LULC maps, temporally processed MODIS monthly NDVI data for 2010 were used as the primary data source for classifying regionally prominent forest and agricultural types. The MODIS NDVI data was derived from processing MOD09 and MYD09 8-day reflectance data with the Time Series Product Tool, a custom software package. Circa 2010 Landsat multispectral data from the dry season were processed into top of atmosphere reflectance mosaics and then classified to derive certain locally common LULC types, such as urban areas and industrial forest plantations. Unsupervised ISODATA clustering was used to derive most LULC classifications. GIS techniques were used to merge MODIS and Landsat classifications into final LULC maps for Sub-Basins (SBs) 1-8 of the LMB. The final LULC maps were produced at 250-meter resolution and delivered to the MRC for use in SWAT modeling for the LMB. A map accuracy assessment was performed for the SB 7 LULC map with 14 classes. This assessment was performed by comparing random locations for sampled LULC types to geospatial reference data such as Landsat RGBs, MODIS NDVI phenologic profiles, high resolution satellite data from Google Map/Earth, and other reference data from the MRC (e.g., crop calendars). LULC accuracy assessment results for SB 7 indicated an overall agreement to reference data of 81% at full scheme specificity. However, by grouping 3 deciduous forest classes into 1 class, the overall agreement improved to 87%. The project enabled updated LULC maps, plus more specific rice types were classified compared to the previous LULC maps. The LULC maps from this project should improve the use of SWAT for modeling

  3. Angiotensin II induced catabolic effect and muscle atrophy are redox dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Yoshida, Tadashi; Rezk, Bashir M.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Vaughn, Charlotte; Tabony, A. Michael; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) causes skeletal muscle wasting via an increase in muscle catabolism. To determine whether the wasting effects of Ang II were related to its ability to increase NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) we infused wild-type C57BL/6J or p47phox−/− mice with vehicle or Ang II for 7 days. Superoxide production was increased 2.4 fold in the skeletal muscle of Ang II infused mice, and this increase was prevented in p47phox−/− mice. Apocynin treatment prevented Ang II-induced superoxide production in skeletal muscle, consistent with Ang II increasing NADPH oxidase derived ROS. Ang II induced loss of body and skeletal muscle weight in C57BL/6J mice, whereas the reduction was significantly attenuated in p47phox−/− animals. The reduction of skeletal muscle weight caused by Ang II was associated with an increase of proteasome activity, and this increase was completely prevented in the skeletal muscle of p47phox−/− mice. In conclusion, Ang II-induced skeletal muscle wasting is in part dependent on NADPH oxidase derived ROS. PMID:21570954

  4. Effects of Computer-Assisted Jigsaw II Cooperative Learning Strategy on Physics Achievement and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Isiaka Amosa; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted Jigsaw II cooperative strategy on physics achievement and retention. The study also determined how moderating variables of achievement levels as it affects students' performance in physics when Jigsaw II cooperative learning is used as an instructional strategy. Purposive sampling technique…

  5. Maxillary first molar extraction in Class II malocclusion : Follow-up studies on treatment effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos

    2015-01-01

    This PhD research investigated treatment effects of extraction of one and two maxillary first molars in Class II subdivision and Class II/1 malocclusion cases respectively from a longer time perspective. Private practice records were scrutinized to evaluate aspects of a treatment technique combining

  6. The effectiveness of different polymerization protocols for class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.C.G. de; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Geitenbeek, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of reduced light exposure times on Vickers hardness (VH) of class II composite resin restorations. METHODS: Class II restorations were made in vitro in three 2mm thick increments in a human molar. Two composite resins (Clearfil AP-X; Esthet-X) were polymerized

  7. The assessment of land use change impact on watersheds runoff using SWAT: case study of Urmia Lake in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Anahita; Jarihani, Ben; Rezaie, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, long counted among the world's largest saltwater lakes, contains only 5% of the amount of water it did just 20 years ago. The decline is generally blamed on a combination of drought, increased water diversion for irrigated agriculture within the lake's watershed and land use mismanagement. It has been believed that land use changes in Lake Urmia basin is one of the most important factors in shrinkage of Urmia Lake in recent decades. Transforming the traditional agricultural practices (i.e., wheat) to the more water consuming practices (i.e., apple orchards) is one of the most important reasons increased agricultural water consumption in the watershed. In this study we assessed the effect of the land use changes of watershed in hydrological runoff processing in the Nazloo chai watershed, one of the most important river basins of the Urmia Lake basin. Actually the rapid and at the same time unreasonable transformations of land use in farm lands of Urmia lake sub basins, extremely has been raised the amount of blue water (surface or groundwater) consumption in watershed which leads to dramatic decrement of watershed runoff amounts. One of the most unfavorable consequences of land use change was changing the blue and green (rainwater insofar as it does not become runoff) water usage patterns in watershed, in addition to water use increment. The soil and water assessment tool (SWAT), one of the most important and reliable models which was used to model the rainfall runoff, has been used in current study. The land use maps were extracted from Landsat images archives for the most severe turning points in respect of land use change in the recent 30 years. After calibrating the model, several land use patterns of historical data were used in the model to produce the runoff. The results showed the strong relation between land use change and runoff reduction in the Lake Urmia basin.

  8. Prevalence and morphology of helminth parasites of fish from river swat, khyber pakhtunkhwa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Ayaz, S.; Shams, S.

    2014-01-01

    A study of the helminth parasites of fish of river swat was conducted from September, 2012 to August, 2013. A total of 250 fish belonging to five genera and six species were examined. The parasites collected were diplozoon khyberensis, bathybothrium rectangulum, bothriocephalus, nippotaenia, cucullanidae, proteocephalus, rhabdochona charsaddiensis, rhabdochona schizothoracis and neoechynorhynchus devdevi. They were indentified by morphological characteristics through microscopic techniques. Overall prevalence of the fish parasites was 58% (145/250. Among these schizothorax plageostomus fish 93.04% |(107/115), schizothorax labiatus 61.11% (33/54), salmo trutta fario 17.85% (05/28), Gara gotyla 0% (0/09), rita rita 0% (0/25) and oncorhynchus mykiss were 0% |(0/19). The intensity of the parasite varied from 1% to 9.2%. Among them high intensity was noted in rhabdochona schizothoracis (9.2%) and schizothorax labiatus. (author)

  9. Assessment of NASA's Physiographic and Meteorological Datasets as Input to HSPF and SWAT Hydrological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacron, Vladimir J.; Nigro, Joseph D.; McAnally, William H.; OHara, Charles G.; Engman, Edwin Ted; Toll, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents the use of simulated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer land use/land cover (MODIS-LULC), NASA-LIS generated precipitation and evapo-transpiration (ET), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) datasets (in conjunction with standard land use, topographical and meteorological datasets) as input to hydrological models routinely used by the watershed hydrology modeling community. The study is focused in coastal watersheds in the Mississippi Gulf Coast although one of the test cases focuses in an inland watershed located in northeastern State of Mississippi, USA. The decision support tools (DSTs) into which the NASA datasets were assimilated were the Soil Water & Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF). These DSTs are endorsed by several US government agencies (EPA, FEMA, USGS) for water resources management strategies. These models use physiographic and meteorological data extensively. Precipitation gages and USGS gage stations in the region were used to calibrate several HSPF and SWAT model applications. Land use and topographical datasets were swapped to assess model output sensitivities. NASA-LIS meteorological data were introduced in the calibrated model applications for simulation of watershed hydrology for a time period in which no weather data were available (1997-2006). The performance of the NASA datasets in the context of hydrological modeling was assessed through comparison of measured and model-simulated hydrographs. Overall, NASA datasets were as useful as standard land use, topographical , and meteorological datasets. Moreover, NASA datasets were used for performing analyses that the standard datasets could not made possible, e.g., introduction of land use dynamics into hydrological simulations

  10. Phytoecological evaluation with detail floristic appraisal of the vegetation arround Malam Jabba, Swat, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Abdur; Swati, Mohammad Farooq; Sher, Hassan; Al-Yemeni, Mohammad N

    2011-12-01

    To determine the present status of plant communities and their possible association with the habitat in Malam Jabba, Swat, Pakistan. A study on the phytoecology was conducted in various ecologically important sites of Malam Jabba, Swat, Pakistan from 2002 to 2004. The altitude of these sites ranged from 1 200 m to 3 200 m. Quadrat method was used for evaluation of plants communities and the data on these attributes was converted to relative values. The plant communities were named after 3 leading species with highest importance values. Biological spectrum of the flora based on the life form was prepared by following Raunkiar's life form classes. The floristic composition and structure of the study area were found to be 200 species belonging to 75 families. Asteraceae, Lamiaceae and Poaceae were important families in the study area. The biological spectrum showed that therophytic and hemicrytophytic life form and micro-nonophyllous leaf sizes were dominant in the area. The air and soil temperatures were decreasing with increasing elevation. Both the air and soil temperatures were relatively higher in south slopes than on the northeast slopes. The vegetation analysis of the area indicated eleven plant communities around the area. The present vegetation is the relics of moist temperate coniferous forest in the area. The communities reflect highly deteriorated conditions. Both the structure and composition of the surrounding vegetation were associated with the types of habitats. The conservation of the remaining populations of the reported communities will be best achieved by proper time of sustainable harvesting. It is only possible with the participation of local communities.

  11. Investigation of solution chemistry effects on sorption behavior of radionuclide 64Cu(II) on illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitong Yang; Guodong Sheng; Zhiqiang Guo; Yubing Sun; Donglin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of various environmental factors such as contact time, pH, ionic strength, coexisting electrolyte ions, humic substances and temperature on the sorption behavior of illite towards 64 Cu(II). The results indicated that 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite achieved equilibrium quickly. The pH- and ionic strength-dependent sorption suggested that 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite was dominated by ion exchange or outer-sphere surface complexation at pH 7. A positive effect of humic substances on 64 Cu(II) sorption was found at pH 6.5. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of 64 Cu(II) at three different temperatures of 293, 313, and 333 K. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , and ΔG 0 ) of 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite were calculated from the temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results indicated that the sorption of 64 Cu(II) on illite was endothermic and spontaneous. From the experimental results, it is possible to conclude that illite has good potentialities for cost-effective treatments of 64 Cu(II)-contaminated wastewaters. (author)

  12. Effect of Demand-Driven advisory services components of Fadama II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Demand-Driven advisory services components of Fadama II on fish farmers' level of ... Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences ... In conclusion, provision of subsidized advisory services to fish farmers will help to boost ...

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II on 1- Methyl-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research July 2015; 14 (7): 1191-1197 ... Abstract. Purpose: To evaluate the receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF- ... catecholamines, reduces levels of dopamine and.

  14. The Effect of World War II on Women in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anne M.

    The field of engineering has been one of the most difficult for women to enter. Even with an increase in the proportion of women in the engineering workforce from 0.3% before the 1970s to 9.5% in 1999, women are still seriously underrepresented. This article examines the history of women in engineering in the United States during World War II. Women were actively recruited as engineering aides by the federal government, which saw them as a temporary substitute for men who were in the military. Yet this crisis did not break down the barriers to and prejudices against women in engineering, nor did it give them a real opportunity to become professional engineers equal to men. After the war, calls for a return to normalcy were used to reestablish social norms, which kept women at home and reserved desirable places in the workforce, including in engineering, for men.

  15. A Comparison of SWAT and ANN Models for Daily Runoff Simulation in Different Climatic Zones of Peninsular Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Jimeno-Sáez; Javier Senent-Aparicio; Julio Pérez-Sánchez; David Pulido-Velazquez

    2018-01-01

    Streamflow data are of prime importance to water-resources planning and management, and the accuracy of their estimation is very important for decision making. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models have been evaluated and compared to find a method to improve streamflow estimation. For a more complete evaluation, the accuracy and ability of these streamflow estimation models was also established separately based on their performance during differe...

  16. Evaluation of precipitation input for SWAT modeling in Alpine catchment: A case study in the Adige river basin (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Ye; Duan, Zheng; Disse, Markus; Chiogna, Gabriele

    2016-12-15

    Precipitation is often the most important input data in hydrological models when simulating streamflow. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a widely used hydrological model, only makes use of data from one precipitation gauge station that is nearest to the centroid of each subbasin, which is eventually corrected using the elevation band method. This leads in general to inaccurate representation of subbasin precipitation input data, particularly in catchments with complex topography. To investigate the impact of different precipitation inputs on the SWAT model simulations in Alpine catchments, 13years (1998-2010) of daily precipitation data from four datasets including OP (Observed precipitation), IDW (Inverse Distance Weighting data), CHIRPS (Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station data) and TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) has been considered. Both model performances (comparing simulated and measured streamflow data at the catchment outlet) as well as parameter and prediction uncertainties have been quantified. For all three subbasins, the use of elevation bands is fundamental to match the water budget. Streamflow predictions obtained using IDW inputs are better than those obtained using the other datasets in terms of both model performance and prediction uncertainty. Models using the CHIRPS product as input provide satisfactory streamflow estimation, suggesting that this satellite product can be applied to this data-scarce Alpine region. Comparing the performance of SWAT models using different precipitation datasets is therefore important in data-scarce regions. This study has shown that, precipitation is the main source of uncertainty, and different precipitation datasets in SWAT models lead to different best estimate ranges for the calibrated parameters. This has important implications for the interpretation of the simulated hydrological processes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Outline of sodium-water reaction test in case of large leak with SWAT-3 testing equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Minoru

    1978-01-01

    The key component in sodium-cooled fast reactors in steam generators, and the sodium-water reaction owing to the break of heating tubes may cause serious damages in equipments and pipings. The main factor controlling this phenomenon is the rate of leak of water. When the rate of water leak is small, the propagation of heating tube breaking may occur owing to ''wastage phenomenon'', on the other hand, when the rate of water leak is large, the phenomena of explosive pressure and flow occur due to the reaction heat and a large quantity of hydrogen generated by the reaction. In PNC, the testing equipments of SWAT-2 for small water leak and SWAT-1 for large leak were constructed, and the development test has been carried out to establish the method of safety design experimentally. The synthetic test equipment for the safety of steam generators, SWAT-3, was constructed to carry out the large water leak test in the scale close to actual plants. The object of the test, the outline of the test equipment, the phenomena of pressure and flow in the water injection test, the confirmation of the occurrence of secondary breaking of adjacent heating tubes, and the disposal of reaction products are described in this paper. This test is till going on, and the final conclusion will be reported later. (Kako, I.)

  18. A Comparison of SWAT and ANN Models for Daily Runoff Simulation in Different Climatic Zones of Peninsular Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jimeno-Sáez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Streamflow data are of prime importance to water-resources planning and management, and the accuracy of their estimation is very important for decision making. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and Artificial Neural Network (ANN models have been evaluated and compared to find a method to improve streamflow estimation. For a more complete evaluation, the accuracy and ability of these streamflow estimation models was also established separately based on their performance during different periods of flows using regional flow duration curves (FDCs. Specifically, the FDCs were divided into five sectors: very low, low, medium, high and very high flow. This segmentation of flow allows analysis of the model performance for every important discharge event precisely. In this study, the models were applied in two catchments in Peninsular Spain with contrasting climatic conditions: Atlantic and Mediterranean climates. The results indicate that SWAT and ANNs were generally good tools in daily streamflow modelling. However, SWAT was found to be more successful in relation to better simulation of lower flows, while ANNs were superior at estimating higher flows in all cases.

  19. Application of SWAT99.2 to sensitivity analysis of water balance components in unique plots in a hilly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-feng Dai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although many sensitivity analyses using the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT in a complex watershed have been conducted, little attention has been paid to the application potential of the model in unique plots. In addition, sensitivity analysis of percolation and evapotranspiration with SWAT has seldom been undertaken. In this study, SWAT99.2 was calibrated to simulate water balance components for unique plots in Southern China from 2000 to 2001, which included surface runoff, percolation, and evapotranspiration. Twenty-one parameters classified into four categories, including meteorological conditions, topographical characteristics, soil properties, and vegetation attributes, were used for sensitivity analysis through one-at-a-time (OAT sampling to identify the factor that contributed most to the variance in water balance components. The results were shown to be different for different plots, with parameter sensitivity indices and ranks varying for different water balance components. Water balance components in the broad-leaved forest and natural grass plots were most sensitive to meteorological conditions, less sensitive to vegetation attributes and soil properties, and least sensitive to topographical characteristics. Compared to those in the natural grass plot, water balance components in the broad-leaved forest plot demonstrated higher sensitivity to the maximum stomatal conductance (GSI and maximum leaf area index (BLAI.

  20. [Coupling SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2 models to simulate water quantity and quality in Shanmei Reservoir watershed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Bing; Chen, Dong-Ping; Chen, Xing-Wei; Chen, Ying

    2013-12-01

    A coupled watershed-reservoir modeling approach consisting of a watershed distributed model (SWAT) and a two-dimensional laterally averaged model (CE-QUAL-W2) was adopted for simulating the impact of non-point source pollution from upland watershed on water quality of Shanmei Reservoir. Using the daily serial output from Shanmei Reservoir watershed by SWAT as the input to Shanmei Reservoir by CE-QUAL-W2, the coupled modeling was calibrated for runoff and outputs of sediment and pollutant at watershed scale and for elevation, temperature, nitrate, ammonium and total nitrogen in Shanmei Reservoir. The results indicated that the simulated values agreed fairly well with the observed data, although the calculation precision of downstream model would be affected by the accumulative errors generated from the simulation of upland model. The SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2 coupled modeling could be used to assess the hydrodynamic and water quality process in complex watershed comprised of upland watershed and downstream reservoir, and might further provide scientific basis for positioning key pollution source area and controlling the reservoir eutrophication.

  1. The protective effect of Transhinone II A in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guanghu; Li Zhiping; Xu Yong; Xu Feng; Wang Jin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect and it's possible mechanism of Tanshinone II A in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods: Having the right hemithorax of female Wistar rats irradiated 30 Gy in 10 fractions within 14 days by 6 MV photons, the radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis animal model was established. In the treatment group, sodium Tanshinone II A sulfonate (15 mg/kg) was given by intraperitoneal injection 1 hour before each fraction of irradiation. Five months after irradiation, the difference of the histopathological changes, the hyckoxyproline content and expression of TGF-β1 between the radiation alone group, tanshinone plus radiation and control group were analyzed by HE stain, Massion stain, immunohistochemical methor and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) method. Results: The histopathological comparison revealed the protective effect of Tanshinone II A. The content of hydroxyproline was (21.99±3.96), (38.25± 7.18), (28.94±4.29) μg/g in the control group, radiation alone group and radiation plus Tanshinone II A. The expression of TGF-β1 (mRNA and protein) was reduced by Tanshinone II A. Pathological changes of the pulmonary fibrosis was reduced by Tanshinone II A yet. Conclusions: Our study shows that Tanshinone II A can inhibit radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and the possible mechanism of its may be made possible through down-regulating the expression of TGF-β1 in the irritated lung tissue. (authors)

  2. Calibration of a Field-Scale Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT Model with Field Placement of Best Management Practices in Alger Creek, Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R. Merriman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Subwatersheds within the Great Lakes “Priority Watersheds” were targeted by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI to determine the effectiveness of the various best management practices (BMPs from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service National Conservation Planning (NCP Database. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model is created for Alger Creek, a 50 km2 tributary watershed to the Saginaw River in Michigan. Monthly calibration yielded very good Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE ratings for flow, sediment, total phosphorus (TP, dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP, and total nitrogen (TN (0.90, 0.79, 0.87, 0.88, and 0.77, respectively, and satisfactory NSE rating for nitrate (0.51. Two-year validation results in at least satisfactory NSE ratings for flow, sediment, TP, DRP, and TN (0.83, 0.54, 0.73, 0.53, and 0.60, respectively, and unsatisfactory NSE rating for nitrate (0.28. The model estimates the effect of BMPs at the field and watershed scales. At the field-scale, the most effective single practice at reducing sediment, TP, and DRP is no-tillage followed by cover crops (CC; CC are the most effective single practice at reducing nitrate. The most effective BMP combinations include filter strips, which can have a sizable effect on reducing sediment and phosphorus loads. At the watershed scale, model results indicate current NCP BMPs result in minimal sediment and nutrient reductions (<10%.

  3. Calibration of a field-scale Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model with field placement of best management practices in Alger Creek, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman-Hoehne, Katherine R.; Russell, Amy M.; Rachol, Cynthia M.; Daggupati, Prasad; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Hayhurst, Brett A.; Stuntebeck, Todd D.

    2018-01-01

    Subwatersheds within the Great Lakes “Priority Watersheds” were targeted by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) to determine the effectiveness of the various best management practices (BMPs) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service National Conservation Planning (NCP) Database. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is created for Alger Creek, a 50 km2 tributary watershed to the Saginaw River in Michigan. Monthly calibration yielded very good Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) ratings for flow, sediment, total phosphorus (TP), dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), and total nitrogen (TN) (0.90, 0.79, 0.87, 0.88, and 0.77, respectively), and satisfactory NSE rating for nitrate (0.51). Two-year validation results in at least satisfactory NSE ratings for flow, sediment, TP, DRP, and TN (0.83, 0.54, 0.73, 0.53, and 0.60, respectively), and unsatisfactory NSE rating for nitrate (0.28). The model estimates the effect of BMPs at the field and watershed scales. At the field-scale, the most effective single practice at reducing sediment, TP, and DRP is no-tillage followed by cover crops (CC); CC are the most effective single practice at reducing nitrate. The most effective BMP combinations include filter strips, which can have a sizable effect on reducing sediment and phosphorus loads. At the watershed scale, model results indicate current NCP BMPs result in minimal sediment and nutrient reductions (<10%).

  4. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podstavkova, S.; Vlcek, D.; Dubovsky, J.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation and UV radiation combined with alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) was observed on survival of cells of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In particular, single parts were evaluated of the overall lethal effect - dying of cells before division and dying of cells after division. It was found that the combined action of low doses of UV radiation and alkylnitrosoureas result in a pronounced protective effect which manifests itself by a higher frequency of surviving cells than was that effected by the action of alkylnitrosoureas alone. As a result of combined action with higher doses of UV radiation this effect is lost, and the resultant values will come close to the theoretically anticipated values. This gradual transition from a protective to an additive effect mainly manifests itself by changes in the proportion of cells dying before division. (author)

  5. Trade potential and conservation issues of medicinal plants in district Swat, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, H.; Ahmad, H.; Yousif, M.

    2012-01-01

    Use of medicinal plants for various health disorders is a common practice especially in rural areas. Poor economic condition and lack of modern health care facilities in remote areas are the major reasons for adopting traditional medicine. Mingora is considered as the main center of trade of medicinal plants not only of Swat but of the entire Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region of Pakistan. The city was analyzed for the trade potential of local medicinal plants. The present study reported trade and marketing profile of 99 species collected locally and sold in the national and international markets. A total of 99 taxa were collected belonging to 55 families and 80 genera. Helvellaceae was at the top among the largest families with 9 taxa, followed by Asteraceae and Solanacea with 8 and 6 taxa respectively. Among the life form Chamaephyte was at the top with 27 taxa (27.27%), followed by Hemicryptophyte, Phanerophyte, Therophyte, Geophyte and Parasite with 25 (25.25%), 24 (24.24%), 17 (20.20%), 2 (2.02%) and 1 taxa (1.01%), respectively. Market analysis revealed that annual production and its share to the market was 8.056 and 6.644 million kg during the years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 whereas, it gave rise to the circulation of Rs. 4475.00 and Rs. 5084.70 millions, respectively. Thus quantity traded decreased due to the unsustainable collection in the wild, while amount circulated increased due to rise in price kg/sup -1/ as a result of increased demand from the national and international market. According to an estimate approximately 99,840 individuals (i.e. 8% of the total population of Swat) are associated with the collection or trade of these important medicinal plants in the valley. The study also revealed that availability of medicinal plants decreased day by day and this process is continued for the last two decades. According to local elders, most of the medicinal plants reported were abundant in the vicinities some 20 years back. However, their population was

  6. The "Mozart Effect II" and Other Communication/Learning Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2007-01-01

    While exploring the development of Communication and Learning Aids in all venues, particularly the effect of music on learning, several different tracks were followed. The therapeutic use of music is for relaxation and stress reduction, which apparently helps the body to access and discharge deeply locked-in material. The Mozart Effect track which…

  7. Gp96 Peptide Antagonist gp96-II Confers Therapeutic Effects in Murine Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia A. Nold-Petry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe expression of heat shock protein gp96 is strongly correlated with the degree of tissue inflammation in ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, thereby leading us to the hypothesis that inhibition of expression via gp96-II peptide prevents intestinal inflammation.MethodsWe employed daily injections of gp96-II peptide in two murine models of intestinal inflammation, the first resulting from five daily injections of IL-12/IL-18, the second via a single intrarectal application of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. We also assessed the effectiveness of gp96-II peptide in murine and human primary cell culture.ResultsIn the IL-12/IL-18 model, all gp96-II peptide-treated animals survived until day 5, whereas 80% of placebo-injected animals died. gp96-II peptide reduced IL-12/IL-18-induced plasma IFNγ by 89%, IL-1β by 63%, IL-6 by 43% and tumor necrosis factor (TNF by 70% compared to controls. The clinical assessment Disease Activity Index of intestinal inflammation severity was found to be significantly lower in the gp96-II-treated animals when compared to vehicle-injected mice. gp96-II peptide treatment in the TNBS model limited weight loss to 5% on day 7 compared with prednisolone treatment, whereas placebo-treated animals suffered a 20% weight loss. Histological disease severity was reduced equally by prednisolone (by 40% and gp96-II peptide (35%. Mice treated with either gp96-II peptide or prednisolone exhibited improved endoscopic scores compared with vehicle-treated control mice: vascularity, fibrin, granularity, and translucency scores were reduced by up to 49% by prednisolone and by up to 30% by gp96-II peptide. In vitro, gp96-II peptide reduced TLR2-, TLR4- and IL-12/IL-18-induced cytokine expression in murine splenocytes, with declines in constitutive IL-6 (54%, lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF (48%, IL-6 (81% and in Staphylococcus epidermidis-induced TNF (67% and IL-6 (81%, as well as IL-12/IL-18-induced IFNγ (75%. gp

  8. Maxwell-Chern-Simons Casimir effect. II. Circular boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, K.A.; Ng, Y.J.

    1992-01-01

    In odd-dimensional spaces, gauge invariance permits a Chern-Simons mass term for the gauge fields in addition to the usual Maxwell-Yang-Mills kinetic energy term. We study the Casimir effect in such a (2+1)-dimensional Abelian theory. The case of parallel conducting lines was considered by us in a previous paper. Here we discuss the Casimir effect for a circle and examine the effect of finite temperature. The Casimir stress is found to be attractive at both low and high temperatures

  9. NMR spectroscopic determination of an equilibrium isotope effect on the hydration of cobalt(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evilia, R.F.; Saunders, M.

    1985-01-01

    A recently reported NMR method for the measurement of deuterium equilibrium isotope effects is applied to the hydration of the paramagnetic cobalt(II) ion. An isotope effect of about 1.3% is measured. A substantial difference between the intrinsic shift of H 2 O and D 2 O when coordinated to cobalt is also measured

  10. Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies. Part II: Empirical evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    2003-01-01

    How do dispersal policies affect labour market integration of refugee immigrants subjected to such policy? To investigate this, we estimate the effects of location characteristics and the average effect of geographical mobility on the hazard rate into first job of refugee immigrants subjected...... of refugees of the same ethnic origin across regions with low unemployment. Second, on average, geographical mobility had large, positive effects on the job finding rate, suggesting that either relocations were carried out to improve employment prospects, or they were carried out to improve place utility...... in the concentration of fellow countrymen and decreasing in the regional unemployment rate, the size of the local population and the percentage of immigrants in the local population. The two latter findings support dispersal policies. The two former findings emphasize that refugees should be dispersed in big clusters...

  11. Stream Flow Simulation of a Snow-Fed Mountainous Basin Using the SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S.; Kansal, M. L.; Jain, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological budget of the Satluj River (a major tributary of Indus river system) in Western Himalaya, is dominated by monsoonal rainfall and snowmelt during the non-monsoon months. The river watershed experiences extensive snowfall in the winters and snowmelt runoff substantially contributes to the streamflow of the river in the spring and summer months. In order to understand the hydrologic response of Satluj basin, hydrological modeling study is carried out using a semi distributed hydrological model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), for the period of thirty years (1985-2014). The basic intent of this study is to derive the parameters required for runoff modeling using the geospatial database. The Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2) algorithm is used to calibrate and validate the model and incorporate uncertainties in the analysis. The results are validated with the observed daily streamflow data at Rampur, in terms of Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient (NSC), R2 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). Further, the snowmelt-runoff mechanism is modelled by relating the temperature changes to the elevation band in the basin. The northern part of the basin and the south part of the basin on the high elevation zones have the coldest maximum temperatures that is about 7°C. It is found that the average contribution of snow and glacier runoff in the annual flow of the Satluj River at Rampur is about 66% and remaining 34% is from rainfall.

  12. Mishal: A Case Study of a Deradicalization and Emancipation Program in SWAT Valley, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Azam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nestled in the SWAT valley lies Pakistan’s earliest known deradicalization initiative for former militants, the Mishal Deradicalization and Emancipation Program (DREP. The Deradicalization program was launched following a military operation in 2009 against the Pakistan wing of the Taliban, namely, the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP. The program aimed to deradicalize and rehabilitate arrested militants, with what officials claim is a 99 percent success rate and with more than 2,500 former Taliban fighters now ‘reformed’. The program abides by a ‘no blood on hand’ policy, whereby it only takes in militants who have not caused any bodily harm to others. In this paper, we analyze the deradicalization program and highlight the limits and challenges it faces. The paper also highlights the common individual and environmental factors among the beneficiary population of the deradicalization program. This study finds that most participants of the program belonged to large or broken families with weak socio-economic profiles. Additionally, these individuals had very little technical knowledge of religion. This study also finds that the program is more oriented towards re-integration rather than deradicalization due to its policy of inducting only low and mid-level cadre militants. The program also has other severe limitations including lack of credible religious scholars, limited financial and human resources.

  13. Health risks associated with heavy metals in the drinking water of Swat, northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonglong; Khan, Hizbullah; Zakir, Shahida; Ihsanullah; Khan, Sardar; Khan, Akbar Ali; Wei, Luo; Wang, Tieyu

    2013-10-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were investigated in drinking water sources (surface and groundwater) collected from Swat valley, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The potential health risks of heavy metals to the local population and their possible source apportionment were also studied. Heavy metal concentrations were analysed using atomic absorption spectrometer and compared with permissible limits set by Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. The concentrations of Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb were higher than their respective permissible limits, while Cu, Mn and Zn concentrations were observed within their respective limits. Health risk indicators such as chronic daily intake (CDI) and health risk index (HRI) were calculated for adults and children separately. CDIs and HRIs of heavy metals were found in the order of Cr > Mn > Ni > Zn > Cd > Cu > Pb and Cd > Ni > Mn > Cr > Cu > Pb > Zn, respectively. HRIs of selected heavy metals in the drinking water were less than 1, indicating no health risk to the local people. Multivariate and univariate statistical analyses showed that geologic and anthropogenic activities were the possible sources of water contamination with heavy metals in the study area.

  14. Land use change impacts on discharge analysis using SWAT model at Ciherang Pondok DAM catchment area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utamahadi, M. A.; Pandjaitan, N. H.; Rau, M. I.

    2018-05-01

    The prompt increase of population influenced the requirement for new regions to fulfill people’s primary needs. Its increased land use change and caused many impacts on the environment, including watersheds as well. Ciherang Pondok DAM catchment area is part of Cisadane watershed and was selected as the research area. This research aimed to analyse the water supply and water discharge change caused by the Urban Planning (RTRW) in 2020. The analysis was conducted using soil and water assessment tools (SWAT) model. Stages of this research were catchment area delineation, HRU identification, calibration and validation of models, and prediction of discharge and water demand. The result showed that RTRW of 2020 increased the maximum discharge of 1.6 m3/s and decreased the minimum discharge of 0.01 m3/s, hence the maximum and minimum discharge ratio increased 0.26% from 2016. Output discharge in 2020 at Ciherang Pondok Dam Catchment Area was classified as well, with discharge of 6.72 – 126.2 m3/s, and could fulfil water demand. For the best result, it is better to use climate data from weather stations inside the study area and it is required an improvement in data archiving system.

  15. Present state and future trends of pine forests of malam jabba, swat district, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, M. F.; Arsalan, M.; Hussain, M. I.; Iqbal, J.; Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Present state and future trend of pine forests of Malam Jabba, Swat district, Pakistan explored. We focused on vegetation composition, structure, diversity and forests dynamics. Thirteen stands were sampled by Point Centered Quarter method. Among all stands four monospecific forests of Pinus wallichiana attained highest density ha-1 except in one stand where Picea smithiana attained 401 trees ha-1. Unlike density, the basal area m2 ha-1 of these stands varies stand to stand. Based on floristic composition and importance value index, five different communities viz Pinus wallichiana-Picea smithiana; Picea smithiana-Pinus wallichiana; Abies pindrow-Pinus wallichiana; Pinus wallichiana-Abies pindrow; Abies pindrow-Picea smithiana and 4 monospecific forests of Pinus wallichiana were recognized. Size class structure of forests showed marked influence of anthropogenic disturbance because not a single stand showed ideal regeneration pattern (inverse J shape distribution). Future of these forests is worst due to absence trees in small size classes. Gaps are also evident in most of the forest stands. Stand diversity, richness, equitability and Simpson dominance values formulated on single stand basis. Diversity of Abides pindrow and Pinus wallichiana stand was highest because these stand occupied dominant species, while lowest diversity observed in some Pinus wallichiana and Picea smithiana stand as these stands have mark difference between the dominance of two species. In the monospecific forests, the diversity level was zero, suggesting the monopolization of resources by one species or elimination of other tree species in these stands. (author)

  16. Assessment of the Environmental Fate of the Herbicides Flufenacet and Metazachlor with the SWAT Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohrer, Nicola; Dietrich, Antje; Kolychalow, Olga; Ulrich, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the environmental fate of the commonly used herbicides flufenacet and metazachlor in the Northern German Lowlands with the ecohydrological Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model) and to test the sensitivity of pesticide-related input parameters on the modeled transport dynamics. The river discharge of the Kielstau watershed was calibrated (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency [NSE], 0.83; = 0.84) and validated (NSE, 0.76; = 0.77) for a daily time step. The environmental fate of metazachlor (NSE, 0.68; = 0.62) and flufenacet (NSE, 0.13; = 0.51) was simulated adequately. In comparison to metazachlor, the simulated flufenacet concentration and loads show a lower model efficiency due to the weaker simulation of the stream flow. The in-stream herbicide loads were less than 0.01% of the applied amount in the observed time period and thus not in conflict with European Environmental Legislation. The sensitivity analysis showed that, besides the accurate simulation of stream flow, the parameterization of the temporal and spatial distribution of the herbicide application throughout the watershed is the key factor for appropriate modeling results, whereas the physicochemical properties of the pesticides play a minor role in the modeling process. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. 'Mote' networks: A nano SWAT Team for the oilpatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, E.

    2004-05-01

    Wireless sensor networks installed in pumping stations, pipelines, or remote areas that monitor various parameters such as energy use, pressure or temperature, are the latest technology finding application in the oil and gas industry. The sensors (also called 'motes') can self-configure the network, including self-correction without downtime. Their principal function is to transfer information using the fastest, most reliable path and send data to the control system via a gateway. Key to the technology is the concept of mesh networks: instead of each mote having a single channel back to some form of a backbone, the system has multiple paths, similar to the Internet, which will find another path if one route is blocked. Each mote is about one inch in size; it is outfitted with a microprocessor, a radio that generates 900 megahertz and a number of other components that optimize the interaction between the radio and the microprocessor. In addition to communicating with each other, the motes also communicate with the client's own control system via a central collection point or gateway. One of the most promising applications is the 'rapid profiling kit' which compares to a SWAT team in which the network may be used to periodically verify other measurements and give them increased accuracy and greater resolution. Monitoring the health of machines by listening to any crunching and knocking is another potential application. 1 fig.

  18. Size effects in ductile cellular solids. Part II : experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrews, E.W.; Gioux, G.; Onck, P.; Gibson, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of metallic foams in a variety of applications, including lightweight structural sandwich panels and energy absorption devices. In such applications, the mechanical response of the foams is of critical importance. In this study, we have investigated the effect

  19. New copper (II)-imidazole derivative effectively inhibits replication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dengue is a kind of infectious disease that was distributed in the tropical and sub-tropical areas. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for humans, even though there have been great efforts towards this end. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) ...

  20. Fertilization of Earth Ponds. II: Effects on Plankton Communities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the effects of slurry inorganic and organic of fertilizers on the production of phyto-and zooplankton in earth ponds was conducted in Central Scotland, U.K. over a period of one year. For the inorganic fertilization, replicate ponds were treated with low and high phosphorus (LP, HP), high phosphorus and nitrogen ...

  1. The basic science of dermal fillers: past and present Part II: adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Erin; Hui, Andrea; Meehan, Shane; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2012-09-01

    The ideal dermal filler should offer long-lasting aesthetic improvement with a minimal side-effect profile. It should be biocompatible and stable within the injection site, with the risk of only transient undesirable effects from injection alone. However, all dermal fillers can induce serious and potentially long-lasting adverse effects. In Part II of this paper, we review the most common adverse effects related to dermal filler use.

  2. Neurological Adverse Effects after Radiation Therapy for Stage II Seminoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbeskov Lauritsen, Liv; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    against the tumour bed) with a conventional fractionation of 2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and....../or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate...... their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic....

  3. Simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V) by Fe–Mn binary oxide: Positive effects of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruiping [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu, Feng [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Chengzhi, E-mail: czhu@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); He, Zan [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Fe–Mn binary oxide achieves the simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V). • Cd(II) at above 0.25 mmol/L improves Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO. • Cd(II) improves more significant Sb(V) adsorption than Ca{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}. • Sb(V) adsorption decreases whereas Cd(II) adsorption increases with elevated pH. • The increased ζ-potential and Cd(II)–Sb(V) precipitation favors Sb(V) adsorption. - Abstract: The coexistence of cadmium ion (Cd(II)) and antimonate (Sb(V)) creates the need for their simultaneous removal. This study aims to investigate the effects of positively-charged Cd(II) on the removal of negative Sb(V) ions by Fe–Mn binary oxide (FMBO) and associated mechanisms. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption density (Q{sub max,Sb(V)}) increased from 1.02 to 1.32 and 2.01 mmol/g in the presence of Cd(II) at 0.25 and 0.50 mmol/L. Cd{sup 2+} exhibited a more significant positive effect than both calcium ion (Ca{sup 2+}) and manganese ion (Mn{sup 2+}). Cd{sup 2+} showed higher affinity towards FMBO and increased its ζ-potential more significantly compared to Ca{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}. The simultaneous adsorption of Sb(V) and Cd(II) onto FMBO can be achieved over a wide initial pH (pH{sub i}) range from 2 to 9, and Q{sub Sb(V)} decreases whereas Q{sub Cd(II)} increases with elevated pH{sub i}. Their combined values, as expressed by Q{sub Sb(V)+Cd(II)}, amount to about 2 mmol/g and vary slightly in the pH{sub i} range 4–9. FTIR and XPS spectra indicate the significant synergistic effect of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO, and that little chemical valence transformation occurs. These results may be valuable for the treatment of wastewater with coexisting heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Sb(V).

  4. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume II, Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    limb . Magnetotherapy proved superior to all of gain; total serum protein; Na+, and K~ ; and rectal the methods tested so far. These include electro...indicate that magnetotherapy has an crease. None of these changes exceeded normal limits, inhibitory effect on the CNS , a spasmolytic action on peripheral...are attributed to differences in the state of ascites fluid proteins during tumor develop— 0685 EXPERIENCE WITH MAGNETOTHERAPY FOR PAINFUL ment

  5. Plant species and communities assessment in interaction with edaphic and topographic factors; an ecological study of the mount Eelum District Swat, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current analyses of vegetation were aimed to study the different effects of environmental variables and plant species and communities interaction to these variables, identified threats to local vegetation and suggestion for remedial measures in the Mount Eelum, Swat, Pakistan. For assessment of environmental variability quantitative ecological techniques were used through quadrats having sizes of 2 × 2, 5 × 5 and 10 × 10 m2 for herbs, shrubs and trees respectively. Result of the present study revealed 124 plant species in the study area. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was used to analyze the ecological gradient of vegetation. The environmental data and species abundance were used in CANOCO software version 4.5. The presence absence data of plant species were elaborated with Cluster and Two Way Cluster Analysis techniques using PC-ORD version 5 to show different species composition that resulted in five plant communities. Findings indicate that elevation, aspect and soil texture are the strongest variables that have significant effect on species composition and distribution of various communities shown with P value 0.0500. It is recommended to protect and use sensibly whole of the Flora normally and rare species particularly in the region.

  6. The effective field theory of nonsingular cosmology: II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yong; Li, Hai-Guang [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Qiu, Taotao [Central China Normal University, Institute of Astrophysics, Wuhan (China); Piao, Yun-Song [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing (China)

    2017-06-15

    Based on the effective field theory (EFT) of cosmological perturbations, we explicitly clarify the pathology in nonsingular cubic Galileon models and show how to cure it in EFT with new insights into this issue. With the least set of EFT operators that are capable to avoid instabilities in nonsingular cosmologies, we construct a nonsingular model dubbed the Genesis-inflation model, in which a slowly expanding phase (namely, Genesis) with increasing energy density is followed by slow-roll inflation. The spectrum of the primordial perturbation may be simulated numerically, which shows itself a large-scale cutoff, as the large-scale anomalies in CMB might be a hint for. (orig.)

  7. Tropospheric ozone and the environment II. Effects, modeling and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This was the sixth International Specialty Conference on ozone for the Air ampersand Waste Management Association since 1978 and the first to be held in the Southeast. Of the preceding five conferences, three were held in Houston, one in New England, and one in Los Angeles. The changing location continues to support the understanding that tropospheric ozone is a nationwide problem, requiring understanding and participation by representatives of all regions. Yet, questions such as the following continue to be raised over all aspects of the nation's efforts to control ozone. Are the existing primary and secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone the appropriate targets for the ozone control strategy, or should they be modified to more effectively accommodate new health or ecological effects information, or better fit statistical analyses of ozone modeling data? Are the modeling tools presently available adequate to predict ozone concentrations for future precursor emission trends? What ozones attainment strategy will be the best means of meeting the ozone standard? To best answer these and other questions there needs to be a continued sharing of information among researchers working on these and other questions. While answers to these questions will often be qualitative and location specific, they will help focus future research programs and assist in developing future regulatory strategies

  8. SPIDER OPTIMIZATION. II. OPTICAL, MAGNETIC, AND FOREGROUND EFFECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dea, D. T.; Clark, C. N.; Contaldi, C. R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Burger, B.; Davis, G.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Crill, B. P.; Dore, O.; Filippini, J. P.; Bond, J. R.; Farhang, M.; Bonetti, J. A.; Bryan, S.; Chiang, H. C.; Fraisse, A. A.; Fissel, L. M.; Gandilo, N. N.

    2011-01-01

    SPIDER is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with degree-scale resolution over a large fraction of the sky. SPIDER's main goal is to measure the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves through their imprint on the polarization of the CMB if the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, is greater than 0.03. To achieve this goal, instrumental systematic errors must be controlled with unprecedented accuracy. Here, we build on previous work to use simulations of SPIDER observations to examine the impact of several systematic effects that have been characterized through testing and modeling of various instrument components. In particular, we investigate the impact of the non-ideal spectral response of the half-wave plates, coupling between focal-plane components and Earth's magnetic field, and beam mismatches and asymmetries. We also present a model of diffuse polarized foreground emission based on a three-dimensional model of the Galactic magnetic field and dust, and study the interaction of this foreground emission with our observation strategy and instrumental effects. We find that the expected level of foreground and systematic contamination is sufficiently low for SPIDER to achieve its science goals.

  9. One-loop effective actions and higher spins. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, L.; Cvitan, M.; Prester, P. Dominis; Giaccari, S.; Štemberga, T.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we continue and improve the analysis of the effective actions obtained by integrating out a scalar and a fermion field coupled to external symmetric sources, started in the previous paper. The first subject we study is the geometrization of the results obtained there, that is we express them in terms of covariant Jacobi tensors. The second subject concerns the treatment of tadpoles and seagull terms in order to implement off-shell covariance in the initial model. The last and by far largest part of the paper is a repository of results concerning all two point correlators (including mixed ones) of symmetric currents of any spin up to 5 and in any dimensions between 3 and 6. In the massless case we also provide formulas for any spin in any dimension.

  10. Antitumor effect and toxicity of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles in mice bearing breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marcella Lemos Brettas; Peixoto, Raphael C A; Joanitti, Graziela A; Oliveira, Ricardo G S; Telles, Luis A M; Miranda-Vilela, Ana L; Bocca, Anamélia L; Vianna, Leonora M S; da Silva, Izabel C R; de Souza, Aparecido R; Lacava, Zulmira G M; Báo, Sônia N

    2013-02-16

    Magnetic fluids containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles represent an attractive platform as nanocarriers in chemotherapy. Recently, we developed a formulation of maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate, which resulted in in vitro cytotoxicity enhanced up to 4.6 times when compared to free rhodium (II) citrate formulation on breast carcinoma cells. In this work, we evaluate the antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Mice were evaluated with regard to the treatments' toxicity through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine; DNA fragmentation and cell cycle of bone marrow cells; and liver, kidney and lung histology. In addition, the antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate and maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate was verified by tumor volume reduction, histology and immunohistochemistry. Regarding the treatments' toxicity, no experimental groups had alterations in levels of serum ALT or creatinine, and this suggestion was corroborated by the histopathologic examination of liver and kidney of mice. Moreover, DNA fragmentation frequency of bone marrow cells was lower than 15% in all experimental groups. On the other hand, the complexes rhodium (II) citrate-functionalized maghemite and free rhodium (II) citrate led to a marked growth inhibition of tumor and decrease in CD31 and Ki-67 staining. In summary, we demonstrated that both rhodium (II) citrate and maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate formulations exhibited antitumor effects against 4T1 metastatic breast cancer cell line following intratumoral administration. This antitumor effect was followed by inhibition of both cell proliferation and microvascularization and by tumor tissue injury characterized as necrosis and fibrosis. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of maghemite

  11. EFFECT OF CADMIUM(II) ON FREE RADICALS IN DOPA-MELANIN TESTED BY EPR SPECTROSCOPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Chodurek, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy may be applied to examine interactions of melanin with metal ions and drugs. In this work EPR method was used to examination of changes in free radical system of DOPA-melanin--the model eumelanin after complexing with diamagnetic cadmium(II) ions. Cadmium(II) may affect free radicals in melanin and drugs binding by this polymer, so the knowledge of modification of properties and free radical concentration in melanin is important to pharmacy. The effect of cadmium(II) in different concentrations on free radicals in DOPA-melanin was determined. EPR spectra of DOPA-melanin, and DOPA-melanin complexes with cadmium(II) were measured by an X-band (9.3 GHz) EPR spectrometer produced by Radiopan (Poznań, Poland) and the Rapid Scan Unit from Jagmar (Krak6w, Poland). The DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) to metal ions molar ratios in the reaction mixtures were 2:1, 1:1, and 1: 2. High concentrations of o-semiquinone (g ~2.0040) free radicals (~10(21)-10(22) spin/g) characterize DOPA-melanin and its complexes with cadmium(II). Formation of melanin complexes with cadmium(II) increase free radical concentration in DOPA-melanin. The highest free radical concentration was obtained for DOPA-melanin-cadmium(II) (1:1) complexes. Broad EPR lines with linewidths: 0.37-0.73 mT, were measured. Linewidths increase after binding of cadmium(II) to melanin. Changes of integral intensities and linewidths with increasing microwave power indicate the homogeneous broadening of EPR lines, independently on the metal ion concentration. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested samples, their EPR lines saturated at low microwave powers. Cadmium(II) causes fastening of spin-lattice relaxation processes in DOPA-melanin. The EPR results bring to light the effect of cadmium(II) on free radicals in melanin, and probably as the consequence on drug binding to eumelanin.

  12. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  13. Distinct Molecular Effects of Angiotensin II and Angiotensin III in Rat Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A. Clark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that central effects of angiotensin (Ang II may be indirect due to rapid conversion to Ang III by aminopeptidase A (APA. Previously, we showed that Ang II and Ang III induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases ERK1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNK phosphorylation in cultured rat astrocytes. Most importantly, both peptides were equipotent in causing phosphorylation of these MAP kinases. In these studies, we used brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes to determine whether Ang II’s phosphorylation of these MAP kinases is due to the conversion of the peptide to Ang III. We pretreated astrocytes with 10 μM amastatin A or 100 μM glutamate phosphonate, selective APA inhibitors, prior to stimulating with either Ang II or Ang III. Both peptides were equipotent in stimulating ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. The APA inhibitors failed to prevent Ang II- and Ang III-mediated phosphorylation of the MAP kinases. Further, pretreatment of astrocytes with the APA inhibitors did not affect Ang II- or Ang III-induced astrocyte growth. These findings suggest that both peptides directly induce phosphorylation of these MAP kinases as well as induce astrocyte growth. These studies establish both peptides as biologically active with similar intracellular and physiological effects.

  14. Animal model for angiotensin II effects in the internal anal sphincter smooth muscle: mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ya-Ping; Puri, Rajinder N; Rattan, Satish

    2002-03-01

    Effect of ANG II was investigated in in vitro smooth muscle strips and in isolated smooth muscle cells (SMC). Among different species, rat internal and sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle showed significant and reproducible contraction that remained unmodified by different neurohumoral inhibitors. The AT(1) antagonist losartan but not AT(2) antagonist PD-123319 antagonized ANG II-induced contraction of the IAS smooth muscle and SMC. ANG II-induced contraction of rat IAS smooth muscle and SMC was attenuated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin, protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor H-7, Ca(2+) channel blocker nicardipine, Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 or p(44/42) mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK(44/42)) inhibitor PD-98059. Combinations of nicardipine and H-7, Y-27632, and PD-98059 caused further attenuation of the ANG II effects. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of both AT(1) and AT(2) receptors. We conclude that ANG II causes contraction of rat IAS smooth muscle by the activation of AT(1) receptors at the SMC and involves multiple intracellular pathways, influx of Ca(2+), and activation of PKC, Rho kinase, and MAPK(44/42).

  15. The effect of UV stars on the intergalactic medium. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnanstine, A.E.; Hills, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation from the UV stars (hot prewhite dwarfs) on the intergalactic medium (IGM) has been investigated. If the UV stars are powered only by gravitational contraction they radiate most of their energy at a typical surface temperature of 1.5 x 10 5 K which produces a very highly ionized IGM in which the elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are left with only one or two electrons. This result in these elements being very inefficient coolants. The gas is cooled principally by free-free emission and the collisional ionization of hydrogen and helium. For a typical UV star temperature of T=1.5 x 10 5 K, the temperature of the ionized gas in the IGM is Tsub(g)=1.2 x 10 5 K for a Hubble constant H 0 =75 kms -1 Mpc -1 and a hydrogen density nsub(H)=10 -6 cm -3 . Heating by cosmic rays and X-rays is insignificant in the IGM except perhaps in the H I clouds because when a hydrogen atom recombines in the IGM it is far more likely to be re-ionized by a UV-star photon than by either of the other two types of particles due to the greater space density of UV-star photons and their appreciably larger ionization cross sections. If the UV stars radiate a substantial fraction of their energy in a helium-burning stage in which they have surface temperatures of about 5 x 10 4 K, the temperature of the IGM could be lowered to about 5 x 10 4 K. (Auth.)

  16. Effects of orally administered undenatured type II collagen against arthritic inflammatory diseases: a mechanistic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, D; Misner, B; Bagchi, M; Kothari, S C; Downs, B W; Fafard, R D; Preuss, H G

    2002-01-01

    Arthritis afflicts approximately 43 million Americans or approximately 16.6% of the US population. The two most common and best known types of arthritis are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A significant amount of scientific research has been done in attempts to explain what initiates forms of arthritis, how it is promoted and perpetuated and how to effectively intervene in the disease process and promote cartilage remodeling. Current pharmacological strategies mainly address immune suppression and antiinflammatory mechanisms and have had limited success. Recent research provides evidence that alterations in the three-dimensional configuration of glycoproteins are responsible for the recognition/response signaling that catalyzes T-cell attack. Oral administration of autoantigens has been shown to suppress a variety of experimentally induced autoimmune pathologies, including antigen-induced RA. The interaction between gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the duodenum and epitopes of orally administered undenatured type II collagen facilitates oral tolerance to the antigen and stems systemic T-cell attack on joint cartilage. Previous studies have shown that small doses of orally administered undenatured type II chicken collagen effectively deactivate killer T-cell attack. A novel glycosylated undenatured type II collagen material (UC-II) was developed to preserve biological activity. The presence of active epitopes in the UC-II collagen is confirmed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test and distinguishes this form from hydrolyzed or denatured collagen. Oral intake of small amounts of glycosylated UC-II presents active epitopes, with the correct three-dimensional structures, to Peyer's patches, which influences the signaling required for the development of immune tolerance. UC-II has demonstrated the ability to induce tolerance, effectively reducing joint pain and swelling in RA subjects. A pilot study was conducted for 42 days to evaluate the

  17. PISC II: Parametric studies. Summary of the PISC II Parametric studies on the Effect of defect Characteristics (EDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Murgatroyd, R.; Dombret, P.

    1989-09-01

    Studies on the effect of defect characteristics and selected inspection parameters on the detection and sizing of defects in ferritic steel blocks have been performed by: - United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA, Risley and Harwell), - CISE, (Italy, Milan), - VINCOTTE (Belgium, Brussels), - CEC, JRC (Ispra Site; complementary measurements), as part of a larger Commission of the European Communities (CEC) programme in support to the PISC (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components), jointly sponsored by OECD (Organization for Economic Coordination and Development) and CEC and operated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra Establishment. The purpose of the programme was to acquire reliable experimental data that could be used both to explain results of the PISC I and II Round Robin Tests (RRT) and to test and validate theoretical models of the ultrasonic testing techniques. For these studies, eighteen test blocks were manufactured by JRC Ispra, Operating Agent and Reference Laboratory of PISC. A range of defect types was inserted with great care covering aspects such as defect shape, defect size, defect surface roughness, defect position in depth, defect orientation. Several of these blocks (defects) were selected by the participating institutions. Each of these participants applied well specified usual ultrasonic techniques: echo techniques, tandem technique, focusing probe technique at 45 0 and time of flight diffraction (TOFD). Results of such measurements propose clear correlation between defect characteristics and amplitude of response of these defects

  18. Application Of Hydrological Models In Poorly Gauged Watersheds A Review Of The Usage Of The Soil And Water Assessment Tool SWAT In Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wambugu Mwangi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In water-scarce developing countries river basins are some of the most valued natural resources but many are poorly gauged and have incomplete hydrological and climate records. In the recent years tropical rivers are increasingly becoming erratic with many hydrologists attributing this variability to combined effects of landscape-specific anthropogenic activities and climate change. Uncertainties about the impacts of climate change compound the challenges attributed to poor and often inconsistent river monitoring data. Under data-scarce conditions and with the increasing land use intensification and urbanization modelling approaches become a useful tool in planning and management of water resources. In this paper we review the application and usability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool SWAT model in conventional planning practice in the management of water resources is poorly-gauged tropical watersheds of Kenya. We assess the technical implications of the model in Intergrated Water Resources management IWRM and its applicability as a planning and management tool for water resources in the era of climate change.

  19. Analysis of the spatial variation in the parameters of the SWAT model with application in Flanders, Northern Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Heuvelmans

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational applications of a hydrological model often require the prediction of stream flow in (future time periods without stream flow observations or in ungauged catchments. Data for a case-specific optimisation of model parameters are not available for such applications, so parameters have to be derived from other catchments or time periods. It has been demonstrated that for applications of the SWAT in Northern Belgium, temporal transfers of the parameters have less influence than spatial transfers on the performance of the model. This study examines the spatial variation in parameter optima in more detail. The aim was to delineate zones wherein model parameters can be transferred without a significant loss of model performance. SWAT was calibrated for 25 catchments that are part of eight larger sub-basins of the Scheldt river basin. Two approaches are discussed for grouping these units in zones with a uniform set of parameters: a single parameter approach considering each parameter separately and a parameter set approach evaluating the parameterisation as a whole. For every catchment, the SWAT model was run with the local parameter optima, with the average parameter values for the entire study region (Flanders, with the zones delineated with the single parameter approach and with the zones obtained by the parameter set approach. Comparison of the model performances of these four parameterisation strategies indicates that both the single parameter and the parameter set zones lead to stream flow predictions that are more accurate than if the entire study region were treated as one single zone. On the other hand, the use of zonal average parameter values results in a considerably worse model fit compared to local parameter optima. Clustering of parameter sets gives a more accurate result than the single parameter approach and is, therefore, the preferred technique for use in the parameterisation of ungauged sub-catchments as part of the

  20. Application of SELECT and SWAT models to simulate source load, fate, and transport of fecal bacteria in watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, T.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling of fate and transport of fecal bacteria in a watershed is a processed based approach that considers releases from manure, point sources, and septic systems. Overland transport with water and sediments, infiltration into soils, transport in the vadose zone and groundwater, die-off and growth processes, and in-stream transport are considered as the other major processes in bacteria simulation. This presentation will discuss a simulation of fecal indicator bacteria source loading and in-stream conditions of a non-tidal watershed (Cedar Bayou Watershed) in South Central Texas using two models; Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) and Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Furthermore, it will discuss a probable approach of bacteria source load reduction in order to meet the water quality standards in the streams. The selected watershed is listed as having levels of fecal indicator bacteria that posed a risk for contact recreation and wading by the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The SELECT modeling approach was used in estimating the bacteria source loading from land categories. Major bacteria sources considered were, failing septic systems, discharges from wastewater treatment facilities, excreta from livestock (Cattle, Horses, Sheep and Goat), excreta from Wildlife (Feral Hogs, and Deer), Pet waste (mainly from Dogs), and runoff from urban surfaces. The estimated source loads from SELECT model were input to the SWAT model, and simulate the bacteria transport through the land and in-stream. The calibrated SWAT model was then used to estimate the indicator bacteria in-stream concentrations for future years based on regional land use, population and household forecast (up to 2040). Based on the reductions required to meet the water quality standards in-stream, the corresponding required source load reductions were estimated.

  1. Decomposing the Bragg glass and the peak effect in a Type-II superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Balog, Sandor

    2018-01-01

    . In Type-II superconductors, disorder generally works to pin vortices, giving zero resistivity below a critical current j(c). However, peaks have been observed in the temperature and field dependences of j(c). This peak effect is difficult to explain in terms of an ordered Abrikosov vortex lattice. Here we...

  2. Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on rats with Type II diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on rats with Type II diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin: A urine metabonomic study. H Zhao, Z Li, G Tian, K Gao, Li Zhiyong, B Zhao, J Wang, L Luo, Q Pan, W Zhang, Z Wu, J Chen, W Wang ...

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II on 1- Methyl-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGFII) on 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP) induced oxidative damage in adult cortical neuronal cultures. Methods: Adult rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. Cortical neurons were prepared from rats. The cells were ...

  4. Stark effect measurements on monomers and trimers of reconstituted light-harvesting complex II of plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palacios, M.A.; Caffarri, S.; Bassi, R.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2004-01-01

    The electric-field induced absorption changes (Stark effect) of reconstituted light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) in different oligomerisation states - monomers and trimers - with different xanthophyll content have been probed at 77 K. The Stark spectra of the reconstituted control samples,

  5. The effect of through-thickness compressive stress on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catalanotti, G.; Furtado, C.; Scalici, T.; Pitarresi, G.; van der Meer, F.P.; Camanho, PP

    2017-01-01

    The effect of through-thickness compressive stress on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness is investigated experimentally and replicated numerically. The modified Transverse Crack Tensile specimen recently proposed by the authors is used, together with an experimental device designed to apply

  6. SWAT use of gridded observations for simulating runoff - a Vietnam river basin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, M. T.; Raghavan, S. V.; Liong, S. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Many research studies that focus on basin hydrology have applied the SWAT model using station data to simulate runoff. But over regions lacking robust station data, there is a problem of applying the model to study the hydrological responses. For some countries and remote areas, the rainfall data availability might be a constraint due to many different reasons such as lacking of technology, war time and financial limitation that lead to difficulty in constructing the runoff data. To overcome such a limitation, this research study uses some of the available globally gridded high resolution precipitation datasets to simulate runoff. Five popular gridded observation precipitation datasets: (1) Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards the Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE), (2) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), (3) Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensing Information using Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN), (4) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), (5) a modified version of Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN2) and one reanalysis dataset, National Centers for Environment Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) are used to simulate runoff over the Dak Bla river (a small tributary of the Mekong River) in Vietnam. Wherever possible, available station data are also used for comparison. Bilinear interpolation of these gridded datasets is used to input the precipitation data at the closest grid points to the station locations. Sensitivity Analysis and Auto-calibration are performed for the SWAT model. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and Coefficient of Determination (R2) indices are used to benchmark the model performance. Results indicate that the APHRODITE dataset performed very well on a daily scale simulation of discharge having a good NSE of 0.54 and R2 of 0.55, when compared to the discharge simulation using station data (0.68 and 0.71). The GPCP proved to be the

  7. SWAT use of gridded observations for simulating runoff – a Vietnam river basin study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Vu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many research studies that focus on basin hydrology have applied the SWAT model using station data to simulate runoff. But over regions lacking robust station data, there is a problem of applying the model to study the hydrological responses. For some countries and remote areas, the rainfall data availability might be a constraint due to many different reasons such as lacking of technology, war time and financial limitation that lead to difficulty in constructing the runoff data. To overcome such a limitation, this research study uses some of the available globally gridded high resolution precipitation datasets to simulate runoff. Five popular gridded observation precipitation datasets: (1 Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards the Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE, (2 Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, (3 Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensing Information using Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN, (4 Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP, (5 a modified version of Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN2 and one reanalysis dataset, National Centers for Environment Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR are used to simulate runoff over the Dak Bla river (a small tributary of the Mekong River in Vietnam. Wherever possible, available station data are also used for comparison. Bilinear interpolation of these gridded datasets is used to input the precipitation data at the closest grid points to the station locations. Sensitivity Analysis and Auto-calibration are performed for the SWAT model. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE and Coefficient of Determination (R2 indices are used to benchmark the model performance. Results indicate that the APHRODITE dataset performed very well on a daily scale simulation of discharge having a good NSE of 0.54 and R2 of 0.55, when compared to the discharge simulation using station data (0

  8. Assessment of waist/hip ratio and its relationship with coronary heart disease in community hospital of district swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, R.; Ahmad, A.; Jan, S.; Rehman, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between central obesity (Abdominal adiposity), measured by Waist/Hip ratio and the development of Coronary Heart Disease in adult population of district Swat. The study comprised of 100 subjects, 34 Control, 33 Hypertensive subjects and 33 subjects with Coronary Heart Disease. Weight, Height, Waist/Hip ratio and Blood Pressure of subjects with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) were compared with Hypertensive subjects and Control subjects. Patients with Coronary Heart Disease had higher Waist/Hip ratio and Blood Pressure than Hypertensive subjects, which in turn had higher values than control subjects. Waist/hip ratio is the dominant risk factor predicting Coronary Heart Disease. (author)

  9. Simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V) by Fe–Mn binary oxide: Positive effects of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Feng; Hu, Chengzhi; He, Zan; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe–Mn binary oxide achieves the simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V). • Cd(II) at above 0.25 mmol/L improves Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO. • Cd(II) improves more significant Sb(V) adsorption than Ca"2"+ and Mn"2"+. • Sb(V) adsorption decreases whereas Cd(II) adsorption increases with elevated pH. • The increased ζ-potential and Cd(II)–Sb(V) precipitation favors Sb(V) adsorption. - Abstract: The coexistence of cadmium ion (Cd(II)) and antimonate (Sb(V)) creates the need for their simultaneous removal. This study aims to investigate the effects of positively-charged Cd(II) on the removal of negative Sb(V) ions by Fe–Mn binary oxide (FMBO) and associated mechanisms. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption density (Q_m_a_x_,_S_b_(_V_)) increased from 1.02 to 1.32 and 2.01 mmol/g in the presence of Cd(II) at 0.25 and 0.50 mmol/L. Cd"2"+ exhibited a more significant positive effect than both calcium ion (Ca"2"+) and manganese ion (Mn"2"+). Cd"2"+ showed higher affinity towards FMBO and increased its ζ-potential more significantly compared to Ca"2"+ and Mn"2"+. The simultaneous adsorption of Sb(V) and Cd(II) onto FMBO can be achieved over a wide initial pH (pH_i) range from 2 to 9, and Q_S_b_(_V_) decreases whereas Q_C_d_(_I_I_) increases with elevated pH_i. Their combined values, as expressed by Q_S_b_(_V_)_+_C_d_(_I_I_), amount to about 2 mmol/g and vary slightly in the pH_i range 4–9. FTIR and XPS spectra indicate the significant synergistic effect of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO, and that little chemical valence transformation occurs. These results may be valuable for the treatment of wastewater with coexisting heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Sb(V).

  10. Free internet datasets for streamflow modelling using SWAT in the Johor river basin, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M. L.

    2014-02-01

    Streamflow modelling is a mathematical computational approach that represents terrestrial hydrology cycle digitally and is used for water resources assessment. However, such modelling endeavours require a large amount of data. Generally, governmental departments produce and maintain these data sets which make it difficult to obtain this data due to bureaucratic constraints. In some countries, the availability and quality of geospatial and climate datasets remain a critical issue due to many factors such as lacking of ground station, expertise, technology, financial support and war time. To overcome this problem, this research used public domain datasets from the Internet as "input" to a streamflow model. The intention is simulate daily and monthly streamflow of the Johor River Basin in Malaysia. The model used is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). As input free data including a digital elevation model (DEM), land use information, soil and climate data were used. The model was validated by in-situ streamflow information obtained from Rantau Panjang station for the year 2006. The coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency were 0.35/0.02 for daily simulated streamflow and 0.92/0.21 for monthly simulated streamflow, respectively. The results show that free data can provide a better simulation at a monthly scale compared to a daily basis in a tropical region. A sensitivity analysis and calibration procedure should be conducted in order to maximize the "goodness-of-fit" between simulated and observed streamflow. The application of Internet datasets promises an acceptable performance of streamflow modelling. This research demonstrates that public domain data is suitable for streamflow modelling in a tropical river basin within acceptable accuracy.

  11. Free internet datasets for streamflow modelling using SWAT in the Johor river basin, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, M L

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow modelling is a mathematical computational approach that represents terrestrial hydrology cycle digitally and is used for water resources assessment. However, such modelling endeavours require a large amount of data. Generally, governmental departments produce and maintain these data sets which make it difficult to obtain this data due to bureaucratic constraints. In some countries, the availability and quality of geospatial and climate datasets remain a critical issue due to many factors such as lacking of ground station, expertise, technology, financial support and war time. To overcome this problem, this research used public domain datasets from the Internet as ''input'' to a streamflow model. The intention is simulate daily and monthly streamflow of the Johor River Basin in Malaysia. The model used is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). As input free data including a digital elevation model (DEM), land use information, soil and climate data were used. The model was validated by in-situ streamflow information obtained from Rantau Panjang station for the year 2006. The coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency were 0.35/0.02 for daily simulated streamflow and 0.92/0.21 for monthly simulated streamflow, respectively. The results show that free data can provide a better simulation at a monthly scale compared to a daily basis in a tropical region. A sensitivity analysis and calibration procedure should be conducted in order to maximize the ''goodness-of-fit'' between simulated and observed streamflow. The application of Internet datasets promises an acceptable performance of streamflow modelling. This research demonstrates that public domain data is suitable for streamflow modelling in a tropical river basin within acceptable accuracy

  12. ANALISIS WILAYAH KONSERVASI DAERAH ALIRAN SUNGAI (DAS KURANJI DENGAN APLIKASI SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadli Irsyad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Degradasi lahan merupakan penyebab utama tingginya runoff dibandingkan dengan faktor lainnya. Perubahan tata guna lahan yang terjadi pada suatu kawasan menyebabkan terjadinya perubahan kondisi catchment area dan dapat menyebabkan perubahan aliran permukaan (runoff.  Jika limpasan yang terjadi saat hujan kecil dan infiltrasi air ke dalam tanah besar, maka air terlebih dahulu disimpan di dalam tanah sehingga akan meningkatkan ketersediaan air tanah. DAS Kuanji merupakan salah satu DAS di Kota Padang yang memiliki luas 202,7 km2 dan terdiri dari 5 sub-DAS. Penelitian ini dilakukan pada kawasan DAS Kuranji yang secara geografis terletak pada 100o20’31,20” – 100o33’50.40” BT dan 00o55’59.88” - 00o47’24” LS. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan pada bulan Maret – Juni 2013. Penelitian ini menggunakan aplikasi open sources software MapWindows GIS 4.8 RC1 (4.8.1 dari www.mapwindow.org.  Tahapan awal dalam penelitian ini yakni pengumpuan data, analisis SWAT di DAS Kuranji, dan penentuan wilayah konservasi DAS Kuranji. Hasil peneltian yang menggunakan MWSWAT untuk DAS Kuranji didapatkan HRU DAS sebanyak 2.034 HRU. Limpasan terbesar yang terjadi yakni 84 mm dengan luasan 75,195 ha, dan tersebar di empat kecamatan (Pauh, Padang Utara, Nanggalo, dan Kototengah. Wilayah konservasi yang direkomendasikan yakni  Limau Manih (81,56 ha, Lambung Bukit (42,27 ha, Gunung Sarik (86,32 ha, Kuranji (60,20 ha, dan Lubuk Minturun (64,45 ha. Kata kunci: Alih Fungsi Lahan,  DAS Kuranji, Konservasi, Limpasan, MWSWAT.

  13. Differential effects of viroporin inhibitors against feline infectious peritonitis virus serotypes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Nakano, Kenta; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV), a feline coronavirus of the family Coronaviridae, causes a fatal disease called FIP in wild and domestic cat species. The genome of coronaviruses encodes a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, the envelope (E) protein. The E protein possesses ion channel activity. Viral proteins with ion channel activity are collectively termed "viroporins". Hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), a viroporin inhibitor, can inhibit the ion channel activity of the E protein and replication of several coronaviruses. However, it is not clear whether HMA and other viroporin inhibitors affect replication of FIPV. We examined the effect of HMA and other viroporin inhibitors (DIDS [4,4'-disothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulphonic acid] and amantadine) on infection by FIPV serotypes I and II. HMA treatment drastically decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2 in a dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146. In contrast, DIDS treatment decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146 in dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2. We investigated whether there is a difference in ion channel activity of the E protein between viral serotypes using E. coli cells expressing the E protein of FIPV serotypes I and II. No difference was observed, suggesting that a viroporin other than the E protein influences the differences in the actions of HMA and DIDS on FIPV serotypes I and II.

  14. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  15. On the Baldwin effect of He II emission lines in WR (WN) stars

    OpenAIRE

    van Gent, J. I.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; de Koter, A.; Morris, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the equivalent width of He ii emission lines and the monochromatic continuum luminosity at the line wavelength in the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars. Model stellar atmospheres and spectra are used to show that the equivalent width inversely correlates with the monochromatic continuum luminosity. We find the effect in Wolf-Rayet star models over a large range of stellar parameters. The effect is shown to be connected to density differences among Wolf-Rayet star...

  16. Effect of Oral Voriconazole on Fungal Keratitis in the Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial II (MUTT II): A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajna, N Venkatesh; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Rajaraman, Revathi; Patel, Sushila; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Das, Manoranjan; Ray, Kathryn J; O'Brien, Kieran S; Oldenburg, Catherine E; McLeod, Stephen D; Zegans, Michael E; Porco, Travis C; Acharya, Nisha R; Lietman, Thomas M; Rose-Nussbaumer, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    To compare oral voriconazole with placebo in addition to topical antifungals in the treatment of filamentous fungal keratitis. The Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial II (MUTT II), a multicenter, double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, was conducted in India and Nepal, with 2133 individuals screened for inclusion. Patients with smear-positive filamentous fungal ulcers and visual acuity of 20/400 (logMAR 1.3) or worse were randomized to receive oral voriconazole vs oral placebo; all participants received topical antifungal eyedrops. The study was conducted from May 24, 2010, to November 23, 2015. All trial end points were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis. Study participants were randomized to receive oral voriconazole vs oral placebo; a voriconazole loading dose of 400 mg was administered twice daily for 24 hours, followed by a maintenance dose of 200 mg twice daily for 20 days, with dosing altered to weight based during the trial. All participants received topical voriconazole, 1%, and natamycin, 5%. The primary outcome of the trial was rate of corneal perforation or the need for therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (TPK) within 3 months. Secondary outcomes included microbiologic cure at 6 days, rate of re-epithelialization, best-corrected visual acuity and infiltrate and/or scar size at 3 weeks and 3 months, and complication rates associated with voriconazole use. A total of 2133 patients in India and Nepal with smear-positive ulcers were screened; of the 787 who were eligible, 240 (30.5%) were enrolled. Of the 119 patients (49.6%) in the oral voriconazole treatment group, 65 were male (54.6%), and the median age was 54 years (interquartile range, 42-62 years). Overall, no difference in the rate of corneal perforation or the need for TPK was determined for oral voriconazole vs placebo (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.57-1.18; P = .29). In prespecified subgroup analyses comparing treatment effects among organism subgroups, there was some

  17. Aplicación del modelo hidrológico-swat-en una microcuenca agrícola de La Pampa ondulada Application of the hydrologic model - swat - on a micro agricultural basin of the rolling Pampa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Behrends Kraemer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El modelado hidrológico es a menudo el primer paso en el desarrollo de sistemas de decisión espacial para identificaráreas vulnerables a la contaminación por nutrientes, pesticidas así como también a contaminantes biológicos. En este sentido el SWAT (Soil and Water Assesment Tool fue desarrollado para predecir impactos de las prácticas de manejo de las tierras en las aguas, sedimentos y agroquímicos en cuencas hidrográficas con diferentes suelos, usos y prácticas en largos períodos de tiempo. Aunque el mismo está siendo aplicado en todo el mundo, todavía no esta difundido su uso en la Argentina, no encontrándose al momento reportes al respecto. Este modelo se utilizó en una microcuenca agrícola de la Pampa Ondulada (Argentina y fue calibrado y validado utilizando los valores de escurrimientos medidos in situ. Se encontraron buenas eficiencias a escala diaria (R²: 0,55; R² ENS: 0,52 y pobres a escala mensual (R²: 0,34; R² ENS: 0,04. En la calibración, los escurrimientos fueron sobreestimados en un 31,8% y 32,6% para la escala mensual y diaria respectivamente, mientras que en la validación se sobreestimó un 42,5% para los valores mensuales y un 41,2% para los diarios. La aplicación del SWAT en esta microcuenca agrícola resultó auspiciosa y conduce a la inclusión de dicho modelo en futuros trabajos.A hydrological model is often the first step for the development of spatial decision systems in order to identify vulnerable areas to the pollution by nutrients, pesticides as well as biological contaminants. The SWAT model was developed to predict the impact of land management on water, agrochemicals and sediments in hydrographical basins with different soils, land uses and practices for long time periods. This model is being used all over the world but it has not been applied in Argentina until present. The SWAT model was used in an agricultural microbasin in the Rolling Pampa (Argentina and was calibrated and validated

  18. Renoprotective effects of angiotensin II receptor blockade in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce angiotensin II formation and induce bradykinin accumulation. Animal studies suggest that bradykinin may play a role for the effects of ACE inhibition on blood pressure and kidney function. Therefore, we compared the renal and hem...... inhibition is primarily caused by interference in the renin-angiotensin system. Our study suggest that losartan represents a valuable new drug in the treatment of hypertension and proteinuria in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy....... and hemodynamic effects of specific intervention in the renin-angiotensin system by blockade of the angiotensin II subtype-1 receptor to the effect of ACE inhibition. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial was performed in 16 type 1 diabetic patients (10 men), age 42 +/- 2 years (mean +/- SEM...

  19. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Effect of the Electron Cloud and CSR on the Upgrade of the PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, Samuel A

    2001-01-01

    Effects of the electron cloud and of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the possible upgrade of the PEP-II B-factory are studied. PEP-II B factory operates with parameters shown in Table 1 and already exceeds the design luminosity. Nevertheless, a possibility of upgrading the machine to even higher luminosities is under consideration [1]. Several scenarios are summarized in Table 2. This paper describes effects of the electron cloud and of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the proposed upgrades of the PEP-II B-factory. The first effect was observed [3] and caused [4] the degradation of the emittance at KEK B-factory. The analytic expression for the e-wake [2] is used in calculations of the head-tail instability. Other obvious effects of higher beam currents such as additional heat load are not considered. The short wave length CSR has been recently observed at Brookhaven [6]. Consideration of the effect of such CSR on the beam dynamics is based on our previous paper [7

  1. Assessment of land-use change on streamflow using GIS, remote sensing and a physically-based model, SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. G. Dos Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the impact of the land-use changes between the periods 1967−1974 and 1997−2008 on the streamflow of Tapacurá catchment (northeastern Brazil using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model. The results show that the most sensitive parameters were the baseflow, Manning factor, time of concentration and soil evaporation compensation factor, which affect the catchment hydrology. The model calibration and validation were performed on a monthly basis, and the streamflow simulation showed a good level of accuracy for both periods. The obtained R2 and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values for each period were respectively 0.82 and 0.81 for 1967−1974, and 0.93 and 0.92 for the period 1997−2008. The evaluation of the SWAT model response to the land cover has shown that the mean monthly flow, during the rainy seasons for 1967−1974, decreased when compared to 1997−2008.

  2. Screening of 110 cirrhotic patients for hepatitis B and C at Saidu Teaching Hospital, Saidu Sharif, Swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, B.; Khan, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Cirrhosis liver is amongst the commonest clinical conditions in Pakistan. Besides other causes, it is mostly related to previous viral infection, in this part of the world. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of HBsAg and anti HCV in cirrhotic patients of Swat district. This Prospective Study was conducted in the Medical unit of Saidu Teaching Hospital, Saidu Sharif from January 2006 to December 2006. One hundred and ten Cirrhotic Patients, 62 Male and 48 Female aged from 14 to 75 years were included in this study. Sera were tested by third generation Elisa method. Fifty-nine out of 110 (53.6%) patients were positive for anti HCV antibodies. Twenty-four (21.81%) Patients were positive for HBsAg. Eleven (10%) patients were positive for both HBsAg and anti HCV anti bodies. Sixteen (14.54%) were negative for both sero maker of hepatitis B and C. It is evident from this study that Hepatitis C, is a leading cause of cirrhosis in District Swat followed by HBV. Both the viruses account for at least three fourths of the total Cirrhotic. (Author)

  3. A comparison of SWAT, HSPF and SHETRAN/GOPC for modelling phosphorus export from three catchments in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Ahmed; Bruen, Michael; Jordan, Philip; Moles, Richard; Kiely, Gerard; Byrne, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Recent extensive water quality surveys in Ireland revealed that diffuse phosphorus (P) pollution originating from agricultural land and transported by runoff and subsurface flows is the primary cause of the deterioration of surface water quality. P transport from land to water can be described by mathematical models that vary in modelling approach, complexity and scale (plot, field and catchment). Here, three mathematical models (soil water and analysis tools (SWAT), hydrological simulation program-FORTRAN (HSPF) and système hydrologique Européen TRANsport (SHETRAN)/grid oriented phosphorus component (GOPC)) of diffuse P pollution have been tested in three Irish catchments to explore their suitability in Irish conditions for future use in implementing the European Water Framework Directive. After calibrating the models, their daily flows and total phosphorus (TP) exports are compared and assessed. The HSPF model was the best at simulating the mean daily discharge while SWAT gave the best calibration results for daily TP loads. Annual TP exports for the three models and for two empirical models were compared with measured data. No single model is consistently better in estimating the annual TP export for all three catchments.

  4. Engineering characterization of ground motion. Task II: Soil structure interaction effects on structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luco, J E; Wong, H L [Structural and Earthquake Engineering Consultants, Inc., Sierra Madre, CA (United States); Chang, C -Y; Power, M S; Idriss, I M [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1986-08-01

    This report presents the results of part of a two-task study on the engineering characterization of earthquake ground motion for nuclear power plant design. The overall objective of this research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is to develop recommendations for methods for selecting design response spectra or acceleration time histories to be used to characterize motion at the foundation level of nuclear power plants. Task I of the study, which is presented in Vol. 1 of NUREG/CR-3805, developed a basis for selecting design response spectra taking into account the characteristics of free-field ground motion found to be significant in causing structural damage. Task II incorporates additional considerations of effects of spatial variations of ground motions and soil-structure interaction on foundation motions and structural response. The results of Task II are presented in Vols. 2 through of NUREG/CR-3805 as follows: Vol. 2 effects of ground motion characteristics on structural response considering localized structural nonlinearities and soil-structure interaction effects; Vol. 3 observational data on spatial variations of earthquake ground motions; Vol. 4 soil-structure interaction effects on structural response; and Vol. 5, summary based on Tasks I and II studies. This report presents the results of the Vol. 4 studies.

  5. A Guideline for Successful Calibration and Uncertainty Analysis for Soil and Water Assessment: A Review of Papers from the 2016 International SWAT Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim C. Abbaspour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of integrated hydrological models to manage a watershed’s water resources are increasingly finding their way into the decision-making processes. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT is a multi-process model integrating hydrology, ecology, agriculture, and water quality. SWAT is a continuation of nearly 40 years of modeling efforts conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS. A large number of SWAT-related papers have appeared in ISI journals, building a world-wide consensus around the model’s stability and usefulness. The current issue is a collection of the latest research using SWAT as the modeling tool. Most models must undergo calibration/validation and uncertainty analysis. Unfortunately, these sciences are not formal subjects of teaching in most universities and the students are often left to their own resources to calibrate their model. In this paper, we focus on calibration and uncertainty analysis highlighting some serious issues in the calibration of distributed models. A protocol for calibration is also highlighted to guide the users to obtain better modeling results. Finally, a summary of the papers published in this special issue is provided in the Appendix.

  6. Assessing the efficacy of the SWAT auto-irrigation function to simulate Irrigation, evapotranspiration and crop response to irrigation management strategies of the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is widely used for simulation of hydrologic processes at various temporal and spatial scales. Less common are long-term simulation analyses of water balance components including agricultural management practices such as irrigation management. In the se...

  7. SWAT Model Application to Assess the Impact of Intensive Corn‐farming on Runoff, Sediments and Phosphorous loss from an Agricultural Watershed in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential future increase in corn-based biofuel may be expected to have a negative impact on water quality in streams and lakes of the Midwestern US due to increased agricultural chemicals usage. This study used the SWAT model to assess the impact of continuous-corn farming o...

  8. The effect of Cu{sup II} ions in L-asparagine single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Ricardo C., E-mail: santana@ufg.br; Gontijo, Henrique O.; Menezes, Arthur F.; Martins, José A.; Carvalho, Jesiel F., E-mail: carvalho@ufg.br

    2016-11-15

    We report the synthesis, crystal growth, and spectroscopic characterization of L-asparagine monohydrate (LAM) single crystals doped with CuII. The crystals were successfully grown by slow cooling from a supersaturated aqueous solution up to size of 16×12×2 mm{sup 3};the effect of copper impurities in the crystals morphology was discussed. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) was used to calculate the g and hyperfine coupling (A) tensors of the CuII ions (g{sub 1}=2.044, g{sub 2}=2.105, g{sub 3}=2.383and A{sub 1}≈0, A{sub 2}=35, A{sub 3}=108 Gauss). The EPR spectra for certain orientations of the magnetic field suggest that CuII ions are coordinated to two {sup 14}N atoms. Correlating the EPR and optical absorption results, the crystal field and the Cu{sup II} orbital bond parameters were calculated. The results indicate that the paramagnetic center occupies interstitial rhombic distorted site and the ground orbital state for the unpaired electron is the d(x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}).

  9. Sensitivity analysis for hydrology and pesticide supply towards the river in SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, K.; van Griensven, A.; Seuntjens, P.; Vanrolleghem, P. A.

    The dynamic behaviour of pesticides in river systems strongly depends on varying climatological conditions and agricultural management practices. To describe this behaviour at the river-basin scale, integrated hydrological and water quality models are needed. A crucial step in understanding the various processes determining pesticide fate is to perform a sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis for hydrology and pesticide supply in SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) will provide useful support for the development of a reliable hydrological model and will give insight in which parameters are most sensitive concerning pesticide supply towards rivers. The study was performed on the Nil catchment in Belgium. In this study we utilised an LH-OAT sensitivity analysis. The LH-OAT method combines the One-factor-At-a-Time (OAT) design and Latin Hypercube (LH) sampling by taking the Latin Hypercube samples as initial points for an OAT design. By means of the LH-OAT sensitivity analysis, the dominant hydrological parameters were determined and a reduction of the number of model parameters was performed. Dominant hydrological parameters were the curve number (CN2), the surface runoff lag (surlag), the recharge to deep aquifer (rchrg_dp) and the threshold depth of water in the shallow aquifer (GWQMN). Next, the selected parameters were estimated by manual calibration. Hereby, the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency improved from an initial value of -22.4 to +0.53. In the second part, sensitivity analyses were performed to provide insight in which parameters or model inputs contribute most to variance in pesticide output. The results of this study show that for the Nil catchment, hydrologic parameters are dominant in controlling pesticide predictions. The other parameter that affects pesticide concentrations in surface water is ‘apfp_pest’, which meaning was changed into a parameter that controls direct losses to the river system (e.g., through the clean up of spray

  10. Spatial multiobjective optimization of agricultural conservation practices using a SWAT model and an evolutionary algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabotyagov, Sergey; Campbell, Todd; Valcu, Adriana; Gassman, Philip; Jha, Manoj; Schilling, Keith; Wolter, Calvin; Kling, Catherine

    2012-12-09

    Finding the cost-efficient (i.e., lowest-cost) ways of targeting conservation practice investments for the achievement of specific water quality goals across the landscape is of primary importance in watershed management. Traditional economics methods of finding the lowest-cost solution in the watershed context (e.g.,(5,12,20)) assume that off-site impacts can be accurately described as a proportion of on-site pollution generated. Such approaches are unlikely to be representative of the actual pollution process in a watershed, where the impacts of polluting sources are often determined by complex biophysical processes. The use of modern physically-based, spatially distributed hydrologic simulation models allows for a greater degree of realism in terms of process representation but requires a development of a simulation-optimization framework where the model becomes an integral part of optimization. Evolutionary algorithms appear to be a particularly useful optimization tool, able to deal with the combinatorial nature of a watershed simulation-optimization problem and allowing the use of the full water quality model. Evolutionary algorithms treat a particular spatial allocation of conservation practices in a watershed as a candidate solution and utilize sets (populations) of candidate solutions iteratively applying stochastic operators of selection, recombination, and mutation to find improvements with respect to the optimization objectives. The optimization objectives in this case are to minimize nonpoint-source pollution in the watershed, simultaneously minimizing the cost of conservation practices. A recent and expanding set of research is attempting to use similar methods and integrates water quality models with broadly defined evolutionary optimization methods(3,4,9,10,13-15,17-19,22,23,25). In this application, we demonstrate a program which follows Rabotyagov et al.'s approach and integrates a modern and commonly used SWAT water quality model(7) with a

  11. Modelování průtoků a vybraných parametrů jakosti vod na povodí Jenínského potoka modelem SWAT

    OpenAIRE

    HOMOLKA, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The thesis continues with the bachelor thesis which had dealt with preparation bases for simulation draining and carrying materials in SWAT model. Simulation should have been realized within basin of the Jenín stream, which watershed is 4,65 km2 large. SWAT model is primary developed for the larger watersheds where simulated values doesn't attain tolerances. Because of this is thesis focused on the methodic of simulation itself, discussion of the problem when is SWAT model almost useless for ...

  12. Effect of picroside II on hind limb ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kılıç Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yiğit Kılıç,1 Abdullah Özer,1 Tolga Tatar,1 Mustafa Hakan Zor,1 Mehmet Kirişçi,2 Hakan Kartal,3 Ali Doğan Dursun,4 Deniz Billur,5 Mustafa Arslan,6 Ayşegül Küçük7 1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Gazi University Medical Faculty, Ankara, 2Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaras, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Ardahan State Hospital, Ardahan, 4Department of Physiology, Ankara University Medical Faculty, 5Department of Histology and Embryology, Ankara University Medical Faculty, 6Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Gazi University Medical Faculty, Ankara, 7Department of Physiology, Dumlupinar University Medical Faculty, Kütahya, Turkey Introduction: Many structural and functional damages are observed in cells and tissues after reperfusion of previously viable ischemic tissues. Acute ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury of lower extremities occurs especially when a temporary cross-clamp is applied to the abdominal aorta during aortic surgery. Research regarding the treatment of I/R injury has been increasing day-by-day. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of picroside II on skeletal muscle of rats experiencing simulated I/R.Materials and methods: Twenty-four male Wistar albino rats weighing between 210 and 300 g were used in this study. Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6 rats each (control, I/R, control + picroside II, and I/R + picroside II. The infrarenal section of the abdominal aorta was occluded with an atraumatic microvascular clamp in I/R group. The clamp was removed after 120 minutes and reperfusion was provided for a further 120 minutes. Picroside II (10 mg kg–1 was administered intraperitoneally to the animals in control + picroside II and I/R + picroside II groups. At the end of the study, skeletal muscle tissue was obtained for the determination of total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant status (TAS levels

  13. A SWAT model validation of nested-scale contemporaneous stream flow, suspended sediment and nutrients from a multiple-land-use watershed of the central USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Sean J; Hubbart, Jason A

    2016-12-01

    There is an ongoing need to validate the accuracy of predictive model simulated pollutant yields, particularly from multiple-land-use (i.e. forested, agricultural, and urban) watersheds. However, there are seldom sufficient observed data sets available that supply requisite spatial and temporal resolution and coupled multi-parameter constituents for rigorous model performance assessment. Four years of hydroclimate and water quality data were used to validate SWAT model estimates of monthly stream flow, suspended sediment, total phosphorus, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and total inorganic nitrogen from 5 nested-scale gauging sites located in a multiple-land-use watershed of the central USA. The uncalibrated SWAT model satisfactorily simulated monthly stream flow with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) values ranging from 0.50 near the headwaters, to 0.75 near the watershed outlet. However, the uncalibrated model did not accurately simulate monthly sediment, total phosphorus, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and total inorganic nitrogen with NSE valuesSWAT model to multiple gauging sites within the watershed improved estimates of monthly stream flow (NSE=0.83), sediment (NSE=0.78), total phosphorus (NSE=0.81), nitrate (NSE=0.90), and total inorganic nitrogen (NSE=0.86). However, NSE values were model performance decreased for sediment, nitrate, and total inorganic nitrogen during the validation period with NSE valuesSWAT model to multiple gauging sites and provide guidance to SWAT model (or similar models) users wishing to improve model performance at multiple scales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling Agricultural Watersheds with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT): Calibration and Validation with a Novel Procedure for Spatially Explicit HRUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshager, Awoke Dagnew; Gassman, Philip W; Secchi, Silvia; Schoof, Justin T; Misgna, Girmaye

    2016-04-01

    Applications of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model typically involve delineation of a watershed into subwatersheds/subbasins that are then further subdivided into hydrologic response units (HRUs) which are homogeneous areas of aggregated soil, landuse, and slope and are the smallest modeling units used within the model. In a given standard SWAT application, multiple potential HRUs (farm fields) in a subbasin are usually aggregated into a single HRU feature. In other words, the standard version of the model combines multiple potential HRUs (farm fields) with the same landuse/landcover, soil, and slope, but located at different places of a subbasin (spatially non-unique), and considers them as one HRU. In this study, ArcGIS pre-processing procedures were developed to spatially define a one-to-one match between farm fields and HRUs (spatially unique HRUs) within a subbasin prior to SWAT simulations to facilitate input processing, input/output mapping, and further analysis at the individual farm field level. Model input data such as landuse/landcover (LULC), soil, crop rotation, and other management data were processed through these HRUs. The SWAT model was then calibrated/validated for Raccoon River watershed in Iowa for 2002-2010 and Big Creek River watershed in Illinois for 2000-2003. SWAT was able to replicate annual, monthly, and daily streamflow, as well as sediment, nitrate and mineral phosphorous within recommended accuracy in most cases. The one-to-one match between farm fields and HRUs created and used in this study is a first step in performing LULC change, climate change impact, and other analyses in a more spatially explicit manner.

  15. Modeling the Impacts of Spatial Heterogeneity in the Castor Watershed on Runoff, Sediment, and Phosphorus Loss Using SWAT: I. Impacts of Spatial Variability of Soil Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boluwade, Alaba; Madramootoo, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Spatial accuracy of hydrologic modeling inputs influences the output from hydrologic models. A pertinent question is to know the optimal level of soil sampling or how many soil samples are needed for model input, in order to improve model predictions. In this study, measured soil properties were clustered into five different configurations as inputs to the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) simulation of the Castor River watershed (11-km 2 area) in southern Quebec, Canada. SWAT is a process-based model that predicts the impacts of climate and land use management on water yield, sediment, and nutrient fluxes. SWAT requires geographical information system inputs such as the digital elevation model as well as soil and land use maps. Mean values of soil properties are used in soil polygons (soil series); thus, the spatial variability of these properties is neglected. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the impacts of spatial variability of soil properties on the prediction of runoff, sediment, and total phosphorus using SWAT. The spatial clustering of the measured soil properties was undertaken using the regionalized with dynamically constrained agglomerative clustering and partitioning method. Measured soil data were clustered into 5, 10, 15, 20, and 24 heterogeneous regions. Soil data from the Castor watershed which have been used in previous studies was also set up and termed "Reference". Overall, there was no significant difference in runoff simulation across the five configurations including the reference. This may be attributable to SWAT's use of the soil conservation service curve number method in flow simulation. Therefore having high spatial resolution inputs for soil data may not necessarily improve predictions when they are used in hydrologic modeling.

  16. Bauhinia variegata (Caesalpiniaceae) leaf extract: An effective treatment option in type I and type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Garud, Mayuresh S

    2016-10-01

    Among various metabolic disorders, diabetes mellitus is one of the most common disorder. Present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extract of Bauhinia variegata leaves (AE) in animal models of type I and type II diabetes. Type I diabetes was induced by streptozotocin at the dose of 55mg/kg (i.p.) in male Sprague Dawley rats while type II diabetes was induced by high fat diet and streptozotocin at the dose of 35mg/kg (i.p.). Diabetic animals were treated with AE at the dose of 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Glipizide (5mg/kg) was used as standard treatment drug. Treatment was given for 28days. Parameters evaluated were body weight, plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin, creatinine and bun urea nitrogen. In type II diabetes, high density lipoprotein levels in plasma and plasma insulin level were also evaluated. Histopathological study of pancreases were carried out in type I study. AE showed significant decrease in plasma glucose significantly. AE was also found to decrease cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level in both types of diabetes. AE did not show any significant effect on plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase. AE was found to increase the albumin and total protein levels. Histopathological study showed that AE decreases the necrotic changes in the pancreatic tissue. Aqueous extract of B. variegata leaves was found effective in treatment of both type I and type II diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The effectiveness of the Herbst appliance for patients with Class II malocclusion: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Yafen; Long, Hu; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Ye, Niansong; Gao, Meiya

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective: To systematically investigate review in literature the effects of the Herbst appliance for patients with Class II malocclusion patients. Method: We performed a comprehensive literature survey on PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, CENTRAL, SIGLE, and ClinicalTrial.gov up to December 2014. The selection criteria: randomized controlled trials or clinical controlled trials; using any kind of Herbst appliances to correct Class II division 1 malocclusions; skeletal and/or dental changes evaluated through lateral cephalograms. And the exclusion criteria: syndromic patients; individual case reports and series of cases; surgical interventions. Article screening, data extraction, assessment of risk of bias, and evaluation of evidence quality through GRADE were conducted independently by two well-trained orthodontic doctors. Consensus was made via group discussion of all authors when there is inconsistent information from the two. After that, sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis were performed to evaluate the robustness of the meta-analysis. Results: Twelve clinical controlled trials meet the above-mentioned criteria, and were included in this analysis. All included studies have eleven measures taken during both active treatment effect and long term effect periods, including four angular ones (i.e., SNA, SNB, ANB, mandibular plane angle) and seven linear ones (i.e. Co-Go, Co-Gn, overjet, overbite, molar relationship, A point-OLp, Pg-OLp) during active treatment effect period were statistically pooled. Meta-analysis and sensitivity analysis demonstrated that all these measures showed consistent results except for SNA, ANB, and overbite. Subgroup analysis showed significant changes in SNA, overbite, and Pg-OLp. Publication bias was detected in SNB, mandibular plane angle, and A point-OLp. Conclusion: The Herbst appliance is effective for patients with Class II malocclusion in active treatment period. Especially, there are obvious changes on dental

  18. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  19. Mercury nano-trap for effective and efficient removal of mercury(II) from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyan; Zhang, Yiming; Ma, Dingxuan; Shi, Zhan; Ma, Shengqian

    2014-11-01

    Highly effective and highly efficient decontamination of mercury from aqueous media remains a serious task for public health and ecosystem protection. Here we report that this task can be addressed by creating a mercury ‘nano-trap’ as illustrated by functionalizing a high surface area and robust porous organic polymer with a high density of strong mercury chelating groups. The resultant porous organic polymer-based mercury ‘nano-trap’ exhibits a record-high saturation mercury uptake capacity of over 1,000 mg g-1, and can effectively reduce the mercury(II) concentration from 10 p.p.m. to the extremely low level of smaller than 0.4 p.p.b. well below the acceptable limits in drinking water standards (2 p.p.b.), and can also efficiently remove >99.9% mercury(II) within a few minutes. Our work therefore presents a new benchmark for mercury adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing mercury(II) and also other heavy metal ions from contaminated water for environmental remediation.

  20. The positive effect of oxygenated solvents for the synthetic use of electroregenerated ytterbium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frontana-Uribe, Bernardo A.; Little, R. Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The addition of an oxygen based solvent, THF for example, to classical electrochemical media (DMF or ACN) improved the electrochemical behavior of the Yb(III)/Yb(II) couple. Two highlights of using 2:1 THF-DMF include the diminishing of the passivation at the carbon vitreous electrode when successive cycles are recorded and the almost totally reversible response of the system. The complexing effect of THF positively affects the electron-transfer kinetics of the redox couple, being faster in DMF-THF than in ACN-THF. A similar complexation effect was confirmed using tetraglyme as a cosolvent. The use of 2:1 THF-DMF allowed us to successfully substitute reticulated vitreous carbon in place of mercury as the working electrode for the Yb(II) electrogeneration experiments. Due to the stability of the alcoholate-Yb(III) complex, the recycling of Yb(III) to Yb(II) could not be achieved in the pinacolization reactions that were attempted

  1. Magnetic Configuration Effects Under Neutral Beam Injection at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of NBI absorption and losses, done for the Reference configuration of TJ-II, has been extended to other magnetic configurations of the flexibility diagram. The main results obtained are the following: Fast ion losses. mainly direct ones, are the determinant factor the absorption behaviour. In the absence of radial electric field, the contribution of the delayed fast ion losses in minimal, as well with CX as without, and corresponds, almost exclusively, to low energy trapped ions (1 to t KeV). There is a strong difference between the direct los behaviour corresponding to both injection directions CO and COUNTER. The first one gives always higher losses in TJ-II. For the extreme configurations the direct losses are very high and are originated by resonant effects, that can be observed even for null electric field, and are due to the 0 and-2 resonances. The intermediate configurations are equally separated from both resonances, in consequence the loss level is lower, producing absorption ratios very, acceptable, higher than 60% of the power entering torus at high density and 40 keV. This corresponds to about 1.2 MW absorbed in plasma under balanced injection. In conclusion, the possible presence of resonant effects on the direct losses is the key element to explain the absorption behaviour for the different magnetic configurations. In addition all the configurations placed inside a wide region around the Reference case in the flexibility diagram seem equally convenient for NBI in TJ-II. (Author) 18 refs

  2. Multi-gauge Calibration for modeling the Semi-Arid Santa Cruz Watershed in Arizona-Mexico Border Area Using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Rewati; Norman, Laura A.; Meixner, Thomas; Callegary, James B.

    2012-01-01

    In most watershed-modeling studies, flow is calibrated at one monitoring site, usually at the watershed outlet. Like many arid and semi-arid watersheds, the main reach of the Santa Cruz watershed, located on the Arizona-Mexico border, is discontinuous for most of the year except during large flood events, and therefore the flow characteristics at the outlet do not represent the entire watershed. Calibration is required at multiple locations along the Santa Cruz River to improve model reliability. The objective of this study was to best portray surface water flow in this semiarid watershed and evaluate the effect of multi-gage calibration on flow predictions. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated at seven monitoring stations, which improved model performance and increased the reliability of flow, in the Santa Cruz watershed. The most sensitive parameters to affect flow were found to be curve number (CN2), soil evaporation and compensation coefficient (ESCO), threshold water depth in shallow aquifer for return flow to occur (GWQMN), base flow alpha factor (Alpha_Bf), and effective hydraulic conductivity of the soil layer (Ch_K2). In comparison, when the model was established with a single calibration at the watershed outlet, flow predictions at other monitoring gages were inaccurate. This study emphasizes the importance of multi-gage calibration to develop a reliable watershed model in arid and semiarid environments. The developed model, with further calibration of water quality parameters will be an integral part of the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM), an online decision support tool, to assess the impacts of climate change and urban growth in the Santa Cruz watershed.

  3. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. The effect of non-aqueous solvents on spectrophotometric analysis of lead (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.A.; Bahbouh, M.; Kamuah, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the following non-aqueous solvents: Methanol, Ethanol, Propanol, iso-propanol, dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide and acetonitrile on spectrophotometric analysis of lead (II) was studied. One absorption peak at range 220-340 nm was observed. The values of maximum wave length (λ max ) and maximum molar absorptivity coefficient (ε max ) vary in accordance with the above solvents and the concentration of HC1. the analytical curves, A=f(C Pb 2+ ), for the determination of lead (II) in presence 5 M HC1 (in methanol) and 7 M HC1 (in other solvents) showed linear proportionality over the concentration range 2.5x10 -5 - 2.0x10 -4 M Pb 2+ . (author). 16 Refs., 4 figs., 2 Tabs

  5. Metabolic and clinical effects of Ramadan fasting in patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarahmadi, S.; Larijani, B.; Bastanhagh, M.H.; Pajouhi, M.; Bardar, J. R.; Zahedi, F.; Zendehdel, K.; Akrami, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of fasting on anthropometric indices and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in patients with type II diabetes. Results: Daily cholesterol intake increased in all subjects (p 0.01). Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and serum fructosamine did not change during the study. Plasma insulin (p < 0.05), C-peptide (p < 0.01) and insulin resistance (p < 0.01) decreased only in men. Total and LDL cholesterol increased significantly in all subjects during the study. Conclusion: Ramadan fasting does not alter carbohydrate metabolism or tissue insulin sensitivity in patients with type II diabetes given appropriate dietary education and rescheduling of oral hypoglycaemic medication. Lipid profile is unfavorably altered due to changes in both diet and biochemical response to starvation. (author)

  6. Temperature dependence of the upper critical field of type II superconductors with fluctuation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikitik, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    Fluctuations of the order parameter are taken into consideration in an analysis of the temperature dependence of the upper critical field of a type II superconductor with a three-dimensional superconductivity. This temperature dependence is of universal applicability, to all type II superconductors, if the magnetic fields and temperatures are expressed in appropriate units. This dependence is derived explicitly for the regions of strong and weak magnetic fields. The results are applied to high T c superconductors, for which fluctuation effects are important. For these superconductors, the H c2 (T) dependence is quite different from the linear dependence characteristic of the mean-field theory, over a broad range of magnetic fields

  7. Analysis of climate change impact on runoff and sediment delivery in a Great Lake watershed using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S.; Bhattarai, R.; Cooke, R.

    2011-12-01

    The green house gas loading of the atmosphere has been increasing since the mid 19th century which threatens to dramatically change the earth's climate in the 21st Century. Scientific evidences show that earth's global average surface temperature has risen some 0.75°C (1.3°F) since 1850. Third Assessment Report (TAR) from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that human activities have increased the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which will result in a warming world and other changes in the climate. TAR has projected an increase in globally average surface temperature of 1.4 to 5.8 °C and an increase in precipitation of 5 to 20 % over the period of 1990 to 2100. Assuming a global temperature increase of between 2.8 and 5.2 °C, it was estimated a 7-15% increase in global evaporation and precipitation rates. Global warming and subsequent climate change could raise sea level by several tens of centimeters in the next fifty years. Such a rise may erode beaches, worsen coastal flooding and threaten water quality in estuaries and aquifers. With the climate already changing and further change in climate highly likely to happen, study of impact of climate and the adaptation is a necessary component of any response to climate change. The objective of this study is to analyze the impact of climate change on runoff and sediment delivery in a Great Lake watershed located in Northern Ohio. Maumee River watershed is predominantly an agricultural watershed with an area of 6330 sq mile and drains to Lake Erie. Agricultural area covers about 89.9% of the watershed while wooded area covers 7.3%, 1.2% is urban area and other land uses account for 1.6%. Water Quality Laboratory, Heidelberg College has monitored the watershed for last 25 years. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is used for both water quantity and water quality simulations for past and future scenarios. SWAT is a continuous, long-term watershed scale

  8. Comparison of frequency of hepatitis B and hepatitis C in pregnant women in urban and rural area of district Swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, S.T.; Marwat, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective analytical study was carried out to observe the frequency of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C among the pregnant women of Swat. The study was carried out from January 2008 to December 2008. It was a retrospective study based on review of records of pregnant women admitted to Labour Room of Obstetrics/Gynaecology Unit, Saidu Teaching Hospital, Swat. Patients were screened for Hepatitis B and C by Immuno Chromatographic Technique (ICT) device. The findings were recorded on proforma and analysed. Those found positive on screening test were confirmed by ELISA. Total number of patients screened was 5607. The frequency of Hepatitis B and C (Combined) was 223 (3.98%), out of which 77 (1.37%) were HBsAg positive, 141 (2.52%) were anti HCV positive and 5 (0.09%) were both HBsAg and anti HCV positive. The frequency of Hepatitis B amongst age groups 14-19 , 20-29, 30-39 and 40-49 years were 2/77, 33/77, 40/77, and 2/77) respectively. The frequency of Hepatitis C amongst age groups 14-19, 20-29,30-39 and 40-49 years was 4/141, 59/141, 67/141 and 11/141 respectively. The frequency of Hepatitis B and C in multigravida was 41/77, 67/141, in grand multigravida it was 20/77, 43/141 and in primigravida it was 16/77, 31/141 respectively. The frequency of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C amongst urban and rural population was 32 (39.02%) and 50 (60.98%); and 40 (27.40%) and 106 (72.60%) respectively. The frequency of Hepatitis B and C (Combined) in urban, rural population were 72 (31.58 %) and 156 (68.15 %) respectively. HBsAg and HCV was common infections in pregnant women of Swat. Therefore, every pregnant woman undergoing delivery and/or any other surgical procedure must be screened for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. (author)

  9. Materials science in microelectronics II the effects of structure on properties in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Machlin, Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The subject matter of thin-films - which play a key role in microelectronics - divides naturally into two headings: the processing / structure relationship, and the structure / properties relationship. Part II of 'Materials Science in Microelectronics' focuses on the latter of these relationships, examining the effect of structure on the following: Electrical properties Magnetic properties Optical properties Mechanical properties Mass transport properties Interface and junction properties Defects and properties Captures the importance of thin films to microelectronic development Examines the cause / effect relationship of structure on thin film properties.

  10. Avaliação da carga mental de trabalho e do desempenho de medidas de mensuração: NASA TLX e SWAT Evaluation of mental workload and performance measurement: NASA TLX and SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane de Souza Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avalia a carga mental para atividades desempenhadas em empresa catarinense de soluções em energia e busca comparar os resultados da carga mental de trabalho encontrada a partir de dois métodos de mensuração atualmente mais usados - NASA TLX e SWAT. Por meio deste estudo avaliou-se a carga mental exigida tanto pela atividade de montagem manual, quanto de montagem automática de placas eletrônicas. Os resultados da avaliação da carga mental evidenciaram que entre as duas formas de execução da atividade, as exigências mentais mostram-se maiores na atividade de montagem manual. Os métodos de avaliação da carga mental aplicados em estudos da ergonomia possibilitam conhecer as capacidades e limitações do trabalhador, características da organização do trabalho e facilitam a apresentação quantitativa e qualitativa dos resultados. A comparação do desempenho entre os dois métodos de avaliação da carga mental, também se mostrou como uma investigação pertinente para o campo da ergonomia, já que são poucos os estudos comparativos em relação ao desempenho dos métodos. Na comparação do desempenho geral entre os dois métodos, o método NASA TLX possibilita avaliar a carga mental analisando diversas dimensões da situação de trabalho e apresenta vantagens quando comparado ao SWAT, pois pode ser facilmente aplicado e mostrou-se com maior aceitação por parte dos avaliados.This study evaluates the mental workload in some activities in an electricity generation company in Santa Catarina, Brazil and compares the mental workload measurements obtained using two commonly used measurement methods- NASA TLX and SWAT. The mental workload required by both manual and automated assembly of circuit boards was evaluated. The evaluation of the mental workload showed that comparing these two types of activities, the mental requirements appear to be higher during manual assembly tasks. The methods for assessing the mental

  11. Effect of anti-VEGF treatment on retinopathy of prematurity in Zone II Stage 3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Mei Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of intravitreal ranibizumab injection for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP in Zone II Stage 3+. METHODS: Data was collected for ROP patients with Zone II Stage 3+ who received intravitreal ranibizumab injections between October 2014 and Janu­ary 2017 at the Department of Ophthalmology in our hospital. No prior laser or other intravitreal treatment was done. Prior to the intervention and at each follow-up visit, fundus examination was performed. Gestational age at birth, sex, birth weight, ROP zone, ROP stage, post menstrual age (PMA at treatment, and follow-up pe­riod were recorded. The final clinical status of the retina was evaluated for each patient. The primary outcome mea­sures included ROP recurrences requiring re-treatment, complete or incomplete peripheral vascularization. RESULTS: Eighty-six eyes of 46 premature infants with Zone II Stage 3+ ROP were enrolled in the study. The mean gestational age at birth was 28.18±1.67 (range: 25 to 33wk and the mean birth weight was 1070.57±226.85 (range: 720.00 to 1650.00 g. The mean PMA at treatment was 38.32±2.99 (range: 32.29 to 46.00wk. Seventy-one eyes (82.56% were treated success­fully with intravitreal ranibizumab as monotherapy. Fifteen eyes (17.44% developed recurrent disease. The mean interval between the treatment and retreatment was 5.96±3.22 (range: 1.86 to 11.71wk. All eyes vascularized into zone III at the end of the study and among them 62 eyes (72.09% achieved complete vascu­larization. CONCLUSION: Intravitreal ranibizumab injection is an effective treatment in Zone II Stage 3+ ROP patients. More patients with longer follow-up duration are necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment.

  12. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  13. Future water availability in the largest freshwater Mediterranean lake is at great risk as evidenced from simulations with the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucak, Tuba; Trolle, Dennis; Andersen, Hans Estrup; Thodsen, Hans; Erdoğan, Şeyda; Levi, Eti E; Filiz, Nur; Jeppesen, Erik; Beklioğlu, Meryem

    2017-03-01

    Inter- and intra-annual water level fluctuations and changes in water flow regime are intrinsic characteristics of Mediterranean lakes. Additionally, considering climate change projections for the water-limited Mediterranean region, increased air temperatures and decreased precipitation are anticipated, leading to dramatic declines in lake water levels as well as severe water scarcity problems. The study site, Lake Beyşehir, the largest freshwater lake in the Mediterranean basin, is - like other Mediterranean lakes - threatened by climatic changes and over-abstraction of water for irrigated crop farming. Therefore, implementation of strict water level management policies is required. In this study, an integrated modeling approach was used to predict the future water levels of Lake Beyşehir in response to potential future changes in climate and land use. Water level estimation was performed by linking the catchment model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) with a Support Vector Regression model (ε-SVR). The projected increase in temperature and decrease in precipitation based on the climate change models led to an enhanced potential evapotranspiration and reduced total runoff. On the other hand, the effects of various land use scenarios within the catchment appeared to be comparatively insignificant. According to the ε-SVR model results, changes in hydrological processes caused a water level reduction for all scenarios. Moreover, the MPI-ESM-MR General Circulation Model outputs produced the most dramatic results by predicting that Lake Beyşehir may dry out by the 2040s with the current outflow regime. The results indicate that shallow Mediterranean lakes may face a severe risk of drying out and losing their ecosystem values in the near future if the current intensity of water abstraction is not reduced. In addition, the results also demonstrate that outflow management and sustainable use of water sources are vital to sustain lake ecosystems in water

  14. Preparation of industrial chemicals by acid leaching from the koga nepheline syenite, southern Swat, lesser Himalayas-Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizami, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper encompasses the study on the preparation of industrial chemicals by acid leaching from the Koga nepheline syenite, Southern Swat, Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan. These rocks have been studied in detail by many workers to exploit their industrial utility in the form of powdered rock material in glass and ceramics and steel industry. The present authors for the first time carried out acid leaching studies and prepared a number of industrial chemicals, like, alumina, aluminium sulphate, sodium and ammonium alums, sodium sulphate) and sodium bisulphate by simple chemical reactions at bench scale successfully. The developed process is simple and economically viable. It is recommended to exploit this process in cottage industry in the mountainous areas hosting these rocks for the benefit of local population. The research and development work for production of these chemicals at pilot plant and industrial scale is recommended as well. (author)

  15. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  16. Effect of temperature on sequestration of Cu (II) from aqueous solution onto turmeric powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayoom, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work effect of temperature on adsorption of Cu(II) onto turmeric powder was investigated in order to understand sequestrating behavior of turmeric powder. Langmuir, Freundlich and D-R equilibrium models were employed and changes in equilibrium parameters with changing temperature have been discussed. Various thermodynamic parameters such as delta H, delta G and delta S have been calculated. It was found that with increase in temperature maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II) increase which showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) onto turmeric powder is endothermic. delta H and Ea values also confirmed the same trend. Entropy values showed increased in randomness with increasing temperature. Gibbs free energies were non spontaneous at all the temperatures studied. E values were in the range of 2.89-3.53 KJmol /sup -1/, which indicated that adsorption is essentially of physical nature. The value of S is much less than 1 indicating favourable sticking of adsorbate to adsorbent with physiosorption mechanism predominant. (author)

  17. Effect of angiotensin II, ATP, and ionophore A23187 on potassium efflux in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, M.V.; Marusic, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Angiotensin II stimulus on perifused bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells elicited an increase in 86Rb efflux from cells previously equilibrated with the radioisotope. When 45Ca fluxes were measured under similar conditions, it was observed that Ca and Rb effluxes occurred within the first 30 s of the addition of the hormone and were independent of the presence of external Ca. The 86Rb efflux due to angiotensin II was inhibited by quinine and apamin. The hypothesis that the angiotensin II response is a consequence of an increase in the K permeability of the glomerulosa cell membrane triggered by an increase in cytosolic Ca is supported by the finding that the divalent cation ionophore A23187 also initiated 86Rb or K loss (as measured by an external K electrode). This increased K conductance was also seen with 10(-4) M ATP. Quinine and apamin greatly reduced the effect of ATP or A23187 on 86Rb or K release in adrenal glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that Ca-dependent K channels or carriers are present in the membranes of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells and are sensitive to hormonal stimulus

  18. [Identification of Zaocys type II collagen and its effect on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Feng, Zhi-tao; Zhu, Jun-qing; Wu, Xiang-hui; Li, Juan

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the homology of Zaocys type 1I collagen ( ZC II ) with the C II collagen from other species, and to investigate the effect of ZC II on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). ZC II was purified with restriction pepsin digestion. Then SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and UV spectrophotometry were used to identify the protein,the homology of the ZC II peptide was analyzed with Mass Spectrometry. The model of CIA mice were induced by subcutaneous injection of Chicken C II into male C57BL/6 mice from the base of the tails. After immunization,ZC II [H,M,L:40,20 and 10 μg/(kgd) ]was administered orally to mice from day 21 to 28 accordingly. The severity of the arthritis in each limb was evaluated using a macroscopic scoring system, and his- topathological change of joint was observed by light microscope with HE staining. The molecular weight of ZC II protein deter- mined by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis was between 110 kD and 140 kD, and UV absorption peak appeared at around 230 nm in wave- length. The peptide mass fingerprinting(PMF) of the purified protein by Mass Spectrometry analysis showed that it had at least 4 peptides matched with other species,and the protein score was greater than 95%. Compared with normal group,the CIA model group had significantly higher scores for arthritis and histopathological changes (P II peptide-treated mice with CIA were significantly lower than the mice from CIA model group(P II has high homology with the C II from other species. Oral administration of ZC II can suppress arthritis in mice with CIA and ameliorate the histopathological changes of the joint.

  19. Experimental investigation of edge sheared flow development and configuration effects in the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, M.A.; Hidalgo, C.; Alonso, A.; Calderon, E.; Orozco, O.; Pablos, J.L. de

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results have shown that the generation of spontaneous perpendicular sheared flow (i.e. the naturally occurring shear layer) requires a minimum plasma density or gradient in the TJ-II stellarator. This finding has been observed by means of multiple plasma diagnostics, including probes, fast cameras, reflectometry and HIBP. The obtained shearing rate of the naturally occurring shear layer results in general comparable to the one observed during biasing-improved confinement regimes. It has been found that there is a coupling between the onset of sheared flow development and an increase in the level of plasma edge fluctuations pointing to turbulence as the main ingredient of the radial electric field drive; once the shear flow develops the level of turbulence tends to decrease. The link between the development of sheared flows and plasma density in TJ-II has been observed in different magnetic configurations and plasma regimes. Preliminary results show that the threshold density value depends on the iota value and on the magnetic ripple (plasma volume). Recent experiments carried out in the LHD stellarator have shown that edge sheared flows are also affected by the magnitude of edge magnetic ripple: the threshold density to trigger edge sheared flows increases with magnetic ripple . Those results have been interpreted as an evidence of the importance of neoclassical effect in the physics of ExB sheared flows. For some TJ-II magnetic configurations with higher edge iota (ι/2π≥ 1.8) there is a sharp increase in the edge density gradient simultaneous to a strong reduction of fluctuations and transport and a slight increase of the shearing rate and perpendicular rotation (≥2 km/s) as density increases above the threshold. The role of the edge ripple, the presence of edge rational surfaces and properties of turbulent transport are considered as possible ingredients to explain the spontaneous development of edge sheared flows in TJ-II. (author)

  20. Assessment of TRMM Products and Their Influence on Hydrologic Models within the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, A.; El Kadiri, R.; Durham, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing datasets have been increasingly employed as an ancillary source of essential hydrologic measurements used for the modeling of hydrologic fluxes. Precipitation is one of the most important meteorological forcing parameter in hydrological investigations and land surface modeling, yet it is largely unknown or misused in water budgets and hydrologic models. The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite products are widely being used by the scientific community due to the general spatial and temporal paucity of precipitation data in many parts of world and particularly in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. This research utilized a two-fold approach towards understanding the accuracy of satellite-based rainfall and its application in hydrologic models First, we evaluated the uncertainty, accuracy, and precision of various rainfall satellite products (i.e. TRMM 3B42 V6, TRMM 3B42 V7, TRMM 3B42 V7a and TRMM 3B42 RT) in comparison to in situ gauge data from more than 150 rain gauges in Morocco and across the MENA region. Our analyses extend over many parts of the MENA region in order to assess the effect that different climatic regimes and topographic characteristics have on each TRMM product. Secondly, we analyzed and compared the hydrologic fluxes produced from different modeling inputs for several watersheds within the MENA region. SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) hydrologic models have been developed for the Oum Er Rbia (Morocco), Asyuti (Egypt), and the Sakarya (Turkey) watersheds. SWAT models produced for each watershed include, one model for each of the four satellite TRMM product (STBM-V6, STBM-V7, STBM-V7a, and STBM-RT) and one model for rain gauge based model (RGBM). Findings indicate the best correlation between field-based and satellite-based rainfall measurements is the TRMM V7a (Pearson coefficient: 0.875) product, followed by TRMM V7 (Pearson coefficient: 0.84), then TRMM V6 (Pearson coefficient: 0

  1. Classification and ordination of understory vegetation using multivariate techniques in the Pinus wallichiana forests of Swat Valley, northern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Inayat Ur; Khan, Nasrullah; Ali, Kishwar

    2017-04-01

    An understory vegetation survey of the Pinus wallichiana-dominated temperate forests of Swat District was carried out to inspect the structure, composition and ecological associations of the forest vegetation. A quadrat method of sampling was used to record the floristic and phytosociological data necessary for the analysis using 300 quadrats of 10 × 10 m each. Some vegetation parameters viz. frequency and density for trees (overstory vegetation) as well as for the understory vegetation were recorded. The results revealed that in total, 92 species belonging to 77 different genera and 45 families existed in the area. The largest families were Asteraceae, Rosaceae and Lamiaceae with 12, ten and nine species, respectively. Ward's agglomerative cluster analysis for tree species resulted in three floristically and ecologically distinct community types along different topographic and soil variables. Importance value indices (IVI) were also calculated for understory vegetation and were subjected to ordination techniques, i.e. canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). DCA bi-plots for stands show that most of the stands were scattered around the centre of the DCA bi-plot, identified by two slightly scattered clusters. DCA for species bi-plot clearly identified three clusters of species revealing three types of understory communities in the study area. Results of the CCA were somewhat different from the DCA showing the impact of environmental variables on the understory species. CCA results reveal that three environmental variables, i.e. altitude, slope and P (mg/kg), have a strong influence on distribution of stands and species. Impact of tree species on the understory vegetation was also tested by CCA which showed that four tree species, i.e. P. wallichiana A.B. Jackson, Juglans regia Linn., Quercus dilatata Lindl. ex Royle and Cedrus deodara (Roxb. ex Lamb.) G. Don, have strong influences on associated understory vegetation. It

  2. Looking Like Gold: Chlorite and Talc Transformation in the Golden Slip Ware Production (Swat Valley, North-Western Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maritan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The archaeometric study of the “golden slip” ware (second century BCE—fourth century CE at the site of Barikot (Swat, north-western Pakistan aimed to define its manufacturing technology and provenance of the raw materials used. For this reason, a multianalytical approach consisting of the microscopic, microstructural and mineralogical analysis of both the golden slip and the ceramic paste was adopted. The slip was found to be composed by platy minerals, microchemically identified as talc and chlorite; their intimate association indicated clearly that they derived from a chlorite-talc schist. This rock is geologically available near the site in the “green stones” lenses within the Mingora ophiolites outcropping in the Swat valley. Due to the use of this stone also for the production of stone tools, it cannot be excluded that the chlorite-talc schist used for the golden slip can be derived from manufacturing residues of the Gandharan sculptures. In order to constrain the firing production technology, laboratory replicas were produced using a locally collected clay and coating them with ground chlorite-talc schist. On the basis of the mineralogical association observed in both the slip and the ceramic paste and the thermodynamic stability of the pristine mineral phases, the golden slip pottery underwent firing under oxidising conditions in the temperature interval between 800 °C and 850 °C. The golden and shining looks of the slip were here interpreted as the result of the combined light reflectance of the platy structure of the talc-based coating and the uniform, bright red colour of the oxidized ceramic background.

  3. Assessment of the SWAT model to simulate a watershed with limited available data in the Pampas region, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Martín; Portapila, Margarita; Rigalli, Alfredo; Maydana, Gisela; Burgués, Martín; García, Carlos M

    2017-10-15

    Argentina has been among the world leaders in the production and export of agricultural products since the 1990s. The Carcarañá River Lower Basin (CRLB), a cropland of the Pampas region supplied by extensive rainfall, is located in an area with few streamgauging and other hydrologic/water-quality stations. Therefore, limited hydrologic data are available resulting in limited water-resources assessment. This work explores the application of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to the CRLB in the Santa Fe province of the Pampas region. The analysis of field and remote-sensing data characterizing hydrology, water quality, soil types, land use/land cover, management practices, and crop yield, guarantee a comprehensive SWAT modeling approach. A combined manual and automated calibration and validation process incorporating sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is performed using information concerning interior watershed processes. Eleven N/P fertilizer rates are selected to simulate the impact of N fertilizer on crop yield, plant uptake, as well as runoff and leaching losses. Different indices (partial factor productivity, agronomic efficiency, apparent crop recovery efficiency of applied nutrient, internal utilization efficiency, and physiological efficiency) are considered to assess nitrogen-use efficiency. The overall quality of the fit is satisfactory considering the input data limitations. This work provides, for the first time in Argentina, a reliable tool to simulate yield response to soil quality and water availability capable to meet defined environmental targets to support decision making on planning public policies and private activities on the Pampas region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulating Crop Evapotranspiration Response under Different Planting Scenarios by Modified SWAT Model in an Irrigation District, Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Sufen; Xue, Han; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-01-01

    Modelling crop evapotranspiration (ET) response to different planting scenarios in an irrigation district plays a significant role in optimizing crop planting patterns, resolving agricultural water scarcity and facilitating the sustainable use of water resources. In this study, the SWAT model was improved by transforming the evapotranspiration module. Then, the improved model was applied in Qingyuan Irrigation District of northwest China as a case study. Land use, soil, meteorology, irrigation scheduling and crop coefficient were considered as input data, and the irrigation district was divided into subdivisions based on the DEM and local canal systems. On the basis of model calibration and verification, the improved model showed better simulation efficiency than did the original model. Therefore, the improved model was used to simulate the crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios in the irrigation district. Results indicated that crop evapotranspiration decreased by 2.94% and 6.01% under the scenarios of reducing the planting proportion of spring wheat (scenario 1) and summer maize (scenario 2) by keeping the total cultivated area unchanged. However, the total net output values presented an opposite trend under different scenarios. The values decreased by 3.28% under scenario 1, while it increased by 7.79% under scenario 2, compared with the current situation. This study presents a novel method to estimate crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios using the SWAT model, and makes recommendations for strategic agricultural water management planning for the rational utilization of water resources and development of local economy by studying the impact of planting scenario changes on crop evapotranspiration and output values in the irrigation district of northwest China.

  5. Simulating Crop Evapotranspiration Response under Different Planting Scenarios by Modified SWAT Model in an Irrigation District, Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    Full Text Available Modelling crop evapotranspiration (ET response to different planting scenarios in an irrigation district plays a significant role in optimizing crop planting patterns, resolving agricultural water scarcity and facilitating the sustainable use of water resources. In this study, the SWAT model was improved by transforming the evapotranspiration module. Then, the improved model was applied in Qingyuan Irrigation District of northwest China as a case study. Land use, soil, meteorology, irrigation scheduling and crop coefficient were considered as input data, and the irrigation district was divided into subdivisions based on the DEM and local canal systems. On the basis of model calibration and verification, the improved model showed better simulation efficiency than did the original model. Therefore, the improved model was used to simulate the crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios in the irrigation district. Results indicated that crop evapotranspiration decreased by 2.94% and 6.01% under the scenarios of reducing the planting proportion of spring wheat (scenario 1 and summer maize (scenario 2 by keeping the total cultivated area unchanged. However, the total net output values presented an opposite trend under different scenarios. The values decreased by 3.28% under scenario 1, while it increased by 7.79% under scenario 2, compared with the current situation. This study presents a novel method to estimate crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios using the SWAT model, and makes recommendations for strategic agricultural water management planning for the rational utilization of water resources and development of local economy by studying the impact of planting scenario changes on crop evapotranspiration and output values in the irrigation district of northwest China.

  6. Steric Effects on the Binding of Phosphate and Polyphosphate Anions by Zinc(II) and Copper(II) Dinuclear Complexes of m-Xylyl-bis-cyclen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Catarina V; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tripier, Raphaël; Delgado, Rita

    2018-05-11

    The triethylbenzene-bis-cyclen (cyclen = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) compound (tbmce) was designed with an imposed structural rigidity at the m-xylyl spacer to be compared to a less restrained and known parent compound (bmce). The framework of both compounds differs only in the substituents of the m-xylyl spacer. The study was centered in the differences observed in the acid-base reactions of both compounds, their copper(II) and zinc(II) complexation behaviors, as well as in the uptake of phosphate and polyphosphate anions (HPPi 3- , ATP 4- , ADP 3- , AMP 2- , PhPO 4 2- , and HPO 4 2- ). On the one hand, the acid-base reactions showed lower values for the third and fourth protonation constants of tbmce than for bmce, suggesting that the ethyl groups of the spacer in tbmce force the two cyclen units to more conformational restricted positions. On the other hand, the stability constant values for copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes revealed that bmce is a better chelator than tbmce pointing out to additional conformational restraints imposed by the triethylbenzene spacer. The binding studies of phosphates by the dinuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes showed much smaller effective association constants for the dicopper complexes. Single-crystal X-ray and computational (density functional theory) studies suggest that anion binding promotes the formation of tetranuclear entities in which anions are bridging the metal centers. Our studies also revealed the dinuclear zinc(II) complex of bmce as a promising receptor for phosphate anions, with the largest effective association constant of 5.94 log units being observed for the formation of [Zn 2 bmce(HPPi)] + . Accordingly, a colorimetric study via an indicator displacement assay to detect phosphates in aqueous solution found that the [Zn 2 bmce] 4+ complex acts as the best receptor for pyrophosphate displaying a detection limit of 2.5 nM by changes visible to naked eye.

  7. The Morse code effect: A crystal-crystal transformation observed in gel-grown lead (II) oxalate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisgarten, J. N.; Marks, J. A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports on an unusual crystal-crystal transformation phenomenon, which we have called the Morse Code Effect, based on the change in appearance of lead(II) oxalate crystals grown in agarose gels.

  8. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991–2003 field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine. Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE  <  0.5 uncalibrated flow and nitrate loss results for a mildly sloped watershed with low runoff. The calibrated monthly tile flow, surface flow, nitrate-N in tile and surface flow, sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.65 and nitrate in tile flow (NSE  =  0.48–0.68 for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE  =  0.00–0.32 and −0.29–0.06, respectively. The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE  =  0.50–0.81 better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE  =  −0.11–0.49. The calibration

  9. Comparison of performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT 2009 and 2012 in an extensively tile-drained watershed in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Gitau, Margaret; Merwade, Venkatesh; Arnold, Jeffrey; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Hirschi, Michael; Engel, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Subsurface tile drainage systems are widely used in agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern US and enable the Midwest area to become highly productive agricultural lands, but can also create environmental problems, for example nitrate-N contamination associated with drainage waters. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been used to model watersheds with tile drainage. SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 provide new tile drainage routines. However, few studies have used these revisions to study tile drainage impacts at both field and watershed scales. Moreover, SWAT2012 revision 645 improved the soil moisture based curve number calculation method, which has not been fully tested. This study used long-term (1991-2003) field site and river station data from the Little Vermilion River (LVR) watershed to evaluate performance of tile drainage routines in SWAT2009 revision 528 (the old routine) and SWAT2012 revisions 615 and 645 (the new routine). Both the old and new routines provided reasonable but unsatisfactory (NSE runoff. The calibrated monthly tile flow, surface flow, nitrate-N in tile and surface flow, sediment and annual corn and soybean yield results from SWAT with the old and new tile drainage routines were compared with observed values. Generally, the new routine provided acceptable simulated tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.65) and nitrate in tile flow (NSE = 0.48-0.68) for field sites with random pattern tile and constant tile spacing, while the old routine simulated tile flow and nitrate in tile flow results for the field site with constant tile spacing were unacceptable (NSE = 0.00-0.32 and -0.29-0.06, respectively). The new modified curve number calculation method in revision 645 (NSE = 0.50-0.81) better simulated surface runoff than revision 615 (NSE = -0.11-0.49). The calibration provided reasonable parameter sets for the old and new routines in the LVR watershed, and the validation results showed that the new routine has the potential to accurately

  10. Constraining top quark effective theory in the LHC Run II era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy; Englert, Christoph; Ferrando, James; Miller, David J.; Moore, Liam; Russell, Michael; White, Chris D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Glasgow,Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The TopFitter collaboration

    2016-04-04

    We perform an up-to-date global fit of top quark effective theory to experimental data from the Tevatron, and from LHC Runs I and II. Experimental data includes total cross-sections up to 13 TeV, as well as differential distributions, for both single top and pair production. We also include the top quark width, charge asymmetries, and polarisation information from top decay products. We present bounds on the coefficients of dimension six operators, and examine the interplay between inclusive and differential measurements, and Tevatron/LHC data. All results are currently in good agreement with the Standard Model.

  11. Hierarchical competition models with the Allee effect II: the case of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assas, Laila; Dennis, Brian; Elaydi, Saber; Kwessi, Eddy; Livadiotis, George

    2015-01-01

    This is part II of an earlier paper that dealt with hierarchical models with the Allee effect but with no immigration. In this paper, we greatly simplify the proofs in part I and provide a proof of the global dynamics of the non-hyperbolic cases that were previously conjectured. Then, we show how immigration to one of the species or to both would, drastically, change the dynamics of the system. It is shown that if the level of immigration to one or to both species is above a specified level, then there will be no extinction region where both species go to extinction.

  12. [Improving the effectiveness of functional jaw orthopedics in Class II malocclusion by appropriate treatment timing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-12-01

    Time can be considered the fourth dimension in dento-facial orthopedics. Treatment timing can play a significant role in the outcomes of treatment aimed to produce an orthopedic effect in the craniofacial structures. The results of methodologically-sound cephalometric studies of both the past and the recent history of orthodontics clearly indicate that optimal treatment timing for Class II skeletal disharmony with a functional appliance (e.g. twin block) is during or slightly after the peak in mandibular growth as revealed by a reliable biologic indicator of individual skeletal maturity such as the cervical vertebral maturation method. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2010.

  13. Study of coupled-bunch collective effects in the PEP-II B-Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.

    1993-05-01

    We present an overview of the calculated longitudinal and transverse coupled-bunch (CB) growth using the measured RF cavity higher order mode impedance and estimated resistive wall (RW) impedance for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory, a dual-ring electron-positron collider. We also describe a visual method of representing the effective beam impedance and corresponding growth rates which is especially useful for understanding the dependence of growth rate on higher order mode frequency and Q, spread of HOM frequencies between cells, and for determining the requirements of the CB feedback systems

  14. The Effects of World War II on Economic and Health Outcomes across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesternich, Iris; Siflinger, Bettina; Smith, James P.; Winter, Joachim K.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate long-run effects of World War II on socio-economic status and health of older individuals in Europe. We analyze data from SHARELIFE, a retrospective survey conducted as part of SHARE in Europe in 2009. SHARELIFE provides detailed data on events in childhood during and after the war for over 20,000 individuals in 13 European countries. We construct several measures of war exposure—experience of dispossession, persecution, combat in local areas, and hunger periods. Exposure to war and more importantly to individual-level shocks caused by the war significantly predicts economic and health outcomes at older ages. PMID:24850973

  15. Search for Quasi-isodynamic Effects in TJ-II; Busqueda de efectos quasi-isodinamicos en el TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The possibility of quasi-isodynamics effects (QID) in the TJ-II helical axis Stellarator has been explored maintaining the present setting for the toroidal field coils (TFC). In order to do this it has been necessary to implement a new method of calculation, using real space coordinates to follow the particle trajectories, instated the Boozer coordinates as was usual formerly. The result for the exploration of the flexibility diagram of TJ-II, including magnetic axis a shift effects, has been negative. It seems that there are not useful QID regions in TJ-II with the present setting of TFC carrying equal currents in all coils. Nevertheless, in spite of this negative result, the calculation in real space and, mainly, the grater number of configurations analysed, have produced a series of new important results, some of them unexpected. The influence of rational surfaces is very important. Optima and minima of confinement alternate at both sides of the rational values (mainly for the 1/2 by period) in a way very similar to the radial electric field resonance cases. This effect originates in the peculiar orbit topology in the presence of diffusion. Some lines of study are proposed to deal with this problem. Finally, the negative result of the QID search suggests the convenience to start a similar search without the restriction of equal currents on all the TEC. (Author) 18 refs.

  16. Effect of emotional intelligence in glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Mehdizadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes, in addition to adverse physical effects, is associated with many psychological problems. The correlation between physical health and emotional intelligence are acceptable. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of emotional intelligence training in glycemic control in patients with type II diabetes. The present study was a quasi-experimental research, which was conducted in Mashhad city, Iran. The participants included 20 patients referring to the diabetic centers. They were selected through convenience sampling and randomly divided into two groups of experiment (n=10 and control (n=10. To measure blood glucose, the level of HbA1c in patients was measured before and after training. The experimental group attended in a period of emotional intelligence training. The training sessions were held as group discussion during 8 weeks, one session of 120-min per week. The findings suggest that emotional intelligence training significantly reduced the level of blood glucose (HbA1c in the test group compared to the control group. Based on the results, emotional intelligence training, as a psychological intervention, by affecting understanding, interpretation, regulation and efficient use of excitement, is effective along with medication therapy in controlling blood glucose in type II diabetic patients.

  17. Overlapping, Additive and Counterregulatory Effects of Type II and I Interferons on Myeloid Dendritic Cell Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Frasca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are central player in immunity by bridging the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system (IS. Interferons (IFNs are one of the most important factors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity too. Thus, the understanding of how type II and I IFNs modulate the immune-regulatory properties of DCs is a central issue in immunology. In this paper, we will address this point in the light of the most recent literature, also highlighting the controversial data reported in the field. According to the wide literature available, type II as well as type I IFNs appear, at the same time, to collaborate, to induce additive effects or overlapping functions, as well as to counterregulate each one's effects on DC biology and, in general, the immune response. The knowledge of these effects has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of infectious/autoimmune diseases and cancer and indicates strategies for using IFNs as vaccine adjuvants and in DC-based immune therapeutic approaches.

  18. Continuum theory of the mixed-state and surface Joule effects in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquet, T.; Mathieu, P.; Simon, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological theory of vortex motion, where the mixed state is regarded as a continuum, has been proposed by two of the authors in a short previous letter. Its outlines are recalled in this paper with further comments and arguments; in particular the basic equations and their implications are discussed at some length. This theory leads to a model of pinning, from which we argue that critical currents I c , in soft type-II samples of standard bulk homogeneity, should be governed essentially by surface defects. I c is interpreted as a physically well-defined part of the total transport current I, which is flowing over a small depth close to the surface. Thus, on the scale of an ordinary sample, this part of the transport current is superficial, the remaining part I-I c being uniformly distributed over the cross section. Coherently, an analysis of the dissipation in such samples predicts that the part VI c of the total Joule effect VI must arise as surface heat sources, while the Joule effect V(I-I c ), usually associated with the steady viscous flow of vortices, is uniformly distributed in the bulk. As a proof, we present a method, using second-sound acoustics, to detect and separate surface and volume heat sources. Experimental results give clear evidence of a surface Joule effect, and support the validity of our model of surface pinning in soft materials

  19. Study of an instability of the PEP-II positron beam (Ohmi effect and multipactoring)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The paper is organized in the following way. First, Ohmi effect induced by direct flow of primary photoelectrons is studied for the PEP-II parameters. The production rate and kinematics take into account the antechamber of the LER. We discuss the effect of the secondary emission of electrons in the AL chamber, where the yield is larger than one. Resonance multipactoring is considered, and then the average density of the secondary electrons is estimated taking into account the space-charge effect and the interaction with the beam. We show that in the extreme case there is a self-consistent regime similar to the regime of the space-charge dominated cathode. Finally, the rate of ion production by accumulated electrons and the possibility of the ion induced pressure instability is discussed

  20. 3D effects on transport and plasma control in the TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, F.; Alegre, D.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Ascasíbar, E.; Baciero, A.; de Bustos, A.; Baiao, D.; Barcala, J. M.; Blanco, E.; Borchardt, M.; Botija, J.; Cabrera, S.; de la Cal, E.; Calvo, I.; Cappa, A.; Carrasco, R.; Castro, R.; De Castro, A.; Catalán, G.; Chmyga, A. A.; Chamorro, M.; Dinklage, A.; Eliseev, L.; Estrada, T.; Fernández-Marina, F.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; García, L.; García-Cortés, I.; García-Gómez, R.; García-Regaña, J. M.; Guasp, J.; Hatzky, R.; Hernanz, J.; Hernández, J.; Herranz, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Hollmann, E.; Jiménez-Denche, A.; Kirpitchev, I.; Kleiber, R.; Komarov, A. D.; Kozachoek, A. S.; Krupnik, L.; Lapayese, F.; Liniers, M.; Liu, B.; López-Bruna, D.; López-Fraguas, A.; López-Miranda, B.; López-Razola, J.; Losada, U.; de la Luna, E.; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Martín-Díaz, F.; Martínez, M.; Martín-Gómez, G.; Martín-Hernández, F.; Martín-Rojo, A. B.; Martínez-Fernández, J.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Medrano, M.; Melón, L.; Melnikov, A. V.; Méndez, P.; Merino, R.; Miguel, F. J.; van Milligen, B.; Molinero, A.; Momo, B.; Monreal, P.; Moreno, R.; Navarro, M.; Narushima, Y.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Ochando, M. A.; Olivares, J.; Oyarzábal, E.; de Pablos, J. L.; Pacios, L.; Panadero, N.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M. A.; de la Peña, A.; Pereira, A.; Petrov, A.; Petrov, S.; Portas, A. B.; Poveda, E.; Rattá, G. A.; Rincón, E.; Ríos, L.; Rodríguez, C.; Rojo, B.; Ros, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sánchez, M.; Sánchez, E.; Sánchez-Sarabia, E.; Sarksian, K.; Satake, S.; Sebastián, J. A.; Silva, C.; Solano, E. R.; Soleto, A.; Sun, B. J.; Tabarés, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Tallents, S.; Tolkachev, A.; Vega, J.; Velasco, G.; Velasco, J. L.; Wolfers, G.; Yokoyama, M.; Zurro, B.

    2017-10-01

    The effects of 3D geometry are explored in TJ-II from two relevant points of view: neoclassical transport and modification of stability and dispersion relation of waves. Particle fuelling and impurity transport are studied considering the 3D transport properties, paying attention to both neoclassical transport and other possible mechanisms. The effects of the 3D magnetic topology on stability, confinement and Alfvén Eigenmodes properties are also explored, showing the possibility of controlling Alfvén modes by modifying the configuration; the onset of modes similar to geodesic acoustic modes are driven by fast electrons or fast ions; and the weak effect of magnetic well on confinement. Finally, we show innovative power exhaust scenarios using liquid metals.

  1. Long-term effects of Class II orthodontic treatment on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, N C; Saffar, M; Hudel, H; Evälahti, M; Heikinheimo, K; Rice, D P C; Ruf, S

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the long-term (≥15 years) benefit of orthodontic Class II treatment (Tx) on oral health (OH). All patients (Department of Orthodontics, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany) who underwent Class II correction (Herbst-multibracket Tx, end of active Tx ≥ 15 years ago) and agreed to participate in a recall (clinical examination, interview, impressions, and photographs) were included. Records after active Tx were used to assess the long-term OH effects. Data were compared to corresponding population-representative age-cohorts as well as to untreated Class I controls without orthodontic Tx need during adolescence. Of 152 treated Class II patients, 75 could be located and agreed to participate at 33.7 ± 3.0 years of age (pre-Tx age: 14.0 ± 2.7 years). The majority (70.8%) were fully satisfied with their teeth and with their masticatory system. The Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth Index (DMFT) was 7.1 ± 4.8 and, thus, almost identical to that of the untreated Class I controls (7.9 ± 3.6). In contrast, the DMFT in the population-representative age-cohort was 56% higher. The determined mean Community Periodontal Index (CPI) maximum score (1.6 ± 0.6) was also comparable to the untreated Class I controls (1.7 ± 0.9) but in the corresponding population-representative age-cohort it was 19-44% higher. The extent of lower incisor gingival recessions did not differ significantly between the treated Class II participants and the untreated Class I controls (0.1 ± 0.2 vs. 0.0 ± 0.1 mm). Patients with orthodontically treated severe Class II malocclusions had a lower risk for oral health impairment than the general population. The risk corresponded to that of untreated Class I controls (without orthodontic Tx need during adolescence).

  2. Effects of ethylene on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity in Bermuda grass under low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone ethylene has been reported to mediate plant response to cold stress. However, it is still debated whether the effect of ethylene on plant response to cold stress is negative or positive. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of ethylene in the cold resistance of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.). Under control (warm) condition, there was no obvious effect of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) or the antagonist Ag(+) of ethylene signaling on electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Under cold stress conditions, ACC-treated plant leaves had a greater level of EL and MDA than the untreated leaves. However, the EL and MDA values were lower in the Ag(+) regime versus the untreated. In addition, after 3 days of cold treatment, ACC remarkably reduced the content of soluble protein and also altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Under control (warm) condition, there was no significant effect of ACC on the performance of photosystem II (PS II) as monitored by chlorophyll α fluorescence transients. However, under cold stress, ACC inhibited the performance of PS II. Under cold condition, ACC remarkably reduced the performance index for energy conservation from excitation to the reduction of intersystem electron acceptors (PI(ABS)), the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0), the quantum yield of electron transport flux from Q(A) to Q(B) (φE0), and the efficiency/probability of electron transport (ΨE0). Simultaneously, ACC increased the values of specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) and dissipation (DI0/RC) after 3 days of cold treatment. Additionally, under cold condition, exogenous ACC altered the expressions of several related genes implicated in the induction of cold tolerance (LEA, SOD, POD-1 and CBF1, EIN3-1, and EIN3-2). The present study thus suggests that ethylene affects the cold tolerance of Bermuda grass by impacting the antioxidant system

  3. Anti-Leishmania activity of new ruthenium(II) complexes: Effect on parasite-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mônica S; Gonçalves, Yasmim G; Nunes, Débora C O; Napolitano, Danielle R; Maia, Pedro I S; Rodrigues, Renata S; Rodrigues, Veridiana M; Von Poelhsitz, Gustavo; Yoneyama, Kelly A G

    2017-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. The many complications presented by the current treatment - including high toxicity, high cost and parasite resistance - make the development of new therapeutic agents indispensable. The present study aims to evaluate the anti-Leishmania potential of new ruthenium(II) complexes, cis‑[Ru II (η 2 -O 2 CR)(dppm) 2 ]PF 6 , with dppm=bis(diphenylphosphino)methane and R=4-butylbenzoate (bbato) 1, 4-(methylthio)benzoate (mtbato) 2 and 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoate (hmxbato) 3, in promastigote cytotoxicity and their effect on parasite-host interaction. The cytotoxicity of complexes was analyzed by MTT assay against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum promastigotes and the murine macrophage (RAW 264.7). The effect of complexes on parasite-host interaction was evaluated by in vitro infectivity assay performed in the presence of two different concentrations of each complex: the promastigote IC 50 value and the concentration nontoxic to 90% of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Complexes 1-3 exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against all Leishmania species assayed. The IC 50 values ranged from 7.52-12.59μM (complex 1); 0.70-3.28μM (complex 2) and 0.52-1.75μM (complex 3). All complexes significantly inhibited the infectivity index at both tested concentrations. The infectivity inhibitions ranged from 37 to 85%. Interestingly, the infectivity inhibitions due to complex action did not differ significantly at either of the tested concentrations, except for the complex 1 against Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum. The infectivity inhibitions resulted from reductions in both percentage of infected macrophages and number of parasites per macrophage. Taken together the results suggest remarkable leishmanicidal activity in vitro by these new ruthenium(II) complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiation effects on resins and zeolites at Three Mile Island Unit II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.K.; Grant, P.J.; Quinn, G.J.; Hofstetter, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects on resin and zeolite used in the waste cleanup at Three Mile Island Unit II have been examined both experimentally and in-situ. Hydrogen and organic gases are generated due to absorbed radiation as a function of resin material, curie loading and residual water content. Significant oxygen scavaging was demonstrated in the organic resin liners. Hydrogen and oxygen gases in near stoichiometric quantities are generated from irradiation of residual water in inorganic zeolites. Gas generation was determined to be directly proportional to curie content but correlates poorly with residual water content in zeolite vessels. Results of the gas generation analyses of EPICOR II liners show that vessels with less than 166 curies had almost no hydrogen generated during two years of storage and therefore did not require safety measures for shipment or storage. Experimental measurements done at research laboratories predicted similar results associated with hydrogen gas generation and oxygen depletion. X-ray diffraction examinations and ion exchange capacity measurements indicated no evidence of irradiation effects on the structure or cesium exchange capacity for zeolites exposed to 10 10 rads. Darkening and damage of organic resin due to radiation has been identified. Breaking and agglomeration of the purification demineralizer resin is believed to be the result of temperature effects. No damage was identified from radiation effects on zeolite. Organic and inorganic sorbents used in the processing of contaminated waters at TMI-2 have been shown to be effective in maintaining long-term stability under high radiation conditions. The effects of radiolytic degradation have been shown by direct measurements and simulation tests and are of use in their general application throughout the industry

  5. Cephalometric effects of the Jones Jig appliance followed by fixed appliances in Class II malocclusion treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayara Paim; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore; Grec, Roberto Henrique da Costa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to cephalometrically assess the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of Class II malocclusion treatment performed with the Jones Jig appliance followed by fixed appliances. The sample comprised 25 patients with Class II malocclusion treated with the Jones Jig appliance followed by fixed appliances, at a mean initial age of 12.90 years old. The mean time of the entire orthodontic treatment was 3.89 years. The distalization phase lasted for 0.85 years, after which the fixed appliance was used for 3.04 years. Cephalograms were used at initial (T1), post-distalization (T2) and final phases of treatment (T3). For intragroup comparison of the three phases evaluated, dependent ANOVA and Tukey tests were used. Jones Jig appliance did not interfere in the maxillary and mandibular component and did not change maxillomandibular relationship. Jones Jig appliance promoted distalization of first molars with anchorage loss, mesialization and significant extrusion of first and second premolars, as well as a significant increase in anterior face height at the end of treatment. The majority of adverse effects that occur during intraoral distalization are subsequently corrected during corrective mechanics. Buccal inclination and protrusion of mandibular incisors were identified. By the end of treatment, correction of overjet and overbite was observed. Jones Jig appliance promoted distalization of first molars with anchorage loss represented by significant mesial movement and extrusion of first and second premolars, in addition to a significant increase in anterior face height.

  6. Development of blow down and sodium-water reaction jet analysis codes-Validation by sodium-water reaction tests (SWAT-1R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Seino; Akikazu Kurihara; Isao Ono; Koji Jitsu

    2005-01-01

    Blow down analysis code (LEAP-BLOW) and sodium-water reaction jet analysis code (LEAP-JET) have been developed in order to improve the evaluation method on sodium-water reaction event in the steam generator (SG) of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR). The validation analyses by these two codes were carried out using the data of Sodium-Water Reaction Test (SWAT-1R). The following main results have been obtained through this validation: (1) The calculational results by LEAP-BLOW such as internal pressure and water flow rate show good agreement with the results of the SWAT- 1R test. (2) The LEAP-JET code can qualitatively simulate the behavior of sodium-water reaction. However, it is found that the code has tendency to overestimate the maximum temperature of the reaction jet. (authors)

  7. Statistical Detection of the He ii Transverse Proximity Effect: Evidence for Sustained Quasar Activity for >25 Million Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Tobias M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Worseck, Gabor [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Hennawi, Joseph F. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Crighton, Neil H. M. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Lukić, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oñorbe, Jose, E-mail: tschmidt@mpia.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-17

    The reionization of helium at z ~ 3 is the final phase transition of the intergalactic medium and supposed to be driven purely by quasars. The He ii transverse proximity effect—enhanced He ii transmission in a background sightline caused by the ionizing radiation of a foreground quasar—therefore offers a unique opportunity to probe the morphology of He ii reionization and to investigate the emission properties of quasars, e.g., ionizing emissivity, lifetime and beaming geometry. We use the most-recent HST/COS far-UV dataset of 22 He ii absorption spectra and conduct our own dedicated optical spectroscopic survey to find foreground quasars around these He ii sightlines. Based on a set of 66 foreground quasars, we perform the first statistical analysis of the He ii transverse proximity effect. Despite a large object-to-object variance, our stacking analysis reveals an excess in the average He ii transmission near the foreground quasars at 3σ significance. This statistical evidence for the transverse proximity effect is corroborated by a clear dependence of the signal strength on the inferred He ii ionization rate at the background sightline. Our detection places, based on the transverse light crossing time, a geometrical limit on the quasar lifetime of t{sub Q} > 25 Myr. This evidence for sustained activity of luminous quasars is relevant for the morphology of H i and He ii reionization and helps to constrain AGN triggering mechanisms, accretion physics and models of black hole mass assembly. We show how future modeling of the transverse proximity effect can additionally constrain quasar emission geometries and e.g., clarify if the large observed object-to-object variance can be explained by current models of quasar obscuration.

  8. Curcumin-Zn(II) complex for enhanced solubility and stability: an approach for improved delivery and pharmacodynamic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Rashmi; Jain, Nitin; Dhar, K L

    2016-08-01

    The aim of present investigation was to prepare Curcumin-Zn(II) complex in a view to enhance solubility, stability and pharmacodynamic effect in experimentally induced ulcerative colitis. Curcumin-Zn(II) complex was prepared by stirring curcumin with anhydrous zinc chloride at a molar ratio of 1:1. The prepared curcumin metallocomplex was characterized by TLC, FTIR, UV spectroscopy and (1)H NMR. In vitro kinetic degradation and solubility of Curcumin and Curcumin-Zn(II) complex was analyzed spectrophotometrically. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of curcumin and its metal complex was assessed in ulcerative colitis in mice. Curcumin showed chelation with zinc ion as confirmed by the TLC, FTIR, UV spectroscopy and (1)H NMR. The results of TLC [Rf value], IR Spectroscopy [shifting of stretching vibrations of υ(C=C) and υ(C=O)], UV spectra [deconvoluted with absorption band at 432-466.4 nm] of Curcumin-Zn(II) complex compared to curcumin confirmed the formation of metallocomplex. (1)HNMR spectra of Curcumin-Zn(II) showed the upfield shift of Ha and Hb. Kinetic stability studies showed metallocomplex with zinc exhibited good stability. In vivo study revealed significant reduction in severity and extent of colonic damage with Curcumin-Zn(II) which were further confirmed by histopathological study. This study recognizes higher solubility and stability of Curcumin-Zn(II) complex and suggested better pharmacodynamic effects.

  9. Effects of nickel(II) addition on the activity of activated sludge microorganisms and activated sludge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Soon-An; Toorisaka, Eiichi; Hirata, Makoto; Hano, Tadashi

    2004-01-01

    The effects of Ni(II) in a synthetic wastewater on the activity of activated sludge microorganisms and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment process were investigated. Two parallel lab-scale SBR systems were operated. One was used as a control unit, while the other received Ni(II) concentrations equal to 5 and 10 mg/l. The SBR systems were operated with FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE modes in the time ratio of 0.5:3.5:1.0:0.75:0.25 for a cycle time of 6 h. The addition of Ni(II) into SBR system caused drastically dropped in TOC removal rate (k) and specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) by activated sludge microorganisms due to the inhibitory effects of Ni(II) on the bioactivity of microorganisms. The addition of 5 mg/l Ni(II) caused a slight reduction in TOC removal efficiency, whereas 10 mg/l Ni(II) addition significantly affected the SBR performance in terms of suspended solids and TOC removal efficiency. Termination of Ni(II) addition led to almost full recovery of the bioactivity in microorganisms as shown in the increase of specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) and SBR treatment performance

  10. Cephalometric effects of the use of 10-hour Force Theory for Class II treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise de Castro Cabrera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the cephalometric effects promoted by the orthodontic treatment of Class II malocclusion patients with the use of the 10-Hour Force Theory, that consists in the use of fixed appliances with 8 hours a day using a cervical headgear appliance and 16 hours a day using Class II elastics, 8 hours on the first mandibular molar and 8 hours in the second mandibular molar. METHODS: Sample comprised 31 patients with mean initial age of 14.90 years, final mean age of 17.25 years and mean treatment time of 2.35 years. The lateral cephalograms in pre-treatment and post-treatment stages were evaluated. Evaluation of cephalometric changes between initial and final treatment phases was performed by paired t test. RESULTS: The cases treated with the 10-Hour Force Theory presented a slight restriction of anterior displacement of the maxilla, increase in the effective length of the mandible, significant improvement of the maxillomandibular relationship, significant increase in anterior lower face height, distal tipping of the maxillary premolar crowns, extrusion and distal tipping of the roots of maxillary molars, significant proclination and protrusion of mandibular incisors, significant extrusion and mesialization of mandibular molars, besides a significant correction of the molar relationship, overjet and overbite. CONCLUSION: The use of the 10-Hour Force Theory in treatment of Class II malocclusion provided satisfactory results.OBJETIVO: esse estudo objetivou avaliar os efeitos cefalométricos promovidos pelo tratamento ortodôntico de pacientes com má oclusão de Classe II com o uso da Teoria de Força das 10 Horas, que consiste no uso de aparelho ortodôntico fixo, 8 horas diárias de uso de aparelho extrabucal cervical e 16 horas de uso de elásticos de Classe II, sendo 8 horas com apoio no primeiro molar inferior e 8 horas com apoio no segundo molar inferior. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 31 pacientes, com idade m

  11. Effects of LHRH and ANG II on prolactin stimulation are mediated by hypophysial AT1 receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becú-Villalobos, D; Lacau-Mengido, I M; Thyssen, S M; Díaz-Torga, G S; Libertun, C

    1994-02-01

    We have used the nonpeptide angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor antagonists losartan (receptor subtype AT1) and PD-123319 (AT2) to determine the participation of ANG II receptor subtypes in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)-induced prolactin release in a perifusion study using intact pituitaries in vitro. LHRH (1.85 x 10(-7) M) released prolactin consistently, whereas losartan (10(-5) M) abolished prolactin response without modifying basal prolactin or luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release. PD-123319 (10(-5) M) had no effect on basal or LHRH-induced prolactin, LH, or FSH release. We also determined that the effect of ANG II on prolactin release was mediated by the same receptor subtype. In adenohypophysial cells dispersed in vitro ANG II (10(-8) M) released prolactin. Losartan (10(-7) and 10(-6) M), but not PD-123319, inhibited this effect. We conclude that in intact hypophyses of 15-day-old female rats the effect of LHRH on prolactin release is readily demonstrated. LHRH-induced prolactin release appears to be mediated by ANG II acting in a paracrine manner on AT1 receptors located on lactotrophs.

  12. No significant effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade on intermediate cardiovascular end points in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjaergaard, Krista D; Jensen, Jens D

    2014-01-01

    Agents blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system are frequently used in patients with end-stage renal disease, but whether they exert beneficial cardiovascular effects is unclear. Here the long-term effects of the angiotensin II receptor blocker, irbesartan, were studied in hemodialysis......, and residual renal function. Brachial blood pressure decreased significantly in both groups, but there was no significant difference between placebo and irbesartan. Use of additional antihypertensive medication, ultrafiltration volume, and dialysis dosage were not different. Intermediate cardiovascular end...... points such as central aortic blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, left ventricular mass index, N-terminal brain natriuretic prohormone, heart rate variability, and plasma catecholamines were not significantly affected by irbesartan treatment. Changes in systolic blood pressure during...

  13. Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Agonist Experts Sustained Neuroprotective Effects In Aged Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; Isenberg, Jacob; Harmel, Allison

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The renin angiotensin system is a promising target for stroke neuroprotection and therapy through activation of angiotensin type II receptors (AT2R). The selective non-peptide AT2R agonist, Compound 21 (C21), has been shown to exhibit neuroprotection and improve stroke outcomes...... in preclinical studies, effects that likely involve neurotropic actions. However, these beneficial actions of C21 have not been demonstrated to occur beyond 1 week post stroke. The objective of this study was to determine if systemic administration of C21 would exert sustained neuroprotective effects in aged...... min), 24 h, and 48 h after stroke. Infarct size was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging at 21 days post MCAO. Animals received blinded neurological exams at 4 h, 24 h, 72 h, 7d, 14d, and 21d post-MCAO. RESULTS: Systemic treatment with C21 after stroke significantly improved neurological function...

  14. Aplicación del modelo hidrológico SWAT a la cuenca del río Meca (Huelva, España)

    OpenAIRE

    Galván González, Laura; Olías Álvarez, Manuel; Fernández de Villarán San Juan, Rubén; Domingo Santos, Juan Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is the main pollutant source in the Odiel river basin (SW Spain). Stream-flow data constitute a tool to assess the pollutant load transported by the drainage network, as well as to evaluate the possible impact of restoration measurements along the river. Due to the malfunctioning of the available stream-gauges and in order to sham the Odiel river behavior, a water model is being elaborated using the tool SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool), developed by ...

  15. Post-Westgate SWAT : C4ISTAR Architectural Framework for Autonomous Network Integrated Multifaceted Warfighting Solutions Version 1.0 : A Peer-Reviewed Monograph

    OpenAIRE

    Nyagudi, Nyagudi Musandu

    2013-01-01

    Nations are today challenged with multiple constraints such as declining population and financial austerity, these inevitably reduce military/security forces preparedness. Faced with well resourced adversaries or those of the asymmetric type, only a Nation that arms itself "intelligently" and fights "smart" attains advantages in the world's ever more complex and restrictive battle-spaces. Police SWAT teams and Military Special Forces face mounting pressure and challenges from adversaries that...

  16. Hydrological simulation in a basin of typical tropical climate and soil using the SWAT model part I: Calibration and validation tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donizete dos R. Pereira

    2016-09-01

    New hydrological insights: The SWAT model was qualified for simulating the Pomba River sub-basin in the sites where rainfall representation was reasonable to good. The model can be used in the simulation of maximum, average and minimum annual daily streamflow based on the paired t-test, contributing with the water resources management of region, although the model still needs to be improved, mainly in the representativeness of rainfall, to give better estimates of extreme values.

  17. Cd(II), Cu(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Depending on the way goethite was pretreated with oxalic acid, affinity for Cd(II) varied ...... Effects and mechanisms of oxalate on Cd(II) adsorption on goethite at different ... precipitation, surfactant mediation, hydrothermal and micro-emulsion.

  18. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  19. Hydrological modeling of the pipestone creek watershed using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT: Assessing impacts of wetland drainage on hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Perez-Valdivia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Study region: Prairie Pothole Region of North America. Study focus: The Prairie Pothole Region of North America has experienced extensive wetland drainage, potentially impacting peak flows and annual flow volumes. Some of this drainage has occurred in closed basins, possibly impacting lake water levels of these systems. In this study we investigated the potential impact of wetland drainage on peak flows and annual volumes in a 2242 km2 watershed located in southeastern Saskatchewan (Canada using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model. New hydrological insights: The SWAT model, which had been calibrated and validated at daily and monthly time steps for the 1997–2009 period, was used to assess the impact of wetland drainage using three hypothetical scenarios that drained 15, 30, and 50% of the non-contributing drainage area. Results of these simulations suggested that drainage increased spring peak flows by about 50, 79 and 113%, respectively while annual flow volumes increased by about 43, 68, and 98% in each scenario. Years that were wetter than normal presented increased peak flows and annual flow volumes below the average of the simulated period. Alternatively, summer peak flows presented smaller increases in terms of percentages during the simulated period. Keywords: Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, Wetland drainage, Peak flow, Annual volume, Prairie Pothole Region

  20. Streamflow in the upper Mississippi river basin as simulated by SWAT driven by 20{sup th} century contemporary results of global climate models and NARCCAP regional climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takle, Eugene S.; Jha, Manoj; Lu, Er; Arritt, Raymond W.; Gutowski, William J. [Iowa State Univ. Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We use Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) when driven by observations and results of climate models to evaluate hydrological quantities, including streamflow, in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) for 1981-2003 in comparison to observed streamflow. Daily meteorological conditions used as input to SWAT are taken from (1) observations at weather stations in the basin, (2) daily meteorological conditions simulated by a collection of regional climate models (RCMs) driven by reanalysis boundary conditions, and (3) daily meteorological conditions simulated by a collection of global climate models (GCMs). Regional models used are those whose data are archived by the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). Results show that regional models correctly simulate the seasonal cycle of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow within the basin. Regional models also capture interannual extremes represented by the flood of 1993 and the dry conditions of 2000. The ensemble means of both the GCM-driven and RCM-driven simulations by SWAT capture both the timing and amplitude of the seasonal cycle of streamflow with neither demonstrating significant superiority at the basin level. (orig.)

  1. The Macroeconomic Effects of War Finance in the United States: World War II and the Korean War.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohanian, Lee E

    1997-01-01

    During World War II, government expenditures were financed primarily by issuing debt. During the Korean War, expenditures were financed almost exclusively by higher taxes, reflecting President Truman's preference for balanced budgets. This paper evaluates quantitatively the economic effects of the different policies used to finance these two wars. Counterfactual experiments are used to explore the implications of financing World War II like the Korean War, and financing the Korean War like Wo...

  2. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  3. ELLERMAN BOMBS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. II. TRIGGERING, VISIBILITY, AND EFFECT ON UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissers, Gregal J. M.; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc H. M.; Rutten, Robert J., E-mail: g.j.m.vissers@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-09-01

    We use high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) to study the transient brightenings of the wings of the Balmer H{alpha} line in emerging active regions that are called Ellerman bombs. Simultaneous sampling of Ca II 8542 A with the SST confirms that most Ellerman bombs also occur in the wings of this line, but with markedly different morphology. Simultaneous images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) show that Ellerman bombs are also detectable in the photospheric 1700 A continuum, again with differing morphology. They are also observable in 1600 A SDO images, but with much contamination from C IV emission in transition-region features. Simultaneous SST spectropolarimetry in Fe I 6301 A shows that Ellerman bombs occur at sites of strong-field magnetic flux cancellation between small bipolar strong-field patches that rapidly move together over the solar surface. Simultaneous SDO images in He II 304 A, Fe IX 171 A, and Fe XIV 211 A show no clear effect of the Ellerman bombs on the overlying transition region and corona. These results strengthen our earlier suggestion, based on H{alpha} morphology alone, that the Ellerman bomb phenomenon is a purely photospheric reconnection phenomenon.

  4. [The effectiveness of magnetic therapy of grade I-II radiation pneumofibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushina, T I

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy of malignant tumours of the chest organs may result in radiation damage of the lungs. To prevent and reduce radiation-induced lung injuries, new types of radiation therapy have been developed, a number of various modifiers investigated, the methods of pharmacotherapy and physiotherapy proposed. The present study involved 37 patients presenting with radiation pneumofibrosis, including 7 ones with lung cancer and 30 patients with breast cancer. Based on the results of clinical, radiographic, and functional investigations, grade 1 and II pneumofibrosis was diagnosed in 20 and 17 patients respectively. After the application of an alternating magnetic field during 15 days, all the patients experience the overall regression of clinical symptoms and disorders of respiratory biomechanics. However, it seems premature to draw a definitive conclusion about the effectiveness of magnetic therapy of grade 1 and II radiation pneumofibrosis before the extensive in-depth investigations are carried out based on a large clinical material including the results of long-term follow-up studies and continuous monitoring.

  5. A novel technique for compensation of space charge effects in the LUPIN-II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassell, C., E-mail: cc878@uowmail.edu.au [Politecnico of Milan, Department of Energy, Via la Masa 34, 20154 Milan (Italy); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Physics, NSW 2522 (Australia); Ferrarini, M. [Fondazione CNAO, via Caminadella16, 20123 Milano (Italy); Rosenfeld, A. [University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Physics, NSW 2522 (Australia); Caresana, M. [Politecnico of Milan, Department of Energy, Via la Masa 34, 20154 Milan (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    A new method for improving REM counter performance in Pulsed Neutron Fields (PNFs) has been developed. This method uses an analysis of the build-up of space charge in the counter to compensate for an underestimation of Ambient Dose Equivalent (H*(10)) in intense pulsed fields. It was applied to three sets of experimental data acquired using the LUPIN-II REM counter device, which is designed for use in PNFs. The data was acquired using the cyclotron at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), at the HiRadMat facility at CERN and at the ‘Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste’ (ELETTRA), Italy. A comparison of the data with and without this compensation method is used to highlight its effectiveness. The LUPIN-II performance, which has already been shown to be able to cope with fields of up to hundreds of nSv/burst, is improved by at least one order of magnitude, with further potential for improvement.

  6. Metabolic effects of dietary fructose and surcose in types I and II diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bantle, J.P.; Laine, D.C.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    To learn more about the metabolic effects of dietary fructose and sucrose, 12 type 1 and 12 type II diabetic subjects were fed three isocaloric (or isoenergic) diets for eight days each according to a randomized, crossover design. The three diets provided, respectively, 21% of the energy as fructose, 23% of the energy as sucrose, and almost all carbohydrate energy as starch. The fructose diet resulted in significantly lower one- and two-hour postprandial plasma glucose levels, overall mean plasma glucose levels, and urinary glucose excretion in both type I and type II subjects than did the starch diet. There were no significant differences between the sucrose and starch diets in any of the measures of glycemic control in either subject group. The fructose and sucrose diets did not significantly increase serum triglyceride values when compared with the starch diet, but both increased postprandial serum lactate levels. The authors conclude that short-term replacement of other carbohydrate sources in the diabetic diet with fructose will improve glycemic control, whereas replacement with sucrose will not aggravate glycemic control

  7. Clinical effects of fixed functional Herbst appliance in the treatment of class II/1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sagittal mandible deficiency is the most common cause of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Treatment objective is to stimulate sagittal mandible growth. Fixed functional Herbst appliance use is beneficial for shortening the time required for treatment and does not depend on patient compliance. Case outline. A 13-year-old girl was referred to the Clinic of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry in Belgrade following previous unsuccessful treatment of her skeletal Class II malocclusion using an activator. The patient's poor cooperation had led to failure of the treatment. Patient was subjected to the Herbst treatment for 6 months followed by fixed appliance for another 8 months. Lateral cephalograms before and after the treatment was performed. The remodelation of condylar and fossal articulation was assessed by superimposition of pre- and post-treatment temporomandibular joint tomograms. The promotion of oral hygiene and fluoride use was performed because orthodontic treatment carries a high caries risk and risk for periodontal disease. Skeletal and dental changes were observed after treatment (correction [Max+Mand]: molar relation 7 mm, overjet 8 mm, skeletal relation 5 mm, molars 2 mm, incisors 3 mm. Combination of Herbst and fixed appliances was effective in the treatment of dental and skeletal irregularities for a short period of time. Conclusion . In the retention period, 14 months after treatment, occlusal stability exists. Follow-up care in oral prevention is based on regular recalls at the dental office and supervision at home by the parents.

  8. Spinal antinociceptive effects of [D-Ala2]deltorphin II, a novel and highly selective delta-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, G; Broccardo, M

    1992-01-01

    Pharmacological assays in isolated tissues and binding tests have recently shown that two peptides, with the sequence Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Asp-(or Glu)- Val-Val-Gly-NH2, isolated from skin extracts of Phyllomedusa bicolor and named [D-Ala2]deltorphin I and II, respectively, possess a higher affinity and selectivity for delta-opioid receptors than any other known natural compound. Since much evidence supports the role of spinal delta-opioid sites in producing antinociceptive effects, we investigated whether analgesia might be detected by direct spinal cord administration of [D-Ala2]deltorphin II (DADELT II) in the rat. The thermal antinociceptive effects of intrathecal DADELT II and dermorphin, a potent mu-selective agonist, were compared at different postinjection times by means of the tail-flick test. The DADELT II produced a dose-related inhibition of the tail-flick response, which lasted 10-60 min depending on the dose and appeared to be of shorter duration than the analgesia produced in rats after intrathecal injection of dermorphin (20-120 min). The analgesic effect of infused or injected DADELT II was completely abolished by naltrindole, the highly selective delta antagonist. These results confirm the involvement of delta receptors in spinal analgesic activity in the rat.

  9. Evaluation of in vitro effects of some analgesic drugs on erythrocyte and recombinant carbonic anhydrase I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Başak; Gençer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay; Turkoğlu, Sumeyye Aydogan; Alper, Meltem; Köçkar, Feray

    2012-02-01

    The in vitro effects of the injectable form of analgesic drugs, dexketoprofen trometamol, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, metamizole sodium, diclofenac sodium, thiocolchicoside, on the activity of purified human carbonic anhydrase I and II were evaluated. The effect of these drugs on erythrocyte hCA I and hCA II was compared to recombinant hCA I and hCA II expressed in Ecoli. IC(50) values of the drugs that caused inhibition were determined by means of activity percentage diagrams. The IC(50) concentrations of dexketoprofen trometamol and dexamethasone sodium phosphate on hCA I were 683 μM and 4250 μM and for hCA II 950 μM and 6200 μM respectively. Conversely, the enzyme activity was increased by diflofenac sodium. In addition, thiocolchicoside has not any affect on hCA I and hCA II. The effect of these drugs on erythrocyte hCA I and hCA II were consistent with the inhibition of recombinant enzymes.

  10. Effect of Crop-Straw Derived Biochars on Pb(II) Adsorption in Two Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tian-yu; XU Ren-kou; GU Tian-xia; JIANG Jun

    2014-01-01

    Two variable charge soils were incubated with biochars derived from straws of peanut, soybean, canola, and rice to investigate the effect of the biochars on their chemical properties and Pb(II) adsorption using batch experiments. The results showed soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) and pH signiifcantly increased after 30 d of incubation with the biochars added. The incorporation of the biochars markedly increased the adsorption of Pb(II), and both the electrostatic and non-electrostatic adsorption mechanisms contributed to Pb(II) adsorption by the variable charge soils. Adsorption isotherms illustrated legume-straw derived biochars more greatly increased Pb(II) adsorption on soils through the non-electrostatic mechanism via the formation of surface complexes between Pb(II) and acid functional groups of the biochars than did non-legume straw biochars. The adsorption capacity of Pb(II) increased, while the desorption amount slightly decreased with the increasing suspension pH for the studied soils, especially in a high suspension pH, indicating that precipitation also plays an important role in immobilizing Pb(II) to the soils.

  11. Exogenous L-Arginine Attenuates the Effects of Angiotensin II on Renal Hemodynamics and the Pressure Natriuresis-Diuresis Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa; Mattson, David L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Administration of exogenous L-Arginine (L-Arg) attenuates Angiotensin II (AngII)-mediated hypertension and kidney disease in rats. The present study assessed renal hemodynamics and pressure-diuresis-natriuresis in anesthetized rats infused with vehicle, AngII (20 ng/kg/min, iv) or AngII + L-Arg (300 µg/kg/min, iv). Increasing renal perfusion pressure (RPP) from approximately 100 to 140 mmHg resulted in a 9–10 fold increase in urine flow and sodium excretion rate in control animals. In comparison, AngII infusion significantly reduced renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by 40–42% and blunted the pressure-dependent increase in urine flow and sodium excretion rate by 54–58% at elevated RPP. Supplementation of L-Arg reversed the vasoconstrictor effects of AngII and restored pressure-dependent diuresis to levels not significantly different from control rats. Experiments in isolated aortic rings were performed to assess L-Arg effects on the vasculature. Dose-dependent contraction to AngII (10−10M to 10−7M) was observed with a maximal force equal to 27±3% of the response to 10−5M phenylephrine. Contraction to 10−7M AngII was blunted by 75±3% with 10−4M L-Arg. The influence of L-Arg to blunt AngII mediated contraction was eliminated by endothelial denudation or incubation with nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Moreover, the addition of 10−3M cationic or neutral amino acids, which compete with L-Arg for cellular uptake, blocked the effect of L-Arg. Anionic amino acids did not influence the effects of L-Arg on AngII-mediated contraction. These studies indicate that L-Arg blunts AngII-mediated vascular contraction by an endothelial- and NOS-dependent mechanism involving cellular uptake of L-Arg. PMID:24472006

  12. Cost effectiveness of liraglutide in type II diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueger, Patrick M; Schultz, Neil M; Lee, Todd A

    2014-11-01

    As novel treatments for type II diabetes enter the market, there is a need to assess their long-term clinical and economic outcomes against currently available treatment alternatives. Objective compilation and evaluation of current pharmacoeconomic evidence can assist payers and decision makers in determining the appropriate place in therapy of a new medication. Our objective was to review the existing pharmacoeconomic literature evaluating the cost effectiveness and overall costs of treatment associated with liraglutide in type II diabetes. Medical literature indexed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EconLit through 1 June 2014 was searched. Full-text, English-language cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and other cost analyses in type II diabetes that compared liraglutide to one or more anti-diabetic agents were included. Initial screening was based on relevance of titles and abstracts followed by examination of the study methods of each remaining manuscript. Studies conducting original pharmacoeconomic analyses were chosen for inclusion. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved, and information on the study design and results was abstracted. Abstracted data elements were chosen and assessed based on the authors' experience as well as criteria set forth by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Task Force. Additionally, reported incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and selected sensitivity analysis results were converted to $US, year 2012 values, in order to facilitate comparison across studies. A total of six cost studies and seven cost-utility studies were identified for inclusion. Across cost studies, liraglutide treatment resulted in costs ranging from a loss of $US2,730 (liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. sitagliptin; pharmacy costs only) over a 1-year time horizon to a savings of $US9,367 (liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. glimepiride; diabetes

  13. Importance of lipopolysaccharide aggregate disruption for the anti-endotoxic effects of heparin cofactor II peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shalini; Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Lipid membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) interactions were investigated for a series of amphiphilic and cationic peptides derived from human heparin cofactor II (HCII), using dual polarization interferometry, ellipsometry, circular dichroism (CD), cryoTEM, and z-potential measurements. Antimicrobial effects of these peptides were compared to their ability to disorder bacterial lipid membranes, while their capacity to block endotoxic effects of LPS was correlated to the binding of these peptides to LPS and its lipid A moiety, and to charge, secondary structure, and morphology of peptide/LPS complexes. While the peptide KYE28 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR) displayed potent antimicrobial and anti-endotoxic effects, its truncated variants KYE21 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRR) and NLF20 (NLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR) provide some clues on structure-activity relations, since KYE21 retains both the antimicrobial and anti-endotoxic effects of KYE28 (although both attenuated), while NLF20 retains the antimicrobial but only a fraction of the anti-endotoxic effect, hence locating the anti-endotoxic effects of KYE28 to its N-terminus. The antimicrobial effect, on the other hand, is primarily located at the C-terminus of KYE28. While displaying quite different endotoxic effects, these peptides bind to a similar extent to both LPS and lipid A, and also induce comparable LPS scavenging on model eukaryotic membranes. In contrast, fragmentation and densification of LPS aggregates, in turn dependent on the secondary structure in the peptide/LPS aggregates, correlate to the anti-endotoxic effect of these peptides, thus identifying peptide-induced packing transitions in LPS aggregates as key for anti-endotoxic functionality. This aspect therefore needs to be taken into account in the development of novel anti-endotoxic peptide therapeutics. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Investigation of detergent effects on the solution structure of spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Mateus B; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T; O' Neill, Hugh, E-mail: hellerwt@ornl.gov, E-mail: oneillhm@ornl.gov [Center for Structural Molecular Biology, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-{beta}-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  15. Research into the biological effects of ionizing radiation somatic effects II: non-cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    Somatic effects of radiation can be considered in two categories: low and high level effects. In the low level exposure region (defined here arbitrarily as a single dose of the order of 10 rads or less, or higher doses at very low dose rates), the only somatic effects other than cancer known definitely at present to have health significance are those on fertiltiy and on the developing individual from conception to near birth. Knowledge of these effects is inadequate at present, and the bulk of this report will be devoted to discussing the types of additional investigations required. With respect to non-cancer somatic effects of radiation at intermediate to high doses and dose rates, enough is known to describe in general the course of early (over the first days to perhaps six weeks) effects, following different doses of external radiation. In particular, the non-cancer late effects of intermediate to high doses of internal and external radiation need better definition. The distinction between non-cancer and cancer-related somatic effects is blurred, at least at high dose levels

  16. Synergistic effect of graphene nanosheets and zinc oxide nanoparticles for effective adsorption of Ni (II) ions from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadian, Mahboubeh; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.; Fard, Mina Matin; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein

    2018-03-01

    The threat of toxic substances such as heavy metals to public health and wildlife has led to an increasing public awareness. Different techniques for neutralizing the toxic effects of heavy metals in wastewater have been used. Here, we prepared a new and efficient type of adsorbent, zinc oxide-graphene nanocomposite (ZnO-Gr), via a green method to remove Ni (II) ions from aqueous solutions. A facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique in the presence of an ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide [C6mim] [NTf2], was used to prepare ZnO-Gr. The synergistic effect between graphene nanosheets and ZnO nanoparticles in this new adsorbent for Ni (II) ions caused a maximum adsorption capacity of 66.7 mg g-1 at room temperature which is much higher than that of graphene nanosheets (3.8 mg g-1) and other carbonaceous nanomaterials used as an adsorbent in the literature. The maximum desorption percentage (90.32%) was achieved at pH 3.6. By thermodynamic study, we found that the adsorption of this heavy metal ion on ZnO-Gr was spontaneous (Δ G° = -6.14 kJ mol-1) and endothermic (Δ H° = 53.31 kJ mol-1) with entropy change of Δ S° = 199.45 J K-1 mol- 1.

  17. Solvent effects on the fluorescence and effective three-photon absorption of a Zn(II)-[meso-tetrakis(4-octyloxyphenyl)porphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yong; Xue, Yuxiong; Sheng, Ning; Rui, Guanghao; Lv, Changgui; He, Jun; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping

    2018-06-01

    The fluorescence and effective three-photon absorption (3PA) properties of Zn(II)-[meso-tetrakis(4-octyloxyphenyl)porphyrin] (labeled Zn(II)-porphyrin) dissolved in three different polar solvents were systematically investigated. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of Zn(II)-porphyrin were investigated by 1H NMR spectra, IR spectra, mass spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectra. The fluorescence emission of Zn(II)-porphyrin in three different solvents excited at the wavelengths of 420 nm (Soret band) and 550 nm (Q-band) were analyzed. By performing Z-scan experiments with femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm, the effective 3PA process of Zn(II)-porphyrin in three different solvents was observed and the underlying mechanism was discussed in detail. It is found that the fluorescence spectra slightly depend on the polarity of the solvent. Interestingly, the effective 3PA properties of Zn(II)-porphyrin strongly depend on the solvent polarity. The lower the solvent polarity is, the larger effective 3PA cross-section is. Low polar solvents are beneficial to applications of Zn(II)-porphyrin in optical limiting, photodynamic therapy, etc.

  18. Effect of Temperature and light intensity on growth and Photosynthetic Activity of Chlamydomonas reinhard II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonsel Jaen, M.; Fernandez Gonzalez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of five temperatures (15,20,25,30 and 35 degree centigree) and two levels of illumination on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlamydomonas reinhard II has been studied. The growth of the cultures was evaluated by optical density. Photosynthetic activity has been carried out studying either the assimilation rate of C0 2 labelled with C-14 or the oxygen evolution by means of polarographic measurements. The maximum photosynthetic rate has been obtained at 25 degree centigree for the lower level of illumination (2400 lux) and at 35 degree centigree for the higher one (13200 lux) and at 35 degree centigree for the higher ono (13200 lux). These results suggest an interaction of temperature and illumination on photosynthetic activity. (Author) 37 refs

  19. Beam-beam effects for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Eden, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    We present a summary of a fairly extensive study of beam-beam issues that arise in the design of PEP-II. Most of these studies are carried out with ''strong-strong'' multiparticle tracking simulations. We focus on: choice of nominal beam-beam parameter, strength of the parasitic collisions, injection issues, performance and tradeoffs with unequal beam-beam parameters. We comment only briefly on beam lifetime. We conclude that: the beams are sufficiently well separated so that the parasitic collisions are effectively weak; that small inequalities in the beam-beam parameters may imply more comfortable performance margins; and that vertical injection with vertical beam separation is more comfortable than horizontal

  20. Comparative analyses of hydrological responses of two adjacent watersheds to climate variability and change using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, Wells; Lang, Megan W.; Sharifi, Amir

    2018-01-01

    Water quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW) are expected to be exacerbated by climate variability and change. However, climate impacts on agricultural lands and resultant nutrient loads into surface water resources are largely unknown. This study evaluated the impacts of climate variability and change on two adjacent watersheds in the Coastal Plain of the CBW, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We prepared six climate sensitivity scenarios to assess the individual impacts of variations in CO2concentration (590 and 850 ppm), precipitation increase (11 and 21 %), and temperature increase (2.9 and 5.0 °C), based on regional general circulation model (GCM) projections. Further, we considered the ensemble of five GCM projections (2085–2098) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario to evaluate simultaneous changes in CO2, precipitation, and temperature. Using SWAT model simulations from 2001 to 2014 as a baseline scenario, predicted hydrologic outputs (water and nitrate budgets) and crop growth were analyzed. Compared to the baseline scenario, a precipitation increase of 21 % and elevated CO2 concentration of 850 ppm significantly increased streamflow and nitrate loads by 50 and 52 %, respectively, while a temperature increase of 5.0 °C reduced streamflow and nitrate loads by 12 and 13 %, respectively. Crop biomass increased with elevated CO2 concentrations due to enhanced radiation- and water-use efficiency, while it decreased with precipitation and temperature increases. Over the GCM ensemble mean, annual streamflow and nitrate loads showed an increase of  ∼  70 % relative to the baseline scenario, due to elevated CO2 concentrations and precipitation increase. Different hydrological responses to climate change were observed from the two watersheds, due to contrasting land use and soil characteristics. The watershed with a larger percent of croplands demonstrated a greater

  1. Comparative analyses of hydrological responses of two adjacent watersheds to climate variability and change using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, Wells D.; Lang, Megan W.; Sharifi, Amir

    2018-01-01

    Water quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW) are expected to be exacerbated by climate variability and change. However, climate impacts on agricultural lands and resultant nutrient loads into surface water resources are largely unknown. This study evaluated the impacts of climate variability and change on two adjacent watersheds in the Coastal Plain of the CBW, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We prepared six climate sensitivity scenarios to assess the individual impacts of variations in CO2 concentration (590 and 850 ppm), precipitation increase (11 and 21 %), and temperature increase (2.9 and 5.0 °C), based on regional general circulation model (GCM) projections. Further, we considered the ensemble of five GCM projections (2085-2098) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario to evaluate simultaneous changes in CO2, precipitation, and temperature. Using SWAT model simulations from 2001 to 2014 as a baseline scenario, predicted hydrologic outputs (water and nitrate budgets) and crop growth were analyzed. Compared to the baseline scenario, a precipitation increase of 21 % and elevated CO2 concentration of 850 ppm significantly increased streamflow and nitrate loads by 50 and 52 %, respectively, while a temperature increase of 5.0 °C reduced streamflow and nitrate loads by 12 and 13 %, respectively. Crop biomass increased with elevated CO2 concentrations due to enhanced radiation- and water-use efficiency, while it decreased with precipitation and temperature increases. Over the GCM ensemble mean, annual streamflow and nitrate loads showed an increase of ˜ 70 % relative to the baseline scenario, due to elevated CO2 concentrations and precipitation increase. Different hydrological responses to climate change were observed from the two watersheds, due to contrasting land use and soil characteristics. The watershed with a larger percent of croplands demonstrated a greater increased rate of 5.2 kg N ha-1 in

  2. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    The relative molar flame ionization detecton (FID) response (RMR) for a hydrocarbon does not change when deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. The exception is methane for which an inverse deuterium effect of 3..5% is observed for tetradeuteriomethane. [13C]Methane shows an inverse isotope effect...... of 2%. The reason for the small or non-existent isotope effects is that H/2H exchange takes place in the pre-combustion hydrogenolysis in the flame. This was shown by taking samples from the lower part of the flame by means of a fused silica capillary probe. By the same technique the hydrogenolytic...

  3. Effects of Pop III to PopII transition on the lowest metallicity stars in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimiao; Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2018-01-01

    We examine the effects of the enrichments from Population III (Pop III) stars on the formation and properties of the first generation of the Population II (Pop II) stars. Pop III stars begin to transition towards Pop II stars when the metals dispersed in Pop III supernovae pollute the nearby gas. However, details of this transition are still largely unknown. We use dwarf galaxy simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to identify the star-forming gas that is likely to be pre-enriched by Pop III supernovae and follow the stars that form in such gas. This pre-enrichment will leave the signature in the lowest metallicity stars that can be used to better constrain the details of the Pop III-to-Pop II transition.

  4. Effects of citrate on hexavalent chromium reduction by structural Fe(II) in nontronite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaolei; Dong, Hailiang; Yang, Xuewei; Kovarik, Libor; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    Iron-bearing clay minerals and organic matter are two important components in natural environments that influence hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction. Previous studies have shown that organic ligands could influence Cr(VI) reduction by aqueous Fe2+ and pyrite. However, the effects of organic ligands on Cr(VI) reduction by structural Fe(II) in clays are not well understood. In this study, the effects of citrate on Cr(VI) reduction by nontronite (NAu-2) were investigated under near neutral pH condition (pH=6). Our results showed that the presence of citrate decreased the rate but increased the amount of Cr(VI) reduction by structural Fe(II) in NAu-2. The decreased reaction rate was likely due to competitive sorption of citrate and polyanionic dichromate (Cr2O7- ), because sorption of dichromate appeared to be the first step for subsequent Cr(VI) reduction. The increased amount of Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of citrate was likely because citrate provided additional reducing power through ligand-metal electron transfer in the presence of soluble Fe 3+ derived from dissolution of reduced NAu-2. Soluble Cr(III)-citrate complex was the possible form of reduced chromium when citrate was present. In contrast, nanometer-sized Cr2O3 particles were the product of Cr(VI) reduction by reduced NAu-2 without citrate. Our study highlights the importance of organic ligands on Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization when iron-bearing clay minerals are applied to treat Cr(VI) contaminant in organic matter rich environments.

  5. Atomic effects in tritium beta-decay. II. Muon to electron conversion in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampler, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    I. The final-state, atomic effects in the low energy end of the tritium beta decay spectrum are studied in detail. The author treats the instantaneous, two-electron repulsion in the final state, effectively to all orders in perturbation theory, by solving the eigenvalue problem with a discretized and truncated form of the Hamiltonian. He finds that these effects fail to explain the distortion in the spectrum observed by Simpson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 649 (1985)). Simpson attributed this distortion to the admixture of a heavy mass antineutrino in the outgoing electron antineutrino state. In fact, the final-state Coulomb effects enhance the distortion. This calculation clears up some of the ambiguities of other theoretical analyses based on considerations of screening functions and perturbation theory. II. He presents a phenomenological study of separate lepton number violating muon to electron conversion in atoms. Previous work on this process has concentrated on elastic transitions where the nucleus characteristics have the gate on the substrate and the source-drain contacts on the top of the sample. The first use as an FET dielectric is reported of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon (prepared from silane and propane mixture), photo-oxidised by UV lamp or laser. These FETs have similar characteristics to those with silicon nitride gate insulator but without the difficulties of preparing good insulator/semiconductor interfaces. Using the same materials attempts have been made to produce charge coupled devices

  6. Effect of Phosphorylation and Copper(II) or Iron(II) Ions Enrichment on Some Physicochemical Properties of Spelt Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Rożnowski, Jacek; Fortuna, Teresa; Nowak, Katarzyna; Szuba, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an assessment of the effect of saturation of spelt starch and monostarch phosphate with copper or iron ions on selected physicochemical properties of the resulting modified starches. Native and modified spelt starch samples were analyzed for selected mineral element content using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Thermodynamic properties were measured using DSC, and pasting properties by RVA. Flow curves of 5% pastes were plotted and described using the Hersc...

  7. Neuroprotective Effects and Mechanisms of Curcumin–Cu(II) and –Zn(II) Complexes Systems and Their Pharmacological Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Fa-Shun; Sun, Jian-Long; Xie, Wen-Hai; Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the main form of dementia and has a steadily increasing prevalence. As both oxidative stress and metal homeostasis are involved in the pathogenesis of AD, it would be interesting to develop a dual function agent, targeting the two factors. Curcumin, a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, is an antioxidant and can also chelate metal ions. Whether the complexes of curcumin with metal ions possess neuroprotective effects has not been evaluated....

  8. Antitumor effect of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles on mice bearing breast cancer: a systemic toxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raphael Cândido Apolinário; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; de Souza Filho, José; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos' Brettas; Oliveira, Ricardo G S; da Silva, Matheus Oliveira; de Souza, Aparecido R; Báo, Sônia Nair

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancer types among women. The use of magnetic fluids for specific delivery of drugs represents an attractive platform for chemotherapy. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate (Magh-Rh2Cit) induced in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor activity, followed by intratumoral administration in breast carcinoma cells. In this study, our aim was to follow intravenous treatment to evaluate the systemic antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Female Balb/c mice were evaluated with regard to toxicity of intravenous treatments through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine and liver, kidney, and lung histology. The antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2Cit), Magh-Rh2Cit, and maghemite nanoparticles coated with citrate (Magh-Cit), used as control, was evaluated by tumor volume reduction, histology, and morphometric analysis. Magh-Rh2Cit and Magh-Cit promoted a significant decrease in tumor area, and no experimental groups presented hematotoxic effects or increased levels of serum ALT and creatinine. This observation was corroborated by the histopathological examination of the liver and kidney of mice. Furthermore, the presence of nanoparticles was verified in lung tissue with no morphological changes, supporting the idea that our nanoformulations did not induce toxicity effects. No studies about the systemic action of rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles have been carried out, making this report a suitable starting point for exploring the therapeutic potential of these compounds in treating breast cancer.

  9. ESTIMATIVA DO BALANÇO SEDIMENTAR DA BACIA DO RIO TIJUCAS (SC-BRASIL A PARTIR DA APLICAÇÃO DO MODELO HIDROLÓGICO SWAT / ESTIMATE OF SEDIMENT BUDGET OF THE TIJUCAS RIVER BASIN APPLYING SWAT HYDROLOGIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Berná Paim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Adopt a basin as a hydrological unit to understand the physical processes related to the water and sediment production is important because its characteristics (area, shape and topography can determine its use in a sustainable manner. This study is aim in the test of the applicability of hydrologic model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool in the Tijucas River Basin to quantify the water and sediment production along it sub-basins. Together, geoprocessing techniques were applied with the creation of a database of geographical information to describe the region. On this database is included the daily precipitation an temperature data of the gauges distributed on the watershed, soil data, a land use map and the digital elevation model (DEM to create the Hydrologic Response Units (HRU’s. A time series with flow values and sediment concentration measured are very important to calibrate and validate the model output parameters. After the calibration of the initial results, the Flow Gauge number 102 presented a Nash and Sutcliffe Coefficient - COE = 0.6 indicating a good adjust of the model. The results were used to create a sediment production map for Tijucas River Basin, when the 10 years average ranged between 0.5 ton/ha and 9.0 ton/ha in some sub-basins.

  10. Phase II trial of epidermal growth factor ointment for patients with Erlotinib-related skin effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kang, Jung Hun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Suee; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Son, Choonhee; Park, Min Jae; Kang, Myung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Young Suk; Sun, Jong Mu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jang, Joung-Soon; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of erlotinib, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pancreatic cancer (PC). In the present study, we evaluated the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ointment on erlotinib-related skin effects (ERSEs). This was an open-label, non-comparative, multicenter, phase II trial. The patients included those diagnosed with NSCLC or PC who were treated with erlotinib. The effectiveness of the ointment was defined as follows: (1) grade 2, 3, or 4 ERSEs downgraded to ≤ grade 1 or (2) grade 3 or 4 ERSEs downgraded to grade 2 and persisted for at least 2 weeks. Fifty-two patients from seven institutes in Korea were enrolled with informed consent. The final assessment included 46 patients (30 males, 16 females). According to the definition of effectiveness, the EGF ointment was effective in 36 (69.2%) intention to treat patients. There were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the EGF ointment by gender (p = 0.465), age (p = 0.547), tumor type (p = 0.085), erlotinib dosage (p = 0.117), and number of prior chemotherapy sessions (p = 0.547). The grading for the average National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) rating of rash/acne and itching improved from 2.02 ± 0.83 to 1.13 ± 0.89 and 1.52 ± 0.84 to 0.67 ± 0.90, respectively (p reason for discontinuing the study was progression of cancer (37%). Based on the results, the EGF ointment is effective for ERSEs, regardless of gender, age, type of tumor, and dosage of erlotinib. The EGF ointment evenly improved all kinds of symptoms of ERSEs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01593995.

  11. Effects of excited state mixing on transient absorption spectra in dimers Application to photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, L; Trinkunas, G; Müller, M G; Holzwarth, A R

    1999-01-01

    The excited state mixing effect is taken into account considering the difference spectra of dimers. Both the degenerate (homo) dimer as well as the nondegenerate (hetero) dimer are considered. Due to the higher excited state mixing with the two-exciton states in the homodimer, the excited state absorption (or the difference spectrum) can be strongly affected in comparison with the results obtained in the Heitler-London approximation. The difference spectrum of the heterodimer is influenced by two resonance effects (i) mixing of the ground state optical transitions of both monomers in the dimer and (ii) mixing of the excited state absorption of the excited monomer with the ground state optical transition in the nonexcited monomer. These effects have been tested by simulating the difference absorption spectra of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) experimentally obtained with the 60 fs excitation pulses at zero delay times and various excitation wavelengths. The pairs of coupled chlorophylls...

  12. Paternal breed effects on expression of IGF-II, BAK1 and BCL2-L1 in bovine preimplantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valleh, Mehdi Vafaye; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Joupari, Morteza Daliri

    2015-01-01

    of this study was to investigate the effects of the paternal breed on the early embryonic development and relative expression of the maternally imprinted gene, IGF-II, and the apoptosis-related genes BAK1 and BCL2-L1 in in vitro produced (IVP) bovine embryos derived from two unrelated paternal breeds (Holstein......Summary The effects of the paternal breed on early embryo and later pre- and postnatal development are well documented. Several recent studies have suggested that such paternal effects may be mediated by the paternally induced epigenetic modifications during early embryogenesis. The objective...... and Brown Swiss). The degree of correlation of IGF-II expression pattern with embryo developmental competence and apoptosis-related genes was also investigated. The relative abundance of IGF-II, BCL2-L1 and BAK1 transcripts in day 8 embryos was measured by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain...

  13. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  14. The anabolic effects of insulin on type II collagen synthesis of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bembenek, M.E.; Liberti, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The anabolic effects of insulin on collagen production of freshly isolated Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes were investigated. The specific radioactivity of newly synthesized collagen was not increased by insulin, indicating that the hormone has no effect on the specific radioactivity of the aminoacyl tRNA pool. Results of further studies obtained from collagen degradation experiments demonstrated that insulin did not alter the rate of [3H]collagen degradation. Together, these results clearly indicate that insulin stimulates collagen biosynthesis. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of the newly synthesized collagen of both control and insulin-stimulated cells revealed a large-molecular-weight component which migrated with authentic alpha 1(II) collagen and was collagenase-sensitive. Additional studies showed that, although insulin increased the processing and secretion of collagen, the hormone did not cause a shift in the distribution of the extracellular and intracellular collagen pools. Finally, results of studies conducted with the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D, indicated that the anabolic effects of insulin on collagen and non-collagen proteins were mediated at a post-transcriptional site

  15. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the acoustic Faraday effect: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent a and b axes for a field parallel to the c axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. ETA-II accelerator upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, D.G.; Deadrick, F.J.; Hibbs, S.M.; Sampayan, S.E.; Petersen, D.E.

    1991-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements to the ETA-II linear induction electron accelerator. The accelerator's cells have been carefully reconditioned to raise the maximum accelerating gap voltage from approximately 100 kV to 125 kV. Insulators of Rexolite plastic in a new ''zero-gap'' arrangement replaced the alumina originals after several alternative materials were investigated. A new multi-cable current feed system will be used to eliminate pulse reflection interactions encountered in earlier experiments. Improved alignment fixtures have been installed to help minimize beam perturbation due to poorly aligned intercell magnets between 10-cell groups. A stretched wire alignment technique (SWAT) has been utilized to enhance overall magnetic alignment, and to characterize irreducible alignment errors. These changes are in conjunction with an expansion of the accelerator from a 20-cell to a 60-cell configuration. When completed, the upgraded accelerator is expected to deliver 2.5 kA of electron beam current at 7.5 MeV in bursts of up to fifty 70-ns pulses at a 5-kHz repetition rate. A 5.5-meter-long wiggler will convert the energy into 3-GW microwave pulses at 140 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

  17. Effect of the tether on the Mg(II), Ca(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) stability constants and pM values of chelating agents related to EDDHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Miguel A; Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Alcázar, Roberto; Lucena, Juan J; Yunta, Felipe; García-Marco, Sonia

    2004-11-07

    The effect of the length and the structure of the tether on the chelating ability of EDDHA-like chelates have not been established. In this work, PDDHA (propylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid), BDDHA (butylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid) and XDDHA (p-xylylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid) have been obtained and their chemical behaviour has been studied and compared with that of EDDHA following our methodology. The purity of the chelating agents, and their protonation, Ca(II), Mg(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II) stability constants and pM values have been determined. The stability constants and pM values indicate that EDDHA forms the most stable chelates followed by PDDHA. However, the differences among the pFe values are small when a nutrient solution is used, and in these conditions the XDDHA/Fe(III) chelate is the most stable. The results obtained in this work indicate that all the chelating agents studied can be used as iron chlorosis correctors and they can be applied to soil/plant systems.

  18. Consequences of captivity: health effects of far East imprisonment in World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, D; Welch, E; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V

    2009-02-01

    Though medical consequences of war attract attention, the health consequences of the prisoner-of-war (POW) experience are poorly researched and appreciated. The imprisonment of Allied military personnel by the Japanese during the World War II provides an especially dramatic POW scenario in terms of deprivation, malnutrition and exposure to tropical diseases. Though predominantly British, these POWs also included troops from Australia, Holland and North America. Imprisonment took place in various locations in Southeast Asia and the Far East for a 3.5-year period between 1942 and 1945. Nutritional deficiency syndromes, dysentery, malaria, tropical ulcers and cholera were major health problems; and supplies of drugs and medical equipment were scarce. There have been limited mortality studies on ex-Far East prisoners (FEPOWs) since repatriation, but these suggest an early (up to 10 years post-release) excess mortality due to tuberculosis, suicides and cirrhosis (probably related to hepatitis B exposure during imprisonment). In terms of morbidity, the commonest has been a psychiatric syndrome which would now be recognized as post-traumatic stress disorder--present in at least one-third of FEPOWs and frequently presenting decades later. Peptic ulceration, osteoarthritis and hearing impairment also appear to occur more frequently. In addition, certain tropical diseases have persisted in these survivors--notably infections with the nematode worm Strongyloides stercoralis. Studies 30 years or more after release have shown overall infection rates of 15%. Chronic strongyloidiasis of this type frequently causes a linear urticarial 'larva currens' rash, but can potentially lead to fatal hyperinfection if immunity is suppressed. Finally, about 5% of FEPOW survivors have chronic nutritional neuropathic syndromes--usually optic atrophy or sensory peripheral neuropathy (often painful). The World War II FEPOW experience was a unique, though often tragic, accidental experiment into

  19. Ceramic materials for porcelain veneers: part II. Effect of material, shade, and thickness on translucency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizon, Karine T L; Bergeron, Cathia; Vargas, Marcos A; Qian, Fang; Cobb, Deborah S; Gratton, David G; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2014-10-01

    Information regarding the differences in translucency among new ceramic systems is lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative translucency of the different types of ceramic systems indicated for porcelain veneers and to evaluate the effect of shade and thickness on translucency. Disk specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.7-mm thick were fabricated for the following 9 materials (n=5): VITA VM9, IPS Empress Esthetic, VITA PM9, Vitablocks Mark II, Kavo Everest G-Blank, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.maxPress, and Lava Zirconia. VITA VM9 served as the positive control and Lava as the negative control. The disks were fabricated with the shade that corresponds to A1. For IPS e.maxPress, additional disks were made with different shades (BL2, BL4, A1, B1, O1, O2, V1, V2, V3), thickness (0.3 mm), and translucencies (high translucency, low translucency). Color coordinates (CIE L∗ a∗ b∗) were measured with a tristimulus colorimeter. The translucency parameter was calculated from the color difference of the material on a black versus a white background. One-way ANOVA, the post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference, and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range tests were used to analyze the data (α=.05). Statistically significant differences in the translucency parameter were found among porcelains (PPM9, Empress Esthetic>Empress CAD>Mark II, Everest, e.max CAD>e.max Press>Lava. Significant differences also were noted when different shades and thickness were compared (Pceramic systems designed for porcelain veneers present varying degrees of translucency. The thickness and shade of lithium disilicate ceramic affect its translucency. Shade affects translucency parameter less than thickness. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Different effects of copper (II), cadmium (II) and phosphate on the sorption of phenanthrene on the biomass of cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Yuqiang; Li, Wei; Xue, Bin; Zhong, Jicheng; Yao, Shuchun; Wu, Qinglong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Low level of Cu 2+ inhibited but high level of Cu 2+ facilitated the sorption of Phe. • Cation–π interaction between Cu 2+ and PAH facilitated the sorption of Phe. • Phenanthrene sorption rebounding did not occur in the presence of high level Cd 2+ . • Both Cd 2+ and PO 4 3− inhibited the sorption of Phe, but had various mechanisms. -- Abstract: Due to the large surface area and high organic carbon content of cyanobacteria, organic contaminants can be readily sorbed on cyanobacteria during algal blooms, and then be transferred to the food web. This process is likely to be affected by the coexisting metals and nutrients, however, the possible impacts remain unclear. Effects of Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and phosphate on the sorption of phenanthrene on cyanobacterial biomass collected from an algal bloom were therefore studied. Continuous decrease in phenanthrene sorption was observed in the presence of low concentrations of Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ ( −1 ), because Cu 2+ and Cd 2+ were coadsorbed with phenanthrene on the surface of cyanobacteria as suggested by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. Phenanthrene sorption began to increase with the further increase in Cu 2+ concentration, but remained lower than that in the absence of Cu 2+ . This increase in sorption was ascribed to the cation–π interaction between Cu 2+ and phenanthrene, as suggested by the enhanced ultraviolet absorbance at 251 nm. In contrast, sorption rebounding of phenanthrene did not occur in the presence of higher concentrations of Cd 2+ . The different effects of Cu 2+ and Cd 2+ on phenanthrene sorption were attributed to that Cd 2+ required much more energy than Cu 2+ to form cation–π complexes with phenanthrene in the solutions. Phenanthrene sorption decreased continuously with the increase in phosphate concentration. Phosphate blocked the binding sites, modified the cell morphology, and increased the

  1. Different effects of copper (II), cadmium (II) and phosphate on the sorption of phenanthrene on the biomass of cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Yuqiang, E-mail: yqtao@niglas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei [Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 (United States); Xue, Bin; Zhong, Jicheng; Yao, Shuchun; Wu, Qinglong [State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Low level of Cu{sup 2+} inhibited but high level of Cu{sup 2+} facilitated the sorption of Phe. • Cation–π interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and PAH facilitated the sorption of Phe. • Phenanthrene sorption rebounding did not occur in the presence of high level Cd{sup 2+}. • Both Cd{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} inhibited the sorption of Phe, but had various mechanisms. -- Abstract: Due to the large surface area and high organic carbon content of cyanobacteria, organic contaminants can be readily sorbed on cyanobacteria during algal blooms, and then be transferred to the food web. This process is likely to be affected by the coexisting metals and nutrients, however, the possible impacts remain unclear. Effects of Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and phosphate on the sorption of phenanthrene on cyanobacterial biomass collected from an algal bloom were therefore studied. Continuous decrease in phenanthrene sorption was observed in the presence of low concentrations of Cu{sup 2+}, and Cd{sup 2+} (<0.04 mmol L{sup −1}), because Cu{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} were coadsorbed with phenanthrene on the surface of cyanobacteria as suggested by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. Phenanthrene sorption began to increase with the further increase in Cu{sup 2+} concentration, but remained lower than that in the absence of Cu{sup 2+}. This increase in sorption was ascribed to the cation–π interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and phenanthrene, as suggested by the enhanced ultraviolet absorbance at 251 nm. In contrast, sorption rebounding of phenanthrene did not occur in the presence of higher concentrations of Cd{sup 2+}. The different effects of Cu{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} on phenanthrene sorption were attributed to that Cd{sup 2+} required much more energy than Cu{sup 2+} to form cation–π complexes with phenanthrene in the solutions. Phenanthrene sorption decreased continuously with the increase

  2. Assessment of future climate change impacts on nonpoint source pollution in snowmelt period for a cold area using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Bian, Jianmin; Zhao, Yongsheng; Tang, Jie; Jia, Zhuo

    2018-02-05

    The source area of Liao River is a typical cold region in northeastern China, which experiences serious problems with agricultural nonpoint source pollution (NPS), it is important to understand future climate change impacts on NPS in the watershed. This issue has been investigated by coupling semi distributed hydrological model (SWAT), statistical downscaling model (SDSM) and global circulation model (GCMs). The results show that annual average temperature would rise by 2.1 °C (1.3 °C) in the 2080 s under scenario RCP8.5 (RCP4.5), and annual precipitation would increase by 67 mm (33 mm). The change in winter temperature and precipitation is most significant with an increase by 0.23 °C/10a (0.17 °C/10a) and 1.94 mm/10a (2.78 mm/10a). The future streamflow, TN and TP loads would decrease by 19.05% (10.59%), 12.27% (8.81%) and 10.63% (6.11%), respectively. Monthly average streamflow, TN and TP loads would decrease from March to November, and increase from December to February. This is because the increased precipitation and temperature in winter, which made the spring snowpack melting earlier. These study indicate the trends of nonpoint source pollution during the snowmelt period under climate change conditions, accordingly adaptation measures will be necessary.

  3. Temporal-spatial distribution of non-point source pollution in a drinking water source reservoir watershed based on SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of drinking water source reservoirs has a close relationship between regional economic development and people’s livelihood. Research on the non-point pollution characteristics in its watershed is crucial for reservoir security. Tang Pu Reservoir watershed was selected as the study area. The non-point pollution model of Tang Pu Reservoir was established based on the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool model. The model was adjusted to analyse the temporal-spatial distribution patterns of total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP. The results showed that the loss of TN and TP in the reservoir watershed were related to precipitation in flood season. And the annual changes showed an "M" shape. It was found that the contribution of loss of TN and TP accounted for 84.5% and 85.3% in high flow years, and for 70.3% and 69.7% in low flow years, respectively. The contributions in normal flow years were 62.9% and 63.3%, respectively. The TN and TP mainly arise from Wangtan town, Gulai town, and Wangyuan town, etc. In addition, it was found that the source of TN and TP showed consistency in space.

  4. The Assessment of Green Water Based on the SWAT Model: A Case Study in the Hai River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Zhu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Green water accounts for two-thirds of precipitation, and the proportion could be even higher in dry years. Conflicts between water supply and demand have gradually become severe in the Hai River Basin (HRB due to the socio-economic development. Thus, the exploitation and the utilization of green water have attracted increasing attention. By gathering the related hydrological, meteorological, and geographic data, the spatiotemporal distribution of green water in HRB and the impacts of land use types on green water are analyzed based on the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool model in this study. Furthermore, three new indices are proposed for evaluation, including the maximum possible storage of green water (MSGW, the consumed green water (CGW, and the utilizable green water (UGW. The results show that (1 the MSGW is relatively low in plain areas and its spatial distribution is significantly associated with the soil type; (2 according to the evaluation results of CGW and UGW in HRB, a further improvement of utilization efficiency of green water could be achieved; (3 in general, the utilization efficiency of precipitation in farmlands is higher than other land use types, which means that the planting of appropriate plants could be helpful to enhance the utilization efficiency of green water. Our results summarize the spatiotemporal distribution of green water resource and provide a reference for water resources management in other water-short agricultural areas.

  5. Evaluation of drought impact on groundwater recharge rate using SWAT and Hydrus models on an agricultural island in western Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clarifying the variations of groundwater recharge response to a changing non-stationary hydrological process is important for efficiently managing groundwater resources, particularly in regions with limited precipitation that face the risk of water shortage. However, the rate of aquifer recharge is difficult to evaluate in terms of large annual-variations and frequency of flood events. In our research, we attempt to simulate related groundwater recharge processes under variable climate conditions using the SWAT Model, and validate the groundwater recharge using the Hydrus Model. The results show that annual average groundwater recharge comprised approximately 33% of total precipitation, however, larger variation was found for groundwater recharge and surface runoff compared to evapotranspiration, which fluctuated with annual precipitation variations. The annual variation of groundwater resources is shown to be related to precipitation. In spatial variations, the upstream is the main surface water discharge area; the middle and downstream areas are the main groundwater recharge areas. Validation by the Hydrus Model shows that the estimated and simulated groundwater levels are consistent in our research area. The groundwater level shows a quick response to the groundwater recharge rate. The rainfall intensity had a great impact on the changes of the groundwater level. Consequently, it was estimated that large spatial and temporal variation of the groundwater recharge rate would be affected by precipitation uncertainty in future.

  6. Variability assesment of some morphological traits among blue pine (pinus wallichiana) communities in hindukush ranges of Swat, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, I. U.; Khan, N.; Ali, K.

    2017-01-01

    Pinus wallichiana dominated forest communities, located in the Hindukush ranges of Swat, Pakistan were analysed for variability in the cone and seed traits. The results disclosed significant variability in mean values, critical difference, co-efficient of variation, broad sense heritability, genetic gain and genetic advance. Genotypic variance (Vg) and genotypic coefficient of variance (GCV) were noted to be lower than the corresponding environmental variance (Ve) and environmental coefficient of variability (ECV) for most of the parameters which clearly shows that these traits are under the control of environment. Both Number of male clusters/branch and 100 seeds weight are heritable traits as having higher genotypic variance and genotypic coefficient of variance. Traits like 100 seeds weight, Number of male cluster/branch, number of female cones/tree, female cone weight and number of sterile scales/cone showed moderate to high percentage of heritability indicates that these traits are under strong genetic control. These heritable additive genetic traits can be used for future breeding and tree improvement plans for the species. It is further concluded that the alleged traits should be given priority while selecting superior genotypes. (author)

  7. Assessing the impacts of sustainable agricultural practices for water quality improvements in the Vouga catchment (Portugal) using the SWAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, João; Roebeling, Peter; Rial-Rivas, María Ermitas

    2015-12-01

    The extensive use of fertilizers has become one of the most challenging environmental issues in agricultural catchment areas. In order to reduce the negative impacts from agricultural activities and to accomplish the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive we must consider the implementation of sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we assess sustainable agricultural practices based on reductions in N-fertilizer application rates (from 100% to 0%) and N-application methods (single, split and slow-release) across key agricultural land use classes in the Vouga catchment, Portugal. The SWAT model was used to relate sustainable agricultural practices, agricultural yields and N-NO3 water pollution deliveries. Results show that crop yields as well as N-NO3 exportation rates decrease with reductions in N-application rates and single N-application methods lead to lower crop yields and higher N-NO3 exportation rates as compared to split and slow-release N-application methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting fecal coliform using the interval-to-interval approach and SWAT in the Miyun watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jianwen; Shen, Zhenyao; Yan, Tiezhu; Qiu, Jiali; Li, Yangyang

    2017-06-01

    Pathogens in manure can cause waterborne-disease outbreaks, serious illness, and even death in humans. Therefore, information about the transformation and transport of bacteria is crucial for determining their source. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to simulate fecal coliform bacteria load in the Miyun Reservoir watershed, China. The data for the fecal coliform were obtained at three sampling sites, Chenying (CY), Gubeikou (GBK), and Xiahui (XH). The calibration processes of the fecal coliform were conducted using the CY and GBK sites, and validation was conducted at the XH site. An interval-to-interval approach was designed and incorporated into the processes of fecal coliform calibration and validation. The 95% confidence interval of the predicted values and the 95% confidence interval of measured values were considered during calibration and validation in the interval-to-interval approach. Compared with the traditional point-to-point comparison, this method can improve simulation accuracy. The results indicated that the simulation of fecal coliform using the interval-to-interval approach was reasonable for the watershed. This method could provide a new research direction for future model calibration and validation studies.

  9. Multi-Objective Validation of SWAT for Sparsely-Gauged West African River Basins—A Remote Sensing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Poméon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Predicting freshwater resources is a major concern in West Africa, where large parts of the population depend on rain-fed subsistence agriculture. However, a steady decline in the availability of in-situ measurements of climatic and hydrologic variables makes it difficult to simulate water resource availability with hydrological models. In this study, a modeling framework was set up for sparsely-gauged catchments in West Africa using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, whilst largely relying on remote sensing and reanalysis inputs. The model was calibrated using two different strategies and validated using discharge measurements. New in this study is the use of a multi-objective validation conducted to further investigate the performance of the model, where simulated actual evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and total water storage were evaluated using remote sensing data. Results show that the model performs well (R2 calibration: 0.52 and 0.51; R2 validation: 0.63 and 0.61 and the multi-objective validation reveals good agreement between predictions and observations. The study reveals the potential of using remote sensing data in sparsely-gauged catchments, resulting in good performance and providing data for evaluating water balance components that are not usually validated. The modeling framework presented in this study is the basis for future studies, which will address model response to extreme drought and flood events and further examine the coincidence with Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE total water storage retrievals.

  10. Species richness, alpha and beta diversity of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants in the woodlands of swat, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, N.; Bergmeier, E.

    2015-01-01

    The variation in species richness and diversity of trees, shrubs and herbs in the mountains of Miandam, Swat, North Pakistan, along an elevation gradient between 1600 m and 3400 m was explored. Field data were collected in 18 altitudinal intervals of 100 m each. Polynomial regression was used to find relations of the different growth forms with elevation. The Shannon index was used for calculating α-diversity and the Simpson index for β-diversity. Species richness and α-diversity of herbs were unrelated to elevation. Herbaceous species turnover was high, ranging between 0.46 and 0.89, with its maximum between 2700 and 3000 m. Hump-shaped relationship was observed for shrubs with maximum richness between 2000 and 2200 m; and α-diversity decreased monotonically. Turnover of shrub species was highest between 2000 and 2500 m. Tree species richness was highest at low elevations, and α-diversity was relatively low along the entire gradient. Tree species turnover was also high in the lower zone and again at 2600-2800 m. Species richness of all vascular plants was highest at 2200-2500 m, and α-diversity was highest in the lower part of the gradient. Beta diversity of all growth forms was quite high ranging between 0.53 and 0.87 along the entire gradient reflecting high species and structural turnover. (author)

  11. Effect of changes of serum IGF-II and CT contents on bone metabolism in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Rongxing; Chen Wenhan; Chen Shaozhu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of changes of serum insulin like growth factor II (IGF-II) and calcitonin (CT) on bone metabolism in both male and female healthy subjects of different age groups. Methods: Serum IGF-II and CT contents were determined with RIA in 180 healthy subjects of both sexes in 5 age groups (27-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and over 70). Results: The serum contents of IGF-II and CT decreased gradually as the age increased. The IGF-II contents in subjects above 70 were significantly lower than those in all other subjects (P<0.01); the values in subjects of the age group 27-39 were also significantly higher than those in the 60-69 group (P<0.05). Again, the serum CT contents in subjects over 50 were significantly lower than those in subjects below 50 (P<0.05, P<0.01). There were little differences among the levels in both sexes, with the exception of a slight but not significant lower value in the females above 50. Conclusion: In older subjects, the decreased contents of serum IGF-II would exert less modulation on osteoblastic activity while the decreased contents of CT would exert less inhibition on osteolytic activity. The contents in older females were even lower due to the decreased estrogen level. Combination of these two factors would lead to the initiation and development of osteoporosis. (authors)

  12. Different effects of copper (II), cadmium (II) and phosphate on the sorption of phenanthrene on the biomass of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuqiang; Li, Wei; Xue, Bin; Zhong, Jicheng; Yao, Shuchun; Wu, Qinglong

    2013-10-15

    Due to the large surface area and high organic carbon content of cyanobacteria, organic contaminants can be readily sorbed on cyanobacteria during algal blooms, and then be transferred to the food web. This process is likely to be affected by the coexisting metals and nutrients, however, the possible impacts remain unclear. Effects of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and phosphate on the sorption of phenanthrene on cyanobacterial biomass collected from an algal bloom were therefore studied. Continuous decrease in phenanthrene sorption was observed in the presence of low concentrations of Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) (phosphate concentration. Phosphate blocked the binding sites, modified the cell morphology, and increased the negative charge as well as the hydrophilicity of the cyanobacterial surface, thereby suppressing phenanthrene sorption. This study indicates that sorption of aromatic organic compounds by cyanobacteria could be significantly alerted by concentrations and properties of the coexisting transition metals and phosphates, which may subsequently affect their transfer to the food web in eutrophic waters. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of electrical field on the quantized vortices in He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsik, V.D.

    2007-01-01

    Electrical polarization and interaction of quantized vortices with electrical field in superfluid Bose fluid are studied. Two types of the vortices polarization are considered; both of them are caused by action of centrifugal forces upon the fluid atoms at their azimuthal motion around the vortex line. Firstly, atoms obtain dipole moments (internal polarization when external polarization when external field is absent) and a nonuniform symmetrical distribution of the polarization density arises; at that, a vortex has no integral dipole moment but each element of the vortex line bears a quadrupole moment. Secondly, action of the centrifugal forces leads to a nonuniform distribution of the atomic density around the vortex line; therefore, the polarization density of the fluid in the external electrical field is also nonuniform in the vicinity of this line and each isolated element of the vortex line obtains dipole moment proportional to the field magnitude (inductive polarization). Analytical expressions for the polarization density around the straight and circular vortex lines are obtained and the effective dipole and quadrupole moments of the vortices are determined. A distribution of the ponderomotive forces acting on the superfluid fluid with quantized vortices in the external electrical field has been analyzed and the caused by field additives to the energy of the straight and circular vortices are found. Numerical estimations of the effects considered are given for He II

  14. Electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice photodetectors with interfacial effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Peng-Fei; Mou, Shin; Chuang, Shun Lien

    2012-01-30

    The electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors in the mid-infrared (IR) range are investigated. We formulate a rigorous band structure model using the 8-band k · p method to include the conduction and valence band mixing. After solving the 8 × 8 Hamiltonian and deriving explicitly the new momentum matrix elements in terms of envelope functions, optical transition rates are obtained through the Fermi's golden rule under various doping and injection conditions. Optical measurements on T2SL photodetectors are compared with our model and show good agreement. Our modeling results of quantum structures connect directly to the device-level design and simulation. The predicted doping effect is readily applicable to the optimization of photodetectors. We further include interfacial (IF) layers to study the significance of their effect. Optical properties of T2SLs are expected to have a large tunable range by controlling the thickness and material composition of the IF layers. Our model provides an efficient tool for the designs of novel photodetectors.

  15. Effect of diabetes and insulin on the turnover of hexokinase II in the skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    An ELISA procedure was developed to determine the amount of hexokinase II protein in the skeletal muscle extracts of rats, and immunoprecipitation was utilized to determine the hexokinase II activity. Both hexokinase II activity and the amount of hexokinase II protein decreased in the diabetic rat. Both increased toward normal treatment with insulin. The rate of synthesis of hexokinase II in the skeletal muscle was determined by the rate of incorporation of [ 3 H] leucine into hexokinase II. This rate was compared to that of the total cytosolic proteins to determine if the rate of hexokinase II synthesis was specifically affected by insulin. This relative rate of synthesis of hexokinase II was found to be approximately two times greater in the normal as compared to the diabetic rat. The apparent rate constants of degradation were determined using a double-isotope technique and from these constants it was possible to calculate the apparent half-lives. The apparent half-life was approximately 2.3 times greater in the normal compared to the diabetic rat and 2 times greater in the insulin-treated compared to the diabetic

  16. The Effect of MHC Class II Transactivator on the Growth and Metastasis of Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    F. Manca, and R. S. Accolla. 1998. HLA class II expression in uninducible hepatocarcinoma cells after transfection of AIR-1 gene product CIITA...Cestari, A. D’Agostino, ’ A M Megiovanni, F. Manca, and R. S. Accolla. 1998. HLA class II expression in uninducible hepatocarcinoma cells after

  17. Effect of Salt on the Metabolism of ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter’ Clade I and II

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhongwei; Dunne, Aislinn; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Saikaly, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    Saline wastewater is known to affect the performance of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process. However, studies comparing the effect of salinity on different PAO clades are lacking. In this study, 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' Clade I and II (hereafter referred to as PAOI and PAOII) were highly enriched (~90% in relative abundance as determined by quantitative FISH) in the form of granules in two sequencing batch reactors. Anaerobic and aerobic batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of salinity on the kinetics and stoichiometry of PAOI and PAOII. PAOI and PAOII communities showed different priority in using polyphosphate (poly-P) and glycogen to generate ATP in the anaerobic phase when exposed to salt, with PAOI depending more on intracellular poly-P degradation (e.g., the proportion of calculated ATP derived from poly-P increased by 5-6% at 0.256 mol/L NaCl or KCl) while PAOII on glycolysis of intracellularly stored glycogen (e.g., the proportion of calculated ATP derived from glycogen increased by 29-30% at 0.256 mol/L NaCl or KCl). In the aerobic phase, the loss of phosphate uptake capability was more pronounced in PAOII due to the higher energy cost to synthesize their larger glycogen pool compared to PAOI. For both PAOI and PAOII, aerobic conversion rates were more sensitive to salt than anaerobic conversion rates. Potassium (K) and sodium (Na) ions exhibited different effect regardless of the enriched PAO culture, suggesting that the composition of salt is an important factor to consider when studying the effect of salt on EBPR performance.

  18. Effect of Salt on the Metabolism of ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter’ Clade I and II

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhongwei

    2018-03-16

    Saline wastewater is known to affect the performance of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process. However, studies comparing the effect of salinity on different PAO clades are lacking. In this study, \\'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis\\' Clade I and II (hereafter referred to as PAOI and PAOII) were highly enriched (~90% in relative abundance as determined by quantitative FISH) in the form of granules in two sequencing batch reactors. Anaerobic and aerobic batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of salinity on the kinetics and stoichiometry of PAOI and PAOII. PAOI and PAOII communities showed different priority in using polyphosphate (poly-P) and glycogen to generate ATP in the anaerobic phase when exposed to salt, with PAOI depending more on intracellular poly-P degradation (e.g., the proportion of calculated ATP derived from poly-P increased by 5-6% at 0.256 mol/L NaCl or KCl) while PAOII on glycolysis of intracellularly stored glycogen (e.g., the proportion of calculated ATP derived from glycogen increased by 29-30% at 0.256 mol/L NaCl or KCl). In the aerobic phase, the loss of phosphate uptake capability was more pronounced in PAOII due to the higher energy cost to synthesize their larger glycogen pool compared to PAOI. For both PAOI and PAOII, aerobic conversion rates were more sensitive to salt than anaerobic conversion rates. Potassium (K) and sodium (Na) ions exhibited different effect regardless of the enriched PAO culture, suggesting that the composition of salt is an important factor to consider when studying the effect of salt on EBPR performance.

  19. Effect of Salt on the Metabolism of ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter’ Clade I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Saline wastewater is known to affect the performance of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR process. However, studies comparing the effect of salinity on different PAO clades are lacking. In this study, ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis’ Clade I and II (hereafter referred to as PAOI and PAOII were highly enriched (∼90% in relative abundance as determined by quantitative FISH in the form of granules in two sequencing batch reactors. Anaerobic and aerobic batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of salinity on the kinetics and stoichiometry of PAOI and PAOII. PAOI and PAOII communities showed different priority in using polyphosphate (poly-P and glycogen to generate ATP in the anaerobic phase when exposed to salt, with PAOI depending more on intracellular poly-P degradation (e.g., the proportion of calculated ATP derived from poly-P increased by 5–6% at 0.256 mol/L NaCl or KCl while PAOII on glycolysis of intracellularly stored glycogen (e.g., the proportion of calculated ATP derived from glycogen increased by 29–30% at 0.256 mol/L NaCl or KCl. In the aerobic phase, the loss of phosphate uptake capability was more pronounced in PAOII due to the higher energy cost to synthesize their larger glycogen pool compared to PAOI. For both PAOI and PAOII, aerobic conversion rates were more sensitive to salt than anaerobic conversion rates. Potassium (K+ and sodium (Na+ ions exhibited different effect regardless of the enriched PAO culture, suggesting that the composition of salt is an important factor to consider when studying the effect of salt on EBPR performance.

  20. Effect of supramolecular organization of a cartilaginous tissue on thermal stability of collagen II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Averkiev, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.; Grokhovskaya, T. E.; Obrezkova, M. V.

    2006-08-01

    The thermal stability of collagen II in various cartilaginous tissues was studied. It was found that heating a tissue of nucleus pulposus results in collagen II melting within a temperature range of 60-70°C; an intact tissue of hyaline cartilage (of nasal septum and cartilage endplates) is a thermally stable system, where collagen II is not denatured completely up to 100°C. It was found that partial destruction of glycosaminoglycans in hyaline cartilage leads to an increase in the degree of denaturation of collagen II upon heating, although a significant fraction remains unchanged. It was shown that electrostatic interactions of proteoglycans and collagen only slightly affect the thermal stability of collagen II in the tissues. Evidently, proteoglycan aggregates play a key role: they create topological hindrances for moving polypeptide chains, thereby reducing the configurational entropy of collagen macromolecules in the state of a random coil.

  1. Effect of Dunaliella tertiolecta organic exudates on the Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A G; Santana-Casiano, J M; González-Dávila, M; Pérez-Almeida, N; Suárez de Tangil, M

    2014-07-15

    The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta on the Fe(II) oxidation rate constants was studied at different stages of growth. The concentration of dissolved organic carbon increased from 2.1 to 7.1 mg L(-1) over time of culture. The oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) was studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2-8.2), temperature (5-35 °C), salinity (10-37), and dissolved organic carbon produced by cells (2.1-7.1 mg L(-1)). The experimental rate always decreased in the presence of organic exudates with respect to that in the control seawater. The Fe(II) oxidation rate constant was also studied in the context of Marcus theory, where ΔG° was 39.31-51.48 kJ mol(-1). A kinetic modeling approach was applied for computing the equilibrium and rate constants for Fe(II) and exudates present in solution, the Fe(II) speciation, and the contribution of each Fe(II) species to the overall oxidation rate constant. The best fit model took into account two acidity equilibrium constants for the Fe(II) complexing ligands with pKa,1=9.45 and pKa,2=4.9. The Fe(II) complexing constants were KFe(II)-LH=3×10(10) and KFe(II)-L=10(7), and the corresponding computed oxidation rates were 68±2 and 36±8 M(-1) min(-1), respectively.

  2. Effect of Jigsaw II, Reading-Writing-Presentation, and Computer Animations on the Teaching of "Light" Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Yasemin; Yildiz, Emre; Çaliklar, Seyma; Simsek, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of Jigsaw II technique, reading-writing-presentation method, and computer animation on students' academic achievements, epistemological beliefs, attitudes towards science lesson, and the retention of knowledge in the "Light" unit covered in the 7th grade. The sample of the study consists…

  3. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Green, Michael L.; Breite, Andrew G.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Dwulet, Francis E.; McCarthy, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation.

  4. Effect of 17β-estradiol on plasma lipids and LDL oxidation in postmenopausal women with type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, H.E.; Leuven, J.A.G.; Kluft, C.; Krans, H.M.J.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Buytenhek, R.; Laarse, A. van der; Princen, H.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    In type II diabetes mellitus the altered hormonal state after menopause may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is associated with a decreased cardiovascular risk, at least in nondiabetic post-menopausal women. We studied the effect of ERT on plasma

  5. Cost-effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery: Increasing the Economic Viability of the Most Effective Treatment for Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeremy A; Ewing, Joseph A; Hale, Allyson L; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Bour, Eric S; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    There has been considerable debate on the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery within larger population groups. Despite the recognition that morbid obesity and its comorbidities are best treated surgically, insurance coverage is not universally available. One of the more costly comorbidities of obesity is Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We propose a model that demonstrates the cost-effectiveness of increasing the number of bariatric surgical operations performed on patients with T2DM in the United States. We applied published population cost estimates (2012) for medical care of T2DM to a retrospective cohort of morbidly obese patients in South Carolina. We compared differences in 10-year medical costs between those having bariatric surgery and controls. Resolution of T2DM in the bariatric cohort was assumed to be 40 per cent. Considering only the direct medical costs of T2DM, the 10-year aggregate cost savings compared with a control group is $2.7 million/1000 patients; the total (direct and indirect) cost savings is $5.4 million/1000 patients. When considering resolution of T2DM alone, increasing the number of bariatric operations for a given population leads to a substantial cost savings over a 10-year period. This study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that bariatric surgery is a cost-effective means of caring for the obese patient.

  6. Effects of Icariside II on Corpus Cavernosum and Major Pelvic Ganglion Neuropathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yi Bai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic erectile dysfunction is associated with penile dorsal nerve bundle neuropathy in the corpus cavernosum and the mechanism is not well understood. We investigated the neuropathy changes in the corpus cavernosum of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and the effects of Icariside II (ICA II on improving neuropathy. Thirty-six 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into normal control group, diabetic group and ICA-II treated group. Diabetes was induced by a one-time intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg. Three days later, the diabetic rats were randomly divided into 2 groups including a saline treated placebo group and an ICA II-treated group (5 mg/kg/day, by intragastric administration daily. Twelve weeks later, erectile function was measured by cavernous nerve electrostimulation with real time intracorporal pressure assessment. The penis was harvested for the histological examination (immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical staining and transmission electron microscopy detecting. Diabetic animals exhibited a decreased density of dorsal nerve bundle in penis. The neurofilament of the dorsal nerve bundle was fragmented in the diabetic rats. There was a decreased expression of nNOS and NGF in the diabetic group. The ICA II group had higher density of dorsal nerve bundle, higher expression of NGF and nNOS in the penis. The pathological change of major pelvic nerve ganglion (including the microstructure by transmission electron microscope and the neurite outgrowth length of major pelvic nerve ganglion tissue cultured in vitro was greatly attenuated in the ICA II-treated group (p < 0.01. ICA II treatment attenuates the diabetes-related impairment of corpus cavernosum and major pelvic ganglion neuropathy in rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

  7. EFFECT OF DIATOMEAOUS EARTH TREATMENT USING HYDROGEN CHLORIDE AND SULFURIC ACID ON KINETICS OF CADMIUM(II ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, treatment of diatomaceous earth, Sangiran, Central Java using hydrogen chloride (HCl and sulfuric acid (H2SO4 on kinetics of Cd(II adsorption in aqueous solution has been carried out. The work was conducted by mixing an amount of grounded diatomaceous earth (200 mesh in size with HCl or H2SO4 solution in various concentrations for two hours at temperature range of 100 - 150oC. The mixture was then filtered and washed with water until the filtrate pH is approximately 7 and then the residue was dried for four hours at a temperature of 70oC. The product was used as an adsorbent to adsorb Cd(II in aqueous solution with various concentrations. The Cd(II adsorbed was determined by analyzing the rest of Cd(II in the solution using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of treatment was evaluated from kinetic parameter of adsorption rate constant calculated based on the simple kinetic model. Results showed  that before equilibrium condition reached, adsorpstion of Cd(II occurred through two steps, i.e. a step tends to follow a reaction of irreversible first order  (step I followed by reaction of reversible first order (step II. Treatment with acids, either hydrogen chloride or sulfuric acid, decreased adsorption rate constant for the step I from 15.2/min to a range of 6.4 - 9.4/min.  However, increasing concentration of acid (in a range of concentration investigated did not give significant and constant change of adsorption rate constant. For step II process,  adsorption involved physical interaction with the sufficient low adsorption energy (in a range of 311.3 - 1001 J/mol.     Keywords: adsorption, cdmium, diatomaceous earth, kinetics.

  8. Investigation in vitro Effects of Rivastigmine and Galantamine Used to Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease on CA Isozymes I and II

    OpenAIRE

    DİLEK, Esra; ÇANKAYA, Murat; EZMECİ, Talat; SUNAR, Mukadder; ÇOBAN, T. Abdulkadir

    2017-01-01

    The carbonicanhydrases (CA, EC. 4.2.1.1) are an expanding family of zinc-containing enzymescatalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 in a two-step reaction toyield HCO3-and H+. These enzymes playimportant roles in several physiological/pathological processes. The aim ofthis study is to evaluate in vitrothe effects of these drug active substances which use which use for treatmentof Alzheimer disease on CA I and II isoenzyme. CA I and II isoenzymes fromhuman blood have been purified using Seph...

  9. Recovery Effect and Life Prolong Effect of Long Term Low-Dose Rate Irradiation on Type II Diabetes Model Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, I.; Sakai, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated on model mice for type II diabetes mellitus, C57BL/KsJ-db/db. The mice develop the type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age due to obesity and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. Female 10-week old mice, a group of 12 mice, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr from 137-Cs (370 GBq). The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, the decrease in the glucose level was observed in 3 mice. Such recovery from the diabetes was never observed in 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There is no systematic difference in the change of body weight, food assumption, and amount of drinking water, between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. The survival was better in the irradiated group: the surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, while 40% in the non-irradiated. Marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; better condition was kept in the irradiated group. In the irradiated mice mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20 ? 30 weeks compared with the non-irradiated mice. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, which lead not only to the recovery of the diabetes, but also to the suppression of the aging process. (Author)

  10. Mechanism and efficiency of cell death of type II photosensitizers: effect of zinc chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, Christiane; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Baptista, Maurício S

    2012-01-01

    A series of meso-substituted tetra-cationic porphyrins, which have methyl and octyl substituents, was studied in order to understand the effect of zinc chelation and photosensitizer subcellular localization in the mechanism of cell death. Zinc chelation does not change the photophysical properties of the photosensitizers (all molecules studied are type II photosensitizers) but affects considerably the interaction of the porphyrins with membranes, reducing mitochondrial accumulation. The total amount of intracellular reactive species induced by treating cells with photosensitizer and light is similar for zinc-chelated and free-base porphyrins that have the same alkyl substituent. Zinc-chelated porphyrins, which are poorly accumulated in mitochondria, show higher efficiency of cell death with features of apoptosis (higher MTT response compared with trypan blue staining, specific acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stronger cytochrome c release and larger sub-G1 cell population), whereas nonchelated porphyrins, which are considerably more concentrated in mitochondria, triggered mainly necrotic cell death. We hypothesized that zinc-chelation protects the photoinduced properties of the porphyrins in the mitochondrial environment. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Effects of the Electric Field on the Direct Loss Asymmetries on TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the radial electric fields upon the direct loss asymmetries have been studied for low energy (0.1-1keV)ions. The analysis shows the permanence of the predominant downwards asymmetry that is only slightly modified in the poloidal rotation direction for moderate electric fields. In TJ-II this poloidal rotation is directed towards decreasing poloidal angles for positive (outward) electric fields and the ions drift along the same direction. Nevertheless for very strong fields the lost particles concentrate in the extreme plasma periphery (at the same time that the rate loss decreases strongly) and have no time, any more, to feel the poloidal rotation before escaping. The gaps between the TF coils receive the most of the losses. On the Vacuum Vessel the losses have a very strong concentration along the Hard Core, in particular on the PLT-2 plane plate (the one that is placed down at Phi=0 degree centigree) and a moderate preference for the 2''nd toroidal octant of each period. The poloidal rotation is much less visible than on the plasma border. The resulting power loads are small. (Author)

  12. The Effect of Group Reminiscence Therapy on Depression in Women With Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of psychological disorders and symptoms. Objectives This research investigated the effect of group reminiscence therapy on depression among women with type II diabetes. Patients and Methods The present study was a clinical trial study. Twenty-four patients referring to the diabetic clinic of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran were selected through simple random sampling and were divided in two groups. Data were collected through a demographic questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Group reminiscence therapy was held over eight biweekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. Finally, data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Chi-Square tests, using SPSS version 20. Results A significant difference was observed between the two groups after the intervention (P = 0.001. The rating for depression decreased significantly in the experimental group. Before the group reminiscence therapy, the highest rating for depression obtained by the experimental group was “need for consultation” (50%, whereas after the intervention, the highest rating was “no depression” (50%. One month after the intervention, the highest rating obtained for depression was “low” (50%. Conclusions Reminiscence therapy decreased depression among diabetic female patients after the intervention and one month after the intervention. It can be said that, through the reminiscence therapy, patients’ past memories were reviewed and emphasis on the positive aspects thereof in the group setting was followed by an increased sense of self-worth and a decrease in depression.

  13. Effect of iron II on hydroxyapatite dissolution and precipitation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbem, A C B; Alves, K M R P; Sassaki, K T; Moraes, J C S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of iron II on the dissolution and precipitation of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA). HA powder was suspended in solutions of iron (0.84 µg/ml, Fe0.84; 18.0 µg/ml, Fe18; 70.0 µg/ml, Fe70), fluoride (1,100 µg/ml, F1,100), and deionized water and submitted to pH cycling. After pH cycling, the samples were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The concentrations of fluoride, calcium, phosphorus, and iron were also analyzed. The data were submitted to ANOVA, and analyzed by Tukey's test (p iron. The intensity of the phosphate bands increased and that of the hydroxyl bands decreased in the group F1,100. It was observed that there was a higher concentration of Ca in the group F1,100, with no significant difference between the groups Fe18 and Fe70 (p > 0.05). There was an increase in Fe concentration in the HA directly related to the Fe concentration of the treatment solutions. Results show that the presence of Fe causes the precipitation of apatite with high solubility. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. PISC II: Parametric studies. Effect of defect characteristics on immersion focusing probe testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombret, P.

    1989-09-01

    The results of the Round-Robin trials conducted under the PISC I exercise (1976-1980) showed large discrepancies in the defect detection and sizing capability among different flaws. To identify the causes of such dispersions and quantify the effects, a Parametric Study was included in the PISC II project, taking into consideration most characteristics of planar flaws. A number of steel specimens containing various artificial defects was made available for the measurements. The defects were ultrasonically scanned by standard methods and by some advanced techniques the high performance of which had been established in the PISC Round-Robin Tests. This report deals with the beam focusing technique: 2 MHz 45 0 shear wave transducers have been used in immersion to collect the signals generated by the reference reflectors. The results show that the depth and the size of a defect do not affect significantly its detection and sizing, provided that the natural variation of sensitivity and of beam diameter along the propagation axis is taken into account. On the other hand, parameters such as the orientation and the roughness modify the conditions of impact and interference of the acoustic beam with the defect surface, and therefore strongly influence the energy partition in diffracted and specularly reflected rays. As an example, sharp smooth defects insonified under an angle of 45 0 return to the transducer signals approximately 10 times smaller than the ASME code calibration level

  15. A NEW COPPER (II)-IMIDAZOLE DERIVATIVE EFFECTIVELY INHIBITS REPLICATION OF DENV-2 IN VERO CELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucipto, Teguh Hari; Churrotin, Siti; Setyawati, Harsasi; Martak, Fahimah; Mulyatno, Kris Cahyo; Amarullah, Ilham Harlan; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori; Yotopranoto, Subagyo; Soegijanto, and Soegeng

    2018-01-01

    Background: Dengue is a kind of infectious disease that was distributed in the tropical and sub-tropical areas. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for humans, even though there have been great efforts towards this end. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) replication is very important. Among the complex compounds, copper(II)-imidazole derivatives are of interest because of their biological and medicinal benefits. Materials and Methods: In the present study, antiviral activity of [Cu(2,4,5-triphenylimidazole)2]n, was evaluated against different stages of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) replication in Vero cell using focus forming unit reduction assay and quantitative ELISA. Results: [Cu(2,4,5-triphenylimidazole)2]n inhibited DENV-2 replication in Vero cells with IC50 = 2.3 μg/ml and SI= 19.42 when cells were treated 2 days after virus infection, whereas its CC50 for cytotoxicity to Vero cells was 44.174 μg/ml. Conclusion: The compound has high anti-DENV2 activity, less toxicity, and a high possibility to be considered a drug candidate. PMID:29619441

  16. Dynamic complexities of a Holling II two-prey one-predator system with impulsive effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xinyu; Li Yongfeng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamic behaviors of a Holling II two-prey one-predator system with impulsive effect concerning biological control and chemical control strategies-periodic releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide (or harvesting pests) at fixed time. By using the Floquet theory of linear periodic impulsive equation and small-amplitude perturbation we show that there exists a globally asymptotically stable two-prey eradication periodic solution when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Further, we prove that the system is permanent if the impulsive period is larger than some critical value, and meanwhile the conditions for the extinction of one of the two prey and permanence of the remaining two species are given. Finally, numerical simulation shows that there exists a stable positive periodic solution with a maximum value no larger than a given level. Thus, we can use the stability of the positive periodic solution and its period to control insect pests at acceptably low levels

  17. Effect of Blood Glucose Fluctuation on Some Trace Elements and Aldosterone Hormone among Type II Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezz El-Arab, A.; El Fouly, A.H.; Mahmoud, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence determine that the metabolism of some trace elements is altered in diabetes mellitus (DM) type II. The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of serum blood glucose fluctuation during (Random, Fasting and Postprandial 2 hours state) on some trace elements such as Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Manganese (Mn), Magnesium (Mg), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), and Aldosterone hormone in type II Diabetic patients associated with metabolic syndrome in comparison with healthy volunteers. The International Diabetes Federation (IFD) consensus the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to central obesity, lipid profile, blood glucose level and blood pressure. A significant change was observed in trace elements level (Cd, Cr, Mg, Mn, Zn, Cu, Na, and K) and Aldosterone hormone as a result of glucose fluctuation among type II diabetic patients.

  18. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  19. Integrated Approach to Inform the New York City Water Supply System Coupling SAR Remote Sensing Observations and the SWAT Watershed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesser, D.; Hoang, L.; McDonald, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Efforts to improve municipal water supply systems increasingly rely on an ability to elucidate variables that drive hydrologic dynamics within large watersheds. However, fundamental model variables such as precipitation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and soil freeze/thaw state remain difficult to measure empirically across large, heterogeneous watersheds. Satellite remote sensing presents a method to validate these spatially and temporally dynamic variables as well as better inform the watershed models that monitor the water supply for many of the planet's most populous urban centers. PALSAR 2 L-band, Sentinel 1 C-band, and SMAP L-band scenes covering the Cannonsville branch of the New York City (NYC) water supply watershed were obtained for the period of March 2015 - October 2017. The SAR data provides information on soil moisture, free/thaw state, seasonal surface inundation, and variable source areas within the study site. Integrating the remote sensing products with watershed model outputs and ground survey data improves the representation of related processes in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) utilized to monitor the NYC water supply. PALSAR 2 supports accurate mapping of the extent of variable source areas while Sentinel 1 presents a method to model the timing and magnitude of snowmelt runoff events. SMAP Active Radar soil moisture product directly validates SWAT outputs at the subbasin level. This blended approach verifies the distribution of soil wetness classes within the watershed that delineate Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) in the modified SWAT-Hillslope. The research expands the ability to model the NYC water supply source beyond a subset of the watershed while also providing high resolution information across a larger spatial scale. The global availability of these remote sensing products provides a method to capture fundamental hydrology variables in regions where current modeling efforts and in situ data remain limited.

  20. Insight into the short- and long-term effects of Cu(II) on denitrifying biogranules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Hai-Yan; Shi, Man-Ling; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is the first time to evaluate the effect of Cu"2"+ on denitrifying biogranules. • A high level of Cu(II) was investigated during batch assays and continuous tests. • Mechanisms of the effects of Cu"2"+ on denitrifying biogranules were discussed. • Effects of pre-exposure to Cu"2"+ and starvation treatments were investigated. - Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the short- and long-term effects of Cu"2"+ on the activity and performance of denitrifying bacteria. The short-term effects of various concentrations of Cu"2"+ on the denitrifying bacteria were evaluated using batch assays. The specific denitrifying activity (SDA) decreased from 14.3 ± 2.2 (without Cu"2"+) to 6.1 ± 0.1 mg N h"−"1 g"−"1 VSS (100 mgCu"2"+ L"−"1) when Cu"2"+ increased from 0 to 100 mg L"−"1 with an increment of 10 mgCu"2"+ L"−"1. A non-competitive inhibition model was used to calculate the 50% inhibition concentration (IC_5_0) of Cu"2"+ on denitrifying sludge (30.6 ± 2.5 mg L"−"1). Monod and Luong models were applied to investigate the influence of the initial substrate concentration, and the results suggested that the maximum substrate removal rate would be reduced with Cu"2"+ supplementation. Pre-exposure to Cu"2"+ could lead to an 18.2–46.2% decrease in the SDA and decreasing percentage of the SDA increased with both exposure time and concentration. In the continuous-flow test, Cu"2"+ concentration varied from 1 to 75 mg L"−"1; however, no clear deterioration was observed in the reactor, and the reactor was kept stable, with the total nitrogen removal efficiency and total organic carbon efficiency greater than 89.0 and 85.0%, respectively. The results demonstrated the short-term inhibition of Cu"2"+ upon denitrification, and no notable adversity was observed during the continuous-flow test after long-term acclimation.

  1. Hall effects on hydromagnetic Couette flow of Class-II in a rotating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... Couette flow of class-II of a viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluid with ... Numerical solution of energy equation and numerical values of rate of heat transfer at ...

  2. The Effects of Japan's Apology for World War II Atrocities on Regional Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cathey, Emily A

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the impact of atrocities that Japan committed against its neighbors during and prior to World War II on Japan's relationships with its neighbors, China and the Republic of Korea...

  3. MarsSedEx I and II: Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sedimentation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is less uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. The effects of gravity on flow hydraulics limit the use of common, semi-empirical models developed to simulate particle settling in terrestrial environments, on Mars. Assessing sedimentation patterns on Mars, aimed at identifying strata potentially hosting traces of life, is potentially affected by such uncertainties. Using first-principle approaches, e.g. through Computational Fluid Dynamics, for calculating settling velocities on other planetary bodies requires a large effort and is limited by the values of boundary conditions, e.g. the shape of the particle. The degree of uncertainty resulting from the differences in gravity on Earth and Mars was therefore tested during three reduced-gravity flights, the MarsSedEx I and II missions, conducted in November 2012 and 2013. Nine types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Based on the observed settling velocities, the uncertainties of empirical relationships developed on Earth to assess particle settling on Mars are discussed. In addition, the potential effects of reduced gravity on patterns of erosion, transport and sorting of sediment, including the implications for identifying strata bearing traces of past life on are examined.

  4. Aplicación del modelo SWAT para evaluar la contaminación por fuentes difusas en la subcuenca del lago de Chapala, México

    OpenAIRE

    BAUTISTA-ÁVALOS, Dinora; CRUZ-CÁRDENAS, Gustavo; MONCAYO-ESTRADA, Rodrigo; SILVA GARCÍA, José Teodoro; ESTRADA-GODOY, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Los modelos de balance hidrológico de cuencas son herramientas que permiten describir procesos dinámicos y predecir, a través de la simulación, escenarios del impacto de las actividades productivas de una región. En el presente trabajo se determinó el balance hídrico y las cargas de contaminantes por actividades agrícolas en la subcuenca del lago de Chapala mediante la herramienta de evaluación de agua y suelo SWAT (2012). Se configuró el modelo con datos de altimetría, con información del ti...

  5. Analyses of PWR spent fuel composition using SCALE and SWAT code systems to find correction factors for criticality safety applications adopting burnup credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Sung; Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    The isotopic composition calculations were performed for 26 spent fuel samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor and 55 spent fuel samples from 7 PWR reactors using the SAS2H module of the SCALE4.4 code system with 27, 44 and 238 group cross-section libraries and the SWAT code system with the 107 group cross-section library. For the analyses of samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor, geometrical models were constructed for each of SCALE4.4/SAS2H and SWAT. For the analyses of samples from 7 PWR reactors, the geometrical model already adopted in the SCALE/SAS2H was directly converted to the model of SWAT. The four kinds of calculation results were compared with the measured data. For convenience, the ratio of the measured to calculated values was used as a parameter. When the ratio is less than unity, the calculation overestimates the measurement, and the ratio becomes closer to unity, they have a better agreement. For many important nuclides for burnup credit criticality safety evaluation, the four methods applied in this study showed good coincidence with measurements in general. More precise observations showed, however: (1) Less unity ratios were found for Pu-239 and -241 for selected 16 samples out of the 26 samples from the Obrigheim reactor (10 samples were deselected because their burnups were measured with Cs-137 non-destructive method, less reliable than Nd-148 method the rest 16 samples were measured with); (2) Larger than unity ratios were found for Am-241 and Cm-242 for both the 16 and 55 samples; (3) Larger than unity ratios were found for Sm-149 for the 55 samples; (4) SWAT was generally accompanied by larger ratios than those of SAS2H with some exceptions. Based on the measured-to-calculated ratios for 71 samples of a combined set in which 16 selected samples and 55 samples were included, the correction factors that should be multiplied to the calculated isotopic compositions were generated for a conservative estimate of the neutron multiplication factor

  6. Effect of timing on the outcomes of 1-phase nonextraction therapy of Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Kim, Ludia H

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this cephalometric study was to evaluate the role of timing in relation to skeletal maturity on the outcomes of nonextraction comprehensive Class II therapy. Three samples of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion were treated with headgear combined with fixed appliances and Class II elastics. Lateral cephalograms were taken of all subjects before therapy (T1) and at an average interval of 6 months after therapy (T2). The first sample (23 subjects) was treated before the pubertal growth spurt, the second sample (24 subjects) received therapy during the pubertal growth spurt, and the third sample (13 subjects) was treated at a postpubertal stage of development. The average T1 to T2 interval was approximately 30 months for all patients, with an average treatment duration of 24 months. Longitudinal observations of a group of 17 subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions were compared with the treated groups at the 3 skeletal maturation intervals with nonparametric statistics. Class II treatment before or during the pubertal growth spurt induced significant favorable skeletal changes (restricted maxillary advancement in prepubertal patients and enhanced mandibular growth in pubertal patients). Patients treated after the pubertal growth spurt had only significant dentoalveolar changes. The greatest amount of dentoskeletal correction of Class II malocclusion with 1-phase nonextraction treatment occurred in patients treated during the pubertal growth spurt.

  7. Comparison of the effect of different intensity exercise on a bicycle ergometer on postprandial lipidemia in type II diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Argani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postprandial lipid clearance failure and lipoprotein disorders, which are independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases are well-recognized in type II diabetes. Reduction of fats through exercise has been proved, though the mechanism is not well-defined, and the effects of different intensity exercise on postprandial lipidemia in diabetes type II is unknown. This study aims to find these effects using a cycle ergometer. METHODS: On three different days, 15 type II diabetics (10 women and 5 men, with a mean age 42.07 ± 6.05 years, weight 94.64 ± 4.37 kg, height 159.78 ± 9.09 cm, and body mass index 29.83 ± 3.93 kg/m2, consumed a full fat breakfast (750-800 kcal, 85% fat, and 150 min later, blood samples were taken from them to measure their lipid profile. The 1st day was the control day, without any exercises. Seven days later, 90 min after enriched breakfast, they did 30 min of exercise on the cycle ergometer with intensity of 55-70% of maximum heart rate (HRmax, and 14 days later, 90 min after enriched breakfast, they did 30 min of exercise with intensity of 70-85% of HRmax. RESULTS: According to Friedman non-parametric test, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol serum level significantly increased after 30 min of moderate intensity exercise (P > 0.05, from 39.4 ± 5.2 to 48.6 ± 9.3, while this increase was insignificant after a higher intensity exercise. Neither intensity levels had any significant effects on triglyceride or on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. CONCLUSION: Results showed that moderate intensity exercise was more effective in increasing HDL cholesterol level in type II diabetics.   Keywords: Postprandial Lipidemia, Resistance Exercise, Bicycle Ergometer, Type II Diabetes 

  8. Application of the SWAT model to an AMD-affected river (Meca River, SW Spain). Estimation of transported pollutant load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, L.; Olías, M.; Fernandez de Villarán, R.; Domingo Santos, J. M.; Nieto, J. M.; Sarmiento, A. M.; Cánovas, C. R.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThe Meca River is highly contaminated by acid mine drainage coming from the Tharsis mining district, belonging to the Iberian Pyrite Belt. This river is regulated by the Sancho reservoir (58 hm 3), with a pH close to 4.2. In this work, the load transported by the Meca River to the Sancho reservoir has been assessed. Due to the lack of streamflow data, the hydrological behaviour of the Meca River basin has been simulated using the SWAT model. The model has been calibrated against registered daily inflows of the Sancho reservoir (1982-2000), excluding the hydrological years 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 that were kept for the validation. The results were satisfactory; the evaluation coefficients for monthly calibration were: r = 0.85 (Pearson's correlation coefficient), NSE = 0.83 (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient) and DV = 1.08 (runoff volume deviation). The main uncertainty was the calibration during low water because of the poor accuracy in the measurement of the inputs to the reservoir in these conditions. Discharge and dissolved concentration relationships for different elements were obtained from hydrochemical samplings, which allowed us to estimate the element pollutant load