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Sample records for swan sleep study

  1. Sleep duration and weight change in midlife women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, Bradley M.; Janssen, Imke; Cursio, John F.; Matthews, Karen A.; Hall, Martica; Gold, Ellen B.; Burns, John W.; Kravitz, Howard M.

    2012-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been associated with higher current body mass index (BMI) and subsequent weight gain. However, most prior longitudinal studies are limited by reliance on self-reported sleep duration, and none accounted for the potential confounding effect of sleep-disordered breathing. The associations of sleep duration with current BMI and BMI change were examined among 310 midlife women in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study (2003–2005). Sleep duration was assessed for approximately one month with concurrent wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing was quantified using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) based on in-home polysomnography. BMI was assessed annually through core SWAN visit 10 (2006 and 2008). Mean BMI increased from 29.6 (SD=7.8) kg/m2 to 30.0 (SD=8.0) kg/m2 over an average of 4.6 years (SD=1.0) of follow up. In cross-sectional analyses controlling for AHI, demographic variables, and several potential confounding variables, actigraphy (estimate=−1.22, 95%C.I.: −2.03, −.42) and diary (estimate=−.86, 95%C.I. −1.62, −.09) measures of sleep duration were inversely associated with BMI. Each hour of less sleep was associated with 1.22 kg/m2 greater BMI for actigraphy sleep duration, and a 0.86 kg/m2 greater BMI for diary sleep duration. Longitudinal associations between sleep duration and annual BMI change were non-significant in unadjusted and fully-adjusted models. In this cohort of midlife women, cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and current BMI were independent of sleep-disordered breathing, but sleep duration was not prospectively associated with weight change. PMID:23505171

  2. Sleep duration and weight change in midlife women: the SWAN sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, Bradley M; Janssen, Imke; Cursio, John F; Matthews, Karen A; Hall, Martica; Gold, Ellen B; Burns, John W; Kravitz, Howard M

    2013-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been associated with higher current BMI and subsequent weight gain. However, most prior longitudinal studies are limited by reliance on self-reported sleep duration, and none accounted for the potential confounding effect of sleep-disordered breathing. The associations of sleep duration with current BMI and BMI change were examined among 310 midlife women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study (2003-2005). Sleep duration was assessed for approximately one month with concurrent wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing was quantified using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) based on in-home polysomnography. BMI was assessed annually through core SWAN visit 10 (2006 and 2008). Mean BMI increased from 29.6 (SD = 7.8) kg/m(2) to 30.0 (SD = 8.0) kg/m(2) over an average of 4.6 years (SD = 1.0) of follow-up. In cross-sectional analyses controlling for AHI, demographic variables, and several potential confounding variables, actigraphy (estimate = -1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.03, -0.42) and diary (estimate = -0.86, 95% CI -1.62, -0.09) measures of sleep duration were inversely associated with BMI. Each hour of less sleep was associated with 1.22 kg/m(2) greater BMI for actigraphy sleep duration, and a 0.86 kg/m(2) greater BMI for diary sleep duration. Longitudinal associations between sleep duration and annual BMI change were nonsignificant in unadjusted and fully adjusted models. In this cohort of midlife women, cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and current BMI were independent of sleep-disordered breathing, but sleep duration was not prospectively associated with weight change. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  3. Chronic Stress is Prospectively Associated with Sleep in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Martica H; Casement, Melynda D; Troxel, Wendy M; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T; Kravitz, Howard M; Krafty, Robert T; Buysse, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate whether levels of upsetting life events measured over a 9-y period prospectively predict subjective and objective sleep outcomes in midlife women. Prospective cohort study. Four sites across the United States. 330 women (46-57 y of age) enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study. N/A. Upsetting life events were assessed annually for up to 9 y. Trajectory analysis applied to life events data quantitatively identified three distinct chronic stress groups: low stress, moderate stress, and high stress. Sleep was assessed by self-report and in-home polysomnography (PSG) during the ninth year of the study. Multivariate analyses tested the prospective association between chronic stress group and sleep, adjusting for race, baseline sleep complaints, marital status, body mass index, symptoms of depression, and acute life events at the time of the Sleep Study. Women characterized by high chronic stress had lower subjective sleep quality, were more likely to report insomnia, and exhibited increased PSG-assessed wake after sleep onset (WASO) relative to women with low to moderate chronic stress profiles. The effect of chronic stress group on WASO persisted in the subsample of participants without baseline sleep complaints. Chronic stress is prospectively associated with sleep disturbance in midlife women, even after adjusting for acute stressors at the time of the sleep study and other factors known to disrupt sleep. These results are consistent with current models of stress that emphasize the cumulative effect of stressors on health over time. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Bedtime Variability and Metabolic Health in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Briana J; Matthews, Karen A; Hasler, Brant P; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Kline, Christopher E; Buysse, Daniel J; Kravitz, Howard M; Tiani, Alaina G; Harlow, Sioban D; Hall, Martica H

    2016-02-01

    Circadian misalignment, as seen in shift workers, can disrupt metabolic processes. Associations between sleep timing in nonshift workers and metabolic health are unknown. We examined sleep timing and indices of metabolic health in a community sample of midlife women. Caucasian (n = 161), African American (n = 121) and Chinese (n = 56) non-shift-working women aged 48-58 y who were not taking insulin-related medications, participated in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study and were subsequently examined approximately 5.39 (standard deviation = 0.71) y later. Daily diary-reported bedtimes were used to calculate four measures of sleep timing: mean bedtime, bedtime variability, bedtime delay and bedtime advance. Body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, HOMA-IR) were measured at two time points. Linear regressions evaluated whether sleep timing was associated with BMI and HOMA-IR cross-sectionally and prospectively. In cross-sectional models, greater variability in bedtime and greater bedtime delay were associated with higher HOMA-IR (β = 0.128; P = 0.007, and β = 0.110; P = 0.013, respectively) and greater bedtime advance was associated with higher BMI (β = 0.095; P = 0.047). Prospectively, greater bedtime delay predicted increased HOMA-IR at Time 2 (β = 0.152; P = 0.003). Results were partially explained by shifted sleep timing on weekends. Frequent shifts in sleep timing may be related to metabolic health among non-shift working midlife women. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 269. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. Relationships between Menopausal and Mood Symptoms and EEG Sleep Measures in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Middle-Aged Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Howard M.; Avery, Elizabeth; Sowers, MaryFran; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Owens, Jane F.; Matthews, Karen A.; Hall, Martica; Zheng, Huiyong; Gold, Ellen B.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine associations of vasomotor and mood symptoms with visually scored and computer-generated measures of EEG sleep. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Setting: Community-based in-home polysomnography (PSG). Participants: 343 African American, Caucasian, and Chinese women; ages 48–58 years; pre-, peri- or post-menopausal; participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (SWAN Sleep Study). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Measures included PSG-assessed sleep duration, continuity, and architecture, delta sleep ratio (DSR) computed from automated counts of delta wave activity, daily diary-assessed vasomotor symptoms (VMS), questionnaires to collect mood (depression, anxiety) symptoms, medication, and lifestyle information, and menopausal status using bleeding criteria. Sleep outcomes were modeled using linear regression. Nocturnal VMS were associated with longer sleep time. Higher anxiety symptom scores were associated with longer sleep latency and lower sleep efficiency, but only in women reporting nocturnal VMS. Contrary to expectations, VMS and mood symptoms were unrelated to either DSR or REM latency. Conclusions: Vasomotor symptoms moderated associations of anxiety with EEG sleep measures of sleep latency and sleep efficiency and was associated with longer sleep duration in this multi-ethnic sample of midlife women. Citation: Kravitz HM; Avery E; Sowers MF; Bromberger JT; Owens JF; Matthews KA; Hall M; Zheng H; Gold EB; Buysse DJ. Relationships between menopausal and mood symptoms and Eeg sleep measures in a multi-ethnic sample of middle-aged women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1221-1232. PMID:21886360

  6. Consistently High Sports/Exercise Activity Is Associated with Better Sleep Quality, Continuity and Depth in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E.; Irish, Leah A.; Krafty, Robert T.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Dugan, Sheila A.; Hall, Martica H.

    2013-01-01

    sleep quality, continuity and depth in midlife women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1279-1288. PMID:23997360

  7. Sleep Hygiene Behaviors Among Midlife Women with Insomnia or Sleep-Disordered Breathing: The SWAN Sleep Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kline, Christopher E.; Irish, Leah A.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Okun, Michele L.; Owens, Jane F.; Hall, Martica H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are the most common sleep disorders among midlife women. Although promoting sleep hygiene behaviors may be a useful behavioral approach for the management of insomnia or SDB, the frequency with which women engage in these behaviors is unclear.

  8. Acculturation and sleep among a multiethnic sample of women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lauren; Troxel, Wendy M; Kravitz, Howard M; Hall, Martica H; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-02-01

    Mexican immigrants to the United States report longer sleep duration and fewer sleep complaints than their US-born counterparts. To investigate whether this effect extends to other immigrant groups, we examined whether the prevalence of self-reported sleep complaints is higher among US-born Hispanic/Latina, Chinese, and Japanese immigrant women compared to their first-generation immigrant ethnic counterparts as well as to US-born whites. We examined whether these associations persisted after adjusting for sociodemographic and health characteristics and whether acculturation mediated the effects. Cross-sectional observational study. Multisite study in Oakland, CA; Los Angeles, CA; and Newark, NJ. Hispanic/Latina (n = 196), Chinese (n = 228), Japanese (n = 271) and non-Hispanic white (n = 485) women (mean age = 46 y, range 42-52 y) participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN); 410 or 59.0% of the nonwhites were first-generation immigrants. None. Questionnaires were used to assess sleep complaints, race/ethnicity, immigrant status, language acculturation (use of English language), and sociodemographic and health variables. Approximately 25% of first-generation immigrant women reported sleep complaints compared to 37% of those who were US-born nonwhites and 42% of US-born whites. Multivariable adjusted logistic regression analyses showed that US-born nonwhites had higher odds of reporting any sleep complaints (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-3.0), compared to first-generation immigrants. Women with higher levels of language acculturation had greater odds of reporting any sleep complaint compared to those with less language acculturation. Adjustment for language acculturation mediated 40.4% (95% CI 28.5-69.8) of the association between immigrant status and any sleep complaint. When results were stratified by race/ethnicity, significant mediation effects of acculturation were only found for Hispanic/Latina and Japanese women

  9. Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Biospecimen Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SWAN Repository is the biospecimen bank of the SWAN study. All stored specimens are from the 3,302 SWAN participants, collected across the 14 clinic visits...

  10. Time-varying correlations between delta EEG power and heart rate variability in midlife women: the SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Scott D; Krafty, Robert T; Taylor, Briana J; Cribbet, Matthew R; Thayer, Julian F; Buysse, Daniel J; Kravitz, Howard M; Buysse, Evan D; Hall, Martica H

    2015-04-01

    No studies have evaluated the dynamic, time-varying relationship between delta electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep and high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) in women. Delta EEG and HF-HRV were measured during sleep in 197 midlife women (M(age)  = 52.1, SD = 2.2). Delta EEG-HF-HRV correlations in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep were modeled as whole-night averages and as continuous functions of time. The whole-night delta EEG-HF-HRV correlation was positive. The strongest correlations were observed during the first NREM sleep period preceding and following peak delta power. Time-varying correlations between delta EEG-HF-HRV were stronger in participants with sleep-disordered breathing and self-reported insomnia compared to healthy controls. The dynamic interplay between sleep and autonomic activity can be modeled across the night to examine within- and between-participant differences including individuals with and without sleep disorders. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  11. Consistently high sports/exercise activity is associated with better sleep quality, continuity and depth in midlife women: the SWAN sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Irish, Leah A; Krafty, Robert T; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M; Buysse, Daniel J; Bromberger, Joyce T; Dugan, Sheila A; Hall, Martica H

    2013-09-01

    To examine relationships between different physical activity (PA) domains and sleep, and the influence of consistent PA on sleep, in midlife women. Cross-sectional. Community-based. 339 women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (52.1 ± 2.1 y). None. Sleep was examined using questionnaires, diaries and in-home polysomnography (PSG). PA was assessed in three domains (Active Living, Household/Caregiving, Sports/Exercise) using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) up to 4 times over 6 years preceding the sleep assessments. The association between recent PA and sleep was evaluated using KPAS scores immediately preceding the sleep assessments. The association between the historical PA pattern and sleep was examined by categorizing PA in each KPAS domain according to its pattern over the 6 years preceding sleep assessments (consistently low, inconsistent/consistently moderate, or consistently high). Greater recent Sports/Exercise activity was associated with better sleep quality (diary "restedness" [P sleep continuity (diary sleep efficiency [SE; P = 0.02]) and depth (higher NREM delta electroencephalographic [EEG] power [P = 0.04], lower NREM beta EEG power [P Exercise activity was also associated with better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores (P = 0.02) and higher PSG-assessed SE (P sleep and Active Living or Household/Caregiving activity (either recent or historical pattern) were noted. Consistently high levels of recreational physical activity, but not lifestyle- or household-related activity, are associated with better sleep in midlife women. Increasing recreational physical activity early in midlife may protect against sleep disturbance in this population.

  12. Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Data: Investigator Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SWAN Coordinating Center provides SWAN data access to SWAN Investigators through the study website. The SWAN website provides access to longitudinal data...

  13. Advances in Sleep Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Sleep Disorders Advances in Sleep Studies Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table ... Disorders / Tips for Getting A Good Night's Sleep / Advances In Sleep Studies Summer 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  14. What Are Sleep Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Studies Related Topics CPAP Narcolepsy Sleep Apnea Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency Send a link to NHLBI to ... away after they are removed. Your doctor will review your sleep study test results and develop a treatment plan ...

  15. Advancing gender equality through the Athena SWAN Charter for Women in Science: an exploratory study of women's and men's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Chapple, Alison; Edmunds, Laurel D; Ziebland, Sue

    2017-02-21

    While in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia, higher education and research institutions are widely engaged with the Athena SWAN Charter for Women in Science to advance gender equality, empirical research on this process and its impact is rare. This study combined two data sets (free- text comments from a survey and qualitative interviews) to explore the range of experiences and perceptions of participation in Athena SWAN in medical science departments of a research-intensive university in Oxford, United Kingdom. The study is based on the secondary analysis of data from two projects: 59 respondents to an anonymous online survey (42 women, 17 men) provided relevant free-text comments and, separately, 37 women participated in face-to-face narrative interviews. Free-text survey comments and narrative interviews were analysed thematically using constant comparison. Both women and men said that participation in Athena SWAN had brought about important structural and cultural changes, including increased support for women's careers, greater appreciation of caring responsibilities, and efforts to challenge discrimination and bias. Many said that these positive changes would not have happened without linkage of Athena SWAN to government research funding, while others thought there were unintended consequences. Concerns about the programme design and implementation included a perception that Athena SWAN has limited ability to address longstanding and entrenched power and pay imbalances, persisting lack of work-life balance in academic medicine, questions about the sustainability of positive changes, belief that achieving the award could become an end in itself, resentment about perceived positive discrimination, and perceptions that further structural and cultural changes were needed in the university and wider society. The findings from this study suggest that Athena SWAN has a positive impact in advancing gender equality, but there may be limits to how much it can

  16. Cardiovascular Fat, Menopause, and Sex Hormones in Women: The SWAN Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoudary, Samar R; Shields, Kelly J; Janssen, Imke; Hanley, Carrie; Budoff, Matthew J; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Powell, Lynda H; Matthews, Karen A

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular risk increases in women after menopause. Mounting evidence demonstrates a role of cardiovascular fat (CF) in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease, but no research has examined CF in relation to sex hormones or menopausal status in women. The objective was to determine the relationship between CF depots, menopausal status, and endogenous sex hormones. Cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs were used. The setting included the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart and Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study. A total of 456 women (mean age, 50.75 y); 62% premenopausal/early perimenopausal, and 38% late peri-/postmenopausal. Menopausal status, endogenous sex hormones measured simultaneously with CF volumes, and circulating estradiol available 4.80 years (median) before CF measures. Volumes of CF (epicardial adipose tissue [EAT], paracardial adipose tissue [PAT], total heart adipose tissue [TAT = EAT + PAT], and aortic perivascular adipose tissue [PVAT]). In final models, late peri-/postmenopausal women had 9.88% more EAT, 20.72% more PAT, and 11.69% more TAT volumes than pre-/early perimenopausal women (P menopausal status. In final models, lower estradiol concentrations were associated with greater volumes of PAT and TAT (P obesity, and other covariates. Endogenous sex hormones are associated with CF. Perhaps CF plays a role in the higher risk of coronary heart disease reported in women after menopause.

  17. Black Swan Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, K.; Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Virtually all assessments of tropical cyclone risk are based on historical records, which are limited to a few hundred years at most. Yet stronger TCs may occur in the future and at places that have not been affected historically. Such events lie outside the realm of historically based expectations and may have extreme impacts. Their occurrences are also often made explainable after the fact (e.g., Hurricane Katrina). We nickname such potential future TCs, characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective predictability, "black swans" (Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007). As, by definition, black swan TCs have yet to happen, statistical methods that solely rely on historical track data cannot predict their occurrence. Global climate models lack the capability to predict intense storms, even with a resolution as high as 14 km (Emanuel et al. 2010). Also, most dynamic downscaling methods (e.g., Bender et al. 2010) are still limited in horizontal resolution and are too expensive to implement to generate enough events to include rare ones. In this study, we apply a simpler statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to simulate large numbers of synthetic storms under a given (observed or projected) climate condition. The method has been shown to generate realistic extremes in various basins (Emanuel et al. 2008 and 2010). We also apply a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC; Luettich et al. 1992) to simulate the storm surges generated by these storms. We then search for black swan TCs, in terms of the joint wind and surge damage potential, in the generated large databases. Heavy rainfall is another important TC hazard and will be considered in a future study. We focus on three areas: Tampa Bay in the U.S., the Persian Gulf, and Darwin in Australia. Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge as it is surrounded by shallow water and low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. High surges are generated by storms with a broad

  18. Mute swans: Natural (?) environmental indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, D.; Perry, Matthew C.

    2004-01-01

    The rapid expansion of the Chesapeake Bay's population of feral mute swans (Cygnus olar), coupled with a dramatic Bay-wide decline in submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), has fueled much of the current debate surrounding the need for a management plan to protect the aquatic food resources that are critical to many species native to the Bay. Crucial to this decision process is a sound understanding of the ecological ramifications of having the year-round presence of a large, nonnative, aquatic herbivore on the Bay. Ultimately, this will require a quantitative assessment of the ecological harm currently posed by mute swans before a biologically defensible management strategy can be developed. Unfortunately, very little new information specific to the Bay's mute swan population has been gathered since Reese first studied them in the late 1960s and 1970s. While the debate over what to do about the rapidly expanding mute swan population continues, there is much that can be gained from study of this beautiful intruder. Several recent studies of the feeding habits of mute swans have shown that mutes can provide a unique barometer, or indicator, of environmental conditions. Because of their reliance on SAV as a primary food source, monitoring the density of swans utilizing a particular area can give some indication of the status of the area's grass beds. This phenomenon was clearly demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when there was a dramatic decline in the number of swans observed around the Eastern Neck NWR, a traditional population stronghold. The shift in bird use was precipitated by a rapid, large-scale collapse of the area's aquatic grass beds, possibly the result of a prolonged drought. During the winter of 2000/2001, a similar ecological assessment was conducted by comparing body weights of swans collected from Tangier Sound, an area with relatively abundant grass beds, and swans from the waters adjacent to Eastern Neck Island. Swans weights tended to reflect the

  19. Study of Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems Among Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Good quality sleep and adequate amount of sleep are important in order to have better cognitive performance and avoid health problems and psychiatric disorders. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe sleep habits and sleep problems in a population of undergraduates, interns and postgraduate students ...

  20. Sleep patterns of co-sleeping and solitary sleeping infants and mothers: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkovich, Ella; Ben-Zion, Hamutal; Karny, Daphna; Meiri, Gal; Tikotzky, Liat

    2015-11-01

    Controversies exist regarding the impact of co-sleeping on infant sleep quality. In this context, the current study examined: (a) the differences in objective and subjective sleep patterns between co-sleeping (mostly room-sharing) and solitary sleeping mother-infant dyads; (b) the predictive links between maternal sleep during pregnancy and postnatal sleeping arrangement; (c) the bi-directional prospective associations between sleeping arrangement and infant/maternal sleep quality at three and six months postpartum. The sample included 153 families recruited during pregnancy. Data were obtained in home settings during the third trimester of pregnancy and at three and six months postpartum. Mothers were asked to monitor their own sleep and their infants' sleep for five nights using actigraphy and sleep diaries. Questionnaires were used to assess sleeping arrangements, feeding methods, socio-demographic characteristics, and maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms. Mothers of co-sleeping infants reported more infant night-wakings than mothers of solitary sleeping infants. However, none of the objective sleep measures was significantly different between co-sleeping and solitary sleeping infants, after controlling for feeding techniques. Co-sleeping mothers had significantly more objective and subjective sleep disturbances than mothers in the solitary sleeping group. Moreover, poorer maternal sleep during pregnancy and at three months postpartum predicted higher levels of co-sleeping at six months. Mothers of co-sleeping infants report more infant night-wakings, and experience poorer sleep than mothers of solitary sleeping infants. The quality of maternal sleep should be taken into clinical consideration when parents consult about co-sleeping. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Polysomnography (Sleep Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this stage, your brain waves, as recorded by electroencephalography (EEG), slow down considerably. Your eyes don't move ... level Body position Limb movement Snoring and other noise you may make as you sleep All of ...

  2. Body image satisfaction and depression in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathryn L; Janssen, Imke; Appelhans, Bradley M; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Karavolos, Kelly; Dugan, Sheila A; Avery, Elizabeth A; Shipp-Johnson, Karla J; Powell, Lynda H; Kravitz, Howard M

    2014-06-01

    With aging, women's bodies undergo changes that can affect body image perception, yet little is known about body image in midlife. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between body image and depressive symptoms in Caucasian and African-American midlife women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Chicago site. Body image was measured using the Stunkard Adult Female Figure Rating Scale, and a clinically significant level of depressive symptoms was defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ≥16 (N=405; N=63 (15.6%) with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms). Differences between perceived actual, perceived ideal, and actual body size and responses to questions concerning weight satisfaction and attractiveness were examined using logistic regression for associations with a CES-D score of ≥16. Women with body image dissatisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; p=0.04) or who perceived themselves as "unattractive" (OR=7.74; pbody image may be more likely to have clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this association.

  3. Shedding light to sleep studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James; Krystal, Andrew; Bozkurt, Alper

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents our efforts in the development of a small wireless, flexible bandage sized near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system for sleep analysis. The current size of the system is 2.8 cm × 1.7 cm × 0.6 cm. It is capable of performing NIRS with 660nm, 940nm and 850nm wavelengths for up to 11 hours continuously. The device is placed on the forehead to measure from the prefrontal cortex and the raw data is continuously streamed over Bluetooth to a nearby data aggregator such as a smartphone for post processing and cloud connection. In this study, we performed traditional polysomnography simultaneously with NIRS to evaluate agreement with traditional measures of sleep and to provide labelled data for future work involving learning algorithms. Ultimately, we expect a machine learning algorithm to be able to generate characterization of sleep states comparable to traditional methods based on this biophotonics data. The system also includes an inertial measurement unit and the features that can be extracted from the presented system include sleep posture, heart rate, respiratory rate, relative change in oxy and deoxy hemoglobin concentrations and tissue oxygenation and cerebral arterial oxygen extracted from these. Preliminary proof of concept results are promising and demonstrate the capability to measure heart rate, respiratory rate and slow-wave-sleep stages. This system serves as a prototype to evaluate the potential of a small bandage-size continuous-wave NIRS device to be a useful means of studying sleep.

  4. Henrietta Swan Leavitt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page 1. CPMG/KNBGE-340/2001. Licenced to post WPP(E) NO.6. Resonance - June 2001. Henrietta Swan Leavitt. (1868 - 1921). Registered with Registrar of Newspapers in India vide Regn. No. 66273/96. ISSN 0971-8044.

  5. #Sleep_as_Android: Feasibility of Using Sleep Logs on Twitter for Sleep Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar, Fatema; Weber, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Social media enjoys a growing popularity as a platform to seek and share personal health information. For sleep studies using data from social media, most researchers focused on inferring sleep-related artifacts from self-reported anecdotal pointers to sleep patterns or issues such as insomnia. The data shared by "quantified-selfers" on social media presents an opportunity to study more quantitative and objective measures of sleep. We propose and validate the approach of collecting and analyz...

  6. Does Risk for Anxiety Increase During the Menopausal Transition? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, Joyce T.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Chang, Yuefang; Randolph, John F.; Avis, Nancy E.; Gold, Ellen B.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the risk of anxiety in women during midlife and the menopausal transition. We examined anxiety as a cluster of 4 symptoms and determined the association between menopausal stage and high anxiety during ten years of follow-up of 2,956 women of multiple race/ethnicities. Methods This study was a longitudinal analysis of data from the multi-site Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a study of menopause and aging. Women were 42-52 at study entry. The outcome was high anxiety, a score of 4 or greater on the sum of four anxiety symptoms rated according to frequency in the previous 2 weeks from 0 (none) to 4 (daily) (upper 20%). Covariates included sociodemographics, health factors, stressors, and vasomotor symptoms (VMS). Results Women with low anxiety at baseline were more likely to report high anxiety symptoms when early or late perimenopausal or postmenopausal compared to when they were premenopausal (odds ratios ranged from 1.56 to 1.61), independent of multiple risk factors, including upsetting life events, financial strain, fair/poor perceived health, and VMS. Women with high anxiety at baseline continued to have high rates of high anxiety throughout the follow-up but odds ratios did not differ by menopausal stage. Conclusion Women with high anxiety premenopausally may be chronically anxious and not at increased risk of high anxiety at specific stages of the menopausal transition. In contrast, women with low anxiety premenopausally may be more susceptible to high anxiety during and after the menopausal transition than before. PMID:23615639

  7. Mass production of `Swan`s Golden`, Cupressus sempervirens by tissue culture and its radiation breeding. 2. Study on growth regulating substance to stimulate the elongation of shoot apex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Hirokatsu [Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Some species of `Swan`s Golden` have been propagated by means of grafting because propagation by cutting is difficult. However, not a few species of the plant are easily lodged, resulting that spreading of `Swan`s Golden` is difficult. Here, an investigation was made on growth regulating substances added into the basal medium in respects of their kinds and concentrations and also the kind of medium for successive culture. As the basal medium, SH medium supplemented with 4 g/l of gel-light and 3 g/l of carbon-powder was used. The optimum medium for the initiation of culture was the basal medium added with zeatin (Ze) and gibberellin (GA) and it was also suitable for successive culture after the 14 day. The medium added with Ze and benzyladenine (BA) or Ze alone was found to be most suitable for the culture after the 28 day. The concentration was optimum at 1 - 2.5 mg/l for either of these growth regulating substances. (M.N.)

  8. Perceived discrimination is associated with reduced breast and cervical cancer screening: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Rathouz, Paul J; Karavolos, Kelly; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Janssen, Imke; Kravitz, Howard M; Lewis, Tené T; Powell, Lynda H

    2014-02-01

    Racial disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening have been documented in African American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. Perceived discrimination may contribute to this disparity. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between perceived everyday racial/ethnic and other discrimination and receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a multiethnic population of women. We analyzed data from 3,258 women participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multiethnic/racial, longitudinal cohort study of the natural history of the menopausal transition conducted at seven U.S. sites. Participants completed a validated measure of perceived discrimination and reasons for believing that they were treated differently, along with Pap smears, clinical breast exams (CBE), and mammography at each follow-up period. We used multiple logistic regression for the binary outcomes of having a Pap smear, CBE, or mammogram in each of the two follow-up years, using self-reported "race discrimination" and "other discrimination" at baseline as the main predictors. African American women reported the highest percentage of racial discrimination (35%), followed by Chinese (20%), Hispanic (12%), Japanese (11%), and non-Hispanic white women (3%). Non-Hispanic white women reported the highest percentage of "other" discrimination (40%), followed by Chinese (33%), African American (24%), Japanese (23%), and Hispanic women (16%). Perceived racial discrimination was not associated with reduced receipt of preventive screening, except in one fully adjusted model. Reported discrimination owing to "other" reasons, such as age or gender, was associated with reduced receipt of Pap smear (odds ratio [OR] 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-0.99), CBE (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.67-0.91), and mammography (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.69-0.92) regardless of patient race. Perceived discrimination is an important issue across racial/ethnic groups and is negatively

  9. Circulating Sex Hormones and Risk of Uterine Fibroids: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason Y Y; Gold, Ellen B; Johnson, Wesley O; Lee, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen has been implicated in the development of uterine fibroids. However, the contribution of androgen in women is unknown. Our objective was to assess the longitudinal relations of circulating androgens and estradiol (E2) and their joint effects to the risk of developing fibroids. This is a 13-year longitudinal study in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. This study was conducted in seven sites across the United States (1997-2013). At baseline, 3240 pre- or early peri-menopausal women with an intact uterus, ages 45-52 years were included; 43.6% completed the follow-up. There were 512 incident and 478 recurrent fibroid cases. We measured near-annual time-varying serum levels of bioavailable E2 and bioavailable T, dichotomized at the median (high vs low). We estimated the conditional odds ratio (OR) of fibroids in the ensuing year using discrete-time proportional odds models adjusted for race/ethnicity/site, age, body mass index, menopausal stage, reproductive factors, smoking, timing of blood draw, and FSH. Women with high T had a statistically significant increased risk of incident fibroids (OR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.76; P = .04), but not recurrent fibroids. This risk was further elevated in those with high T and E2 (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.07-2.17; P = .02). High E2 and T was associated with lower risk of recurrent fibroids (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.26-0.96; P = .04). High T with high E2 was associated with an elevated risk of incident fibroids in midlife women who never reported fibroids before baseline. Conversely, the risk of recurrent fibroids was mitigated in women with high E2 and high T.

  10. A Video Method to Study Drosophila Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, John E.; Raizen, David M.; Maycock, Matthew H.; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Allan I.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To use video to determine the accuracy of the infrared beam-splitting method for measuring sleep in Drosophila and to determine the effect of time of day, sex, genotype, and age on sleep measurements. Design: A digital image analysis method based on frame subtraction principle was developed to distinguish a quiescent from a moving fly. Data obtained using this method were compared with data obtained using the Drosophila Activity Monitoring System (DAMS). The location of the fly was identified based on its centroid location in the subtracted images. Measurements and Results: The error associated with the identification of total sleep using DAMS ranged from 7% to 95% and depended on genotype, sex, age, and time of day. The degree of the total sleep error was dependent on genotype during the daytime (P video. Both video and DAMS detected a homeostatic response to sleep deprivation. Conclusions: Video digital analysis is more accurate than DAMS in fly sleep measurements. In particular, conclusions drawn from DAMS measurements regarding daytime sleep and sleep architecture should be made with caution. Video analysis also permits the assessment of fly position and brief movements during sleep. Citation: Zimmerman JE; Raizen DM; Maycock MH; Maislin G; Pack AI. A video method to study drosophila sleep. SLEEP 2008;31(11):1587–1598. PMID:19014079

  11. A sleep study in cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Marca, G; Vollono, C; Rubino, M; Capuano, A; Di Trapani, G; Mariotti, P

    2006-03-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache with a close relation to sleep. CH presents a circa-annual rhythmicity; attacks occur preferably during the night, in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and they are associated with autonomic and neuroendocrine modifications. The posterior hypothalamus is the key structure for the biological phenomenon of CH. Our aim is to describe a 55-year-old man presenting a typical episodic CH, in whom we performed a prolonged sleep study, consisting of a 9-week actigraphic recording and repeated polysomnography, with evaluation of both sleep macrostructure and microstructure. During the acute bout of the cluster we observed an irregular sleep-wake pattern and abnormalities of REM sleep. After the cluster phase these alterations remitted. We conclude that CH was associated, in this patient, with sleep dysregulation involving the biological clock and the arousal mechanisms, particularly in REM. All these abnormalities are consistent with posterior hypothalamic dysfunction.

  12. Unsupervised online classifier in sleep scoring for sleep deprivation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Corneyllie, Alexandra; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Chouvet, Guy; Gervasoni, Damien

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate an unsupervised adaptive algorithm for real-time detection of sleep and wake states in rodents. We designed a Bayesian classifier that automatically extracts electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) features and categorizes non-overlapping 5-s epochs into one of the three major sleep and wake states without any human supervision. This sleep-scoring algorithm is coupled online with a new device to perform selective paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD). Controlled laboratory settings for chronic polygraphic sleep recordings and selective PSD. Ten adult Sprague-Dawley rats instrumented for chronic polysomnographic recordings. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparison with the score obtained by a human expert reader. Online detection of PS is then validated with a PSD protocol with duration of 72 hours. Our algorithm gave a high concordance with human scoring with an average κ coefficient > 70%. Notably, the specificity to detect PS reached 92%. Selective PSD using real-time detection of PS strongly reduced PS amounts, leaving only brief PS bouts necessary for the detection of PS in EEG and EMG signals (4.7 ± 0.7% over 72 h, versus 8.9 ± 0.5% in baseline), and was followed by a significant PS rebound (23.3 ± 3.3% over 150 minutes). Our fully unsupervised data-driven algorithm overcomes some limitations of the other automated methods such as the selection of representative descriptors or threshold settings. When used online and coupled with our sleep deprivation device, it represents a better option for selective PSD than other methods like the tedious gentle handling or the platform method. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Cardiac filariosis in migratory Mute swans (Cygnus olor in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Manno

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarconema eurycerca is a common parasitic disease of North America swans and geese. The infection has been correlated with severe heart lesions, often resulting in cardiac failure and death of the animals. Heartworms infections have been previously reported in European swans, and specifically in the United Kingdom and Nederland. Both the countries are characterized by a cold temperate weather, similar to the one that can be found in swan wintering areas of U.S.A. and Canada. The first record of cardiac filariasis associated with Sarconema eurycerca infection in four swans in Italy. Twelve mute swans were examined during avian influenza surveillance activities on migratory birds. Birds were collected in the year 2006, in wintering areas of Eastern Sicily (Italy. Four of the twelve swans showed necrotic-haemorrhagic myocarditis with intra-lesional nematodes. Morphological characteristics identified the parasite as a filarial nematode. Birds lungs samples were used for parasites DNA extraction. The latter was used as template for polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and sequencing of part of the 12S rDNA gene. Comparison of genomic DNA extracted from a reference S. eurycerca isolate confirmed parasite identity and provided the first sequence resources for this species of value to future diagnostic and epidemiological studies.

  14. USE OF FOCUS GROUPS IN MULTI-SITE, MULTI-ETHNIC RESEARCH PROJECTS FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH: A STUDY OF WOMEN ACROSS THE NATION (SWAN) EXAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Adler, Shelley R.; Mouton, Charles P.; Ory, Marcia; Underwood, Lynne G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To outline the lessons learned about the use of focus groups for the multi-site, multi-ethnic longitudinal Study of Women Across the Nation (SWAN). Focus groups were designed to identify potential cultural differences in the incidence of symptoms and the meaning of transmenopause among women of diverse cultures, and to identify effective recruitment and retention strategies. Design Inductive and deductive focus groups for a multi-ethnic study. Setting Seven community research sites across the United States conducted focus groups with six ethnic populations: African American, Chinese American, Japanese American, Mexican American, non-Hispanic white, and Puerto Rican. Patients or Participants Community women from each ethnic group of color. Interventions A set of four/five focus groups in each ethnic group as the formative stage of the deductive, quantitative SWAN survey. Main Outcome Measures Identification of methodological advantages and challenges to the successful implementation of formative focus groups in a multi-ethnic, multi-site population-based epidemiologic study. Results We provide recommendations from our lessons learned to improve the use of focus groups in future studies with multi-ethnic populations. Conclusions Mixed methods using inductive and deductive approaches require the scientific integrity of both research paradigms. Adequate resources and time must be budgeted as essential parts of the overall strategy from the outset of study. Inductive cross-cultural researchers should be key team members, beginning with inception through each subsequent design phase to increase the scientific validity, generalizability, and comparability of the results across diverse ethnic groups, to assure the relevance, validity and applicability of the findings to the multicultural population of focus. PMID:19769020

  15. Use of focus groups in multi-site, multi-ethnic research projects for women's health: a Study of Women Across the Nation (swan) example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Adler, Shelley R; Mouton, Charles E; Ory, Marcia; Underwood, Lynne G

    2009-01-01

    To outline the lessons learned about the use of focus groups for the multisite, multi-ethnic longitudinal Study of Women Across the Nation (SWAN). Focus groups were designed to identify potential cultural differences in the incidence of symptoms and the meaning of transmenopause among women of diverse cultures, and to identify effective recruitment and retention strategies. Inductive and deductive focus groups for a multi-ethnic study. Seven community research sites across the United States conducted focus groups with six ethnic populations: African American, Chinese American, Japanese American, Mexican American, non-Hispanic white, and Puerto Rican. Community women from each ethnic group of color. A set of four/five focus groups in each ethnic group as the formative stage of the deductive, quantitative SWAN survey. Identification of methodological advantages and challenges to the successful implementation of formative focus groups in a multi-ethnic, multi-site population-based epidemiologic study. We provide recommendations from our lessons learned to improve the use of focus groups in future studies with multi-ethnic populations. Mixed methods using inductive and deductive approaches require the scientific integrity of both research paradigms. Adequate resources and time must be budgeted as essential parts of the overall strategy from the outset of study. Inductive cross-cultural researchers should be key team members, beginning with inception through each subsequent design phase to increase the scientific validity, generalizability, and comparability of the results across diverse ethnic groups, to assure the relevance, validity and applicability of the findings to the multicultural population of focus.

  16. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... REM sleep? What is the effect of sleep deprivation? What are sleep myths? What are sleep disorders? ... Some hormones produced during sleep affect the body's use of energy. This may be how inadequate sleep ...

  17. Sleep wake pattern analysis: Study of 131 medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Nita Ninama; Jaydeep Kangathara

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Sleep is part of the rhythm of life. Without a good sleep the mind is less adapts, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep wake cycle of the students is quite different and characterized by delayed onset, partial sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, insufficient sleep duration and occurrence of napping episodes during the day The aim of the present study is to know sleep wake pattern in medical student, role of residence and individual characterization...

  18. Brief Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Adolescents: An Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, E Juulia; Huurre, Taina; Tilli, Maija; Kiviruusu, Olli; Partonen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among adolescents, but there are no brief interventions to treat them. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief semistructured, individually delivered sleep intervention to ameliorate adolescents' sleeping difficulties and lengthen sleep duration. All students aged 16-18 years in a high school were screened for sleeping difficulties and 36 students with the highest sleep problem scores were invited to the intervention. Postintervention improvements were observed on self-reported and actiwatch-registered sleep duration, self-reported sleep quality and sleep latency, perceived stress and anxiety (all p values sleep efficiency and sleep latency did not change (p > 0.05). A brief individual sleep intervention can be effective in lengthening sleep duration and improving subjective sleep quality and well-being among adolescents.

  19. Study of Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems Among Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [6] The escalating level of stress on students, as well as the hectic schedule of interns and residents working at the hospital is affecting their health and life style. Numerous studies conducted within the past decade have analyzed the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on medical house staff in various medical as well as ...

  20. Sleep duration and sleep quality in relation to 12-year cardiovascular disease incidence: the MORGEN study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.; Spijkerman, A.M.W.; Kromhout, D.; Berg, van den J.F.; Verschuren, M.W.W.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: We studied sleep duration and sleep quality in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. Design/Setting: Dutch population-based cohort study. Participants: 20,432 men and women aged 20-65 y with no history of CVD. Interventions: N/A Measurements: Sleep duration and sleep

  1. 76 FR 77890 - Swan Ranch Railroad, L.L.C.-Operation Exemption-Swan Industrial Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Swan Ranch Railroad, L.L.C.--Operation Exemption--Swan Industrial Park Swan... located within the Swan Industrial Park, in Cheyenne, Wyo. The track over which SRR will operate is...

  2. Parity, lactation, bone strength, and 16-year fracture risk in adult women: findings from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takahiro; Ishii, Shinya; Greendale, Gail A; Cauley, Jane A; Ruppert, Kristine; Crandall, Carolyn J; Karlamangla, Arun S

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to examine the associations of lifetime parity and accumulated length of lactation with bone strength in women prior to the menopause transition and fracture risk during and after the transition. Participants were 2239 pre- or early peri-menopausal women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), ages 42-53 years at baseline, who had no childbirths after age 42. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in the femoral neck and the lumbar spine at the baseline SWAN visit using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and the composite indices of femoral neck strength relative to load (in three failure modes: compression, bending, and impact) were calculated from femoral neck BMD, femoral neck size, and body size. Data on fractures after age 42 were collected for a median follow-up of 15.7 years (interquartile range, 11.4-18.5 years). In multiple linear regressions adjusted for covariates, lifetime parity was associated positively with femoral neck strength relative to load (0.024 standard deviation (SD) increment in impact strength index per childbirth, p=0.049), but accumulated length of lactation was associated negatively with lumbar spine BMD (0.018 SD decrement per every additional 6 months of lactation, p=0.040). In Cox proportional hazards regressions adjusted for covariates, neither parity nor lactation was associated with fracture hazard after age 42. In conclusion, parity and lactation have little impact on peak bone strength prior to menopause, and do not affect fracture risk after age 42 over 16-year follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep Habits and Patterns of College Students: An Expanded Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buboltz, Walter, Jr., Jenkins, Steve M.; Soper, Barlow; Woller, Kevin; Johnson, Patrick; Faes, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This study represents an expansion of previous research investigating the prevalence of sleep difficulties in college students. Sleep quality and sleep habits were assessed via self-report questionnaires. Poor sleep quality was reported by 22.6% of participants, whereas 65.9% replied that they experienced occasional sleep problems. More than half…

  4. Landsat evaluation of trumpeter swan historical nesting sites in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Laura Elizabeth

    The trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) has historically nested in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Declines in habitat quality may be limiting the growth of the Tri-State Flock. The purpose of this study was to map historical nesting areas for trumpeter swans in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and evaluate Landsat images for changes to habitat. Historical nesting sites were evaluated through image classification and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and compared to field conditions. Swan nesting records were analyzed in comparison to drought index and human visitation rates to determine if these factors may contribute to the decline of trumpeter swans nesting in YNP. Vegetation type and water quality were evaluated at 36 wetlands identified as historical nesting locations. Potamogetonaceae was the largest family represented in plant samples and had the highest frequency of occurrence in samples. There was no significant difference in whether swans were present or absent in wetlands with regards to water quality parameters tested or physical parameters identified. There was an association between certain drought index values and the number of cygnets fledged and the number of territories occupied by swan pairs. I was unsuccessful in using image classification to define pixel characteristics common among historical nesting territories of swans in YNP based on 5 Landsat images from 1975, 1979, 1990, 1999, and 2005. I was also unable to distinguish aquatic plant species composition, emergent and submergent plants, open water versus aquatic vegetation, wetland classification, or swan preference using image classification. No relationship was found in a regression model of NDVI values and swan pair occupancy or number of swans fledged, with the exception of a weak, positive relationship between pair occupancy and positive NDVI values, and a strong, positive relationship between swan fledge rates and positive NDVI values

  5. Beauty sleep: experimental study on the perceived health and attractiveness of sleep deprived people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Axelsson, J.; Ingre, M.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Olsson, A.; Lekander, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether sleep deprived people are perceived as less healthy, less attractive, and more tired than after a normal night's sleep. Design Experimental study. Setting Sleep laboratory in Stockholm, Sweden. Participants 23 healthy, sleep deprived adults (age 18-31) who were

  6. Sleep habits and sleep disturbances in Dutch children: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Litsenburg, R.R.L.; Waumans, R.C.; van den Berg, G.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disorders can lead to significant morbidity. Information on sleep in healthy children is necessary to evaluate sleep disorders in clinical practice, but data from different societies cannot be simply generalized. The aims of this study were to (1) assess the prevalence of sleep disturbances in

  7. Final report: Waterfowl activity and habitat use on the Swan Lake HREP Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We studied diurnal activity and habitat use patterns of waterfowl on Swan Lake in Calhoun County, IL during fall and spring migrations 1992-93. Swan Lake, a 1,255 ha...

  8. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Carroll, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammatory disease risk and all-cause mortality. Here, we assess global evidence linking sleep disturbance, sleep duration, and inflammation in adult humans. Methods A systematic search of English language publications was performed, with inclusion of primary research articles that characterized sleep disturbance and/or sleep duration or performed experimental sleep deprivation, and assessed inflammation by levels of circulating markers. Effect sizes (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled using a random effect model. Results A total of 72 studies (n>50000) were analyzed with assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). Sleep disturbance was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES 0.12; 95% CI 0.05 – 0.19) and IL-6 (ES 0.20; 95% CI 0.08 – 0.31). Shorter sleep duration, but not the extreme of short sleep, was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES 0.09; 95% CI 0.01 – 0.17) but not IL-6 (ES 0.03; 95% CI −0.09 – 0.14). The extreme of long sleep duration was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES 0.17; 95% CI 0.01 – 0.34) and IL-6 (ES 0.11; 95% CI 0.02 – 0.20). Neither sleep disturbances nor sleep duration was associated with TNF. Neither experimental sleep deprivation nor sleep restriction was associated with CRP, IL-6, or TNF. Some heterogeneity among studies was found, but no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Sleep disturbance and long sleep duration, but not short sleep duration, are associated with increases in markers of systemic inflammation. PMID:26140821

  9. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Carroll, Judith E

    2016-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammatory disease risk and all-cause mortality. Here, we assess global evidence linking sleep disturbance, sleep duration, and inflammation in adult humans. A systematic search of English language publications was performed, with inclusion of primary research articles that characterized sleep disturbance and/or sleep duration or performed experimental sleep deprivation and assessed inflammation by levels of circulating markers. Effect sizes (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled using a random effect model. A total of 72 studies (n > 50,000) were analyzed with assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Sleep disturbance was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES .12; 95% CI = .05-.19) and IL-6 (ES .20; 95% CI = .08-.31). Shorter sleep duration, but not the extreme of short sleep, was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES .09; 95% CI = .01-.17) but not IL-6 (ES .03; 95% CI: -.09 to .14). The extreme of long sleep duration was associated with higher levels of CRP (ES .17; 95% CI = .01-.34) and IL-6 (ES .11; 95% CI = .02-20). Neither sleep disturbances nor sleep duration was associated with TNFα. Neither experimental sleep deprivation nor sleep restriction was associated with CRP, IL-6, or TNFα. Some heterogeneity among studies was found, but there was no evidence of publication bias. Sleep disturbance and long sleep duration, but not short sleep duration, are associated with increases in markers of systemic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Anorexia nervosa: study method and sleep analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, S; Zapata, R; Gual, P; Quintanilla, B

    1989-01-01

    By studying anorexia nervosa with an Integrated Inventory and the quality and the quantity of sleep applying Hauri's scale for the analysis of dream contents, the sleeping habits of 50 anorexic patients who were under treatment have been studied. The results show that sleep in these patients is similar and sometimes better in quantity and quality than those in the control group. Their dreams are characterized by an almost total absence of sexual, aggressive and alimentary contents, and that reality, active participation, unpleasant feelings and sensory-perceptive elements are predominant.

  11. Incorporating Measures of Sleep Quality into Cancer Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, Nancy S.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Boudreau, Eilis A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/background Sleep disturbance may influence the development of cancer and responses to treatment. It is also closely tied to recovery and quality of life in cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers, and recent studies have begun to show beneficial effects of sleep promoting interventions. Despite the importance of sleep to cancer and its treatment and the availability of numerous tools for measuring sleep quality and quantity, sleep measurements are underutilized in cancer studies. Methods This review, written for cancer researchers interested in incorporating sleep measures into their studies, is designed to raise awareness about the importance of sleep and suggest strategies for including sleep evaluation in cancer studies. Conclusions Inclusion of readily available sleep measures may ultimately improve cancer care by facilitating studies that lead to a greater understanding of how sleep and sleep disturbance influence all aspects of cancer care and the patient experience. PMID:25510361

  12. Annual survival rates of adult and immature eastern population tundra swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; Bart, J.; Limpert, R.J.; Sladen, William J. L.; Hines, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus ) of the eastern population were neckbanded in Maryland, North Carolina, and Alaska from 1966 through 1990. These swans were resighted and recaptured during autumn, winter, and spring, 1966-1990. Although the original motivation for this study involved swan movements, we wanted to use the resulting data to test hypotheses about sources of variation in swan survival rates. Recaptures of legbanded and neckbanded swans permitted us to estimate neckband loss rates, which were found to vary with age and sex of swans, and number of years since initial application. Estimates of annual neckband retention rate ranged from about 0.50 for adult male swans greater than or equal to 2 years after initial neckbanding to > 0.96 for immature swans and adult females the first year following neckbanding. This variation in neckband loss rates prevented the simple correction of survival estimates to account for such loss. Consequently, we developed a series of multinomial models parameterized with survival, sighting, and neckband retention probabilities for use with the recapture and resighting data.

  13. Analyzing data files in SWAN

    CERN Document Server

    Gajam, Niharika

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally analyzing data happens via batch-processing and interactive work on the terminal. The project aims to provide another way of analyzing data files: A cloud-based approach. It aims to make it a productive and interactive environment through the combination of FCC and SWAN software.

  14. An actigraphy study of sleep and pain in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Howard M; Zheng, Huiyong; Bromberger, Joyce T; Buysse, Daniel J; Owens, Jane; Hall, Martica H

    2015-07-01

    We examined whether women reporting nighttime pain would have more actigraphy-measured evidence for disturbed sleep and would report feeling less rested compared with women without nighttime pain. Up to 27 consecutive nights of actigraphy and sleep diary data from each participant were analyzed in this community-based study of 314 African-American (n = 118), white (n = 141), and Chinese (n = 55) women, aged 48 to 58 years, who were premenopausal, perimenopausal, or postmenopausal and were participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study. Dependent variables were actigraphy-measured movement and fragmentation index, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and diary self-report of "feeling rested" after waking up. All outcomes were fitted using linear mixed-effects models to examine covariate-adjusted associations between the independent variable (nighttime pain severity) and sleep outcomes. Higher pain severity scores were associated with longer sleep duration but reduced sleep efficiency and less restful sleep. Women reporting nocturnal vasomotor symptoms had more sleep-related movement and sleep fragmentation, had reduced sleep efficiency, and were less likely to feel rested after wakening whether or not they reported pain. Midlife women who report higher nighttime pain levels have more objective evidence for less efficient sleep, consistent with self-reported less restful sleep. Nocturnal vasomotor symptoms also can contribute to restlessness and wakefulness in midlife women.

  15. Symptoms of depressed mood, disturbed sleep, and sexual problems in midlife women: cross-sectional data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prairie, Beth A; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Luther, James; Hess, Rachel; Thurston, Rebecca C; Wisner, Katherine L; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2015-02-01

    Women report many nonvasomotor symptoms across the menopausal transition, including sleep disturbances, depressed mood, and sexual problems. The co-occurrence of these three symptoms may represent a specific menopausal symptom triad. We sought to evaluate the interrelatedness of disturbed sleep, depressed mood, and sexual problems in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and determine the characteristics of women exhibiting this symptom triad. SWAN is a multisite, multiethnic observational cohort study of the menopausal transition in the United States. Sleep disturbance, sexual problems, and depressed mood were determined based on self-report. Women who reported all three symptoms simultaneously were compared to those who did not. Logistic regression models estimated the association of demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics with the symptom triad. Study participants (n=1716) were 49.8 years old on average and primarily in very good or excellent health. Sixteen and a half percent had depressed mood, 36.6% had a sleep problem, and 42.2% had any sexual problem. Five percent of women (n=90) experienced all three symptoms. Women with the symptom triad compared with those without had lower household incomes, less education, were surgically postmenopausal or late perimenopausal, rated their general health as fair or poor, and had more stressful life events and lower social support. The symptom triad of sleep disturbance, depressed mood, and sexual problems occurred in only 5% of women, and occurred most often among women with lower socioeconomic status, greater psychosocial distress, and who were surgically menopausal or in the late perimenopause.

  16. Instruments to study sleep disorders in climacteric women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Monterrosa-Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To identify the scales to assess sleep disorders applied to women with climacteric stage. Bibliographical research without intervention, the available information in scientific databases. Performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Ebscohos OvidSP and Health Library. The words used in this article: insomnia, adjustment sleep disorder, questionnaires, studies and menopause. Publications of all types were included. Seven scales were identified: Insomnia Severity Index, Athens Insomnia Scale, Pittsburgh Quality of sleep Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Jenkins Sleep Scale, Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire and The St Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire. There are validated scales in multiple languages and considered appropriate for studying sleep disorders.

  17. Analysis of sleep parameters in patients with obstructive sleep apnea studied in a hospital vs. a hotel-based sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Kimberly N; Song, Yanna; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A

    2008-04-15

    Polysomnography is associated with changes in sleep architecture called the first-night effect. This effect is believed to result from sleeping in an unusual environment and the technical equipment used to study sleep. Sleep experts hope to decrease this variable by providing a more familiar, comfortable atmosphere for sleep testing through hotel-based sleep centers. In this study, we compared the sleep parameters of patients studied in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories. We retrospectively reviewed polysomnograms completed in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories from August 2003 to July 2005. All patients were undergoing evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea. Hospital-based patients were matched for age and apnea-hypopnea index with hotel-based patients. We compared the sleep architecture changes associated with the first-night effect in the two groups. The associated conditions and symptoms listed on the polysomnography referral forms are also compared. No significant differences were detected between the two groups in sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, REM sleep latency, total amount of slow wave sleep (NREM stages 3 and 4), arousal index, and total stage 1 sleep. This pilot study failed to show a difference in sleep parameters associated with the first-night effect in patients undergoing sleep studies in our hotel and hospital-based sleep laboratories. Future studies need to compare the first-night effect in different sleep disorders, preferably in multi-night recordings.

  18. Improving sleep quality interventions among menopausal women with sleep disturbances in Taiwan: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Chin; Tsao, Lee-Ing; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of improving sleep quality interventions in menopausal women with sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbances are an extensive and common problem among menopausal women. There is an increased trend in the use of non-pharmacological methods to alleviate sleep disturbances. Studies that have implemented two or more non-pharmacological strategies for menopausal women are scant. A repeat measurement with a randomized assignment was conducted. A total of 59 menopausal women with sleep disturbance were recruited and randomly assigned to experimental (n = 29) and control (n = 30) groups. Participants in the experimental group received four 2-hour improving sleep quality activities, whereas the control group received regular greeting calls. Sleep quality was measured prior to intervention, and on the 5th and 8th weeks by using the Pittsburg's Sleep Quality Index, and Actiwatch was worn before and during the 8 weeks of intervention. Generalized estimating equation was used to analyze data. The results revealed that subjective sleep quality had significant main effect in group and time. The findings of the objective measurement showed that participants in the experimental group had significantly shorter frequency of awakening time and increased sleep efficiency. The improving sleep quality intervention is a healthy and cost-effective method to improve sleep quality in community-dwelling menopausal women with sleep disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Guide to Understanding Your Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... efficiency. People who have significant difficulties in either initiating or maintaining sleep have diminished sleep efficiency, which ... repeatedly between Non-REM and REM sleep. The structure of these cycles–poetically known as “sleep architecture”– ...

  20. Nurses' management of adolescent sleep disturbance: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallido, Tamara; Jackson, Debra; O'Brien, Louise

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate nurses' knowledge of adolescent sleep and sleep disturbance and the strategies they employ to facilitate sleep in adolescent patients. Sleep disturbance in adolescents is common and associated with potentially devastating outcomes and co-morbidities. Despite this, little literature exists that reports nursing interventions related to facilitating sleep, and no literature could be located that explored what Australian nurses know about adolescent sleep and sleep disturbance. Qualitative. Eight nurses routinely involved in the care of adolescent patients were interviewed via email and instant messaging over a five month period. Explored was the formation and extent of knowledge held by these nurses about adolescent sleep and sleep disturbance and the strategies they used to facilitate sleep in adolescent patients. Data were analysed thematically. Three main themes were identified: 'A patchwork of experiences', 'Traditional remedies, personal beliefs and commonsense' and 'Drugs, doctors and disempowerment'. Despite a lack of formal education about adolescent sleep and sleep disturbance, through life and professional experience the nurses in this study had formulated effective strategies to assist the sleep of adolescent patients. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE; There is a need for nursing education regarding adolescent sleep issues. Providing rationales for nursing strategies would afford nurses greater confidence to strongly advocate for a more non-pharmacological approach to managing certain types of sleep disturbance. Initiating routine assessment of adolescent sleep in both hospital and community settings could be beneficial to detecting a range of difficulties adolescent patients may be experiencing.

  1. Sleep cycle studies in babies of undernourished mothers.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, V P; Katiyar, G. P.; Agarwal, K. N.; Das,T. K.; Dey, P K

    1980-01-01

    Polygraphic sleep cycle studies--comprising simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG), electrocardiogram (ECG), electro-oculogram (ECOG), phasic body activity and respiration--were performed on 19 term newborn babies born to severely undernourished mothers, and results compared with 19 healthy newborn babies. The sleep cycle in babies of undernourished mothers showed disorganisation during active rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and quiet nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The sleep...

  2. Can sleep deprivation studies explain why human adults sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee K

    2012-11-01

    This review will concentrate on the consequences of sleep deprivation in adult humans. These findings form a paradigm that serves to demonstrate many of the critical functions of the sleep states. The drive to obtain food, water, and sleep constitutes important vegetative appetites throughout the animal kingdom. Unlike nutrition and hydration, the reasons for sleep have largely remained speculative. When adult humans are nonspecifically sleep-deprived, systemic effects may include defects in cognition, vigilance, emotional stability, risk-taking, and, possibly, moral reasoning. Appetite (for foodstuffs) increases and glucose intolerance may ensue. Procedural, declarative, and emotional memory are affected. Widespread alterations of immune function and inflammatory regulators can be observed, and functional MRI reveals profound changes in regional cerebral activity related to attention and memory. Selective deprivation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, on the contrary, appears to be more activating and to have lesser effects on immunity and inflammation. The findings support a critical need for sleep due to the widespread effects on the adult human that result from nonselective sleep deprivation. The effects of selective REM deprivation appear to be different and possibly less profound, and the functions of this sleep state remain enigmatic.

  3. The SWAN biomedical discourse ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Wu, Elizabeth; Wong, Gwen; Ocana, Marco; Kinoshita, June; Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim

    2008-10-01

    Developing cures for highly complex diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, requires extensive interdisciplinary collaboration and exchange of biomedical information in context. Our ability to exchange such information across sub-specialties today is limited by the current scientific knowledge ecosystem's inability to properly contextualize and integrate data and discourse in machine-interpretable form. This inherently limits the productivity of research and the progress toward cures for devastating diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. SWAN (Semantic Web Applications in Neuromedicine) is an interdisciplinary project to develop a practical, common, semantically structured, framework for biomedical discourse initially applied, but not limited, to significant problems in Alzheimer Disease (AD) research. The SWAN ontology has been developed in the context of building a series of applications for biomedical researchers, as well as in extensive discussions and collaborations with the larger bio-ontologies community. In this paper, we present and discuss the SWAN ontology of biomedical discourse. We ground its development theoretically, present its design approach, explain its main classes and their application, and show its relationship to other ongoing activities in biomedicine and bio-ontologies.

  4. Sleep Restriction Impairs Vocabulary Learning when Adolescents Cram for Exams: The Need for Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Deshpande, Aadya; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Lo, June C.; Chee, Michael W.L.; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The ability to recall facts is improved when learning takes place at spaced intervals, or when sleep follows shortly after learning. However, many students cram for exams and trade sleep for other activities. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of study spacing and time in bed (TIB) for sleep on vocabulary learning in adolescents. Methods: In the Need for Sleep Study, which used a parallel-group design, 56 adolescents aged 15–19 years were randomly assigned to a week of either 5 h or 9 h of TIB for sleep each night as part of a 14-day protocol conducted at a boarding school. During the sleep manipulation period, participants studied 40 Graduate Record Examination (GRE)-type English words using digital flashcards. Word pairs were presented over 4 consecutive days (spaced items), or all at once during single study sessions (massed items), with total study time kept constant across conditions. Recall performance was examined 0 h, 24 h, and 120 h after all items were studied. Results: For all retention intervals examined, recall of massed items was impaired by a greater amount in adolescents exposed to sleep restriction. In contrast, cued recall performance on spaced items was similar between sleep groups. Conclusions: Spaced learning conferred strong protection against the effects of sleep restriction on recall performance, whereas students who had insufficient sleep were more likely to forget items studied over short time intervals. These findings in adolescents demonstrate the importance of combining good study habits and good sleep habits to optimize learning outcomes. Citation: Huang S, Deshpande A, Yeo SC, Lo JC, Chee MW, Gooley JJ. Sleep restriction impairs vocabulary learning when adolescents cram for exams: the Need for Sleep Study. SLEEP 2016;39(9):1681–1690. PMID:27253768

  5. Role stress, role reward, and mental health in a multiethnic sample of midlife women: results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza di Scalea, Teresa; Matthews, Karen A; Avis, Nancy E; Thurston, Rebecca C; Brown, Charlotte; Harlow, Sioban; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about the independent associations of reward and stress within specific roles with multiple measures of mental health in an ethnically diverse community sample of midlife women. The objective of this study is to examine if (1) role reward (within each role and across roles) contributes directly to mental health and buffers the negative impact of role stress and (2) associations among role occupancy, role stress, and role reward and mental health vary by race/ethnicity. With separate logistic regression analysis, we investigated cross-sectional relationships between role stress and role reward with presence/absence of high depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D≥16]), anxiety symptoms (feeling tense or nervous, irritable or grouchy, fearful for no reason, and heart pounding or racing total score≥4), or low social functioning (bottom 25th percentile of the Short-Form-36 [SF-36] social functioning subscale) in 2549 women participating in the third visit of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a longitudinal population-based study of menopause. High reward across roles attenuated the negative impact of role stress on social functioning but not on anxiety or depression. High reward marriage buffered the impact of marital stress on depression, and high reward mothering buffered the effect of maternal stress on depression and social functioning. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics and Chinese with high stress across roles had better social functioning, and African American mothers had lower odds of high depressive symptoms. Role reward buffers the negative impact of stress on social functioning and depression, but not on anxiety. Minorities may respond to role stress by seeking social support.

  6. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  7. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  8. Longitudinal Changes in Sexual Functioning as Women Transition Through Menopause: Results from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Nancy E.; Brockwell, Sarah; Randolph, John F.; Shen, Shunhua; Cain, Virginia S.; Ory, Marcia; Greendale, Gail A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Sexual functioning is an important component of women’s lives. The extent to which the menopause transition is associated with decreased sexual functioning remains inconclusive. This study seeks to determine if advancing through the menopause transition is associated with changes in sexual functioning. Design A prospective, longitudinal cohort study of women aged 42–52 at baseline recruited at 7 US sites (N=3302) in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Cohort eligible women had an intact uterus, at least one ovary, were not currently using exogenous hormones, were either pre- or early perimenopausal, and self-identified as one of the study’s designated racial/ethnic groups. Data from the baseline interview and six annual follow-up visits are reported. Outcomes are self-reported ratings of importance of sex; frequency of sexual desire, arousal, masturbation, sexual intercourse, and pain during intercourse; degree of emotional satisfaction and physical pleasure. Results Adjusting for baseline age, chronological aging, and relevant social, health, and psychological parameters, the odds of reporting vaginal or pelvic pain increased and desire decreased by late perimenopause. Masturbation increased at early perimenopause, but declined during postmenopause. Menopausal transition was unrelated to other outcomes. Health, psychological functioning, and importance of sex were related to all sexual function outcomes. Age, race/ethnicity, marital status, change in relationship, and vaginal dryness were also associated with sexual functioning. Conclusions Pain during sexual intercourse increases and sexual desire decreases over the menopausal transition. Masturbation increases during the early transition, but then declines in postmenopause. Adjusting for other factors, the menopausal transition was not independently associated with reports of the importance of sex, sexual arousal, frequency of sexual intercourse, emotional satisfaction with

  9. Environmental tobacco smoke and risk of late-diagnosis incident fibroids in the Study of Women's Health across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason Y Y; Chang, Po-Yin; Gold, Ellen B; Johnson, Wesley O; Lee, Jennifer S

    2016-10-01

    To assess the longitudinal relationship of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during midlife, and its interaction with active smoking, with the risk of late-diagnosis incident uterine fibroids during the menopausal transition. Thirteen-year prospective cohort study. Not applicable. Community-based, multiracial/ethnic cohort of 2,575 women aged 42 to 52 years at baseline, undergoing the menopausal transition. Questionnaire and blood draws. Discrete-time proportional odds models were used to estimate the conditional odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident fibroids, adjusted for menopausal status, race/ethnicity, study site, age, education, estradiol levels, sex hormone use, body mass index, timing of blood draw, age at menarche, alcohol use, and smoking status and pack-years. As part of SWAN, at each near-annual study visit, ETS exposure, smoking, and fibroid occurrence were self-reported via questionnaire, and blood draws were collected. Women who were exposed to ETS (≥1 person-hour/week) had 1.28 (95% CI, 1.03, 1.60) times the adjusted odds of incident fibroids in the ensuing year compared the unexposed. The odds were elevated in never smokers (adjusted OR 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06, 1.70) and former smokers (adjusted OR 2.57; 95% CI, 1.05, 7.23). In midlife, ETS exposure was associated with an increased risk of late-diagnosis incident fibroids in women undergoing the menopausal transition. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lead toxicosis in tundra swans near a mining and smelting complex in northern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Hoffman, D.J.; Grove, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Die-offs of waterfowl have occurred in the Coeur d`Alene River system in northern Idaho since at least the early 1900`s. We investigated causes of mortality and lead and cadmium contamination of 46 tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) from 1987 to 1989; an additional 22 swans found dead in 1990 were not examined. We necropsied 43 of the 46 birds found from 1987 to 1989; 38 of these were from the Coeur d`Alene River system, which has been contaminated with mining and smelting wastes for a century, and the other 5 were from a nearby, relatively uncontaminated area. Of the 36 livers of swans from the contaminated area that were analyzed, 32 contained lethal levels of lead (6 to 40 micrograms/g, wet weight) and all birds exhibited several symptoms of lead poisoning, notably enlarged gall bladders containing viscous, darkgreen bile. Only 13% of the lead-poisoned birds (10% when data were included from other studies of swans in the area) contained shot, compared to 95% of lead-poisoning swans in studies outside northern Idaho. Lead concentrations in blood samples from 16 apparently healthy swans (0.5 to 2.3 micrograms/g, and 4 leadpoisoned birds found moribund (1.3 to 9.6 micrograms/g) indicating that tundra swans accumulated high levels of lead from ingestion of sediment that contained up to 8,700 micrograms/g of lead and plants that contained up to 400 micrograms/g. The swans spend only a few weeks in the area staging during the spring migration. The five tundra swans from the uncontaminated area had low levels of lead and essentially no symptoms of lead poisoning.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Psychosocial features associated with lifetime comorbidity of major depression and anxiety disorders among a community sample of mid-life women: the SWAN mental health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyranowski, Jill M; Schott, Laura L; Kravitz, Howard M; Brown, Charlotte; Thurston, Rebecca C; Joffe, Hadine; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2012-12-01

    In clinical samples, comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders is associated with greater symptom severity and elevated suicide risk. Less is known, however, regarding the long-term psychosocial impact that a lifetime history of both major depressive disorder (MDD) and one or more anxiety disorders has in community samples. This report evaluates clinical, psychological, social, and stress-related characteristics associated with a lifetime history of MDD and anxiety. Data from 915 women aged 42-52 who were recruited as part of the the Study of Women's Health across the Nation (SWAN) Mental Health Study were used to examine clinical and psychosocial features across groups of women with a lifetime history of MDD alone, anxiety alone, both MDD and anxiety, or neither MDD nor anxiety. As compared with women with a history of either MDD or anxiety alone, women with a comorbid history were more likely to report recurrent MDD, multiple and more severe lifetime anxiety disorders, greater depressive and anxiety symptoms, diminished social support, and more past-year distressing life events. Exploratory analyses indicated that women with a comorbid history also report more childhood abuse/neglect and diminished self-esteem, as compared with women with a history of either disorder alone. Midlife women with a comorbid history that includes both MDD and anxiety disorders report diminished social support, more symptomatic distress, and a more severe and recurrent psychiatric history. Future research is needed to clarify the biological and psychosocial risk factors associated with this comorobid profile, and to develop targeted interventions for this at-risk group. Depression and Anxiety 00:1-8, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The black swan the impact of the highly improbable

    CERN Document Server

    Taleb, Nassim Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    A black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: It is unpredictable; it carries a massive impact; and, after the fact, we concoct an explanation that makes it appear less random, and more predictable, than it was. The astonishing success of Google was a black swan; so was 9/11. For Nassim Nicholas Taleb, black swans underlie almost everything about our world, from the rise of religions to events in our own personal lives. Why do we not acknowledge the phenomenon of black swans until after they occur? Part of the answer, according to Taleb, is that humans are hardwired to learn specifics when they should be focused on generalities. We concentrate on things we already know and time and time again fail to take into consideration what we don’t know. We are, therefore, unable to truly estimate opportunities, too vulnerable to the impulse to simplify, narrate, and categorize, and not open enough to rewarding those who can imagine the “impossible.” For years, Taleb has studi...

  13. Sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among Brazilian dental students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Negra, Júnia Maria; Scarpelli, Ana Carolina; Tirsa-Costa, Débora; Guimarães, Flávia Helena; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among dental students of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed including 183 Brazilian dental students aged from 17 to 46 years old. The complete course curriculum consists of 9 semesters. Students enrolled in the first semester, the middle semester and the final semester of the course participated in the survey. The PSQI-BR (the Brazilian version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire Index) was used for data collection. The PSQI-BR was distributed during lecture classes. Sleep bruxism and awake bruxism diagnosis was based on self-reported data. Descriptive analysis, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Poisson regression with robust estimator were the statistical tests used. Sleep bruxism prevalence was 21.5% and awake bruxism prevalence was 36.5%. Sleep duration components were associated with sleep bruxism (PR=1.540; 95% CI: 1.00-2.37) and awake bruxism (PR=1.344; 95% CI: 1,008-1,790). There was an association between awake bruxism and habitual sleep efficiency component (PR=1.323; 95% CI: 1.03-1.70). Sleep disturbance component and awake bruxism were associated (PR=1.533; 95% CI: 1.03-2.27). Poor sleep quality was an important factor among dental students, who reported sleep bruxism as well as among those who presented awake bruxism.

  14. Sex Steroid Hormone Profiles are Related to Sleep Measures from Polysomnography and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Mary Fran; Zheng, Huiyong; Kravitz, Howard M.; Matthews, Karen; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Gold, Ellen B.; Owens, Jane; Consens, Flavia; Hall, Martica

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To relate reproductive hormones (and the preceding 7-year rates of their change) to objectively and subjectively assessed sleep measures, independent of age, vasomotor symptom frequency, depressive symptoms, and body size. Design: A cross-sectional sleep substudy nested in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a longitudinal study of the menopausal transition. Setting: Community-based. Participants: 365 Caucasian, African American, and Chinese women. Measurements and Results: Sleep duration, continuity, and architecture were measured during two nights of in-home polysomnography (PSG) studies. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality, sleep diaries for medication, vasomotor symptoms, lifestyle information and questionnaires for depressive symptoms. Blood collected annually in the years prior to sleep study was assayed for follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2), and total testosterone (T). More rapid rate of FSH change was significantly associated with higher delta sleep percent, longer total sleep time (TST), but less favorable self-reported sleep quality (PSQI). Baseline E2 was modestly and negatively associated with sleep quality. Women in the lowest total testosterone quartile at baseline had more wake time after sleep onset (WASO) than women in the highest quartile. Lower E2/T ratio, an index reflecting the increasing androgenic environment with the menopause transition, was associated with less WASO. Conclusions: More rapid rate of FSH change was associated with longer sleep duration but poor sleep quality. Women with higher T or who were closer to the completion of the transition process (as indexed by a lower E2/T) had less sleep discontinuity (less WASO). Citation: Sowers MF; Zheng H; Kravitz HM; Matthews K; Bromberger JT; Gold EB; Owens J; Consens F; Hall M. Sex steroid hormone profiles are related to sleep measures From polysomnography and the pittsburgh sleep quality

  15. Sleep, School Performance, and a School-Based Intervention among School-Aged Children: A Sleep Series Study in China

    OpenAIRE

    Shenghui Li; Lester Arguelles; Fan Jiang; Wenjuan Chen; Xingming Jin; Chonghuai Yan; Ying Tian; Xiumei Hong; Ceng Qian; Jun Zhang; Xiaobin Wang; Xiaoming Shen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sufficient sleep during childhood is essential to ensure a transition into a healthy adulthood. However, chronic sleep loss continues to increase worldwide. In this context, it is imperative to make sleep a high-priority and take action to promote sleep health among children. The present series of studies aimed to shed light on sleep patterns, on the longitudinal association of sleep with school performance, and on practical intervention strategy for Chinese school-aged children. ...

  16. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mute swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, D.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Morton, Alexandra; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Most ecotoxicological risk assessments of wildlife emphasize contaminant exposure through ingestion of food and water. However, the role of incidental ingestion of sediment-bound contaminants has not been adequately appreciated in these assessments. This study evaluates the toxicological consequences of contamination of sediments with metals from hard-rock mining and smelting activities. Lead-contaminated sediments collected from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in Idaho were combined with either a commercial avian maintenance diet or ground rice and fed to captive mute swans (Cygnus olor) for 6 weeks. Experimental treatments consisted of maintenance or rice diets containing 0, 12 (no rice group), or 24% highly contaminated (3,950 ug/g lead) sediment or 24% reference (9.7 ug/g lead) sediment. Although none of the swans died, the group fed a rice diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment were the most severely affected, experiencing a 24% decrease in mean body weight, including three birds that became emaciated. All birds in this treatment group had nephrosis; abnormally dark, viscous bile; and significant (p fast intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are diagnostic of lead poisoning in waterfowl. Body weight and hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations in swans on control (no sediment) and reference (uncontaminated) sediment diets remained unchanged. These data provide evidence that mute swans consuming environmentally relevant concentrations of Coeur d'Alene River Basin sediment developed severe sublethal lead poisoning. Furthermore, toxic effects were more pronounced when the birds were fed lead contaminated sediment combined with rice, which closely resembles the diet of swans in the wild.

  17. Sleep health literacy in head start families and staff: exploratory study of knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen A; Schwartz, Barbara; Schechter, Clyde

    2016-03-01

    Healthy child development requires sufficient, quality sleep. Sleep problems in early childhood impair social-emotional and cognitive function and increase obesity risk. From a health literacy framework, "sleep health literacy" denotes the knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep and to recognize a sleep problem. To explore the untapped potential of early childhood education (ECE) programs to promote sleep health literacy, we surveyed staff (n=63) and parents (n=196) in Head Start about sleep-related knowledge, attitudes/beliefs, sleep hygiene, and sleep problems. Head Start is the largest ECE program in the United States. Most parents believed that their child had healthy sleep habits (81%); few believed that he or she had a sleep problem (10%). Yet, unhealthy bedtime practices and insufficient sleep for age were reported in 50% and 33% of children, respectively. Between 10% and 12% of children had 1 or more sleep onset or awakening problems. Every unhealthy bedtime practice but one was associated with a sleep problem; parental presence at bedtime was associated with the most problems. Insufficient sleep was significantly associated with unhealthy sleep practices. More children with late vs early bedtimes (48% vs14%, P competencies to promote healthy sleep in families and their capacity to address sleep problems. US health literacy goals include the need to embed accurate, accessible, and actionable health information in ECE programs. Study findings strongly support the need to work toward sleep health literacy in ECE programs.

  18. Tundra swan populations, productivity, and local movements on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, northwest Alaska, 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the monitoring of populations and production of tundra swans on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in 1985 as part of a long-term study. Radio...

  19. Long-term Results of Lateral Band Translocation for the Correction of Swan Neck Deformity in Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marije; van Vliet, Daphne C.; Smeulders, Mark J.; Kreulen, Mick

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of lateral band translocation for correcting swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Methods: Swan neck deformities of 62 fingers were corrected using a modified lateral band

  20. EEG Changes across Multiple Nights of Sleep Restriction and Recovery in Adolescents: The Need for Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ju Lynn; Lo, June C.; Gooley, Joshua J.; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate sleep EEG changes in adolescents across 7 nights of sleep restriction to 5 h time in bed [TIB]) and 3 recovery nights of 9 h TIB. Methods: A parallel-group design, quasi-laboratory study was conducted in a boarding school. Fifty-five healthy adolescents (25 males, age = 15–19 y) who reported habitual TIBs of approximately 6 h on week nights (group average) but extended their sleep on weekends were randomly assigned to Sleep Restriction (SR) or Control groups. Participants underwent a 2-week protocol comprising 3 baseline nights (TIB = 9 h), 7 nights of sleep opportunity manipulation (TIB = 5 h for the SR and 9 h for the Control group), and 3 nights of recovery sleep (TIB = 9 h). Polysomnography was obtained on two baseline, three manipulation, and two recovery nights. Results: Across the sleep restriction nights, total SWS duration was preserved relative to the 9 h baseline sleep opportunity, while other sleep stages were reduced. Considering only the first 5 h of sleep opportunity, SR participants had reduced N1 duration and wake after sleep onset (WASO), and increased total sleep time (TST), rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and slow wave sleep (SWS) relative to baseline. Total REM sleep, N2, and TST duration remained above baseline levels by the third recovery sleep episode. Conclusions: In spite of preservation of SWS duration over multiple nights of sleep restriction, adolescents accustomed to curtailing nocturnal sleep on school day nights evidence residual effects on sleep macro-structure, even after three nights of recovery sleep. Older teenagers may not be as resilient to successive nights of sleep restriction as is commonly believed. Citation: Ong JL, Lo JC, Gooley JJ, Chee MW. EEG changes across multiple nights of sleep restriction and recovery in adolescents: the need for sleep study. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1233–1240. PMID:27091536

  1. A review of sleep deprivation studies evaluating the brain transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Alisa S; Huber, Jason D; O'Callaghan, James P; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show a positive association between adequate sleep and good health. Further, disrupted sleep may increase the risk for CNS diseases, such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. However, there has been limited progress in determining how sleep is linked to brain health or how sleep disruption may increase susceptibility to brain insult and disease. Animal studies can aid in understanding these links. In reviewing the animal literature related to the effects of sleep disruption on the brain, we found most of the work was directed toward investigating and characterizing the role of various brain areas or structures in initiating and regulating sleep. In contrast, limited effort has been directed towards understanding how sleep disruption alters the brain's health or susceptibility to insult. We also note many current studies have determined the changes in the brain following compromised sleep by examining, for example, the brain transcriptome or to a more limited extent the proteome. However, these studies have utilized almost exclusively total sleep deprivation (e.g., 24 out of 24 hours) paradigms or single short periods of limited acute sleep deprivation (e.g., 3 out of 24 hours). While such strategies are beneficial in understanding how sleep is controlled, they may not have much translational value for determining links between sleep and brain health or for determining how sleep disruption may increase brain susceptibility to insult. Surprisingly, few studies have determined how the duration and recurrence of sleep deprivation influence the effects seen after sleep deprivation. Our aim in this review was to identify relevant rodent studies from 1980 through 2012 and analyze those that use varying durations of sleep deprivation or restriction in their effort to evaluate the effects of sleep deprivation on the brain transcriptome and to a more limited extent the proteome. We examined how differences in the duration of sleep deprivation affect

  2. Sleep Restriction Impairs Vocabulary Learning when Adolescents Cram for Exams: The Need for Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Deshpande, Aadya; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Lo, June C; Chee, Michael W L; Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-09-01

    The ability to recall facts is improved when learning takes place at spaced intervals, or when sleep follows shortly after learning. However, many students cram for exams and trade sleep for other activities. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of study spacing and time in bed (TIB) for sleep on vocabulary learning in adolescents. In the Need for Sleep Study, which used a parallel-group design, 56 adolescents aged 15-19 years were randomly assigned to a week of either 5 h or 9 h of TIB for sleep each night as part of a 14-day protocol conducted at a boarding school. During the sleep manipulation period, participants studied 40 Graduate Record Examination (GRE)-type English words using digital flashcards. Word pairs were presented over 4 consecutive days (spaced items), or all at once during single study sessions (massed items), with total study time kept constant across conditions. Recall performance was examined 0 h, 24 h, and 120 h after all items were studied. For all retention intervals examined, recall of massed items was impaired by a greater amount in adolescents exposed to sleep restriction. In contrast, cued recall performance on spaced items was similar between sleep groups. Spaced learning conferred strong protection against the effects of sleep restriction on recall performance, whereas students who had insufficient sleep were more likely to forget items studied over short time intervals. These findings in adolescents demonstrate the importance of combining good study habits and good sleep habits to optimize learning outcomes. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Sleep deprivation, pain and prematurity: a review study

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Cristina Santos de Carvalho Bonan; João da Costa Pimentel Filho; Rosana Maria Tristão; José Alfredo Lacerda de Jesus; Dioclécio Campos Junior

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe current reports in the scientific literature on sleep in the intensive care environment and sleep deprivation associated with painful experiences in premature infant. A systematic search was conducted for studies on sleep, pain, premature birth and care of the newborn. Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, VHL and SciELO databases were consulted. The association between sleep deprivation and pain generates effects that are observe...

  4. Cognitive Performance, Sleepiness, and Mood in Partially Sleep Deprived Adolescents: The Need for Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C.; Ong, Ju Lynn; Leong, Ruth L.F.; Gooley, Joshua J.; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of sleep restriction (7 nights of 5 h time in bed [TIB]) on cognitive performance, subjective sleepiness, and mood in adolescents. Methods: A parallel-group design was adopted in the Need for Sleep Study. Fifty-six healthy adolescents (25 males, age = 15–19 y) who studied in top high schools and were not habitual short sleepers were randomly assigned to Sleep Restriction (SR) or Control groups. Participants underwent a 2-w protocol consisting of 3 baseline nights (TIB = 9 h), 7 nights of sleep opportunity manipulation (TIB = 5 h for the SR and 9 h for the control groups), and 3 nights of recovery sleep (TIB = 9 h) at a boarding school. A cognitive test battery was administered three times each day. Results: During the manipulation period, the SR group demonstrated incremental deterioration in sustained attention, working memory and executive function, increase in subjective sleepiness, and decrease in positive mood. Subjective sleepiness and sustained attention did not return to baseline levels even after 2 recovery nights. In contrast, the control group maintained baseline levels of cognitive performance, subjective sleepiness, and mood throughout the study. Incremental improvement in speed of processing, as a result of repeated testing and learning, was observed in the control group but was attenuated in the sleep-restricted participants, who, despite two recovery sleep episodes, continued to perform worse than the control participants. Conclusions: A week of partial sleep deprivation impairs a wide range of cognitive functions, subjective alertness, and mood even in high-performing high school adolescents. Some measures do not recover fully even after 2 nights of recovery sleep. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 497. Citation: Lo JC, Ong JL, Leong RL, Gooley JJ, Chee MW. Cognitive performance, sleepiness, and mood in partially sleep deprived adolescents: the need for sleep study

  5. Guide to Understanding Your Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    CPAP Help | Donate | Sleep Health App ASAA Family Sites: RSS Facebook Twitter Google Vimeo YouTube Forum About Who Is the ASAA Advocacy Industry Partners ... the ASAA Research Financials Supporting the ASAA Learn Sleep Health Sleep Apnea Information for Individuals Sleep Apnea Information ...

  6. A descriptive study to assess the impact of surgical stomas on individuals' sleep perceptions & response to sleep hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorbeck, Ellen; Willette-Murphy, Karen; Meiers, Sonja; Rudel, Rebecca; Alakhras, Mazen

    2010-01-01

    Multiple factors affect the sleep quality of individuals with surgically created stomas. Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation as the theoretical framework, a study was conducted to: 1) assess subjective sleep quality perceptions and objective sleep measurement in adults with stomas, 2) determine if there is a correlation between subjective and objective measurement of sleep in this group, and 3) implement a stoma-specific sleep hygiene intervention to improve these sleep quality perceptions. Subjective assessment focused on sleep subset questions from the Stoma Quality of Life Index (SQOLI) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Respondents' (n = 26) subjective sleep scores were 7.23 mean global score on seven questions (PSQI, range: 0 [no difficulty sleeping] to 3 [severe difficulty sleeping], total 0 to 21) with a mean score of 7.32 on three questions (SQOLI, range 1 [severe difficulty sleeping] to 4 [no difficulty sleeping], total 0 to 12) on sleep subset questions; composite scores of 5 or greater (PSQI) and 3 or less (SQOLI) indicating sleep problems. Scores showed that adults with stomas have increased sleep disruption and poor sleep quality. Five respondents who met intervention enrollment criteria participated in an objective sleep assessment using actigraphy, overnight oxygenation studies, and a 4-week sleep hygiene intervention. Mean PSQI score improved by 1.20 but the difference was not statistically significant. Because the results of this study confirm that sleep problems are common in older adults with a stoma, larger sample size studies of >4 weeks' duration are warranted. Until additional research results are available, the existence of sleep quality and overnight pouching concerns should be recognized and use of the low-cost, easy-to-use, stoma-specific sleep hygiene intervention considered.

  7. Media constructions of sleep and sleep disorders: a study of UK national newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Clive; Boden, Sharon; Williams, Simon; Lowe, Pam; Steinberg, Deborah

    2007-08-01

    Medicalisation, healthicisation and 'personal' strategies have been identified as the main factors contributing to the socially mediated experience of sleep and sleep disorders in modern societies. Medicalisation and healthicisation are publicly available discourses. But the degree to which apparently 'personal' strategies for managing sleep are presented in popular media has been underestimated. This study of the coverage of 5 UK newspapers shows that both medicalised and healthicised discourses are concentrated in the 'serious' press. The tabloid press is more likely to constitute sleep as a private realm and tabloid readers are therefore relatively less exposed to officially sanctioned forms of knowledge about sleep. Analysis of Daily Mail coverage shows, though, that women's 'personal' strategies for managing sleep are far from being private solutions. The Mail presents this topic as a component of its social construction of a 'Middle England' lifestyle, giving these apparently 'personal' solutions a political resonance.

  8. Central sleep apnea in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michael; Krishnan, Arun V; Eckert, Danny J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate sleep-disordered breathing and symptoms of sleepiness in a consecutive clinical cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Twenty-one (16 females) community-dwelling adults aged 18-75 years with MS and an Expanded Disability Status Scale score between 2 and 6 were recruited consecutively from an academic teaching hospital MS clinic. Participants performed a home sleep study (ResMed ApneaLink Plus) to objectively quantify sleep-disordered breathing. Subjective sleepiness and its impact were assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire. Three (one female) of the 19 participants who completed home overnight testing had central sleep apnea (median apnea-hypopnea index = 15 [range = 8-36] events/h sleep, median nadir SaO2 = 88 % [range = 81-88]). There were no cases of obstructive sleep apnea. Thirty-three percent of participants reported excessive daytime sleepiness, and 71% reported poor sleep quality. Home sleep testing was well tolerated, and a high proportion of central rather than obstructive sleep apnea was observed in a clinical MS sample. Possible reasons include brainstem or spinal cord lesions from MS affecting the control of breathing. Poor sleep quality and daytime sleepiness were common in this group.

  9. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Sol; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Okun, Michael S.; Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) affecting patient's quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG) in their “on medication” state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED) was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD). REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A). Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances. PMID:26504612

  10. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martinez-Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson’s disease (PD affecting patient’s quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG in their “on medication” state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A. Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances.

  11. Dream Content in Patients With Sleep Apnea: A Prospective Sleep Laboratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pauli, Franziska; Stefani, Ambra; Holzknecht, Evi; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Mitterling, Thomas; Holzinger, Brigitte; Högl, Birgit

    2018-01-15

    Few studies have addressed dreaming in patients with sleep apnea. We hypothesized that respiratory events and subsequent oxygen desaturation act as an important physiological trigger and may thus influence dream content in patients with a sleep-related breathing disorder. Seventy-six patients (28 women, mean age 54 years, range 20-82) who underwent polysomnography because of suspected sleep apnea participated in this study. Dream reports and dream questionnaires were collected immediately after first morning awakening, at 5:30 AM, at the sleep laboratory. Dream content analysis with respect to possible respiratory-related content was performed. Patients were stratified into primary snoring, mild, moderate, and severe sleep apnea groups. In 63 patients sleep apnea was diagnosed (mild n = 31, 49.2%, moderate n = 13, 20.6%, severe n = 19, 30.2%), and 13 subjects in whom a sleep-related breathing disorder was not confirmed were included as a control group with primary snoring. There was no significant difference in respiratory-related dream topics between patients and controls. Also, no influence of respiratory parameters measured during polysomnography on dream content was detectable. We failed to detect a difference in dream content between patients with sleep apnea and controls. Further studies are required to determine whether these results indicate that the incorporation of respiratory events into dreams is absent in patients with sleep apnea or represents a bias due to the collection of dream content in the early morning hours.

  12. Actigraphy-assessed sleep during school and vacation periods: a naturalistic study of restricted and extended sleep opportunities in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Allen, Nicholas B; Nicholas, Christian L; Dudgeon, Paul; Murray, Greg; Trinder, John

    2014-02-01

    School-related sleep restriction in adolescents has been identified by studies comparing weekday and weekend sleep. This study compared weekday and vacation sleep to assess restricted and extended sleep opportunities. One-hundred and forty-six adolescents (47.3% male) aged 16.2 ± 1.0 years (M ± SD) from the general community wore an actigraph continuously for 4 weeks: the last week of a school term (Time-E), the following 2-week vacation, and the first week of the next term. Self-reported sleep was assessed for each of the three time intervals, and chronotype was assessed using the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire at Time-E. Daily actigraphy bedtime, rise-time, time-in-bed, total sleep time, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, and % wake after sleep onset were analysed using latent growth curve modelling. The removal of school-related sleep restriction was associated with an abrupt delay in sleep timing and increase in sleep duration. Subsequently, bedtime and rise-time showed further linear delays throughout the vacation, while changes in time-in-bed were non-significant. Sleep onset latency increased linearly, peaking in the middle of the second vacation week. Across the first vacation week, total sleep time and sleep efficiency linearly decreased, while % wake after sleep onset increased. These changes stabilized during the second vacation week. Older age and eveningness were associated with later bedtime and rise-time, whilst females had longer time-in-bed, total sleep time and sleep onset latency. Compared with school days, sleep during the vacation was characterized by later timing, longer duration, lower quality and greater variability. Recovery from school-related sleep restriction appeared to be completed within the 2 weeks of naturalistic extended sleep. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations Between Objectively Measured Sleep Duration and Body Mass Index: The CARDIA Sleep Study

    OpenAIRE

    LAUDERDALE, Diane S.; Knutson, Kristen L.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Yan, Lijing L; Hulley, Stephen B; Liu, Kiang

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have found an association between shorter sleep duration and higher body mass index (BMI) in adults. Most previous studies have been cross-sectional and relied on self-reported sleep duration, which may not be very accurate. In the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Sleep Study (2000–2006), the authors examine whether objectively measured sleep is associated with BMI and change in BMI. They use several nights of wrist actigraphy to measure sleep among p...

  14. Short Sleep and Adolescents' Performance on a Concussion Assessment Battery: An Experimental Sleep Manipulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Dean W; Powers, Scott W; Slattery, Eric W; Gubanich, Paul J

    2017-07-21

    Correlational studies have linked short sleep to adolescents' report of postconcussion symptoms and cognitive performance during concussion assessments. This study tested whether those are cause-effect relationships. Three-week randomly counterbalanced, within-subjects, crossover experiment. Adolescents slept at home with weekly visits to an outpatient clinic for sleep monitor uploads and outcome assessments. Twenty-four healthy 14- to 17.9-year-olds. After an initial sleep-stabilization period, adolescents experienced 5-night spans of short sleep (SS; 6.5 hours/night in bed) versus Healthy Sleep Opportunity (HS; 9.5 hours/night in bed). Cognitive indexes and the postconcussion symptom scale (PCSS) from the Immediate PostConcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing. Adolescents reported significantly worse symptoms on the PCSS after SS than HS, even after excluding items manifestly related to sleep. Verbal memory was also worse after SS than HS, though the effect was small. The manipulation did not significantly affect other cognitive indexes. A realistic "dose" of short sleep, similar to what many adolescents experience regularly on school nights, can cause or contribute to symptom reports during concussion assessments. Consistent with previous sleep research, one-on-one cognitive tests seem to be less sensitive than measures of emotional and behavioral functioning to the effects of short sleep.

  15. Hematological parameters in relation to age, sex and biochemical values for mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolka, B; Włodarczyk, R; Zbikowski, A; Dolka, I; Szeleszczuk, P; Kluciński, W

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of the correct morphological and biochemical parameters in mute swans is an important indicator of their health status, body condition, adaptation to habitat and useful diagnostic tools in veterinary practice and ecological research. The aim of the study was to obtain hematological parameters in relation to age, sex and serum biochemistry values in wild-living mute swans. We found the significant differences in the erythrocyte count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in relation to age of mute swans. There were no differences in hematological values between males and females. The leukogram and H/L ratio did not vary by age and sex in swans. Among of biochemical parameters the slightly increased AST, ALP, CK, K, urea, decreased CHOL and TG values were recorded. As far as we know, this is the first study in which the morphometric parameters of blood cells in mute swans were presented. We found extremely low concentration of lead in blood (at subthreshold level). No blood parasites were found in blood smears. The analysis of body mass and biometric parameters revealed a significant differences dependent on age and sex. No differences in the scaled mass index were found. Our results represent a normal hematologic and blood chemistry values and age-sex related changes, as reference values for the mute swan.

  16. Raising a beautiful swan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-01-01

    and included a total of 15 interdisciplinary staff members. After transcribing the interviews, the text material was analysed and interpreted in a three-methodological-step process inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. In the analysis and interpretation three themes was identified. The themes were......: (1) a chance towards a new and better scene; (2) a step towards a more neurologically friendly environment; and (3) a renewed view of the neurological patients. This study concludes that to the health professionals, the intervention was meaningful in several ways because it created structure during...... mealtimes and emphasized the importance of creating a calm environment for both patients and health professionals. The intervention was described as an eye-opening and well-regarded event in the field of neurological care that facilitated community, and reflections on nursing care and professional identity...

  17. EEG Changes across Multiple Nights of Sleep Restriction and Recovery in Adolescents: The Need for Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ju Lynn; Lo, June C; Gooley, Joshua J; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-06-01

    To investigate sleep EEG changes in adolescents across 7 nights of sleep restriction to 5 h time in bed [TIB]) and 3 recovery nights of 9 h TIB. A parallel-group design, quasi-laboratory study was conducted in a boarding school. Fifty-five healthy adolescents (25 males, age = 15-19 y) who reported habitual TIBs of approximately 6 h on week nights (group average) but extended their sleep on weekends were randomly assigned to Sleep Restriction (SR) or Control groups. Participants underwent a 2-week protocol comprising 3 baseline nights (TIB = 9 h), 7 nights of sleep opportunity manipulation (TIB = 5 h for the SR and 9 h for the Control group), and 3 nights of recovery sleep (TIB = 9 h). Polysomnography was obtained on two baseline, three manipulation, and two recovery nights. Across the sleep restriction nights, total SWS duration was preserved relative to the 9 h baseline sleep opportunity, while other sleep stages were reduced. Considering only the first 5 h of sleep opportunity, SR participants had reduced N1 duration and wake after sleep onset (WASO), and increased total sleep time (TST), rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and slow wave sleep (SWS) relative to baseline. Total REM sleep, N2, and TST duration remained above baseline levels by the third recovery sleep episode. In spite of preservation of SWS duration over multiple nights of sleep restriction, adolescents accustomed to curtailing nocturnal sleep on school day nights evidence residual effects on sleep macro-structure, even after three nights of recovery sleep. Older teenagers may not be as resilient to successive nights of sleep restriction as is commonly believed. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. The effects of sleep extension on sleep and cognitive performance in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Outcome variables were objectively measured sleep and cognitive performance. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by

  19. Sleep During Pregnancy: The nuMoM2b Pregnancy and Sleep Duration and Continuity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kathryn J; Facco, Francesca L; Grobman, William A; Parker, Corette B; Herbas, Marcos; Hunter, Shannon; Silver, Robert M; Basner, Robert C; Saade, George R; Pien, Grace W; Manchanda, Shalini; Louis, Judette M; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Lang; Chung, Judith H; Wing, Deborah A; Simhan, Hyagriv N; Haas, David M; Iams, Jay; Parry, Samuel; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-05-01

    To characterize sleep duration, timing and continuity measures in pregnancy and their association with key demographic variables. Multisite prospective cohort study. Women enrolled in the nuMoM2b study (nulliparous women with a singleton gestation) were recruited at the second study visit (16-21 weeks of gestation) to participate in the Sleep Duration and Continuity substudy. Women sleep log for 7 consecutive days. Time in bed, sleep duration, fragmentation index, sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset, and sleep midpoint were averaged across valid primary sleep periods for each participant. Valid data were available from 782 women with mean age of 27.3 (5.5) years. Median sleep duration was 7.4 hours. Approximately 27.9% of women had a sleep duration of sleep duration of >9 hours. In multivariable models including age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, insurance status, and recent smoking history, sleep duration was significantly associated with race/ethnicity and insurance status, while time in bed was only associated with insurance status. Sleep continuity measures and sleep midpoint were significantly associated with all covariates in the model, with the exception of age for fragmentation index and smoking for wake after sleep onset. Our results demonstrate the relationship between sleep and important demographic characteristics during pregnancy.

  20. Toxicity of Anacostia River, Washington, DC, USA, sediment fed to mute swans (Cygnus olor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.; Melancon, M.J.; Sileo, L.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion is sometimes the principal route by which waterfowl are exposed to environmental contaminants, and at severely contaminated sites waterfowl have been killed by ingesting sediment. Mute swans (Cygnus olor) were fed a diet for six weeks with a high but environmentally realistic concentration (24%) of sediment from the moderately polluted Anacostia River in the District of Columbia, to estimate the sediment?s toxicity. Control swans were fed the same diet without the sediment. Five organochlorine compounds were detected in the treated diets but none of 22 organochlorine compounds included in the analyses were detected in livers of the treated swans. The concentrations of 24 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons measured in the treated diet were as high as 0.80 mg/kg and they were thought to have been responsible for the observed induction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in livers. A concentration of 85 mg/kg of lead in the diet was enough to decrease red blood cell ALAD activity but was not high enough to cause more serious effects of lead poisoning. The dietary concentrations of Al, Fe, V, and Ba were high compared to the concentrations of these elements known to be toxic in laboratory feeding studies, but these elements did not accumulate in the livers of the treated swans and probably were not readily available in the sediment. Although ingestion of the Anacostia River sediment caused subtle toxicological effects in swans, we concluded from pathological examinations and weight data that the treated swans remained basically healthy.

  1. Wave hindcast studies using SWAN nested in WAVEWATCH III - comparison with measured nearshore buoy data off Karwar, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Sandhya, K.G.; Nair, T.M.B.; Rathod, J.L.

    for the tropical Indian Ocean are 0.8 m/s, 0.57, 2.6 m/s and 52.5, respectively (Harikumar et al., 2013). The earlier studies have shown that bathymetry is also an important factor (Chawla, 2007; Brown and Wolf, 2009). Hence, both bathymetry and wind field.... J. Geophysical Res. 104 (4), 7649- 7666. Brown, Jennifer M., and Judith Wolf., 2009. Coupled wave and surge modellingfor the easern Irish sea and implications for model wind-stress. Continental shelf Res. 29(10), 1329-1342. Cavaleri, L., 1994...

  2. Sleep and Multisystem Biological Risk: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Merkin, Sharon Stein; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and mortality. This study examines the contribution of sleep duration and sleep quality on a multisystem biological risk index that is known to be associated with morbidity and mortality. Methods Analyses include a population-based sample from the Midlife Development in the United States survey recruited to the Biomarker substudy. A total of 1,023 participants aged 54.5 years (SD = 11.8), 56% female and 77.6% white, were included in the analyses. A multisystem biological risk index was derived from 22 biomarkers capturing cardiovascular, immune, lipid-metabolic, glucose-metabolic, sympathetic, parasympathetic, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal systems. Self-reported average sleep duration was categorized as short (Sleep quality was determined using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index categorized as normal (≤5) and poor quality (>5) sleep. Findings Linear mixed effect models adjusting for age, gender, race, education, income, BMI, and health status were performed. As compared to normal sleepers, multisystem biological risk in both short (B(SE) = .38(.15), pPoor quality sleep alone was associated with elevated multisystem biological risk (B(SE) = .15(.06), p = .01), but was not significant after adjustment for health status. All short sleepers reported poor sleep quality. However in the long sleepers, only those who reported poor sleep quality exhibited elevated multisystem biological risk (B(SE) = .93(.3), p = .002). Conclusions Self-reported poor sleep quality with either short or long sleep duration is associated with dysregulation in physiological set points across regulatory systems, leading to elevated multisystem biological risk. Physicians should inquire about sleep health in the assessment of lifestyle factors related to disease risk, with evidence that healthy sleep is associated with lower multisystem biological risk. PMID:25714703

  3. Chronotype, sleep quality and sleep duration in adult distance education: Not related to study progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; Kirschner, Paul A.; De Groot, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Research in traditional education shows chronotype, sleep duration and sleep quality to be related to learning performance. Research in adult students participating in distance education (DE) is scarce. This study aims to provide knowledge on these relationships in this educational setting. In an

  4. To Study or to Sleep? The Academic Costs of Extra Studying at the Expense of Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen-O'Neel, Cari; Huynh, Virginia W.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined how nightly variations in adolescents' study and sleep time are associated with academic problems on the following day. Participants ("N" = 535, 9th grade M[subscript age] = 14.88) completed daily diaries every day for 14 days in 9th, 10th, and 12th grades. Results suggest that regardless of how much a…

  5. Mind Wandering, Sleep Quality, Affect and Chronotype: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carciofo, Richard; Du, Feng; Song, Nan; Zhang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs cognition, including executive functions and concentration, but there has been little direct research on the relationships between sleep quality and mind wandering or daydreaming. Evening chronotype is associated with poor sleep quality, more mind wandering and more daydreaming; negative affect is also a mutual correlate. This exploratory study investigated how mind wandering and daydreaming are related to different aspects of sleep quality, and whether sleep quality influences the relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering/daydreaming and chronotype. Three surveys (Ns = 213; 190; 270) were completed with Chinese adults aged 18–50, including measures of sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, mind wandering, daydreaming, chronotype and affect (positive and negative). Higher frequencies of mind wandering and daydreaming were associated with poorer sleep quality, in particular with poor subjective sleep quality and increased sleep latency, night-time disturbance, daytime dysfunction and daytime sleepiness. Poor sleep quality was found to partially mediate the relationships between daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering and negative affect. Additionally, low positive affect and poor sleep quality, in conjunction, fully mediated the relationships between chronotype and mind wandering, and chronotype and daydreaming. The relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and positive affect were also moderated by chronotype, being weaker in those with a morning preference. Finally, while daytime sleepiness was positively correlated with daydream frequency, it was negatively correlated with a measure of problem-solving daydreams, indicating that more refined distinctions between different forms of daydreaming or mind wandering are warranted. Overall, the evidence is suggestive of a bi-directional relationship between poor sleep quality and mind wandering/daydreaming, which may be

  6. Cognitive Performance, Sleepiness, and Mood in Partially Sleep Deprived Adolescents: The Need for Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C; Ong, Ju Lynn; Leong, Ruth L F; Gooley, Joshua J; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of sleep restriction (7 nights of 5 h time in bed [TIB]) on cognitive performance, subjective sleepiness, and mood in adolescents. A parallel-group design was adopted in the Need for Sleep Study. Fifty-six healthy adolescents (25 males, age = 15-19 y) who studied in top high schools and were not habitual short sleepers were randomly assigned to Sleep Restriction (SR) or Control groups. Participants underwent a 2-w protocol consisting of 3 baseline nights (TIB = 9 h), 7 nights of sleep opportunity manipulation (TIB = 5 h for the SR and 9 h for the control groups), and 3 nights of recovery sleep (TIB = 9 h) at a boarding school. A cognitive test battery was administered three times each day. During the manipulation period, the SR group demonstrated incremental deterioration in sustained attention, working memory and executive function, increase in subjective sleepiness, and decrease in positive mood. Subjective sleepiness and sustained attention did not return to baseline levels even after 2 recovery nights. In contrast, the control group maintained baseline levels of cognitive performance, subjective sleepiness, and mood throughout the study. Incremental improvement in speed of processing, as a result of repeated testing and learning, was observed in the control group but was attenuated in the sleep-restricted participants, who, despite two recovery sleep episodes, continued to perform worse than the control participants. A week of partial sleep deprivation impairs a wide range of cognitive functions, subjective alertness, and mood even in high-performing high school adolescents. Some measures do not recover fully even after 2 nights of recovery sleep. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 497. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Sleep duration and sleep quality in relation to 12-year cardiovascular disease incidence: the MORGEN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, Marieke P; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Kromhout, Daan; van den Berg, Julia F; Verschuren, W M Monique

    2011-11-01

    We studied sleep duration and sleep quality in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. Dutch population-based cohort study. 20,432 men and women aged 20-65 and with no history of CVD. N/A. Sleep duration and sleep quality were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Morbidity data, vital status, and causes of death were obtained through linkage with several national registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models. During 10-15 years of follow-up, 1,486 CVD and 1,148 coronary heart disease (CHD) events occurred. Short sleepers (≤ 6 h) had a 15% higher risk of total CVD (HR: 1.15; 95%CI: 1.00-1.32) and a 23% higher risk of CHD (HR: 1.23 [1.04-1.45]) compared to normal sleepers (7 h) after adjustment for all confounders. Additional adjustment for intermediate biological risk factors attenuated these relative risks to 1.11 (0.97-1.27) for total CVD and to 1.19 (1.00-1.40) for CHD. Short sleepers with poor sleep quality had a 63% higher risk of CVD (HR: 1.63 [1.21-2.19]) and a 79% higher risk of CHD incidence (HR: 1.79 [1.24-2.58]) compared to normal sleepers with good sleep quality, after adjustments for all confounders. We observed no associations between long sleep duration (≥ 9 h) and CVD or CHD incidence. Short sleepers, especially those with poor sleep quality, have an increased risk of total CVD and CHD incidence. Future investigations should not only focus on sleep duration, but should also take sleep quality into account.

  8. Sleep-disordered breathing, sleep duration, and childhood overweight: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen; Chervin, Ronald D; Howe, Laura D

    2015-03-01

    To examine independent associations between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), sleep duration from birth through 6.75 years, and body mass index (BMI) through 15 years of age in a population-based cohort. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children collected parent questionnaire data on child sleep duration and SDB symptoms from birth through 6.75 years and child BMI from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children research clinics (n = 1899). For SDB, logistic regression models-minimal, confounder, and confounder + sleep duration adjusted-examined associations with BMI at 7, 10, and 15 years of age. For short sleep duration (≤10th percentile), comparable SDB-adjusted models examined associations with BMI at 15 years of age. Children with the worst SDB symptoms vs asymptomatic children, had increased odds of overweight at 7 (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.04-4.17), 10 (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.02-3.16), and 15 years of age (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.27-3.97) in models adjusted for sleep duration. Similarly, short sleep duration at ≈5-6 years was associated with overweight at 15 years, independent of SDB. Children with short sleep duration at 4.75 years were more likely to be overweight at 15 years in minimally (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.52-3.20), confounder (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.34-2.96), and SDB-adjusted (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.36-3.04) models. Both SDB and short sleep duration significantly and independently increase children's odds of becoming overweight. Findings underscore the potential importance of early identification and remediation of SDB, along with insufficient sleep, as strategies for reducing childhood obesity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of SOP's for Prodcutivity Surveys for EP tundra swans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report reviews the SOPs for productivity surveys of tundra swans to identify areas of improvement. An average of 18,700 swans has been surveyed in the Atlantic...

  10. Malheur NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Trumpeter Swan - Production

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The survey estimates recruitment of trumpeter swan on the refuge. The survey should be conducted in August and September, before migratory swans arrive on the Refuge...

  11. Effects of Actigraphically Acquired Sleep Quality onDriving Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patientsand Control drivers: A Naturalistic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksan, Nazan; Marini, Robert; Tippin, Jon; Dawson, Jeffrey; Rizzo, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of sleep quality on next day driving outcomes in a 3.5-month naturalistic driving study of 67 OSA and 47 matched control drivers. Sleep quality measures included total sleep time and sleep fragmentation from actigraphy. The driving outcomes included average speed, lateral control, longitudinal control, distraction, attention to driving- and non-driving related tasks. Sleep quality affected next day's driving performance differently for OSA and control drivers. Better sleep quality was associated with better lateral and longitudinal control during highway driving for control drivers. The reverse was true for OSA drivers. Similar effects were also seen in terms of distractions and attention to the driving task. These effects suggest improved sleep leads to greater risky driving and 'activation' among OSA drivers. Collectively, the findings suggest investment in long-term monitoring of sleep quality in commercial vehicle drivers both with and without sleep disorders may help manage safety risks.

  12. Migration of Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus) Wintering in Japan Using Satellite Tracking: Identification of the Eastern Palearctic Flyway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbo; Doko, Tomoko; Fujita, Go; Hijikata, Naoya; Tokita, Ken-Ichi; Uchida, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Kan; Hiraoka, Emiko; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Migration through the Eastern Palearctic (EP) flyway by tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) has not been thoroughly documented. We satellite-tracked the migration of 16 tundra swans that winter in Japan. The objectives of this study were 1) to show the migration pattern of the EP flyway of tundra swans; 2) to compare this pattern with the migration pattern of whooper swans; and 3) to identify stopover sites that are important for these swans' conservation. Tundra swans were captured at Kutcharo Lake, Hokkaido, in 2009-2012 and satellite-tracked. A new method called the "MATCHED (Migratory Analytical Time Change Easy Detection) method" was developed. Based on median, the spring migration began on 18 April and ended on 27 May. Autumn migration began on 9 September and ended on 2 November. The median duration of the spring and autumn migrations were 48 and 50 days, respectively. The mean duration at one stopover site was 5.5 days and 6.8 days for the spring and autumn migrations, respectively. The number of stopover sites was 3.0 and 2.5 for the spring and autumn migrations, respectively. The mean travel distances for the spring and autumn migrations were 6471 and 6331 km, respectively. Seven migration routes passing Sakhalin, the Amur River, and/or Kamchatka were identified. There were 15, 32, and eight wintering, stopover, and breeding sites, respectively. The migration routes and staging areas of tundra swans partially overlap with those of whooper swans, whose migration patterns have been previously documented. The migration patterns of these two swan species that winter in Japan confirm the importance of the Amur River, Udyl' Lake, Shchastya Bay, Aniva Bay, zaliv Chayvo Lake, zal Piltun Lake, zaliv Baykal Lake, Kolyma River, Buyunda River, Sen-kyuyel' Lake, and northern coastal areas of the Sea of Okhotsk.

  13. Sleep and sleep ecology in the first 3 years: a web-based study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadeh, Avi; Mindell, Jodi A; Luedtke, Kathryn; Wiegand, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to provide data on sleep patterns during the first 3 years, based on a large US-Canada Internet sample, to assess the prevalence of parental interventions and related factors...

  14. [Sleep, work, and study: sleep duration in working and non-working students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erico Felden; Bernardo, Maria Perpeto Socorro Leite; D'Almeida, Vânia; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the duration of sleep and associated factors in working and non-working students. Data were analyzed on the sleep-wake cycle in 863 teenage students in São Paulo, Brazil. Adjusted analyses were performed to compare sleep duration in working and non-working students. 18.4% of the group worked, and 52% of the working students slept eight hours or less per night. Prevalence of short sleep duration was higher in working students of both sexes (males, p = 0.017; females, p students showed short sleep duration in the analysis adjusted for socioeconomic status, but short sleep was more frequent in older adolescents (p = 0.004) and in lower (p = 0.001) and middle (p = 0.011) socioeconomic classes. Although more working students were in night school, in the model adjusted for gender and socioeconomic status, working students in afternoon courses showed higher prevalence of short sleep duration (PR = 2.53; 95%CI: 1.68-4.12).

  15. Sleep Bruxism, Awake Bruxism and Sleep Quality among Brazilian Dental Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Serra-Negra,Júnia Maria; Scarpelli,Ana Carolina; Tirsa-Costa,Débora; Guimarães,Flávia Helena; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; PAIVA,Saul Martins

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of sleep bruxism, awake bruxism and sleep quality among dental students of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed including 183 Brazilian dental students aged from 17 to 46 years old. The complete course curriculum consists of 9 semesters. Students enrolled in the first semester, the middle semester and the final semester of the course participated in the survey. The PSQI-BR (th...

  16. Sleep Quality, Sleep Duration, and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study With 60,586 Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xiang Qian; Liu, Xudong; Deng, Han-Bing; Chan, Ta-Chien; Ho, Kin Fai; Wang, Feng; Vermeulen, Roel; Tam, Tony; Wong, Martin C S; Tse, L A; Chang, Ly-Yun; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong

    2018-01-15

    There is limited information on the relationship between risk of cardiovascular disease and the joint effects of sleep quality and sleep duration, especially from large, prospective, cohort studies. This study is to prospectively investigate the joint effects of sleep quality and sleep duration on the development of coronary heart disease. This study examined 60,586 adults aged 40 years or older. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on sleep quality and sleep duration as well as a wide range of potential confounders. Events of coronary heart disease were self-reported in subsequent medical examinations. Two types of Sleep Score (multiplicative and additive) were constructed to reflect the participants' sleep profiles, considering both sleep quality and sleep duration. The Cox regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 2,740 participants (4.5%) reported new events of coronary heart disease at follow-up. For sleep duration, participants in the group of 8 h/d) did not reach statistical significance (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.98-1.26). For sleep quality, both dreamy sleep (HR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10-1.32) and difficult to fall asleep/use of sleeping pills or drugs (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.25-1.56) were associated with an increased risk of the disease. Participants in the lowest quartile of multiplicative Sleep Score (HR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.16-1.47) and of additive sleep score (HR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.16-1.47) were associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease compared with those in the highest quartile. Both short sleep duration and poor sleep quality are associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The association for long sleep duration does not reach statistical significance. Lower Sleep Score (poorer sleep profile) increases the risk of coronary heart disease, suggesting the importance of considering sleep duration and sleep quality together when developing strategies to

  17. Sleep, school performance, and a school-based intervention among school-aged children: a sleep series study in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Shenghui; Arguelles, Lester; Jiang, Fan; Chen, Wenjuan; Jin, Xingming; Yan, Chonghuai; Tian, Ying; Hong, Xiumei; Qian, Ceng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaobin; Shen, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    .... The present series of studies aimed to shed light on sleep patterns, on the longitudinal association of sleep with school performance, and on practical intervention strategy for Chinese school-aged children...

  18. Polysomnographic Measurement of Sleep Duration and Bodily Pain Perception in the Sleep Heart Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Jeremy A; Dubrovsky, Boris; Basner, Robert C; Redline, Susan; George, Liziamma; Lederer, David J

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether total sleep time (TST) and specific sleep stage duration are associated with bodily pain perception and whether sex, age, or subjective sleepiness modifies this relationship. Data from adults ages 39-90 y (n = 5,199) who took part in the Sleep Heart Health Study Exam 1 were analyzed. TST, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep time, and slow wave sleep (SWS) time were measured by unattended, in-home nocturnal polysomnography. Bodily pain perception was measured via the Short Form-36 questionnaire bodily pain component. We used logistic regression to examine associations between total and individual sleep stage durations and bodily pain perception controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, antidepressant use, and important cardiovascular conditions (smoking [pack-years], history of diabetes, and history of percutaneous coronary intervention and/or coronary artery bypass graft). In the fully adjusted model, REM sleep time and SWS time were not associated with "moderate to severe pain," whereas TST was: Each 1-h decrement in TST was associated with a 7% increased odds of "moderate to severe pain" (odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.002, 1.14). Due to modification of the association between SWS time and "moderate to severe pain" by sex (P for interaction = 0.01), we performed analyses stratified by sex: Each 1-h decrement in SWS time was associated with a 20% higher odds of "moderate to severe pain" among men (odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.42) whereas an association was not observed among women. Shorter TST among all subjects and shorter SWS time in men was associated with "moderate to severe pain." REM sleep time was not associated with bodily pain perception in this cohort. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  19. A Twin Study of Sleep Duration and Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Noonan, Carolyn; Goldberg, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the relative importance of genetic and environmental contributions to the association between sleep duration and body mass index (BMI). Methods: Twins from the University of Washington Twin Registry, a community-based sample of U.S. twins, provided self-reported height and weight for BMI calculation and habitual sleep duration. A generalized estimating equation model evaluated the overall and within twin pair effects of sleep duration on BMI with and without stratification by twin zygosity. A structural equation model was used to assess genetic and non-genetic contributions to BMI and sleep duration. Results: The study sample included 1,224 twins comprised of 423 monozygotic, 143 dizygotic, and 46 indeterminate pairs. The mean age was 36.9 years; 69% were female. A multivariate adjusted analysis of all twins revealed an elevated mean BMI (26.0 kg/m2) in short sleeping twins (sleeping 7–8.9 h/night (BMI 24.8 kg/m2; p sleeping twins having a mean BMI of 25.8 kg/m2 compared to 24.9 kg/m2 for the 7–8.9 h/night sleep duration group (p = 0.02). When restricted to monozygotic twins, the within-twin pair analysis continued to reveal an elevated BMI in the short sleeping twins (25.7 kg/m2) compared to the 7–8.9 h/night reference group (24.7 kg/m2; p = 0.02). No differences in mean BMI were observed between the 7–8.9 h/night reference group twins and longer sleeping twins (≥ 9 h/night) in the analysis of all twins, the overall within-twin pair analysis, or the within-twin pair analysis stratified by zygosity. The heritability of sleep duration was 0.31 (p = 0.08) and BMI 0.76 (p sleep duration and BMI (p = 0.28). Conclusions: Short sleep was associated with elevated BMI following careful adjustment for genetics and shared environment. These findings point toward an environmental cause of the relationship between sleep duration and BMI. Citation: Watson NF; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Noonan C; Goldberg J. A twin study of sleep duration

  20. Motor events during healthy sleep: a quantitative polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Biermayr, Marlene; Bregler, Deborah; Ehrmann, Laura; Ulmer, Hanno; Högl, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Many sleep disorders are characterized by increased motor activity during sleep. In contrast, studies on motor activity during physiological sleep are largely lacking. We quantitatively investigated a large range of motor phenomena during polysomnography in physiological sleep. Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Academic referral sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers age 19-77 y were strictly selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening procedure. N/A. Polysomnography according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) standards was performed, and quantitative normative values were established for periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), high frequency leg movements (HFLM), fragmentary myoclonus (FM), neck myoclonus (NM), and rapid eye movement (REM)-related electromyographic (EMG) activity. Thirty-six subjects had a PLMS index > 5/h, 18 had a PLMS index > 15/h (90th percentile: 24.8/h). Thirty-three subjects had HFLM (90th percentile: four sequences/night). All subjects had FM (90th percentile 143.7/h sleep). Nine subjects fulfilled AASM criteria for excessive FM. Thirty-five subjects had NM (90th percentile: 8.8/h REM sleep). For REM sleep, different EMG activity measures for the mentalis and flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were calculated: the 90th percentile for phasic mentalis EMG activity for 30-sec epochs according to AASM recommendation was 15.6%, and for tonic mentalis EMG activity 2.6%. Twenty-five subjects exceeded the recently proposed phasic mentalis cutoff of 11%. None of the subjects exceeded the tonic mentalis cutoff of 9.6%. Quantification of motor phenomena is a basic prerequisite to develop normative values, and is a first step toward a more precise description of the various motor phenomena present during sleep. Because rates of motor events were unexpectedly high even in physiological sleep, the future use of normative values for both research and clinical routine is essential.

  1. Sleep in the human hippocampus: a stereo-EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Moroni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is compelling evidence indicating that sleep plays a crucial role in the consolidation of new declarative, hippocampus-dependent memories. Given the increasing interest in the spatiotemporal relationships between cortical and hippocampal activity during sleep, this study aimed to shed more light on the basic features of human sleep in the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded intracerebral stereo-EEG directly from the hippocampus and neocortical sites in five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The time course of classical EEG frequency bands during the first three NREM-REM sleep cycles of the night was evaluated. We found that delta power shows, also in the hippocampus, the progressive decrease across sleep cycles, indicating that a form of homeostatic regulation of delta activity is present also in this subcortical structure. Hippocampal sleep was also characterized by: i a lower relative power in the slow oscillation range during NREM sleep compared to the scalp EEG; ii a flattening of the time course of the very low frequencies (up to 1 Hz across sleep cycles, with relatively high levels of power even during REM sleep; iii a decrease of power in the beta band during REM sleep, at odds with the typical increase of power in the cortical recordings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data imply that cortical slow oscillation is attenuated in the hippocampal structures during NREM sleep. The most peculiar feature of hippocampal sleep is the increased synchronization of the EEG rhythms during REM periods. This state of resonance may have a supportive role for the processing/consolidation of memory.

  2. Mortality in tundra swans Cygnus columbianus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek, J.C.; Serie, J.R.; Converse, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Our paper identifies and examines the significance of hunting and non-hunting mortality affecting the Eastern Population (EP) and Western Population (WP) (see Serie & Bartonek 1991a) of Tundra Swans. Sport hunting (Serie & Bartonek 1991b), native subsistence hunting (Copp 1989, Stewart & Bernier 1989), malicious shooting (McKelvey & MacNeill 1981), avian cholera (Friend et al. 1981, Schroeder 1983), ecto- and endoparasites (Trauger & Bartonek 1977, Woebeser 1981), lead poisoning (Sherwood 1960, Friend et al. 1981), collision (Willard 1978), and drowning (Miller et al. 1986) have been documented as being direct or indirect causes of mortality in fledged Tundra Swans; but their relative importance remains unknown.

  3. Report to the Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-1999 breeding ground survyes of geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of nesting geese, tundra swans, and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for the 15th consecutive year. The...

  4. Report to the Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-2000 breeding ground survyes of geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of geese, tundra swans, and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for the 16th consecutive year. The survey...

  5. Report to Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-1996 breeding ground surveys of geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone, Yukon-Kuskokwim delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of nesting geese, swans and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for the 12th consecutive year. The survey...

  6. Report to Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-1995 breeding ground surveys of geese and swans in the coastal zone, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of nesting geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta were conducted for the eleventh consecutive year. The...

  7. Evaluation of the association of menopausal status with delta and beta EEG activity during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian G; Bromberger, Joyce T; Buysse, Daniel J; Hall, Martica H; Hardin, Kimberly A; Kravitz, Howard M; Matthews, Karen A; Rasor, Marianne O'Neill; Utts, Jessica; Gold, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Women report increasing sleep difficulties during menopause, but polysomnographic measures do not detect sleep disturbances. We examined whether two spectral analysis sleep measures, delta and beta power, were related to menopausal status. The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study compared cross-sectionally spectral sleep measures in women in different stages of menopause. Sleep EEG was recorded in the participants' homes with ambulatory recorders. A multi-ethnic cohort of premenopausal and early perimenopausal (n = 189), late perimenopausal (n = 73), and postmenopausal (n = 59) women. EEG power in the delta and beta frequency bands was calculated for all night NREM and all night REM sleep. Physical, medical, psychological, and socioeconomic data were collected from questionnaires and diaries. Beta EEG power in NREM and REM sleep in late perimenopausal and postmenopausal women exceeded that in pre- and early perimenopausal women. Neither all night delta power nor the trend in delta power across the night differed by menopausal status. In a multivariate model that controlled for the physical, demographic, behavioral, psychological, and health-related changes that accompany menopause, beta power in both NREM and REM sleep EEG was significantly related to menopausal status. The frequency of hot flashes explained part but not all of the relation of beta power to menopausal status. Elevated beta EEG power in late perimenopausal and postmenopausal women provides an objective measure of disturbed sleep quality in these women. Elevated beta EEG activity suggests that arousal level during sleep is higher in these women.

  8. A method for checking interobserver reliability in observational sleep studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J S; Bliwise, D L; Dement, W C

    1989-08-01

    Disturbances of the sleep/wake cycle occur frequently in nursing home residents. Because of the many technical difficulties in studying sleep and rhythms in such patients, systematic behavioral observations offer an alternative approach. In this study we describe a method for determining interrater reliability of such observations. Two individuals observed 39 nursing home residents four times per hour during daytime and nighttime hours. Results indicated high interrater reliability for both sleep/wake and the presence of apnea during sleep. Both day and night observations were made reliably. We found only 101 discrepancies of 1.160 tandem observations. These results suggests that behavioral observations are a viable approach in the study of the sleep/wake cycle in nursing home settings.

  9. Subjective Sleep Complaints in Pediatric Depression: A Controlled Study and Comparison with EEG Measures of Sleep and Waking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, Michele A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal D.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Children with major depressive disorder (MDD) often complain of sleep disturbances; however, polysomnographic studies have failed to find objective evidence of these disturbances. This article examines subjective sleep reports of children with MDD and healthy controls focusing on comparing subjective and objective sleep measures.…

  10. Maternal Sleep-Related Cognitions and Infant Sleep: A Longitudinal Study from Pregnancy through the 1st Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikotzky, Liat; Sadeh, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Infant sleep is a major source of concern for many parents. The aims of this longitudinal study were to assess: (a) the development of sleep patterns among infants, (b) the development of maternal cognitions regarding infant sleep, and (c) the relations between these domains during the 1st year of life. Eighty-five mothers were recruited during…

  11. Pilot Study of a Sleep Health Promotion Program for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, J C; Miller, E; Hafer, B; Reidell, M F; Buysse, D J; Franzen, P L

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a pilot study of a sleep health promotion program for college students. The aims of the study were to 1) determine the feasibility of the program, and 2) explore changes in sleep knowledge and sleep diary parameters. Open trial of a sleep health promotion program for college students. A small liberal arts university in southwestern Pennsylvania. University students (primarily female). Active intervention components included individualized email feedback based on each participant's baseline sleep diary and an in-person, group format presentation on sleep health. Participants completed online questionnaires and sleep diaries before and after the health promotion intervention. Online questionnaires focused on sleep knowledge and attitudes toward sleep, as well as Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sleep and psychosocial assessments. Of participants who completed some aspect of the study, 89% completed at least one intervention component (in-person lecture and/or sleep diary). Participants reported significant improvement in sleep knowledge and changes in sleep diary parameters (decreased sleep onset latency and time spent in bed, resulting in greater sleep efficiency). Sleep duration also increased by 30 minutes among short sleepers who obtained sleep at baseline. Preliminary evaluation of a brief program to promote sleep health suggests that it is feasible and acceptable to implement, and that it can favorably alter sleep knowledge and behaviors reported on the sleep diary in college students. Controlled trials are warranted.

  12. Childhood maltreatment and adulthood poor sleep quality: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajobir, Amanuel A; Kisely, Steve; Williams, Gail; Strathearn, Lane; Najman, Jake M

    2017-08-01

    Available evidence from cross-sectional studies suggests that childhood maltreatment may be associated with a range of sleep disorders. However, these studies have not controlled for potential individual-, familial- and environmental-level confounders. To determine the association between childhood maltreatment and lower sleep quality after adjusting for potential confounders. Data for the present study were obtained from a pre-birth cohort study of 3778 young adults (52.6% female) of the Mater Hospital-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy follow up at a mean age of 20.6 years. The Mater Hospital-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy is a prospective Australian pre-birth cohort study of mothers consecutively recruited during their first obstetric clinic visit at Brisbane's Mater Hospital in 1981-1983. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index at the 21-year follow up. We linked this dataset to agency-recorded substantiated cases of childhood maltreatment. A series of separate logistic regression models was used to test whether childhood maltreatment predicted lower sleep quality after adjustment for selected confounders. Substantiated physical abuse significantly predicted lower sleep quality in males. Single and multiple forms of childhood maltreatment, including age of maltreatment and number of substantiations, did not predict lower sleep quality in either gender in both crude and adjusted models. Not being married, living in a residential problem area, cigarette smoking and internalising were significantly associated with lower sleep quality in a fully adjusted model for the male-female combined sample. Childhood maltreatment does not appear to predict young adult poor sleep quality, with the exception of physical abuse for males. While childhood maltreatment has been found to predict a range of mental health problems, childhood maltreatment does not appear to predict sleep problems occurring in young adults. Poor sleep quality was

  13. Community based study of sleep bruxism during early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insana, Salvatore P.; Gozal, David; McNeil, Daniel W.; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aims for this study were to determine the prevalence of sleep-bruxism among young children, explore child behavior problems that may be associated with sleep-bruxism, and identify relations among sleep-bruxism, health problems, and neurocognitive performance. Methods The current study was a retrospective analysis of parent report surveys, and behavioral and neurocognitive assessments. Parents of 1953 preschool and 2888 first grade children indicated their child’s frequency of bruxism during sleep. A subsample of preschool children (n = 249) had additional behavioral, as well as neurocognitive assessments. Among the subsample, parents also reported on their child’s health, and completed the Child Behavioral Checklist; children were administered the Differential Ability Scales, and Pre-Reading Abilities subtests of the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment. Results 36.8% of preschoolers and 49.6% of first graders were reported to brux ≥ 1 time per week. Among the preschool subsample, bruxing was independently associated with increased internalizing behaviors (β = .17). Bruxism was also associated with increased health problems (β = .19), and increased health problems were associated with decreased neurocognitive performance (β = .22). Conclusions The prevalence of sleep-bruxism was high. A dynamic and potentially clinically relevant relation exists among sleep-bruxism, internalizing behaviors, health, and neurocognition. Pediatric sleep-bruxism may serve as a sentinel marker for possible adverse health conditions, and signal a need for early intervention. These results support the need for an interdisciplinary approach to pediatric sleep medicine, dentistry, and psychology. PMID:23219144

  14. Community based study of sleep bruxism during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insana, Salvatore P; Gozal, David; McNeil, Daniel W; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E

    2013-02-01

    The aims for this study were to determine the prevalence of sleep-bruxism among young children, explore child behavior problems that may be associated with sleep-bruxism, and identify relations among sleep-bruxism, health problems, and neurocognitive performance. The current study was a retrospective analysis of parent report surveys, and behavioral and neurocognitive assessments. Parents of 1953 preschool and 2888 first grade children indicated their child's frequency of bruxism during sleep. A subsample of preschool children (n=249) had additional behavioral, as well as neurocognitive assessments. Among the subsample, parents also reported on their child's health, and completed the Child Behavioral Checklist; children were administered the Differential Ability Scales, and Pre-Reading Abilities subtests of the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment. 36.8% of preschoolers and 49.6% of first graders were reported to brux ⩾1time per week. Among the preschool subsample, bruxing was independently associated with increased internalizing behaviors (β=.17). Bruxism was also associated with increased health problems (β=.19), and increased health problems were associated with decreased neurocognitive performance (β=.22). The prevalence of sleep-bruxism was high. A dynamic and potentially clinically relevant relation exists among sleep-bruxism, internalizing behaviors, health, and neurocognition. Pediatric sleep-bruxism may serve as a sentinel marker for possible adverse health conditions, and signal a need for early intervention. These results support the need for an interdisciplinary approach to pediatric sleep medicine, dentistry, and psychology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of sleep extension on sleep and cognitive performance in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J. F.; Oort, F. J.; Meijer, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Outcome variables were objectively measured sleep and cognitive performance. Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by advancing bedtimes in the

  16. Brainwave entrainment for better sleep and post-sleep state of young elite soccer players - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeln, Vera; Kleinert, Jens; Strüder, Heiko K; Schneider, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation on psychophysical performance and well-being is comprehensively investigated. Research investigating the effect of improved sleep is rare. Just as little exists about attempts to support athletic mental state and performance by improving sleep quality. This study aims to investigate whether sleep quality of top athletes can be improved by auditory brainwave entrainment and whether this leads to enhancements of post-sleep psychophysical states. In a pilot study, 15 young elite soccer players were stimulated for eight weeks during sleep with binaural beats around 2-8 Hz. Once a week after wake-up, participants completed three different questionnaires: a sleep diary, an adjective list for psychophysical and motivational state, and a self-assessment questionnaire for sleep and awakening quality. Fifteen sport students executed the same protocol sleeping on the same pillow, but without stimulation. Subjective ratings of sleep and awakening quality, sleepiness and motivational state were significantly improved only in the intervention group, but did not impact their perceived physical state. In summary, eight weeks of auditory stimulation with binaural beats improved perceived sleep quality and the post-sleep state of athletes, whereas the effect on physical level is assumed to occur in a time-delayed fashion. It seems to be worthwhile - to further elaborate long-time effects and consequences on physical and mental performance.

  17. Long sleep duration is associated with serum cholesterol in the elderly: The rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. van den Berg (Julia); H.M. Miedema (Henk); J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); A.K. Neven (Arie); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Epidemiological studies have repeatedly found increased mortality associated with both habitual short and long sleep duration. The mechanisms behind these associations are unclear. We investigated whether objectively measured sleep duration, time in bed, and sleep

  18. Free Will, Black Swans and Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Ted; Wiers, Reinout W

    2017-01-01

    The current dominant perspective on addiction as a brain disease has been challenged recently by Marc Lewis, who argued that the brain-changes related to addiction are similar to everyday changes of the brain. From this alternative perspective, addictions are bad habits that can be broken, provided that people are motivated to change. In that case, autonomous choice or "free will" can overcome bad influences from genes and or environments and brain-changes related to addiction. Even though we concur with Lewis that there are issues with the brain disease perspective, we also argue that pointing to black swans can be important, that is: there can be severe cases where addiction indeed tips over into the category of brain disease, but obviously that does not prove that every case of addiction falls into the disease category, that all swans are black. We argue that, for example, people suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome, can be described as having a brain disease, often caused by alcohol addiction. Moreover, the brain changes occurring with addiction are related to choice-behaviour (and the related notions of willed action), habit formation and insight, hence essential mental abilities to break the addiction. We argue for a more graded perspective, where both black swans (severe brain disease which makes recovery virtually impossible) and white swans (unaffected brain) are rare, and most cases of addiction come as geese in different shades of gray.

  19. Illegitimate tasks and sleep quality: an ambulatory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diana; Semmer, Norbert K; Elfering, Achim

    2014-08-01

    The current study investigated the short-term effect of illegitimate tasks on sleep quality, assessed by actigraphy. Seventy-six employees of different service jobs participated in a 2-week data collection. Data were analysed by way of multilevel analyses. As predicted, illegitimate tasks were positively related to sleep fragmentation and sleep-onset latency, but not to sleep efficiency and not to sleep duration. Time pressure, social stressors at work and at home, and the value of the dependent variable from the previous day were controlled. Results confirm the predictive power of illegitimate tasks for a variable that can be considered crucial in the development of long-term outcomes of daily experiences. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Sleep deprivation, pain and prematurity: a review study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Santos de Carvalho Bonan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to describe current reports in the scientific literature on sleep in the intensive care environment and sleep deprivation associated with painful experiences in premature infant. A systematic search was conducted for studies on sleep, pain, premature birth and care of the newborn. Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, VHL and SciELO databases were consulted. The association between sleep deprivation and pain generates effects that are observed in the brain and the behavioral and physiological activity of preterm infants. Polysomnography in intensive care units and pain management in neonates allow comparison with the first year of life and term infants. We have found few references and evidence that neonatal care programs can influence sleep development and reduce the negative impact of the environment. This evidence is discussed from the perspective of how hospital intervention can improve the development of premature infants.

  1. A sleep diary and questionnaire study of naturally short sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Welsh, D. K.; Kennedy, K. S.; Rose, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    Whereas most people require more than 6 h of sleep to feel well rested, there appears to be a group of people who can function well on between 3 and 6 h of sleep. The aims of the present study were to compare 12 naturally short (3-6 h) sleepers (9 males 3 females, mean age 39.6 years, SD age 10.1 years) recruited by a media publicity campaign with age, gender and chronotype matched medium length (7-8.5 h) sleepers on various measures. Measurement instruments included diaries and questionnaires to assess sleep duration and timing, as well as questionnaire assessments of sleep pathology, morningness-eveningness, extroversion, neuroticism, pathological daytime sleepiness, subclinical hypomania, optimism, depressive symptoms, exercise, and work habits. Few measures showed reliable differences between naturally short sleepers and controls except the obvious ones related to sleep duration. There was, however, some evidence for subclinical hypomanic symptoms in naturally short sleepers.

  2. Sleep deprivation, pain and prematurity: a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Kelly Cristina Santos de Carvalho; Pimentel Filho, João da Costa; Tristão, Rosana Maria; Jesus, José Alfredo Lacerda de; Campos Junior, Dioclécio

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to describe current reports in the scientific literature on sleep in the intensive care environment and sleep deprivation associated with painful experiences in premature infant. A systematic search was conducted for studies on sleep, pain, premature birth and care of the newborn. Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, VHL and SciELO databases were consulted. The association between sleep deprivation and pain generates effects that are observed in the brain and the behavioral and physiological activity of preterm infants. Polysomnography in intensive care units and pain management in neonates allow comparison with the first year of life and term infants. We have found few references and evidence that neonatal care programs can influence sleep development and reduce the negative impact of the environment. This evidence is discussed from the perspective of how hospital intervention can improve the development of premature infants.

  3. Is there a First Night Effect on Sleep Bruxism? A Sleep Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Lavigne, Gilles; Rompré, Pierre; Kato, Takafumi; Urade, Masahiro; Huynh, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep bruxism (SB) is reported to vary in frequency over time. The aim of this study was to assess the first night effect on SB. Methods: A retrospective polysomnographic (PSG) analysis was performed of data from a sample of SB patients (12 females, 4 males; age range: 17-39 years) recorded in a sleep laboratory over 2 consecutive nights. Sleep parameters and jaw muscle activity variables (i.e., rhythmic masticatory muscle activity [RMMA]) for SB were quantified and compared between the 2 nights. Subjects were classified into groups according to severity of RMMA frequency, such as low frequency (2-4 episodes/h and/or bruxism time index, and mean burst duration (repeated measure ANOVAs, p ≤ 0.05). Five patients of 8 in the low frequency group were classified into the moderate-high frequency group on the second night, whereas only one patient in the moderate-high frequency group moved to the low frequency group. Conclusions: The results showed no overall first night effect on severity of RMMA frequency in young and healthy patients with SB. In clinical practice, one-night sleep recording may be sufficient for moderate-high frequency SB patients. However, low RMMA frequency in the first night could be confirmed by a second night based on the patient's medical and dental history. Citation: Hasegawa Y; Lavigne G; Rompré P; Kato T; Urade M; Huynh N. Is there a first night effect on sleep bruxism? A sleep laboratory study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(11):1139-1145. PMID:24235894

  4. Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Duration, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Experimental Sleep Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, DE; Olmstead, R; Carroll, JE

    2015-01-01

    © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Background Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammatory disease risk and all-cause mortality. Here, we assess global evidence linking sleep disturbance, sleep duration, and inflammation in adult humans. Methods A systematic search of English language publications was performed, with inclusion of primary research articles that characterized sleep disturbance and/or sleep duration or performed experimental sleep deprivation and assessed inflammation...

  5. Study Finds a Connection between Glaucoma and Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Study Finds a Connection Between Glaucoma and Sleep Apnea ... sueño Sep. 06, 2013 Over the years, several studies have demonstrated an increased rate of glaucoma among ...

  6. Regional reductions in sleep electroencephalography power in obstructive sleep apnea: a high-density EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie G; Riedner, Brady A; Smith, Richard F; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio; Davidson, Richard J; Benca, Ruth M

    2014-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significant alterations in neuronal integrity resulting from either hypoxemia and/or sleep loss. A large body of imaging research supports reductions in gray matter volume, alterations in white matter integrity and resting state activity, and functional abnormalities in response to cognitive challenge in various brain regions in patients with OSA. In this study, we used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG), a functional imaging tool that could potentially be used during routine clinical care, to examine the regional distribution of neural activity in a non-clinical sample of untreated men and women with moderate/severe OSA. Sleep was recorded with 256-channel EEG in relatively healthy subjects with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 10, as well as age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched controls selected from a research population initially recruited for a study on sleep and meditation. Sleep laboratory. Nine subjects with AHI > 10 and nine matched controls. N/A. Topographic analysis of hdEEG data revealed a broadband reduction in EEG power in a circumscribed region overlying the parietal cortex in OSA subjects. This parietal reduction in neural activity was present, to some extent, across all frequency bands in all stages and episodes of nonrapid eye movement sleep. This investigation suggests that regional deficits in electroencephalography (EEG) power generation may be a useful clinical marker for neural disruption in obstructive sleep apnea, and that high-density EEG may have the sensitivity to detect pathological cortical changes early in the disease process.

  7. Sleep-disordered breathing and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh M Punjabi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing is a common condition associated with adverse health outcomes including hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The overall objective of this study was to determine whether sleep-disordered breathing and its sequelae of intermittent hypoxemia and recurrent arousals are associated with mortality in a community sample of adults aged 40 years or older.We prospectively examined whether sleep-disordered breathing was associated with an increased risk of death from any cause in 6,441 men and women participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study. Sleep-disordered breathing was assessed with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI based on an in-home polysomnogram. Survival analysis and proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for mortality after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, body mass index, and prevalent medical conditions. The average follow-up period for the cohort was 8.2 y during which 1,047 participants (587 men and 460 women died. Compared to those without sleep-disordered breathing (AHI: or=30.0 events/h sleep-disordered breathing were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.80-1.08, 1.17 (95% CI: 0.97-1.42, and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.14-1.86, respectively. Stratified analyses by sex and age showed that the increased risk of death associated with severe sleep-disordered breathing was statistically significant in men aged 40-70 y (hazard ratio: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.31-3.33. Measures of sleep-related intermittent hypoxemia, but not sleep fragmentation, were independently associated with all-cause mortality. Coronary artery disease-related mortality associated with sleep-disordered breathing showed a pattern of association similar to all-cause mortality.Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with all-cause mortality and specifically that due to coronary artery disease, particularly in men aged 40-70 y with severe sleep-disordered breathing. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  8. The reversibility of swan neck deformity in chronic atlantoaxial dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, Peter G; Wang, Shenglin; Zhao, Deng; Wang, Shaobai; Kozanek, Michal; Wang, Chao

    2013-04-01

    Prospective case series and radiographical analysis. This study aimed to characterize the changes in subaxial alignment after surgical correction of occipitoaxial kyphosis, establish normal parameters, and report on clinical outcomes in a population of patients with chronic atlantoaxial dislocation patients presenting with swan neck deformities. Swan neck deformity of the cervical spine is a term used to describe the simultaneous development of both abnormal kyphosis and hyperlordosis malalignments. Currently, there are no published series that discuss their outcomes after treatment and, more specifically, the subsequent changes that occur in the subaxial spine after the correction of the primary deformity in cases of chronic hyperkyphosis at the occipitoaxial segment. This was a prospective clinical and radiographical study in a population of patients with chronic atlantoaxial dislocation presenting with swan neck deformities. C0-C2 and C2-C7 angles were measured using plain radiographs pre- and postsurgery. The relationship between the alignment of the occipitoaxial joint and the subaxial cervical spine was evaluated. Japanese Orthopaedic Society scores were used to assess functional outcomes. C0-C2 improved from a mean of -14.4° (SD, 9.5°) preoperatively to a mean of 7.8° (SD, 1.0°) postoperatively (P = 0.02). C2-C7 changed from a mean of 43° (SD, 2.8°) to a mean of 18.6° (SD, 11.2°) postoperatively (P = 0.02). A significant correlation was detected between the changes that occurred in the upper and lower cervical alignments (R = 0.133; P atlantoaxial dislocation are favorable and associated with a low complication rate.

  9. Baseline hematology and clinical chemistry results from captive-raised trumpeter swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Glenn H.; Rininger, D.L.; Ets, M.K.; Sladen, William J. L.; Rees, Eileen C.; Earnst, Susan L.; Coulson, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Results from hematology and clinical chemistry tests are presented for healthy captive-raised Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) to help establish baseline data. Blood samples were obtained from 14 cygnets between the ages of three to four and seven to eight months that were the subjects of a study to teach migration routes to swans. Males and females differed significantly in asparatate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total protein. Age categories differed significantly in hematocrit, white blood cell counts, alkaline phosphatase, aspar-rate aminotransferase, glucose, cholesterol and uric acid. There were no significant differences among age categories in values of alanine aminotransferase, calcium, triglycerides and total protein.

  10. Role of manganese oxides in the exposure of mute swans (Cygnus olor) to Pb and other elements in the Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this study are to estimate exposure of waterfowl to elements in contaminated sediments in the Chesapeake Bay and to consider the potential role of Mn in influencing bioavailability and exposure. Mute swans living on the Aberdeen Proving Ground were collected and samples of swan digesta were analyzed and compared to samples of feces collected from mute swans living at a nearby reference site. Sediments from the proving ground had elevated concentrations of Cu, S, Se, Zn, As, Co, Cr, Hg and Pb, but concentrations of only the first four of these elements were elevated in swan digesta. Sediments from the proving ground had an elevated mean concentration of total As, about seven times the concentration at the reference site, but the swans from that site were not ingesting more As than were reference swans. Swans at both sites were feeding on submerged aquatic vegetation and ingested about 4% sediment at the proving ground and about 5% sediment at the reference site. None of the concentrations detected in the digesta or livers of the swans was considered toxic, although the concentrations of Cu and Se were high compared to those concentrations reported in other waterfowl. A remarkably high mean concentration of Mn (6900 mg/kg, dry weight) detected in the feces of the reference swans was attributed to the deposition of manganese oxides on vegetation. The ingestion of Pb by swans at the reference site was correlated with Mn and Fe concentrations, rather than with markers of sediment ingestion. The Pb was presumably scavenged by Mn and Fe oxides from the water and deposited on the surface of vegetation. Under some environmental chemical conditions, this route of exposure for Pb is more important than sediment ingestion, which was previously thought to be the main route of exposure.

  11. A study on the sleep quality of incoming university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu Hui; Shih, Chi-Chen; Lee, I Hui; Hou, Yi-Wen; Chen, Kao Chin; Chen, Kow-Tong; Yang, Yen Kuang; Yang, Yi Ching

    2012-05-30

    This study was designed to examine the prevalence and the risk factors of poor sleep quality in 4318 incoming university students in Taiwan. The test battery comprised a self-administered structured questionnaire, including items related to personal medical history and lifestyle habits, the Measurement of Support Functions (MSF), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Chinese Internet Addiction Scale-Revision (CIAS-R), neuroticism subscale of the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI), and the 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ-12). Of the total study population, 2360 students (54.7%) were classified into the poor sleep quality group, as defined by a PSQI score ≥6. Based on the results of multivariate logistic regression analysis, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with undergraduate students, female gender, skipping breakfast, tea drinking, a higher tendency toward internet addition, poor social support, higher neuroticism, and higher CHQ scores. Poor sleep quality is prevalent among incoming university students in Taiwan, and more work is needed on the identification of the factors influencing poor sleep, and in providing systematic education in the importance of sleep and time management skills to university students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combining Human Epigenetics and Sleep Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans: A Cross-Species Approach for Finding Conserved Genes Regulating Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huiyan; Zhu, Yong; Eliot, Melissa N; Knopik, Valerie S; McGeary, John E; Carskadon, Mary A; Hart, Anne C

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to test a combined approach to identify conserved genes regulating sleep and to explore the association between DNA methylation and sleep length. We identified candidate genes associated with shorter versus longer sleep duration in college students based on DNA methylation using Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays. Orthologous genes in Caenorhabditis elegans were identified, and we examined whether their loss of function affected C. elegans sleep. For genes whose perturbation affected C. elegans sleep, we subsequently undertook a small pilot study to re-examine DNA methylation in an independent set of human participants with shorter versus longer sleep durations. Eighty-seven out of 485,577 CpG sites had significant differential methylation in young adults with shorter versus longer sleep duration, corresponding to 52 candidate genes. We identified 34 C. elegans orthologs, including NPY/flp-18 and flp-21, which are known to affect sleep. Loss of five additional genes alters developmentally timed C. elegans sleep (B4GALT6/bre-4, DOCK180/ced-5, GNB2L1/rack-1, PTPRN2/ida-1, ZFYVE28/lst-2). For one of these genes, ZFYVE28 (also known as hLst2), the pilot replication study again found decreased DNA methylation associated with shorter sleep duration at the same two CpG sites in the first intron of ZFYVE28. Using an approach that combines human epigenetics and C. elegans sleep studies, we identified five genes that play previously unidentified roles in C. elegans sleep. We suggest sleep duration in humans may be associated with differential DNA methylation at specific sites and that the conserved genes identified here likely play roles in C. elegans sleep and in other species.

  13. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: A clinical and sleep EEG study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dhanuka, A.K; Jain, B.K; Daljit, Singh; Maheshwari, D

    2001-01-01

    ...) and is associated with absence seizures in more than one third of cases. Fifteen patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy were studied with regard to their clinical profile, EEG data and sleep EEG findings...

  14. A Collaborative Study of Sleep, Performance and Health Relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belenky, Gregory; Van Dongen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    .... These studies will provide the scientific basis for the effective management of sleep to sustain performance in the operational environment, including all 24x7 operations, extended work hours, and shiftwork...

  15. A Collaborative Study of Sleep, Performance and Health Relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belenky, Gregory; Van Dongen, Hans

    2005-01-01

    .... These studies will provide the scientific basis for the effective management of sleep to sustain performance in the operational environment, including all 24x7 operations, extended work hours, and shiftwork...

  16. Sleep-disordered breathing and mortality: a prospective cohort study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Punjabi, Naresh M; Caffo, Brian S; Goodwin, James L; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Newman, Anne B; O'Connor, George T; Rapoport, David M; Redline, Susan; Resnick, Helaine E; Robbins, John A; Shahar, Eyal; Unruh, Mark L; Samet, Jonathan M

    2009-01-01

    .... The overall objective of this study was to determine whether sleep-disordered breathing and its sequelae of intermittent hypoxemia and recurrent arousals are associated with mortality in a community...

  17. Chronic sleep reduction is associated with academic achievement and study concentration in higher education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Vermeulen, Marije C M; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Gordijn, Marijke C M; Hamburger, Hans L; Meijer, Anne M; van Rijn, Karin J; Vlak, Monique; Weysen, Tim

    2017-09-07

    Inadequate sleep impairs cognitive function and has been associated with worse academic achievement in higher education students; however, studies that control for relevant background factors and include knowledge on sleep hygiene are scarce. This study examined the association of chronic sleep reduction (i.e. symptoms of chronic sleep reduction such as shortness of sleep, sleepiness and irritation), subjective sleep quality and sleep hygiene knowledge with academic achievement (grades and study credits) and study concentration among 1378 higher education students (71% female, mean age 21.73 years, SD = 3.22) in the Netherlands. Demographic, health, lifestyle and study behaviour characteristics were included as covariates in hierarchical regression analyses. After controlling for significant covariates, only chronic sleep reduction remained a significant predictor of lower grades (last exam, average in current academic year). Better sleep quality and sleep hygiene knowledge were associated with better academic achievement, but significance was lost after controlling for covariates, except for a remaining positive association between sleep hygiene beliefs and grades in the current academic year. Moreover, better sleep quality and lower scores on chronic sleep reduction were associated with better study concentration after controlling for significant covariates. To conclude, chronic sleep reduction is associated with academic achievement and study concentration in higher education students. Inadequate sleep hygiene knowledge is moderately associated with worse academic achievement. Future research should investigate whether sleep hygiene interventions improve academic achievement in students of higher education. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  18. Parenting matters: a longitudinal study into parenting and adolescent sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Anne Marie; Reitz, Ellen; Dekoviċ, Maja

    2016-10-01

    The current three-wave longitudinal study examined the differential relations between general parenting behaviour (monitoring, autonomy granting, and the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship) and adolescent sleep (bedtimes, time in bed, sleep quality and sleepiness) over a period of 2 years. At Time 1, the sample consisted of 650 adolescents between 12 and 15 years old (M = 13.36 years; SD = 0.55 years). At Time 2, 563 adolescents participated, and at Time 3 there were 493 adolescents. The distribution of boys and girls was about equal. Adolescents completed questionnaires in the classroom. Linear mixed model analyses were performed, controlling for sex, age, social economic status and ethnicity. Results showed that higher levels of monitoring contributed to earlier bedtimes, longer time in bed, better sleep quality and less sleepiness. The parent-adolescent relationship quality showed positive associations with time in bed, sleep quality and sleepiness, but not with bedtimes. Autonomy granting appeared hardly to be related to any of the sleep variables. In addition, passing of time, sex and ethnicity contributed to adolescent sleep as main effects or in interaction with parental control and support, suggesting that the main effects of monitoring and the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship are not constant across the whole range of the covariates. Based on the findings of this study, it can be concluded that general parenting behaviour may contribute to better adolescent sleep over time. Therefore, the involvement of parents in improvement of adolescent sleep is highly advocated. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Sleep Apnea and Obstructive Airway Disease in Older Men: Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying Y; Blackwell, Terri; Ensrud, Kristine E; Stone, Katie L; Omachi, Theodore A; Redline, Susan

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the association between obstructive airway disease (OAD) and sleep apnea in older men. A community-based cross-sectional study of 853 community-dwelling older men (mean age 80.7 ± 4.1 years [range 73 to 90]) across 6 centers in the United States from the Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men Study. Sleep was objectively measured using full in-home polysomnography and lung function was objectively measured using spirometry. The association of OAD (pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15 events/hour) was assessed using logistic regression. OAD and sleep apnea were identified in 111 (13.0%) and 247 (29.0%) men, respectively. In univariate analysis, participants with OAD had a lower AHI (mean ± SD; 8.7 ± 11.7 vs. 12.7 ± 13.8, P = 0.0009) and a lower prevalence of sleep apnea (14.4 vs. 31.1%, P = 0.0003) compared to participants without OAD. OAD remained independently associated with a lower odds of sleep apnea (odds ratio 0.30, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.55, P = 0.0001) after adjustment for demographics, body composition, smoking, and potential mediators (arousal index, time spent in rapid eye movement sleep). Individuals with OAD and sleep apnea (n = 16) had an increased arousal index and lower oxygen saturation level as compared to individuals with OAD alone (P values sleep apnea in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly men, and unexplained by differences in adiposity or sleep architecture. Although uncommon in this cohort, coexisting sleep apnea and OAD was associated with increased sleep fragmentation and nocturnal oxygen desaturation compared to OAD alone. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Dumas Cintra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart® system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001. After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample.

  1. Parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism improves sleep quality: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Justin; Wang, Tracy S; Hammad, Abdulrahman Y; Burgardt, Laura; Doffek, Kara; Carr, Azadeh A; Shaker, Joseph L; Carroll, Ty B; Evans, Douglas B; Yen, Tina W F

    2017-01-01

    This prospective survey study assessed changes in sleep quality in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism after parathyroidectomy. Patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism (n = 110) or thyroidectomy for benign euthyroid disease (control group; n = 45) were recruited between June 2013 and June 2015 and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index preoperatively and at 1- and 6 months postoperatively. "Poor" sleep quality was defined as a score >5; a clinically important and relevant improvement was a ≥3-point decrease. Preoperatively, parathyroid patients had worse sleep quality than thyroid patients (mean 8.1 vs 5.3; P sleep quality (P = .03). Postoperatively, only parathyroid patients demonstrated improvement in sleep quality; mean scores did not differ between the parathyroid and thyroid groups at 1 month (6.3 vs 5.3; P = .12) or 6 months (5.8 vs 4.6; P = .11). The proportion of patients with a clinically important improvement in sleep quality was greater in the parathyroid group at 1 month (37% vs 10%; P sleep quality between the 2 groups at 1 month (50% vs 40%; P = .32) and 6 months (40% vs 29%; P = .22). More than two-thirds of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism report poor sleep quality. After parathyroidectomy, over one-third experienced improvement, typically within the first month postoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-world, open-label study to evaluate the effectiveness of mirtazapine on sleep quality in outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Li, Zexuan; Li, Lingjiang; Hao, Wei

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of mirtazapine on sleep quality in real-world outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Demographic characteristics of MDD outpatients were collected and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was assessed before and after treatment. In 3,924 MDD outpatients after treatment, sleep efficiency was significantly higher (P sleep latency (P sleep medications (P sleep latency (P sleep duration (P sleep efficiency (P sleep latency (P sleep medications (P sleep latency (P sleep duration (P sleep efficiency (P sleep quality of MDD outpatients, and decreases the concomitant use of sleep medications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. On the Development of an Operational SWAN Model for the Black Sea (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpinar, A.; Van Vledder, G.P.

    2013-01-01

    This poster describes the results of some studies performed on the development of an efficient and operational SWAN model for the Black Sea. This model will be used to study the wind-wave climate and wave energy potential in the region and will provide boundary conditions for coastal engineering and

  4. Comparison of a single-channel EEG sleep study to polysomnography

    OpenAIRE

    Lucey, Brendan P.; McLeland, Jennifer S.; Toedebusch, Cristina D.; Boyd, Jill; Morris, John C; Landsness, Eric C.; Yamada, Kelvin; Holtzman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate home sleep study to assess electroencephalography (EEG)-based sleep stages and EEG power would be advantageous for both clinical and research purposes, such as for longitudinal studies measuring changes in sleep stages over time. The purpose of this study was to compare sleep scoring of a single-channel EEG recorded simultaneously on the forehead against attended polysomnography. Participants were recruited from both a clinical sleep center and a longitudinal research study invest...

  5. The effects of sleep extension on sleep and cognitive performance in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J F; Oort, F J; Meijer, A M

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Outcome variables were objectively measured sleep and cognitive performance. Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by advancing bedtimes in the evening) or to a control group (no instruction). Our sample consisted of 55 adolescents (mean age, 15.44 y; 85.5% girls) with symptoms of chronic sleep reduction (loss of energy, shortness of sleep, sleepiness, and irritation). Sleep was monitored with actigraphy over 3 weeks; the first week was the baseline week and the last two weeks were the experimental weeks. Participants in the experimental group were instructed to extend their sleep during the week by gradually advancing their bedtimes by 5 minutes each night. Additionally participants were asked to prevent bedtime shifts on weekend nights. Cognitive performance was assessed before and after the experimental manipulation. During the last week of the experiment, adolescents in the sleep extension group had earlier bedtimes, earlier sleep onsets, spent more time in bed, and slept longer than adolescents in the control group. These results indicate that the experimental manipulation was successful and that adolescents in the experimental group fell asleep earlier and slept longer than adolescents in the control group. Furthermore some aspects of cognitive performance, especially visuospatial processing, significantly changed in the sleep extension group. Gradual sleep extension has beneficial effects on adolescents' sleep and is related to changes in some aspects of cognitive performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Parasomnias and sleep disordered breathing in Caucasian and Hispanic children – the Tucson children's assessment of sleep apnea study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, James L; Kaemingk, Kris L; Fregosi, Ralph F; Rosen, Gerald M; Morgan, Wayne J; Smith, Terry; Quan, Stuart F

    2004-01-01

    Background Recent studies in children have demonstrated that frequent occurrence of parasomnias is related to increased sleep disruption, mental disorders, physical harm, sleep disordered breathing, and parental duress. Although there have been several cross-sectional and clinical studies of parasomnias in children, there have been no large, population-based studies using full polysomnography to examine the association between parasomnias and sleep disordered breathing. The Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study is a community-based cohort study designed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of objectively measured sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in pre-adolescent children six to 11 years of age. This paper characterizes the relationships between parasomnias and SDB with its associated symptoms in these children. Methods Parents completed questionnaires pertaining to their child's sleep habits. Children had various physiological measurements completed and then were connected to the Compumedics PS-2 sleep recording system for full, unattended polysomnography in the home. A total of 480 unattended home polysomnograms were completed on a sample that was 50% female, 42.3% Hispanic, and 52.9% between the ages of six and eight years. Results Children with a Respiratory Disturbance Index of one or greater were more likely to have sleep walking (7.0% versus 2.5%, p sleep talking (18.3% versus 9.0%, p sleep disturbances as well as learning problems was observed in children with parasomnia. Those with parasomnias associated with arousal were observed to have increased number of stage shifts. Small alterations in sleep architecture were found in those with enuresis. Conclusions In this population-based cohort study, pre-adolescent school-aged children with SDB experienced more parasomnias than those without SDB. Parasomnias were associated with a higher prevalence of other sleep disturbances and learning problems. Clinical evaluation of children with

  7. Sleep Duration and Quality among Different Occupations--China National Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjie Sun; Yaqin Yu; Jingqin Yuan; Changwei Li; Tingting Liu; Dongdong Lin; Abby Lau; Chongke Zhong; Tan Xu; GuangLiang Shan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between occupation, sleep duration and sleep quality. Methods The data for this study was extracted from data collected from the 2008 Chinese Sub-optimal Health Study. Our study sample consisted of 18,316 Chinese subjects aged 18-65. Occupation and other relevant characteristics to sleep were collected. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to measure sleep quality and multiple logistic regression models to examine the association of occupatio...

  8. The C3 Framework: One Year Later - an Interview with Kathy Swan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    On September 17, 2013 (Constitution Day), the C3 Framework was released under the title "The College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History." The C3 Project Director and lead writer was NCSS member Kathy Swan, who is…

  9. Clinical utility of the Chinese Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal-Behaviors questionnaire (SWAN) when compared with DISC-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Grace Fong-Chun; Lai, Kelly Yee-Ching; Luk, Ernest Siu-Luen; Hung, Se-Fong; Leung, Patrick Wing-Leung

    2014-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and impairing child and adolescent psychiatric disorder. Early identification and prompt treatment are essential. Rating scales are commonly used by clinicians and researchers to assess ADHD children. In the current study, we aimed to examine the clinical utility of the Chinese version of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviors (SWAN) questionnaire. We validated its subscale scores against the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (DISC-IV) and looked into its ability to identify ADHD in a psychiatric clinic setting. We also tested age and gender effects on SWAN scores. Specific subscale cutoff scores of SWAN were subsequently determined. A total of 290 children aged 6-12 years old studying in local mainstream primary schools were recruited from a clinic setting and interviewed with the parent version of DISC-IV. Their parents and teachers completed the corresponding version of SWAN. Both parent and teacher versions of SWAN were found to have good concurrent validity with DISC-IV. It could identify ADHD well in a clinic sample. Gender-specific cutoff scores were determined. Sensitivities and specificities were found to be satisfactory. SWAN was also found to perform equally well in identifying ADHD in those with and without comorbid Autistic Spectrum Disorder. SWAN was proven to be a useful tool to aid the assessment of ADHD in a clinic sample.

  10. Sleep disturbances and cognitive decline in the Northern Manhattan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alberto R; Gardener, Hannah; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Dong, Chuanhui; Cheung, Ying Kuen; Stern, Yaakov; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B

    2016-10-04

    To examine frequent snoring, sleepiness, and sleep duration with baseline and longitudinal performance on neuropsychological (NP) battery. The analysis consists of 711 participants of the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS) with sleep data and NP assessment (age 63 ± 8 years, 62% women, 18% white, 17% black, 67% Hispanic) and 687 with repeat NP testing (at a mean of 6 ± 2 years). The main exposures were snoring, sleepiness, and sleep duration obtained during annual follow-up. Using factor analysis-derived domain-specific Z scores for episodic memory, language, executive function, and processing speed, we constructed multivariable regression models to evaluate sleep symptoms with baseline NP performance and change in performance in each NP domain. In the cross-sectional analysis, adjusting for demographics and the NOMAS vascular risk score, participants with frequent snoring had worse executive function (β = -12; p = 0.04) and processing speed (β = -13; p = 0.02), but no difference in with episodic memory or language. Those with severe daytime sleepiness (β = -26; p = 0.009) had worse executive function, but no changes in the other NP domains. There was no cross-sectional association between sleep duration and NP performance. Frequent snoring (β = -29; p = 0.0007), severe daytime sleepiness (β = -29; p = 0.05), and long sleep duration (β = -29; p = 0.04) predicted decline in executive function, adjusting for demographic characteristics and NOMAS vascular risk score. Sleep symptoms did not explain change in episodic memory, language, or processing speed. In this race-ethnically diverse community-based cohort, sleep symptoms led to worse cognitive performance and predicted decline in executive function. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. The Impact of Sleep Timing, Sleep Duration, and Sleep Quality on Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation amongst Japanese Freshmen: The EQUSITE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atin Supartini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to identify the impact of bedtime, wake time, sleep duration, sleep-onset latency, and sleep quality on depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation amongst Japanese freshmen. Methods. This cross-sectional data was derived from the baseline survey of the Enhancement of Q-University Students Intelligence (EQUSITE study conducted from May to June, 2010. A total of 2,631 participants were recruited and completed the following self-reported questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, and the original Health Support Questionnaires developed by the EQUSITE study research team. Results. Of 1,992 participants eligible for analysis, 25.5% (n=507 reported depressive symptoms (CES-D total score ≥ 16, and 5.8% (n=115 reported suicidal ideation. The present study showed that late bedtime (later than 01:30, sleep-onset latency (≥30 minutes, and poor sleep quality showed a marginally significant association with depressive symptoms. Poor sleep quality was seen to predict suicidal ideation even after adjusting for depressive symptoms. Conclusion. The current study has important implications for the role of bedtime in the prevention of depressive symptoms. Improving sleep quality may prevent the development of depressive symptoms and reduce the likelihood of suicidal ideation.

  12. Predicting sleep quality from stress and prior sleep: A study of day-to-day covariation across six weeks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Äkerstedt, T.; Orsini, N.; Petersen, H.; Axelsson, J.; Lekander, M.; Kecklund, L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background/objectives: The connection between stress and sleep is well established in cross-sectional questionnaire studies and in a few prospective studies. Here, the intention was to study the link between stress and sleep on a day-to-day basis across 42 days. Methods: Fifty participants kept a

  13. Sleep duration and quality among different occupations--China national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Yu, Yaqin; Yuan, Jingqin; Li, Changwei; Liu, Tingting; Lin, Dongdong; Lau, Abby; Zhong, Chongke; Xu, Tan; Shan, GuangLiang

    2015-01-01

    To examine the associations between occupation, sleep duration and sleep quality. The data for this study was extracted from data collected from the 2008 Chinese Sub-optimal Health Study. Our study sample consisted of 18,316 Chinese subjects aged 18-65. Occupation and other relevant characteristics to sleep were collected. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to measure sleep quality and multiple logistic regression models to examine the association of occupation with shortened sleep duration and poor sleep quality. Farmers had the longest sleep duration (mean=8.22 hours) while the civil servants had the shortest sleep duration (mean=7.85 hours). Farmers also had the best sleep quality (mean score=3.74) while professional workers had the worst sleep quality (mean score=4.87). Compared to civil servants, the OR of shortened sleep duration and poor sleep quality for blue collar workers is 1.39 (95%CI: 1.11-1.73) and 1.28 (95%-CI: 1.15-1.42), respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, education, area, smoking, drinking, pain, and health status. sleep duration and quality varied among different Chinese occupation populations. The blue collar workers are more likely to have shortened sleep duration and poor sleep quality.

  14. Sleep duration and quality among different occupations--China national study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Sun

    Full Text Available To examine the associations between occupation, sleep duration and sleep quality.The data for this study was extracted from data collected from the 2008 Chinese Sub-optimal Health Study. Our study sample consisted of 18,316 Chinese subjects aged 18-65. Occupation and other relevant characteristics to sleep were collected. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI to measure sleep quality and multiple logistic regression models to examine the association of occupation with shortened sleep duration and poor sleep quality.Farmers had the longest sleep duration (mean=8.22 hours while the civil servants had the shortest sleep duration (mean=7.85 hours. Farmers also had the best sleep quality (mean score=3.74 while professional workers had the worst sleep quality (mean score=4.87. Compared to civil servants, the OR of shortened sleep duration and poor sleep quality for blue collar workers is 1.39 (95%CI: 1.11-1.73 and 1.28 (95%-CI: 1.15-1.42, respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, education, area, smoking, drinking, pain, and health status.sleep duration and quality varied among different Chinese occupation populations. The blue collar workers are more likely to have shortened sleep duration and poor sleep quality.

  15. Sleep in spousal Alzheimer caregivers: a longitudinal study with a focus on the effects of major patient transitions on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; Mausbach, Brent T; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Dimsdale, Joel E; Mills, Paul J; Patterson, Thomas L; Ziegler, Michael G; Roepke, Susan K; Chattillion, Elizabeth A; Allison, Matthew; Grant, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Findings on sleep disturbances in family dementia caregivers are conflicting. We studied the longitudinal effects of dementia caregiving and major transitions in the caregiving situation on caregivers' sleep and the effect of moderating variables. Community-based longitudinal study with assessments about once a year for up to three years. A sample of 109 elderly spousal Alzheimer caregivers and 48 non-caregiving age- and gender-matched controls. Random regression models with fixed and time-variant effects for covariates known to affect sleep were used to evaluate changes in the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and in four actigraphy measures over time in relation to caregiving status and transitions (i.e., nursing home placement or death of the Alzheimer disease spouse). Multivariate-adjusted sleep characteristics did not significantly differ between caregivers and non-caregivers over time. Spousal death increased caregivers' nighttime wake after sleep onset (WASO) by 23 min (P = 0.002) and daytime total sleep time (TST) by 29 min (P = 0.003), while nighttime sleep percent decreased by 3.2% (P = 0.009) and nighttime TST did not change. Placement of the spouse had no significant effect on caregivers' sleep. Older age, male gender, role overload, depressive symptoms, and proinflammatory cytokines variously emerged as significant moderators of the relationships between caregiving and transitions with poor subjective and objective sleep. Alzheimer caregivers and non-caregiving controls had similar trajectories of sleep. However, there may be subgroups of caregivers who are vulnerable to develop sleep disturbances, including those whose spouses have died.

  16. [Sleep disorders in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--results of a polysomnographic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Jan; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Wiater, Alfred

    2005-07-01

    We report results of a polysomnographic study carried out with children aged 6 to 12 years with either ADHD or a sleep disorder. The study focussed on whether the sleep structure and architecture of n = 36 ADHD children with and without sleep disorders differed from that of either n=15 children with sleep disorders or n=87 children without sleep disorders. Moreover, we assessed whether there was an increased risk for co-morbid sleep-related breathing disorders among ADHD children. All children underwent polysomnography in a paediatric clinic. Principal variables of the sleep structure and architecture as well as cardiorespirographic measures were analysed. Our findings demonstrate that sleep problems in children with ADHD seem to be unspecific concurrent symptoms since the sleep structure of sleep-disordered ADHD children and children with sleep disorders was similar. Only minor differences were found between non-sleep-disturbed ADHD children and healthy children without sleep problems. We conclude that sleep problems in ADHD are independent co-morbid symptoms without any pathogenetic relationship to vigilance functions in ADHD. The cardiorespirographic analyses showed that a subgroup of ADHD children with sleep problems may be at increased risk for co-morbid sleep-related breathing disorder. This finding is potentially important for differential diagnostic considerations in ADHD.

  17. Latina adolescent sleep and mood: an ecological momentary assessment pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolyn; Zhang, Lei; Holt, Katie; Hardeman, Rachel; Peterson, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Sleep and mood represent two important malleable opportunities for adolescent health. This study investigated the sleep-mood relationship in adolescent girls. Short-term, longitudinal design. Latina adolescents (N = 19, mean age 15) completed ecological momentary assessments on sleep (perceived quality, self-report quantity) and mood (negative affect, positive affect, and positivity ratio). Adolescents sent 1,598 texts on sleep and mood. Bidirectional sleep-mood relationships were in expected directions; negative affect and the positivity ratio affect predicted adolescents' sleep quality. Interventions should encourage sleep-mood relationship awareness, and further research should identify significant differences to inform tailored interventions with adolescents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Telemetric Study of Sleep Architecture and Sleep Homeostasis in the Day-Active Tree Shrew Tupaia belangeri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, Alex; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Barf, R. Paulien; Fuchs, Eberhard; Meerlo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: In this study the authors characterized sleep architecture and sleep homeostasis in the tree shrew, Tupaia belangeri, a small, omnivorous, day-active mammal that is closely related to primates. Design: Adult tree shrews were individually housed under a 12-hr light/12-hr dark cycle

  19. Sleep quality and duration are related to microvascular function: the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsen, Thomas; Wijnstok, Nienke J; Hoekstra, Trynke; Eringa, Etto C; Serné, Erik H; Smulders, Yvo M; Twisk, Jos W R

    2015-04-01

    Sleep and sleep disorders are related to cardiovascular disease, and microvascular function is an early cardiovascular disease marker. Therefore, the relationship of sleep (measured in sleep quality and duration) with microvascular function was examined in healthy adults. Sleep quality was assessed with the validated Sleep Wake Experience List (SWEL) questionnaire. Duration of sleep was self-reported in an additional question. Microvascular function was measured using nailfold capillaroscopy. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between sleep and microvascular function. Potential confounders included physical activity, smoking, blood pressure, body mass index and several biochemical parameters. Analyses were performed in 259 participants (116 men). For women reporting insufficient (sleep duration, microvascular function (post-ischaemic capillary recruitment) was significantly lower (b = -11.17; P = 0.04) compared to women reporting sufficient sleep duration. There was no relationship between sleep quality and microvascular function in females. In males, a trend towards lower capillary recruitment was found in those reporting a combination of poor sleep quality and insufficient duration (b = -7.54; P = 0.09), compared to those reporting good sleep quality as well as sufficient duration. This study suggests an association between sleep and microvascular function. Which aspects of sleep exactly affect microvascular function, and if indeed the association is different between males and females in other samples, needs further research. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Actigraphy-defined measures of sleep and movement across the menstrual cycle in midlife menstruating women: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huiyong; Harlow, Siobán D; Kravitz, Howard M; Bromberger, Joyce; Buysse, Daniel J; Matthews, Karen A; Gold, Ellen B; Owens, Jane F; Hall, Martica

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate patterns in actigraphy-defined sleep measures across the menstrual cycle by testing the hypothesis that sleep would be more disrupted in the premenstrual period (ie, within the 14 d before menses). A community-based longitudinal study of wrist actigraphy-derived sleep measures was conducted in 163 (58 African American, 78 white, and 27 Chinese) late-reproductive-age (mean [SD], 51.5 [2.0] y) women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study. Daily measures of sleep (sleep efficiency [%] and total sleep time [minutes]) and movement during sleep (mean activity score [counts]) were characterized using wrist actigraphy across a menstrual cycle or 35 days, whichever was shorter. Data were standardized to 28 days to account for unequal cycle lengths and divided into four weekly segments for analyses. Sleep efficiency declined gradually across the menstrual cycle, but the decline became pronounced on the fourth week (the premenstrual period). Compared with the third week, sleep efficiency declined by 5% (P sleep time was 25 minutes less (P = 0.0002) on the fourth week. We found no significant differences between the mean for the second week and the mean for the third week. The association of weekly segments with sleep efficiency or total sleep time was modified by sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, including body mass index, race, study site, financial strain, marital status, and smoking. Among late-reproductive-age women, sleep varies systematically across the menstrual cycle, including a gradual decline in sleep efficiency across all weeks, with a more marked change premenstrually during the last week of the menstrual cycle. These sleep changes may be modified by altering lifestyle factors.

  1. SWANS: A Prototypic SCALE Criticality Sequence for Automated Optimization Using the SWAN Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, E.

    2001-01-11

    SWANS is a new prototypic analysis sequence that provides an intelligent, semi-automatic search for the maximum k{sub eff} of a given amount of specified fissile material, or of the minimum critical mass. It combines the optimization strategy of the SWAN code with the composition-dependent resonance self-shielded cross sections of the SCALE package. For a given system composition arrived at during the iterative optimization process, the value of k{sub eff} is as accurate and reliable as obtained using the CSAS1X Sequence of SCALE-4.4. This report describes how SWAN is integrated within the SCALE system to form the new prototypic optimization sequence, describes the optimization procedure, provides a user guide for SWANS, and illustrates its application to five different types of problems. In addition, the report illustrates that resonance self-shielding might have a significant effect on the maximum k{sub eff} value a given fissile material mass can have.

  2. Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J; Askeland, Kristin G; Sivertsen, Børge

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Relationships Between Sleep Stages and Changes in Cognitive Function in Older Men: The MrOS Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeonsu; Blackwell, Terri; Yaffe, Kristine; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Redline, Susan; Stone, Katie L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the associations between sleep stage distributions and subsequent decline in cognitive function in older men over time. Design: A population-based prospective substudy of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study. Settings: Six sites in the United States. Participants: Community-dwelling men aged 67 y or older (n = 2,601), who were free of probable dementia at sleep visit. Follow-up averaged 3.4 y. Measurement and Results: Sleep stages were identified by in-home polysomnography at the initial sleep visit (2003–2005). Cognitive outcomes were assessed with the Trail Making Test Part B and Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) at sleep visit and two follow-up visits. After adjusting for multiple confounders compared with men in the lowest quartile of percent of sleep time spent in Stage N1, those in the highest quartile had a twofold increase in cognitive decline for both cognitive tests (adjusted annualized percent change/y: Trail Making Test Part B Q1 = 1.06, Q4 = 2.45, P = 0.01; 3MS Q1 = −0.27, Q4 = −0.48, P = 0.03). In addition, compared with men in the highest quartile, men in the lowest quartile of percent of sleep time in Stage R revealed more cognitive decline on the 3MS (adjusted annualized percent change/y: Q1 = −0.49, Q4 = −0.22, P = 0.003). These findings were consistent even after further adjustment of total sleep time and sleep disordered breathing. No significant relationships between other sleep stages (N2, N3) and cognitive change were found. Conclusion: Increased time in Stage N1 sleep and less time in Stage REM sleep are associated with worsening cognitive performance in older men over time. Citation: Song Y, Blackwell T, Yaffe K, Ancoli-Israel S, Redline S, Stone KL, Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study Group. Relationships between sleep stages and changes in cognitive function in older men: the MrOS Sleep Study. SLEEP 2015;38(3):411–421. PMID:25325465

  4. Sleep, school performance, and a school-based intervention among school-aged children: a sleep series study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghui Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sufficient sleep during childhood is essential to ensure a transition into a healthy adulthood. However, chronic sleep loss continues to increase worldwide. In this context, it is imperative to make sleep a high-priority and take action to promote sleep health among children. The present series of studies aimed to shed light on sleep patterns, on the longitudinal association of sleep with school performance, and on practical intervention strategy for Chinese school-aged children. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A serial sleep researches, including a national cross-sectional survey, a prospective cohort study, and a school-based sleep intervention, were conducted in China from November 2005 through December 2009. The national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 8 cities and a random sample of 20,778 children aged 9.0±1.61 years participated in the survey. The five-year prospective cohort study included 612 children aged 6.8±0.31 years. The comparative cross-sectional study (baseline: n = 525, aged 10.80±0.41; post-intervention follow-up: n = 553, aged 10.81±0.33 was undertaken in 6 primary schools in Shanghai. A battery of parent and teacher reported questionnaires were used to collect information on children's sleep behaviors, school performance, and sociodemographic characteristics. The mean sleep duration was 9.35±0.77 hours. The prevalence of daytime sleepiness was 64.4% (sometimes: 37.50%; frequently: 26.94%. Daytime sleepiness was significantly associated with impaired attention, learning motivation, and particularly, academic achievement. By contrast, short sleep duration only related to impaired academic achievement. After delaying school start time 30 minutes and 60 minutes, respectively, sleep duration correspondingly increased by 15.6 minutes and 22.8 minutes, respectively. Moreover, intervention significantly improved the sleep duration and daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient sleep and daytime sleepiness

  5. Sleep, school performance, and a school-based intervention among school-aged children: a sleep series study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenghui; Arguelles, Lester; Jiang, Fan; Chen, Wenjuan; Jin, Xingming; Yan, Chonghuai; Tian, Ying; Hong, Xiumei; Qian, Ceng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaobin; Shen, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Sufficient sleep during childhood is essential to ensure a transition into a healthy adulthood. However, chronic sleep loss continues to increase worldwide. In this context, it is imperative to make sleep a high-priority and take action to promote sleep health among children. The present series of studies aimed to shed light on sleep patterns, on the longitudinal association of sleep with school performance, and on practical intervention strategy for Chinese school-aged children. A serial sleep researches, including a national cross-sectional survey, a prospective cohort study, and a school-based sleep intervention, were conducted in China from November 2005 through December 2009. The national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 8 cities and a random sample of 20,778 children aged 9.0±1.61 years participated in the survey. The five-year prospective cohort study included 612 children aged 6.8±0.31 years. The comparative cross-sectional study (baseline: n = 525, aged 10.80±0.41; post-intervention follow-up: n = 553, aged 10.81±0.33) was undertaken in 6 primary schools in Shanghai. A battery of parent and teacher reported questionnaires were used to collect information on children's sleep behaviors, school performance, and sociodemographic characteristics. The mean sleep duration was 9.35±0.77 hours. The prevalence of daytime sleepiness was 64.4% (sometimes: 37.50%; frequently: 26.94%). Daytime sleepiness was significantly associated with impaired attention, learning motivation, and particularly, academic achievement. By contrast, short sleep duration only related to impaired academic achievement. After delaying school start time 30 minutes and 60 minutes, respectively, sleep duration correspondingly increased by 15.6 minutes and 22.8 minutes, respectively. Moreover, intervention significantly improved the sleep duration and daytime sleepiness. Insufficient sleep and daytime sleepiness commonly existed and positively associated with the impairment of

  6. Sleep hygiene intervention for youth aged 10 to 18 years with problematic sleep: a before-after pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Evan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study aimed to examine the changes following a sleep hygiene intervention on sleep hygiene practices, sleep quality, and daytime symptoms in youth. Methods Participants aged 10–18 years with self-identified sleep problems completed our age-appropriate F.E.R.R.E.T (an acronym for the categories of Food, Emotions, Routine, Restrict, Environment and Timing sleep hygiene programme; each category has three simple rules to encourage good sleep. Participants (and parents as appropriate completed the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC, Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS, and wore Actical® monitors twice before (1 and 2 weeks and three times after (6, 12 and 20 weeks the intervention. Anthropometric data were collected two weeks before and 20 weeks post-intervention. Results Thirty-three youths (mean age 12.9 years; M/F = 0.8 enrolled, and retention was 100%. ASHS scores significantly improved (p = 0.005 from a baseline mean (SD of 4.70 (0.41 to 4.95 (0.31 post-intervention, as did PSQI scores [7.47 (2.43 to 4.47 (2.37; p  Conclusions Our findings suggest the F.E.R.R.E.T sleep hygiene education programme might be effective in improving sleep in children and adolescents. However because this was a before and after study and a pilot study with several limitations, the findings need to be addressed with caution, and would need to be replicated within a randomised controlled trial to prove efficacy. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12612000649819

  7. Sleep architecture and obstructive sleep apnea in obese children with and without metabolic syndrome: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilolghadr, Shabnam; Yazdi, Zohreh; Mahram, Manoochehr; Babaei, Farkhondeh; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Nozari, Hoormehr; Saffari, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and biochemical parameters of metabolic disorders are both closely related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to compare sleep architecture and OSA in obese children with and without metabolic syndrome. Forty-two children with metabolic syndrome were selected as case group and 38 children without metabolic syndrome were matched for age, sex, and BMI as control group. The standardized Persian version of bedtime problems, excessive daytime sleepiness, awakenings during the night, regularity and duration of sleep, snoring (BEARS) and Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaires were completed, and polysomnography (PSG) was performed for all study subjects. Scoring was performed using the manual of American Academy of Sleep Medicine for children. Data were analyzed using chi-square test, T test, Mann-Whitney U test, and logistic regression analysis. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and N1 stage in the case group were significantly longer than the control group, while REM sleep was significantly shorter. Waking after sleep onset (WASO) was significantly different between two groups. Severe OSA was more frequent in the control group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that severe OSA (OR 21.478, 95 % CI 2.160-213.600; P = 0.009) and REM sleep (OR 0.856, 95 % CI 0.737-0.994; P = 0.041) had independent association with metabolic syndrome. Obese children with metabolic syndrome had increased WASO, N1 sleep stage, and severe OSA. But the results regarding sleep architecture are most likely a direct result of OSA severity. More longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the association of metabolic syndrome and OSA.

  8. Toxicity of Anacostia River, Washington, DC, USA, sediment fed to mute swans (Cygnus olor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.; Melancon, M.J.; Sileo, L.

    2000-03-01

    Sediment ingestion is sometimes the principal route by which waterfowl are exposed to environmental contaminants, and at severely contaminated sites waterfowl have been killed by ingesting sediment. Mute swans (Cygnus olor) were fed a diet for 6 weeks with a high but environmentally realistic concentration (24%) of sediment from the moderately polluted Anacostia River in the District of Columbia, USA, to estimate the sediment's toxicity. Control swans were fed the same diet without the sediment. Five organochlorine compounds were detected in the treated diets, but none of 22 organochlorine compounds included in the analyses was detected in livers of the treated swans. The concentrations of 24 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons measured in the treated diet were as high as 0.80 mg/kg, and they were thought to have been responsible for the observed induction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in livers. A concentration of 85 mg/kg of lead in the diet was enough to decrease red blood cell ALAD activity but was not high enough to cause more serious effects of lead poisoning. The dietary concentrations of Al, Fe, V, and Ba were high compared to the concentrations of these elements known to be toxic in laboratory feeding studies. However, the lack of accumulation in the livers of the treated swans suggested that these elements were not readily available from the ingested sediment. The authors did not study all potential toxic effects, but, on the basis of those that they did consider, they concluded that the treated swans were basically healthy after a chronic exposure to the sediment.

  9. The isolation and characterization of a novel telomerase immortalized first trimester trophoblast cell line, Swan 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straszewski-Chavez, S L; Abrahams, V M; Alvero, A B; Aldo, P B; Ma, Y; Guller, S; Romero, R; Mor, G

    2009-11-01

    Studies using first trimester trophoblast cells may be limited by the inability to obtain patient samples and/or adequate cell numbers. First trimester trophoblast cell lines have been generated by SV40 transformation or similar methods, however, this approach is known to induce phenotypic and karyotypic abnormalities. The introduction of telomerase has been proposed to be a viable alternative for the immortalization of primary human cells. To investigate whether telomerase-induced immortalization might be a more feasible approach for the generation of first trimester trophoblast cell lines, we isolated primary trophoblast cells from a 7-week normal placenta and infected the cells with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Although this hTERT-infected first trimester trophoblast cell line, which we have named Swan 71, has been propagated for more than 100 passages, it still has attributes that are characteristic of primary first trimester trophoblast cells. The Swan 71 cells are positive for the expression of cytokeratin 7, vimentin and HLA-G, but do not express CD45, CD68 or the Fibroblast Specific Antigen (FSA), CD90/Thy-1. In addition, we also demonstrated that the Swan 71 cells secrete fetal fibronectin (FFN) as well as low levels of human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (hCG). Moreover, the Swan 71 cells exhibit a cytokine and growth factor profile that is similar to primary trophoblast cells and are resistant to Fas, but not TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. This suggests that the Swan 71 cells may represent a valuable model for future in vitro trophoblast studies.

  10. Depressive symptoms and sleep: a population-based polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Laura Siqueira; Castro, Juliana; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Quarantini, Lucas Castro; Kauati, Adriana; Mello, Luiz Eugenio; Santos-Silva, Rogerio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-12-30

    The goals of the present study were to determine the prevalence of depression in the adult population of Sao Paulo, Brazil and to explore the relationship among sociodemographic, physical and psychological factors, sleep-related symptoms and polysomnography parameters. Participants of a cross-sectional study (N = 1101) were administered questionnaires and submitted to polysomnography. A score > 20 in the Beck Depression Inventory was used to describe depression. Results revealed that the prevalence of depression was 10.9%. Estimates were higher in women and were significantly higher among housewives, non-workers and individuals with lower education and income. A combination of sleep-related symptoms and impaired quality of life was 2.5 times more frequent among depressed than non-depressed. Co-morbid insomnia and anxiety were positively associated to depressive symptomatology. There were no alterations in the polysomnography parameters, in either group. The occurrence of sleep apnea with values on the apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 5 was similar and frequent in both groups (around 30%). The findings suggest that depressive symptoms were associated with low education, low income, severe comorbid symptomatology, and impaired quality of life. Considering the high prevalence of sleep apnea, these results point to potential social and financial burdens associated with the depressive symptomatology and various sleep diagnoses. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of entertainment and communication technologies before sleep could affect sleep and weight status: a population-based study among children

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, Nomathemba; Khan, Kaviul; Loehr, Sarah; Chu, Yen; Veugelers, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality have been demonstrated to be associated with childhood obesity. It has been suggested that electronic entertainment and communication devices (EECDs) including TVs, computers, tablets, video games and cell phones interfere with sleep in children and youth. The aim of this study was to assess the impact that the use of EECDs in the hour before bedtime has on sleep and weight status to inform sleep promotion interventions and programs to pr...

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea and systemic hypertension: longitudinal study in the general population: the Vitoria Sleep Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Pumarega, Irene; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Aizpuru, Felipe; Miranda-Serrano, Erika; Rubio, Ramón; Martínez-Null, Cristina; de Miguel, Javier; Egea, Carlos; Cancelo, Laura; Alvarez, Ainhoa; Fernández-Bolaños, Marta; Barbé, Ferrán

    2011-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and systemic hypertension (SH) are highly prevalent. Although their association has been suggested in cross-sectional studies, conflicting evidence has emerged from longitudinal studies. To assess the association between obstructive sleep apnea and SH in the middle-aged general population. A total of 2,148 subjects were included in a longitudinal study of the Vitoria Sleep Cohort, a general population sample aged 30-70 years. We analyzed data on office blood pressure, anthropometric measures, health history, and home polygraphy. Out of 1,557 subjects who completed the 7.5-year follow-up, 377 were excluded for having SH at baseline. The odds ratios for the incidence of SH, according to the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) at baseline, were estimated in 1,180 subjects (526 men and 654 women) after adjustment for age; sex; body mass index; neck circumference; fitness level; and alcohol, tobacco, and coffee consumption. The RDI was divided into quartiles (0-2.9, 3-6.9, 7-13.9, and ≥ 14), using the first quartile as reference. The crude odds ratio for incident hypertension increased with higher RDI category with a dose-response effect (P < 0.001), but was not statistically significant after adjustment for age (P = 0.051). Adjustments for sex (P = 0.342), body mass index (P = 0.803), neck circumference (P = 0.885), and fitness level and alcohol, tobacco, and coffee consumption (P = 0.708) further reduced the strength of the association between RDI and SH. No differences were observed between men and women. Our findings do not suggest an association between obstructive sleep apnea and the incidence of SH in the middle-aged general population. Long-term follow-up longitudinal studies are needed to better ascertain this association.

  13. Age-specific survival of tundra swans on the lower Alaska Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixell, Brandt W.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Conn, Paul B.; Dau, Christian P.; Sarvis, John E.; Sowl, Kristine M.

    2013-01-01

    The population of Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus columbianus) breeding on the lower Alaska Peninsula represents the southern extremity of the species' range and is uniquely nonmigratory. We used data on recaptures, resightings, and recoveries of neck-collared Tundra Swans on the lower Alaska Peninsula to estimate collar loss, annual apparent survival, and other demographic parameters for the years 1978–1989. Annual collar loss was greater for adult males fitted with either the thinner collar type (0.34) or the thicker collar type (0.15) than for other age/sex classes (thinner: 0.10, thicker: 0.04). The apparent mean probability of survival of adults (0.61) was higher than that of immatures (0.41) and for both age classes varied considerably by year (adult range: 0.44–0.95, immature range: 0.25–0.90). To assess effects of permanent emigration by age and breeding class, we analyzed post hoc the encounter histories of swans known to breed in our study area. The apparent mean survival of known breeders (0.65) was generally higher than that of the entire marked sample but still varied considerably by year (range 0.26–1.00) and indicated that permanent emigration of breeding swans was likely. We suggest that reductions in apparent survival probability were influenced primarily by high and variable rates of permanent emigration and that immigration by swans from elsewhere may be important in sustaining a breeding population at and near Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.

  14. Relationships between sleep stages and changes in cognitive function in older men: the MrOS Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeonsu; Blackwell, Terri; Yaffe, Kristine; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Redline, Susan; Stone, Katie L

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the associations between sleep stage distributions and subsequent decline in cognitive function in older men over time. A population-based prospective substudy of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study. Six sites in the United States. Community-dwelling men aged 67 y or older (n = 2,601), who were free of probable dementia at sleep visit. Follow-up averaged 3.4 y. Sleep stages were identified by in-home polysomnography at the initial sleep visit (2003-2005). Cognitive outcomes were assessed with the Trail Making Test Part B and Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) at sleep visit and two follow-up visits. After adjusting for multiple confounders compared with men in the lowest quartile of percent of sleep time spent in Stage N1, those in the highest quartile had a twofold increase in cognitive decline for both cognitive tests (adjusted annualized percent change/y: Trail Making Test Part B Q1 = 1.06, Q4 = 2.45, P = 0.01; 3MS Q1 = -0.27, Q4 = -0.48, P = 0.03). In addition, compared with men in the highest quartile, men in the lowest quartile of percent of sleep time in Stage R revealed more cognitive decline on the 3MS (adjusted annualized percent change/y: Q1 = -0.49, Q4 = -0.22, P = 0.003). These findings were consistent even after further adjustment of total sleep time and sleep disordered breathing. No significant relationships between other sleep stages (N2, N3) and cognitive change were found. Increased time in Stage N1 and less time in Stage R are associated with worsening cognitive performance in older men over time. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Disparities in sleep characteristics by race/ethnicity in a population-based sample: Chicago Area Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnethon, Mercedes R; De Chavez, Peter John; Zee, Phyllis C; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Liu, Kiang; Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Ng, Jason; Knutson, Kristen L

    2016-02-01

    Prior studies report less favorable sleep characteristics among non-Whites as compared with non-Hispanic Whites. However, few population-based studies have used objective measures of sleep duration, especially in more than two racial/ethnic groups. We tested whether objectively estimated sleep duration and self-reported sleep quality varied by race and whether differences were at least partially explained by the variability in clinical, psychological, and behavioral covariates. Adults aged 35-64 years who self-identified as White, Black, Asian, or Hispanic were randomly sampled from Chicago, IL, and the surrounding suburbs. Our analytic sample included adults who had an apnea-hypopnea index sample of adults with a low probability of sleep apnea and following adjustment for known confounders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Further evidences for sleep instability and impaired spindle-delta dynamics in schizophrenia: a whole-night polysomnography study with neuroloop-gain and sleep-cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Arun; Kumar, Sunil; Nair, Ajay Kumar; Lukose, Ammu; Marigowda, Vrinda; John, John P; Kutty, Bindu M

    2017-10-01

    Sleep offers a unique window into the brain dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Many past sleep studies have reported abnormalities in both macro-sleep architecture (like increased awakenings) as well as micro-sleep-architecture (like spindle deficits) in patients with schizophrenia (PSZ). The present study attempts to replicate previous reports of macro- and micro-sleep-architectural abnormalities in schizophrenia. In addition, the study also examined sleep-stage changes and spindle-delta dynamics across sleep-cycles to provide further evidence in support of the dysfunctional thalamocortical mechanisms causing sleep instability and poor sleep maintenance associated with schizophrenia pathophysiology. Whole-night polysomnography was carried out among 45 PSZ and 39 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Sleep-stage dynamics were assessed across sleep-cycles using a customized software algorithm. Spindle-delta dynamics across sleep-cycles were determined using neuroloop-gain analysis. PSZ showed macro-sleep architecture abnormalities such as prolonged sleeplessness, increased intermittent-awakenings, long sleep-onset latency, reduced non-rapid eye movement (NREM) stage 2 sleep, increased stage transitions, and poor sleep efficiency. They also showed reduced spindle density (sigma neuroloop-gain) but comparable slow wave density (delta neuroloop-gain) throughout the sleep. Sleep-cycle-wise analysis revealed transient features of sleep instability due to significantly increased intermittent awakenings especially in the first and third sleep-cycles, and unstable and recurrent stage transitions in both NREM (first sleep-cycle) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-periods (second sleep-cycle). Spindle deficits were persistent across the first three cycles and were positively correlated with sleep disruption during the subsequent REM sleep. In addition to replicating previously reported sleep deficits in PSZ, the current study showed subtle deficits in NREM

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep symptoms with change in quality of life: the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Graciela E; An, Ming-Wen; Goodwin, James L; Shahar, Eyal; Redline, Susan; Resnick, Helaine; Baldwin, Carol M; Quan, Stuart F

    2009-08-01

    Findings from population studies evaluating the progression and incidence of sleep disordered breathing have shown evidence of a longitudinal increase in the severity of sleep disordered breathing. The present study evaluates the association among changes in sleep disordered breathing, sleep symptoms, and quality of life over time. Prospective cohort study. Data were from the Sleep Heart Health Study. Multicenter study. Three thousand seventy-eight subjects aged 40 years and older from the baseline and follow-up examination cycles were included. The primary outcomes were changes in the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scales obtained from the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey. The primary exposure was change in the respiratory disturbance index obtained from unattended overnight polysomnograms performed approximately 5 years apart. Other covariates included measures of excessive daytime sleepiness and difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep. Mean respiratory disturbance index increased from 8.1 +/- 11 SD at baseline to 10.9 +/- 14 (P up. The mean Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scores were 48.5 and 54.1 at baseline and 46.3 and 54.8 at follow-up. No associations between change in respiratory disturbance index and changes in Physical Component Summary or Mental Component Summary scores were seen. However, worsening of difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness were significantly associated with lower quality of life. A slight increase in severity of sleep disordered breathing was seen over 5 years; this was not associated with worsening of quality of life. However, subjective symptoms of quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness were associated with declining quality of life.

  18. Disagreement between subjective and actigraphic measures of sleep duration in a population-based study of elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.F. van den; Rooij, F.J.A. van; Vos, H.; Tulen, J.H.M.; Hofman, A.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Neven, A.K.; Tiemeier, H.

    2008-01-01

    Sleep duration is an important concept in epidemiological studies. It characterizes a night's sleep or a person's sleep pattern, and is associated with numerous health outcomes. In most large studies, sleep duration is assessed with questionnaires or sleep diaries. As an alternative, actigraphy may

  19. Disagreement between subjective and actigraphic measures of sleep duration in a population-based study of elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. van den Berg (Julia); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); H. Vos; J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); A. Hofman (Albert); H.M. Miedema (Henk); A.K. Neven (Arie); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSleep duration is an important concept in epidemiological studies. It characterizes a night's sleep or a person's sleep pattern, and is associated with numerous health outcomes. In most large studies, sleep duration is assessed with questionnaires or sleep diaries. As an alternative,

  20. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linden M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael Linden,1,2 Marie Dietz,1 Christian Veauthier,3 Ingo Fietze3 1Research Group Psychosomatic Rehabilitation, Charité University Medicine Berlin, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Rehabilitation Centre Seehof, Teltow, 3Interdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Objective: To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients.Method: A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80 and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19. They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night’s sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP].Results: In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes, evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often, and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective

  1. A Postpartum Sleep and Fatigue Intervention Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Jennifer J; Dogan, Sirin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and cost of a self-management intervention for postpartum fatigue and sleep in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban women. Helping U Get Sleep (HUGS) is a theory-guided intervention developed from the Individual and Family Self-Management Theory. Medicaid-enrolled participants in the United States were recruited from an inpatient postpartum unit. Treatment and attention control interventions were delivered (15 HUGS, 12 comparison) at a week 3 postpartum home visit and 4 follow-up phone calls. Over the 9-week protocol, the HUGS group demonstrated significant improvements in subjective fatigue and subjective sleep disturbance relative to the comparison group. The HUGS intervention was feasible and acceptable, delivered on average, in 100 min and costing US$79 per participant.

  2. Impaired sleep quality and sleep duration in smokers-results from the German Multicenter Study on Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Stefan; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Riemann, Dieter; Szagun, Bertram; Jaehne, Andreas; Brinkmeyer, Jürgen; Gründer, Gerhard; Wienker, Thomas; Diaz-Lacava, Amalia; Mobascher, Arian; Dahmen, Norbert; Thuerauf, Norbert; Kornhuber, Johannes; Kiefer, Falk; Gallinat, Jürgen; Wagner, Michael; Kunz, Dieter; Grittner, Ulrike; Winterer, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is a severe health burden being related to a number of chronic diseases. Frequently, smokers report about sleep problems. Sleep disturbance, in turn, has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathophysiology of several disorders related to smoking and may be relevant for the pathophysiology of nicotine dependence. Therefore, determining the frequency of sleep disturbance in otherwise healthy smokers and its association with degree of nicotine dependence is highly relevant. In a population-based case-control study, 1071 smokers and 1243 non-smokers without lifetime Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Axis I disorder were investigated. Sleep quality (SQ) of participants was determined by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. As possible confounders, age, sex and level of education and income, as well as depressiveness, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity, alcohol drinking behaviour and perceived stress, were included into multiple regression analyses. Significantly more smokers than non-smokers (28.1% versus 19.1%; P sleep latency, sleep duration and global SQ were found significantly more often in smokers than non-smokers. Consistently, higher degrees of nicotine dependence and intensity of smoking were associated with shorter sleep duration. This study demonstrates for the first time an elevated prevalence of sleep disturbance in smokers compared with non-smokers in a population without lifetime history of psychiatric disorders even after controlling for potentially relevant risk factors. It appears likely that smoking is a behaviourally modifiable risk factor for the occurrence of impaired SQ and short sleep duration. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Sleep patterns, sleep disorders and mammographic density in spanish women: The DDM-Spain/Var-DDM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-Flechas, Ana María; Lope, Virginia; Moreo, Pilar; Ascunce, Nieves; Miranda-García, Josefa; Vidal, Carmen; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Llobet, Rafael; Aragonés, Nuria; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz

    2017-05-01

    We explored the relationship between sleep patterns and sleep disorders and mammographic density (MD), a marker of breast cancer risk. Participants in the DDM-Spain/var-DDM study, which included 2878 middle-aged Spanish women, were interviewed via telephone and asked questions on sleep characteristics. Two radiologists assessed MD in their left craneo-caudal mammogram, assisted by a validated semiautomatic-computer tool (DM-scan). We used log-transformed percentage MD as the dependent variable and fitted mixed linear regression models, including known confounding variables. Our results showed that neither sleeping patterns nor sleep disorders were associated with MD. However, women with frequent changes in their bedtime due to anxiety or depression had higher MD (e β :1.53;95%CI:1.04-2.26). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Sleep Medication Use and Poor Sleep Quality on Risk of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the US: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yaena; Kirkwood, Cynthia K; Mays, Darcy P; Slattum, Patricia W

    2016-02-01

    Sleep complaints and the consumption of medications for sleep are common in older adults. Falls are also a significant concern for older adults and sedative use has been identified as a risk factor for falls. Sleep quality is a potential confounder in studies evaluating the relationship between sleep medication use and falls. However, very few studies have assessed the combined impact of sleep medication use and sleep quality on the risk of falls. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between sleep medication use, poor sleep quality, and falls in community-dwelling older adults. This was a multicenter, 6-month prospective cohort study conducted in senior housings settings in central Virginia, USA. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a medication review was conducted. Data regarding falls were collected over 6 months by use of a diary. Logistic regression modeling was used to examine the effects of poor sleep quality, sleep medication use, and both, on the risk of falls. Among 113 independently living older adults (mean age ± standard deviation 81.1 ± 8.6), 46.9 % fell at least once during a 6-month period; 62.8 % (n = 71) had poor sleep quality, and 44.2 % (n = 50) used medications or treatments to aid sleep. Compared with participants reporting good sleep quality and no sleep medication use, those who reported poor sleep quality and sleep medication use had an increased risk of falls after adjusting for covariates (odds ratio 3.23, 95 % confidence interval 1.05-9.91). The group with good sleep quality and sleep medication use, as well as the group with poor sleep quality and no sleep medication use had no significantly greater risk for falls compared with the group with good sleep quality and no sleep medication use. A combined effect of sleep quality and sleep medication use on the risk of falls suggests that medication effectiveness may be an important factor to consider in understanding the risk

  5. Internalizing and externalizing traits predict changes in sleep efficiency in emerging adulthood: An actigraphy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eYaugher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on psychopathology and experimental studies of sleep restriction support a relationship between sleep disruption and both internalizing and externalizing disorders. The objective of the current study was to extend this research by examining sleep, impulsivity, antisocial personality traits, and internalizing traits in a university sample. Three hundred and eighty six individuals (161 males between the ages of 18 and 27 years (M = 18.59, SD = 0.98 wore actigraphs for 7 days and completed established measures of disorder-linked personality traits and sleep quality (i.e., Personality Assessment Inventory, Triarchic Psychopathy Measure, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. As expected, sleep measures and questionnaire scores fell within the normal range of values and sex differences in sleep and personality were consistent with previous research results. Similar to findings in predominantly male forensic psychiatric settings, higher levels of impulsivity predicted poorer subjective sleep quality in both women and men. Consistent with well-established associations between depression and sleep, higher levels of depression in both sexes predicted poorer subjective sleep quality. Bidirectional analyses showed that better sleep efficiency decreases depression. Finally, moderation analyses showed that gender does have a primary role in sleep efficiency and marginal effects were found. The observed relations between sleep and personality traits in a typical university sample add to converging evidence of the relationship between sleep and psychopathology and may inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology in young adulthood.

  6. The interplay between daily affect and sleep: a 2-week study of young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Pillai, Vivek; Roth, Thomas; Drake, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    Little attention has been paid to the relation between daily affect and sleep, as most prior studies have focused instead on the role of pathological mood in the context of sleep disturbance. However, understanding the transaction between normal variations in emotional experiences and sleep can shed light on the premorbid vulnerabilities that trigger the evolution of affect and sleep into more problematic states. The present study used a 2-week daily sampling approach to examine the impact of day-to-day variations in positive and negative affect on nightly self-reported sleep-onset latency, sleep duration and sleep quality in a sample of young women. Hierarchical linear modelling revealed temporal relations between positive and negative affect states and sleep parameters. Specifically, different aspects of both positive and negative affect were uniquely predictive of sleep indices, with sadness and serenity acting as the most consistent predictors. Additionally, better sleep quality was predictive of greater happiness the following day. These results highlight the importance of how our daily emotional experiences influence our nightly sleep and, in turn, how our sleep has an impact on our daily affect. Moreover, our findings may offer insight into the progression of normative levels of affect and sleep as they develop into comorbid depression, anxiety and insomnia. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  7. Sleep problems in adolescence. A study of senior high school students in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaratou, Helen; Dikeos, Dimitris G; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitris C; Sbokou, Ourania; Soldatos, Costantin R

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep habits and sleep-related problems in high school adolescent students in Greece through the Athens Insomnia Scale and to assess the relation of these problems to demographic and other variables. The Athens Insomnia Scale 5-item version (AIS-5) was administered to 713 adolescent senior high school students in the Greater Athens Area. Data such as age, sex, school records, and time spent per week in school-related and extracurricular activities were collected. The sample's mean sleep duration was 7.5 h, mean bedtime 00.20 a.m. and wake-up time 7.15 a.m. Total sleep time was not affected by gender, but was influenced by time spent in various activities. Sleep complaints were related to delayed sleep, onset latency and insufficient total duration of sleep. Of the respondents, 30% estimated that their sleep onset latency was markedly delayed and 30% reported that their total sleep time was markedly insufficient. Girls complained more than boys, while correlations showed that students with lower academic performance and those in second grade were more likely to have higher AIS-5 scores. The results show that the sleep time of high school students is dependent on practical matters such as school schedule and other activities, while sleep complaints are related to female gender, bad school performance as well as to the second grade. The difference between actual sleep time and sleep complaints should be considered when studying the sleep of adolescents.

  8. Society environmental economic benefits of swan-labelled workwear service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Dall, Ole; Thomsen, Henning

    2011-01-01

    was funded and published by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency 2009-2011. The assessment illustrates the problems to find reliable documentation for the environmental performance of eco-labelled versus conventional products. The assessment mainly focuses on the use-phase since this has been proven......This paper presents an environmental and socio-economic comparison of textile supply of workwear with and without the Nordic Swan labelling scheme. The study is part of a project for development of a methodology for the environmental and socio-economic comparison for product groups. The study...... to be the most important part of the lifecycle. For the use-phase a significant difference in environmental performance can be demonstrated between the European average figures and the figures for the Danish company providing the ecolabelled service. By application of the developed methodology this difference...

  9. The Contribution of Psychosocial Stressors to Sleep among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dayna A.; Lisabeth, Lynda; Lewis, Tené T.; Sims, Mario; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Samdarshi, Tandaw; Taylor, Herman; Diez Roux, Ana V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Studies have shown that psychosocial stressors are related to poor sleep. However, studies of African Americans, who may be more vulnerable to the impact of psychosocial stressors, are lacking. Using the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) baseline data, we examined associations of psychosocial stressors with sleep in 4,863 African Americans. Methods: We examined cross-sectional associations between psychosocial stressors and sleep duration and quality in a large population sample of African Americans. Three measures of psychosocial stress were investigated: the Global Perceived Stress Scale (GPSS); Major Life Events (MLE); and the Weekly Stress Inventory (WSI). Sleep was assessed using self-reported hours of sleep and sleep quality rating (1 = poor; 5 = excellent). Multinomial logistic and linear regression models were used to examine the association of each stress measure (in quartiles) with continuous and categorical sleep duration ( 9 h (“long”) versus 7 or 8 h (“normal”); and with sleep quality after adjustment for demographics and risk factors (body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity). Results: Mean age of the sample was 54.6 years and 64% were female. Mean sleep duration was 6.4 + 1.5 hours, 54% had a short sleep duration, 5% had a long sleep duration, and 34% reported a “poor” or “fair” sleep quality. Persons in the highest GPSS quartile had higher odds of very short sleep (odds ratio: 2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.02, 4.08), higher odds of short sleep (1.72, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.12), shorter average sleep duration (Δ = −33.6 min (95% CI: −41.8, −25.4), and reported poorer sleep quality (Δ = −0.73 (95% CI: −0.83, −0.63) compared to those in the lowest quartile of GPSS after adjustment for covariates. Similar patterns were observed for WSI and MLE. Psychosocial stressors were not associated with long sleep. For WSI, effects of stress on sleep duration were stronger for younger (sleep, lower average

  10. LIGHT EXPOSURE AMONG ADOLESCENTS WITH DELAYED SLEEP PHASE DISORDER: A PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, R. Robert; Burgess, Helen J.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Sharma, Ruchi G.; Slocumb, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Our study objective was to compare light exposure and sleep parameters between adolescents with delayed sleep phase disorder (n=16, 15.3 ± 1.8 years) and unaffected controls (n=22, 13.7 ± 2.4 years) using a prospective cohort design. Participants wore wrist actigraphs with photosensors for 14 days. Mean hourly lux levels from 20:00-05:00 h and 05:00-14:00 h were examined, in addition to the 9-hour intervals prior to sleep onset and after sleep offset. Sleep parameters were compared separately, and were also included as covariates within models that analyzed associations with specified light intervals. Additional covariates included group and school night status. Adolescent subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder received more evening (psleep exposure with adjustments for the time of sleep onset (psleep offset interval. Increased total sleep time and later sleep offset times were associated with decreased evening (psleep onset times were associated with increased evening exposure (psleep time also correlated with increased exposure during the 9 hours before sleep-onset (p=0.01), and a later sleep onset time corresponded with decreased exposure during the same interval (psleep timing among adolescents with delayed sleep phase disorder. Pre- and post-sleep exposure do not appear to contribute directly to phase delays. Sensitivity to morning light may be reduced among adolescents with delayed sleep phase disorder. PMID:22080736

  11. Parasomnias and sleep disordered breathing in Caucasian and Hispanic children – the Tucson children's assessment of sleep apnea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fregosi Ralph F

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies in children have demonstrated that frequent occurrence of parasomnias is related to increased sleep disruption, mental disorders, physical harm, sleep disordered breathing, and parental duress. Although there have been several cross-sectional and clinical studies of parasomnias in children, there have been no large, population-based studies using full polysomnography to examine the association between parasomnias and sleep disordered breathing. The Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study is a community-based cohort study designed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of objectively measured sleep disordered breathing (SDB in pre-adolescent children six to 11 years of age. This paper characterizes the relationships between parasomnias and SDB with its associated symptoms in these children. Methods Parents completed questionnaires pertaining to their child's sleep habits. Children had various physiological measurements completed and then were connected to the Compumedics PS-2 sleep recording system for full, unattended polysomnography in the home. A total of 480 unattended home polysomnograms were completed on a sample that was 50% female, 42.3% Hispanic, and 52.9% between the ages of six and eight years. Results Children with a Respiratory Disturbance Index of one or greater were more likely to have sleep walking (7.0% versus 2.5%, p p p Conclusions In this population-based cohort study, pre-adolescent school-aged children with SDB experienced more parasomnias than those without SDB. Parasomnias were associated with a higher prevalence of other sleep disturbances and learning problems. Clinical evaluation of children with parasomnias should include consideration of SDB.

  12. Let Sleeping Zebrafish Lie: A New Model for Sleep Studies: e281

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachel Jones

    2007-01-01

    .... Light might act through various pathways to suppress sleep, and this could combine with a lack of melatonin to cause the striking effects of light on sleep in zebrafish and to overcome weaker circadian (cyclical...

  13. Sleep and the Housing and Neighborhood Environment of Urban Latino Adults Living in Low-Income Housing: The AHOME Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Earle C; Pichardo, Margaret S; Rosenbaum, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is implicated in the risk of many chronic diseases; however, little is known about the living conditions that influence sleep. In this study of 371 low-income Latino residents, household crowding was associated with reduced odds of long sleep duration relative to average and short sleep duration. Neighborhood disorder and perceived building problems were associated with more sleep disturbances and poor sleep quality. Building problems were associated with prolonged sleep latency. There was a significant cumulative effect of adverse housing and neighborhood conditions on sleep outcomes. These results show that adverse conditions of both the housing and neighborhood environments are associated with poor sleep outcomes.

  14. Association Between Sleep Timing, Obesity, Diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Kristen L; Wu, Donghong; Patel, Sanjay R; Loredo, Jose S; Redline, Susan; Cai, Jianwen; Gallo, Linda C; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ramos, Alberto R; Teng, Yanping; Daviglus, Martha L; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies implicate inadequate sleep duration and quality in metabolic disease. Fewer studies have examined the timing of sleep, which may be important because of its potential impact on circadian rhythms of metabolic function. We examined the association between sleep timing and metabolic risk among Hispanic/Latino adults. Cross-sectional data from community-based study of 13429 participants aged 18-74 years. People taking diabetic medications were excluded. Sleep timing was determined from self-reported bedtimes and wake times. Chronotype was defined as the midpoint of sleep on weekends adjusted for sleep duration on weekdays. Other measurements included body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose levels, estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose levels 2 hours post oral glucose ingestion, and hemoglobin A1c. Survey linear regression models tested associations between sleep timing and metabolic measures. Analyses were stratified by diabetes status and age-group when significant interactions were observed. Among participants with diabetes, fasting glucose levels were positively associated with bedtime (approximately +3%/hour later, p sleep (approximately +2%/hour later, p sleep (+1.5%/hr later, p sleep timing was associated with lower BMI, lower fasting glucose, and lower HbA1c, but the opposite association was observed among older participants. Later sleep timing was associated with higher estimated insulin resistance across all groups. Some associations between sleep timing and metabolic measures may be age-dependent.

  15. [Swan Song: The Advent of the Psychotic Nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Fernando Muñoz

    2012-09-01

    Different forms of artistic expression, such as literature and cinema, constitute an inexhaustible source for the study of mental illness. The use of psychodynamic models may contribute to a better understanding of the spectrum between personality disorders and the psychosis spectrum, thus enriching the phenomenological approach in the psychiatric clinical practice. To examine from psychodynamic standpoints the main character of the American film Black Swan, and the nature of her psychotic symptoms. Reviewing of sources and relevant theoretical currents. Analysis shows the usefulness of a psychodynamically- oriented dimensional model for understanding the so-called psychotic breaks as well as the applicability of psychoanalytic psychosis theories in general psychiatric practice, as they may provide a more flexible clinical approach, closer to the patient's subjective experience. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of rapid-eye movements in sleep studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajeev; Takeuchi, Tomoka; Laroche, Suzie; Gotman, Jean

    2005-08-01

    One of the key features of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep is the presence of bursts of REMs. Sleep studies routinely use REMs to classify sleep stages. Moreover, REM count or density has been used in studies involving learning and various psychiatric disorders. Most of these studies have been based on the visual identification of REMs, which is generally a very time-consuming task. This and the varying definitions of REMs across scorers have warranted the development of automatic REM detection methodologies. In this paper, we present a new detection scheme that combines many of the intrinsic properties of REMs and requires minimal parameter adjustments. In the proposed method, a single parameter can be used to control the REM detection sensitivity and specificity tradeoff. Manually scored training data are used to develop the method. We assess the performance of the method against manual scoring of individual REM events and present validation results using a separate data set. The ability of the method to discriminate fast horizontal ocular movement in REM sleep from other types of events is highlighted. A key advantage of the presented method is the minimal a priori information requirement. The results of training data (recordings from five subjects) show an overall sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 81.6%. The performance on the testing data (recording from five subjects different from the training data) showed overall sensitivity of 67.2% and specificity of 77.5%.

  17. Effect of stress on sleep quality in young adult medical students: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Renu Lohitashwa; Ningamma Kadli; Ravikiran Kisan; Sindhuja A; Dileep Deshpande

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because of demanding clinical and academic duties, medical students are at an increased risk for development of sleep disruption. Studying the relation between sleep quality and psychological stress can be useful in implementing an organized mental health program in medical colleges. The main objective is to study the prevalence and the effect of stress on sleep quality in young adult medical students. Methods: A cross sectional study to recognize the effect of stress on sleep ...

  18. Study of sleep disorders among young children using hindi translated and validated version of pediatric sleep questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of sleep disorders among children aging between 4 and 9 years using Hindi version of Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ. Methods: This study had two parts first, translation and validation of PSQ into Hindi language, and second, assessment of the prevalence of sleep disorders using PSQ Hindi version. Hindi PSQ was distributed in randomly chosen primary schools in a semi-urban area. The children were requested to get them filled by their parents. When the questionnaires were returned, responses were analyzed. Results: Most of the items of the Hindi version had perfect agreement with original questionnaire in a bilingual population (κ =1. Totally, 435 children were included in the field study having average age of 6.3 years. Obstructive sleep apnea was reported in 7.5% children; symptoms suggestive of restless legs syndrome were reported by 2%–3%; teeth grinding by 13.9% and sleep talking by 22.6% children. Conclusion: PSQ Hindi version is a validated tool to screen for sleep disorders among children. Sleep disorders are fairly prevalent among young children in India.

  19. Study of Sleep Disorders among Young Children Using Hindi Translated and Validated Version of Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Ali, Ramjan; Verma, Sunanda; Joshi, Kriti; Dhyani, Mohan; Bhasin, Kanchan; Bhasin, Neha; Goyal, Jatin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of sleep disorders among children aging between 4 and 9 years using Hindi version of Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ). This study had two parts first, translation and validation of PSQ into Hindi language, and second, assessment of the prevalence of sleep disorders using PSQ Hindi version. Hindi PSQ was distributed in randomly chosen primary schools in a semi-urban area. The children were requested to get them filled by their parents. When the questionnaires were returned, responses were analyzed. Most of the items of the Hindi version had perfect agreement with original questionnaire in a bilingual population (κ =1). Totally, 435 children were included in the field study having average age of 6.3 years. Obstructive sleep apnea was reported in 7.5% children; symptoms suggestive of restless legs syndrome were reported by 2%-3%; teeth grinding by 13.9% and sleep talking by 22.6% children. PSQ Hindi version is a validated tool to screen for sleep disorders among children. Sleep disorders are fairly prevalent among young children in India.

  20. Sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Patricia; Muzet, Alain

    2000-08-01

    Sleep inertia is a transitional state of lowered arousal occurring immediately after awakening from sleep and producing a temporary decrement in subsequent performance. Many factors are involved in the characteristics of sleep inertia. The duration of prior sleep can influence the severity of subsequent sleep inertia. Although most studies have focused on sleep inertia after short naps, its effects can be shown after a normal 8-h sleep period. One of the most critical factors is the sleep stage prior to awakening. Abrupt awakening during a slow wave sleep (SWS) episode produces more sleep inertia than awakening in stage 1 or 2, REM sleep being intermediate. Therefore, prior sleep deprivation usually enhances sleep inertia since it increases SWS. There is no direct evidence that sleep inertia exhibits a circadian rhythm. However, it seems that sleep inertia is more intense when awakening occurs near the trough of the core body temperature as compared to its circadian peak. A more controversial issue concerns the time course of sleep inertia. Depending on the studies, it can last from 1 min to 4 h. However, in the absence of major sleep deprivation, the duration of sleep inertia rarely exceeds 30 min. But all these results should be analysed as a function of type of task and dependent variables. Different cognitive functions are probably not sensitive to the same degree to sleep inertia and special attention should be provided to dependent variables as a result of the cognitive processes under review. Finally, sleep disorders represent risk factors which deserve new insight in treatment strategies to counteract the adverse effects of sleep inertia.

  1. The Social Patterning of Sleep in African Americans: Associations of Socioeconomic Position and Neighborhood Characteristics with Sleep in the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dayna A; Lisabeth, Lynda; Hickson, DeMarc; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Samdarshi, Tandaw; Taylor, Herman; Diez Roux, Ana V

    2016-09-01

    We investigated cross-sectional associations of individual-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and neighborhood characteristics (social cohesion, violence, problems, disadvantage) with sleep duration and sleep quality in 5,301 African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study. All measures were self-reported. Sleep duration was assessed as hours of sleep; sleep quality was reported as poor (1) to excellent (5). SEP was measured by categorized years of education and income. Multinomial logistic and linear regression models were fit to examine the associations of SEP and neighborhood characteristics (modeled dichotomously and tertiles) with sleep duration (short vs. normal, long vs. normal) and continuous sleep duration and quality after adjustment for demographics and risk factors. The mean sleep duration was 6.4 ± 1.5 hours, 54% had a short (≤ 6 h) sleep duration, 5% reported long (≥ 9 h) sleep duration, and 24% reported fair to poor sleep quality. Lower education was associated with greater odds of long sleep (odds ratio [OR] = 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.42, 3.38) and poorer sleep quality (β = -0.17, 95% CI = -0.27, -0.07) compared to higher education after adjustment for demographics and risk factors. Findings were similar for income. High neighborhood violence was associated with shorter sleep duration (-9.82 minutes, 95% CI = -16.98, -2.66) and poorer sleep quality (β = -0.11, 95% CI = -0.20, 0.00) after adjustment for demographics and risk factors. Results were similar for neighborhood problems. In secondary analyses adjusted for depressive symptoms in a subset of participants, most associations were attenuated and only associations of low SEP with higher odds of long sleep and higher neighborhood violence with poorer sleep quality remained statistically significant. Social and environmental characteristics are associated with sleep duration and quality in African Americans. Depressive symptoms may explain at least part of this association.

  2. Nightmares affect the experience of sleep quality but not sleep architecture: an ambulatory polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Franc; Schredl, Michael; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-01-01

    Nightmares and bad dreams are common in people with emotional disturbances. For example, nightmares are a core symptom in posttraumatic stress disorder and about 50% of borderline personality disorder patients suffer from frequent nightmares. Independent of mental disorders, nightmares are often associated with sleep problems such as prolonged sleep latencies, poorer sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness. It has not been well documented whether this is reflected in objectively quantifiable physiological indices of sleep quality. Questionnaires regarding subjective sleep quality and ambulatory polysomnographic recordings of objective sleep parameters were collected during three consecutive nights in 17 individuals with frequent nightmares (NM) and 17 healthy control participants (HC). NM participants reported worse sleep quality, more waking problems and more severe insomnia compared to HC group. However, sleep measures obtained by ambulatory polysomnographic recordings revealed no group differences in (a) overall sleep architecture, (b) sleep cycle duration as well as REM density and REM duration in each cycle and (c) sleep architecture when only nights with nightmares were analyzed. Our findings support the observation that nightmares result in significant impairment which is independent from disturbed sleep architecture. Thus, these specific problems require specific attention and appropriate treatment.

  3. Effect of Traffic Noise on Sleep: A Case Study in Serdang Raya, Selangor, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bavani Nadaraja

    2010-01-01

    .... The most common yet serious problem is sleep disturbance. In this study field measurement and questionnaire survey were carried out to determine the overall noise level and the view and opinion of the residents on their sleep disturbance...

  4. Clinical utility of the Chinese Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal-behaviors questionnaire (SWAN when compared with DISC-IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan GFC

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Grace Fong-Chun Chan,1 Kelly Yee-Ching Lai,2 Ernest Siu-Luen Luk,3 Se-Fong Hung,2 Patrick Wing-Leung Leung4 1Department of Psychiatry, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, 2Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Private practice, 4Clinical and Health Psychology Centre, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common and impairing child and adolescent psychiatric disorder. Early identification and prompt treatment are essential. Rating scales are commonly used by clinicians and researchers to assess ADHD children. Objective: In the current study, we aimed to examine the clinical utility of the Chinese version of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviors (SWAN questionnaire. We validated its subscale scores against the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (DISC-IV and looked into its ability to identify ADHD in a psychiatric clinic setting. We also tested age and gender effects on SWAN scores. Specific subscale cutoff scores of SWAN were subsequently determined.Method: A total of 290 children aged 6–12 years old studying in local mainstream primary schools were recruited from a clinic setting and interviewed with the parent version of DISC-IV. Their parents and teachers completed the corresponding version of SWAN.Results: Both parent and teacher versions of SWAN were found to have good concurrent validity with DISC-IV. It could identify ADHD well in a clinic sample. Gender-specific cutoff scores were determined. Sensitivities and specificities were found to be satisfactory. SWAN was also found to perform equally well in identifying ADHD in those with and without comorbid Autistic Spectrum Disorder.Conclusion: SWAN was proven to be a useful tool to aid the assessment of ADHD in a clinic sample. Keywords: ADHD, SWAN, DISC-IV, validity

  5. Sleep study in Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder and Bipolar children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Prat, Xavier; Álvarez-Guerrico, Ion; Bleda-Hernández, María J; Camprodon-Rosanas, Ester; Batlle-Vila, Santiago; Pujals-Altes, Elena; Nascimento-Osorio, María T; Martín-López, Luís M; Álvarez-Martínez, Enric; Pérez-Solá, Víctor; Romero-Cela, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    Decreased need for sleep has been proposed as a core symptom of mania and it has been associated with the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder. The emergence of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) as a new diagnostic has been controversial and much has been speculated about its relationship with the bipolar spectrum. REM sleep fragmentation could be a biomarker of affective disorders and it would help us to differentiate them from other disorders. Polysomnographic cross-sectional study of children with DMDD, bipolar disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). All participants underwent a psychiatric semi-structured interview to obtain the diagnosis, comorbidities and primary sleep disorders. DMDD’s sample was performed following DSM5 criteria. Perform polysomnography in a sample of bipolar, DMDD and ADHD children and compare their profiles to provide more evidence about the differences or similarities between bipolar disorder and DMDD. Bipolar group had the highest REM density values while ADHD had the lowest. REM density was not statiscally different between bipolar phenotypes. REM density was associated with antidepressant treatment, episodes of REM and their interaction. REM latency was associated with antipsychotic treatment and school performance. Bipolar patients had higher scores on the depression scale than DMDD and ADHD groups. No significant differences between the two compared affective disorders were found. However there were differences in REM density between bipolar and ADHD groups. REM sleep study could provide a new theoretical framework to better understand the pathogenesis of pediatric bipolar disorder.

  6. Habitual sleep and kidney function in chronic kidney disease: the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Kristen L; Lash, James; Ricardo, Ana C; Herdegen, James; Thornton, J D; Rahman, Mahboob; Turek, Nicolas; Cohan, Janet; Appel, Lawrence J; Bazzano, Lydia A; Tamura, Manjula K; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Weir, Matthew R; Van Cauter, Eve

    2017-06-23

    Physiological evidence suggests that sleep modulates kidney function. Our objective was to examine the cross-sectional association between kidney function and objectively-estimated habitual sleep duration, quality and timing in a cohort of patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease. This study involved two US clinical centers of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, including 432 participants in a CRIC ancillary sleep study. Habitual sleep duration, quality and timing were measured using wrist actigraphy for 5-7 days. Validated sleep questionnaires assessed subjective sleep quality, daytime sleepiness and risk of sleep apnea. Kidney function was assessed with the estimated glomerular filtration rate using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation, and the urinary protein to creatinine ratio. Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate was associated with shorter sleep duration (-1.1 mL min-1  1.73 m-2 per hour less sleep, P = 0.03), greater sleep fragmentation (-2.6 mL min-1  1.73 m-2 per 10% higher fragmentation, P kidney disease should consider inquiring about sleep and possibly sending for clinical sleep assessment. Longitudinal and interventional trials are needed to understand causal direction. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  7. The joint effect of sleep duration and disturbed sleep on cause-specific mortality: results from the Whitehall II cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naja Hulvej Rod

    Full Text Available Both sleep duration and sleep quality are related to future health, but their combined effects on mortality are unsettled. We aimed to examine the individual and joint effects of sleep duration and sleep disturbances on cause-specific mortality in a large prospective cohort study.We included 9,098 men and women free of pre-existing disease from the Whitehall II study, UK. Sleep measures were self-reported at baseline (1985-1988. Participants were followed until 2010 in a nationwide death register for total and cause-specific (cardiovascular disease, cancer and other mortality.There were 804 deaths over a mean 22 year follow-up period. In men, short sleep (≤ 6 hrs/night and disturbed sleep were not independently associated with CVD mortality, but there was an indication of higher risk among men who experienced both (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 0.96-2.58. In women, short sleep and disturbed sleep were independently associated with CVD mortality, and women with both short and disturbed sleep experienced a much higher risk of CVD mortality (3.19; 1.52-6.72 compared to those who slept 7-8 hours with no sleep disturbances; equivalent to approximately 90 additional deaths per 100,000 person years. Sleep was not associated with death due to cancer or other causes.Both short sleep and disturbed sleep are independent risk factors for CVD mortality in women and future studies on sleep may benefit from assessing disturbed sleep in addition to sleep duration in order to capture health-relevant features of inadequate sleep.

  8. Sleep abnormalities in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy-A sleep questionnaire and polysomnography based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Sujata; Puri, Vinod; Chaudhry, Neera; Gupta, Anu; Rabi, Sumit Kumar

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the quality of sleep, its architecture and occurrence of epileptiform discharges with their distribution across various stages of sleep in patients of Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), both drug naïve as well as those already on treatment. 99 patients of JME [36 drug naïve, 63 on antiepileptic drug(s) (AED)], and 30 healthy controls were recruited. Sleep quality and daytime sleepiness were evaluated with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), respectively.Polysomnography (PSG) was done to assess the sleep architecture. The EDI (Epileptiform Discharge Index) per stage of sleep was calculated. JME patients had significantly poor quality of sleep by PSQI (p=0.02).PSG revealed reduced sleep efficiency [p<0.001], increased sleep latency [p=0.02], increased%WASO [p<0.001], increased%N1 [p=0.01] and decreased% REM sleep [p=0.002] in the patients compared to controls. Epileptiform discharges were frequent among drug naïve JME patients [drug naïve, 868 vs. 727, treatment group]. EDI was higher in N1 (p=0.001) and N2 (p=0.007) in drug naïve compared to JME patients on treatment. EDI in valproate treatment group was relatively lower to other AEDs. JME is associated with poor sleep quality and altered architecture, irrespective of treatment status. REM sleep is significantly decreased in JME patients. Epileptiform discharges are frequent in lighter NREM sleep and EDI is higher in drug naïve patients. Although AEDs disrupt the NREM sleep, their use is associated with arousal stability in lighter stages of sleep and lower EDI, in particular with valproate. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Omega-3 DHA and sleep in UK children: Results from the DOLAB study.

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Paul; Burton, Jennifer R.; Sewell, Richard P.; Spreckelsen, Thees F; Richardson, Alex J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from the DHA-Oxford-Learning-and-Behaviour study (DOLAB) on the benefits of DHA supplementation for childrens' sleep.    See also the article: atty acids and sleep in UK children: subjective and pilot objective sleep results from the DOLAB study – a randomized controlled trial. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1111/jsr.12135/)

  10. Chronic sleep reduction is associated with academic achievement and study concentration in higher education students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Vermeulen, M; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Gordijn, Marijke C M; Hamburger, Hans L; Meijer, Anne M; van Rijn, Karin J; Vlak, Monique; Weysen, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate sleep impairs cognitive function and has been associated with worse academic achievement in higher education students; however, studies that control for relevant background factors and include knowledge on sleep hygiene are scarce. This study examined the association of chronic sleep

  11. Sleep during a regular week night: A twin-sibling study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; Someren, E.J.W.; Beem, A.L.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Willemsen, G.

    2008-01-01

    Previous genetic investigations of variation in normal sleep have focused on measures that describe sleep over longer periods of time. We undertook a study with the aim of evaluating whether heritability can be found in single-night sleep traits. A classical twin study design of monozygotic and

  12. Chronic sleep reduction is associated with academic achievement and study concentration in higher education students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Vermeulen, M; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Gordijn, Marijke C M; Hamburger, Hans L; Meijer, Anne M; van Rijn, Karin J; Vlak, Monique; Weysen, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Inadequate sleep impairs cognitive function and has been associated with worse academic achievement in higher education students; however, studies that control for relevant background factors and include knowledge on sleep hygiene are scarce. This study examined the association of chronic sleep

  13. Sleep patterns and insomnia among portuguese adolescents: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Odete; Garrido, António; Pereira, Carlos; Veiga, Nélio; Serpa, Carla; Sakellarides, Constantino

    2014-11-01

    Inadequate sleep patterns and insomnia are frequently linked and represent common sleep disorders among adolescents. The present study provides data on sleep patterns and insomnia among Portuguese adolescents. In a cross-sectional study we evaluated 6,919 students from the 7th to the 12th grade from twenty-six secondary schools. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Insomnia was defined based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV criteria and daytime sleepiness was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Sleep patterns evaluated both sleep duration ("insufficient" sleep was defined as sleep 29.3%. All prevalence were higher among girls (Psleep time, on weeknights, was 8:04±1:13 hours. On average adolescents went to bed at 22:18±1:47 hours, took 21 minutes to fall asleep and woke up at 7:15±0:35 hours. Only 6.4% of adolescents stated having a regular bedtime. The majority of adolescents (90.6%) reported having difficulty waking up, 64.7% experienced daytime sleepiness and 53.3% experienced sleep during classes. There are high prevalence of inadequate sleep patterns, insufficient sleep and insomnia among Portuguese adolescents. Insufficient sleep is associated with sleep patterns and social and behavioural factors. These results add to our knowledge of adolescent sleep worldwide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The Contribution of Psychosocial Stressors to Sleep among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dayna A; Lisabeth, Lynda; Lewis, Tené T; Sims, Mario; Hickson, DeMarc A; Samdarshi, Tandaw; Taylor, Herman; Diez Roux, Ana V

    2016-07-01

    Studies have shown that psychosocial stressors are related to poor sleep. However, studies of African Americans, who may be more vulnerable to the impact of psychosocial stressors, are lacking. Using the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) baseline data, we examined associations of psychosocial stressors with sleep in 4,863 African Americans. We examined cross-sectional associations between psychosocial stressors and sleep duration and quality in a large population sample of African Americans. Three measures of psychosocial stress were investigated: the Global Perceived Stress Scale (GPSS); Major Life Events (MLE); and the Weekly Stress Inventory (WSI). Sleep was assessed using self-reported hours of sleep and sleep quality rating (1 = poor; 5 = excellent). Multinomial logistic and linear regression models were used to examine the association of each stress measure (in quartiles) with continuous and categorical sleep duration ( 9 h ("long") versus 7 or 8 h ("normal"); and with sleep quality after adjustment for demographics and risk factors (body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity). Mean age of the sample was 54.6 years and 64% were female. Mean sleep duration was 6.4 + 1.5 hours, 54% had a short sleep duration, 5% had a long sleep duration, and 34% reported a "poor" or "fair" sleep quality. Persons in the highest GPSS quartile had higher odds of very short sleep (odds ratio: 2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.02, 4.08), higher odds of short sleep (1.72, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.12), shorter average sleep duration (Δ = -33.6 min (95% CI: -41.8, -25.4), and reported poorer sleep quality (Δ = -0.73 (95% CI: -0.83, -0.63) compared to those in the lowest quartile of GPSS after adjustment for covariates. Similar patterns were observed for WSI and MLE. Psychosocial stressors were not associated with long sleep. For WSI, effects of stress on sleep duration were stronger for younger (sleep, lower average sleep duration, and lower sleep quality in African Americans

  15. Daytime sleep duration and the development of childhood overweight: the KOALA Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolijn, R; Gubbels, J S; Sleddens, E F C; Kremers, S P J; Thijs, C

    2016-10-01

    Reduced nighttime sleep is a risk factor for childhood overweight, but the association between daytime sleep and overweight is unknown. The aim of this study is to evaluate daytime sleep duration as an independent risk factor for childhood overweight. Data from the KOALA Birth Cohort Study on daytime and nighttime sleep at 2 years (N = 2322), and body mass index (BMI) around 2, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 years were used. Multivariable general estimating equation regression analyses were performed to examine the associations of sleep duration with BMI (linear) and overweight (logistic). No associations between daytime sleep and BMI or overweight were found, whereas longer nighttime sleep was associated with lower BMI and lower risk of overweight persisting up to age 9. Daytime sleep duration is probably less relevant for prevention of childhood overweight. © 2015 World Obesity.

  16. Sleep disturbances in fibromyalgia: A meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Lin; Chang, Ling-Yin; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Fang, Su-Chen; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in fibromyalgia, but the features of sleep disturbances are not well understood. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies to compare the sleep outcomes of individuals with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. We systematically searched eight databases (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Airiti Library and Wanfang Data) for articles published before April 2016. Twenty-five case-controlled studies and a total of 2086 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Sleep was assessed using polysomnography and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. When sleep was assessed using polysomnography (19 studies), significant differences were observed in wake time after sleep onset (g=0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-1.41), total sleep time (g=-0.78, 95% CI=-1.34 to -0.15), sleep efficiency (g=-0.78, 95% CI=-1.23 to -0.32), percentage of stage 1 sleep (g=0.55, 95% CI=0.15-0.95), and percentage of slow-wave sleep (g=-0.66, 95% CI=-1.21 to -0.12) between participants with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. When sleep was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (7 studies), significant differences were observed in global scores (g=2.19, 95% CI 1.58-2.79), sleep onset latency (g=1.75, 95% CI 0.80-2.70), and sleep efficiency (g=-1.08, 95% CI -1.65 to -0.51) between participants with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Individuals with fibromyalgia experience lower sleep quality and sleep efficiency; longer wake time after sleep onset, short sleep duration, and light sleep when objectively assessed and more difficulty in initiating sleep when subjectively assessed. Sleep difficulties in fibromyalgia appear to be more when reported subjectively than when assessed objectively. This study received no funding from any source. All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest. This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors

  17. Objective sleep structure and cardiovascular risk factors in the general population: the HypnoLaus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba-Rubio, José; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Andries, Daniela; Tobback, Nadia; Preisig, Martin; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Luca, Gianina; Tafti, Mehdi; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the association between objective sleep measures and metabolic syndrome (MS), hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. Cross-sectional study. General population sample. There were 2,162 patients (51.2% women, mean age 58.4 ± 11.1). Patients were evaluated for hypertension, diabetes, overweight/obesity, and MS, and underwent a full polysomnography (PSG). PSG measured variables included: total sleep time (TST), percentage and time spent in slow wave sleep (SWS) and in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, sleep efficiency and arousal index (ArI). In univariate analyses, MS was associated with decreased TST, SWS, REM sleep, and sleep efficiency, and increased ArI. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, drugs that affect sleep and depression, the ArI remained significantly higher, but the difference disappeared in patients without significant sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Differences in sleep structure were also found according to the presence or absence of hypertension, diabetes, and overweight/obesity in univariate analysis. However, these differences were attenuated after multivariate adjustment and after excluding subjects with significant SDB. In this population-based sample we found significant associations between sleep structure and MS, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. However, these associations were cancelled after multivariate adjustment. We conclude that normal variations in sleep contribute little if any to MS and associated disorders. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. Sleep, School Performance, and a School-Based Intervention among School-Aged Children: A Sleep Series Study in China: e67928

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shenghui Li; Lester Arguelles; Fan Jiang; Wenjuan Chen; Xingming Jin; Chonghuai Yan; Ying Tian; Xiumei Hong; Ceng Qian; Jun Zhang; Xiaobin Wang; Xiaoming Shen

    2013-01-01

    .... The present series of studies aimed to shed light on sleep patterns, on the longitudinal association of sleep with school performance, and on practical intervention strategy for Chinese school-aged children...

  19. An experimental study of adolescent sleep restriction during a simulated school week: changes in phase, sleep staging, performance and sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Alex; Carskadon, Mary A; Dorrian, Jillian; Coussens, Scott; Short, Michelle A

    2017-04-01

    This laboratory study investigated the impact of restricted sleep during a simulated school week on circadian phase, sleep stages and daytime functioning. Changes were examined across and within days and during a simulated weekend recovery. Participants were 12 healthy secondary school students (six male) aged 15-17 years [mean = 16.1 years, standard deviation (SD) = 0.9]. After 2 nights with 10 h (21:30-07:30 hours), time in bed was restricted to 5 h for 5 nights (02:30-07:30 hours), then returned to 10 h time in bed for 2 nights (21:30-07:30 hours). Saliva was collected in dim light on the first and last sleep restriction nights to measure melatonin onset phase. Sleep was recorded polysomnographically, and the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and Karolinska Sleepiness Scale were undertaken 3-hourly while awake. Average phase delay measured by melatonin was 3 h (SD = 50 min). Compared to baseline, sleep during the restriction period contained a smaller percentage of Stages 1 and 2 and rapid eye movement (REM) and a greater percentage of Stage 4. PVT lapses increased significantly during sleep restriction and did not return to baseline levels during recovery. Subjective sleepiness showed a similar pattern during restriction, but returned to baseline levels during recovery. Results suggest that sustained attention in adolescents is affected negatively by sleep restriction, particularly in the early morning, and that a weekend of recovery sleep is insufficient to restore performance. The discrepancy between sleepiness ratings and performance may indicate a lack of perception of this residual impairment. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Childhood Sleep Duration and Quality in Relation to Leptin Concentration in Two Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeke, Caroline E.; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Redline, Susan; Taveras, Elsie M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Poor sleep in childhood is associated with increased obesity risk, possibly by affecting appetite-regulating hormones such as leptin. We examined short- and long-term sleep duration and quality in relation to leptin in two US pediatric cohorts. Design: Analysis of data from two prospective cohort studies. Setting: Population-based. Adolescent polysomnography assessments performed in a clinical research unit. Patients or Participants: Children in Project Viva (n = 655) and adolescents in the Cleveland Children's Sleep & Health Study (n = 502). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: In Project Viva, mothers reported average child sleep duration annually from infancy through age 7, and we measured leptin at ages 3 and 7. In the Cleveland Children's Sleep & Health Study, we collected self-reported sleep duration, polysomnography-derived measures of sleep quality, and fasting leptin at ages 16-19. In sex-stratified linear regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and adiposity, chronic curtailed sleep was associated with lower leptin at age 7 in girls; a one-unit decrease in sleep score was associated with a 0.08 decrease in log leptin (95%CI: 0.01,0.15). The association was stronger in girls with greater adiposity (P = 0.01). Among adolescents, shorter sleep was associated with lower leptin in males; each one-hour decrease in sleep duration was associated with a 0.06 decrease in log leptin (95%CI: 0.00, 0.11). Sleep duration was not associated with leptin at other ages. Sleep quality indices were not associated with leptin. Conclusions: Our results suggest possible age-specific sexual dimorphism in the influence of sleep on leptin, which may partly explain inconsistencies in the literature. Citation: Boeke CE; Storfer-Isser A; Redline S; Taveras EM. Childhood sleep duration and quality in relation to leptin concentration in two cohort studies. SLEEP 2014;37(3):613-620. PMID:24587585

  1. The impact of prolonged violent video-gaming on adolescent sleep: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel L; Gradisar, Michael; Drummond, Aaron; Lovato, Nicole; Wessel, Jason; Micic, Gorica; Douglas, Paul; Delfabbro, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Video-gaming is an increasingly prevalent activity among children and adolescents that is known to influence several areas of emotional, cognitive and behavioural functioning. Currently there is insufficient experimental evidence about how extended video-game play may affect adolescents' sleep. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term impact of adolescents' prolonged exposure to violent video-gaming on sleep. Seventeen male adolescents (mean age = 16 ± 1 years) with no current sleep difficulties played a novel, fast-paced, violent video-game (50 or 150 min) before their usual bedtime on two different testing nights in a sleep laboratory. Objective (polysomnography-measured sleep and heart rate) and subjective (single-night sleep diary) measures were obtained to assess the arousing effects of prolonged gaming. Compared with regular gaming, prolonged gaming produced decreases in objective sleep efficiency (by 7 ± 2%, falling below 85%) and total sleep time (by 27 ± 12 min) that was contributed by a near-moderate reduction in rapid eye movement sleep (Cohen's d = 0.48). Subjective sleep-onset latency significantly increased by 17 ± 8 min, and there was a moderate reduction in self-reported sleep quality after prolonged gaming (Cohen's d = 0.53). Heart rate did not differ significantly between video-gaming conditions during pre-sleep game-play or the sleep-onset phase. Results provide evidence that prolonged video-gaming may cause clinically significant disruption to adolescent sleep, even when sleep after video-gaming is initiated at normal bedtime. However, physiological arousal may not necessarily be the mechanism by which technology use affects sleep. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. Canada goose kill statistics: Swan Lake Public Hunting Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document discusses how the flexible kill formula for Canada goose hunting at Swan Lake Public Hunting Area was reached. Methods used to collect Canada goose...

  3. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) manages multiple water management units. Silver Lake is the largest unit that is utilized primarily as a water storage...

  4. Narrative Report : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September - December 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Swan Lake NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  6. Primitive Weapons Deer Hunt Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting activity and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Swan...

  7. Tundra swan avian infuenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Alaska Peninsula as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in mid to late July 2008. This...

  8. The swans and geese of Alaska's arctic slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A mid-summer aerial search was made on the 23,000 square miles of waterfowl habitat on Alaska's Arctic slope. Observations included 159 whistling swan (Olor...

  9. SWAN: a Service for Interactive Analysis in the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Piparo, Danilo; Mato, Pere; Mascetti, Luca; Moscicki, Jakub; Lamanna, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    SWAN (Service for Web based ANalysis) is a platform to perform interactive data analysis in the cloud. SWAN allows users to write and run their data analyses with only a web browser, leveraging on the widely-adopted Jupyter notebook interface. The user code, executions and data live entirely in the cloud. SWAN makes it easier to produce and share results and scientific code, access scientific software, produce tutorials and demonstrations as well as preserve analyses. Furthermore, it is also a powerful tool for non-scientific data analytics. This paper describes how a pilot of the SWAN service was implemented and deployed at CERN. Its backend combines state-of-the-art software technologies with a set of existing IT services such as user authentication, virtual computing infrastructure, mass storage, file synchronisation and sharing, specialised clusters and batch systems. The added value of this combination of services is discussed, with special focus on the opportunities offered by the CERNBox service and it...

  10. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAKP) as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in late July 2009....

  11. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAKP) and the Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAKP) in late July 2010 as part of...

  12. Tundra swan avain influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Alaska Peninsula as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in late July 2006. At Caribou River,...

  13. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Alaska Peninsula as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in late July 2007. On the Northern...

  14. [Disease Prevention and Control Plan Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Disease Prevention and Control Plan for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge provides background information on disease surveillance; an inventory of Refuge...

  15. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2001 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  16. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  17. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  18. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  19. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  20. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  1. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  2. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  3. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  4. Grassland Management Plan : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Grassland Management Plan for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge provides an overview of the Refuge, a list of special considerations affecting grassland...

  5. Narrative Report : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September - December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Sleep-related eating disorder versus sleepwalking: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, Agnès; Flamand, Mathilde; Oudiette, Delphine; Voillery, Dorothée; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2012-09-01

    Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) may have some common clinical features with sleepwalking and with eating behavior disorders. The objective of this study was to compare clinical, sleep, and eating behavior measures in patients with SRED vs. sleepwalkers and controls. Overall, 15 patients with SRED, 21 sleepwalkers, and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers underwent interviews, completed sleep, anxiety, depression, and eating behavior scales, and had a night-time videopolysomnography. Patients with SRED were mainly women, had disease onset in adulthood, suffered nightly episodes and insomnia, and had more frequent eating problems in childhood and higher current anorexia scores than sleepwalkers and controls. Unlike controls, they shared several commonalities with sleepwalkers, including a high frequency (66%) of past or current sleepwalking, a similar timing of parasomnia episodes during the first half of the night, numerous arousals from stage N3, and a similarly altered level of daytime sleepiness and anxiety, but higher awareness during parasomnia episodes. Conversely, only 10% of sleepwalkers ate during their sleepwalking episodes. On videopolysomnography, the eating episodes occurred mostly within 1min after awakening from stage N2 (n=9) or stage N3 (n=6). The frequencies of restless legs syndrome, periodic leg movements, and sleep apnea were similar across the three groups. Patients with SRED share several clinical commonalities with sleepwalkers (although their level of awareness is higher) plus former or current eating behavior problems. It suggests that they have specialized a former sleepwalking behavior toward sleep-related eating because they are more vulnerable to eating behavior problems during the daytime. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comprehensive assessments of long-term sleep habits in epidemiological study: Validity and reliability of sleep factors questionnaire (SFQ) among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Fu, Wen-Xue; Wang, Xin; Deng, Qin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Lin-Yan; Zhao, Hao; Fan, Wen-Yan; Huang, Shao-Xin

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiological studies suggested that poor sleep is a potentially novel risk factor for several health outcomes currently; however, there are no validated questionnaires that can systematically measure sleep parameters within these studies. We evaluated the reliability and validity of 17-item sleep factors questionnaire (SFQ), which was developed to comprehensively assess long-term sleep habits for the Jiujiang Breast Cancer Study (JBCS), Jiujiang, China. The participants included 100 women aged 18-74years, who were randomly selected from the JBCS project, and completed a SFQ at baseline and again 1year later, and 4 quarterly 30 consecutive days (a total of 120days) sleep diaries over this same year. Reliability was tested by comparing the 2 SFQs; validity by comparing the average measures between the SFQ and the 4 sleep diaries. Validity analysis showed moderate correlation (γ=0.41) for sleep duration with the adjusted concordance correlation coefficient (CCCadj) of 0.54; the weighted κ statistics indicated an excellent agreement for night/shift work and sleep medication use; fair-to-moderate for sleep quality, light at night (LAN), nighttime sleeping with light on, sleep noise and nap time; slight-to-fair for sleep quality and nighttime wakings frequency. Reliability analysis showed excellent correlation for night/shift work and sleep medication use; fair-to-moderate for LAN, nighttime wakings frequency, insomnia frequency, sleep noise and nap time; but slight-to-fair for insomnia frequency and nighttime sleeping with light on; the CCCadj for sleep duration was 0.61. The SFQ showed reasonable reliability and validity for sleep assessments in most domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep bruxism in children: sleep studies correlate poorly with parental reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, N T; Desplats, E; Bellerive, A

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of sleep bruxism (SB) is usually reported as highest during childhood and decreases with age. However, this is based on parental reports and self-reports in the absence of quantitative data. Moreover, although SB signs, symptoms, and cutoff criteria have been established in the adult population, they remain unassessed in the pediatric population. This study aims to classify SB in children according to sleep variables and rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) frequency indexes and to determine associations with objective signs and symptoms of SB in comparison with parental reports. Thirty-two children (11.5 ± 0.3 years) recruited at the orthodontic clinic underwent a dental assessment and ambulatory sleep recording (type II). Parents responded to a validated screening questionnaire on tooth clenching and grinding. A two-step cluster analysis was performed to classify participants into RMMA frequency groups, as described subsequently, followed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare groups. Fisher's exact test was performed for analyzing the associations between the signs and symptoms according to RMMA. Three RMMA frequency groups were identified: low (n = 12), moderate-high (n = 13), and control (n = 7). Between-group comparisons for episodes per hour and bursts/hour were significant (p <0.001). No relationships were found between RMMA (presence/absence) and clinically assessed tooth wear or reports of tooth clenching or grinding or craniofacial complaints. RMMA frequency classification differs slightly between children and adults. No association was observed between parental reports and RMMA, suggesting the need to improve parental knowledge of children's SB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Management of sleeping problems with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curfs, L.M.G.; Didden, H.C.M.; Sikkema, S.P.E.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de

    1999-01-01

    Sleeping problems are common among children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Extinction may be effective if sleeping problems have been shaped and are positively reinforced by parental attention. The present study shows that extinction was effective in the treatment of severe sleeping problems in a

  10. The Optimal Dose of Midazolam for Promoting Sleep in Critically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Joong Kim

    2014-08-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The appropriate quantity of sleep in critically ill patients was achieved with a continuous infusion of 0.02-0.03 mg/kg/h midazolam. However, the quality of sleep was poor. Further study is required for the promotion of quality sleep in such patients.

  11. Actigraphic sleep fragmentation, efficiency and duration associate with dietary intake in the Rotterdam study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short self-reported sleep duration is associated with dietary intake and this association may partly mediate the link between short sleep and metabolic abnormalities. Subjective sleep measures, however, may be inaccurate and biased. The objective of this study was to evaluate the associations betwee...

  12. Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter T; Malison, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

  13. Probabilistic characterization of sleep architecture: home based study on healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Molina, Gary; Vissapragada, Sreeram; Mahadevan, Anandi; Goodpaster, Robert; Riedner, Brady; Bellesi, Michele; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-08-01

    The quantification of sleep architecture has high clinical value for diagnostic purposes. While the clinical standard to assess sleep architecture is in-lab based polysomnography, higher ecological validity can be obtained with multiple sleep recordings at home. In this paper, we use a dataset composed of fifty sleep EEG recordings at home (10 per study participant for five participants) to analyze the sleep stage transition dynamics using Markov chain based modeling. The statistical analysis of the duration of continuous sleep stage bouts is also analyzed to identify the speed of transition between sleep stages. This analysis identified two types of NREM states characterized by fast and slow exit rates which from the EEG analysis appear to correspond to shallow and deep sleep respectively.

  14. Sleep patterns and insomnia among adolescents: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell M; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine sleep patterns and rates of insomnia in a population-based study of adolescents aged 16-19 years. Gender differences in sleep patterns and insomnia, as well as a comparison of insomnia rates according to DSM-IV, DSM-V and quantitative criteria for insomnia (Behav. Res. Ther., 41, 2003, 427), were explored. We used a large population-based study in Hordaland county in Norway, conducted in 2012. The sample included 10,220 adolescents aged 16-18 years (54% girls). Self-reported sleep measurements included bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, rate and frequency and duration of difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep and rate and frequency of tiredness and sleepiness. The adolescents reported short sleep duration on weekdays (mean 6:25 hours), resulting in a sleep deficiency of about 2 h. A majority of the adolescents (65%) reported sleep onset latency exceeding 30 min. Girls reported longer sleep onset latency and a higher rate of insomnia than boys, while boys reported later bedtimes and a larger weekday-weekend discrepancy on several sleep parameters. Insomnia prevalence rates ranged from a total prevalence of 23.8 (DSM-IV criteria), 18.5 (DSM-V criteria) and 13.6% (quantitative criteria for insomnia). We conclude that short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and insomnia were prevalent in adolescents. This warrants attention as a public health concern in this age group. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. Decreased Nocturnal Awakenings in Young Adults Performing Bikram Yoga: A Low-Constraint Home Sleep Monitoring Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Matt T.; Kudesia, Ravi S.

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the impact of Bikram Yoga on subjective and objective sleep parameters. We compared subjective (diary) and objective (headband sleep monitor) sleep measures on yoga versus nonyoga days during a 14-day period. Subjects ( = 1 3 ) were not constrained regarding yoga-practice days, other exercise, caffeine, alcohol, or naps. These activities did not segregate by choice of yoga days. Standard sleep metrics were unaffected by yoga, including sleep latency, total sleep t...

  16. Characterization of sleep breathing pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes: sweet sleep study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lecube

    Full Text Available Although sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS is highly prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, it is unknown whether or not subjects with and without T2D share the same sleep breathing pattern.A cross-sectional study in patients with SAHS according to the presence (n = 132 or not (n = 264 of T2D. Both groups were matched by age, gender, BMI, and waist and neck circumferences. A subgroup of 125 subjects was also matched by AHI. The exclusion criteria included chronic respiratory disease, alcohol abuse, use of sedatives, and heart failure. A higher apnea hypopnea index (AHI was observed in T2D patients [32.2 (10.2-114.0 vs. 25.6 (10.2-123.4 events/hours; p = 0.002. When sleep events were evaluated separately, patients with T2D showed a significant increase in apnea events [8.4 (0.1-87.7 vs. 6.3 (0.0-105.6 e/h; p = 0.044, as well as a two-fold increase in the percentage of time spent with oxygen saturation <90% [15.7 (0.0-97.0 vs. 7.9 (0.0-95.6 %; <0.001], higher rates of oxygen desaturation events, and also higher daily sleepiness [7.0 (0.0-21.0 vs. 5.0 (0.0-21.0; p = 0.006] than subjects without T2D. Significant positive correlations between fasting plasma glucose and AHI, the apnea events, and CT90 were observed. Finally, multiple linear regression analyses showed that T2D was independently associated with AHI (R2 = 0.217, the apnea index (R2 = 0.194, CT90 (R2 = 0.222, and desaturation events.T2D patients present a different pattern of sleep breathing than subject without diabetes. The most important differences are the severity of hypoxemia and the number of apneas whereas the incidence of hypopnea episodes is similar.

  17. On the genetics of sleep disorders: genome-wide association studies and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael J ParsonsMammalian Genetics Unit, MRC Harwell, Harwell, Oxfordshire, UKAbstract: Sleep is an essential behavior, yet much of its underlying functions are still unknown. The disruption of sleep can led to a variety of health consequences. Family and twin studies have together shown that genetic factors underlie variation in sleep characteristics and sleep disorders. Given the importance of sleep to our well-being, understanding its underlying genetic factors is essential to both the prevention and treatment of these disorders. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS have helped to provide evidence of associations of both known and novel genetic variants with sleep disorders. This review outlines the findings from GWAS for a number of sleep disorders, including insomnia, restless leg syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, and narcolepsy, and discusses these findings in the context of supporting evidence from independent methodologies. Finally, the limitations of GWAS approaches are outlined, along with the future directions of the genetics of sleep in the post-GWAS era.Keywords: genome-wide association studies, sleep, sleep disorder, insomnia, restless leg syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, narcolepsy

  18. Microbial impact of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and whistling swans (Cygnus columbianus columbianus) on aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussong, D; Damaré, J M; Limpert, R J; Sladen, W J; Weiner, R M; Colwell, R R

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the intestinal bacterial flora of Canada geese and whistling swans were carried out with the finding that wild birds harbor significantly more fecal coliforms than fecal streptococci. The reverse was typical of captive and fasting birds. Neither Salmonella spp. nor Shigella spp. were isolated from 44 migratory waterfowl that were wintering in the Chesapeake Bay region. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were detected in seven birds. Geese eliminated 10(7) and swans 10(9) fecal coliforms per day. Results of in situ studies showed that large flocks of waterfowl can cause elevated fecal coliform densities in the water column. From the data obtained in this study, it is possible to predict the microbial impact of migratory waterfowl upon aquatic roosting sites.

  19. Coexistence and population genetic structure of the whooper swan Cygnus cygnus and mute swan Cygnus olor in Lithuania and Latvia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butkauskas, Dalius; Švažas, Saulius; Tubelytė, Vaida; Morkūnas, Julius; Sruoga, Aniolas; Boiko, Dmitrijs; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Stanevičius, Vitas; Baublys, Vykintas

    2012-01-01

    .... Marked differences in the genetic population structure of both species may partially explain the dominance of the whooper swan, as genetic population divergence can be a major factor affecting inter...

  20. Effects of state and trait anxiety on sleep structure: A polysomnographic study in 1083 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, András; Montana, Xavier; Lanquart, Jean-Pol; Hubain, Philippe; Szűcs, Anna; Linkowski, Paul; Loas, Gwenolé

    2016-10-30

    Anxiety affects millions of people and has been shown to co-occur in combination with sleep disturbances, generating heavy medical costs and a huge socio-medico-economic burden. Sleep-studies in anxiety disorders are inconsistent and the effects of state and trait anxiety are unexplored. We selected 1083 patients from the database of a hospital sleep laboratory. The patients had polysomnography for different sleep disorders; their sleep initiation (sleep onset latency), sleep maintenance (total sleep time), non-rapid eye movement sleep-, and rapid eye movement sleep parameters; as well as their State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck depression scale were measured. In order to be included in our study, individuals needed to score in the low or high range on the State and/or Trait Subscales of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. We found that both state and trait anxiety affected non-rapid eye movement sleep parameters. Sleep onset latency changes predominantly associated to state anxiety while rapid eye movement parameters related to trait anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Associations of quality of sleep with lifestyle factors and profile of studies among Lithuanian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preišegolavičiūtė, Evelina; Leskauskas, Darius; Adomaitienė, Virginija

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze associations among quality of sleep, profile of the studies, and lifestyle factors among the students of three different study profiles (medicine, economics, and law). A total of 405 randomly selected students from the first and fourth years of studies from 4 different universities in Lithuania answered the standardized questionnaires consisting of two parts: 1) the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for subjective evaluation of sleep quality; 2) the questionnaire about sleep and lifestyle habits and impact of poor sleep on the quality of life developed by the researchers. More than half (59.4%) of the students scored higher than 5 on the PSQI, which allowed suspecting sleep disorders. A significant difference in the frequency of poor sleepers was found regarding the profile of studies (Pstudents. There was a significant correlation between quality of sleep and subjective evaluation of quality of life (Pstudents experienced the highest impact of poor sleep on the quality of life (P=0.008). Students studying before going to sleep, spending more time studying, and having less leisure time had worse quality of sleep (Pstudents of medicine. The incidence of sleep problems is high among students in Lithuania, reaching 59.4%. Medical students have worse quality of sleep and worse impact of poor sleep on the quality of life compared to students of law and economics. A significant difference was found between medical students and their peers in other profiles of studies regarding their attitudes and habits related to studies: medical students spent more time for studying, were more anxious about studies and less satisfied with the results, studied more often before going to sleep.

  2. Sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 2: a controlled polysomnographic study and self-reported questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romigi, A; Albanese, M; Placidi, F; Izzi, F; Liguori, C; Marciani, M G; Mercuri, N B; Terracciano, C; Vitrani, G; Petrucci, A; Di Gioia, B; Massa, R

    2014-06-01

    There is a paucity of data available regarding the occurrence of sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2). In this study the sleep-wake cycle and daytime sleepiness were investigated in DM2 patients and compared with results from healthy subjects and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients. Twelve DM2 outpatients, 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls and 18 DM1 patients were recruited. Subjective quality of sleep was assessed by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Both the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Daytime Sleepiness Scale were performed in order to evaluate excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). All participants underwent polysomnographic monitoring over 48 h as well as the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Sleep efficiency was DM2 patients, and significantly reduced when compared with controls or with DM1. Decreased sleep efficiency was associated with sleep-disordered breathing in seven out of 12 DM2 patients and/or periodic limbs movements of sleep (PLMS) in three out of eight patients. Six DM2 patients showed REM sleep without atonia, whereas none of the controls or DM1 patients showed REM sleep dysregulation. The global PSQI score was higher in DM2 patients than in controls and DM1 patients. Sleep quality in DM2 patients is poorer than in DM1 patients and controls. Sleep apnea is the most common sleep disorder in DM2 patients. Obstructive sleep apnea and sleep fragmentation may represent the main cause of EDS, whereas PLMS is a frequent finding in DM1. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EAN.

  3. Nightmares affect the experience of sleep quality but not sleep architecture: an ambulatory polysomnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Franc; Schredl, Michael; Georg W Alpers

    2015-01-01

    Background Nightmares and bad dreams are common in people with emotional disturbances. For example, nightmares are a core symptom in posttraumatic stress disorder and about 50% of borderline personality disorder patients suffer from frequent nightmares. Independent of mental disorders, nightmares are often associated with sleep problems such as prolonged sleep latencies, poorer sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness. It has not been well documented whether this is reflected in objectively quan...

  4. Sleep disturbances and cause-specific mortality: Results from the GAZEL cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Poor sleep is an increasing problem in modern society, but most previous studies on the association between sleep and mortality rates have addressed only duration, not quality, of sleep. The authors prospectively examined the effects of sleep disturbances on mortality rates and on important risk...... factors for mortality, such as body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes. A total of 16,989 participants in the GAZEL cohort study were asked validated questions on sleep disturbances in 1990 and were followed up until 2009, with...

  5. The impact of an online prematriculation sleep course (sleep 101) on sleep knowledge and behaviors in college freshmen: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Quan SF; Ziporyn PS

    2017-01-01

    College students have a high prevalence of poor sleep quality and sleep deficiency which negatively impacts their academic, mental and physical performance. A prematriculation course focused on improving sleep knowledge and behaviors may reduce sleep problems. “Sleep 101” is an online prematriculation course developed to educate incoming college freshmen about the importance of sleep in their lives and to recommend behaviors that will improve their sleep health. In a pilot program, “Sleep 101...

  6. Evaluation of a piezoelectric system as an alternative to electroencephalogram/ electromyogram recordings in mouse sleep studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Géraldine M; Nicod, Jérôme; Emmenegger, Yann; Donohue, Kevin D; O'Hara, Bruce F; Franken, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, sleep studies in mammals are performed using electroencephalogram/electromyogram (EEG/EMG) recordings to determine sleep-wake state. In laboratory animals, this requires surgery and recovery time and causes discomfort to the animal. In this study, we evaluated the performance of an alternative, noninvasive approach utilizing piezoelectric films to determine sleep and wakefulness in mice by simultaneous EEG/EMG recordings. The piezoelectric films detect the animal's movements with high sensitivity and the regularity of the piezo output signal, related to the regular breathing movements characteristic of sleep, serves to automatically determine sleep. Although the system is commercially available (Signal Solutions LLC, Lexington, KY), this is the first statistical validation of various aspects of sleep. EEG/EMG and piezo signals were recorded simultaneously during 48 h. Mouse sleep laboratory. Nine male and nine female CFW outbred mice. EEG/EMG surgery. The results showed a high correspondence between EEG/EMG-determined and piezo-determined total sleep time and the distribution of sleep over a 48-h baseline recording with 18 mice. Moreover, the piezo system was capable of assessing sleep quality (i.e., sleep consolidation) and interesting observations at transitions to and from rapid eye movement sleep were made that could be exploited in the future to also distinguish the two sleep states. The piezo system proved to be a reliable alternative to electroencephalogram/electromyogram recording in the mouse and will be useful for first-pass, large-scale sleep screens for genetic or pharmacological studies. Mang GM, Nicod J, Emmenegger Y, Donohue KD, O'Hara BF, Franken P. Evaluation of a piezoelectric system as an alternative to electroencephalogram/electromyogram recordings in mouse sleep studies.

  7. Arvicanthis ansorgei, a Novel Model for the Study of Sleep and Waking in Diurnal Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Jeffrey; Ruppert, Elisabeth; Calvel, Laurent; Robin-Choteau, Ludivine; Gropp, Claire-Marie; Allemann, Caroline; Reibel, Sophie; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Bourgin, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Sleep neurobiology studies use nocturnal species, mainly rats and mice. However, because their daily sleep/wake organization is inverted as compared to humans, a diurnal model for sleep studies is needed. To fill this gap, we phenotyped sleep and waking in Arvicanthis ansorgei, a diurnal rodent widely used for the study of circadian rhythms. Video-electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOG) recordings. Rodent sleep laboratory. Fourteen male Arvicanthis ansorgei, aged 3 mo. 12 h light (L):12 h dark (D) baseline condition, 24-h constant darkness, 6-h sleep deprivation. Wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep showed similar electrophysiological characteristics as nocturnal rodents. On average, animals spent 12.9 h ± 0.4 awake per 24-h cycle, of which 6.88 h ± 0.3 was during the light period. NREM sleep accounted for 9.63 h ± 0.4, which of 5.13 h ± 0.2 during dark period, and REM sleep for 89.9 min ± 6.7, which of 52.8 min ± 4.4 during dark period. The time-course of sleep and waking across the 12 h light:12 h dark was overall inverted to that observed in rats or mice, though with larger amounts of crepuscular activity at light and dark transitions. A dominant crepuscular regulation of sleep and waking persisted under constant darkness, showing the lack of a strong circadian drive in the absence of clock reinforcement by external cues, such as a running wheel. Conservation of the homeostatic regulation was confirmed with the observation of higher delta power following sustained waking periods and a 6-h sleep deprivation, with subsequent decrease during recovery sleep. Arvicanthis ansorgei is a valid diurnal rodent model for studying the regulatory mechanisms of sleep and so represents a valuable tool for further understanding the nocturnality/diurnality switch. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Continuity of sleep problems from adolescence to young adulthood: results from a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Yaqoot; Doi, Suhail A R; Najman, Jake M; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2017-08-01

    Considering the lack of evidence on incidence and continuity of sleep problems from adolescence to young adulthood, this study explores sleep problems' incidence and their continuation rates from 14 to 21 years. Sleep data from the 14-year (n = 4,924) and 21-year (n = 3660) follow-up of the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy cohort were used. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, and psychological conditions were explored for their role in sleep problems. Modified Poisson regression with a robust error variance was used to identify predictors. Inverse probability weights were used to account for attrition. Of all subjects, 26.0% of the subjects at 14 years and 28.3% of the subjects at 21 years reported "often" sleep problems, with 41.7% of adolescent sleep problems persisting at 21 years. Perinatal and early-life maternal factors, for example, drug abuse (incidence rate ratio (IRR), 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.71), smoking, depression, and anxiety, were significant predictors of adolescent sleep problems. Female sex (IRR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.55-2.94), advanced pubertal stages, and smoking were the important predictors of sleep problems at 21 years. Adolescent depression/anxiety supported the continuity of sleep problems (IRR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.05-1.40), whereas exercise was seen to exert a protective effect. This study indicates high rates of sleep problems in young subjects, with around half of sleep problems originating in adolescence persisting in young adulthood. Therefore, early interventions are needed to manage sleep problems in young subjects and prevent further progression to other life stages. Future studies should explore if sleep problems in young adults also persist in later life stages and identify the factors supporting the continuity of sleep problems. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Social stressors at work, sleep quality and psychosomatic health complaints--a longitudinal ambulatory field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diana; Elfering, Achim

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that occupational stress increases psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The present longitudinal actigraphy field study investigated the role of sleep quality--objectively assessed sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation, and subjectively assessed sleep quality--as a mediator in the relationship between stressful work conditions at time 1 and psychosomatic health complaints at time 2. A longitudinal hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were positively related to objectively assessed sleep fragmentation and to psychosomatic health complaints. Moreover, objectively assessed sleep fragmentation mediated the effect of social stressors at work on psychosomatic health complaints. Contrary to our expectations, social stressors at work were not related to other sleep quality parameters (i.e. sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and subjectively assessed sleep quality) during follow-up. Sleep fragmentation is discussed as an important consequence of social stressors at work that increase the risk of psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Nocturia is Associated with Poor Sleep Quality Among Older Women in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Constance H; Vaughan, Camille P; Markland, Alayne D; Huang, Alison J; Mitchell, Michael N; Bliwise, Donald L; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Redline, Susan; Alessi, Cathy A; Stone, Katie

    2017-11-01

    (1) To examine relationships between frequency of nocturia and self-reported sleep quality and objective sleep measures in older women, and (2) to estimate the amount of variation in sleep measures that is specifically attributable to frequency of nocturia. Secondary, cross sectional analysis of the multicenter prospective cohort Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF). Community-dwelling women aged ≥80 years. Frequency of nocturia in the previous 12 months, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index sleep quality subscale, and actigraphy-measured wake after sleep onset (WASO) and total sleep time (TST). Of 1,520 participants, 25% (n = 392) reported their nocturia frequency was 3-4 times/night and an additional 60% (n = 917) reported their nocturia frequency was 1-2 times/night. More frequent nocturia was associated with poor sleep quality (3-4/night: 26.8% reported fairly bad or very bad sleep quality; 1-2/night: 14.7%; 0/night: 7.7%; P sleep quality (odds ratio: 4.26 [95% CI 1.65, 11.01]; P = .003) and was associated with a 37-minute worsening in WASO (95% CI 26.0, 49.0; P sleep quality and longer wake time at night. Interventions that improve nocturia may be useful in improving sleep quality and wake time at night. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Sleep and Respiration in 100 Healthy Caucasian Sleepers--A Polysomnographic Study According to American Academy of Sleep Medicine Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterling, Thomas; Högl, Birgit; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Hackner, Heinz; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-06-01

    Despite differences between American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and Rechtschaffen and Kales scoring criteria, normative values following the current AASM criteria are lacking. We investigated sleep and respiratory variables in healthy adults over the lifespan, and established polysomnographic normative values according to current standards. Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Academic referral hospital sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers aged 19-77 y were selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening. N/A. All subjects underwent one full-night polysomnography. Sleep and arousals were scored according to AASM standards. Respiration was scored according to AASM 2007 and 2012 criteria in order to compare both methods. Percentile curves showed age-related differences in sleep architecture: a decrease was found for sleep efficiency [≤ 30 y: 87.0 (71.9-94.1)% versus > 60 y: 79.7 (44.5-90.9)%], total sleep time [≤ 30 y: 413.5 (345.6-451.9) min versus > 60 y: 378.3 (216.0-440.0) min], the percentages of N3 [≤ 30 y 20.7 (15.2-37.5)% versus > 60 y: 14.9 (2.4-35.6)%] and rapid eye movement sleep [≤ 30 y 15.5 (7.5-23.6)% versus. > 60 y: 10.3 (1.9-21.9)%], whereas the percentage of wake time after sleep onset increased with age [≤ 30 y 6.0 (1.9-22.8)% versus > 60 y: 15.2 (6.3-48.7)%]. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was higher when applying the AASM 2012 criteria [AHI AASM 2007 0.7 (0.0-21.5)/h versus 2012: 1.7 (0.0-25)/h; P 15/h. This study provides normative data on sleep macrostructure, microstructure, and respiration in adults following AASM standards. Furthermore, we demonstrated that respiration scoring according to AASM 2012 results in higher AHIs, and challenge the use of age-independent respiratory cutoff values. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  12. Sleep Duration and Neurocognitive Function in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alberto R; Tarraf, Wassim; Daviglus, Martha; Davis, Sonia; Gallo, Linda C; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Penedo, Frank J; Redline, Susan; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Wright, Clinton B; Zee, Phyllis C; González, Hector M

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the association between sleep duration and neurocognitive function in a representative sample of middle-aged to older Hispanic/Latino adults in the US. We tested the hypothesis that sleep duration has a nonlinear, inverted U-shaped association with neurocognitive function. We performed a cross-sectional analysis from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) participants ages 45-74 years (n = 8,676). HCHS/SOL is a community-based cohort from four US urban areas sampled using a probability design from 2008-2011. Self-reported sleep duration was calculated as a weighted average of the difference between habitual wake and bedtimes assessed by separate questions for weekdays and weekends. Neurocognitive function was measured with standardized scores for Word (Phonemic) Fluency (WF), Brief-Spanish English Verbal learning test (B-SEVLT), and Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS) tests. The mean age was 56.5 years; 55% were women; and 40.4% had less than high school education. Average sleep duration was 7.8 ± 1.7 hours. There was an inverted U-shaped association with sleep duration and WF, B-SEVLT sum, and the DSS, with no association with B-SEVLT delayed-recall. Participants with intermediate sleep duration had the best neurocognitive function, while long sleepers had worse neurocognitive function adjusting for demographic, behavioral, and medical factors, daytime sleepiness, and use of sleep medications. Sleep duration had curvilinear inverted U-shaped associations with neurocognitive function, with worse scores among participants with longer sleep duration. These findings may provide a framework to further examine sleep duration in the prevention and treatment of neurocognitive disorders.

  13. Gender equity programmes in academic medicine: a realist evaluation approach to Athena SWAN processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Louise; Wyatt, David; Fudge, Nina; Mattingley, Helena; Williamson, Catherine; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-09-08

    Gender inequity has persisted in academic medicine. Yet equity is vital for countries to achieve their full potential in terms of translational research and patient benefit. This study sought to understand how the gender equity programme, Athena SWAN, can be enabled and constrained by interactions between the programme and the context it is implemented into, and whether these interactions might produce unintended consequences. Multimethod qualitative case studies using a realist evaluation approach. 5 departments from a university medical school hosting a Translational Research Organisation. 25 hours of observations of gender equality committee meetings, 16 in-depth interviews with Heads of Departments, Committee Leads and key personnel involved in the initiative. 4 focus groups with 15 postdoctoral researchers, lecturers and senior lecturers. The implementation of Athena SWAN principles was reported to have created social space to address gender inequity and to have highlighted problematic practices to staff. However, a number of factors reduced the programme's potential to impact gender inequity. Gender inequity was reproduced in the programme's enactment as female staff was undertaking a disproportionate amount of Athena SWAN work, with potential negative impacts on individual women's career progression. Early career researchers experienced problems accessing Athena SWAN initiatives. Furthermore, the impact of the programme was perceived to be undermined by wider institutional practices, national policies and societal norms, which are beyond the programme's remit. Gender equity programmes have the potential to address inequity. However, paradoxically, they can also unintentionally reproduce and reinforce gender inequity through their enactment. Potential programme impacts may be undermined by barriers to staff availing of career development and training initiatives, and by wider institutional practices, national policies and societal norms. Published by the

  14. A Study of the Association Between Sleep Bruxism, Low Quality of Sleep, and Degenerative Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Glaucia Marques; Bonato, Letícia Ladeira; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Silva, Jesca Neftali Nogueira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in individuals suffering from sleep bruxism (SB), associating these characteristics with the quality of sleep. For this, we followed the International Classification of Sleep Disorders for the diagnosis of SB, in addition to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the classification of TMD and cone beam computed tomography. It was found that 97.7% of the individuals with bruxism had at least 1 RDC/TMD group III diagnosis, 75.6% of the subjects considered their sleep quality as poor, and the largest group (23%) had centric bruxism. There was no significant association between the pattern of sleep quality (P = 0.36), the type of SB (P = 0.277), and the presence of degenerative changes of the TMJ. Regardless of the quality of sleep and the type of bruxism presented, the prevalence of degenerative bone disorders was high (67%) among women with a mean age of 46 years and a clinical diagnosis of SB.

  15. A community study of sleep bruxism in Hong Kong children: association with comorbid sleep disorders and neurobehavioral consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, M H B; Zhang, Jihui; Li, A M; Wing, Y K

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of childhood sleep bruxism (SB) varied from 5% to 46% among various studies. In addition to local facial and dental adverse consequences, accumulating evidence suggests that childhood SB could be associated with comorbid sleep and systemic neurobehavioral disturbances. This study attempted to investigate the prevalence and clinical correlates of SB in a large community sample. This study was part of an ongoing epidemiologic study about sleep problems among Hong Kong Chinese children. A total of 9172 questionnaires were distributed to children of grades 1-6 from 13 randomly selected primary schools. Parents of the children were asked to complete and return the Hong Kong children sleep questionnaire, which aimed to explore the sleep problems and patterns of their children. Six thousand three hundred and eighty-nine questionnaires with valid answers to SB were received and the response rate was 69.7%. The mean age of the recruited children was 9.2±1.8years (50.6%, boys). The prevalence of SB with teeth grinding frequency more than thrice weekly over the past year was 5.9%. SB was more prevalent among boys with decreasing prevalence across age. SB was associated with chronic medical diseases, sleep-related breathing problem, upper respiratory infection, and other parasomnia features, especially sleep talking (OR (95%CI)=4.07 (2.33-7.11)). Children with SB were more likely noticed by their parents to be hyperactive (OR (95%CI)=1.61 (1.25-2.07)) and bad-tempered (OR (95%CI)=1.69 (1.35-2.12)) and had deterioration in their academic performance (OR (95%CI)=1.22(1.03-1.43)). Almost 6% of Hong Kong primary schoolchildren suffered from frequent SB. The condition was most prevalent among young boys. SB was found to be associated with a variety of medical conditions, neuropsychiatric sequelae, and comorbid sleep conditions, especially sleep talking and sleep related breathing problems. Further prospective studies will need to clarify the longitudinal course of

  16. Sleeping for Two: An Open-Pilot Study of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomfohr-Madsen, Lianne M; Clayborne, Zahra M; Rouleau, Codie R; Campbell, Tavis S

    2017-01-01

    Insomnia and disturbed sleep are common during pregnancy. This study investigated the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered in pregnancy. Thirteen pregnant women with insomnia participated in five weekly CBT-I group sessions. All participants completed the study and provided baseline and follow-up data. Significant reductions in insomnia symptoms and increases in subjective sleep quality were observed over the course of the study. Diary and actigraphy assessments of sleep also changed, such that participants reported less time in bed (TIB), shorter sleep onset latency (SOL), increased sleep efficiency (SE), and increased subjective total sleep time (TST). Additionally, symptoms of depression, pregnancy-specific anxiety, and fatigue all decreased over the course of treatment. Effect sizes ranged from medium to large. CBT-I delivered during pregnancy was associated with significant improvements in sleep and mood. The next step in this area of inquiry is to better establish effectiveness via a randomized controlled trial.

  17. Ancient DNA and morphometric analysis reveal extinction and replacement of New Zealand's unique black swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlence, Nicolas J; Kardamaki, Afroditi; Easton, Luke J; Tennyson, Alan J D; Scofield, R Paul; Waters, Jonathan M

    2017-07-26

    Prehistoric human impacts on megafaunal populations have dramatically reshaped ecosystems worldwide. However, the effects of human exploitation on smaller species, such as anatids (ducks, geese, and swans) are less clear. In this study we apply ancient DNA and osteological approaches to reassess the history of Australasia's iconic black swans ( Cygnus atratus ) including the palaeo-behaviour of prehistoric populations. Our study shows that at the time of human colonization, New Zealand housed a genetically, morphologically, and potentially ecologically distinct swan lineage ( C. sumnerensis , Poūwa), divergent from modern (Australian) C. atratus Morphological analyses indicate C. sumnerensis exhibited classic signs of the 'island rule' effect, being larger, and likely flight-reduced compared to C. atratus Our research reveals sudden extinction and replacement events within this anatid species complex, coinciding with recent human colonization of New Zealand. This research highlights the role of anthropogenic processes in rapidly reshaping island ecosystems and raises new questions for avian conservation, ecosystem re-wilding, and de-extinction. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Actigraphic sleep fragmentation, efficiency and duration associate with dietary intake in the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Zuurbier, Lisette A; de Jonge, Ester; Voortman, Trudy; Jacques, Paul F; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Scheer, Frank A J L; Kiefte-De Jong, Jessica C; Hofman, Albert; Ordovás, José M; Franco, Oscar H; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Short self-reported sleep duration is associated with dietary intake and this association may partly mediate the link between short sleep and metabolic abnormalities. Subjective sleep measures, however, may be inaccurate and biased. The objective of this study was to evaluate the associations between actigraphic measures of sleep fragmentation, efficiency and duration and energy and macronutrient intakes. We used data from a subgroup of 439 participants of the population-based cohort, Rotterdam Study. Sleep was assessed using 7-day actigraphy and sleep diaries, and dietary data with a validated food frequency questionnaire. We assessed the associations of actigraphic sleep parameters with dietary intake using multivariable linear regression models. Higher sleep fragmentation was associated with 4.19 g lower carbohydrate intake per standard deviation of fragmentation {β [95% confidence interval (CI) = -4.19 (-8.0, -0.3)]; P = 0.03}. Each additional percentage increase in sleep efficiency was associated with 11.1 kcal lower energy intake [β (95% CI) = -11.1 (-20.6, -1.7); P = 0.02]. Furthermore, very short sleep duration (energy intake [β (95% CI = 218.06 (33.3, 402.8), P = 0.02], relative to the reference group (≥6.5 to efficiency and very short sleep duration (energy intake. The association between sleep and higher energy intake could mediate, in part, the link between short sleep or sleep fragmentation index and metabolic abnormalities. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. The influence of drought-induced acidification on the biotic recovery of Swan Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnott, S.E. [York Univ., Dorset, ON (Canada) Dept. of Biology; Yan, N.; Nicholls, K. [Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Dorset, ON (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide emissions from Sudbury smelters have been reduced from greater than 2.2 million t/year in the 1960s, to less than 0.3 million t/year since1994, as a result of changes in industrial practices that were developed in accordance with government emission control regulations. In response, sulfate concentrations have decreased in hundreds of Sudbury area lakes and both alkalinity and pH values have risen. In some cases the pH changes were enough to begin to restore damaged biotic assemblages. There is no current understanding of how short term, drought- induced acidification effects affect the recovery of biota from historical acidification. A study was undertaken to determine if the biota of Swan Lake were recovering as water quality improved during the early to mid-1980s and to determine if the drought-driven acidification event influenced this recovery. As well, investigators wanted to determine if changes in the recovery patterns of planktonic algae, rotifers, and Crustacea in Swan Lake coincided with the 1988 re-acidification event. The plankton of Swan Lake began to recover from acid stress during the early 1980s as did the rotifer community, but, in contrast to the algae and rotifers, the crustacean zooplankton was both slow to recover and incomplete in the early 1980s. The slow pace of recovery in Swan Lake was probably not attributable to an absence of potential colonists. The drought-induced re-acidification of the lake had a dramatic effect in biological recovery through a multitude of factors. Reasons for expected plankton communities decline and unexpected Crustacean communities increases are speculated about. 52 refs., 4 figs.

  20. A feasibility study: Use of actigraph to monitor and follow-up sleep/wake patterns in individuals attending community pharmacy with sleeping disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Zaswiza Mohamad; Smith, Alesha J; Smith, Simon S; Nissen, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Community pharmacists are in a suitable position to give advice and provide appropriate services related to sleep disorders to individuals who are unable to easily access sleep clinics. An intervention with proper objective measure can be used by the pharmacist to assist in consultation. The study objectives are to evaluate: (1) The effectiveness of a community pharmacy-based intervention in managing sleep disorders and (2) the role of actigraph as an objective measure to monitor and follow-up individuals with sleeping disorders. The intervention care group (ICG) completed questionnaires to assess sleep scale scores (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] and Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), wore a wrist actigraph, and completed a sleep diary. Sleep parameters (sleep efficiency in percentage [SE%], total sleep time, sleep onset latency, and number of nocturnal awakenings) from actigraphy sleep report were used for consultation and to validate sleep diary. The usual care group (UCG) completed similar questionnaires but received standard care. Pre- and post-mean scores for sleep scales and sleep parameters were compared between and within groups. A significant difference was observed when comparing pre- and post-mean scores for ISI in the ICG, but not for ESS. For SE%, an increase was found in the number of subjects rated as "good sleepers" at post-assessment in the ICG. ISI scores offer insights into the development of a community pharmacy-based intervention for sleeping disorders, particularly in those with symptoms of insomnia. It also demonstrates that actigraph could provide objective sleep/wake data to assist community pharmacists during the consultation.

  1. A microstructural study of sleep instability in drug-naive patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: sleep spindles, rapid eye movements, and muscle atonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénolé, Fabian; Chevrier, Elyse; Stip, Emmanuel; Godbout, Roger

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at characterizing the functional stability of sleep in schizophrenia by quantifying dissociated stages of sleep (DSS), and to explore their correlation with psychopathology. The sleep of 10 first-break, drug-naive young adults with schizophrenia and 10 controls was recorded. Four basic DSS patterns were scored: 1) the transitional EEG-mixed intermediate stage (EMIS); 2) Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep without rapid eye movement (RSWR); 3) REM sleep without atonia (RSWA); and 4) non-REM sleep with rapid eye movements. An intermediate sleep (IS) score was calculated by summing EMIS and RSWR scores, and the durations of intra-REM sleep periods IS (IRSPIS) and IS scored "at the expense" of REM sleep (ISERS) were determined. Patients were administered the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) at the time of recording. Proportions of each DSS variables over total sleep time and proportions of IRSPIS and ISERS over REM sleep duration were compared between patients and controls. Correlation coefficients between DSS variables and BPRS total scores were calculated. The proportion of total DSS did not differ between patients and controls. Among DSS subtypes, RSWA was significantly increased in patients while other comparisons showed no significant differences. Significant positive correlations were found between BPRS scores and proportions of DSS, IS, RSWR, IRSPIS and ISERS over total sleep and REM sleep durations. These results demonstrate the functional instability of REM sleep in first-break, drug naive young adults with schizophrenia and unveil a pattern reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorder. The significant correlation suggests that schizophrenia and REM sleep share common neuronal control mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A feasibility study: Use of actigraph to monitor and follow-up sleep/wake patterns in individuals attending community pharmacy with sleeping disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaswiza Mohamad Noor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community pharmacists are in a suitable position to give advice and provide appropriate services related to sleep disorders to individuals who are unable to easily access sleep clinics. An intervention with proper objective measure can be used by the pharmacist to assist in consultation. Objectives: The study objectives are to evaluate: (1 The effectiveness of a community pharmacy-based intervention in managing sleep disorders and (2 the role of actigraph as an objective measure to monitor and follow-up individuals with sleeping disorders. Methods and Instruments: The intervention care group (ICG completed questionnaires to assess sleep scale scores (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] and Insomnia Severity Index [ISI], wore a wrist actigraph, and completed a sleep diary. Sleep parameters (sleep efficiency in percentage [SE%], total sleep time, sleep onset latency, and number of nocturnal awakenings from actigraphy sleep report were used for consultation and to validate sleep diary. The usual care group (UCG completed similar questionnaires but received standard care. Results: Pre- and post-mean scores for sleep scales and sleep parameters were compared between and within groups. A significant difference was observed when comparing pre- and post-mean scores for ISI in the ICG, but not for ESS. For SE%, an increase was found in the number of subjects rated as “good sleepers” at post-assessment in the ICG. Conclusions: ISI scores offer insights into the development of a community pharmacy-based intervention for sleeping disorders, particularly in those with symptoms of insomnia. It also demonstrates that actigraph could provide objective sleep/wake data to assist community pharmacists during the consultation.

  3. Effects of propofol on sleep quality in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients: a physiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondili, Eumorfia; Alexopoulou, Christina; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Georgopoulos, Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    To access the effect of propofol administration on sleep quality in critically ill patients ventilated on assisted modes. This was a randomized crossover physiological study conducted in an adult ICU at a tertiary hospital. Two nights' polysomnography was performed in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients with and without propofol infusion, while respiratory variables were continuously recorded. Arterial blood gasses were measured in the beginning and at the end of the study. The rate of propofol infusion was adjusted to maintain a sedation level of 3 on the Ramsay scale. Sleep architecture was analyzed manually using predetermined criteria. Patient-ventilator asynchrony was evaluated breath by breath using the flow-time and airway pressure-time waveforms. Twelve patients were studied. Respiratory variables, patient-ventilator asynchrony, and arterial blood gasses did not differ between experimental conditions. With or without propofol all patients demonstrated abnormal sleep architecture, expressed by lack of sequential progression through sleep stages and their abnormal distribution. Sleep efficiency, sleep fragmentation, and sleep stage distribution (1, 2, and slow wave) did not differ with or without propofol. Compared to without propofol, both the number of patients exhibiting REM sleep (p = 0.02) and the percentage of REM sleep (p = 0.04) decreased significantly with propofol. In critically ill patients ventilated on assisted modes, propofol administration to achieve the recommended level of sedation suppresses the REM sleep stage and further worsens the poor sleep quality of these patients.

  4. Animal studies on the role of sleep in memory: from behavioral performance to molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havekes, Robbert; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Although the exact functions of sleep remain a topic of debate, several hypotheses propose that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition . For over a century, researchers have applied a wide variety of behavioral, electrophysiological, biochemical, and molecular approaches to study how memory processes are promoted by sleep and perturbed by sleep loss. Interestingly, experimental studies indicate that cognitive impairments as a consequence of sleep deprivation appear to be most severe with learning and memory processes that require the hippocampus , which suggests that this brain region is particularly sensitive to the consequences of sleep loss. Moreover, recent studies in laboratory rodents indicate that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal neuronal plasticity and memory processes by attenuating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. Attenuated cAMP-PKA signaling can lead to a reduced activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and ultimately affect the expression of genes and proteins involved in neuronal plasticity and memory formation. Pharmacogenetic experiments in mice show that memory deficits following sleep deprivation can be prevented by specifically boosting cAMP signaling in excitatory neurons of the hippocampus. Given the high incidence of sleep disturbance and sleep restriction in our 24/7 society, understanding the consequences of sleep loss and unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms is of great importance.

  5. Links between sleep and body mass index in bipolar disorders: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudebesse, C; Geoffroy, P-A; Henry, C; Germain, A; Scott, J; Lajnef, M; Leboyer, M; Bellivier, F; Etain, B

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and excess bodyweight are highly prevalent in individuals with bipolar disorders (BD) and are associated with adverse consequences. Multiple factors may explain increased bodyweight in BD including side effects of psychotropic medications, and reduced physical activity. Research in the general population demonstrates that sleep disturbances may also contribute to metabolic burden. We present a cross-sectional study of the associations between body mass index (BMI) and sleep parameters in patients with BD as compared with healthy controls (HC). Twenty-six French outpatients with remitted BD and 29 HC with a similar BMI completed a 21-day study of sleep parameters using objective (actigraphy) and subjective (PSQI: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) assessments. In BD cases, but not in HC, higher BMI was significantly correlated with lower sleep efficiency (P=0.009) and with several other sleep parameters: shorter total sleep time (P=0.01), longer sleep onset latency (P=0.05), higher fragmentation index (P=0.008), higher inter-day variability (P=0.05) and higher PSQI total score (P=0.004). The findings suggest a link between a high BMI and several sleep disturbances in BD, including lower sleep efficiency. Physiological mechanisms in BD cases may include an exaggeration of phenomena observed in non-clinical populations. However, larger scale studies are required to clarify the links between metabolic and sleep-wake cycle disturbances in BD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in sleep and wake in response to different sleeping surfaces: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, W Vaughn; Boggs, Niki; Letton, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Six married couples (12 adults, mean age 34.8 years) were randomized as couples in a cross-over design to sleep on a queen-size conventional mattress for 2 weeks and a specially-designed pressure-relief mattress for 2 weeks. The pressure-relief mattress was designed to reduce the number of contact points exceeding 30 mm Hg. Actigraphic measurements of sleep and self-reports of sleep and daytime symptoms were collected at baseline for 2 weeks on each couple's home mattress and box springs at home, followed by 2 weeks of data collection on each randomized mattress for a total of 6 weeks of data collection. Pressure maps were created for each participant on each sleeping surface. There were no significant differences between the randomized sleeping surfaces for any measure of actigraphic sleep or self-reported sleep and daytime symptoms. However, poor pressure relief performance of the home mattress was associated with better actigraphic sleep on the randomized pressure-relief mattress. We conclude that while pressure-relief mattresses may not be universally preferred, baseline characteristics of the sleeper and/or their mattress may explain performance and sleeper preferences on future mattress selection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. How Acute Total Sleep Loss Affects the Attending Brain: A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F.; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Design: Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. Methods: The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Conclusion: Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. Citation: Ma N, Dinges DF, Basner M, Rao H. How acute total

  8. When is the Swan Knight not the Swan Knight? 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Alastair

    2017-01-01

    Berthold von Holle wrote three thirteenth-century romances that straddle the boundary between Low and High German. This article addresses the challenges posed by his position on the northern perimeter of the medieval German literary canon. It argues against a reductive focus on Arthurian romance...... when contextualizing Berthold, describing instead an apparent reworking of the Swan Knight story in Demantin. The article thereby reassesses Berthold’s significance, proposing that research on European literatures would be better able to deal with such authors if it deployed an abstract concept...... of literary space alongside approaches that focus on the material world and manuscript transmission....

  9. Implementing Lumberjacks and Black Swans Into Model-Based Tools to Support Human-Automation Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Angelia; Wickens, Christopher D

    2017-03-01

    The objectives were to (a) implement theoretical perspectives regarding human-automation interaction (HAI) into model-based tools to assist designers in developing systems that support effective performance and (b) conduct validations to assess the ability of the models to predict operator performance. Two key concepts in HAI, the lumberjack analogy and black swan events, have been studied extensively. The lumberjack analogy describes the effects of imperfect automation on operator performance. In routine operations, an increased degree of automation supports performance, but in failure conditions, increased automation results in more significantly impaired performance. Black swans are the rare and unexpected failures of imperfect automation. The lumberjack analogy and black swan concepts have been implemented into three model-based tools that predict operator performance in different systems. These tools include a flight management system, a remotely controlled robotic arm, and an environmental process control system. Each modeling effort included a corresponding validation. In one validation, the software tool was used to compare three flight management system designs, which were ranked in the same order as predicted by subject matter experts. The second validation compared model-predicted operator complacency with empirical performance in the same conditions. The third validation compared model-predicted and empirically determined time to detect and repair faults in four automation conditions. The three model-based tools offer useful ways to predict operator performance in complex systems. The three tools offer ways to predict the effects of different automation designs on operator performance.

  10. Workplace bullying, sleep problems and leisure-time physical activity: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Gullander, Maria; Hogh, Annie; Persson, Roger; Kolstad, Henrik A; Willert, Morten Vejs; Bonde, Jens Peter; Kaerlev, Linda; Rugulies, Reiner; Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard

    2016-01-01

    Workplace bullying is a potent stressor that may increase sleep problems. Since physical fitness improves resilience to stress, it seems plausible that recreational physical activities may moderate the association between bullying and sleep. The study aimed to examine prospectively whether (i) bullying increases the risk of sleep problems, and (ii) the association between bullying and sleep problems is moderated by leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). The study sample comprised a cohort of public and private sector employees, who were enrolled into the Work Bullying and Harassment (WBH) cohort (N=3278) or the Psychosocial Risk Factors for Stress and Mental Disease (PRISME) cohort (N=4455). We measured workplace bullying using one question that was preceded by a definition of bullying. We used the Karolinska sleep questionnaire to assess sleep problems. The number of hours per week spent on LTPA estimated the degree of physical activity. Workplace bullying at baseline (T1) was associated with awakening problems and lack of restful sleep at follow-up (T2) but not with overall sleep problems and disturbed sleep. T1-LTPA did not moderate the association between T1-workplace bullying and T2-sleep problems. We found support that workplace bullying is related to development of T2-sleep problems, but this association seems not to be modified by LTPA.

  11. Nighttime sleep duration and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: the Dongfeng-Tongji prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhong, Rong; Lou, Jiao; Pan, An; Tang, Yuhan; Chang, Jiang; Ke, Juntao; Li, Jiaoyuan; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Youjie; Chen, Weihong; Guo, Huan; Wei, Sheng; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping

    2016-09-01

    To examine the association between self-reported nighttime sleep duration and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) risk by comparing the incidence rates of NAFLD among healthy subjects with different sleep duration during the 5 years follow-up. 8965 eligible NAFLD-free subjects with a mean age of 61.6 years (males, 43.4%) from Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study at baseline were enrolled in the study. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between sleep duration and incident NAFLD with potential confounders adjusted. Sleep duration was categorized into five groups: sleep, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) were 1.21 (1.07-1.38) for those who sleep 8-9 h/day, and 1.31 (1.13-1.52) for those who sleep over 9 h/day. However, no significant association was found with short nightly sleep duration (sleep duration was associated with a modestly increased risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. Key messages Long nighttime sleep duration was associated with a modestly increased risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. The effect of long nighttime sleep on the risk of incident NAFLD was attenuated greatly by body mass index (BMI) in men.

  12. Assessment of sleep and circadian rhythm disorders in the very old: the Newcastle 85+ Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Catt, Michael; Collerton, Joanna; Davies, Karen; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Jagger, Carol

    2014-01-01

    to examine the association between subjective and objective measures of sleep and wake and other health parameters in a cohort of the very old. a population-based cohort study. primary care, North East England. four hundred and twenty-one men and women, aged 87-89, recruited to the Newcastle 85+ Study cohort. sleep questionnaires were administered and sleep-wake patterns were assessed over 5-7 days with a novel wrist triaxial accelerometer. Associations between sleep measures and various health parameters, including mortality at 24 months, were examined. only 16% of participants perceived their sleep as severely disturbed as assessed with questionnaire responses. Wrist accelerometry showed marked variation between normal and abnormal sleep-wake cycles that did not correlate with the participants' perception of sleep. Impaired sleep-wake cycles were significantly associated with cognitive impairment, disability, depression, increased falls, body mass index and arthritis but not with any other specific disease markers and with decreased survival. commonly used sleep questionnaires do not differentiate well between those with objectively determined disturbance of sleep-wake cycles and those with normal cycles. Abnormal sleep-wake patterns are associated with institutionalisation, cognitive impairment, disability, depression and arthritis but not with other diseases; there is also an association with reduced survival.

  13. Sleep and use of electronic devices in adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Jakobsen, Reidar; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2015-02-02

    Adolescents spend increasingly more time on electronic devices, and sleep deficiency rising in adolescents constitutes a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate daytime screen use and use of electronic devices before bedtime in relation to sleep. A large cross-sectional population-based survey study from 2012, the youth@hordaland study, in Hordaland County in Norway. Cross-sectional general community-based study. 9846 adolescents from three age cohorts aged 16-19. The main independent variables were type and frequency of electronic devices at bedtime and hours of screen-time during leisure time. Sleep variables calculated based on self-report including bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset. Adolescents spent a large amount of time during the day and at bedtime using electronic devices. Daytime and bedtime use of electronic devices were both related to sleep measures, with an increased risk of short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and increased sleep deficiency. A dose-response relationship emerged between sleep duration and use of electronic devices, exemplified by the association between PC use and risk of less than 5 h of sleep (OR=2.70, 95% CI 2.14 to 3.39), and comparable lower odds for 7-8 h of sleep (OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.96). Use of electronic devices is frequent in adolescence, during the day as well as at bedtime. The results demonstrate a negative relation between use of technology and sleep, suggesting that recommendations on healthy media use could include restrictions on electronic devices. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Sleep and use of electronic devices in adolescence: results from a large population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Jakobsen, Reidar; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adolescents spend increasingly more time on electronic devices, and sleep deficiency rising in adolescents constitutes a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate daytime screen use and use of electronic devices before bedtime in relation to sleep. Design A large cross-sectional population-based survey study from 2012, the youth@hordaland study, in Hordaland County in Norway. Setting Cross-sectional general community-based study. Participants 9846 adolescents from three age cohorts aged 16–19. The main independent variables were type and frequency of electronic devices at bedtime and hours of screen-time during leisure time. Outcomes Sleep variables calculated based on self-report including bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset. Results Adolescents spent a large amount of time during the day and at bedtime using electronic devices. Daytime and bedtime use of electronic devices were both related to sleep measures, with an increased risk of short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and increased sleep deficiency. A dose–response relationship emerged between sleep duration and use of electronic devices, exemplified by the association between PC use and risk of less than 5 h of sleep (OR=2.70, 95% CI 2.14 to 3.39), and comparable lower odds for 7–8 h of sleep (OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.96). Conclusions Use of electronic devices is frequent in adolescence, during the day as well as at bedtime. The results demonstrate a negative relation between use of technology and sleep, suggesting that recommendations on healthy media use could include restrictions on electronic devices. PMID:25643702

  15. Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms Among Middle-Aged Women: The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, Joyce T.; Harlow, Sioban; Avis, Nancy; Kravitz, Howard M.; Cordal, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We examined racial/ethnic differences in significant depressive symptoms among middle-aged women before and after adjustment for socioeconomic, health-related, and psychosocial characteristics. Methods. Racial/ethnic differences in unadjusted and adjusted prevalence of significant depressive symptoms (score ≥ 16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression [CES-D] Scale) were assessed with univariate and multiple logistic regressions. Results. Twenty-four percent of the sample had a CES-D score of 16 or higher. Unadjusted prevalence varied by race/ethnicity (P women had the highest odds, and Chinese and Japanese women had the lowest odds, for a CES-D score of 16 or higher. This variation is in part because of health-related and psychosocial factors that are linked to socioeconomic status. PMID:15284047

  16. Overview of efforts to expand the range of the Rocky Mountain population of trumpeter swans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Near extinction in 1900, by 1992 the Rocky Mountain Population (RMP) of Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) contained +2200 swans. The foremost problem facing the...

  17. Water‐Data Report 3936360931115 SILVER LAKE AT SWAN LAKE NWR, WEST LEVEE, 2014-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — WATER MONITORING STATION ANALYSIS – CALENDAR YEAR 2014 to 2016 SITE NUMBER: 393636093111501 SITE NAME: Silver Lake at Swan Lake NWR, West Levee COOPERATION: Swan...

  18. Population structure and productivity of whistling swans on the Yukon Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Whistling swans Cygnus colombianus are the most conspicuous of wildfowl of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the principal nesting grounds for swans wintering in western...

  19. Childhood socioeconomic circumstances and depressive symptom burden across 15 years of follow-up during midlife: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, Joyce T; Schott, Laura L; Matthews, Karen A; Kravitz, Howard M; Harlow, Siobán D; Montez, Jennifer Karas

    2017-08-01

    Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage may contribute to adult depression. Understanding pathways by which early socioeconomic adversity may shape adult depression is important for identifying areas for intervention. Studies to date have focused on one potential pathway, adult socioeconomic status (SES), and assessed depression at only one or a few time points. Our aims were to examine (a) the association between childhood SES (low vs. high) and depressive symptom burden in midlife and (b) whether adult socioeconomic, psychosocial, and physical health characteristics are important pathways. Using annual data from a cohort of 1109 black and white US women recruited in 1996-1997, we evaluated the association between childhood SES and depressive symptom burden across 15 years in midlife and whether adult characteristics-financial difficulty, lower education, stressful events, low social support, low role functioning, medical conditions, and bodily pain-mediated the association. Depressive symptom burden was estimated by calculating area under the curve of annual scores across 15 years of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D). In unadjusted models, low childhood SES was associated with greater depressive burden (P = 0.0002). Each hypothesized mediator, individually, did not reduce the association. However, when five of the hypothesized mediators were included together in the same analysis, they explained more than two thirds of the association between childhood SES and depressive symptom burden reducing the P value for childhood SES to non-significance (P = 0.20). These results suggest that childhood SES influences midlife depressive symptom burden through a cluster of economic stress, limited social resources, and physical symptoms in adulthood.

  20. Sleep in babies born to chronically heroin addicted mothers. A follow up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F; Torrioli, M G; Casella, G; Tempesta, E; Fundarò, C

    1988-02-01

    The effects of chronic addiction to, and withdrawal from, opiates on sleep have been described in experimental animals, in human adults and infants born to addicted mothers. These sleep alterations are seen through the first weeks of life. Thirteen maternally addicted babies were studied. Sleep samples were recorded and scored within a few days following birth and repeated 4 or 5 weeks later after recovery from the abstinence syndrome. A significant decrease in quiet sleep and increase of active sleep were found. The same alterations, although less marked, were observed in a follow up recording performed during the second month of life. Sleep alterations in addicted newborns could be related to central nervous system (CNS) distress caused by withdrawal. The authors however propose a perturbation of endogenous opiates subsequent to fetal addiction as a cause of sleep alterations.

  1. [Study on the relationship between college students' physical quality and the quality of sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian-chun; Ma, Wei-juan; Chen, Gui-mei; Ye, Dong-qing

    2013-05-01

    The author wants to investigate the relationship between college students' physical quality and the quality of sleep. Stratified cluster sampling method is used, and invites a total of 2981 Anhui college students to take part in the questionnaire study, the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and physical test, in order to survey the sleep quality and physical quality of college students. The physical quality and sleep quality are analyzed by the multiple factor non conditional logistic regression analysis methods. PSQI scores of the 2744 students are (5.378 ± 2.492), 477 people (17.4%) have poor sleep quality. The endurance, speed, strength quality scores are (75.850 ± 13.279), (69.760 ± 16.422), (66.278 ± 18.709) points. Logistic regression analysis shows that excellent endurance (OR = 0.418) is a protective factor of sleep quality. The improvement of endurance may improve sleep quality.

  2. Association of Ethnicity with Involuntary Childlessness and Perceived Reasons for Infertility: Baseline Data from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmon, Anatte; Hailpern, Susan M.; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Green, Robin R.; Santoro, Nanette; Polotsky, Alex J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether ethnicity is associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived reasons for difficulties in becoming pregnant . Design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal cohort Setting Multiethnic, community-based observational study of US women Patient(s) 3149 midlife women, aged 42-52 Main Outcome Measure(s) Involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility Result(s) One hundred and thirty-three subjects (4.2%) were involuntarily childless, defined by a reported history of infertility and nulliparity. Ethnicity was significantly associated with self-reported involuntary childlessness. After controlling for economic and other risk factors, African-American (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.15 – 0.59) and Chinese women (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.14 – 0.90) were less likely to suffer from involuntary childlessness as compared to non-Hispanic Caucasian women. Additionally, 302 subjects reported a perceived etiology of infertility. An unexpectedly large proportion of these women (24.5%, 74 out of 302) reported etiologies not known to cause infertility (i.e. tipped uterus, ligaments for tubes were stretched), with African-American women having been most likely to report these etiologies (OR 2.81; 95% CI 1.26 – 6.28) as the reason for not becoming pregnant. Conclusion(s) Ethnicity is significantly associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility. Misattribution of causes of infertility is common and merits further consideration with respect to language or cultural barriers as well as possible physician misattribution. PMID:21958690

  3. Association of ethnicity with involuntary childlessness and perceived reasons for infertility: baseline data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmon, Anatte; Hailpern, Susan M; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Green, Robin R; Santoro, Nanette; Polotsky, Alex J

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate whether ethnicity is associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived reasons for difficulties in becoming pregnant. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal cohort. Multiethnic, community-based observational study of US women. Women in midlife (3,149), aged 42-52 years. None. Involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility. One hundred thirty-three subjects (4.2%) were involuntarily childless, defined by a reported history of infertility and nulliparity. Ethnicity was significantly associated with self-reported involuntary childlessness. After controlling for economic and other risk factors, African American (odds ratio [OR] 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.59) and Chinese women (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.14-0.90) were less likely to suffer from involuntary childlessness compared with non-Hispanic white women. In addition, 302 subjects reported a perceived etiology of infertility. An unexpectedly large proportion of these women (24.5%, 74 of 302) reported etiologies not known to cause infertility (i.e., tipped uterus, ligaments for tubes were stretched), with African American women having been most likely to report these etiologies (OR 2.81; 95% CI 1.26-6.28) as the reason for not becoming pregnant. Ethnicity is significantly associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility. Misattribution of causes of infertility is common and merits further consideration with respect to language or cultural barriers, as well as possible physician misattribution. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics, sleep and memory: a recall-by-genotype study of ZNF804A variants and sleep neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmich, Charlotte; Durant, Claire; Jones, Matthew W; Timpson, Nicholas J; Bartsch, Ullrich; Corbin, Laura J

    2015-10-24

    Schizophrenia is a complex, polygenic disorder for which over 100 genetic variants have been identified that correlate with diagnosis. However, the biological mechanisms underpinning the different symptom clusters remain undefined. The rs1344706 single nucleotide polymorphism within ZNF804A was among the first genetic variants found to be associated with schizophrenia. Previously, neuroimaging and cognitive studies have revealed several associations between rs1344706 and brain structure and function. The aim of this study is to use a recall-by-genotype (RBG) design to investigate the biological basis for the association of ZNF804A variants with schizophrenia. A RBG study, implemented in a population cohort, will be used to evaluate the impact of genetic variation at rs1344706 on sleep neurophysiology and procedural memory consolidation in healthy participants. Participants will be recruited from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) on the basis of genotype at rs1344706 (n = 24). Each participant will be asked to take part in two nights of in-depth sleep monitoring (polysomnography) allowing collection of neurophysiological sleep data in a manner not amenable to large-scale study. Sleep questionnaires will be used to assess general sleep quality and subjective sleep experience after each in-house recording. A motor sequencing task (MST) will be performed before and after the second night of polysomnography. In order to gather additional data about habitual sleep behaviour participants will be asked to wear a wrist worn activity monitor (actiwatch) and complete a sleep diary for two weeks. This study will explore the biological function of ZNF804A genotype (rs1344706) in healthy volunteers by examining detailed features of sleep architecture and physiology in relation to motor learning. Using a RBG approach will enable us to collect precise and detailed phenotypic data whilst achieving an informative biological gradient. It would not be

  5. Childhood sleep duration and quality in relation to leptin concentration in two cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeke, Caroline E; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Redline, Susan; Taveras, Elsie M

    2014-03-01

    Poor sleep in childhood is associated with increased obesity risk, possibly by affecting appetite-regulating hormones such as leptin. We examined short- and long-term sleep duration and quality in relation to leptin in two US pediatric cohorts. Analysis of data from two prospective cohort studies. Population-based. Adolescent polysomnography assessments performed in a clinical research unit. Children in Project Viva (n = 655) and adolescents in the Cleveland Children's Sleep & Health Study (n = 502). N/A. In Project Viva, mothers reported average child sleep duration annually from infancy through age 7, and we measured leptin at ages 3 and 7. In the Cleveland Children's Sleep & Health Study, we collected self-reported sleep duration, polysomnography-derived measures of sleep quality, and fasting leptin at ages 16-19. In sex-stratified linear regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and adiposity, chronic curtailed sleep was associated with lower leptin at age 7 in girls; a one-unit decrease in sleep score was associated with a 0.08 decrease in log leptin (95% CI: 0.01,0.15). The association was stronger in girls with greater adiposity (P = 0.01). Among adolescents, shorter sleep was associated with lower leptin in males; each one-hour decrease in sleep duration was associated with a 0.06 decrease in log leptin (95% CI: 0.00, 0.11). Sleep duration was not associated with leptin at other ages. Sleep quality indices were not associated with leptin. Our results suggest possible age-specific sexual dimorphism in the influence of sleep on leptin, which may partly explain inconsistencies in the literature.

  6. Objective Sleep Structure and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the General Population: The HypnoLaus Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba-Rubio, José; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Andries, Daniela; Tobback, Nadia; Preisig, Martin; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Luca, Gianina; Tafti, Mehdi; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the association between objective sleep measures and metabolic syndrome (MS), hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: General population sample. Participants: There were 2,162 patients (51.2% women, mean age 58.4 ± 11.1). Interventions: Patients were evaluated for hypertension, diabetes, overweight/obesity, and MS, and underwent a full polysomnography (PSG). Measurements and Results: PSG measured variables included: total sleep time (TST), percentage and time spent in slow wave sleep (SWS) and in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, sleep efficiency and arousal index (ArI). In univariate analyses, MS was associated with decreased TST, SWS, REM sleep, and sleep efficiency, and increased ArI. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, drugs that affect sleep and depression, the ArI remained significantly higher, but the difference disappeared in patients without significant sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Differences in sleep structure were also found according to the presence or absence of hypertension, diabetes, and overweight/obesity in univariate analysis. However, these differences were attenuated after multivariate adjustment and after excluding subjects with significant SDB. Conclusions: In this population-based sample we found significant associations between sleep structure and metabolic syndrome (MS), hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. However, these associations were cancelled after multivariate adjustment. We conclude that normal variations in sleep contribute little if any to MS and associated disorders. Citation: Haba-Rubio J, Marques-Vidal P, Andries D, Tobback N, Preisig M, Vollenweider P, Waeber G, Luca G, Tafti M, Heinzer R. Objective sleep structure and cardiovascular risk factors in the general population: the HypnoLaus study. SLEEP 2015;38(3):391–400. PMID:25325467

  7. Sleep architecture in ziprasidone-treated bipolar depression: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Anusha; Summers, Dave; Willing, Stephanie Lm; Jokic, Ruzica; Milev, Roumen

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of ziprasidone augmentation therapy on sleep architecture in bipolar depression. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical pilot trial of ziprasidone versus placebo in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition bipolar disorder with current major depressive episode. The effects during acute (2-5 days) and continuation treatment (28-31 days) were measured. Main outcomes were sleep architecture variables including rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and slow wave sleep (SWS) measured by polysomnography. Secondary outcomes included subjective sleep quality measures and illness severity measures including the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) and Clinical Global Illness Severity (CGI-S) scores. The completer analysis comprised of 14 patients (ziprasidone, N = 8 and placebo, N = 6). Latency to REM, duration of SWS, duration of stage 2 sleep, total sleep time, onset to sleep latency, number of awakenings and overall sleep efficiency significantly improved in ziprasidone-treated participants over placebo. CGI-S and HAMA scores also significantly improved. No significant difference between treatment groups was seen on the HAMD-17, MADRS or in self-reported sleep quality. Increase in SWS duration significantly correlated with improvement in CGI-S, however, this finding did not withstand Bonferroni correction. Adjunctive ziprasidone treatment alters sleep architecture in patients with bipolar depression, which may partially explain its mechanism of action and merits further investigation.

  8. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Navvabi, Iman; Ahmadi Hoseini, Seyed Hosein; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS) and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5) was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10) was 5% (2/40). There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively). In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = -0.48). We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80%) and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease.

  9. Tunable somatosensory stimulation for selective sleep restriction studies in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Dillon M; Staggs, Kendra E; Yaghouby, Farid; Agarwal, Anuj; O'Hara, Bruce F; Donohue, Kevin D; Blalock, Eric M; Sunderam, Sridhar

    2016-08-01

    Many methods for sleep restriction in rodents have emerged, but most are intrusive, lack fine control, and induce stress. Therefore, a versatile, non-intrusive means of sleep restriction that can alter sleep in a controlled manner could be of great value in sleep research. In previous work, we proposed a novel system for closed-loop somatosensory stimulation based on mechanical vibration and applied it to the task of restricting Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep in mice [1]. While this system was effective, it was a crude prototype and did not allow precise control over the amplitude and frequency of stimulation applied to the animal. This paper details the progression of this system from a binary, "all-or-none" version to one that allows dynamic control over perturbation to accomplish graded, state-dependent sleep restriction. Its preliminary use is described in two applications: deep sleep restriction in rats, and REM sleep restriction in mice.

  10. Parent knowledge of child sleep: a pilot study in a children's hospital cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowall, Philippa S; Campbell, Angela C; Elder, Dawn E

    2016-05-01

    Parent knowledge about child sleep may influence parent efforts to support healthy sleep in their children. The present study aimed to describe parent knowledge of child sleep in a hospital cohort and potential correlates including barriers to children's bedtime, information seeking about child sleep, and demographics such as child age, parent education, and household income. In total, 115 parents of children aged 2-12 years attending hospital inpatient wards or day ward were approached individually and invited to complete the questionnaire. Questionnaire items were modified measures in published articles, identified through literature review, or developed from clinical experience. Parents on average answered half of the knowledge questions accurately, and knowledge about child sleep was positively correlated with education and household income. Parents who sought information from books or the Internet had greater knowledge about child sleep than parents who did not endorse these sources of information. The accuracy of parent estimations of their child's sleep requirements varied: 55% were within recommendations, while 26% underestimated their child's sleep requirements, 19% overestimated. Parents who correctly estimated their child's sleep requirements had higher education and income on average and were more likely to parent younger children (age 2-5 years). Parents who overestimated or underestimated sleep requirements were more likely to identify greater barriers to their child's bedtime. Overall knowledge of child sleep in this sample was poor, consistent with samples from North American communities. Future studies should examine whether knowledge about child sleep and barriers to children's bedtimes are related to actual child sleep behaviors or parent practices to support their children to achieve a healthy sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Artificial intelligence based decision support for trumpeter swan management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojda, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The number of trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) breeding in the Tri-State area where Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming come together has declined to just a few hundred pairs. However, these birds are part of the Rocky Mountain Population which additionally has over 3,500 birds breeding in Alberta, British Columbia, Northwest Territories, and Yukon Territory. To a large degree, these birds seem to have abandoned traditional migratory pathways in the flyway. Waterfowl managers have been interested in decision support tools that would help them explore simulated management scenarios in their quest towards reaching population recovery and the reestablishment of traditional migratory pathways. I have developed a decision support system to assist biologists with such management, especially related to wetland ecology. Decision support systems use a combination of models, analytical techniques, and information retrieval to help develop and evaluate appropriate alternatives. Swan management is a domain that is ecologically complex, and this complexity is compounded by spatial and temporal issues. As such, swan management is an inherently distributed problem. Therefore, the ecological context for modeling swan movements in response to management actions was built as a multiagent system of interacting intelligent agents that implements a queuing model representing swan migration. These agents accessed ecological knowledge about swans, their habitats, and flyway management principles from three independent expert systems. The agents were autonomous, had some sensory capability, and could respond to changing conditions. A key problem when developing ecological decision support systems is empirically determining that the recommendations provided are valid. Because Rocky Mountain trumpeter swans have been surveyed for a long period of time, I was able to compare simulated distributions provided by the system with actual field observations across 20 areas for the period 1988

  12. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity on Cardiac Remodeling: The Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korcarz, Claudia E; Peppard, Paul E; Young, Terry B; Chapman, Carrie B; Hla, K Mae; Barnet, Jodi H; Hagen, Erika; Stein, James H

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the prospective associations of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with future echocardiographic measures of adverse cardiac remodeling. This was a prospective long-term observational study. Participants had overnight polysomnography followed by transthoracic echocardiography a mean (standard deviation) of 18.0 (3.7) y later. OSA was characterized by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, events/hour). Echocardiography was used to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function and mass, left atrial volume and pressure, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, and right ventricular (RV) systolic function, size, and hemodynamics. Multivariate regression models estimated associations between log10(AHI+1) and future echocardiographic findings. A secondary analysis looked at oxygen desaturation indices and future echocardiographic findings. At entry, the 601 participants were mean (standard deviation) 47 (8) y old (47% female). After adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, baseline log10(AHI+1) was associated significantly with future reduced LV ejection fraction and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) ≤ 15 mm. After further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, participants with higher baseline log10(AHI+1) had lower future LV ejection fraction (β = -1.35 [standard error = 0.6]/log10(AHI+1), P = 0.03) and higher odds of TAPSE ≤ 15 mm (odds ratio = 6.3/log10(AHI+1), 95% confidence interval = 1.3-30.5, P = 0.02). SaO2 desaturation indices were associated independently with LV mass, LV wall thickness, and RV area (all P obesity. Hypoxia may be a stimulus for hypertrophy in individuals with OSA. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. The use of entertainment and communication technologies before sleep could affect sleep and weight status: a population-based study among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Nomathemba; Khan, Kaviul; Loehr, Sarah; Chu, Yen; Veugelers, Paul

    2017-07-19

    Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality have been demonstrated to be associated with childhood obesity. It has been suggested that electronic entertainment and communication devices (EECDs) including TVs, computers, tablets, video games and cell phones interfere with sleep in children and youth. The aim of this study was to assess the impact that the use of EECDs in the hour before bedtime has on sleep and weight status to inform sleep promotion interventions and programs to prevent childhood obesity. A provincially representative sample of 2334 grade 5 children and their parents in Alberta, Canada was surveyed. Parents reported their child's bedtime and wake-up time along with how often their child snored, felt sleepy during the day, woke-up at night and woke-up in the morning feeling unrefreshed. Sleep duration, sleep quality and sleep efficiency were derived from these indicators. Parents also reported on the presence of EECDs in their child's bedroom, while children reported use of EECDs during the day and frequency of using each of these devices during the hour before sleep. The height and weight of children were measured. Multivariable mixed effect linear and logistic regression models were used to determine how sleep duration, sleep quality, sleep efficiency and weight status are influenced by (i) access to EECDs in children's bedrooms, (ii) use of EECDs during the hour before sleep, and (iii) calming activities specifically reading during the hour before sleep. Sleep duration was shorter by -10.8 min (cell phone), -10.2 min (computer) and -7.8 min (TV) for those with bedroom access to and used these EECDs during the hour before sleep compared to no access and no use. Good sleep quality was hindered by bedroom access to and use of all EECDs investigated during the hour before sleep, particularly among users of cell phones (OR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.58-0.71) and computers (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.65-0.80). Very good sleep efficiency was decreased by access

  14. Using Sleep Interventions to Engage and Treat Heavy-Drinking College Students: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucito, Lisa M; DeMartini, Kelly S; Hanrahan, Tess H; Yaggi, Henry Klar; Heffern, Christina; Redeker, Nancy S

    2017-04-01

    Continued high alcohol consumption levels by college students highlight the need for more effective alcohol interventions and novel treatment engagement strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate a behavioral sleep intervention as a means to engage heavy-drinking college students in treatment and reduce alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences. Heavy-drinking college students (N = 42) were assigned to 1 of 2 web-based interventions comprised of 4 modules delivered over 4 weeks. The experimental intervention focused primarily on sleep and included evidence-based sleep content (i.e., stimulus control instructions, sleep scheduling [consistent bed/rise times; ideal sleep duration for adolescents/young adults], sleep hygiene advice, relaxation training, cognitive strategies to target sleep-disruptive beliefs), and alcohol content (i.e., normative and blood alcohol level feedback, moderate drinking guidelines, controlled drinking strategies, effects of alcohol on sleep and the body, advice to moderate drinking for improved sleep) in young adults. The control condition Healthy Behaviors provided basic advice about nutrition, exercise, sleep (i.e., good sleep hygiene only), and drinking (i.e., effects of alcohol on the body, moderate drinking guidelines, advice to moderate drinking for sleep). Participants in both conditions monitored their sleep using daily web-based diaries and a wrist-worn sleep tracker. Recruitment ads targeting college students with sleep concerns effectively identified heavy-drinking students. The program generated a high number of inquiries and treatment completion rates were high. Both interventions significantly reduced typical week drinking and alcohol-related consequences and improved sleep quality and sleep-related impairment ratings. The control condition yielded greater reductions in total drinks in a heaviest drinking week. The effects on drinking were larger than those observed in typical brief alcohol intervention

  15. Sleep Habits and Patterns of College Students: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buboltz, Walter C.; Brown, Franklin; Soper, Barlow

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed college students regarding their sleep habits, patterns, and problems. A large majority had at least occasional sleep problems, with women reporting more of some difficulties than men. The most common sleep difficulties were taking more than 30 minutes to fall asleep, trouble falling asleep more than three times per week, morning…

  16. To Assess Sleep Quality among Pakistani Junior Physicians (House Officers): A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surani, A A; Surani, A; Zahid, S; Ali, S; Farhan, R; Surani, S

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation among junior physicians (house officers) is of growing concern. In developed countries, duty hours are now mandated, but in developing countries, junior physicians are highly susceptible to develop sleep impairment due to long working hours, on-call duties and shift work schedule. We undertook the study to assess sleep quality among Pakistani junior physicians. A cross-sectional study was conducted at private and public hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan, from June 2012 to January 2013. The study population comprised of junior doctors (house physicians and house surgeons). A consecutive sample of 350 physicians was drawn from the above-mentioned study setting. The subject underwent two validated self-administered questionnaires, that is, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A total of 334 physicians completely filled out the questionnaire with a response rate of 95.4% (334/350). Of 334 physicians, 36.8% (123/334) were classified as "poor sleepers" (global PSQI score > 5). Poor sleep quality was associated with female gender (P = 0.01), excessive daytime sleepiness (P sleep time (P sleep onset latency (P sleep disturbances (P 10) were more prevalent among poor sleepers (P Sleep quality among Pakistani junior physicians is significantly poor. Efforts must be directed towards proper sleep hygiene education. Regulations regarding duty hour limitations need to be considered.

  17. 50 CFR 20.107 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for tundra swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tundra swans. 20.107 Section 20.107 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.107 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for tundra swans. This section provides for the annual hunting of tundra swans in designated portions of the 48 contiguous United...

  18. Noninvasive Ventilation Improves Sleep in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Prospective Polysomnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijsen, Bart; Buyse, Bertien; Belge, Catharina; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Decramer, Marc; Testelmans, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effects of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on sleep in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after meticulous titration with polysomnography (PSG). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 24 ALS patients were admitted to the sleep laboratory during 4 nights for in-hospital NIV titration with PSG and nocturnal capnography. Questionnaires were used to assess subjective sleep quality and quality of life (QoL). Patients were readmitted after one month. Results: In the total group, slow wave sleep and REM sleep increased and the arousal-awakening index improved. The group without bulbar involvement (non-bulbar) showed the same improvements, together with an increase in sleep efficiency. Nocturnal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels improved in the total and non-bulbar group. Except for oxygen saturation during REM sleep, no improvement in respiratory function or sleep structure was found in bulbar patients. However, these patients showed less room for improvement. Patient-reported outcomes showed improvement in sleep quality and QoL for the total and non-bulbar group, while bulbar patients only reported improvements in very few subscores. Conclusions: This study shows an improvement of sleep architecture, carbon dioxide, and nocturnal oxygen saturation at the end of NIV titration and after one month of NIV in ALS patients. More studies are needed to identify the appropriate time to start NIV in bulbar patients. Our results suggest that accurate titration of NIV by PSG improves sleep quality. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 511. Citation: Vrijsen B, Buyse B, Belge C, Robberecht W, Van Damme P, Decramer M, Testelmans D. Noninvasive ventilation improves sleep in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a prospective polysomnographic study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):559–566. PMID:25766713

  19. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and sleep quality : a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Mohler; Patrizia Frei; Jürg Fröhlich; Charlotte Braun-Fahrländer; Martin Röösli

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is persistent public concern about sleep disturbances due to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate whether sleep quality is affected by mobile phone use or by other RF-EMF sources in the everyday environment. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study with 955 study participants aged between 30 and 60 years. Sleep quality and daytime sleepiness was assessed by means of standardized questionna...

  20. "It's Not All About My Baby's Sleep": A Qualitative Study of Factors Influencing Low-Income African American Mothers' Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Danielle N; Mindell, Jodi A; Reyes, Naomi R; Hart, Chantelle N; Herring, Sharon J

    2016-01-01

    Low-income African American mothers are at particular risk for poor postpartum sleep. This study sought to understand facilitators and barriers that exist to getting a good night's sleep among these high-risk mothers. Semistructured interviews with 18 low-income African Americans (3-6 months postpartum) were conducted. Most mothers described their own sleep quality to be poor, despite the fact that their babies' sleep improved substantially from the newborn period. Mothers kept themselves awake due to their own internal worry and anxiety, along with external factors that were largely independent of babies' sleep, including work and school commitments and the home environment. For the few mothers with good sleep quality, time management and family support were strong facilitators. Findings lay the groundwork for sleep improvement interventions.

  1. Coffee, caffeine, and sleep: A systematic review of epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ian; Landolt, Hans Peter

    2017-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world. It is readily available in coffee and other foods and beverages, and is used to mitigate sleepiness, enhance performance, and treat apnea in premature infants. This review systematically explores evidence from epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials as to whether coffee and caffeine have deleterious effects on sleep. Caffeine typically prolonged sleep latency, reduced total sleep time and sleep efficiency, and worsened perceived sleep quality. Slow-wave sleep and electroencephalographic (EEG) slow-wave activity were typically reduced, whereas stage-1, wakefulness, and arousals were increased. Dose- and timing-response relationships were established. The sleep of older adults may be more sensitive to caffeine compared to younger adults. Pronounced individual differences are also present in young people, and genetic studies isolated functional polymorphisms of genes implicated in adenosine neurotransmission and metabolism contributing to individual sensitivity to sleep disruption by caffeine. Most studies were conducted in male adults of Western countries, which limits the generalizability of the findings. Given the importance of good sleep for general health and functioning, longitudinal investigations aimed at establishing possible causal relationships among coffee- and caffeine-induced changes in sleep quality and health development are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk factors for sleep disturbances in older adults: Evidence from prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagula, Stephen F; Stone, Katie L; Fabio, Anthony; Cauley, Jane A

    2016-02-01

    No systematic review of epidemiological evidence has examined risk factors for sleep disturbances among older adults. We searched the PubMed database combining search terms targeting the following domains 1) prospective, 2) sleep, and 3) aging, and identified 21 relevant population-based studies with prospective sleep outcome data. Only two studies utilized objective measures of sleep disturbance, while six used the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and thirteen used insomnia symptoms or other sleep complaints as the outcome measure. Female gender, depressed mood, and physical illness were most consistently identified as risks for future sleep disturbances. Less robust evidence implicated the following as potentially relevant predictors: lower physical activity levels, African-American race, lower economic status, previous manual occupation, widowhood, marital quality, loneliness and perceived stress, preclinical dementia, long-term benzodiazepine and sedative use, low testosterone levels, and inflammatory markers. Chronological age was not identified as a consistent, independent predictor of future sleep disturbances. In conclusion, prospective studies have identified female gender, depressed mood, and physical illness as general risk factors for future sleep disturbances in later life, although specific physiological pathways have not yet been established. Research is needed to determine the precise mechanisms through which these factors influence sleep over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep characteristics of young children in Japan: internet study and comparison with other Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Jun; Mindell, Jodi A; Sadeh, Avi

    2011-10-01

    A recent international Internet-based study of young children (birth to 36 months) found that total sleep duration in Japan was the shortest among 17 countries/regions. The present study compared features of children's sleep in Japan relative to those in other Asian countries/regions. Parents of 872 infants and toddlers in Japan (48.6% boys), and parents of 20 455 infants and toddlers in 11 other Asian countries/regions (48.1% boys; China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam) completed an Internet-based expanded version of the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire. Young children in Japan exhibited significantly fewer nocturnal wakings and shorter daytime sleep in comparison with other Asian countries/regions. Although the former finding was apparent in all age groups, the reduced duration of daytime sleep in Japan was not present until after 3 months of age. Interestingly, sleep problems were reported by significantly fewer parents in Japan compared with those in other Asian countries/regions, although parents in Japan reported significantly more difficulty at bedtime. The short sleep duration of young children in Japan is largely due to a relatively short duration of daytime sleep. Significant differences in sleep characteristics in Japan relative to other Asian regions were found primarily after 3 months of age. Future studies should further explore the underlying causes and the potential impacts of these sleep differences. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Sleep and nighttime energy consumption in early childhood: a population‐based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, J.; Llewellyn, C. H.; Johnson, L.; van Jaarsveld, C. H. M.; Syrad, H.; Fisher, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Shorter sleep is a risk factor for weight gain in young children. Experimental studies show that sleep deprivation is associated with higher nighttime energy intake, but no studies have examined the patterning of energy intake in relation to nighttime sleep duration in young children. Objectives The objectives of the study were to test the hypothesis that shorter‐sleeping children would show higher nighttime energy intake and to examine whether the additional calories were from drinks, snacks or meals. Methods Participants were 1278 families from the Gemini twin cohort, using data from one child per family selected at random to avoid clustering effects. Nighttime sleep duration was measured at 16 months of age using the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire. Energy intake by time of day and eating episode (meal, snack, drink) were derived from 3‐day diet diaries completed when children were 21 months. Results Consistent with our hypothesis, shorter‐sleeping children consumed more calories at night only (linear trend P weight, gestational age, maternal education, weight and daytime sleep. Conclusions Shorter‐sleeping, young children consume more calories, predominantly at night, and from milk drinks. Parents should be aware that providing milk drinks at night may contribute to excess intake. This provides a clear target for intervention that may help address associations between sleep and weight observed in later childhood. PMID:25565402

  5. Poor sleep quality and later sleep timing are risk factors for osteopenia and sarcopenia in middle-aged men and women: The NEO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Eliane A; de Mutsert, Renée; le Cessie, Saskia; Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Heemst, Diana; den Heijer, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2017-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has detrimental metabolic consequences. Osteopenia and sarcopenia usually occur together and increase risk of fractures and disease. Results from studies linking sleep parameters to osteopenia or sarcopenia are scarce and inconsistent. To examine the associations of sleep parameters with osteopenia and sarcopenia, considering the influence of sex and menopause. Cross-sectional analysis of 915 participants (45-65 years, 56% women, BMI 26 (range: 18-56) kg/m2) in the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study, a population-based cohort study. Sleep duration, quality, and timing were assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); bone mineral density and relative appendicular muscle mass were measured by DXA scans. Linear and logistic regressions were performed to associate sleep parameters to bone mineral density, relative appendicular muscle mass, osteopenia (t-score between -1 and -2.5) and sarcopenia (1 SD below average muscle mass). After adjustment for confounding factors, one unit increase in PSQI score (OR and 95% CI, 1.09, 1.03-1.14), declined self-rated sleep quality (1.76, 1.03-3.01), sleep latency (1.18, 1.06-1.31), and a one hour later sleep timing (1.51, 1.08-2.11), but not sleep duration (1.05, 0.90-1.23), were associated with osteopenia. PSQI score (1.10, 1.02-1.19) was also associated with sarcopenia; OR's of sleep latency and later mid-sleep time with sarcopenia were 1.14 (0.99-1.31) and 1.54 (0.91-2.61), respectively. Associations were somewhat stronger in women and varied per menopausal status. These results suggest that decreased sleep quality and a later sleep timing are risk factors for osteopenia and sarcopenia in middle aged individuals.

  6. Associations of objectively and subjectively measured sleep quality with subsequent cognitive decline in older community-dwelling men: the MrOS sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Terri; Yaffe, Kristine; Laffan, Alison; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Redline, Susan; Ensrud, Kristine E; Song, Yeonsu; Stone, Katie L

    2014-04-01

    To examine associations of objectively and subjectively measured sleep with subsequent cognitive decline. A population-based longitudinal study. Six centers in the United States. Participants were 2,822 cognitively intact community-dwelling older men (mean age 76.0 ± 5.3 y) followed over 3.4 ± 0.5 y. None. OBJECTIVELY MEASURED SLEEP PREDICTORS FROM WRIST ACTIGRAPHY: total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), wake after sleep onset (WASO), number of long wake episodes (LWEP). Self-reported sleep predictors: sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]), TST. Clinically significant cognitive decline: five-point decline on the Modified Mini-Mental State examination (3MS), change score for the Trails B test time in the worse decile. Associations of sleep predictors and cognitive decline were examined with logistic regression and linear mixed models. After multivariable adjustment, higher levels of WASO and LWEP and lower SE were associated with an 1.4 to 1.5-fold increase in odds of clinically significant decline (odds ratio 95% confidence interval) Trails B test: SE sleep efficiency, greater nighttime wakefulness, greater number of long wake episodes, and poor self-reported sleep quality were associated with subsequent cognitive decline.

  7. Sleep education improves the sleep duration of adolescents: a randomized controlled pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kira, Geoff; Maddison, Ralph; Hull, Michelle; Blunden, Sarah; Olds, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    .... A parallel, two-arm randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted. High school students (13 to 16 years) were randomly allocated to either a classroom-based sleep education program intervention...

  8. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  9. Sleep duration affects risk for ulcerative colitis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Khalili, Hamed; Konijeti, Gauree G; Higuchi, Leslie M; de Silva, Punyanganie; Fuchs, Charles S; Richter, James M; Schernhammer, Eva S; Chan, Andrew T

    2014-11-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with production of inflammatory cytokines. Disturbed sleep quality has been associated with increased risk of disease flare in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the association between sleep and risk of incident CD and UC has not been previously examined. We conducted a prospective study of women who were enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I since 1976 and NHS II since 1989 and followed through detailed biennial questionnaires with >90% follow-up. We examined the association of sleep duration reported in 1986 in NHS I and 2001 in NHS II with incident CD and UC, diagnosed through 2010, in NHS I and 2009 in NHS II. Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for potential confounders were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among 151,871 women, we confirmed 191 cases of CD (incidence, 8/100,000 person-years) and 230 cases of UC (incidence, 10/100,000 person-years) over 2,292,849 person-years. Compared with women with reported usual sleep durations of 7-8 h/day (incidence, 8/100,000 person-years), women with reported sleep duration 9 h/day (20/100,000 person-years) had a higher incidence of UC (P sleep durations sleep durations >9 h/day, compared with sleep durations of 7-8 h/day. In contrast, sleep duration did not modify risk of CD. Duration of rotating night shift work was not associated with CD or UC. On the basis of data from the NHS I and II, less than 6 hours sleep/day and more than 9 hours sleep/day are each associated with an increased risk of UC. Further studies are needed to evaluate sleep as a modifiable risk factor in the pathogenesis and progression of IBD. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. How acute total sleep loss affects the attending brain: a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-02-01

    Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Sleep quality and the risk of work injury: a Swiss case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehli, Katrin; Miedinger, David; Bingisser, Roland; Dürr, Selina; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Maier, Sabrina; Mehta, Amar J; Müller, Roland; Schindler, Christian; Zogg, Stefanie; Künzli, Nino; Leuppi, Jörg D

    2014-10-01

    Sleep problems are a well-known risk factor for work injuries, but less is known about which vulnerable populations are most at risk. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between sleep quality and the risk of work injury and to identify factors that may modify the association. A case-control study including 180 cases and 551 controls was conducted at the University Hospital in Basel, Switzerland, from 1 December 2009 to 30 June 2011. Data on work injuries and sleep quality were collected. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of the association between sleep quality and work injury were estimated in multivariable logistic regression analyses and were stratified by hypothesized effect modifiers (age, gender, job risk, shift work, sleep duration and working hours). Poor sleep quality was associated significantly with work injury of any type (P work injury was significantly higher for workers older than 30 years (odds ratio>30 1.30 versus odds ratio≤30 0.91, P 7 0.79, P working 50 h or more per week (odds ratio≥50 1.79 versus odd ratioWork injury risk increased with increasing severity of sleep problems (P work injury frequency increased with decreasing sleep quality (P working hours may enhance the risk of work injuries associated with sleep quality. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Black swans and dragon kings: A unified model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-09-01

    The term “black swan” is a metaphor for outlier events whose statistics are characterized by Pareto's Law and by Zipf's Law; namely, statistics governed by power-law tails. The term “dragon king” is a metaphor for a singular outlier event which, in comparison with all other outlier events, is in a league of its own. As an illustrative example consider the wealth of a family that is sampled at random from a medieval society: the nobility constitutes the black-swan category, and the royal family constitutes the dragon-king category. In this paper we present and analyze a dynamical model that generates, universally and jointly, black swans and dragon kings. According to this model, growing from the microscopic scale to the macroscopic scale, black swans and dragon kings emerge together and invariantly with respect to initial conditions.

  13. Determinants of sleep behavior in adolescents: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Reut; Somerville, Gail; Paquin, Soukaina; Boursier, Johanne

    2017-06-01

    To identify determinants of sleep behavior in adolescents of middle to high socioeconomic status. Eighteen students (9 boys, 9 girls) with a mean age of 14.9±1.5years were interviewed using a standardized script inspired by the theory of planned behavior. Interviews were audio-recorded and anonymously transcribed verbatim. In addition, participants completed a survey assessing demographic and health characteristics and their sleep duration was measured using actigraphy. Adolescents listed a few positive benefits of healthy sleep and described a large number of immediate negative consequences caused by sleep deprivation. Strong positive/negative emotions were barriers to healthy sleep. The use of electronic devices at bedtime and sports participation were described as both barriers to and facilitators of healthy sleep. Participants indicated their intention to sleep more and to use relaxing activities at bedtime. Some intended to advance their bedtime, but none intended to stop using electronic devices at bedtime. Most participants stated that it would be easy to turn off phones but difficult to turn off movies at bedtime, and many believed that their parents and peers were against engaging in risky sleep behavior. Interventions that seek to alter adolescents' ability to regulate affect and address their beliefs regarding the use of electronic devices at bedtime, combined with information regarding the long-term impact of sleep health, may improve the effectiveness of sleep promotion programs for adolescents. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB(9ed4)), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (sei(ts1)) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB(9ed4) flies was also assessed. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB(9ed4)/+ and sei(ts1) mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB(9ed4)/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB(9ed4)/+ became adults. These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. To Assess Sleep Quality among Pakistani Junior Physicians (House Officers): A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Surani, AA; Surani, A; Zahid, S; Ali, S; Farhan, R; Surani, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep deprivation among junior physicians (house officers) is of growing concern. In developed countries, duty hours are now mandated, but in developing countries, junior physicians are highly susceptible to develop sleep impairment due to long working hours, on-call duties and shift work schedule. Aim: We undertook the study to assess sleep quality among Pakistani junior physicians. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at private and public hospitals in Kar...

  16. A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, Alice; Clayton, Esther; Sankey, Ruth; Hill, Catherine M

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs immune responses and pain tolerance, both key to recovery from acute illness. Hospitalised children and their co-sleeping parents also risk emotional lability and impaired coping skills when sleep-deprived. We aimed to study the experiences of children and parents during hospital admissions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents within a week of their child's discharge. Questions explored parent and child sleep quality, factors contributing to this, perceived impact on day-time functioning and suggested improvements to ward sleep environment. Southampton Children's Hospital, UK. 17 co-sleeping parents of 16 children aged 3-12 years completed interviews. Children admitted for surgical procedures and those with established sleep disorders or nocturnal seizures were excluded. Constant comparative methods identified themes within the data using a grounded theory approach. Parents reported that they, and to a lesser extent their children, experienced reduced sleep quality. Noise and light as well as ward schedules were identified as key factors disrupting sleep. Parents reported that lack of sleep caused difficulties with their own emotional regulation and that of their child, affecting daytime parent-child relationships. Furthermore, they reported a negative impact of sleep deprivation on decision-making about their child's medical care. Parents identified poor sleep in hospital as a significant additional burden to their child's hospital admission. Importantly, they identified potential improvements to the ward sleep environment. Intervention studies that target modifiable, child-centred alterations to night-time ward culture are recommended, focusing on measurable child and parental outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhilei; Ma, Hongfei; Xie, Manling; Yan, Peipei; Guo, Yanjun; Bao, Wei; Rong, Ying; Jackson, Chandra L; Hu, Frank B; Liu, Liegang

    2015-03-01

    It remains unclear how many hours of sleep are associated with the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the dose-response relationship between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes. PubMed and Embase were searched up to 20 March 2014 for prospective observational studies that assessed the relationship of sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes. Both semiparametric and parametric methods were used. Ten articles with 11 reports were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. A total of 18,443 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 482,502 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 2.5 to 16 years. A U-shaped dose-response relationship was observed between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes, with the lowest risk observed at a sleep duration category of 7-8 h per day. Compared with 7-h sleep duration per day, the pooled relative risks for type 2 diabetes were 1.09 (95% CI 1.04-1.15) for each 1-h shorter sleep duration among individuals who slept sleep duration among individuals with longer sleep duration. Our dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies shows a U-shaped relationship between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes, with the lowest type 2 diabetes risk at 7-8 h per day of sleep duration. Both short and long sleep duration are associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, underscoring the importance of appropriate sleep duration in the delay or prevention of type 2 diabetes. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  18. Randomized, Prospective Study of the Impact of a Sleep Health Program on Firefighter Injury and Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jason P; O'Brien, Conor S; Barger, Laura K; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Czeisler, Charles A; Lockley, Steven W

    2017-01-01

    Firefighters' schedules include extended shifts and long work weeks which cause sleep deficiency and circadian rhythm disruption. Many firefighters also suffer from undiagnosed sleep disorders, exacerbating fatigue. We tested the hypothesis that a workplace-based Sleep Health Program (SHP) incorporating sleep health education and sleep disorders screening would improve firefighter health and safety compared to standard practice. Prospective station-level randomized, field-based intervention. US fire department. 1189 firefighters. Sleep health education, questionnaire-based sleep disorders screening, and sleep clinic referrals for respondents who screened positive for a sleep disorder. Firefighters were randomized by station. Using departmental records, in an intention-to-treat analysis, firefighters assigned to intervention stations which participated in education sessions and had the opportunity to complete sleep disorders screening reported 46% fewer disability days than those assigned to control stations (1.4 ± 5.9 vs. 2.6 ± 8.5 days/firefighter, respectively; p = .003). There were no significant differences in departmental injury or motor vehicle crash rates between the groups. In post hoc analysis accounting for intervention exposure, firefighters who attended education sessions were 24% less likely to file at least one injury report during the study than those who did not attend, regardless of randomization (OR [95% CI] 0.76 [0.60, 0.98]; χ2 = 4.56; p = .033). There were no significant changes pre- versus post-study in self-reported sleep or sleepiness in those who participated in the intervention. A firefighter workplace-based SHP providing sleep health education and sleep disorders screening opportunity can reduce injuries and work loss due to disability in firefighters.

  19. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and sleep quality: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Evelyn; Frei, Patrizia; Fröhlich, Jürg; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Röösli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    There is persistent public concern about sleep disturbances due to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate whether sleep quality is affected by mobile phone use or by other RF-EMF sources in the everyday environment. We conducted a prospective cohort study with 955 study participants aged between 30 and 60 years. Sleep quality and daytime sleepiness was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires in May 2008 (baseline) and May 2009 (follow-up). We also asked about mobile and cordless phone use and asked study participants for consent to obtain their mobile phone connection data from the mobile phone operators. Exposure to environmental RF-EMF was computed for each study participant using a previously developed and validated prediction model. In a nested sample of 119 study participants, RF-EMF exposure was measured in the bedroom and data on sleep behavior was collected by means of actigraphy during two weeks. Data were analyzed using multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders. In the longitudinal analyses neither operator-recorded nor self-reported mobile phone use was associated with sleep disturbances or daytime sleepiness. Also, exposure to environmental RF-EMF did not affect self-reported sleep quality. The results from the longitudinal analyses were confirmed in the nested sleep study with objectively recorded exposure and measured sleep behavior data. We did not find evidence for adverse effects on sleep quality from RF-EMF exposure in our everyday environment.

  20. Pulmonary rehabilitation and sleep quality: a before and after controlled study of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    McDonnell, Lucy M; Hogg, Lauren; McDonnell, Lynn; White, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep quality is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is associated with poor quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves quality of life, exercise capacity, and anxiety and depression. Its effect on sleep quality is uncertain. Aim: To determine whether PR improves sleep quality in COPD. Methods: A prospective controlled ‘before and after’ study of sleep quality in COPD patients attending a community PR programme was conducted. Sleep quality ...

  1. Sleep bruxism associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A pilot study using a new portable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winck, M; Drummond, M; Viana, P; Pinho, J C; Winck, J C

    Sleep bruxism (SB) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) share common pathophysiologic pathways. We aimed to study the presence and relationship of SB in a OSAS population. Patients referred with OSAS suspicion and concomitant SB complains were evaluated using a specific questionnaire, orofacial evaluation and cardio-respiratory polygraphy that could also monitor audio and EMG of the masseter muscles. From 11 patients studied 9 had OSAS. 55.6% were male, mean age was 46.3±11.3 years, and apnea hypopnea index of 11.1±5.7/h. Through specific questionnaire 55.6% had SB criteria. Orofacial examination (only feasible in 3) confirmed tooth wear in all. 77.8% had polygraphic SB criteria (SB index>2/h). Mean SB index was 5.12±3.6/h, phasic events predominated (72.7%). Concerning tooth grinding episodes, we found a mean of 10.7±9.2 per night. All OSAS patients except two (77.8%) had more than two audible tooth-grinding episodes. These two patients were the ones with the lowest SB index (1.0 and 1.4 per hour). Only in one patient could we not detect tooth grinding episodes. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between tooth grinding episodes and SB index and phasic event index (R=0.755, p=0.019 and R=0.737, p=0.023 respectively, Pearson correlation). Mean apnoea to bruxism index was 0.4/h, meaning that only a minority of SB events were not secondary to OSAS. We could not find any significant correlation between AHI and bruxism index or phasic bruxism index (R=-0.632 and R=-0.611, p>0.05, Pearson correlation). This pilot study shows that SB is a very common phenomenon in a group of mild OSAS patients, probably being secondary to it in the majority of cases. The new portable device used may add diagnostic accuracy and help to tailor therapy in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Short Sleep Duration Increases Metabolic Impact in Healthy Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Han-Bing; Tam, Tony; Zee, Benny Chung-Ying; Chung, Roger Yat-Nork; Su, Xuefen; Jin, Lei; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chang, Ly-Yun; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong; Lao, Xiang Qian

    2017-10-01

    The metabolic impact of inadequate sleep has not been determined in healthy individuals outside laboratories. This study aims to investigate the impact of sleep duration on five metabolic syndrome components in a healthy adult cohort. A total of 162121 adults aged 20-80 years (men 47.4%) of the MJ Health Database, who were not obese and free from major diseases, were recruited and followed up from 1996 to 2014. Sleep duration and insomnia symptoms were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Incident cases of five metabolic syndrome components were identified by follow-up medical examinations. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for three sleep duration categories "short)," "6-8 hours/day (regular)," and "> 8 hours/day (long)" with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Analyses were stratified by insomnia symptoms to assess whether insomnia symptoms modified the association between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome. Compared to regular sleep duration, short sleep significantly (p sleep decreased the risk of hypertriglyceridemia (adjusted HR 0.89 [0.84-0.94]) and metabolic syndrome (adjusted HR 0.93 [0.88-0.99]). Insomnia symptoms did not modify the effects of sleep duration. Sleep duration may be a significant determinant of metabolic health.

  3. Sleeping patterns of Afghan unaccompanied asylum-seeking adolescents: a large observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Bronstein

    Full Text Available Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC have experienced multiple traumas and are a high-risk group for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The effects of trauma are known to be associated with sleep problems; indeed sleeping problems are core features of PTSD. However, there has been no systematic research examining the sleep of this high risk group of children. This study presents the first evidence on the sleeping patterns of Afghan UASC living in the UK. A total of 222 male Afghan children, aged 13-18, were interviewed using validated self-report questionnaires measuring sleeping patterns and PTSD. Overall, UASC patterns for bed time and rise time appear acculturated to the country of asylum. Mean UASC sleep onset latency scores were approximately 20 minutes greater compared with normative scores, which may be a reflection of UASC pre-migration and post-migration experiences. As expected, UASC who screened above the clinical cut-off for PTSD reported significantly greater sleep onset latency, increased nightmares, and less total sleep time compared to the non-PTSD group. The results may be of particular interest to clinicians given that, compared to screening for PTSD, screening for sleep problems may be a less culturally disputed form of initial assessment indicating distress in UASC. Similarly, the field of UASC and refugee child interventions is largely focused on trauma, yet sleep may provide a novel avenue for equally or more effective treatment.

  4. Sleep in patients with remitted bipolar disorders: a meta-analysis of actigraphy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, P A; Scott, J; Boudebesse, C; Lajnef, M; Henry, C; Leboyer, M; Bellivier, F; Etain, B

    2015-02-01

    Sleep dysregulation is highly prevalent in bipolar disorders (BDs), with previous actigraphic studies demonstrating sleep abnormalities during depressive, manic, and interepisode periods. We undertook a meta-analysis of published actigraphy studies to identify whether any abnormalities in the reported sleep profiles of remitted BD cases differ from controls. A systematic review identified independent studies that were eligible for inclusion in a random effects meta-analysis. Effect sizes for actigraphy parameters were expressed as standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Nine of 248 identified studies met eligibility criteria. Compared with controls (N=210), remitted BD cases (N=202) showed significant differences in SMD for sleep latency (0.51 [0.28-0.73]), sleep duration (0.57 [0.30-0.84]), wake after sleep onset (WASO) (0.28 [0.06-0.50]) and sleep efficiency (-0.38 [-0.70-0.07]). Moderate heterogeneity was identified for sleep duration (I2=44%) and sleep efficiency (I2=44%). Post hoc meta-regression analyses demonstrated that larger SMD for sleep duration were identified for studies with a greater age difference between BD cases and controls (β=0.22; P=0.03) and non-significantly lower levels of residual depressive symptoms in BD cases (β=-0.13; P=0.07). This meta-analysis of sleep in remitted bipolar disorder highlights disturbances in several sleep parameters. Future actigraphy studies should pay attention to age matching and levels of residual depressive symptoms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Refreshing Sleep and Sleep Continuity Determine Perceived Sleep Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Libman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep quality is a construct often measured, employed as an outcome criterion for therapeutic success, but never defined. In two studies we examined appraised good and poor sleep quality in three groups: a control group, individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, and those with insomnia disorder. In Study 1 we used qualitative methodology to examine good and poor sleep quality in 121 individuals. In Study 2 we examined sleep quality in 171 individuals who had not participated in Study 1 and evaluated correlates and predictors of sleep quality. Across all six samples and both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, the daytime experience of feeling refreshed (nonrefreshed in the morning and the nighttime experience of good (impaired sleep continuity characterized perceived good and poor sleep. Our results clarify sleep quality as a construct and identify refreshing sleep and sleep continuity as potential clinical and research outcome measures.

  6. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  7. Workplace bullying, sleep problems and leisure-time physical activity: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Gullander, Maria; Hogh, Annie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Workplace bullying is a potent stressor that may increase sleep problems. Since physical fitness improves resilience to stress, it seems plausible that recreational physical activities may moderate the association between bullying and sleep. The study aimed to examine prospectively...... and Harassment (WBH) cohort (N=3278) or the Psychosocial Risk Factors for Stress and Mental Disease (PRISME) cohort (N=4455). We measured workplace bullying using one question that was preceded by a definition of bullying. We used the Karolinska sleep questionnaire to assess sleep problems. The number of hours...... whether (i) bullying increases the risk of sleep problems, and (ii) the association between bullying and sleep problems is moderated by leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). METHODS: The study sample comprised a cohort of public and private sector employees, who were enrolled into the Work Bullying...

  8. Workplace bullying, sleep problems and leisure-time physical activity: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Gullander, Maria; Hogh, Annie

    2015-01-01

    and Harassment (WBH) cohort (N=3278) or the Psychosocial Risk Factors for Stress and Mental Disease (PRISME) cohort (N=4455). We measured workplace bullying using one question that was preceded by a definition of bullying. We used the Karolinska sleep questionnaire to assess sleep problems. The number of hours......OBJECTIVES: Workplace bullying is a potent stressor that may increase sleep problems. Since physical fitness improves resilience to stress, it seems plausible that recreational physical activities may moderate the association between bullying and sleep. The study aimed to examine prospectively...... whether (i) bullying increases the risk of sleep problems, and (ii) the association between bullying and sleep problems is moderated by leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). METHODS: The study sample comprised a cohort of public and private sector employees, who were enrolled into the Work Bullying...

  9. Sleep Quality and Associated Factors in Older Turkish Adults With Hypertension: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Belgüzar; Tenekeci, Elif Gökçe

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate sleep quality and to explore its associations with participant characteristics, anemia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and physical activity in older Turkish adults with hypertension. This cross-sectional study included 128 adults aged 60 years or older with hypertension. Data were collected by using a personal information form, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Anemia was assessed by hemoglobin levels. Eighty-one patients (63.3%) reported poor sleep quality. Anemia was present in 35.2% of the patients (defined as hemoglobin sleep quality. Conclusion/Implication: The majority of the participants had poor sleep quality. Better understanding of risk factors associated with poor sleep quality may contribute to more effective interventions to improve health and well-being.

  10. Sleep variability and cardiac autonomic modulation in adolescents - Penn State Child Cohort (PSCC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of objectively measured habitual sleep patterns on cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in a population-based sample of adolescents. We used data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. CAM was assessed by heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) analysis of beat-to-beat normal R-R intervals from a 39-h electrocardiogram, on a 30-min basis. The HRV indices included frequency domain (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio), and time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, and heart rate or HR) variables. Actigraphy was used for seven consecutive nights to estimate nightly sleep duration and time in bed. The seven-night mean (SD) of sleep duration and sleep efficiency were used to represent sleep duration, duration variability, sleep efficiency, and efficiency variability, respectively. HF and LF were log-transformed for statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between sleep patterns and CAM. After adjusting for major confounders, increased sleep duration variability and efficiency variability were significantly associated with lower HRV and higher HR during the 39-h, as well as separated by daytime and nighttime. For instance, a 1-h increase in sleep duration variability is associated with -0.14(0.04), -0.12(0.06), and -0.16(0.05) ms(2) decrease in total, daytime, and nighttime HF, respectively. No associations were found between sleep duration, or sleep efficiency and HRV. Higher habitual sleep duration variability and efficiency variability are associated with lower HRV and higher HR, suggesting that an irregular sleep pattern has an adverse impact on CAM, even in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterizing Adult Sleep Behavior Over 20 Years-The Population-Based Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomers, Margot L; Hulsegge, Gerben; van Oostrom, Sandra H; Proper, Karin I; Verschuren, W M Monique; Picavet, H Susan J

    2017-07-01

    To describe sleep duration patterns of adults over a 20-year period; to compare sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics across these patterns; and to relate the patterns to sleep quality. The study population consisted of 3695 adults aged 20 to 59 years at baseline. Five measurements of self-reported sleep duration were used to compose seven patterns from 1987 to 2012: persistent short (≤6 hours), moderate (7-8 hours), or long (≥9 hours) sleep duration and several changing patterns (varying and became short, moderate, or long sleepers). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to compare characteristics across sleep duration patterns. About 56% of the adults had persistent moderate sleep duration over 20 years. This group had a better sleep quality than the other groups. Of the adults who changed in their sleep duration (40%), 43% became a short sleeper. Sleep duration patterns that deviate from persistent moderate sleep duration were associated with physical inactivity during leisure time (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs] varied between 1.26 [1.04-1.53] and 1.58 [1.06-2.37]) and with poor self-rated health (ORs [95% CIs] varied between 1.50 [1.20-1.87] and 2.15 [1.48-3.12]). Nearly half of the adults did not have persistent moderate sleep duration over a 20-year period and more than one-sixth became short sleeper. This is reason for concern considering the adverse health status associated with short and long sleep duration. Leisure-time physical activity is a potential important target to prevent unfavorable changes in sleep duration over the life course.

  12. The National Veteran Sleep Disorder Study: Descriptive Epidemiology and Secular Trends, 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Melannie; Ray, Meredith A.; Hébert, James R.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Zhang, Hongmei; Steck, Susan E.; Bogan, Richard K.; Burch, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: A large proportion of individuals affected by sleep disorders are untreated and susceptible to accidents, injuries, long-term sequelae (e.g., risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, psychiatric disorders), and increased mortality risk. Few studies have examined the scope and magnitude of sleep disorder diagnoses in the United States (US) or factors influencing them. Veterans are particularly vulnerable to factors that elicit or exacerbate sleep disorders. Methods: This serial cross-sectional study characterized secular trends in diagnosed sleep disorders among veterans seeking care in US Veterans Health Administration facilities over an eleven-year span (FY2000–2010, n = 9,786,778). Electronic medical records from the national Veterans Administration Informatics and Computing Infrastructure database were accessed. Cases were defined using diagnostic codes specified by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Age-adjusted annual prevalence was summarized by sex, race, combat exposure, body mass index, and comorbid diagnoses (cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental disorders). Results: Sleep apnea (47%) and insomnia (26%) were the most common diagnoses among patients with any sleep disorder. There was a six-fold relative increase in total sleep disorder prevalence over the study period. Posttraumatic stress disorder, which tripled over the same time period, was associated with the highest prevalence of sleep disorders (16%) among the comorbid conditions evaluated. Conclusions: The results indicate a growing need for integration of sleep disorder management with patient care and health care planning among US veterans. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1331. Citation: Alexander M, Ray MA, Hébert JR, Youngstedt SD, Zhang H, Steck SE, Bogan RK, Burch JB. The National Veteran Sleep Disorder Study: descriptive epidemiology and secular trends, 2000–2010. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1399–1410. PMID:27091538

  13. Predictors of heartburn during sleep in a large prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fass, Ronnie; Quan, Stuart F; O'Connor, George T; Ervin, Ann; Iber, Conrad

    2005-05-01

    Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux, which may result in nocturnal heartburn, has been demonstrated to be associated with a more severe form of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study was to determine the clinical predictors of heartburn during sleep in a large prospective cohort study. Study subjects were members of the parent cohorts from which the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) recruited participants. SHHS is a multicenter, longitudinal, cohort study of the cardiovascular consequences of sleep-disordered breathing. As part of the recruitment process, parent cohort members completed a questionnaire that permitted an assessment of the relationships between heartburn during sleep, and patient demographics, sleep abnormalities, medical history, and social habits in nine community-based parent cohorts across the United States. All variables, significant at the p education decreased the risk of reporting heartburn during sleep. Heartburn during sleep is very common in the general population. Reports of this type of symptom of GERD are strongly associated with increased BMI, carbonated soft drink consumption, snoring and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, hypertension, asthma, and usage of benzodiazepines. Overall, heartburn during sleep may be associated with sleep complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness.

  14. Changes in Sleep Duration During Transition to Statutory Retirement: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllyntausta, Saana; Salo, Paula; Kronholm, Erkki; Aalto, Ville; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Stenholm, Sari

    2017-07-01

    This study examined whether sleep duration changes during the transition from full-time work to statutory retirement and, if this were the case, which preretirement factors, including sociodemographic, work, lifestyle, and health factors, predict these changes. Data from repeated surveys of the Finnish Public Sector study, linked to records of retirement, were used. The study population consisted of 5785 participants who retired on a statutory basis in 2000-2011 and who had responded to surveys on sleep duration at least once immediately before and after their retirement (mean number of repeat study waves 3.6). Linear regression analyses with generalized estimating equations were used to examine changes in sleep duration around retirement. Before retirement there was a slight decrease in sleep duration. During the 4-year retirement transition, sleep duration increased from 7 hours 0 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 6 hours 54 minutes to 7 hours 6 minutes) to 7 hours and 22 minutes (95% CI 7 hours 16 minutes to 7 hours 27 minutes); thus, mean increase being 22 minutes. Increase in sleep duration was greatest in those who were short sleepers, heavy drinkers, or had sleep difficulties. After the retirement transition, sleep duration remained at approximately the same level, as no significant changes were observed. This longitudinal study suggests that transition from full-time work to statutory retirement is associated with an increase in sleep duration.

  15. Comparison of a single-channel EEG sleep study to polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Mcleland, Jennifer S; Toedebusch, Cristina D; Boyd, Jill; Morris, John C; Landsness, Eric C; Yamada, Kelvin; Holtzman, David M

    2016-12-01

    An accurate home sleep study to assess electroencephalography (EEG)-based sleep stages and EEG power would be advantageous for both clinical and research purposes, such as for longitudinal studies measuring changes in sleep stages over time. The purpose of this study was to compare sleep scoring of a single-channel EEG recorded simultaneously on the forehead against attended polysomnography. Participants were recruited from both a clinical sleep centre and a longitudinal research study investigating cognitively normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Analysis for overall epoch-by-epoch agreement found strong and substantial agreement between the single-channel EEG compared to polysomnography (κ = 0.67). Slow wave activity in the frontal regions was also similar when comparing the single-channel EEG device to polysomnography. As expected, Stage N1 showed poor agreement (sensitivity 0.2) due to lack of occipital electrodes. Other sleep parameters, such as sleep latency and rapid eye movement (REM) onset latency, had decreased agreement. Participants with disrupted sleep consolidation, such as from obstructive sleep apnea, also had poor agreement. We suspect that disagreement in sleep parameters between the single-channel EEG and polysomnography is due partially to altered waveform morphology and/or poorer signal quality in the single-channel derivation. Our results show that single-channel EEG provides comparable results to polysomnography in assessing REM, combined Stages N2 and N3 sleep and several other parameters, including frontal slow wave activity. The data establish that single-channel EEG can be a useful research tool. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Sleep quality in long haul truck drivers: A study on Iranian national data

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Iran has a high rate of road traffic accidents. Poor quality of sleep brings about loss of attention, which is an important cause of road traffic accidents particularly in monotonous roads. The causes of poor quality of sleep in occupational drivers are multifactorial. The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of poor sleep quality among occupational drivers with rotating work schedules and analyze its different risk factors. Methods: 2200 professional long-h...

  17. Sleep characteristics and progression of coronary artery calcification: Results from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowall, Bernd; Lehmann, Nils; Mahabadi, Amir-Abbas; Lehnich, Anna-Therese; Moebus, Susanne; Budde, Thomas; Seibel, Rainer; Grönemeyer, Dietrich; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Stang, Andreas

    2018-02-09

    Sleep characteristics are associated with incident cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but there is a lack of studies on the association between sleep characteristics and incidence/progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC). In the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, a population-based cohort study in Germany, CAC was assessed by electron-beam tomography at baseline and at 5-year follow-up. In an analysis set of 3043 subjects (age at baseline 45-74 years; 47% men), we fitted logistic and linear regression models to assess associations between self-rated sleep characteristics (nocturnal and total sleep duration; napping; various sleep disorders) and CAC incidence/CAC progression. Progression was measured as 5-year progression factor, as categories of absolute CAC change, and additionally characterized as rapid or slow compared to an extrapolation of baseline CAC values. We observed barely any association between sleep characteristics and CAC progression regardless of the chosen statistical approach; associations between sleep and CAC incidence were slightly larger, e.g., the geometric mean of the 5-year CAC progression factor was 6.8% (95% confidence interval: -9.5; 25.9) larger for ≤5 h, 2.9% (-7.3; 14.3) larger for 5.1-6.9 h and 7.1% (-2.4; 15.7) smaller for ≥7.5 h total sleep compared to 7- <7.5 h total sleep. For subjects with any regular sleep disorder, the geometric mean of the 5-year CAC progression was 3.5% (-4.7; 11.2) smaller compared to subjects without any regular sleep disorder. In this German cohort study, sleep characteristics were barely associated with CAC progression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Drivers of waterfowl population dynamics: from teal to swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, David N.; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Schmutz, Joel A.; Rotella, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Waterfowl are among the best studied and most extensively monitored species in the world. Given their global importance for sport and subsistence hunting, viewing and ecosystem functioning, great effort has been devoted since the middle part of the 20th century to understanding both the environmental and demographic mechanisms that influence waterfowl population and community dynamics. Here we use comparative approaches to summarise and contrast our understanding ofwaterfowl population dynamics across species as short-lived as the teal Anas discors and A.crecca to those such as the swans Cygnus sp. which have long life-spans. Specifically, we focus on population responses to vital rate perturbations across life history strategies, discuss bottom-up and top-down responses of waterfowlpopulations to global change, and summarise our current understanding of density dependence across waterfowl species. We close by identifying research needs and highlight ways to overcome the challenges of sustainably managing waterfowl populations in the 21st century.

  19. How do people with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy sleep? A clinical and video-EEG with EOG and submental EMG for sleep staging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Vieira Scarlatelli-Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess subjective and objective sleep parameters in a homogeneous group of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE patients through internationally validated clinical questionnaires, video-electroencephalographic (VEEG and polysomnographic (PSG studies. Fifty-six patients with definite diagnosis of MTLE who were candidates for epilepsy surgery underwent a detailed clinical history, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS, neurological examination, 1.5 T brain magnetic resonance imaging, VEEG and PSG. Sixteen percent of patients reported significant daytime sleepiness as measured by ESS and 27% reported low levels of sleep quality as measured by PSQI. Patients with medically resistant epilepsy by MTLE showed increased wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO with mean ± standard deviation of 17.4 ± 15.6, longer non-rapid eye movement (NREM 1 (7.5 ± 4.6% and NREM3 sleep (26.6 ± 11.8%, abnormal rapid eye movement (REM latency in 30/56 patients, shorter REM sleep (16.7 ± 6.6%, and abnormal alpha delta patterns were observed in 41/56 patients. The analysis of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs evidenced highest spiking rate during NREM3 sleep and higher concordance with imaging data when IEDs were recorded in sleep, mainly during REM sleep. We concluded that patients with MTLE showed disrupted sleep architecture that may result in daytime dysfunction and sleep complaints. Furthermore, NREM sleep activated focal IEDs and them - when recorded during sleep - had higher localizing value.

  20. Arvicanthis ansorgei, a Novel Model for the Study of Sleep and Waking in Diurnal Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Jeffrey; Ruppert, Elisabeth; Calvel, Laurent; Robin-Choteau, Ludivine; Gropp, Claire-Marie; Allemann, Caroline; Reibel, Sophie; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Bourgin, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep neurobiology studies use nocturnal species, mainly rats and mice. However, because their daily sleep/wake organization is inverted as compared to humans, a diurnal model for sleep studies is needed. To fill this gap, we phenotyped sleep and waking in Arvicanthis ansorgei, a diurnal rodent widely used for the study of circadian rhythms. Design: Video-electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOG) recordings. Setting: Rodent sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen male Arvicanthis ansorgei, aged 3 mo. Interventions: 12 h light (L):12 h dark (D) baseline condition, 24-h constant darkness, 6-h sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep showed similar electrophysiological characteristics as nocturnal rodents. On average, animals spent 12.9 h ± 0.4 awake per 24-h cycle, of which 6.88 h ± 0.3 was during the light period. NREM sleep accounted for 9.63 h ± 0.4, which of 5.13 h ± 0.2 during dark period, and REM sleep for 89.9 min ± 6.7, which of 52.8 min ± 4.4 during dark period. The time-course of sleep and waking across the 12 h light:12 h dark was overall inverted to that observed in rats or mice, though with larger amounts of crepuscular activity at light and dark transitions. A dominant crepuscular regulation of sleep and waking persisted under constant darkness, showing the lack of a strong circadian drive in the absence of clock reinforcement by external cues, such as a running wheel. Conservation of the homeostatic regulation was confirmed with the observation of higher delta power following sustained waking periods and a 6-h sleep deprivation, with subsequent decrease during recovery sleep. Conclusions: Arvicanthis ansorgei is a valid diurnal rodent model for studying the regulatory mechanisms of sleep and so represents a valuable tool for further understanding the nocturnality/diurnality switch. Citation: Hubbard J, Ruppert E, Calvel L, Robin-Choteau L, Gropp CM

  1. Sleep problems and suicide attempts among adolescents: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyawala, Neel; Stevens, Jack; McBee-Strayer, Sandra M; Cannon, Elizabeth A; Bridge, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    This study used a case-control design to compare sleep disturbances in 40 adolescents who attempted suicide with 40 never-suicidal adolescents. Using hierarchical logistic regression analyses, we found that self-reported nighttime awakenings were significantly associated with attempted suicide, after controlling for antidepressant use, antipsychotic use, affective problems, and being bullied. In a separate regression analysis, the parent-reported total sleep problems score also predicted suicide attempt status, controlling for key covariates. No associations were found between suicide attempts and other distinct sleep problems, including falling asleep at bedtime, sleeping a lot during the day, trouble waking up in the morning, sleep duration, and parent-reported nightmares. Clinicians should be aware of sleep problems as potential risk factors for suicide attempts for adolescents.

  2. Emerging Adults' Text Message Use and Sleep Characteristics: A Multimethod, Naturalistic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Karla Klein; Horissian, Mikael; Crichlow-Ball, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Emerging adults use text messaging as a principal form of social communication, day and night, and this may compromise their sleep. In this study, a hypothetical model was tested linking daytime and nighttime text message use with multiple sleep characteristics. Subjective and objective measures of texting and sleep were utilized to assess 83 college students over a seven-day period during an academic term. Greater number of daily texts, awareness of nighttime cell phone notifications, and compulsion to check nighttime notifications were significantly associated with poorer subjective sleep quality. Awareness of nighttime notifications was significantly associated with higher self-reported global sleep problems and more sleep disruptions. Results suggest potential benefits of targeting nighttime texting habits in health promotion efforts for emerging adults.

  3. Postmenopausal hormones and sleep quality in the elderly: a population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Nancy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep disturbance and insomnia are commonly reported by postmenopausal women. However, the relationship between hormone therapy (HT and sleep disturbances in postmenopausal community-dwelling adults is understudied. Using data from the multicenter Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF, we tested the relationship between HT and sleep-wake estimated from actigraphy. Methods Sleep-wake was ascertained by wrist actigraphy in 3,123 women aged 84 ± 4 years (range 77-99 from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF. This sample represents 30% of the original SOF study and 64% of participants seen at this visit. Data were collected for a mean of 4 consecutive 24-hour periods. Sleep parameters measured objectively included total sleep time, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep latency, wake after sleep onset (WASO, and nap time. All analyses were adjusted for potential confounders (age, clinic site, race, BMI, cognitive function, physical activity, depression, anxiety, education, marital status, age at menopause, alcohol use, prior hysterectomy, and medical conditions. Results Actigraphy measurements were available for 424 current, 1,289 past, and 1,410 never users of HT. Women currently using HT had a shorter WASO time (76 vs. 82 minutes, P = 0.03 and fewer long-wake (≥ 5 minutes episodes (6.5 vs. 7.1, P = 0.004 than never users. Past HT users had longer total sleep time than never users (413 vs. 403 minutes, P = 0.002. Women who never used HT had elevated odds of SE Conclusions Postmenopausal women currently using HT had improved sleep quality for two out of five objective measures: shorter WASO and fewer long-wake episodes. The mechanism behind these associations is not clear. For postmenopausal women, starting HT use should be considered carefully in balance with other risks since the vascular side-effects of hormone replacement may exceed its beneficial effects on sleep.

  4. The impact of sleep on female sexual response and behavior: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Arnedt, J Todd; Pillai, Vivek; Ciesla, Jeffrey A

    2015-05-01

    The etiological role of sleep disturbance in sexual difficulties has been largely overlooked. Research suggests that short sleep duration and poor sleep quality lead to poor female sexual response. However, prior research consists of cross-sectional studies, and the influence of sleep on sexual functioning and behavior has not been prospectively examined. We sought to examine the influence of nightly sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep onset latency on daily female sexual response and activity. This study used a longitudinal design to study 171 women free of antidepressants and with reliable Internet access who were recruited from a university setting in the United States. Participants first completed baseline measures in a laboratory, and then completed web-delivered surveys at their habitual wake time for 14 consecutive days. All outcome measures were modified for daily recall. Participants completed the Profile of Female Sexual Function's desire, subjective arousal, and orgasmic functioning scales and the Female Sexual Function Index's genital arousal scale, and indicated whether they engaged in partnered sexual activity or self-stimulation in response to dichotomous items. Analyses revealed that longer sleep duration was related to greater next-day sexual desire (b = 0.32, P = 0.02), and that a 1-hour increase in sleep length corresponded to a 14% increase in odds of engaging in partnered sexual activity (odds ratio = 1.14, P disorders as risk factors for sexual dysfunction. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Sleep problems and internet addiction among children and adolescents: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-08-01

    Although the literature has documented associations between sleep problems and internet addiction, the temporal direction of these relationships has not been established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the bidirectional relationships between sleep problems and internet addiction among children and adolescents longitudinally. A four-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 1253 children and adolescents in grades 3, 5 and 8 from March 2013 to January 2014. The sleep problems of the student participants were measured by parental reports on the Sleep Habit Questionnaire, which catalogues early insomnia, middle insomnia, disturbed circadian rhythm, periodic leg movements, sleep terrors, sleepwalking, sleep talking, nightmares, bruxism, snoring and sleep apnoea. The severity of internet addiction was measured by students' self-reports on the Chen Internet Addiction Scale. Based on the results of time-lag models, dyssomnias (odds ratio = 1.31), especially early and middle insomnias (odds ratio = 1.74 and 2.24), sequentially predicted internet addiction, and internet addiction sequentially predicted disturbed circadian rhythm (odds ratio = 2.40), regardless of adjustment for gender and age. This is the first study to demonstrate the temporal relationship of early and middle insomnia predicting internet addiction, which subsequently predicts disturbed circadian rhythm. These findings imply that treatment strategies for sleep problems and internet addiction should vary according to the order of their occurrence. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. Dissociative symptoms and sleep parameters--an all-night polysomnography study in patients with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; Franck, Erik; Van Gastel, Ann; De Volder, Ilse; Van Den Eede, Filip; Verschuere, Bruno; Merckelbach, Harald

    2013-08-01

    Dissociative disorders encompass a range of symptoms varying from severe absent-mindedness and memory problems to confusion about one's own identity. Recent studies suggest that these symptoms may be the by-products of a labile sleep-wake cycle. In the current study, we explored this issue in patients suffering from insomnia (N=46). We investigated whether these patients have raised levels of dissociative symptoms and whether these are related to objective sleep parameters. Patients stayed for at least one night in a specialized sleep clinic, while sleep EEG data were obtained. In addition, they completed self-report measures on dissociative symptoms, psychological problems, and sleep characteristics. Dissociative symptom levels were elevated in patients suffering from insomnia, and were correlated with unusual sleep experiences and poor sleep quality. Longer REM sleep periods and less time spent awake during the night were predictive of dissociation. This is the first study to show that insomnia patients have raised dissociative symptom levels and that their dissociative symptoms are related to objective EEG parameters. These findings are important because they may inspire sleep-related treatment methods for dissociative disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sleep among bereaved caregivers of patients admitted to hospice: a 1-year longitudinal pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdal, Anners; Slåtten, Kari; Saghaug, Elisabeth; Grov, Ellen Karine; Normann, Are Peder; Lee, Kathryn A; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Gay, Caryl L

    2016-01-04

    This pilot study aimed to describe the sleep of partners and other family caregivers prior to and in the first year after a hospice patient's death. The study also evaluated the feasibility of the study protocol and determined the effect sizes in preparation for a full-scale study. The pilot study used a longitudinal, descriptive and comparative design. Participants included primary family caregivers of patients admitted to a hospice in Oslo, Norway. Caregiver sleep was measured subjectively with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and objectively using wrist actigraphy for 4 nights and 3 days at three different times: during the hospice stay, and at 6 and 12 months after the patient's death. 16 family caregivers (10 partners and 6 other family members) completed the 1-year study protocol. Overall, sleep quality and quantity were stable over time and at each assessment, approximately half of the sample had poor sleep quality, both by self-report and objective measures. However, the sleep trajectories differed significantly over time, with older caregivers (≥ 65 years) having significantly longer sleep durations than younger caregivers (sleep quality also differed over time depending on the caregiver's relationship to the patient, with partner caregivers having significantly worse sleep quality than other family caregivers. Caring for a dying family member is known to interfere with sleep, yet little is known about bereaved caregivers. The results of this pilot study demonstrate the feasibility of the longitudinal study protocol and indicate that sleep problems are common for caregivers and continue into the bereavement period, particularly for partner caregivers. The caregiver's relationship to the patient may be an important factor to consider in future studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Influencing Factors for Sleep Quality Among Shift-working Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study in China Using 3-factor Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Sun, Dong-Mei; Li, Chang-Bing; Tao, Min-Fang

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify influencing factors for sleep quality among shift-working nurses based on a three-factor scoring model that included sleep efficacy, sleep quality and daily dysfunction. A cross-sectional survey of 513 nurses in a hospital in Shanghai, China, was conducted using a self-reported questionnaire. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Data were analyzed based on the three-factor PSQI model: Factor 1, sleep efficacy; Factor 2, sleep quality; Factor 3, daily disturbances. After adjusting for age, marital status, and having children, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that participants who had previous shift work experience which was at least 6 months ago, or were currently performing shift work were significantly more likely to have poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) than those who had never done shift work (adjusted odds ratios of 3.943 and 3.975, respectively, both p sleep quality. An appropriate arrangement and intervention strategies are needed in Chinese hospitals in order to improve sleep quality among shift-working nurses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The influence of sleep on auditory learning: a behavioral study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaab, Nadine; Paetzold, Miriam; Becker, Markus; Walker, Matthew P; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2004-03-22

    Evidence continues to support a role for sleep in delayed learning without further practice. Here we demonstrate the beneficial influence of sleep on auditory skill learning. Fifty-six subjects were randomly assigned to two groups, trained and tested on a pitch memory task three times across 24 h. The morning group was trained at 09.00 h, retested 12 h later that same day, and again after 12 h sleep. The evening group was trained at 21.00 h, retested 12 h immediately after sleep, and again 12 h later the next day. At retesting, both groups combined showed significant delayed learning only after sleep, but not across equivalent periods of wake, regardless of which came first. These data add to the growing literature describing sleep-dependent learning throughout sensory and motor domains.

  10. Susan swan and the female grotesque Susan swan and the female grotesque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Bornéo Funck

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics. Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics.

  11. Sleep and academic performance in Indigenous Australian children from a remote community: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Patrick; Kohler, Mark; Blunden, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Disruptions to sleep in childhood are associated with poor behaviour and deficits in academic performance and executive function. Although academic performance of indigenous children from remote communities in Australia is documented as well below that of non-indigenous children, the extent of sleep disruption and its contribution to academic performance among this population has not been assessed. This pilot study aimed to objectively assess the sleep of remote indigenous children and the association between sleep disruption and both academic performance and executive function. Twenty-one children from a remote Australian indigenous community aged 6-13 years wore actigraphy for two consecutive nights, reported subjective sleepiness, and were objectively assessed for academic performance (Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, 2nd Edition) and executive function (NEuroloPSYcological Assessment-II). Results show marked reduction in sleep time, sleep fragmentation, academic performance and auditory attention compared with non-indigenous norms. Sleep duration was not associated with performance, possibly because of reduced sleep and performance observed across the entire group. Sleep fragmentation was associated with reduced reading and numerical skills (P sleep of indigenous children in remote communities is an important area of future inquiry, and our initial findings of poor sleep and an association between sleep disruption and academic performance may have important implications for intervention strategies aimed at 'closing the gap'. Further studies should assess a broader range of demographic, social and economic factors to better understand the associations reported here and guide future intervention. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Relationship of neuroimaging to typical sleep times during a clinical reasoning task: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Kelly, William; Costanzo, Michelle E; Artino, Anthony R; van der Vleuten, Cees; Beckman, Thomas J; Roy, Michael J; Holmboe, Eric S; Wittich, Christopher M; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-04-01

    Sleep deprivation and fatigue have been associated with medical errors, clinical performance decrements, and reduced quality of life for both practicing physicians and medical students. Greater understanding of the impact of sleep quantity on clinical reasoning could improve patient care. The purpose of our pilot study was to examine relationships between clinical reasoning (assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging) and sleep time (measured in different ways by actigraphy) while answering multiple-choice questions (MCQs) from licensing agencies. Residents and faculty were administered a clinical reasoning exercise (MCQs from licensing bodies) during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Usual sleep patterns were sampled with actigraphy. Covariate analysis was used to examine the relationship between sleep duration (mean sleep, minimum sleep, maximum sleep) and brain activity during clinical reasoning (solving MCQs from licensing bodies). The mean sleep time over the duration of monitoring for the group was 7.19 hours (SD 0.66) with a range of 6.1 to 8.1 hours (internal medicine faculty 7.1 hours, SD 0.41; internal medicine residents 7.27 hours, SD 0.92). There was a negative relationship between activation in the prefrontal cortex and minimum sleep time while reflecting on MCQs. Our findings provide evidence that the quantity of sleep can modulate brain activity while completing a clinically meaningful task that should be confirmed in larger studies. Our findings suggest that the construct of sleepiness may be more complex than appreciated by many and that the most important of these sleep measures in terms of outcomes remains to be determined. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Subjective and objective sleep and self-harm behaviors in young children: A general population study

    OpenAIRE

    Singareddy, Ravi; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh B.; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; FERNANDEZ-MENDOZA, Julio; Calhoun, Susan L.; Shaffer, Michele L.; Bixler, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    Significant association between sleep disturbances and suicidal ideation and/or attempts is reported in adults and adolescents. However, there is paucity of studies exploring the association between sleep and self-harm behaviors (SHB) in young children and are limited to only subjective sleep measures. We examined the association between SHB and both subjective and objective sleep in a population-based sample of 5–12 yr. old. Parents of every student in 3 local school (K-5) districts (n=7,312...

  14. Objectively measured sleep and β-amyloid burden in older adults: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P Spira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/aims: Although disturbed sleep is associated with cognitive deficits, the association between sleep disturbance and Alzheimer’s disease pathology is unclear. In this pilot study, we examined the extent to which sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep-disordered breathing are associated with β-amyloid (Aβ deposition in the brains of living humans. Methods: We studied 13 older adults (8 with normal cognition and 5 with mild cognitive impairment. Participants completed neuropsychological testing, polysomnography, and Aβ imaging with [11C]-Pittsburgh compound B. Results: Among participants with mild cognitive impairment, higher apnea–hypopnea index and oxygen desaturation index were associated with greater Aβ deposition, globally and regionally in the precuneus. There were no significant associations between sleep-disordered breathing and Aβ deposition among cognitively normal participants. There were no significant associations between sleep duration or sleep fragmentation and Aβ deposition. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that among older adults with mild cognitive impairment, greater sleep-disordered breathing severity is associated with greater Aβ deposition.

  15. Sleep extension improves serving accuracy: A study with college varsity tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Simon, Richard D

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of sleep extension on tennis serving accuracy, as well as daytime sleepiness in college varsity tennis players. Twelve (seven females and five males) healthy students on a college varsity tennis team maintained their habitual sleep-wake schedule for a one-week baseline period followed by a one-week sleep extension period. Participants were requested to sleep at least nine hours, including naps, during the sleep extension period. Serving accuracy was assessed when participants were sleep deprived (prior to the sleep extension period) and after the sleep extension period. Levels of daytime sleepiness were monitored via the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and caffeine consumption was recorded throughout the study. Participants slept significantly more in the second week--the sleep extension week--compared with the first week--the baseline week (8.85 vs. 7.14 h; psleep extension period, accuracy of the tennis serves improved significantly (35.7% vs. 41.8%; psleep of approximately 2h per night significantly increased athletic performance in college varsity tennis players. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Longitudinal study of sleep patterns of United States Military Academy cadets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nita Lewis; Shattuck, Lawrence G; Matsangas, Panagiotis

    2010-12-01

    The study provided an opportunity to observe sleep patterns in a college-age population attending the United States Military Academy. This 4-year longitudinal study investigated sleep patterns of cadets. A stratified sample of 80 cadets had sleep patterns monitored using actigraphy for 8 months: one month in both fall and spring academic semesters over a 4-year period. Data were collected at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. Participants were members of the class of 2007 (n˜1300) ranging in age from 17 to 22 when entering USMA. A sample of the class (n=80) wore wrist activity monitors and completed activity logs for one month in fall and spring academic semesters for the 4-year period. On average over the 4 years, cadets sleptdebt. Cadets slept more during fall than spring semesters. Male and female cadet sleep patterns varied dramatically, with males consistently receiving less sleep than females (˜21 m for nighttime sleep and ˜23 m for daily sleep). Cadet sleep at USMA is related to academic year, semester, season, sex, school day or weekend, and day of the week. These students suffer from chronic sleep debt. Restrictions imposed by the military academy limit the generalizability of the findings to other college age populations.

  17. Sleep duration, sleep quality, and obesity risk among older adults from six middle-income countries: findings from the study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildner, Theresa E; Liebert, Melissa A; Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath; Josh Snodgrass, J

    2014-01-01

    Changes in sleep patterns often occur in older adults. Previous studies have documented associations between sleep duration, sleep quality, and obesity risk in older individuals, yet few studies have examined these trends in lower-income countries. The present cross-sectional study uses nationally representative datasets from six countries to examine these relationships. Two hypotheses related to obesity risk and sleep patterns were tested using data from the first wave of the World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE). This longitudinal study draws on samples of older adults (>50 years old) in six middle-income countries (China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russian Federation, and South Africa). Self-report data were used to measure sleep duration, sleep quality, lifestyle and sociodemographic information, while anthropometric measurements were collected to assess body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Multiple linear regressions were used to examine the relationship between sleep patterns and obesity risk while controlling for lifestyle factors. Shorter sleep durations in both men and women were significantly associated with higher BMI and WC measures (P obesity risk. Surprisingly, high sleep quality was significantly associated with increased male BMI and WC in China and India (P obesity risk, which is important given the global increase of obesity-related diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and sleep quality: A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Aarts (Nikkie); L.A. Zuurbier (Lisette); R. Noordam; A. Hofman (Albert); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); L.E. Visser

    2016-01-01

    textabstractStudy Objectives: Poor sleep is a risk factor for the development and recurrence of depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is consistently associated with good subjective sleep in clinically depressed patient populations. However, studies in the general population

  19. Characterizing Adult Sleep Behavior Over 20 Years-The Population-Based Doetinchem Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomers, Margot L; Hulsegge, Gerben; van Oostrom, Sandra H; Proper, Karin I.; Verschuren, W M Monique|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071858849; Picavet, H. Susan J

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe sleep duration patterns of adults over a 20-year period; to compare sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics across these patterns; and to relate the patterns to sleep quality. Methods: The study population consisted of 3695 adults aged 20 to 59 years at

  20. Melatonin for chronic sleep onset insomnia in children: A Randomized placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Heijden, J.A.M. van der; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of melatonin treatment in childhood sleep onset insomnia, 40 elementary school children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more than 1 year from chronic sleep onset insomnia, were studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The children were randomly assigned to

  1. Impact of self-reported symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma on sleep disordered breathing and sleep disturbances in the elderly with polysomnography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Won, Ha-Kyeong; Moon, Sung-Do; Kim, Byung-Keun; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Ki-Woong; Yoon, In-Young

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep disturbances have been reported to be associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, population-based studies of this issue in the elderly are rare. To investigate the impact of self-reported rhinitis and asthma on sleep apnea and sleep quality using polysomnography in an elderly Korean population. A total of 348 elderly subjects who underwent one-night polysomnography study among a randomly selected sample were enrolled. Study subjects underwent anthropometric and clinical evaluations. Simultaneously, the prevalence and co-morbid status of asthma and allergic rhinitis, and subjective sleep quality were evaluated using a self-reported questionnaire. Ever-diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was significantly more prevalent in subjects with SDB compared with those without SDB. Subjects with an ever-diagnosis of allergic rhinitis showed a higher O2 desaturation index and mean apnea duration. Indices regarding sleep efficiency were affected in subjects with a recent treatment of allergic rhinitis or asthma. Waking after sleep onset was longer and sleep efficiency was lower in subjects who had received allergic rhinitis treatment within the past 12 months. Subjects who had received asthma treatment within the past 12 months showed significantly lower sleep efficiency than others. Our study indicates that a history of allergic rhinitis is associated with increased risk of SDB in the elderly. Sleep disturbance and impaired sleep efficiency were found in the subjects who had received recent treatment of allergic rhinitis or asthma. Physicians should be aware of the high risk of sleep disorders in older patients with respiratory allergic diseases.

  2. Impact of self-reported symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma on sleep disordered breathing and sleep disturbances in the elderly with polysomnography study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Hoon Kim

    Full Text Available Sleep disordered breathing (SDB and sleep disturbances have been reported to be associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, population-based studies of this issue in the elderly are rare.To investigate the impact of self-reported rhinitis and asthma on sleep apnea and sleep quality using polysomnography in an elderly Korean population.A total of 348 elderly subjects who underwent one-night polysomnography study among a randomly selected sample were enrolled. Study subjects underwent anthropometric and clinical evaluations. Simultaneously, the prevalence and co-morbid status of asthma and allergic rhinitis, and subjective sleep quality were evaluated using a self-reported questionnaire.Ever-diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was significantly more prevalent in subjects with SDB compared with those without SDB. Subjects with an ever-diagnosis of allergic rhinitis showed a higher O2 desaturation index and mean apnea duration. Indices regarding sleep efficiency were affected in subjects with a recent treatment of allergic rhinitis or asthma. Waking after sleep onset was longer and sleep efficiency was lower in subjects who had received allergic rhinitis treatment within the past 12 months. Subjects who had received asthma treatment within the past 12 months showed significantly lower sleep efficiency than others.Our study indicates that a history of allergic rhinitis is associated with increased risk of SDB in the elderly. Sleep disturbance and impaired sleep efficiency were found in the subjects who had received recent treatment of allergic rhinitis or asthma. Physicians should be aware of the high risk of sleep disorders in older patients with respiratory allergic diseases.

  3. Refreshing Sleep and Sleep Continuity Determine Perceived Sleep Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Libman; Catherine Fichten; Laura Creti; Kerry Conrod; Dieu-Ly Tran; Roland Grad; Mary Jorgensen; Rhonda Amsel; Dorrie Rizzo; Marc Baltzan; Alan Pavilanis; Sally Bailes

    2016-01-01

    Sleep quality is a construct often measured, employed as an outcome criterion for therapeutic success, but never defined. In two studies we examined appraised good and poor sleep quality in three groups: a control group, individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, and those with insomnia disorder. In Study 1 we used qualitative methodology to examine good and poor sleep quality in 121 individuals. In Study 2 we examined sleep quality in 171 individuals who had not participated in Study 1 and ev...

  4. Sleep affects cortical source modularity in temporal lobe epilepsy: A high-density EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) constitute a perturbation of ongoing cerebral rhythms, usually more frequent during sleep. The aim of the study was to determine whether sleep influences the spread of IEDs over the scalp and whether their distribution depends on vigilance-related modifications in cortical interactions. Wake and sleep 256-channel electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded in 12 subjects with right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) differentiated by whether they had mesial or neocortical TLE. Spikes were selected during wake and sleep. The averaged waking signal was subtracted from the sleep signal and projected on a bidimensional scalp map; sleep and wake spike distributions were compared by using a t-test. The superimposed signal of sleep and wake traces was obtained; the rising phase of the spike, the peak, and the deflections following the spike were identified, and their cortical generator was calculated using low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) for each group. A mean of 21 IEDs in wake and 39 in sleep per subject were selected. As compared to wake, a larger IED scalp projection was detected during sleep in both mesial and neocortical TLE (pEEG deflections followed the spike, the cortical sources of which displayed alternating activations of different cortical areas in wake, substituted by isolated, stationary activations in sleep in mesial TLE and a silencing in neocortical TLE. During sleep, the IED scalp region increases, while cortical interaction decreases. The interaction of cortical modules in sleep and wake in TLE may influence the appearance of IEDs on scalp EEG; in addition, IEDs could be proxies for cerebral oscillation perturbation. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Study protocol: the sleeping sound with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberklaid Frank

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 70% of children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD experience sleep problems including difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep. Sleep problems in children with ADHD can result in poorer child functioning, impacting on school attendance, daily functioning and behaviour, as well as parental mental health and work attendance. The Sleeping Sound with ADHD trial aims to investigate the efficacy of a behavioural sleep program in treating sleep problems experienced by children with ADHD. We have demonstrated the feasibility and the acceptability of this treatment program in a pilot study. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial (RCT is being conducted with 198 children (aged between 5 to 12 years with ADHD and moderate to severe sleep problems. Children are recruited from public and private paediatric practices across the state of Victoria, Australia. Upon receiving informed written consent, families are randomised to receive either the behavioural sleep intervention or usual care. The intervention consists of two individual, face-to-face consultations and a follow-up phone call with a trained clinician (trainee consultant paediatrician or psychologist, focusing on the assessment and management of child sleep problems. The primary outcome is parent- and teacher-reported ADHD symptoms (ADHD Rating Scale IV. Secondary outcomes are child sleep (actigraphy and parent report, behaviour, daily functioning, school attendance and working memory, as well as parent mental health and work attendance. We are also assessing the impact of children's psychiatric comorbidity (measured using a structured diagnostic interview on treatment outcome. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first RCT of a behavioural intervention aiming to treat sleep problems in children with ADHD. If effective, this program will provide a feasible non-pharmacological and acceptable intervention improving child sleep and ADHD

  6. Sleep quality and its psychological correlates among university students in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemma Seblewngel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep is an important physiological process for humans. University students in most resource limited countries often report poor sleep quality due to changing social opportunities and increasing academic demands. However, sleep quality among university students has not been studied in Ethiopia. Thus, this study assessed sleep quality and its demographic and psychological correlates among university students. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two universities in Ethiopia. Multistage sampling procedures were used to enroll 2,817 students into the study. A self-administered structured questionnaire including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS and selected modules of the World Health Organization STEPS instrument was used for the study. This research included 2,551 students. Frequency, median, mean with standard deviation and 95% confidence interval were used to characterize sleep quality and other variables. Analysis of variance and binary logistic regression procedures were also used. Result The prevalence of poor sleep quality (total PSQI score > 5 was 55.8% (1,424. Female students (adjusted odds ratio (AOR 1.23; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.57, second year (AOR 2.91; 95% CI: 2.1, 4.02 and third year students (AOR 2.25; 95% CI 1.62, 3.12 had statistically significant higher odds of poor sleep quality. Perceived stress level and symptoms of depression and anxiety were strongly associated with sleep quality. Conclusion A substantial proportion of university students are affected by poor sleep quality. If our results are confirmed in prospective studies, health promotion and educational programs for students should emphasize the importance of sleep and mental health.

  7. Sleep quality and its psychological correlates among university students in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Seblewngel; Gelaye, Bizu; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Williams, Michelle A

    2012-12-28

    Sleep is an important physiological process for humans. University students in most resource limited countries often report poor sleep quality due to changing social opportunities and increasing academic demands. However, sleep quality among university students has not been studied in Ethiopia. Thus, this study assessed sleep quality and its demographic and psychological correlates among university students. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two universities in Ethiopia. Multistage sampling procedures were used to enroll 2,817 students into the study. A self-administered structured questionnaire including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and selected modules of the World Health Organization STEPS instrument was used for the study. This research included 2,551 students. Frequency, median, mean with standard deviation and 95% confidence interval were used to characterize sleep quality and other variables. Analysis of variance and binary logistic regression procedures were also used. The prevalence of poor sleep quality (total PSQI score > 5) was 55.8% (1,424). Female students (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.23; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.57), second year (AOR 2.91; 95% CI: 2.1, 4.02) and third year students (AOR 2.25; 95% CI 1.62, 3.12) had statistically significant higher odds of poor sleep quality. Perceived stress level and symptoms of depression and anxiety were strongly associated with sleep quality. A substantial proportion of university students are affected by poor sleep quality. If our results are confirmed in prospective studies, health promotion and educational programs for students should emphasize the importance of sleep and mental health.

  8. The use of a wave boundary layer model in SWAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    2017-01-01

    A Wave Boundary Layer Model (WBLM) is implemented in the third-generation ocean wave model SWAN to improve the wind-input source function under idealized, fetch-limited condition. Accordingly, the white capping dissipation parameters are re-calibrated to fit the new wind-input source function...

  9. Sleep duration and risk of lung cancer in the physicians' health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Owais; Petrone, Andrew B; Aleem, Sohaib; Manzoor, Kamran; Gaziano, John M; Djousse, Luc

    2014-09-20

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer and cancer related cause of death worldwide. However, the association between sleep duration and incident lung cancer has not been investigated in a prospective cohort study. We prospectively examined the association between sleep duration and incident lung cancer in a cohort of 21,026 United States (US) male physicians. Self-reported sleep duration was ascertained during 2002 annual follow-up questionnaire. Incident lung cancer was ascertained through yearly follow-up questionnaires. Cox regression was used to estimate relative risk of incident lung cancer. The average age at baseline was 68.3±8.8 yr. During a mean follow up of 7.5 (±2.2) yr, 150 cases of lung cancer occurred. Using 7 h of sleep as the reference group, multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95%CI) for lung cancer were 1.18 (0.77-1.82), 1.0 (ref), and 0.97 (0.67-1.41) from lowest to the highest category of sleep duration (P for quadratic trend 0.697), respectively. In a secondary analysis, smoking status did not modify the sleep duration-lung cancer association (P=0.78). There was no evidence for an interaction between sleep duration and sleep apnea on the risk of lung cancer either (P=0.65). Our data failed to show a higher risk of lung cancer in association with altered sleep duration among US male physicians.

  10. Evaluating Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep in Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tim I.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months) in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions. PMID:16951722

  11. Evaluating Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep in Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim I. Williams

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions.

  12. Cumulative exposure to short sleep and body mass outcomes: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Patrick M; Reither, Eric N; Peppard, Paul E; Burger, Andrew E; Hale, Lauren

    2015-12-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with excess body mass among adolescents and young adults. The mechanisms theorized to drive that association suggest that persistent exposure to short sleep should be associated with greater accumulations of body mass. We use prospective cohort data from four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1994-2009; n = 14 800) to examine associations between cumulative exposure to short sleep throughout adolescence and early adulthood and obesity and elevated waist circumference outcomes. We compare several clinical and distribution-based standards of short sleep to assess which measures are associated most strongly with body mass. Cumulative exposure to short sleep exhibits dose-response associations with obesity and elevated waist circumference. Relative to respondents with no instances of short sleep, those who slept -0.50 standard deviations or less than the age and sex-specific average sleep hours in all four waves had 1.45 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 2.04] times the odds of being obese and 1.45 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.06) times the odds of having an elevated waist circumference. Our findings suggest that cumulative exposure to short sleep during adolescence and young adulthood may play an important role in the etiology of obesity and elevated waist circumference during this important developmental period. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. [Study on the status and quality of sleep-related influencing factors in medical college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-shuang; Chen, Jing-wu; Yang, Xiu-zhen

    2005-05-01

    To study the status and influencing factors on sleep quality in some medical college students. Stratified sampling, pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), self-evaluation depression scale (SDS), self-evaluation anxiety scale (SAS) and self-developed questionnaire of influencing factors on the quality of sleep in medical college students were used. Cumulative odds logistic model was performed to analyze the related factors on the quality of sleep. 19.17 percent of the medical college students showed poor quality of sleep and the difference between genders was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Statistically significant (P students and correlation was found between sleep quality and depression or anxiety (P quality of sleep in medical college students would include: worry of sleep, irregular work/rest, worry on examination, stress, relationship with classmates, self-evaluated health condition, environments of the dormitory and late to bed. Influencing factors were identified and comprehensive measures should be taken to improve the quality of sleep.

  14. Subjective and objective sleep and self-harm behaviors in young children: a general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singareddy, Ravi; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh B; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Calhoun, Susan L; Shaffer, Michele L; Bixler, Edward O

    2013-10-30

    Significant association between sleep disturbances and suicidal ideation and/or attempts is reported in adults and adolescents. However, there is paucity of studies exploring the association between sleep and self-harm behaviors (SHB) in young children and are limited to only subjective sleep measures. We examined the association between SHB and both subjective and objective sleep in a population-based sample of 5-12 yr old. Parents of every student in 3 local school (K-5) districts (n=7312) was sent a screening questionnaire. Randomly selected children from this sample underwent a comprehensive history, physical examination, a 9-h overnight polysomnogram and completed several questionnaires. Among the final sample (n=693), 27 children had SHB with adjusted prevalence of 3%. There was no difference in age, gender, obesity, or socioeconomic status in subjects with or without SHB. Significantly more children with SHB had subjective sleep difficulty and depression. Difficulty maintaining sleep and frequent nightmares were associated with SHB independent of depression or demographics. Polysomnographic %REM-sleep was significantly higher in the SHB group after adjusting for demographics and depression. These data indicate that parent reported sleep disturbances are independently associated with SHB. It is possible that higher REM-sleep is a non-invasive biomarker for risk of self-harm behaviors in young children. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparing neural correlates of REM sleep in posttraumatic stress disorder and depression: a neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebdlahad, Sommer; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Buysse, Daniel J; Price, Julie C; Germain, Anne

    2013-12-30

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disturbances predict poor clinical outcomes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). In MDD, REM sleep is characterized by activation of limbic and paralimbic brain regions compared to wakefulness. The neural correlates of PTSD during REM sleep remain scarcely explored, and comparisons of PTSD and MDD have not been conducted. The present study sought to compare brain activity patterns during wakefulness and REM sleep in 13 adults with PTSD and 12 adults with MDD using [¹⁸F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (PET). PTSD was associated with greater increase in relative regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc) in limbic and paralimbic structures in REM sleep compared to wakefulness. Post-hoc comparisons indicated that MDD was associated with greater limbic and paralimbic rCMRglc during wakefulness but not REM sleep compared to PTSD. Our findings suggest that PTSD is associated with increased REM sleep limbic and paralimbic metabolism, whereas MDD is associated with wake and REM hypermetabolism in these areas. These observations suggest that PTSD and MDD disrupt REM sleep through different neurobiological processes. Optimal sleep treatments between the two disorders may differ: REM-specific therapy may be more effective in PTSD.

  16. Sleep disturbances, anxiety and depression in patients with oral lichen planus: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, D; Ruoppo, E; Leuci, S; Aria, M; Amato, M; Mignogna, M D

    2015-02-01

    The psychological factors and their association with chronic inflammatory disease, aren't well recognized, yet their importance in oral lichen planus is still debated. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sleep disturbances, anxiety, depression and their association in patient with oral lichen planus. 50 patients with oral lichen planus vs. equal number of age and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Questionnaires examining insomnia symptoms, excessive daytime sleepiness (Pittsburgh sleep quality index and Epworth aleepiness scale) depression and anxiety (The Hamilton rating scale for Depression and Anxiety) were used. The patients with oral lichen planus had statistically higher scores in all items of the Pittsburgh sleep quality index, the Hamilton rating scale for depression and anxiety and Epworth sleepiness scale than the healthy controls. The median and inter-quartile range of the Pittsburgh sleep quality index was 5-2 and for the oral lichen planus patients and 4-2 for the healthy controls (P depressed mood and anxiety correlated positively with sleep disturbances. The Pearson correlations were 0.76 for Pittsburgh sleep quality Index vs. Hamilton rating scale for depression (P sleep quality Index vs. Hamilton rating scale for anxiety (P sleep problems, depressed mood and anxiety as compared with controls. We suggest to screen sleep disturbances in patients with oral lichen planus because they could be considered a prodromal symptoms of mood disorders. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Actigraphy Measured Sleep Indices and Adiposity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Rachel P; Redline, Susan; Bertoni, Alain G; Chen, Xiaoli; Ouyang, Pamela; Szklo, Moyses; Lutsey, Pamela L

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the cross-sectional relationship between objectively measured sleep characteristics and multiple indices of adiposity in racially/ethnically diverse older adults within the MESA Sleep study (n = 2,146). 7-day actigraphy was used to assess sleep duration, sleep efficiency, and night-to-night variability. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and total body fat were modeled continuously and according to obesity cut-points. Models were adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral variables. Participants who slept less than 6 hours a night had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference, and body fat relative to those who slept 7-8 hours. Those who slept less than 5 hours had a 16% higher prevalence of general obesity (BMI ≥ 30 vs. sleep efficiency and night-to-night sleep variability. Among an older multi-ethnic cohort, we found robust associations across multiple indices of sleep and adiposity. Targeting sleep characteristics may be of benefit in obesity interventions, but more research is needed to rule out reverse causality. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. The effect of sleep deprivation on retrieval of emotional memory: a behavioural study using film stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesta, Daniela; Socci, Valentina; Dello Ioio, Giada; De Gennaro, Luigi; Ferrara, Michele

    2017-07-24

    Although the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on memory consolidation are well documented, it is still unclear how the facilitating effect of emotions on memory consolidation processes could be modulated by the lack of sleep. In this study, we investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on episodic memory using emotional and non-emotional film stimuli. Forty-eight healthy subjects, divided into a sleep group (SG) and a sleep-deprived (SD) group, completed an Encoding and a Recall phase. Participants in the SD group were sleep deprived the night immediately following the Encoding phase, whereas the control group slept at home. The Recall phase was administered to all subjects 48 h after the Encoding. During the Encoding phase, six film clips of different valence (two positive, two neutral and two negative) were presented to the participants. During the Recall phase, episodic memory was assessed by a recognition task. Results showed that the SD group had a lower discrimination memory performance for all stimuli compared to the SG, confirming the deleterious effect of sleep deprivation on episodic memory consolidation. Therefore, lack of sleep severely impairs the consolidation of both emotional and neutral memories, as valence-related effects on memory consolidation were not observed after sleep deprivation.

  19. The effect of poor sleep quality on mood outcome differs between men and women: A longitudinal study of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Erika F H; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Kamali, Masoud; Assari, Shervin; McInnis, Melvin G

    2015-07-15

    Sleep disturbance is bi-directionally related to mood de-stabilization in bipolar disorder (BD), and sleep quality differs in men and women. We aimed to determine whether perception of poor sleep quality would have a different effect on mood outcome in men versus women. We assessed association between sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) at study intake and mood outcome over 2 years in subjects from the Prechter Longitudinal Study of Bipolar Disorder (N=216; 29.6% males). The main outcome measure was the severity, variability, and frequency of mood episodes measured by self-report over 2 years of follow-up. Multivariable linear regression models stratified by sex examined the relationship between PSQI with mood outcomes, while age, stressful life events, mood state and neuroticism at baseline were controlled. In women, poor sleep quality at baseline predicted increased severity (B=0.28, ppoor sleep quality was a stronger predictor than baseline depression; poor sleep quality predicted increased severity (B=0.19, ppoor sleep quality. We measured perception of sleep quality, but not objective changes in sleep. In a longitudinal study of BD, women reported poorer perceived sleep quality than men, and poor sleep quality predicted worse mood outcome in BD. Clinicians should be sensitive to addressing sleep complaints in women with BD early in treatment to improve outcome in BD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Prospective Association of the Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm With Sleep Duration and Perceived Sleeping Problems in Preschoolers: The Generation R Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridjan, Nathalie S; Kocevska, Desana; Luijk, Maartje P C M; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-06-01

    Cortisol, the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, plays an important role in modulating sleep. Yet, studies investigating the association between diurnal cortisol rhythm and sleep patterns in young children are scarce. We tested the hypothesis that the diurnal cortisol rhythm is associated with shorter sleep duration and more sleep problems across early childhood. This study was embedded in Generation R, a population-based cohort from fetal life onward. Parents collected saliva samples from their infant at five moments during day 1. In 322 infants aged 12 to 20 months, we determined the diurnal cortisol rhythm by calculating the area under the curve (AUC), the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and the diurnal slope. Sleep duration and sleep behavior were repeatedly assessed across ages of 14 months to 5 years. Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess related cortisol measures to sleep duration and sleep behavior. The diurnal cortisol slope and the CAR, but not the AUC, were associated with sleep duration across childhood. Children with flatter slopes and children with a more positive CAR were more likely to have shorter nighttime sleep duration (β per nmol/L/h slope = -0.12, 95% confidence interval = -0.19 to -0.05, p = .001; β per nmol/L CAR = -0.01, 95% confidence interval = -0.02 to 0.00, p = .04). Cortisol measures did not predict sleep problems. The present study suggests that a flatter diurnal cortisol slope and a more marked morning rise, which can indicate stress (or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal dysregulation), have a long-term association with sleep regulation.

  1. Sleep assessment in a population-based study of chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes Michele

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disabling condition that affects approximately 800,000 adult Americans. The pathophysiology remains unknown and there are no diagnostic markers or characteristic physical signs or laboratory abnormalities. Most CFS patients complain of unrefreshing sleep and many of the postulated etiologies of CFS affect sleep. Conversely, many sleep disorders present similarly to CFS. Few studies characterizing sleep in unselected CFS subjects have been published and none have been performed in cases identified from population-based studies. Methods The study included 339 subjects (mean age 45.8 years, 77% female, 94.1% white identified through telephone screen in a previously described population-based study of CFS in Wichita, Kansas. They completed questionnaires to assess fatigue and wellness and 2 self-administered sleep questionnaires. Scores for five of the six sleep factors (insomnia/hypersomnia, non-restorative sleep, excessive daytime somnolence, sleep apnea, and restlessness in the Centre for Sleep and Chronobiology's Sleep Assessment Questionnaire© (SAQ© were dichotomized based on threshold. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was used as a continuous variable. Results 81.4% of subjects had an abnormality in at least one SAQ© sleep factor. Subjects with sleep factor abnormalities had significantly lower wellness scores but statistically unchanged fatigue severity scores compared to those without SAQ© abnormality. CFS subjects had significantly increased risk of abnormal scores in the non-restorative (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 28.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]= 7.4–107.0 and restlessness (OR = 16.0; 95% CI = 4.2–61.6 SAQ© factors compared to non-fatigued, but not for factors of sleep apnea or excessive daytime somnolence. This is consistent with studies finding that, while fatigued, CFS subjects are not sleepy. A strong correlation (0.78 of Epworth score was found only for the excessive

  2. The Impact of Sleep-Disordered Breathing on Body Mass Index (BMI): The Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark A; Goodwin, James L; Silva, Graciela E; Behari, Ajay; Newman, Anne B; Punjabi, Naresh M; Resnick, Helaine E; Robbins, John A; Quan, Stuart F

    2011-12-08

    INTRODUCTION: It is well known that obesity is a risk factor for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). However, whether SDB predicts increase in BMI is not well defined. Data from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) were analyzed to determine whether SDB predicts longitudinal increase in BMI, adjusted for confounding factors. METHODS: A full-montage unattended home polysomnogram (PSG) and body anthropometric measurements were obtained approximately five years apart in 3001 participants. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was categorized using clinical thresholds: sleep apnea), and ≥ 15 (moderate to severe sleep apnea). Linear regression was used to examine the association between the three AHI groups and increased BMI. The model included age, gender, race, baseline BMI, and change in AHI as covariates. RESULTS: Mean (SD) age was 62.2 years (10.14), 55.2% were female and 76.1% were Caucasian. Five-year increase in BMI was modest with a mean (SD) change of 0.53 (2.62) kg/m(2) (p=0.071). A multivariate regression model showed that subjects with a baseline AHI between 5-15 had a mean increase in BMI of 0.22 kg/m(2) (p=0.055) and those with baseline AHI ≥ 15 had a BMI increase of 0.51 kg/m(2) (pBMI over approximately 5 years. This observation may help explain why persons with SDB have difficulty losing weight.

  3. The Incidence and Risk of Herpes Zoster in Patients With Sleep Disorders: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lin, Hsuan-Hung; Cheng, Nan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    .... Studies on sleep disorders and the risk of herpes zoster (HZ) are scant.We conducted a population-based cohort study to evaluate the risk of HZ in patients with sleep disorders and potential risk factors for HZ development...

  4. Performance of Remotely Controlled Mandibular Protrusion Sleep Studies for Prediction of Oral Appliance Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Ngiam, Joachim; Cistulli, Peter A

    2017-03-15

    Mandibular protrusion during sleep monitoring has been proposed as a method to predict oral appliance treatment outcome. A commercial remotely controlled mandibular protrusion (RCMP) device has become available for this purpose with predictive accuracy demonstrated in an initial study. Our aim was to validate this RCMP method for oral appliance treatment outcome prediction in a clinical sleep laboratory setting. Forty-two obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 10 events/h) were recruited to undergo a RCMP sleep study before commencing oral appliance treatment. The RCMP study was used to make a prediction of treatment "Success" or "Failure" based on a rule of ≤ 1 respiratory event per 5 min supine rapid eye movement sleep. Oral appliance treatment response was verified by polysomonography and defined as treatment AHI 30 events/h). Two participants (5%) were not able to tolerate the RCMP study. Oral appliance treatment outcome was verified in 33 participants (RCMP results: "Success" n = 10, "Failure" n = 15, "Inconclusive" n = 8). In those with a treatment outcome prediction (n = 25) the diagnostic characteristics of the RCMP test were sensitivity 81.8%, specificity 92.9%, positive predictive value 90%, and negative predictive value 86.7% (n = 3 misclassified). The RCMP device was well tolerated by patients and successfully used to perform mandibular protrusion sleep studies in our sleep laboratory. The RCMP sleep study showed good accuracy as a prediction technique for oral appliance treatment outcome, although there was a high rate of inconclusive tests.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as an accident risk factor in professional drivers in Yekaterinburg. Dangerous Sleep (DS-1 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Belkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20% of all road traffic accidents may be associated with falling asleep while driving. This may be caused by sleep disorders leading to daytime sleepiness, the most common of which is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Objective: to study somatic and mental health, sleep disorders, OSAS in particular, in the population of Russian drivers (Sverdlovsk Region. Patients and methods. The descriptive cohort «Dangerous Sleep» (DS-1 study of 20 professional drivers having more than 5-year driving experience was conducted at the Clinical Institute of the Brain. The mean age of the drivers was 45.8 years. They underwent somatic evaluation for cardiovascular risk factors and a psychological examination involving a risk readiness diagnostic procedure, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and an electroencephalographic examination. A somnological examination assumed testing using the Epworth sleepiness scale, polysomnography, or overnight pulse metry. Results and discussion. 30% of the drivers were found to have marked attention disorders and an inability to adapt to extreme conditions, which create a risk for professional duties. The predisposing factors were noted to be alcohol addiction, overweight, and OSAS, the rate of the latter proved to be higher than that in the general population of able-bodied men. It was shown that a somnological examination should be obligatorily performed while hiring professional drivers, particularly to long hauliers. The drivers having a long length of experience, in whom a periodic examination detects sleep disorders, should be treated for somatic diseases and should also have individual working schedules to rule out their long night-time driving. 

  6. Impact of nocturnal sleep deprivation on declarative memory retrieval in students at an orphanage: a psychoneuroradiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Ahmed O; Tallawy, Hamdy N El; Farghaly, Hussein Rs; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Hussein, Amr S

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on total and partial (early and late) declarative memory and activation in the areas of the brain involved in these activities. The study included two experiments. Experiment 1 included 40 male residents of an orphanage aged 16-19 years, who were divided into four groups (n = 10 each) and subjected to total sleep deprivation, normal sleep, early-night sleep deprivation, or late-night sleep deprivation. Experiment 2 included eight students from the same institution who were divided into the same four groups (n = 2) as in experiment 1. Declarative memory was tested using lists of associated word pairs in both experiments, and activation of the relevant brain regions was measured before and after retrieval by single-photon emission computed tomography for subjects in experiment 2 only. Students subjected to normal sleep had significantly higher scores for declarative memory retrieval than those subjected to total sleep deprivation (P = 0.002), early-night sleep deprivation (P = 0.005), or late-night sleep deprivation (P = 0.02). The left temporal lobe showed the highest rate of activity during memory retrieval after normal sleep, whereas the frontal, parietal, and right temporal lobes were more active after sleep deprivation. Both slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep play an active role in consolidation of declarative memory, which in turn allows memory traces to be actively reprocessed and strengthened during sleep, leading to improved performance in memory recall.

  7. Relationship between insomnia and pain in major depressive disorder: A sleep diary and actigraphy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Tso, Kwok-Chu

    2010-09-01

    Insomnia and pain are frequent complaints during the course of a major depressive episode. We analyzed the association between insomnia and pain symptoms using subjective and objective sleep measures. This is a prospective, naturalistic follow-up study in a university-based psychiatric unit. Ninety-one Chinese patients were enrolled during an acute episode of major depressive disorder (mean age=48years, 73 women); 82 of them were reassessed 3months later using the same assessment on sleep, pain, depressive, and anxiety symptoms. Clinician-rated insomnia symptoms were obtained using the insomnia items of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Subjective sleep disturbances were assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Detailed sleep pattern was acquired using sleep diary and actigraphy. Pain intensity was evaluated using a verbal rating scale, a visual analog scale, and a multidimensional pain scale. Cross-sectional analyses found that insomnia symptoms and quantitative sleep parameters were related to pain symptoms. The correlations between sleep and pain scores were more significant after 3months of pharmacotherapy as compared to baseline. After controlling for the severity of anxiety and depression, the ISI total score and actigraphy-derived wake after sleep onset and total sleep time remained significant in predicting pain. This study supports specific role of subjective sleep disturbances and actigraphic measures in predicting pain symptoms in major depressive disorder. Further studies using a micro-longitudinal design are necessary to find out the causal relationship between sleep and pain in depressed patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The National Veteran Sleep Disorder Study: Descriptive Epidemiology and Secular Trends, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Melannie; Ray, Meredith A; Hébert, James R; Youngstedt, Shawn D; Zhang, Hongmei; Steck, Susan E; Bogan, Richard K; Burch, James B

    2016-07-01

    A large proportion of individuals affected by sleep disorders are untreated and susceptible to accidents, injuries, long-term sequelae (e.g., risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, psychiatric disorders), and increased mortality risk. Few studies have examined the scope and magnitude of sleep disorder diagnoses in the United States (US) or factors influencing them. Veterans are particularly vulnerable to factors that elicit or exacerbate sleep disorders. This serial cross-sectional study characterized secular trends in diagnosed sleep disorders among veterans seeking care in US Veterans Health Administration facilities over an eleven-year span (FY2000-2010, n = 9,786,778). Electronic medical records from the national Veterans Administration Informatics and Computing Infrastructure database were accessed. Cases were defined using diagnostic codes specified by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Age-adjusted annual prevalence was summarized by sex, race, combat exposure, body mass index, and comorbid diagnoses (cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental disorders). Sleep apnea (47%) and insomnia (26%) were the most common diagnoses among patients with any sleep disorder. There was a six-fold relative increase in total sleep disorder prevalence over the study period. Posttraumatic stress disorder, which tripled over the same time period, was associated with the highest prevalence of sleep disorders (16%) among the comorbid conditions evaluated. The results indicate a growing need for integration of sleep disorder management with patient care and health care planning among US veterans. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1331. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Sleep remains disturbed in obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with positive airway pressure: a three-month cohort study using continuous actigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippin, Jon; Aksan, Nazan; Dawson, Jeffrey; Anderson, Steven W.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Objective Some patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remain sleepy despite positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. The mechanisms by which this occurs are unclear but could include persistently disturbed sleep. The goal of this study was to explore the relationships between subjective sleepiness and actigraphic measures of sleep during the first three months of PAP treatment. Methods We enrolled 80 patients with OSA and 50 comparison subjects prior to treatment and observed them through three months of PAP therapy. PAP adherence and presence of residual respiratory events were determined from PAP machine downloads. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and actigraphic data were collected before and at monthly intervals after starting PAP. Results OSA subjects were sleepier and showed a greater degree of sleep disruption by actigraphy at baseline. After three months of PAP, only ESS and number of awakenings normalized, while wake after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep efficiency (SE) remained worse in OSA subjects. For OSA subjects, FOSQ improved but never reached the same level as comparison subjects. ESS and FOSQ improved slowly over the study period. Conclusions As a group, OSA patients show actigraphic evidence of persistently disturbed sleep and sleepiness related impairments in day-to-day function after three months of PAP therapy. Improvements in sleepiness evolve over months with more severely affected patients responding quicker. Persistent sleep disruption may partially explain residual sleepiness in some PAP adherent OSA patients. PMID:27810182

  10. Sleep remains disturbed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea treated with positive airway pressure: a three-month cohort study using continuous actigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippin, Jon; Aksan, Nazan; Dawson, Jeffrey; Anderson, Steven W; Rizzo, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Some patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remain sleepy despite positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. The mechanisms by which this occurs are unclear but could include persistently disturbed sleep. The goal of this study was to explore the relationships between subjective sleepiness and actigraphic measures of sleep during the first three months of PAP treatment. We enrolled 80 patients with OSA and 50 comparison subjects prior to treatment and observed them through three months of PAP therapy. PAP adherence and presence of residual respiratory events were determined from PAP machine downloads. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and actigraphic data were collected before and at monthly intervals after starting PAP. Patients with OSA were sleepier and showed a greater degree of sleep disruption by actigraphy at the baseline. After three months of PAP, only ESS and number of awakenings (AWAKE#) normalized, while wake after sleep onset and sleep efficiency remained worse in patients with OSA. FOSQ was improved in patients with OSA but never reached the same level as that of comparison subjects. ESS and FOSQ improved slowly over the study period. As a group, patients with OSA show actigraphic evidence of persistently disturbed sleep and sleepiness-related impairments in day-to-day function after three months of PAP therapy. Improvements in sleepiness evolve over months with more severely affected patients responding quicker. Persistent sleep disruption may partially explain residual sleepiness in some PAP-adherent OSA patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A Study of Possible Sleep Deprivation in Medical Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred medical students were investigated for possible sleep deprivation using questionnaires. The use of drugs in form of stimulants, use of sleeping pills, and the nature of hostel space accommodation for the students were also investigated. A similar sizeable number of non-medical students were also investigated.

  12. Perceptions of Sleep Duration, Patterns and Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties: A Study of Greek Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulou, Maria S.; Cooper, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated adolescent students' perceptions of sleep duration and patterns, and the way they relate to emotional and behavioural difficulties. Five hundred and two students from public schools in Greece completed the Sleep Questionnaire and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). It was demonstrated that consistency in…

  13. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottlieb, D.J.; Hek, K.; Chen, T.H.; Watson, N.F.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Byrne, E.M.; Cornelis, M.; Warby, S.C.; Bandinelli, S.; Cherkas, L.; Evans, D.S.; Grabe, H.J.; Lahti, J.; Li, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lumley, T.; Marciante, K.D.; Pérusse, L.; Psaty, B.M.; Robbins, J.; Tranah, G.J.; Vink, J.M.; Wilk, J.B.; Stafford, J.M.; Bellis, C.; Biffar, R.; Bouchard, C.; Cade, B.; Curhan, G.C.; Eriksson, J.G.; Ewert, R.; Ferrucci, L.; Fulop, T.; Gehrman, P.R.; Goodloe, R.; Harris, T.B.; Heath, A.C.; Hernandez, D.G.; Hofman, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Hunter, D.J.; Jensen, M.K.; Johnson, A.D.; Kahonen, M.; Kao, L.; Kraft, P.; Larkin, E.K.; Lauderdale, D.S.; Luik, A.I.; Medici, M.; Montgomery, G.W.; Palotie, A.; Patel, S.R.; Pistis, G.; Porcu, E.; Quaye, L.; Raitakari, O.; Redline, S.; Rimm, E.B.; Rotter, J.I.; Smith, A.V.; Spector, T.D.; Teumer, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vohl, M.C.; Widen, E.; Willemsen, G.; Young, T.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Y.; Blangero, J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Gudnason, V.; Hu, F.; Mangino, M.; Martin, N.G.; O'Connor, G.T.; Stone, K.L.; Tanaka, T.; Viikari, J.; Gharib, S.A.; Punjabi, N.M.; Raikkonen, K.; Völzke, H.; Mignot, E.; Tiemeier, H.

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based

  14. Sleep in seasonal affective disorder patients in forced desynchrony : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorengevel, Kathelijne M.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; den Boer, Johan; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    2002-01-01

    The majority of winter-type seasonal affective disorder (SAD) patients complain of hypersomnia and daytime drowsiness. As human sleep is regulated by the interaction of circadian, ultradian and homeostatic processes, sleep disturbances may be caused by either one of these factors. The present study

  15. Ethnic differences in self-reported sleep duration in The Netherlands--the HELIUS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anujuo, Kenneth; Stronks, Karien; Snijder, Marieke B.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Agyemang, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ethnic differences in sleep duration, and the contribution of socio-economic status (SES) to the observed differences in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 6959 participants (aged 18-71 years) from the multi-ethnic HELIUS cohort were studied. Outcome variables were short sleep ( <7 h/night)

  16. Sleep and treatment outcome in posttraumatic stress disorder : Results from an effectiveness study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, Miriam J.J.; Grey, Nick; Clark, David M.; Wild, Jennifer; Stott, Richard; Ehlers, Anke

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundMost patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suffer from sleep problems. Concerns have been raised about possible detrimental effects of sleep problems on the efficacy of psychological treatments for PTSD. In this study, we investigated the relation of session-to-session changes

  17. Sleep duration of underserved minority children in a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short sleep duration has been shown to associate with increased risk of obesity. Childhood obesity is more prevalent among underserved minority children. The study measured the sleep duration of underserved minority children living in a large US urban environment using accelerometry and its relation...

  18. Sleep laboratory studies in restless legs syndrome patients as compared with normals and acute effects of ropinirole. 1. Findings on objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Gruber, G; Saletu, M; Brandstätter, N; Hauer, C; Prause, W; Ritter, K; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G

    2000-01-01

    Although the restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder with a relatively high prevalence rate (8% in Austria) and leads to insomnia and excessive daytime tiredness, there is a paucity of sleep laboratory data concerning objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate 12 untreated RLS patients as compared with 12 normal controls and subsequently measure the acute effects of 0.5 mg ropinirole (Requip((R))) - a nonergoline dopamine agonist - as compared with placebo. In 3 nights (adaptation, placebo, ropinirole night) sleep induction, maintenance and architecture were measured objectively by polysomnography, subjective sleep and awakening quality were assessed by self-rating scales and visual-analog scales, and objective awakening quality was evaluated by a psychometric test battery. In polysomnography, RLS patients demonstrated, as compared with normal controls, a decreased total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficacy, increased wakefulness during the total sleep period and frequency of nocturnal awakenings, increased sleep stage S1, decreased S2 and increased stage shifts. Subjective sleep quality tended to decrease, and morning well-being, mood, affectivity and wakefulness were deteriorated. In the noopsyche, fine motor activity and reaction time performance were deteriorated. Ropinirole 0.5 mg induced, as compared with placebo, an increase in TST, sleep efficacy, S2 sleep and stage shifts. In the morning, somatic complaints increased slightly, while fine motor activity and reaction time performance improved. Our findings suggest a key-lock principle in the diagnosis/treatment of RLS and a dopaminergic mechanism in its pathogenesis, which is supported by the data on periodic leg movements during sleep and arousals of the subsequent paper. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Association between elder abuse and poor sleep: A cross-sectional study among rural older Malaysians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairi, Noran N.; Choo, Wan Yuen; Hairi, Farizah M.; Sooryanarayana, Rajini; Ahmad, Sharifah N.; Razak, Inayah A.; Peramalah, Devi; Aziz, Suriyati A.; Mohamad, Zaiton L.; Mohamad, Rosmala; Ali, Zainudin M.; Awang Mahmud, Awang B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between elder abuse and poor sleep using a Malay validated version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Design This study was divided into two phases. Phase I tested the construct validity and reliability of the Malay version of PSQI. Phase II was a population-based, cross-sectional study with a multi-stage cluster sampling method. Home-based interviews were conducted by trained personnel using a structured questionnaire, to determine exposure and outcome. Setting Kuala Pilah, a district in Negeri Sembilan which is one of the fourteen states in Malaysia. Participants 1648 community-dwelling older Malaysians. Results The Malay version of PSQI had significant test re-test reliability with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.62. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that one factor PSQI scale with three components (subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep disturbances) was most suitable. Cronbach’s Alpha was 0.60 and composite reliability was 0.63. PSQI scores were highest among neglect (4.11), followed by physical (4.10), psychological (3.96) and financial abuse (3.60). There was a dose-response relationship between clustering of abuse and PSQI scores; 3.41, 3.50 and 3.84 for “no abuse”, “1 type of abuse” and “2 types or more”. Generalized linear models revealed six variables as significant determinants of sleep quality–abuse, co-morbidities, self-rated health, income, social support and gait speed. Among abuse subtypes, only neglect was significantly associated with poor sleep. Conclusion The Malay PSQI was valid and reliable. Abuse was significantly associated with poor sleep. As sleep is essential for health and is a good predictor for mortality among older adults, management of abuse victims should entail sleep assessment. Interventions or treatment modalities which focus on improving sleep quality among abuse victims should be designed. PMID:28686603

  20. Onset of Impaired Sleep and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula; Lange, Theis; Jennum, Poul; Virtanen, Marianna; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Vahtera, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Impaired sleep has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the underlying mechanisms are still unsettled. We sought to determine how onset of impaired sleep affects the risk of established physiological CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia). In a longitudinal cohort study with 3 survey waves (2000, 2004, 2008) from the Finnish Public Sector study we used repeated information on sleep duration and disturbances to determine onset of impaired sleep. Information on development of CVD risk factors, as indicated by initiation of medication for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia was derived from electronic medical records within 8 years of follow-up. Data on 45,647 participants was structured as two data-cycles to examine the effect of change in sleep (between two waves) on incident CVD events. We applied strict inclusion and exclusion criteria to determine temporality between changes in sleep and the outcomes. While we did not find consistent effects of onset of short or long sleep, we found onset of disturbed sleep to predict subsequent risk of hypertension (hazard ratio = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.04-1.44) and dyslipidemia (HR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07-1.29) in fully adjusted analyses. Results suggest that onset of sleep disturbances rather than short or long sleep mark an increase in physiological risk factors, which may partly explain the higher risk of CVD observed among impaired sleepers. A commentary on this paper appears in this issue on page 1629. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. A prospective study of sleep duration and pneumonia risk in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay R; Malhotra, Atul; Gao, Xiang; Hu, Frank B; Neuman, Mark I; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data suggest sleep deprivation may impair host immunity. We sought to assess the effect of poor sleep on pneumonia risk. Prospective, observational cohort study. 56,953 female nurses (ages 37 to 57 years old) participating in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and asthma with no prior history of pneumonia. At baseline, participants reported their average sleep duration and whether this quantity was adequate for them. Questionnaires ascertaining a new pneumonia diagnosis were mailed every 2 years. Cases required physician diagnosis and chest radiograph confirmation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the relative risk for incident pneumonia over 4 years. Over 217,500 person-years, 977 cases of pneumonia were identified. Relative to 8-h sleepers, both short and long sleep durations were associated with elevated pneumonia risk. The age-adjusted relative risk for pneumonia was 1.70 (95% CI 1.30-2.23) in those sleeping ≤ 5 h and 1.49 (95% CI 1.12-1.98) in those sleeping ≥ 9 h. After adjusting for potential confounders, the relative risks were 1.39 (95% CI: 1.06-1.82) in those sleeping ≤ 5 h and 1.38 (95% CI 1.04-1.84) in those sleeping ≥ 9 h. Perceived inadequate sleep was also associated with pneumonia with a relative risk of 1.50 (95% CI 1.29-1.74) in multivariate models. Both reduced and prolonged habitual sleep durations are associated with increased risk of pneumonia. Further research is needed to understand how sleep habits can influence immunity.

  2. Hand self-Shiatsu for sleep problems in persons with chronic pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cary A; Bostick, Geoff; Bellmore, Leisa; Kumanayaka, Dilesha

    2014-03-01

    Difficulty falling asleep (sleep latency) and staying asleep (sleep maintenance) are common problems for persons living with pain. Research demonstrates that sleep problems are, in turn, related to exacerbation of chronic pain. There is a growing body of evidence for a range of pragmatic, non-pharmacological sleep interventions that can potentially be incorporated into pain management programs. This study looks at the outcome of teaching patients with musculoskeletal pain standardized pre-bedtime hand self-Shiatsu (HSS) to reduce sleep latency. A case series design, with participants acting as their own controls, was selected to facilitate hypothesis generation for this novel, under-researched intervention. Sleep efficiency, latency and maintenance, sleep beliefs, pain intensity and basic participant demographics were collected at baseline with actigraphy and standardized self-report questionnaires. After one week of baseline data collection, the HSS intervention was taught to participants. Follow-up data were collected at 2 and 8 weeks post-intervention. Data collected at baseline and the two follow-up periods revealed no apparent changes in the objective actigraphy data. However a trend toward improved self-reported sleep latency (time to fall asleep) and sleep duration (time spent asleep) emerged. A number of participants reported they were more concerned with increasing their period of unbroken sleep as opposed to their total sleep time and it is possible that HSS may be useful to be applied during nighttime awakenings as well as before bed. None of the participants reported adverse effects of the intervention. These preliminary findings are promising and future studies exploring the mechanism of action and with stronger control of treatment fidelity are indicated.

  3. Association between sleep and working memory in children with ADHD: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciberras, E; DePetro, A; Mensah, F; Hiscock, H

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between sleep problems and working memory in children aged 5-13 years with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children with ADHD were recruited into a randomized controlled trial from 21 paediatric practices in VIC, Australia. Cross-sectional data for intervention and control children were pooled at 6 months post randomization for the current analyses (n = 189). Children who met the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for ADHD and had a parent-reported moderate/severe sleep problem that fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a behavioural sleep disorder were recruited into the study. Sleep was assessed by detailed parent (Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire) and self-reports (Self-Sleep Report). Working memory was measured using the Working Memory Test Battery for Children (low and very low working memory defined as memory; for each standard deviation increase in self-reported sleep problems, working memory scores decreased by -3.8 points (95% confidence interval (CI): -6.7, -0.8; p = 0.01). There was some evidence that self-reported sleep problems were associated with low (p = 0.06) and very low working memory (p = 0.01). There was minimal evidence that parent-reported sleep problems were associated with poorer working memory with the exception of bedtime resistance problems. Behavioural sleep problems and working memory are associated in children with ADHD, particularly when sleep is assessed by self-report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep restriction increases white blood cells, mainly neutrophil count, in young healthy men: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia2, Brice Faraut1,2, Patricia Stenuit1, Maria José Esposito1,2, Michal Dyzma1,2, Dany Brohée2, Jean Ducobu2, Michel Vanhaeverbeek2, Myriam Kerkhofs1,21Sleep Laboratory; 2Laboratory of Experimental Medicine (ULB 222 Unit, CHU de Charleroi Vésale Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Montigny-le-Tilleul, BelgiumObjectives: This study examines the effects of sleep restricted to four hours for three consecutive nights on blood parameters, known to be associated with cardiovascular risk, in young healthy men.Material and methods: Eight young healthy men (age 24.5 ± 3.3 years were studied in the sleep restricted group. Nine young healthy men (age 24 ± 2 years were included in the control group and spent the days and nights in the sleep lab, while sleeping eight hours/night. One baseline night was followed by three nights of sleep restriction to four hours and by one recovery night of eight hours. Blood samplings were performed after the baseline night and after the third night of sleep restriction or without restriction for the control group.Results: A significant increase in white blood cells (WBC (5.79 ± 1.05 vs. 6.89 ± 1.31 103 cell/µl, p = 0.03, and neutrophils (3.17 ± 0.69 vs 4.24 ± 0.97 103 cell/µl, p = 0.01 was observed after the third night of sleep restriction. Other blood parameters were not affected. No significant variation was observed in the control group.Conclusion: Sleep restriction affected WBC count, mainly neutrophils, considered as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Stress induced by the short term sleep restriction could be involved in this observation.Keywords: sleep restriction, men, cardiovascular risk, cholesterol, neutrophils

  5. Association between elder abuse and poor sleep: A cross-sectional study among rural older Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Raudah Mohd; Wazid, Syeda Wasfeea; Hairi, Noran N; Choo, Wan Yuen; Hairi, Farizah M; Sooryanarayana, Rajini; Ahmad, Sharifah N; Razak, Inayah A; Peramalah, Devi; Aziz, Suriyati A; Mohamad, Zaiton L; Mohamad, Rosmala; Ali, Zainudin M; Bulgiba, Awang

    2017-01-01

    To examine the association between elder abuse and poor sleep using a Malay validated version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). This study was divided into two phases. Phase I tested the construct validity and reliability of the Malay version of PSQI. Phase II was a population-based, cross-sectional study with a multi-stage cluster sampling method. Home-based interviews were conducted by trained personnel using a structured questionnaire, to determine exposure and outcome. Kuala Pilah, a district in Negeri Sembilan which is one of the fourteen states in Malaysia. 1648 community-dwelling older Malaysians. The Malay version of PSQI had significant test re-test reliability with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.62. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that one factor PSQI scale with three components (subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep disturbances) was most suitable. Cronbach's Alpha was 0.60 and composite reliability was 0.63. PSQI scores were highest among neglect (4.11), followed by physical (4.10), psychological (3.96) and financial abuse (3.60). There was a dose-response relationship between clustering of abuse and PSQI scores; 3.41, 3.50 and 3.84 for "no abuse", "1 type of abuse" and "2 types or more". Generalized linear models revealed six variables as significant determinants of sleep quality-abuse, co-morbidities, self-rated health, income, social support and gait speed. Among abuse subtypes, only neglect was significantly associated with poor sleep. The Malay PSQI was valid and reliable. Abuse was significantly associated with poor sleep. As sleep is essential for health and is a good predictor for mortality among older adults, management of abuse victims should entail sleep assessment. Interventions or treatment modalities which focus on improving sleep quality among abuse victims should be designed.

  6. Childhood Sleepwalking and Sleep Terrors: A Longitudinal Study of Prevalence and Familial Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Dominique; Pennestri, Marie-Hélène; Paquet, Jean; Desautels, Alex; Zadra, Antonio; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E; Boivin, Michel; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-07-01

    Childhood sleepwalking and sleep terrors are 2 parasomnias with a risk of serious injury for which familial aggregation has been shown. To assess the prevalence of sleepwalking and sleep terrors during childhood; to investigate the link between early sleep terrors and sleepwalking later in childhood; and to evaluate the degree of association between parental history of sleepwalking and presence of somnambulism and sleep terrors in children. Sleep data from a large prospective longitudinal cohort (the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development) of 1940 children born in 1997 and 1998 in the province were studied from March 1999 to March 2011. Prevalence of sleep terrors and sleepwalking was assessed yearly from ages 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 years, respectively, to age 13 years through a questionnaire completed by the mother. Parental history of sleepwalking was also queried. The peak of prevalence was observed at 1 1/2 years for sleep terrors (34.4% of children; 95% CI, 32.3%-36.5%) and at age 10 years for sleepwalking (13.4%; 95% CI, 11.3%-15.5%). As many as one-third of the children who had early childhood sleep terrors developed sleepwalking later in childhood. The prevalence of childhood sleepwalking increases with the degree of parental history of sleepwalking: 22.5% (95% CI, 19.2%-25.8%) for children without a parental history of sleepwalking, 47.4% (95% CI, 38.9%-55.9%) for children who had 1 parent with a history of sleepwalking, and 61.5% (95% CI, 42.8%-80.2%) for children whose mother and father had a history of sleepwalking. Moreover, parental history of sleepwalking predicted the incidence of sleep terrors in children as well as the persistent nature of sleep terrors. These findings substantiate the strong familial aggregation for the 2 parasomnias and lend support to the notion that sleepwalking and sleep terrors represent 2 manifestations of the same underlying pathophysiological entity.

  7. An observational clinical and video-polysomnographic study of the effects of rotigotine in sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Yue-Chang; Lan, Dan-Mei; Wu, Hui -Juan; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and negatively impacts quality of life. There is little data on how dopamine agonists influence nocturnal sleep in PD, particularly in sleep laboratory data to measure sleep parameters and their changes objectively. The goal of this open-label study was to objectively evaluate the effect of rotigotine on sleep in PD patients by video-polysomnographic methods. A total of 25 PD patients with complaints of nocturnal sleep impairment were enrolled. The sleep quality before and after stable rotigotine therapy was evaluated subjectively through questionnaire assessments and objectively measured by video-polysomnographic methods. The Parkinsonism, depression, anxiety, and quality of life of PD patients were also evaluated through questionnaire assessments. At the end of rotigotine treatment, the PD daytime functioning, motor performance, depression, subjective quality of sleep, and the quality of life improved. Video-polysomnographic analysis showed that the sleep efficiency and stage N1% were increased, while the sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, and the periodic leg movements in sleep index were decreased after rotigotine treatment. Video-polysomnographic analysis confirmed the subjective improvement of sleep after rotigotine treatment. This observation suggests that in PD rotigotine is a treatment option for patients complaining from sleep disturbances.

  8. What Is Sleep Apnea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have type 2 diabetes. Hormonal changes in sleep deprivation. We know that sleep deprivation decreases the response of the body to insulin , ... with sleep apnea who finds it hard to use your CPAP machine? This study is assessing whether ...

  9. Work-family conflict and sleep disturbance: the Malaysian working women study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazami, Sanaz; Mozafari, Mosayeb; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Akmal, Syaqirah

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing effect of the four dimensions of work-family conflicts (strain and time-based work interference into family and family interference into work) on sleep disturbance in Malaysian working women. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 325 Malaysian married working women. Multiple-stage simple random sampling method was used to recruit women from public service departments of Malaysia. Self-administrated questionnaires were used to measure the study variables and data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. We found that high level of the four dimensions of work-family conflicts significantly increase sleep disturbance. Our analyses also revealed an age-dependent effect of the work-family conflict on sleep disturbance. Women in their 20 to 30 yr old suffer from sleep disturbance due to high level of time-based and strain-based work-interference into family. However, the quality of sleep among women aged 30-39 were affected by strain-based family-interference into work. Finally, women older than 40 yr had significantly disturbed sleep due to strain-based work-interference into family as well as time-based family interference into work. Our findings showed that sleep quality of working women might be disturbed by experiencing high level of work-family conflict. However, the effects of inter-role conflicts on sleep varied among different age groups.

  10. The effect of sleep deprivation on leadership behaviour in military officers: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Pallesen, Ståle; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Espevik, Roar

    2016-12-01

    While several studies show that leaders frequently lack sleep, little is known about how this influences leadership behaviour. The present study encompasses an experiment that investigated how three main types of leadership behaviour: transformational (four sub-facets); transactional (two sub-facets); and passive-avoidant (two sub-facets) leadership differed across a rested and a long-term, partially sleep-deprived condition. A total of 16 military naval officers participated. In both conditions, the leaders managed a team of three subordinates in a navy navigation simulator, instructed to complete a specific mission (A or B). Both sleep state (rested or sleep deprived) and mission were counterbalanced. Leadership behaviour was video recorded and subsequently rated on the three leadership behaviours. Overall, the scores on transformational leadership (and on two of four sub-facets) and transactional leadership (on both sub-facets) decreased from the rested to sleep-deprived condition, whereas scores on passive-avoidant leadership overall (and on both sub-facets) increased from the rested to sleep-deprived condition. This study underscores the importance of including sleep as a potentially important determinant when assessing leadership effectiveness. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and 15-Year Cognitive Decline: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Bengtson, Lindsay G S; Punjabi, Naresh M; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Wruck, Lisa M; MacLehose, Richard F; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    Prospective data evaluating abnormal sleep quality and quantity with cognitive decline are limited because most studies used subjective data and/or had sh