WorldWideScience

Sample records for swan cygnus bewickii

  1. Significance of the White Sea as a Stopover for Bewick's Swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii in Spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolet, B. A.; Andreev, V. A.; Clausen, P.

    2001-01-01

    We searched for a major stopover site of Bewick's Swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii in the White Sea following the suggestion that one should exist on the stretch between Estonia and the breeding grounds (1750 km). We discovered 733 Swans in Dvina Bay during a late aerial survey in spring 1993...

  2. Commensal foraging with Bewick’s Swans Cygnus bewickii doubles instantaneous intake rate of Common Pochards Aythya ferina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyimesi, A.; van Lith, B.; Nolet, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Aquatically foraging Bewick’s Swans Cygnus bewickii have been repeatedly reported to be accompanied by diving ducks, but the exact nature of this relationship is unclear. Based on field observations, we found a strong correlation between the number of foraging swans and the number of foraging Common

  3. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  4. Satellite tracking of the migration of Whooper Swans Cygnus cygnus wintering in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tetsuo; Yamaguchi, Noriyuki M.; Hijikata, N.; Hiraoka, Emiko N.; Hupp, Jerry; Flint, Paul L.; Tokita, Ken-ichi; Fujita, Go; Uchida, Kiyoshi; Sato, F.; Kurechi, Masayuki; Pearce, John M.; Ramey, Andy M.; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We satellite-tracked Whooper Swans Cygnus cygnus wintering in northern Japan to document their migration routes and timing, and to identify breeding areas. From 47 swans that we marked at Lake Izunuma-Uchinuma, Miyagi Prefecture, northeast Honshu, and at Lake Kussharo, east Hokkaido, we observed 57 spring and 33 autumn migrations from 2009-2012. In spring, swans migrated north along Sakhalin Island from eastern Hokkaido using stopovers in Sakhalin, at the mouth of the Amur River and in northern coastal areas of the Sea of Okhotsk. They ultimately reached molting/breedmg areas along the Indigirka River and the lower Kolyma River in northern Russia. In autumn, the swans basically reversed the spring migration routes. We identified northern Honshu, eastern Hokkaido, coastal areas in Sakhalin, the lower Amur River and northern coastal areas of the Sea of Okhotsk as the most frequent stopover sites, and the middle reaches of the Indigirka and the lower Kolyma River as presumed breeding sites. Our results are helpful in understanding the distribution of the breeding and stopover sites of Whooper Swans wintering in Japan and in identifying their major migration habitats. Our findings contribute to understanding the potential transmission process of avian influenza viruses potentially carried by swans, and provide information necessary to conserve Whooper Swans in East Asia.

  5. Mortality in tundra swans Cygnus columbianus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek, J.C.; Serie, J.R.; Converse, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Our paper identifies and examines the significance of hunting and non-hunting mortality affecting the Eastern Population (EP) and Western Population (WP) (see Serie & Bartonek 1991a) of Tundra Swans. Sport hunting (Serie & Bartonek 1991b), native subsistence hunting (Copp 1989, Stewart & Bernier 1989), malicious shooting (McKelvey & MacNeill 1981), avian cholera (Friend et al. 1981, Schroeder 1983), ecto- and endoparasites (Trauger & Bartonek 1977, Woebeser 1981), lead poisoning (Sherwood 1960, Friend et al. 1981), collision (Willard 1978), and drowning (Miller et al. 1986) have been documented as being direct or indirect causes of mortality in fledged Tundra Swans; but their relative importance remains unknown.

  6. Migrating swans profit from favourable changes in wind conditions at low altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M; Beekman, JH; Kontiokorpi, J; Mulder, RJW; Nolet, BA

    Because energy reserves limit flight range, wind assistance may be of crucial importance for migratory birds. We tracked eight Bewick's swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii, using 95-g satellite transmitters with altimeters and activity sensors, during their spring migration from Denmark to northern

  7. Migrating swans profit from favourable changes in wind conditions at low altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.R.J.; Beekman, J.H.; Kontiokorpi, J.; Mulder, R.J.W.; Nolet, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Because energy reserves limit flight range, wind assistance may be of crucial importance for migratory birds. We tracked eight Bewicks swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii, using 95-g satellite transmitters with altimeters and activity sensors, during their spring migration from Denmark to northern

  8. Coexistence and population genetic structure of the whooper swan Cygnus cygnus and mute swan Cygnus olor in Lithuania and Latvia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butkauskas, Dalius; Švažas, Saulius; Tubelytė, Vaida; Morkūnas, Julius; Sruoga, Aniolas; Boiko, Dmitrijs; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Stanevičius, Vitas; Baublys, Vykintas

    2012-01-01

    .... Marked differences in the genetic population structure of both species may partially explain the dominance of the whooper swan, as genetic population divergence can be a major factor affecting inter...

  9. Skipping swans: Fuelling rates and wind conditions determine differential use of migratory stopover sites of Bewick's Swans Cygnus bewickii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, J.H.; Nolet, B.A.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Some migratory birds refuel at stopover sites that they by-pass on the return trip. In theory, this skipping behaviour is only expected in time-selected migrants when the overflown site is of a lower quality than the departure site. We provide empirical evidence that quality differences in stopover

  10. Skipping swans : Fuelling rates and wind conditions determine differential use of migratory stopover sites of Bewick's Swans Cygnus bewickii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, JH; Nolet, BA; Klaassen, M

    2002-01-01

    Some migratory birds refuel at stopover sites that they by-pass on the return trip. In theory, this skipping behaviour is only expected in time-selected migrants when the overflown site is of a lower quality than the departure site. We provide empirical evidence that quality differences in stopover

  11. Monitoring of heavy metal burden in mute swan (Cygnus olor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grúz, Adrienn; Szemerédy, Géza; Kormos, Éva; Budai, Péter; Majoros, Szilvia; Tompai, Eleonóra; Lehel, József

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals (especially arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury and lead) were measured in the contour (body) feathers of mute swans (Cygnus olor) and in its nutrients (fragile stonewort [Chara globularis], clasping leaf pondweed [Potamogeton perfoliatus], Eurasian watermilfoil [Myriophyllum spicatum], fennel pondweed [Potamogeton pectinatus]) to investigate the accumulation of metals during the food chain. The samples (17 feathers, 8 plants) were collected at Keszthely Bay of Lake Balaton, Hungary. Dry ashing procedure was used for preparing of sample and the heavy metal concentrations were analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Copper (10.24 ± 2.25 mg/kg) and lead (1.11 ± 1.23 mg/kg) were detected the highest level in feathers, generally, the other metals were mostly under the detection limit (0.5 mg/kg). However, the concentrations of the arsenic (3.17 ± 1.87 mg/kg), cadmium (2.41 ± 0.66 mg/kg) and lead (2.42 ± 0.89 mg/kg) in the plants were low but the chromium (198.27 ± 102.21 mg/kg) was detected in high concentration.

  12. Cardiac filariosis in migratory Mute swans (Cygnus olor in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Manno

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarconema eurycerca is a common parasitic disease of North America swans and geese. The infection has been correlated with severe heart lesions, often resulting in cardiac failure and death of the animals. Heartworms infections have been previously reported in European swans, and specifically in the United Kingdom and Nederland. Both the countries are characterized by a cold temperate weather, similar to the one that can be found in swan wintering areas of U.S.A. and Canada. The first record of cardiac filariasis associated with Sarconema eurycerca infection in four swans in Italy. Twelve mute swans were examined during avian influenza surveillance activities on migratory birds. Birds were collected in the year 2006, in wintering areas of Eastern Sicily (Italy. Four of the twelve swans showed necrotic-haemorrhagic myocarditis with intra-lesional nematodes. Morphological characteristics identified the parasite as a filarial nematode. Birds lungs samples were used for parasites DNA extraction. The latter was used as template for polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and sequencing of part of the 12S rDNA gene. Comparison of genomic DNA extracted from a reference S. eurycerca isolate confirmed parasite identity and provided the first sequence resources for this species of value to future diagnostic and epidemiological studies.

  13. Toxicity of Anacostia River, Washington, DC, USA, sediment fed to mute swans (Cygnus olor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.; Melancon, M.J.; Sileo, L.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion is sometimes the principal route by which waterfowl are exposed to environmental contaminants, and at severely contaminated sites waterfowl have been killed by ingesting sediment. Mute swans (Cygnus olor) were fed a diet for six weeks with a high but environmentally realistic concentration (24%) of sediment from the moderately polluted Anacostia River in the District of Columbia, to estimate the sediment?s toxicity. Control swans were fed the same diet without the sediment. Five organochlorine compounds were detected in the treated diets but none of 22 organochlorine compounds included in the analyses were detected in livers of the treated swans. The concentrations of 24 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons measured in the treated diet were as high as 0.80 mg/kg and they were thought to have been responsible for the observed induction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in livers. A concentration of 85 mg/kg of lead in the diet was enough to decrease red blood cell ALAD activity but was not high enough to cause more serious effects of lead poisoning. The dietary concentrations of Al, Fe, V, and Ba were high compared to the concentrations of these elements known to be toxic in laboratory feeding studies, but these elements did not accumulate in the livers of the treated swans and probably were not readily available in the sediment. Although ingestion of the Anacostia River sediment caused subtle toxicological effects in swans, we concluded from pathological examinations and weight data that the treated swans remained basically healthy.

  14. Computed tomography of coxofemoral injury in five mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpenberger, Michaela; Scope, Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Five mute swans (Cygnus olor) were presented with inability to stand or with abnormal positioning of a leg. Clinical examinations indicated the possibility of femoral fractures or coxofemoral luxations. The suspected diagnosis was proven by means of computed tomography (CT), while superimposition of gastrointestinal contents or other artefacts limited radiographic diagnosis in three birds. A typical CT sign for lesions of the coxofemoral joint apart from femoral displacement was haemorrhage within the pelvic bones (especially around the acetabulum), found in four of the five birds. Small femoral head avulsion fractures could be detected only with CT.

  15. Toxicity of Anacostia River, Washington, DC, USA, sediment fed to mute swans (Cygnus olor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.; Melancon, M.J.; Sileo, L.

    2000-03-01

    Sediment ingestion is sometimes the principal route by which waterfowl are exposed to environmental contaminants, and at severely contaminated sites waterfowl have been killed by ingesting sediment. Mute swans (Cygnus olor) were fed a diet for 6 weeks with a high but environmentally realistic concentration (24%) of sediment from the moderately polluted Anacostia River in the District of Columbia, USA, to estimate the sediment's toxicity. Control swans were fed the same diet without the sediment. Five organochlorine compounds were detected in the treated diets, but none of 22 organochlorine compounds included in the analyses was detected in livers of the treated swans. The concentrations of 24 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons measured in the treated diet were as high as 0.80 mg/kg, and they were thought to have been responsible for the observed induction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity in livers. A concentration of 85 mg/kg of lead in the diet was enough to decrease red blood cell ALAD activity but was not high enough to cause more serious effects of lead poisoning. The dietary concentrations of Al, Fe, V, and Ba were high compared to the concentrations of these elements known to be toxic in laboratory feeding studies. However, the lack of accumulation in the livers of the treated swans suggested that these elements were not readily available from the ingested sediment. The authors did not study all potential toxic effects, but, on the basis of those that they did consider, they concluded that the treated swans were basically healthy after a chronic exposure to the sediment.

  16. Delineation of Tundra Swan Cygnus c. columbianus populations in North America: geographic boundaries and interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Craig R.; Sladen, William J. L.; Wilson, Heather M.; Savage, Susan E.; Sowl, Kristine M.; Henry, Bill; Schwitters, Mike; Snowden, James

    2014-01-01

    North American Tundra Swans Cygnus c. columbianus are composed of two wellrecognised populations: an Eastern Population (EP) that breeds across northern Canada and north of the Brooks Range in Alaska, which migrates to the eastern seaboard of the United States, and a Western Population (WP) that breeds in coastal regions of Alaska south of the Brooks Range and migrates to western North America. We present results of a recent major ringing effort from across the breeding range in Alaska to provide a better definition of the geographic extent of the migratory divide in Alaska. We also reassess the staging and winter distributions of these populations based on locations of birds tracked using satellite transmitters, and recent recoveries and sightings of neck-collared birds. Summer sympatry of EP and WP Tundra Swans is very limited, and largely confined to a small area in northwest Alaska. Autumn migration pathways of EP and WP Tundra swans abut in southwest Saskatchewan, a region where migrating WP birds turn west, and EP birds deviate abruptly eastward. Overall, from 1989 to 2013 inclusive, 2.6% of recoveries or resightings reported to the USGS Bird Banding Laboratory were of birds that moved from the domain of the population in which they were initially captured to within the range of the other population; a proportion roughly comparable to the results of Limpert et al. (1991) for years before 1990. Of the 70 cross-boundary movements reported since 1989, 39% were of birds marked on breeding areas and 61% were of birds marked on wintering areas. Dispersing swans (i.e. those that made crossboundary movements) did not differ with respect to age or sex from those that did not move between populations. The Brooks Range in northern Alaska effectively separates the two populations within Alaska, but climate-induced changes in tundra breeding habitats and losses of wetlands on staging areas may alter the distribution for both of these populations.

  17. Migration of Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus) Wintering in Japan Using Satellite Tracking: Identification of the Eastern Palearctic Flyway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbo; Doko, Tomoko; Fujita, Go; Hijikata, Naoya; Tokita, Ken-Ichi; Uchida, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Kan; Hiraoka, Emiko; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Migration through the Eastern Palearctic (EP) flyway by tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) has not been thoroughly documented. We satellite-tracked the migration of 16 tundra swans that winter in Japan. The objectives of this study were 1) to show the migration pattern of the EP flyway of tundra swans; 2) to compare this pattern with the migration pattern of whooper swans; and 3) to identify stopover sites that are important for these swans' conservation. Tundra swans were captured at Kutcharo Lake, Hokkaido, in 2009-2012 and satellite-tracked. A new method called the "MATCHED (Migratory Analytical Time Change Easy Detection) method" was developed. Based on median, the spring migration began on 18 April and ended on 27 May. Autumn migration began on 9 September and ended on 2 November. The median duration of the spring and autumn migrations were 48 and 50 days, respectively. The mean duration at one stopover site was 5.5 days and 6.8 days for the spring and autumn migrations, respectively. The number of stopover sites was 3.0 and 2.5 for the spring and autumn migrations, respectively. The mean travel distances for the spring and autumn migrations were 6471 and 6331 km, respectively. Seven migration routes passing Sakhalin, the Amur River, and/or Kamchatka were identified. There were 15, 32, and eight wintering, stopover, and breeding sites, respectively. The migration routes and staging areas of tundra swans partially overlap with those of whooper swans, whose migration patterns have been previously documented. The migration patterns of these two swan species that winter in Japan confirm the importance of the Amur River, Udyl' Lake, Shchastya Bay, Aniva Bay, zaliv Chayvo Lake, zal Piltun Lake, zaliv Baykal Lake, Kolyma River, Buyunda River, Sen-kyuyel' Lake, and northern coastal areas of the Sea of Okhotsk.

  18. Behaviour of wintering Tundra Swans Cygnus columbianus columbianus at the Eel River delta and Humboldt Bay, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jeffrey M.; Gress, Carol; Byers, Jacob W.; Jennings, Emily; Ely, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus columbinanus phenology and behaviour at the Eel River delta and southern Humboldt Bay in northern California, USA, is described. Counts made each January from 1963 onwards peaked at 1,502 swans in 1988. Monthly counts recorded during the 2006/07 and 2008/09 winters peaked in February, at 1,033 and 772 swans respectively. Swans roosted on ephemeral ponds at the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, on ephemeral ponds within grassland pastures in the vicinity of the Refuge, and perhaps also used the Eel River as a roost. Flights between Refuge roosts and the pastures and ponds occurred in the two hours after sunrise and before dark. In winters 2008/09 and 2009/10, the percentage of cygnets in the flocks was 10.6% and 21.4% respectively, and increased to =31% cygnets each year after most swans had departed from the area in March. Average brood size in 2009/10 was 2.1 cygnets. Daily activities consisted of foraging (44.9% of activities recorded), comfort behaviour (22.1%), locomotion (16.2%) and vigilance (15.5%). Eight neck-collared swans identified in the wintering flock were marked at four locations in different parts of Alaska, up to 1,300 km apart.

  19. Testing whether macroevolution follows microevolution: are colour differences among swans (Cygnus) attributable to variation at the MCIR locus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Marie A; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2008-09-12

    The MC1R (melanocortin-1 receptor) locus underlies intraspecific variation in melanin-based dark plumage coloration in several unrelated birds with plumage polymorphisms. There is far less evidence for functional variants of MC1R being involved in interspecific variation, in which spurious genotype-phenotype associations arising through population history are a far greater problem than in intraspecific studies. We investigated the relationship between MC1R variation and plumage coloration in swans (Cygnus), which show extreme variation in melanic plumage phenotypes among species (white to black). The two species with melanic plumage, C. atratus and C. melanocoryphus (black and black-necked swans respectively), both have amino acid changes at important functional sites in MC1R that are consistent with increased MC1R activity and melanism. Reconstruction of MC1R evolution over a newly generated independent molecular phylogeny of Cygnus and related genera shows that these putative melanizing mutations were independently derived in the two melanic lineages. However, interpretation is complicated by the fact that one of the outgroup genera, Coscoroba, also has a putative melanizing mutation at MC1R that has arisen independently but has nearly pure white plumage. Epistasis at other loci seems the most likely explanation for this discrepancy. Unexpectedly, the phylogeny shows that the genus Cygnus may not be monophyletic, with C. melanocoryphus placed as a sister group to true geese (Anser), but further data will be needed to confirm this. Our study highlights the difficulty of extrapolating from intraspecific studies to understand the genetic basis of interspecific adaptive phenotypic evolution, even with a gene whose structure-function relationships are as well understood as MC1R as confounding variation make clear genotype/phenotype associations difficult at the macroevolutionary scale. However, the identification of substitutions in the black and black-necked swan

  20. Testing whether macroevolution follows microevolution: Are colour differences among swans (Cygnus attributable to variation at the MC1R locus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pointer Marie A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MC1R (melanocortin-1 receptor locus underlies intraspecific variation in melanin-based dark plumage coloration in several unrelated birds with plumage polymorphisms. There is far less evidence for functional variants of MC1R being involved in interspecific variation, in which spurious genotype-phenotype associations arising through population history are a far greater problem than in intraspecific studies. We investigated the relationship between MC1R variation and plumage coloration in swans (Cygnus, which show extreme variation in melanic plumage phenotypes among species (white to black. Results The two species with melanic plumage, C. atratus and C. melanocoryphus (black and black-necked swans respectively, both have amino acid changes at important functional sites in MC1R that are consistent with increased MC1R activity and melanism. Reconstruction of MC1R evolution over a newly generated independent molecular phylogeny of Cygnus and related genera shows that these putative melanizing mutations were independently derived in the two melanic lineages. However, interpretation is complicated by the fact that one of the outgroup genera, Coscoroba, also has a putative melanizing mutation at MC1R that has arisen independently but has nearly pure white plumage. Epistasis at other loci seems the most likely explanation for this discrepancy. Unexpectedly, the phylogeny shows that the genus Cygnus may not be monophyletic, with C. melanocoryphus placed as a sister group to true geese (Anser, but further data will be needed to confirm this. Conclusion Our study highlights the difficulty of extrapolating from intraspecific studies to understand the genetic basis of interspecific adaptive phenotypic evolution, even with a gene whose structure-function relationships are as well understood as MC1R as confounding variation make clear genotype/phenotype associations difficult at the macroevolutionary scale. However, the identification

  1. Hematological parameters in relation to age, sex and biochemical values for mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolka, B; Włodarczyk, R; Zbikowski, A; Dolka, I; Szeleszczuk, P; Kluciński, W

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of the correct morphological and biochemical parameters in mute swans is an important indicator of their health status, body condition, adaptation to habitat and useful diagnostic tools in veterinary practice and ecological research. The aim of the study was to obtain hematological parameters in relation to age, sex and serum biochemistry values in wild-living mute swans. We found the significant differences in the erythrocyte count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in relation to age of mute swans. There were no differences in hematological values between males and females. The leukogram and H/L ratio did not vary by age and sex in swans. Among of biochemical parameters the slightly increased AST, ALP, CK, K, urea, decreased CHOL and TG values were recorded. As far as we know, this is the first study in which the morphometric parameters of blood cells in mute swans were presented. We found extremely low concentration of lead in blood (at subthreshold level). No blood parasites were found in blood smears. The analysis of body mass and biometric parameters revealed a significant differences dependent on age and sex. No differences in the scaled mass index were found. Our results represent a normal hematologic and blood chemistry values and age-sex related changes, as reference values for the mute swan.

  2. Short report: Antibody prevalence of select arboviruses in mute swans (Cygnus olor) in the Great Lakes region and Atlantic coast of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kerri; Marks, David R; Arsnoe, Dustin M; Bevins, Sarah N; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott C; Mickley, Randall M; DeLiberto, Thomas J

    2014-12-01

    Mute swans (Cygnus olor) are an invasive species in the United States. The dramatic increase in their populations in localized areas has led to various problems, among them competition with native species and attacks on humans by aggressive swans. However, very little is known about the ability of these swans to transmit pathogens to humans, domestic birds, or wildlife or participate in enzootic maintenance. To learn more about select pathogens that mute swans may harbor, a survey was conducted from April of 2011 to August of 2012 in the Great Lakes region and localized areas of the Atlantic coast, which revealed serologic evidence of arbovirus exposure in mute swans. Of 497 mute swans tested, antibodies were detected for eastern equine encephalitis (4.8%), St. Louis encephalitis (1.4%), West Nile (1.2%), and Turlock (0.6%) viruses. Samples were also tested for evidence of antibodies to La Crosse virus, but none were positive. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  3. Microbial impact of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and whistling swans (Cygnus columbianus columbianus) on aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussong, D; Damaré, J M; Limpert, R J; Sladen, W J; Weiner, R M; Colwell, R R

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the intestinal bacterial flora of Canada geese and whistling swans were carried out with the finding that wild birds harbor significantly more fecal coliforms than fecal streptococci. The reverse was typical of captive and fasting birds. Neither Salmonella spp. nor Shigella spp. were isolated from 44 migratory waterfowl that were wintering in the Chesapeake Bay region. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were detected in seven birds. Geese eliminated 10(7) and swans 10(9) fecal coliforms per day. Results of in situ studies showed that large flocks of waterfowl can cause elevated fecal coliform densities in the water column. From the data obtained in this study, it is possible to predict the microbial impact of migratory waterfowl upon aquatic roosting sites.

  4. Trace Elements (Pb, Zn, Cu in Blood of Mute Swan (Cygnus olor from the Isonzo River Nature Reserve (Italy

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    G Isani*, M Cipone, G Andreani, E Carpenè, E Ferlizza, K Kravos1 and F Perco1

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lead concentrations in blood of 45 specimens of mute swan from the molting area of the Isonzo River Mouth Nature Reserve (Italy were determined in two consecutive years (2006-2007, some birds were neck ringed to identify their homing behavior. The second sampling included whole body X-ray radiography and Cu and Zn plasma analyses to investigate the health impact of putative Pb exposure. X-ray images of all investigated specimens did not show any radiopacity due to the ingestion of metal bodies. Lead levels (0.08-0.44 g/ml were in the range of those reported for swans living in unpolluted or slightly polluted environments and excluded acute intoxication, as confirmed by clinical investigation. Zinc concentrations ranged between 2.93 and 7.59 g/ml and were one order of magnitude higher than Cu concentrations (0.21-0.42 g/ml. The negative correlation between Pb and Zn concentrations could be indicative of adverse health effects caused by chronic lead exposure. To our knowledge this is the first study reporting Pb, Zn and Cu blood levels, X-ray radiographies and data on the origin of swan populations.

  5. Role of manganese oxides in the exposure of mute swans (Cygnus olor) to Pb and other elements in the Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this study are to estimate exposure of waterfowl to elements in contaminated sediments in the Chesapeake Bay and to consider the potential role of Mn in influencing bioavailability and exposure. Mute swans living on the Aberdeen Proving Ground were collected and samples of swan digesta were analyzed and compared to samples of feces collected from mute swans living at a nearby reference site. Sediments from the proving ground had elevated concentrations of Cu, S, Se, Zn, As, Co, Cr, Hg and Pb, but concentrations of only the first four of these elements were elevated in swan digesta. Sediments from the proving ground had an elevated mean concentration of total As, about seven times the concentration at the reference site, but the swans from that site were not ingesting more As than were reference swans. Swans at both sites were feeding on submerged aquatic vegetation and ingested about 4% sediment at the proving ground and about 5% sediment at the reference site. None of the concentrations detected in the digesta or livers of the swans was considered toxic, although the concentrations of Cu and Se were high compared to those concentrations reported in other waterfowl. A remarkably high mean concentration of Mn (6900 mg/kg, dry weight) detected in the feces of the reference swans was attributed to the deposition of manganese oxides on vegetation. The ingestion of Pb by swans at the reference site was correlated with Mn and Fe concentrations, rather than with markers of sediment ingestion. The Pb was presumably scavenged by Mn and Fe oxides from the water and deposited on the surface of vegetation. Under some environmental chemical conditions, this route of exposure for Pb is more important than sediment ingestion, which was previously thought to be the main route of exposure.

  6. Overview of efforts to expand the range of the Rocky Mountain population of trumpeter swans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Near extinction in 1900, by 1992 the Rocky Mountain Population (RMP) of Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) contained +2200 swans. The foremost problem facing the...

  7. Population structure and productivity of whistling swans on the Yukon Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Whistling swans Cygnus colombianus are the most conspicuous of wildfowl of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the principal nesting grounds for swans wintering in western...

  8. Tundra swan avian infuenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Alaska Peninsula as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in mid to late July 2008. This...

  9. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAKP) as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in late July 2009....

  10. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAKP) and the Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAKP) in late July 2010 as part of...

  11. Tundra swan avain influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Alaska Peninsula as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in late July 2006. At Caribou River,...

  12. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Alaska Peninsula as part of statewide Avian Influenza (AI) investigations in late July 2007. On the Northern...

  13. Pacific Flyway management plan for the Western Population of tundra swans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this plan is to establish guidelines for the cooperative management of the Western Population (WP) of tundra swans (Cygnus c. columbianus). This...

  14. Tundra swan avian influenza surveillance and banding effort, Alaska Peninsula, 18-28 July, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) were captured on the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAKP) and the Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAKP) in late July20 10 as part of...

  15. Tundra swan population survey in Bristol Bay, Northern Alaska Peninsula, 2003 and 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) population surveys were conducted in spring and late summer of 2003 and 2008 according to the schedule established in the Alaska...

  16. Tundra swan population survey in Bristol Bay, northern Alaska Peninsula, 2003 and 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) population surveys were conducted in spring and late summer of 2003 and 2008 according to the schedule established in the Alaska...

  17. Mute swans: Natural (?) environmental indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, D.; Perry, Matthew C.

    2004-01-01

    The rapid expansion of the Chesapeake Bay's population of feral mute swans (Cygnus olar), coupled with a dramatic Bay-wide decline in submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), has fueled much of the current debate surrounding the need for a management plan to protect the aquatic food resources that are critical to many species native to the Bay. Crucial to this decision process is a sound understanding of the ecological ramifications of having the year-round presence of a large, nonnative, aquatic herbivore on the Bay. Ultimately, this will require a quantitative assessment of the ecological harm currently posed by mute swans before a biologically defensible management strategy can be developed. Unfortunately, very little new information specific to the Bay's mute swan population has been gathered since Reese first studied them in the late 1960s and 1970s. While the debate over what to do about the rapidly expanding mute swan population continues, there is much that can be gained from study of this beautiful intruder. Several recent studies of the feeding habits of mute swans have shown that mutes can provide a unique barometer, or indicator, of environmental conditions. Because of their reliance on SAV as a primary food source, monitoring the density of swans utilizing a particular area can give some indication of the status of the area's grass beds. This phenomenon was clearly demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when there was a dramatic decline in the number of swans observed around the Eastern Neck NWR, a traditional population stronghold. The shift in bird use was precipitated by a rapid, large-scale collapse of the area's aquatic grass beds, possibly the result of a prolonged drought. During the winter of 2000/2001, a similar ecological assessment was conducted by comparing body weights of swans collected from Tangier Sound, an area with relatively abundant grass beds, and swans from the waters adjacent to Eastern Neck Island. Swans weights tended to reflect the

  18. Spatial variation in tuber depletion by swans explained by differences in net intake rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, BA; Langevoord, O; Bevan, RM; Engelaar, KR; Klaassen, M; Mulder, RJW

    We tested whether the spatial variation in resource depletion by Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus) foraging on belowground tubers of sage pondweed (Potnmogeton pectinatus) was caused by differences in net energy intake rates. The variation in giving up densities within the confines of one lake was

  19. Spatial variation in tuber depletion by swans explained by differences in net intake rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, B.A.; Langevoord, O.; Bevan, R.M.; Engelaar, K.R.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Mulder, R.J.W.; Van Dijk, S.

    2001-01-01

    We tested whether the spatial variation in resource depletion by Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus) foraging on belowground tubers of sage pondweed (Potnmogeton pectinatus) was caused by differences in net energy intake rates. The variation in giving up densities within the confines of one lake was

  20. Mutual ornamentation, sexual selection, and social dominance in the black swan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijeveld, K; Gregurke, J; Hall, C; Komdeur, J; Mulder, RA

    We investigated the adaptive significance of a sexually monomorphic ornament in the black swan Cygnus atratus. Both sexes grow curled feathers on their wings (range 7-22 curled feathers per wing), which are displayed prominently in a range of social interactions. The number of curled feathers

  1. Annual survival rates of adult and immature eastern population tundra swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; Bart, J.; Limpert, R.J.; Sladen, William J. L.; Hines, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus ) of the eastern population were neckbanded in Maryland, North Carolina, and Alaska from 1966 through 1990. These swans were resighted and recaptured during autumn, winter, and spring, 1966-1990. Although the original motivation for this study involved swan movements, we wanted to use the resulting data to test hypotheses about sources of variation in swan survival rates. Recaptures of legbanded and neckbanded swans permitted us to estimate neckband loss rates, which were found to vary with age and sex of swans, and number of years since initial application. Estimates of annual neckband retention rate ranged from about 0.50 for adult male swans greater than or equal to 2 years after initial neckbanding to > 0.96 for immature swans and adult females the first year following neckbanding. This variation in neckband loss rates prevented the simple correction of survival estimates to account for such loss. Consequently, we developed a series of multinomial models parameterized with survival, sighting, and neckband retention probabilities for use with the recapture and resighting data.

  2. Cygnus A revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bemmel, IM; Crenshaw, DM; Karemer, SB; George, IM

    2002-01-01

    Deep spectro-polarimetry observations of Cygnus A show a redshift; of the emission lines in polarized flux on the far side of the galaxy. This shift is interpreted as an outflow of the scattering medium with respect to the nucleus of the object. On the other hand, the coronal lines indicate the

  3. Baseline hematology and clinical chemistry results from captive-raised trumpeter swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Glenn H.; Rininger, D.L.; Ets, M.K.; Sladen, William J. L.; Rees, Eileen C.; Earnst, Susan L.; Coulson, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Results from hematology and clinical chemistry tests are presented for healthy captive-raised Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) to help establish baseline data. Blood samples were obtained from 14 cygnets between the ages of three to four and seven to eight months that were the subjects of a study to teach migration routes to swans. Males and females differed significantly in asparatate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total protein. Age categories differed significantly in hematocrit, white blood cell counts, alkaline phosphatase, aspar-rate aminotransferase, glucose, cholesterol and uric acid. There were no significant differences among age categories in values of alanine aminotransferase, calcium, triglycerides and total protein.

  4. Artificial intelligence based decision support for trumpeter swan management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojda, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The number of trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) breeding in the Tri-State area where Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming come together has declined to just a few hundred pairs. However, these birds are part of the Rocky Mountain Population which additionally has over 3,500 birds breeding in Alberta, British Columbia, Northwest Territories, and Yukon Territory. To a large degree, these birds seem to have abandoned traditional migratory pathways in the flyway. Waterfowl managers have been interested in decision support tools that would help them explore simulated management scenarios in their quest towards reaching population recovery and the reestablishment of traditional migratory pathways. I have developed a decision support system to assist biologists with such management, especially related to wetland ecology. Decision support systems use a combination of models, analytical techniques, and information retrieval to help develop and evaluate appropriate alternatives. Swan management is a domain that is ecologically complex, and this complexity is compounded by spatial and temporal issues. As such, swan management is an inherently distributed problem. Therefore, the ecological context for modeling swan movements in response to management actions was built as a multiagent system of interacting intelligent agents that implements a queuing model representing swan migration. These agents accessed ecological knowledge about swans, their habitats, and flyway management principles from three independent expert systems. The agents were autonomous, had some sensory capability, and could respond to changing conditions. A key problem when developing ecological decision support systems is empirically determining that the recommendations provided are valid. Because Rocky Mountain trumpeter swans have been surveyed for a long period of time, I was able to compare simulated distributions provided by the system with actual field observations across 20 areas for the period 1988

  5. Landsat evaluation of trumpeter swan historical nesting sites in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Laura Elizabeth

    The trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) has historically nested in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Declines in habitat quality may be limiting the growth of the Tri-State Flock. The purpose of this study was to map historical nesting areas for trumpeter swans in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and evaluate Landsat images for changes to habitat. Historical nesting sites were evaluated through image classification and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and compared to field conditions. Swan nesting records were analyzed in comparison to drought index and human visitation rates to determine if these factors may contribute to the decline of trumpeter swans nesting in YNP. Vegetation type and water quality were evaluated at 36 wetlands identified as historical nesting locations. Potamogetonaceae was the largest family represented in plant samples and had the highest frequency of occurrence in samples. There was no significant difference in whether swans were present or absent in wetlands with regards to water quality parameters tested or physical parameters identified. There was an association between certain drought index values and the number of cygnets fledged and the number of territories occupied by swan pairs. I was unsuccessful in using image classification to define pixel characteristics common among historical nesting territories of swans in YNP based on 5 Landsat images from 1975, 1979, 1990, 1999, and 2005. I was also unable to distinguish aquatic plant species composition, emergent and submergent plants, open water versus aquatic vegetation, wetland classification, or swan preference using image classification. No relationship was found in a regression model of NDVI values and swan pair occupancy or number of swans fledged, with the exception of a weak, positive relationship between pair occupancy and positive NDVI values, and a strong, positive relationship between swan fledge rates and positive NDVI values

  6. Lead toxicosis in tundra swans near a mining and smelting complex in northern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Hoffman, D.J.; Grove, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Die-offs of waterfowl have occurred in the Coeur d`Alene River system in northern Idaho since at least the early 1900`s. We investigated causes of mortality and lead and cadmium contamination of 46 tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) from 1987 to 1989; an additional 22 swans found dead in 1990 were not examined. We necropsied 43 of the 46 birds found from 1987 to 1989; 38 of these were from the Coeur d`Alene River system, which has been contaminated with mining and smelting wastes for a century, and the other 5 were from a nearby, relatively uncontaminated area. Of the 36 livers of swans from the contaminated area that were analyzed, 32 contained lethal levels of lead (6 to 40 micrograms/g, wet weight) and all birds exhibited several symptoms of lead poisoning, notably enlarged gall bladders containing viscous, darkgreen bile. Only 13% of the lead-poisoned birds (10% when data were included from other studies of swans in the area) contained shot, compared to 95% of lead-poisoning swans in studies outside northern Idaho. Lead concentrations in blood samples from 16 apparently healthy swans (0.5 to 2.3 micrograms/g, and 4 leadpoisoned birds found moribund (1.3 to 9.6 micrograms/g) indicating that tundra swans accumulated high levels of lead from ingestion of sediment that contained up to 8,700 micrograms/g of lead and plants that contained up to 400 micrograms/g. The swans spend only a few weeks in the area staging during the spring migration. The five tundra swans from the uncontaminated area had low levels of lead and essentially no symptoms of lead poisoning.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mute swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, D.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Morton, Alexandra; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Most ecotoxicological risk assessments of wildlife emphasize contaminant exposure through ingestion of food and water. However, the role of incidental ingestion of sediment-bound contaminants has not been adequately appreciated in these assessments. This study evaluates the toxicological consequences of contamination of sediments with metals from hard-rock mining and smelting activities. Lead-contaminated sediments collected from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in Idaho were combined with either a commercial avian maintenance diet or ground rice and fed to captive mute swans (Cygnus olor) for 6 weeks. Experimental treatments consisted of maintenance or rice diets containing 0, 12 (no rice group), or 24% highly contaminated (3,950 ug/g lead) sediment or 24% reference (9.7 ug/g lead) sediment. Although none of the swans died, the group fed a rice diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment were the most severely affected, experiencing a 24% decrease in mean body weight, including three birds that became emaciated. All birds in this treatment group had nephrosis; abnormally dark, viscous bile; and significant (p fast intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are diagnostic of lead poisoning in waterfowl. Body weight and hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations in swans on control (no sediment) and reference (uncontaminated) sediment diets remained unchanged. These data provide evidence that mute swans consuming environmentally relevant concentrations of Coeur d'Alene River Basin sediment developed severe sublethal lead poisoning. Furthermore, toxic effects were more pronounced when the birds were fed lead contaminated sediment combined with rice, which closely resembles the diet of swans in the wild.

  8. Henrietta Swan Leavitt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page 1. CPMG/KNBGE-340/2001. Licenced to post WPP(E) NO.6. Resonance - June 2001. Henrietta Swan Leavitt. (1868 - 1921). Registered with Registrar of Newspapers in India vide Regn. No. 66273/96. ISSN 0971-8044.

  9. Blood lead concentrations in Alaskan tundra swans: linking breeding and wintering areas with satellite telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Craig R.; Franson, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) like many waterfowl species are susceptible to lead (Pb) poisoning, and Pb-induced mortality has been reported from many areas of their wintering range. Little is known however about Pb levels throughout the annual cycle of tundra swans, especially during summer when birds are on remote northern breeding areas where they are less likely to be exposed to anthropogenic sources of Pb. Our objective was to document summer Pb levels in tundra swans throughout their breeding range in Alaska to determine if there were population-specific differences in blood Pb concentrations that might pose a threat to swans and to humans that may consume them. We measured blood Pb concentrations in tundra swans at five locations in Alaska, representing birds that winter in both the Pacific Flyway and Atlantic Flyway. We also marked swans at each location with satellite transmitters and coded neck bands, to identify staging and wintering sites and determine if winter site use correlated with summer Pb concentrations. Blood Pb levels were generally low ( < 0.2 μg/ml) in swans across all breeding areas. Pb levels were lower in cygnets than adults, suggesting that swans were likely exposed to Pb on wintering areas or on return migration to Alaska, rather than on the summer breeding grounds. Blood Pb levels varied significantly across the five breeding areas, with highest concentrations in birds on the North Slope of Alaska (wintering in the Atlantic Flyway), and lowest in birds from the lower Alaska Peninsula that rarely migrate south for winter.

  10. Persistence of high lead concentrations and associated effects in Tundra Swans captured near a mining and smelting complex in northern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Hoffman, D.J.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl, particularly tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus), has been documented in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in northern Idaho for nearly a century. Over 90% of the lead-poisoned tundra swans in this area that were necropsied have no ingested lead shot. Spent lead shot from hunting activities over the years is therefore a minor source of lead in these swans. The migrating swans accumulated lethal burdens of lead from ingestion of sediments and aquatic vegetation during a short stopover in the spring. The lead originated from mining and smelting activities. Lead concentrations and physiological characteristics of blood were compared in swans captured in swim-in traps, with moribund swans caught by hand in the lead-contaminated area in 1987 and 1994-1995 and with birds captured by night-lighting in reference areas in 1994-1995. Blood lead concentrations in swans were highest in moribund birds (3.3 ?g g-1 in 1987 and 1995), intermediate in those trapped in the contaminated area (0.82 ?g g-1 in 1987 and 1.8 ?g g-1 in 1995), and lowest (0.11 ?g g-1) in those trapped in the reference areas. daminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) was significantly inhibited in swans from the contaminated area. Hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly depressed only in moribund swans. Of the 19 swans found moribund and euthanized, 18 were classified as having lead toxicosis on the basis of lead levels in blood (1.3 to 9.6 ?g g-1) and livers (6 to 40 ?g g-1) and necropsy findings. The 19th swan had aspergillosis. There was no evidence that effects of lead on tundra swans had diminished from 1987 to 1995.

  11. Black Swan Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, K.; Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Virtually all assessments of tropical cyclone risk are based on historical records, which are limited to a few hundred years at most. Yet stronger TCs may occur in the future and at places that have not been affected historically. Such events lie outside the realm of historically based expectations and may have extreme impacts. Their occurrences are also often made explainable after the fact (e.g., Hurricane Katrina). We nickname such potential future TCs, characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective predictability, "black swans" (Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007). As, by definition, black swan TCs have yet to happen, statistical methods that solely rely on historical track data cannot predict their occurrence. Global climate models lack the capability to predict intense storms, even with a resolution as high as 14 km (Emanuel et al. 2010). Also, most dynamic downscaling methods (e.g., Bender et al. 2010) are still limited in horizontal resolution and are too expensive to implement to generate enough events to include rare ones. In this study, we apply a simpler statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to simulate large numbers of synthetic storms under a given (observed or projected) climate condition. The method has been shown to generate realistic extremes in various basins (Emanuel et al. 2008 and 2010). We also apply a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC; Luettich et al. 1992) to simulate the storm surges generated by these storms. We then search for black swan TCs, in terms of the joint wind and surge damage potential, in the generated large databases. Heavy rainfall is another important TC hazard and will be considered in a future study. We focus on three areas: Tampa Bay in the U.S., the Persian Gulf, and Darwin in Australia. Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge as it is surrounded by shallow water and low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. High surges are generated by storms with a broad

  12. Environmental and human influences on trumpeter swan habitat occupancy in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.H.; Lindberg, M.S.; Johnson, D.S.; Schmultz, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 70-80% of the entire population of the Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus huccinator) depends for reproduction on wetlands in Alaska. This makes the identification of important habitat features and the effects of human interactions important for the species' long-term management. We analyzed the swan's habitat preferences in five areas throughout the state and found that swan broods occupied some wetland types, especially larger closed-basin wetlands such as lakes and ponds, at rates much higher than they occupied other wetland types, such as shrubby or forested wetlands. We also found a negative effect of transportation infrastructure on occupancy by broods in and around the Minto Flats State Game Refuge, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, and Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge. This finding is of particular interest because much of the Minto Flats refuge has recently been licensed for oil and gas exploration and parts of the Kenai refuge have been developed in the past. We also investigated the potential effects of the shrinkage of closed-basin ponds on habitat occupancy by nesting Trumpeter Swans. We compared nesting swans' use of ponds with changes in the ponds' size and other characteristics from 1982 to 1996 and found no relationships between occupancy and changes in pond size. However, we believe that the recent and rapid growth of Trumpeter Swan populations in Alaska may become limited by available breeding habitat, and anthropogenic and climate-induced changes to the swan's breeding habitats have the potential to limit future production. ?? 2009 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular detection of hematozoa infections in tundra swans relative to migration patterns and ecological conditions at breeding grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Ely, Craig R.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Pearce, John M.; Heard, Darryl J.

    2012-01-01

    Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) are broadly distributed in North America, use a wide variety of habitats, and exhibit diverse migration strategies. We investigated patterns of hematozoa infection in three populations of tundra swans that breed in Alaska using satellite tracking to infer host movement and molecular techniques to assess the prevalence and genetic diversity of parasites. We evaluated whether migratory patterns and environmental conditions at breeding areas explain the prevalence of blood parasites in migratory birds by contrasting the fit of competing models formulated in an occupancy modeling framework and calculating the detection probability of the top model using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). We described genetic diversity of blood parasites in each population of swans by calculating the number of unique parasite haplotypes observed. Blood parasite infection was significantly different between populations of Alaska tundra swans, with the highest estimated prevalence occurring among birds occupying breeding areas with lower mean daily wind speeds and higher daily summer temperatures. Models including covariates of wind speed and temperature during summer months at breeding grounds better predicted hematozoa prevalence than those that included annual migration distance or duration. Genetic diversity of blood parasites in populations of tundra swans appeared to be relative to hematozoa prevalence. Our results suggest ecological conditions at breeding grounds may explain differences of hematozoa infection among populations of tundra swans that breed in Alaska.

  14. Mute swans and their Chesapeake Bay habitats: proceedings of a symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The symposium 'Mute Swans and their Chesapeake Bay Habitats,' held on June 7, 2001, provided a forum for biologists and managers to share research findings and management ideas concerning the exotic and invasive mute swan (Cygnus olar). This species has been increasing in population size and is considered by many to be a problem in regard to natural food resources in the Bay that are used by native waterfowl during the winter months. Other persons, however, feel that resource managers are attempting to create a problem to justify more killing of waterfowl by hunters. Some persons also believe that managers should focus on the larger issues causing the decline of native food resources, such as the unabated human population increase in the Bay watershed and in the immediate coastal areas of the Bay. The symposium, sponsored by the Wildfowl Trust of North America and the U.S. Geological Survey, provided the atmosphere for presentation of mute swan data and opinions in a collegial setting where discussion was welcomed and was often informative and enthusiastic. An interesting historic review of the swan in regard to the history of mankind was presented, followed by a discussion on the positive and negative effects of invasive species. Biologists from different parts of the continent discussed the population status of the species in several states in the east and in the Great Lakes area. Data on the food habits of this species were presented in regard to submerged aquatic vegetation, and an interesting discussion on the role that the food habits of Canada geese in regard to native vegetation was presented. Findings and recommendations of the Mute Swan Task Force were presented. Finally, a representative of the Friends of Animals gave a thought-provoking presentation in defense of the mute swan. The presentations, in general, provided the necessary information and recommendations to allow managers to proceed with management of this controversial species with new and

  15. Teaching migration routes to canada geese and trumpeter swans using ultralight aircraft, 1990-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladen, William J. L.; Lishman, W.A.; Ellis, D.H.; Shire, G.G.; Rininger, D.L.; Rees, Eileen C.; Earnst, Susan L.; Coulson, John C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes eleven years (1990-2001) of experiments to teach Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) and Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) pre-selected migration routes using ultralight aircraft. When Canada Geese were trained to follow an ultralight aircraft for southward autumn migrations of 680 or 1,320 km, 81% (83/103) returned on their own in the next spring to near their place of training. In contrast, none returned of 21 similarly raised geese that were transported south in a closed truck over a route of 680 km. Trumpeter Swans have proven more difficult to train. However, in two experiments in which Trumpeter Swans followed an ultralight for the entire pre-selected route, one of three and two of four returned close to their training area. A stage-by-stage method, in which swans were transported in trucks between stops, flown in the vicinity and penned with a view of the night sky, has shown some promise. So far an established migration route (north and south twice) has been confirmed in only two geese

  16. 76 FR 77890 - Swan Ranch Railroad, L.L.C.-Operation Exemption-Swan Industrial Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Swan Ranch Railroad, L.L.C.--Operation Exemption--Swan Industrial Park Swan... located within the Swan Industrial Park, in Cheyenne, Wyo. The track over which SRR will operate is...

  17. Age-specific survival of tundra swans on the lower Alaska Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixell, Brandt W.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Conn, Paul B.; Dau, Christian P.; Sarvis, John E.; Sowl, Kristine M.

    2013-01-01

    The population of Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus columbianus) breeding on the lower Alaska Peninsula represents the southern extremity of the species' range and is uniquely nonmigratory. We used data on recaptures, resightings, and recoveries of neck-collared Tundra Swans on the lower Alaska Peninsula to estimate collar loss, annual apparent survival, and other demographic parameters for the years 1978–1989. Annual collar loss was greater for adult males fitted with either the thinner collar type (0.34) or the thicker collar type (0.15) than for other age/sex classes (thinner: 0.10, thicker: 0.04). The apparent mean probability of survival of adults (0.61) was higher than that of immatures (0.41) and for both age classes varied considerably by year (adult range: 0.44–0.95, immature range: 0.25–0.90). To assess effects of permanent emigration by age and breeding class, we analyzed post hoc the encounter histories of swans known to breed in our study area. The apparent mean survival of known breeders (0.65) was generally higher than that of the entire marked sample but still varied considerably by year (range 0.26–1.00) and indicated that permanent emigration of breeding swans was likely. We suggest that reductions in apparent survival probability were influenced primarily by high and variable rates of permanent emigration and that immigration by swans from elsewhere may be important in sustaining a breeding population at and near Izembek National Wildlife Refuge.

  18. Analyzing data files in SWAN

    CERN Document Server

    Gajam, Niharika

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally analyzing data happens via batch-processing and interactive work on the terminal. The project aims to provide another way of analyzing data files: A cloud-based approach. It aims to make it a productive and interactive environment through the combination of FCC and SWAN software.

  19. Ancient DNA and morphometric analysis reveal extinction and replacement of New Zealand's unique black swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlence, Nicolas J; Kardamaki, Afroditi; Easton, Luke J; Tennyson, Alan J D; Scofield, R Paul; Waters, Jonathan M

    2017-07-26

    Prehistoric human impacts on megafaunal populations have dramatically reshaped ecosystems worldwide. However, the effects of human exploitation on smaller species, such as anatids (ducks, geese, and swans) are less clear. In this study we apply ancient DNA and osteological approaches to reassess the history of Australasia's iconic black swans ( Cygnus atratus ) including the palaeo-behaviour of prehistoric populations. Our study shows that at the time of human colonization, New Zealand housed a genetically, morphologically, and potentially ecologically distinct swan lineage ( C. sumnerensis , Poūwa), divergent from modern (Australian) C. atratus Morphological analyses indicate C. sumnerensis exhibited classic signs of the 'island rule' effect, being larger, and likely flight-reduced compared to C. atratus Our research reveals sudden extinction and replacement events within this anatid species complex, coinciding with recent human colonization of New Zealand. This research highlights the role of anthropogenic processes in rapidly reshaping island ecosystems and raises new questions for avian conservation, ecosystem re-wilding, and de-extinction. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Biospecimen Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SWAN Repository is the biospecimen bank of the SWAN study. All stored specimens are from the 3,302 SWAN participants, collected across the 14 clinic visits...

  1. Drivers of waterfowl population dynamics: from teal to swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, David N.; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Schmutz, Joel A.; Rotella, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Waterfowl are among the best studied and most extensively monitored species in the world. Given their global importance for sport and subsistence hunting, viewing and ecosystem functioning, great effort has been devoted since the middle part of the 20th century to understanding both the environmental and demographic mechanisms that influence waterfowl population and community dynamics. Here we use comparative approaches to summarise and contrast our understanding ofwaterfowl population dynamics across species as short-lived as the teal Anas discors and A.crecca to those such as the swans Cygnus sp. which have long life-spans. Specifically, we focus on population responses to vital rate perturbations across life history strategies, discuss bottom-up and top-down responses of waterfowlpopulations to global change, and summarise our current understanding of density dependence across waterfowl species. We close by identifying research needs and highlight ways to overcome the challenges of sustainably managing waterfowl populations in the 21st century.

  2. The SWAN biomedical discourse ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Wu, Elizabeth; Wong, Gwen; Ocana, Marco; Kinoshita, June; Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim

    2008-10-01

    Developing cures for highly complex diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, requires extensive interdisciplinary collaboration and exchange of biomedical information in context. Our ability to exchange such information across sub-specialties today is limited by the current scientific knowledge ecosystem's inability to properly contextualize and integrate data and discourse in machine-interpretable form. This inherently limits the productivity of research and the progress toward cures for devastating diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. SWAN (Semantic Web Applications in Neuromedicine) is an interdisciplinary project to develop a practical, common, semantically structured, framework for biomedical discourse initially applied, but not limited, to significant problems in Alzheimer Disease (AD) research. The SWAN ontology has been developed in the context of building a series of applications for biomedical researchers, as well as in extensive discussions and collaborations with the larger bio-ontologies community. In this paper, we present and discuss the SWAN ontology of biomedical discourse. We ground its development theoretically, present its design approach, explain its main classes and their application, and show its relationship to other ongoing activities in biomedicine and bio-ontologies.

  3. First INTEGRAL observations of Cygnus X-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhu, O.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Zdziarski, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first INTEGRAL results on Cyg X-3 from the PV phase observations of the Cygnus region. The source was clearly detected by the JEM-X, ISGRI and SPI. The INTEGRAL observations were supported by simultaneous pointed RXTE observations. Their lightcurves folded over the 4.8 hour binary...

  4. Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Data: Investigator Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SWAN Coordinating Center provides SWAN data access to SWAN Investigators through the study website. The SWAN website provides access to longitudinal data...

  5. The Cocoon Shock of Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snios, Bradford; Kraft, Ralph P.; Nulsen, Paul; Wise, Michael W.

    2017-08-01

    Cygnus A is an archetype FRII radio galaxy and is the nearest powerful radio galaxy in the Universe. It is hosted by the central galaxy of a rich cluster, and X-ray observations of the system provide a unique opportunity to investigate the physical structure of a powerful radio galaxy as well as the galaxy's impact on the cluster host. My talk will cover our analysis of the recent deep exposure Chandra observations of Cygnus A's cocoon shock. The observational data is fitted with multiple models to assess the speed and strength of the cocoon shock to high accuracy. The results show that the shocked gas is driven with a generally uniform pressure, although a pressure difference of 30% is seen between the radio lobes. I will discuss implications of these findings on both the radio jet properties and the jet's interactions with its cluster atmosphere.

  6. Cygnus A at 8. 5 millimeter wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachenberg, O.; Furst, E.; Harth, W.; Steffen, P.; Wilson, W.; Hirth, W.

    1976-05-15

    The compact central component of Cygnus A was observed at 8.5 mm wavelength with the Effelsberg 100 m telescope. The flux was found to 1.8 +- 0.6 Jy. Including the spectral information already known, a flat or slightly increasing spectrum can be derived in the range from 5 GHz up to 35 GHz. If the measured radiation is interpreted as synchrotron emission, high values of the magnetic field strength and the (relatistic) electron density are needed. (AIP)

  7. Review of SOP's for Prodcutivity Surveys for EP tundra swans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report reviews the SOPs for productivity surveys of tundra swans to identify areas of improvement. An average of 18,700 swans has been surveyed in the Atlantic...

  8. Malheur NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Trumpeter Swan - Production

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The survey estimates recruitment of trumpeter swan on the refuge. The survey should be conducted in August and September, before migratory swans arrive on the Refuge...

  9. Demographic outcomes of diverse migration strategies assessed in a metapopulation of tundra swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Craig R; Meixell, Brandt W

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a prominent aspect of the life history of many avian species, but the demographic consequences of variable migration strategies have only infrequently been investigated, and rarely when using modern technological and analytical methods for assessing survival, movement patterns, and long-term productivity in the context of life history theory. We monitored the fates of 50 satellite-implanted tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) over 4 years from five disparate breeding areas in Alaska, and used known-fate analyses to estimate monthly survival probability relative to migration distance, breeding area, migratory flyway, breeding status, and age. We specifically tested whether migratory birds face a trade-off, whereby long-distance migrants realize higher survival rates at the cost of lower productivity because of reduced time on breeding areas relative to birds that migrate shorter distances and spend more time on breeding areas. Annual migration distances varied significantly among breeding areas (1020 to 12720 km), and were strongly negatively correlated with time spent on breeding areas (r = -0.986). Estimates of annual survival probability varied by wintering area (Pacific coast, Alaska Peninsula, and Eastern seaboard) and ranged from 0.79 (95%CI: 0.70-0.88) to 1.0, depending on criteria used to discern mortalities from radio failures. We did not find evidence for a linear relationship between migration distance and survival as swans from the breeding areas with the shortest and longest migration distances had the highest survival probabilities. Survival was lower in the first year post-marking than in subsequent years, but there was not support for seasonal differences in survival. Productivity varied among breeding populations and was generally inversely correlated to survival, but not migration distance or time spent on breeding areas. Tundra swans conformed to a major tenet of life history theory, as populations with the highest survival

  10. Audible Noise Design of ISS Cargo Module "Cygnus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destefanis, Stefano; Paron, Alberto; Bandini, Flavio

    2014-06-01

    Orbital developed the Cygnus advanced manoeuvring spacecraft to demonstrate cargo delivery services under a NASA Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Space Act Agreement.In addition to the COTS development and demonstration program, Orbital will utilize Cygnus to perform ISS resupply flights under the Commercial Resupply Service (CRS) contract.Starting in January 2014 Orbital launched its first of eight missions to deliver approximately 20,000 kilograms of cargo to the ISS (International Space Station). Cygnus will carry crew supplies, spares and scientific experiments to the ISS.Cygnus consists of a common service module and a pressurized cargo module. The pressurized cargo module is based on the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), developed by Thales Alenia Space for NASA. Since Cygnus pressurized cargo module will host astronauts performing daily tasks, it is required to be compliant with NASA guidelines related to acoustic comfort (working areas noise not to exceed NC-50 requirement) and safety (caution and warning alarms audibility).The main source of noise inside Cygnus is the ventilation fan, which happens to be the same model already installed on the ATV (Automated Transfer Vehicle) cargo module: however, the strategy adopted to limit its acoustic disturbance had to be differently tailored.This paper presents the activities (assumptions, design, characterization, testing) that led to define the type of noise control devices used on Cygnus, up to its first successful flight (module labelled "PCM0") to the ISS, where it reached 2nd place in the "quietest visiting modules" ranking.

  11. Identification of two novel reassortant avian influenza a (H5N6) viruses in whooper swans in Korea, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jipseol; Woo, Chanjin; Ip, Hon S.; An, Injung; Kim, Youngsik; Lee, Kwanghee; Jo, Seong-Deok; Son, Kidong; Lee, Saemi; Oem, Jae-Ku; Wang, Seung-Jun; Kim, Yongkwan; Shin, Jeonghwa; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Jheong, Weonhwa

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundOn November 20, 2016 two novel strains of H5N6 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIVs) were isolated from three whooper swans (Cygnus cygnus) at Gangjin Bay in South Jeolla province, South Korea. Identification of HPAIVs in wild birds is significant as there is a potential risk of transmission of these viruses to poultry and humans.ResultsPhylogenetic analysis revealed that Gangjin H5N6 viruses classified into Asian H5 clade 2.3.4.4 lineage and were distinguishable from H5N8 and H5N1 HPAIVs previously isolated in Korea. With the exception of the polymerase acidic (PA) gene, the viruses were most closely related to A/duck/Guangdong/01.01SZSGXJK005-Y/2016 (H5N6) (98.90 ~ 99.74%). The PA genes of the two novel Gangjin H5N6 viruses were most closely related to AIV isolates previously characterized from Korea, A/hooded crane/Korea/1176/2016 (H1N1) (99.16%) and A/environment/Korea/W133/2006 (H7N7) (98.65%). The lack of more recent viruses to A/environment/Korea/W133/2006 (H7N7) indicates the need for analysis of recent wild bird AIVs isolated in Korea because they might provide further clues as to the origin of these novel reassortant H5N6 viruses.ConclusionsAlthough research on the origins and epidemiology of these infections is ongoing, the most likely route of infection for the whooper swans was through direct or indirect contact with reassortant viruses shed by migratory wild birds in Korea. As H5N6 HPAIVs can potentially be transmitted to poultry and humans, continuous monitoring of AIVs among wild birds will help to mitigate this risk.

  12. Free Will, Black Swans and Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Ted; Wiers, Reinout W

    2017-01-01

    The current dominant perspective on addiction as a brain disease has been challenged recently by Marc Lewis, who argued that the brain-changes related to addiction are similar to everyday changes of the brain. From this alternative perspective, addictions are bad habits that can be broken, provided that people are motivated to change. In that case, autonomous choice or "free will" can overcome bad influences from genes and or environments and brain-changes related to addiction. Even though we concur with Lewis that there are issues with the brain disease perspective, we also argue that pointing to black swans can be important, that is: there can be severe cases where addiction indeed tips over into the category of brain disease, but obviously that does not prove that every case of addiction falls into the disease category, that all swans are black. We argue that, for example, people suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome, can be described as having a brain disease, often caused by alcohol addiction. Moreover, the brain changes occurring with addiction are related to choice-behaviour (and the related notions of willed action), habit formation and insight, hence essential mental abilities to break the addiction. We argue for a more graded perspective, where both black swans (severe brain disease which makes recovery virtually impossible) and white swans (unaffected brain) are rare, and most cases of addiction come as geese in different shades of gray.

  13. The Cygnus region of the galaxy: A VERITAS perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstein A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cygnus-X star-forming region (“Cygnus” is the richest star-forming region within 2 kpc of Earth and is home to a wealth of potential cosmic ray accelerators, including supernova remnants, massive star clusters, and pulsar wind nebulae. Over the past five years, discoveries by several gamma-ray observatories sensitive in different energy bands, including the identification by Fermi-LAT of a potential cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays, have pinpointed this region as a unique laboratory for studying the early phases of the cosmic ray life cycle. From 2007 to 2009 VERITAS, a very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV observatory in southern Arizona, undertook an extensive survey of the Cygnus region from 67 to 82 degrees Galactic longitude and from −1 to 4 degrees in Galactic latitude. In the years since, VERITAS has continued to accumulate data at specific locations within the survey region. We will review the discoveries and insights that this rich dataset has already provided. We will also consider the key role that we expect these data to play in interpreting the complex multiwavelength picture we have of the Cygnus region, particularly in the vicinity of the Cygnus cocoon. As part of this discussion we will summarize ongoing studies of VERITAS data in the Cygnus region, including the development of new data analysis techniques that dramatically increase VERITAS' sensitivity to sources on scales larger than a square degree.

  14. XMM-Newton observations of CYGNUS X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Miller, Jon

    2005-01-01

    Observations of Cygnus X-1 were first attempted under this program in the spring of 2004, but were complicated by instrumental flaring problems. Successful observations were completed in the fall of 2004, and processed data were delivered to the PI in the winter and spring of 2005. Thus, focused work on this data was only possible starting in 2005. A preliminary reduction and analysis of data from the EPIC CCD cameras and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer has been made. The EPIC spectra reveal the best example of a broadened, relativistic iron emission line yet found in Cygnus X-1. The Oxygen K-shell region has been shown to be a very complex wavelength range in numerous spectra of accreting sources, but the RGS spectra reveal this region in great detail and will be important in understanding the wind from the 0-type donor star that is focused onto the black hole in Cygnus X-1.

  15. SWANS: A Prototypic SCALE Criticality Sequence for Automated Optimization Using the SWAN Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, E.

    2001-01-11

    SWANS is a new prototypic analysis sequence that provides an intelligent, semi-automatic search for the maximum k{sub eff} of a given amount of specified fissile material, or of the minimum critical mass. It combines the optimization strategy of the SWAN code with the composition-dependent resonance self-shielded cross sections of the SCALE package. For a given system composition arrived at during the iterative optimization process, the value of k{sub eff} is as accurate and reliable as obtained using the CSAS1X Sequence of SCALE-4.4. This report describes how SWAN is integrated within the SCALE system to form the new prototypic optimization sequence, describes the optimization procedure, provides a user guide for SWANS, and illustrates its application to five different types of problems. In addition, the report illustrates that resonance self-shielding might have a significant effect on the maximum k{sub eff} value a given fissile material mass can have.

  16. Population, behavioural and physiological responses of an urban population of black swans to an intense annual noise event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Catherine J; Jessop, Tim S; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Johnstone, Michele; Feore, Megan; Mulder, Raoul A

    2012-01-01

    Wild animals in urban environments are exposed to a broad range of human activities that have the potential to disturb their life history and behaviour. Wildlife responses to disturbance can range from emigration to modified behaviour, or elevated stress, but these responses are rarely evaluated in concert. We simultaneously examined population, behavioural and hormonal responses of an urban population of black swans Cygnus atratus before, during and after an annual disturbance event involving large crowds and intense noise, the Australian Formula One Grand Prix. Black swan population numbers were lowest one week before the event and rose gradually over the course of the study, peaking after the event, suggesting that the disturbance does not trigger mass emigration. We also found no difference in the proportion of time spent on key behaviours such as locomotion, foraging, resting or self-maintenance over the course of the study. However, basal and capture stress-induced corticosterone levels showed significant variation, consistent with a modest physiological response. Basal plasma corticosterone levels were highest before the event and decreased over the course of the study. Capture-induced stress levels peaked during the Grand Prix and then also declined over the remainder of the study. Our results suggest that even intensely noisy and apparently disruptive events may have relatively low measurable short-term impact on population numbers, behaviour or physiology in urban populations with apparently high tolerance to anthropogenic disturbance. Nevertheless, the potential long-term impact of such disturbance on reproductive success, individual fitness and population health will need to be carefully evaluated.

  17. Population, behavioural and physiological responses of an urban population of black swans to an intense annual noise event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J Payne

    Full Text Available Wild animals in urban environments are exposed to a broad range of human activities that have the potential to disturb their life history and behaviour. Wildlife responses to disturbance can range from emigration to modified behaviour, or elevated stress, but these responses are rarely evaluated in concert. We simultaneously examined population, behavioural and hormonal responses of an urban population of black swans Cygnus atratus before, during and after an annual disturbance event involving large crowds and intense noise, the Australian Formula One Grand Prix. Black swan population numbers were lowest one week before the event and rose gradually over the course of the study, peaking after the event, suggesting that the disturbance does not trigger mass emigration. We also found no difference in the proportion of time spent on key behaviours such as locomotion, foraging, resting or self-maintenance over the course of the study. However, basal and capture stress-induced corticosterone levels showed significant variation, consistent with a modest physiological response. Basal plasma corticosterone levels were highest before the event and decreased over the course of the study. Capture-induced stress levels peaked during the Grand Prix and then also declined over the remainder of the study. Our results suggest that even intensely noisy and apparently disruptive events may have relatively low measurable short-term impact on population numbers, behaviour or physiology in urban populations with apparently high tolerance to anthropogenic disturbance. Nevertheless, the potential long-term impact of such disturbance on reproductive success, individual fitness and population health will need to be carefully evaluated.

  18. Canada goose kill statistics: Swan Lake Public Hunting Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document discusses how the flexible kill formula for Canada goose hunting at Swan Lake Public Hunting Area was reached. Methods used to collect Canada goose...

  19. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) manages multiple water management units. Silver Lake is the largest unit that is utilized primarily as a water storage...

  20. Narrative Report : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September - December 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Swan Lake NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  2. Primitive Weapons Deer Hunt Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge [Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting activity and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Swan...

  3. The swans and geese of Alaska's arctic slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A mid-summer aerial search was made on the 23,000 square miles of waterfowl habitat on Alaska's Arctic slope. Observations included 159 whistling swan (Olor...

  4. SWAN: a Service for Interactive Analysis in the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Piparo, Danilo; Mato, Pere; Mascetti, Luca; Moscicki, Jakub; Lamanna, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    SWAN (Service for Web based ANalysis) is a platform to perform interactive data analysis in the cloud. SWAN allows users to write and run their data analyses with only a web browser, leveraging on the widely-adopted Jupyter notebook interface. The user code, executions and data live entirely in the cloud. SWAN makes it easier to produce and share results and scientific code, access scientific software, produce tutorials and demonstrations as well as preserve analyses. Furthermore, it is also a powerful tool for non-scientific data analytics. This paper describes how a pilot of the SWAN service was implemented and deployed at CERN. Its backend combines state-of-the-art software technologies with a set of existing IT services such as user authentication, virtual computing infrastructure, mass storage, file synchronisation and sharing, specialised clusters and batch systems. The added value of this combination of services is discussed, with special focus on the opportunities offered by the CERNBox service and it...

  5. [Disease Prevention and Control Plan Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Disease Prevention and Control Plan for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge provides background information on disease surveillance; an inventory of Refuge...

  6. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2001 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  7. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  8. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  9. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  10. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  11. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  12. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  13. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  14. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  15. Grassland Management Plan : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Grassland Management Plan for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge provides an overview of the Refuge, a list of special considerations affecting grassland...

  16. Narrative Report : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September - December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Discovery of a Radio Transient in Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.; Carilli, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    We report the detection of a new radio source close to the nucleus of Cygnus A. Observations taken with the Very Large Array at frequencies between 8-20 GHz in July 2015, and between 20-50 GHz in August 2016, reveal a point source at the following location (J2000): RA = 19:59:28.32385 Dec = +40:44:01.9165 The source is detected at all frequencies and cleanly resolved from the Cygnus A nucleus; the separation is 0.395" (=430 pc). The positional accuracy (as registered against the nucleus) is approximately 3 mas. The flux density of this source is 4 mJy at 10 GHz, with a spectral index of alpha ~ -0.2 (F_nu ~ nu^alpha).

  18. Veritas observations of the microquasar Cygnus X-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Berger, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Chen, X.; Federici, S. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W.; Feng, Q. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: avarlott@purdue.edu, E-mail: cui@purdue.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration) and; Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; and others

    2013-12-20

    We report results from TeV gamma-ray observations of the microquasar Cygnus X-3. The observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) over a time period from 2007 June 11 to 2011 November 28. VERITAS is most sensitive to gamma rays at energies between 85 GeV and 30 TeV. The effective exposure time amounts to a total of about 44 hr, with the observations covering six distinct radio/X-ray states of the object. No significant TeV gamma-ray emission was detected in any of the states, nor with all observations combined. The lack of a positive signal, especially in the states where GeV gamma rays were detected, places constraints on TeV gamma-ray production in Cygnus X-3. We discuss the implications of the results.

  19. INTEGRAL-RXTE observations of Cygnus X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Wilms, J.; Chernyakova, M.

    2003-01-01

    We present first results from contemporaneous observations of Cygnus X-1 with INTEGRAL and RXTE, made during INTEGRAL's performance verification phase in 2002 November and December. Consistent with earlier results, the 3-250 keV data are well described by Comptonization spectra from a Compton...... the 1.5 months spanned by our observations. Our results indicate a remarkable consistency among the independently calibrated detectors, with the remaining issues being mainly related to the flux calibration of INTEGRAL....

  20. The Massive Star Forming Region Cygnus OB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicholas James; Drake, J. J.; Drew, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the massive star forming Cygnus OB2. Cygnus OB2 is the northern hemisphere's most massive star forming region and hosts a tremendously rich and diverse stellar population, with thousands of OB stars. The strong and highly variable extinction in the direction of the association have hindered previous studies of the region, but recent deep photometric surveys in the optical and near-infrared are opening the region up for study. The appreciation of the pivotal status of Cyg OB2 has led to a number of recent ambitious surveys of the cluster and its setting within the Cygnus-X region at X-ray, infrared and radio wavelengths. Chandra X-ray observations of two fields in the center of the association reveal 1720 X-ray sources, which we have combined with optical and near-IR photometry from the IPHAS and UKIDSS surveys. Near-IR photometry reveals a stellar population with a spread of ages greater than previously thought, overturning the picture of coeval star formation in the region. The distribution of young sources in the region shows evidence for clustering and significant mass segregation, which we judge to be primordial given the cluster's age.

  1. Cygnus Code Simulation of Magnetoshell Aerocapture and Entry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Kirtley, David; Barnes, Dan; Slough, John

    2017-10-01

    A Magnetoshell Aerocapture and Entry System (MAC) is a novel concept for planetary atmospheric entry, which enables both manned and planetary deep space orbiter space missions that are difficult with present day technologies. The MAC uses a low-beta dipole plasma magnetoshell to produce a drag effect on the spacecraft through the collisional interactions between the entry atmospheric neutrals and the confined plasma in the magnetoshell, creating a dynamic and controllable plasma parachute for entry. To understand the performance and the behavior of the MAC, the Cygnus 2D Hall MHD code is used for this study. The Cygnus code is a 2D Hall MHD code with coupled external circuits, which has been originally developed for studying FRC formation, translation, merging, and compression. In this study, the Cygnus code is modified to support the MAC geometry with a simplified plasma-neutral model that accounts for electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange to simulate the collisional interaction processes for the MAC.

  2. When is the Swan Knight not the Swan Knight? 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Alastair

    2017-01-01

    Berthold von Holle wrote three thirteenth-century romances that straddle the boundary between Low and High German. This article addresses the challenges posed by his position on the northern perimeter of the medieval German literary canon. It argues against a reductive focus on Arthurian romance...... when contextualizing Berthold, describing instead an apparent reworking of the Swan Knight story in Demantin. The article thereby reassesses Berthold’s significance, proposing that research on European literatures would be better able to deal with such authors if it deployed an abstract concept...... of literary space alongside approaches that focus on the material world and manuscript transmission....

  3. Water‐Data Report 3936360931115 SILVER LAKE AT SWAN LAKE NWR, WEST LEVEE, 2014-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — WATER MONITORING STATION ANALYSIS – CALENDAR YEAR 2014 to 2016 SITE NUMBER: 393636093111501 SITE NAME: Silver Lake at Swan Lake NWR, West Levee COOPERATION: Swan...

  4. 50 CFR 20.107 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for tundra swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tundra swans. 20.107 Section 20.107 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.107 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for tundra swans. This section provides for the annual hunting of tundra swans in designated portions of the 48 contiguous United...

  5. Black swans and dragon kings: A unified model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-09-01

    The term “black swan” is a metaphor for outlier events whose statistics are characterized by Pareto's Law and by Zipf's Law; namely, statistics governed by power-law tails. The term “dragon king” is a metaphor for a singular outlier event which, in comparison with all other outlier events, is in a league of its own. As an illustrative example consider the wealth of a family that is sampled at random from a medieval society: the nobility constitutes the black-swan category, and the royal family constitutes the dragon-king category. In this paper we present and analyze a dynamical model that generates, universally and jointly, black swans and dragon kings. According to this model, growing from the microscopic scale to the macroscopic scale, black swans and dragon kings emerge together and invariantly with respect to initial conditions.

  6. INTELLIGENT INPUT/OUTPUT CONTROLLER FOR CYGNUS COMPUTER

    OpenAIRE

    LUIS FERNANDO VIEIRA GOMES

    1992-01-01

    O sistema Cygnus é um computador multiprocessador de memória compartilhada e estrutura modular desenvolvido pelos departamentos de Energia Elétrica e Informática da PUC/RJ. Este trabalho tem como objetivo a introdução de um novo controlador de acesso a discos e impressora. Este controlador é baseado no microprocessador 68010 e utiliza técnicas de implementação de memórias cachê de disco em um ambiente de multiprogramação onde processos, através de tr...

  7. Physical parameters of the visible component of Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, O. E.; Bychkova, L. V.; Kopylov, I. M.; Kumajgorodskaya, R. N.

    1984-02-01

    The physical parameters of the supergiant HDE 226868, the visible component of Cygnus X-1, are refined by quantitative spectral methods from spectral material obtained on the six-meter telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory, USSR Academy of Sciences. The values of the spectral class, effective temperature, radius, luminosity, and acceleration of gravity are determined and their variation with the phase of the orbital period are revealed; the mass of the visible component of the system is determined as 37.6 + or - 1.5 solar masses and the rate of mass loss is estimated as (1.5 - 2) x 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr.

  8. Susan swan and the female grotesque Susan swan and the female grotesque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Bornéo Funck

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics. Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics.

  9. Einstein observations of selected regions of the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, P. A.; Kahn, S. M.; Mckee, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    The imaging proportional counter on the Einstein X-ray Observatory is used to obtain high quality soft X-ray maps of two 40 x 40 arcmin regions of the Cygnus Loop. One region covers the western shock front; the other is centered on the southern diffuse extension. After careful correction for background and detector gain variations these two regions were subdivided for X-ray spectral analysis. In both cases the spectra of the brightest X-ray emitting areas are characterized by temperatures of about 2 million K, whereas the spectra of the fainter diffuse regions are indicative of higher temperatures (T greater than about 4 million K) and suggest the presence of a second, hard component. These results, together with the correlation of the X-ray spatial distribution with the optical and radio maps, are discussed in terms of current models of supernova remnant evolution. The evidence suggests that the Cygnus Loop is the result of a Type II supernova of a star of initial mass of less than about 20 solar masses.

  10. Instabilities and Turbulence in a Cygnus Loop Shock Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John

    2017-08-01

    The [O III] emission in old supernova remnants takes the form of long, crisp filaments, while the H alpha and [S II] emission is frothy and clumpy. That indicates that instabilities in cooling gas behind the shock produce strong turbulence. This very rapid generation of turbulence is not considered in the picture of global turbulence in the ISM, and it amplifies magnetic fields and boosts the energy of cosmic rays. It can also affect the overall emission spectrum of the shocked gas in ways not considered in the 1D models used to interpret spectra of SNRs, HH objects and AGN. We propose to quantify and understand the mechanism for generating turbulence by obtaining narrow band WFC3 images and STIS UV and optical spectra to complement an existing Heritage mosaic of WFC3 images of the western Cygnus Loop (Veil Nebula). This is a unique opportunity to fully characterize the post-shock flow in a supernova remnant shock because the Cygnus Loop is nearby and nearly unreddened. It is crucial both for the understanding of turbulence and for interpreting the spectra of unresolved shocks in more distant SNRs, in AGN and in HH objects.

  11. Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM) Flight Inertial Load Static Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Giovanni; Mancini, Simone; Palmieri, Paolo; Rutigliano, Luigi

    2012-07-01

    Cygnus PCM Flight Inertial Load Static Test campaign has been performed by Thales Alenia Space - Italy (TAS-I) to achieve the Static Qualification of its Primary Structure. A “Proto-flight Approach” has been followed (as per [1] and [2]), thus the first flight unit, the PCM0, has been tested up to qualification level (qualification/acceptance factor equivalent to 1.2 [1]). The PCM0 has been constrained to a dummy Service Module (the second member of Cygnus Spacecraft), representative in terms of interfaces provisions, and flight load conditions have been reproduced with proper forces that have been applied by means of hydraulic jacks at internal PCM secondary structure interfaces. Test load cases have been defined in order to simulate load paths and relevant stress fields associated to the worst flight load conditions by using the FE model analyses. Tests have been monitored by means of gauges and displacement transducers and results have been utilized to correlate the PCM FEM following [3] requirements.

  12. The use of a wave boundary layer model in SWAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    2017-01-01

    A Wave Boundary Layer Model (WBLM) is implemented in the third-generation ocean wave model SWAN to improve the wind-input source function under idealized, fetch-limited condition. Accordingly, the white capping dissipation parameters are re-calibrated to fit the new wind-input source function...

  13. The black swan the impact of the highly improbable

    CERN Document Server

    Taleb, Nassim Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    A black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: It is unpredictable; it carries a massive impact; and, after the fact, we concoct an explanation that makes it appear less random, and more predictable, than it was. The astonishing success of Google was a black swan; so was 9/11. For Nassim Nicholas Taleb, black swans underlie almost everything about our world, from the rise of religions to events in our own personal lives. Why do we not acknowledge the phenomenon of black swans until after they occur? Part of the answer, according to Taleb, is that humans are hardwired to learn specifics when they should be focused on generalities. We concentrate on things we already know and time and time again fail to take into consideration what we don’t know. We are, therefore, unable to truly estimate opportunities, too vulnerable to the impulse to simplify, narrate, and categorize, and not open enough to rewarding those who can imagine the “impossible.” For years, Taleb has studi...

  14. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkably, an astronomical black hole is completely described by the two numbers that specify its mass and its spin. Knowledge of spin is crucial for understanding how, for example, black holes produce relativistic jets. Recently, it has become possible to measure the spins of black holes by focusing on the very inner region of an accreting disk of hot gas orbiting the black hole. According to General Relativity (GR), this disk is truncated at an inner radius 1 that depends only on the mass and spin of the black hole. We measure the radius of the inner edge of this disk by fitting its continuum X-ray spectrum to a fully relativistic model. Using our measurement of this radius, we deduce that the spin of Cygnus X-1 exceeds 97% of the maximum value allowed by GR.

  15. Subaru spectroscopy and spectral modeling of Cygnus A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, Matthew J.; Perlman, Eric S. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Nikutta, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Packham, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, 1 UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Elitzur, Moshe [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. República 252, Santiago (Chile); Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levenson, N. A. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Radomski, James T. [SOFIA/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Calle Luis Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-06-10

    We present high angular resolution (∼0.''5) MIR spectra of the powerful radio galaxy, Cygnus A (Cyg A), obtained with the Subaru telescope. The overall shape of the spectra agree with previous high angular resolution MIR observations, as well as previous Spitzer spectra. Our spectra, both on and off nucleus, show a deep silicate absorption feature. The absorption feature can be modeled with a blackbody obscured by cold dust or a clumpy torus. The deep silicate feature is best fit by a simple model of a screened blackbody, suggesting that foreground absorption plays a significant, if not dominant, role in shaping the spectrum of Cyg A. This foreground absorption prevents a clear view of the central engine and surrounding torus, making it difficult to quantify the extent the torus attributes to the obscuration of the central engine, but does not eliminate the need for a torus in Cyg A.

  16. X-ray line emission from the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, S. M.; Charles, P. A.; Bowyer, S.; Blissett, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The HEAO 1 satellite has observed the X-ray spectrum of the Cygnus Loop in the 0.1-2.0 keV band. The observed count-rate spectrum is deconvolved by the Kahn and Blissett technique to demonstrate conclusively the presence of oxygen- and iron-line emission between 0.6 and 0.9 keV. The spectrum has been fitted with single- and two-component Raymond-Smith plasma emission models. The best-fit dominant X-ray temperature is approximately 3,200,000 K, and the best-fit interstellar column density is approximately a few times 10 to the 20th/sq cm.

  17. Forecasting, Foresight and Strategic Planning for Black Swans

    OpenAIRE

    Kostas Nikolopoulos; F. Petropoulos

    2015-01-01

    In this research essay we propose a methodological innovation through: a) advocating for the broader use of OR forecasting tools and in specific intermittent demand estimators for forecasting black and grey swans, as a simpler, faster and quite robust alternative to econometric probabilistic methods like EVT; b) demonstrating the use in such a context of a rather popular forecasting paradigm: the Naive method (forecasting short horizons) and the SBA method (foresight long horizons) through th...

  18. Financial black swans driven by ultrafast machine ecology

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Neil; Hunsader, Eric; Meng, Jing; Ravindar, Amith; Carran, Spencer; Tivnan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Society's drive toward ever faster socio-technical systems, means that there is an urgent need to understand the threat from 'black swan' extreme events that might emerge. On 6 May 2010, it took just five minutes for a spontaneous mix of human and machine interactions in the global trading cyberspace to generate an unprecedented system-wide Flash Crash. However, little is known about what lies ahead in the crucial sub-second regime where humans become unable to respond or intervene sufficiently quickly. Here we analyze a set of 18,520 ultrafast black swan events that we have uncovered in stock-price movements between 2006 and 2011. We provide empirical evidence for, and an accompanying theory of, an abrupt system-wide transition from a mixed human-machine phase to a new all-machine phase characterized by frequent black swan events with ultrafast durations (<650ms for crashes, <950ms for spikes). Our theory quantifies the systemic fluctuations in these two distinct phases in terms of the diversity of the...

  19. Evidence for a TDE Origin for the Radio Transient in Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael W.; de Vries, Martijn; Rowlinson, Antonia; Nulsen, Paul; Snios, Bradford; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana

    2017-08-01

    Recently new JVLA observations by Perley et al. (2017) have revealed evidence for a luminous radio transient at a projected distance of 0.46 kpc from the nucleus of Cygnus A. Based on data taken between 1989 and 2016, the flux density of this radio transient has risen from an upper limit of <0.5 mJy to 4 mJy at a frequency of 8.5 GHz. Additional VLBA observations at 8 GHz by the same authors confirm this transient source to be compact (<4 pc) and coinciding with a source seen previously in optical and NIR images. Perley et al. (2017) have interpreted this source to be a secondary supermassive black hole in a close orbit around the Cygnus A nucleus. Several explanations have been proposed for the turn-on of the Cygnus A-2 transient over the 9 year timeframe including variability in the accretion onto this secondary BH and alternatively a possible tidal disruption event (TDE).We present the results of a new X-ray analysis utilizing new and archival data from the Chandra and Swift satellites. Cygnus A has been observed multiple times by Chandra between 2000, 2005, and 2015-2017. The Swift satellite performed 9 observations of Cygnus A between 2006 and 2017. Based on these observations, we present evidence for a decline in the flux of the Cygnus A nucleus, with the soft X-ray flux (0.3-1.2 keV) showing a drop by a factor of 2 between 2000 and 2005. The Swift observations confirm the X-ray emission from the Cygnus A continued to fade after 2006. As the radio source was last undetected in 1997, these data constrain the peak of the X-ray emission and the likely onset of brightening in the radio to a window of 3 years or less. This timescale implies a very rapid onset of accretion onto the secondary black hole and strongly favors the TDE interpretation for the origin of the Cygnus A-2 radio transient. Chandra images of the 3 kpc x 3 kpc region around the Cygnus A nucleus show clear evidence for an extended region of soft X-ray emission dimming on this timescale, which we

  20. Parallaxes and proper motions of interstellar masers toward the Cygnus X star-forming complex. I. Membership of the Cygnus X region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygl, K. L. J.; Brunthaler, A.; Sanna, A.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Honma, M.; Torstensson, K. J. E.; Fujisawa, K.

    2012-03-01

    Context. Whether the Cygnus X complex consists of one physically connected region of star formation or of multiple independent regions projected close together on the sky has been debated for decades. The main reason for this puzzling scenario is the lack of trustworthy distance measurements. Aims: We aim to understand the structure and dynamics of the star-forming regions toward Cygnus X by accurate distance and proper motion measurements. Methods: To measure trigonometric parallaxes, we observed 6.7 GHz methanol and 22 GHz water masers with the European VLBI Network and the Very Long Baseline Array. Results: We measured the trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of five massive star-forming regions toward the Cygnus X complex and report the following distances within a 10% accuracy: 1.30+0.07-0.07 kpc for W75N, 1.46+0.09-0.08 kpc for DR20, 1.50+0.08-0.07 kpc for DR21, 1.36+0.12-0.11 kpc for IRAS 20290+4052, and 3.33+0.11-0.11 kpc for AFGL 2591. While the distances of W 75N, DR 20, DR 21, and IRAS 20290+4052 are consistent with a single distance of 1.40 ± 0.08 kpc for the Cygnus X complex, AFGL 2591 is located at a much greater distance than previously assumed. The space velocities of the four star-forming regions in the Cygnus X complex do not suggest an expanding Strömgren sphere.

  1. Final report: Waterfowl activity and habitat use on the Swan Lake HREP Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We studied diurnal activity and habitat use patterns of waterfowl on Swan Lake in Calhoun County, IL during fall and spring migrations 1992-93. Swan Lake, a 1,255 ha...

  2. A hybrid version of swan for fast and efficient practical wave modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Genseberger (Menno); J. Donners

    2016-01-01

    htmlabstractIn the Netherlands, for coastal and inland water applications, wave modelling with SWAN has become a main ingredient. However, computational times are relatively high. Therefore we investigated the parallel efficiency of the current MPI and OpenMP versions of SWAN. The MPI version is

  3. Cardiac output monitoring by echocardiography: should we pass on Swan-Ganz catheters?

    OpenAIRE

    Perrino, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography offers a noninvasive technique for the continuous monitoring of cardiac performance. The combination of 2-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler velocitometry provide assessment of cardiac anatomy, valve function and, ventricular loading conditions. Although transesophageal echocardiography has become accepted for perioperative monitoring, it is typically used in conjunction with Swan-Ganz catheterization. To supplant Swan-Ganz catheters, an echocardiographi...

  4. THE MASS OF THE BLACK HOLE IN CYGNUS X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosz, Jerome A. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Narayan, Ramesh; Gou, Lijun [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Aufdenberg, Jason P. [Physical Sciences Department, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States); Remillard, Ronald A., E-mail: orosz@sciences.sdsu.edu, E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: reid@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: narayan@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: lgou@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aufded93@erau.edu, E-mail: rr@space.mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Cygnus X-1 is a binary star system that is comprised of a black hole and a massive giant companion star in a tight orbit. Building on our accurate distance measurement reported in the preceding paper, we first determine the radius of the companion star, thereby constraining the scale of the binary system. To obtain a full dynamical model of the binary, we use an extensive collection of optical photometric and spectroscopic data taken from the literature. By using all of the available observational constraints, we show that the orbit is slightly eccentric (both the radial velocity and photometric data independently confirm this result) and that the companion star rotates roughly 1.4 times its pseudosynchronous value. We find a black hole mass of M = 14.8 {+-} 1.0 M{sub Sun }, a companion mass of M{sub opt} = 19.2 {+-} 1.9 M{sub Sun }, and the angle of inclination of the orbital plane to our line of sight of i = 27.1 {+-} 0.8 deg.

  5. The reversibility of swan neck deformity in chronic atlantoaxial dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, Peter G; Wang, Shenglin; Zhao, Deng; Wang, Shaobai; Kozanek, Michal; Wang, Chao

    2013-04-01

    Prospective case series and radiographical analysis. This study aimed to characterize the changes in subaxial alignment after surgical correction of occipitoaxial kyphosis, establish normal parameters, and report on clinical outcomes in a population of patients with chronic atlantoaxial dislocation patients presenting with swan neck deformities. Swan neck deformity of the cervical spine is a term used to describe the simultaneous development of both abnormal kyphosis and hyperlordosis malalignments. Currently, there are no published series that discuss their outcomes after treatment and, more specifically, the subsequent changes that occur in the subaxial spine after the correction of the primary deformity in cases of chronic hyperkyphosis at the occipitoaxial segment. This was a prospective clinical and radiographical study in a population of patients with chronic atlantoaxial dislocation presenting with swan neck deformities. C0-C2 and C2-C7 angles were measured using plain radiographs pre- and postsurgery. The relationship between the alignment of the occipitoaxial joint and the subaxial cervical spine was evaluated. Japanese Orthopaedic Society scores were used to assess functional outcomes. C0-C2 improved from a mean of -14.4° (SD, 9.5°) preoperatively to a mean of 7.8° (SD, 1.0°) postoperatively (P = 0.02). C2-C7 changed from a mean of 43° (SD, 2.8°) to a mean of 18.6° (SD, 11.2°) postoperatively (P = 0.02). A significant correlation was detected between the changes that occurred in the upper and lower cervical alignments (R = 0.133; P atlantoaxial dislocation are favorable and associated with a low complication rate.

  6. Public history and mass incarceration: interview with Martha Swan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Martha; Rizzo, Mary

    2014-02-01

    Nonprofit human rights organization John Brown Lives! uses local and regional history as a tool to raise contemporary questions around racial injustice, inspired by the work of controversial abolitionist leader John Brown. In this interview, founder Martha Swan discusses how John Brown Lives! uses public history, from a series of community conversations around mass incarceration and drug laws to a traveling exhibit on voting rights in nineteenth century New York State, to encourage people to question the narrative of American history, the meaning of freedom, the role of policy in racial issues, and the connections between history and place.

  7. 10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, H. C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Time variability analyses have been applied to data composed of event times of X-rays emitted from the binary system Cygnus X-1 to search for unique black hole signatures. The X-ray data analyzed was collected at ten microsecond time resolution or better from two instruments, the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory (HEAO) A-1 detector and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA). HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA collected data from 1977--79 and from 1996 on with energy sensitivity from 1--25 keV and 2--60 keV, respectively. Variability characteristics predicted by various models of an accretion disk around a black hole have been searched for in the data. Drop-offs or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier power spectra are expected from some of these models. The Fourier spectral technique was applied to the HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA data with careful consideration given for correcting the Poisson noise floor for instrumental effects. Evidence for a drop-off may be interpreted from the faster fall off in variability at frequencies greater than the observed breaks. Both breaks occur within the range of Keplerian frequencies associated with the inner edge radii of advection-dominated accretion disks predicted for Cyg X-1. The break between 10--20 Hz is also near the sharp rollover predicted by Nowak and Wagoner`s model of accretion disk turbulence. No QPOs were observed in the data for quality factors Q > 9 with a 95% confidence level upper limit for the fractional rms amplitude at 1.2% for a 16 M⊙ black hole.

  8. The RMI Space Weather and Navigation Systems (SWANS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnant, Rene; Lejeune, Sandrine; Wautelet, Gilles; Spits, Justine; Stegen, Koen; Stankov, Stan

    The SWANS (Space Weather and Navigation Systems) research and development project (http://swans.meteo.be) is an initiative of the Royal Meteorological Institute (RMI) under the auspices of the Belgian Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (STCE). The RMI SWANS objectives are: research on space weather and its effects on GNSS applications; permanent mon-itoring of the local/regional geomagnetic and ionospheric activity; and development/operation of relevant nowcast, forecast, and alert services to help professional GNSS/GALILEO users in mitigating space weather effects. Several SWANS developments have already been implemented and available for use. The K-LOGIC (Local Operational Geomagnetic Index K Calculation) system is a nowcast system based on a fully automated computer procedure for real-time digital magnetogram data acquisition, data screening, and calculating the local geomagnetic K index. Simultaneously, the planetary Kp index is estimated from solar wind measurements, thus adding to the service reliability and providing forecast capabilities as well. A novel hybrid empirical model, based on these ground-and space-based observations, has been implemented for nowcasting and forecasting the geomagnetic index, issuing also alerts whenever storm-level activity is indicated. A very important feature of the nowcast/forecast system is the strict control on the data input and processing, allowing for an immediate assessment of the output quality. The purpose of the LIEDR (Local Ionospheric Electron Density Reconstruction) system is to acquire and process data from simultaneous ground-based GNSS TEC and digital ionosonde measurements, and subsequently to deduce the vertical electron density distribution. A key module is the real-time estimation of the ionospheric slab thickness, offering additional infor-mation on the local ionospheric dynamics. The RTK (Real Time Kinematic) status mapping provides a quick look at the small-scale ionospheric effects on the RTK

  9. Discovery of carbon radio recombination lines in absorption towards Cygnus A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Asgekar, A.; White, G. J.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Brentjens, M.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Conway, J. E.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; van Enst, J.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Jackson, N. J.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Klijn, W.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J. P.; Mevius, M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mol, J. D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schwarz, D.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    We present the first detection of carbon radio recombination line absorption along the line of sight to Cygnus A. The observations were carried out with the Low Frequency Array in the 33-57 MHz range. These low-frequency radio observations provide us with a new line of sight to study the diffuse,

  10. THE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN THE NEARBY MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION CYGNUS OB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarcello, M. G.; Drake, J. J.; Wright, N. J.; Hora, J. L.; Aldcroft, T.; Fruscione, A.; Kashyap, V. L. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS-67, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Drew, J. E. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Gutermuth, R. A. [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Naylor, T.; King, R. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alvarez, D. [Dpto. de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-08-20

    The formation of stars in massive clusters is one of the main modes of the star formation process. However, the study of massive star-forming regions is hampered by their typically large distances to the Sun. One exception to this is the massive star-forming region Cygnus OB2 in the Cygnus X region, at the distance of {approx}1400 pc. Cygnus OB2 hosts very rich populations of massive and low-mass stars, being the best target in our Galaxy to study the formation of stars, circumstellar disks, and planets in the presence of massive stars. In this paper, we combine a wide and deep set of photometric data, from the r band to 24 {mu}m, in order to select the disk-bearing population of stars in Cygnus OB2 and identify the class I, class II, and stars with transition and pre-transition disks. We selected 1843 sources with infrared excesses in an area of 1 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 1 Degree-Sign centered on Cyg OB2 in several evolutionary stages: 8.4% class I, 13.1% flat-spectrum sources, 72.9% class II, 2.3% pre-transition disks, and 3.3% transition disks. The spatial distribution of these sources shows a central cluster surrounded by an annular overdensity and some clumps of recent star formation in the outer region. Several candidate subclusters are identified, both along the overdensity and in the rest of the association.

  11. Anomalous radio-loudness of Cygnus A and other powerful radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, PD; Arnaud, KA

    1996-01-01

    The nearby, extremely powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A stands out as having an atypically low far-infrared/radio luminosity ratio. It is demonstrated that in objects displaying such a low ratio the radio-loudness is anomalously high, which fact is connected to these objects inhabiting dense X-ray

  12. A Far-Ultraviolet Study of the Cygnus Loop Using the VOYAGER Ultraviolet Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancura, Olaf; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Holberg, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the Voyager 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometers to study the far-ultraviolet emissions from different types of shock waves in the Cygnus Loop. In the southeast and northern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR), we have measured the O(VI) lambda1035 surface brightness from the main blast wave. This value is several times below the average and more than one order of magnitude below the peak O(VI) brightness in the SNR as measured with Voyager. A simple blast wave model appears able to reproduce the observations in the southeast and the northern parts of the Cygnus Loop but can only account for 10%-15% of the total O(VI) emission from the Cygnus Loop. The brightest O(VI) and C(III) lambda977 emission is found coincident with optical filamentation and X-ray enhancements in the northeast. We interpret the observations in the northeast in terms of nonradiative and incomplete shocks whose surface area rises in the optical filamentary regions. We conclude that the bulk of the O(VI) emission from the Cygnus Loop arises from optically bright clouds within which intermediate-velocity (200 + 50 km/s) nonradiative and incomplete shocks are widespread.

  13. 75 FR 30422 - Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Chariton County, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ..., 2006). For more about the initial process and the history of this refuge, see that notice. Swan Lake... photography, and environmental education and interpretation. CCP Alternatives and Our Preferred Alternative...

  14. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report for January - April 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report begins with Refuge...

  16. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  17. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  18. Report on a Cannon Net Trap Workshop Held at Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a report of material covered during a workshop on cannon net trapping and banding held at the Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Sumner, Missouri,...

  19. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  20. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  1. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  2. Whistling swan dyeing program, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, fall, 1961-spring, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the whistling swan dyeing program on Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, in the fall of 1961 to trap birds which, owing to the absence of food in...

  3. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge trumperter swan translocation project : Issues/action items

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Background information and current issues regarding the trumpeter swan translocation project at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge. Major issues include harvesting of...

  4. 1977-1984 Canada Goose Necropsy Data from Swan Lake NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Collection of data sheets detailing necropsy results from Canada Geese carcasses found at Swan Lake NWR. The data sheets give detailed reports on what was found...

  5. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  6. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an...

  7. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  8. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2008 fiscal year. The report begins with a summary of the...

  9. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1997-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1997-2007 calendar years. The report begins with a...

  10. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  11. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report for January - April 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Tundra swan populations, productivity, and local movements on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, northwest Alaska, 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the monitoring of populations and production of tundra swans on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in 1985 as part of a long-term study. Radio...

  13. Swan River National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report begins with Refuge...

  14. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report for January - April 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  16. [Swan Song: The Advent of the Psychotic Nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Fernando Muñoz

    2012-09-01

    Different forms of artistic expression, such as literature and cinema, constitute an inexhaustible source for the study of mental illness. The use of psychodynamic models may contribute to a better understanding of the spectrum between personality disorders and the psychosis spectrum, thus enriching the phenomenological approach in the psychiatric clinical practice. To examine from psychodynamic standpoints the main character of the American film Black Swan, and the nature of her psychotic symptoms. Reviewing of sources and relevant theoretical currents. Analysis shows the usefulness of a psychodynamically- oriented dimensional model for understanding the so-called psychotic breaks as well as the applicability of psychoanalytic psychosis theories in general psychiatric practice, as they may provide a more flexible clinical approach, closer to the patient's subjective experience. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Society environmental economic benefits of swan-labelled workwear service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Dall, Ole; Thomsen, Henning

    2011-01-01

    was funded and published by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency 2009-2011. The assessment illustrates the problems to find reliable documentation for the environmental performance of eco-labelled versus conventional products. The assessment mainly focuses on the use-phase since this has been proven......This paper presents an environmental and socio-economic comparison of textile supply of workwear with and without the Nordic Swan labelling scheme. The study is part of a project for development of a methodology for the environmental and socio-economic comparison for product groups. The study...... to be the most important part of the lifecycle. For the use-phase a significant difference in environmental performance can be demonstrated between the European average figures and the figures for the Danish company providing the ecolabelled service. By application of the developed methodology this difference...

  18. Diet and nutrition of western rock lobsters, Panulirus cygnus, in shallow coastal waters: the role of habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalist consumers often have diets that vary considerably over time and space, which reflects changes in resource availability. Predicting diets of consumers can therefore be difficult. The western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus, is an omnivorous generalist consumer that uses ...

  19. Compensatory growth in an aquatic plant mediates exploitative competition between seasonally tied herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Bert; Nolet, Bart A; De Boer, Thujs; De Vries, Peter P; Klaassen, Marcel

    2009-07-01

    The degree to which vertebrate herbivores exploitatively compete for the same food plant may depend on the level of compensatory plant growth. Such compensation is higher when there is reduced density-dependent competition in plants after herbivore damage. Whether there is relief from competition may largely be determined by the life-history stage of plants under herbivory. Such stage-specific compensation may apply to seasonal herbivory on the clonal aquatic plant sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus L.). It winters in sediments of shallow lakes as tubers that are foraged upon by Bewick's Swans (Cygnus columbianus bewickii Yarrell), whereas aboveground biomass in summer is mostly consumed by ducks, coots, and Mute Swans. Here, tuber predation may be compensated due to diminished negative density dependence in the next growth season. However, we expected lower compensation to summer herbivory by waterfowl and fish as density of aboveground biomass in summer is closely related to photosynthetic carbon fixation. In a factorial exclosure study we simultaneously investigated (1) the effect of summer herbivory on aboveground biomass and autumn tuber biomass and (2) the effect of tuber predation in autumn on aboveground biomass and tuber biomass a year later. Summer herbivory strongly influenced belowground tuber biomass in autumn, limiting food availability to Bewick's Swans. In contrast, tuber predation in autumn by Bewick's Swans had a limited and variable effect on P. pectinatus biomass in the following growth season. Whereas relief from negative density dependence largely eliminates effects of belowground herbivory by swans, aboveground herbivory in summer limits both above- and belowground plant biomass. Hence, there was an asymmetry in exploitative competition, with herbivores in summer reducing food availability for belowground herbivores in autumn, but not the other way around.

  20. Cygnus X-3 transition from the ultrasoft to the hard state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Belanger, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The nature of Cygnus X-3 is still not understood well. This binary system might host a black hole or a neutron star. Recent observations by INTEGRAL have shown that Cygnus X- 3 was again in an extremely ultrasoft state. Here we present our analysis of the transition from the ultrasoft state....... During the ultrasoft state, the soft X-ray spectrum is well-described by an absorbed (NH = 1.5 x 10(22) cm(-2)) black body model, whereas the X-ray spectrum above 20 keV appears to be extremely low and hard (Gamma similar or equal to 1.7). During the transition, the radio flux rises to a level of > 1 Jy...

  1. Fussy feeders: phyllosoma larvae of the Western Rocklobster (Panulirus cygnus) demonstrate prey preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Megan I; Thompson, Peter A; Jeffs, Andrew G; Säwström, Christin; Sachlikidis, Nikolas; Beckley, Lynnath E; Waite, Anya M

    2012-01-01

    The Western Rocklobster (Panulirus cygnus) is the most valuable single species fishery in Australia and the largest single country spiny lobster fishery in the world. In recent years a well-known relationship between oceanographic conditions and lobster recruitment has become uncoupled, with significantly lower recruitment than expected, generating interest in the factors influencing survival and development of the planktonic larval stages. The nutritional requirements and wild prey of the planktotrophic larval stage (phyllosoma) of P. cygnus were previously unknown, hampering both management and aquaculture efforts for this species. Ship-board feeding trials of wild-caught mid-late stage P. cygnus phyllosoma in the eastern Indian Ocean, off the coast of Western Australia, were conducted in July 2010 and August-September 2011. In a series of experiments, phyllosoma were fed single and mixed species diets of relatively abundant potential prey items (chaetognaths, salps, and krill). Chaetognaths were consumed in 2-8 times higher numbers than the other prey, and the rate of consumption of chaetognaths increased with increasing concentration of prey. The highly variable lipid content of the phyllosoma, and the fatty acid profiles of the phyllosoma and chaetognaths, indicated they were from an oligotrophic oceanic food chain where food resources for macrozooplankton were likely to be constrained. Phyllosoma fed chaetognaths over 6 days showed significant changes in some fatty acids and tended to accumulate lipid, indicating an improvement in overall nutritional condition. The discovery of a preferred prey for P. cygnus will provide a basis for future oceanographic, management and aquaculture research for this economically and ecologically valuable species.

  2. Fussy feeders: phyllosoma larvae of the Western Rocklobster (Panulirus cygnus demonstrate prey preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan I Saunders

    Full Text Available The Western Rocklobster (Panulirus cygnus is the most valuable single species fishery in Australia and the largest single country spiny lobster fishery in the world. In recent years a well-known relationship between oceanographic conditions and lobster recruitment has become uncoupled, with significantly lower recruitment than expected, generating interest in the factors influencing survival and development of the planktonic larval stages. The nutritional requirements and wild prey of the planktotrophic larval stage (phyllosoma of P. cygnus were previously unknown, hampering both management and aquaculture efforts for this species. Ship-board feeding trials of wild-caught mid-late stage P. cygnus phyllosoma in the eastern Indian Ocean, off the coast of Western Australia, were conducted in July 2010 and August-September 2011. In a series of experiments, phyllosoma were fed single and mixed species diets of relatively abundant potential prey items (chaetognaths, salps, and krill. Chaetognaths were consumed in 2-8 times higher numbers than the other prey, and the rate of consumption of chaetognaths increased with increasing concentration of prey. The highly variable lipid content of the phyllosoma, and the fatty acid profiles of the phyllosoma and chaetognaths, indicated they were from an oligotrophic oceanic food chain where food resources for macrozooplankton were likely to be constrained. Phyllosoma fed chaetognaths over 6 days showed significant changes in some fatty acids and tended to accumulate lipid, indicating an improvement in overall nutritional condition. The discovery of a preferred prey for P. cygnus will provide a basis for future oceanographic, management and aquaculture research for this economically and ecologically valuable species.

  3. Dragon-Kings, Black-Swans and Prediction (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.

    2010-12-01

    Extreme fluctuations or events are often associated with power law statistics. Indeed, it is a popular belief that "wild randomness'' is deeply associated with distributions with power law tails characterized by small exponents. In other words, power law tails are often seen as the epitome of extreme events (the "Black Swan'' story). Here, we document in very different systems that there is life beyond power law tails: power laws can be superseded by "dragon-kings'', monster events that occur beyond (or changing) the power law tail. Dragon-kings reveal hidden mechanisms that are only transiently active and that amplify the normal fluctuations (often described by the power laws of the normal regime). The goal of this lecture is to catalyze the interest of the community of geophysicists across all fields of geosciences so that the "invisible gorilla" fallacy may be avoided. Our own research illustrates that new statistics or representation of data are often necessary to identify dragon-kings, with strategies guided by the underlying mechanisms. Paradoxically, the monsters may be ignored or hidden by the use of inappropriate analysis or statistical tools that amount to cut a mamooth in small pieces, so as to lead to the incorrect belief that only mice exist. In order to stimulate further research, we will document and discuss the dragon-king phenomenon on the statistics of financial losses, economic geography, hydrodynamic turbulence, mechanical ruptures, avalanches in complex heterogeneous media, earthquakes, and epileptic seizures. The special status of dragon-kings open a new research program on their predictability, based on the fact that they belong to a different class of their own and express specific mechanisms amplifying the normal dynamics via positive feedbacks. We will present evidence of these claims for the predictions of material rupture, financial crashes and epileptic seizures. As a bonus, a few remarks will be offered at the end on how the dragon

  4. Carbon, Helium, and Proton Kinetic Temperatures in a Cygnus Loop Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.

    2015-06-01

    Observations of SN 1006 have shown that ions and electrons in the plasma behind fast supernova remnant shock waves are far from equilibrium, with the electron temperature much lower than the proton temperature and ion temperatures approximately proportional to ion mass. In the ˜360 km s-1shock waves of the Cygnus Loop, on the other hand, electron and ion temperatures are roughly equal, and there is evidence that the oxygen kinetic temperature is not far from the proton temperature. In this paper, we report observations of the He ii λ1640 line and the C iv λ1550 doublet in a 360 km s-1shock in the Cygnus Loop. While the best-fit kinetic temperatures are somewhat higher than the proton temperature, the temperatures of He and C are consistent with the proton temperature and the upper limits are 0.5 and 0.3 times the mass-proportional temperatures, implying efficient thermal equilibration in this collisionless shock. The equilibration of helium and hydrogen affects the conversion between proton temperatures determined from Hα line profiles and shock speeds, and the efficient equilibration found here reduces the shock speed estimates and the distance estimate to the Cygnus Loop of Medina et al. to about 800 pc.

  5. Discovery of a Pulsar Wind Nebula Candidate in the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We report on a discovery of a diffuse nebula containing a point-like source in the southern blowout region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. The X-ray spectra from the nebula and the point-like source are well represented by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices of 2.2+/-0.1 and 1.6+/-0.2, respectively. The photon indices as well as the flux ratio of F(sub nebula)/F(sub point-like) approx. 4 lead us to propose that the system is a pulsar wind nebula, although pulsations have not yet been detected. If we attribute its origin to the Cygnus Loop supernova, then the 0.5-8 keV luminosity of the nebula is computed to be 2.1x10(exp 31)(d/540pc)(exp 2)ergss/2, where d is the distance to the Loop. This implies a spin-down loss-energy E approx. 2.6x10(exp 35)(d/540pc)(exp 2)ergs/s. The location of the neutron star candidate, approx.2deg away from the geometric center of the Loop, implies a high transverse velocity of approx.1850(theta/2deg)(d/540pc)(t/10kyr)/k/s assuming the currently accepted age of the Cygnus Loop.

  6. Long-term Results of Lateral Band Translocation for the Correction of Swan Neck Deformity in Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marije; van Vliet, Daphne C.; Smeulders, Mark J.; Kreulen, Mick

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of lateral band translocation for correcting swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Methods: Swan neck deformities of 62 fingers were corrected using a modified lateral band

  7. Feedback at the Working Surface : A Joint X-ray and Low-Frequency Radio Spectral Study of the Cocoon Shock in Cygnus A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Michael W.; Rafferty, D. A.; McKean, J. P.

    We report on preliminary results from a joint spectral analysis of the cocoon shock region in Cygnus A using deep archival Chandra data and new low-frequency radio data from LOFAR. Being both bright in X-rays and the most powerful radio source in the local universe, the FRII radio galaxy Cygnus A

  8. Risk, surprises and black swans fundamental ideas and concepts in risk assessment and risk management

    CERN Document Server

    Aven, Terje

    2014-01-01

    Risk, Surprises and Black Swans provides an in depth analysis of the risk concept with a focus on the critical link to knowledge; and the lack of knowledge, that risk and probability judgements are based on.Based on technical scientific research, this book presents a new perspective to help you understand how to assess and manage surprising, extreme events, known as 'Black Swans'. This approach looks beyond the traditional probability-based principles to offer a broader insight into the important aspects of uncertain events and in doing so explores the ways to manage them.

  9. Deep X-ray Observations of an Ongoing Merger and 400 Myr of AGN Activity in Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael W.; De Vries, Martijn; Nulsen, Paul; Snios, Bradford; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana; Duffy, Ryan; Halbesma, Timo; Donnert, Julius; Hardcastle, Martin

    2017-08-01

    We present a detailed spatial and spectral analysis of the large-scale X-ray emission associated with the merging cluster of galaxies containing the powerful Cygnus A radio galaxy. Using a new 1 Msec exposure from the ongoing Chandra XVP project, we have mapped the large-scale structure, temperature and abundance of the ICM in a 1 Mpc x 1 Mpc region surrounding Cygnus A. This new, deep exposure resolves unprecedented detail in the jets, lobes, and cocoon shock associated with Cygnus A, and provides new insights into the emission mechanisms that produce these features as well as implications for the ongoing activity of the central AGN. On larger scales, these new data reveal complex and dramatic temperature, pressure, entropy and metallicity structure in the ICM surrounding Cygnus A. We confirm the presence of large-scale X-ray emission associated with the two merging cluster components seen previously in lower resolution data. The temperature structure on the scale of the merger exhibits an asymmetric enhancement to the NW consistent with projected hotter gas from the merger shock. Using the derived density and temperature profiles in the two merging sub-cluster components as inputs, we have constructed a grid of hydro-dynamical simulations to constrain the geometry of the merger system. These models imply a pre-merger system with a 1:1 mass ratio at the virial radius with an inclination toward the line of sight of 35-45 deg. In addition to the merger-induced temperature asymmetry, we find evidence for additional surface brightness and temperature features indicative of previous outburst activity in Cygnus A over the past 400 Myr. Based on the location and strength of these features, we derive the energy associated with these previous outbursts and place constraints on the growth of the black hole in Cygnus A over that timescale.

  10. New Evidence for a Black Hole in the Compact Binary Cygnus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. Its known to consist of a massive. Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. Yet one of the most basic of pa.ranietern the mass of the compact object - is not known. Nor is it even clear whether its is a neutron star or a black hole. In this Paper we present our analysis of the broad-band high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship which has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than 4.2 solar mass thus clearly indicative of a black hole and as such resolving a longstanding issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a. range of recently published distance estimates constrains the compact object mass to lie between 4.2 solar mass and 14.4 solar mass. Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate is approx. l0 solar mass, with the. error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared-envelope evolutionary models of compact binaries. as well as establishing Cygnus X-3 as the first confirmed accretion-powered galactic gamma: ray source.

  11. NuSTAR and SUZAKU observations of the hard state in Cygnus X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, M. L.; Tomsick, J. A.; Miller, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broadband spectra....... to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low...

  12. An Investigation into PAH Destruction in Nearby Supernova Remnants, North Polar Spur and Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Sarah M.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2015-01-01

    Our goal in conducting this research was to look at the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/large dust grain emission intensity ratio in nearby supernova remnants to find evidence for selective PAH destruction by hot gas and high velocity shock waves within these regions, as predicted by the models of Arendt et al. (2010) and Micelotta et al. (2010a,b). Two supernova remnants were studied- the North Polar Spur (NPS) and the Cygnus Loop. The data for PAHs were obtained from the WISE W3 12 micron all-sky map processed by Meisner & Finkbeiner (2014), and the data for the larger grains come from the IRAS 100 micron all-sky map processed by Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998). After obtaining a control PAH/large grain intensity ratio of ~2.8 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) from two high latitude clouds, MBM 30 and MBM 32, we found that the intensity ratios across the NPS and Cygnus Loop were not far off- ~2.7 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) and ~3.1 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr), respectively- showing no evidence of selective large-scale PAH destruction in supernova remnants. The individual intensities for both PAHs and large grains do decrease inside the Cygnus Loop, however, suggesting a decrease in abundances of both grain types, which could mean total dust grain destruction with the normal ratios coming from foreground and background dust located in the line of sight of the remnant. In addition, temperature and E(B-V) measurements taken from calibrated IRAS images show that while the dust column density increases in the Eastern Veil of the Cygnus Loop, the dust temperature reaches a local maximum, indicating the heating of large grains by interaction with the hot gas in the remnant. The PAH/large grain ratio in the Eastern Veil does decrease and could be indicative of currently ongoing active grain destruction there, with the PAHs being destroyed on a more rapid timescale than the large grains.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF REU Program grant to the Department of Physics & Astronomy at

  13. Thermal and Non-thermal emission in the Jets and Lobes of Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Martijn; Wise, Michael; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Nulsen, Paul; Snios, Bradford; Hardcastle, Martin

    2017-08-01

    We present a spatially-resolved, spectral analysis aimed at detecting and characterizing the non-thermal X-ray emission from the jets and lobes in the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A based on a new, deep 1 Msec Chandra exposure. These jets and lobes are believed to be a primary means by which energy liberated by accretion onto the central supermassive black hole is transported into the outer galaxy and are integral to understanding the mechanisms that drive AGN feedback. Despite being well-studied over the years, we still do not understand how this energy is transported, the connection between the X-ray and radio structures, and the underlying emission mechanisms that produce them. The X-ray jets in Cygnus A show a clear misalignment with the radio and it has been proposed that they are either inverse Compton-emitting relics or a separate electron population emitting X-ray synchrotron emission. Previous X-ray studies of the jets and lobes have been unsuccessful in distinguishing between these possibilities largely due to the difficulty of separating any non-thermal components from thermal emission in the surrounding hot ICM at CCD spectral resolutions.In this presentation, we report on a new statistical analysis using MCMC sampling and Bayesian model selection to characterize the X-ray emission in the jets and lobes of Cygnus A. The model includes a mixture of thermal ICM emission and distinct non-thermal components from both the eastern and western jets and lobes. Our analysis clearly favors the presence of non-thermal emission and we find a distinct asymmetry with the western lobe roughly 20% fainter and with a much steeper photon index. Combining existing radio data with our X-ray fluxes and photon indices, we determine the energy densities and pressures for both synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) emission models. For the IC model, we derive energy densities in the lobes consistent with the external pressure; however, both the eastern and western jets would be

  14. X-ray observations of the 1980 Cygnus X-1 'high state'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Masai, K.; Vallerga, J. V.; Cominsky, L. R.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Kruper, J. S.; Ricker, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of intensity transitions in the X-ray emission from the black-hole candidate Cygnus X-1 were made by the Hakucho satellite during the summer of 1980 and are reported here. In addition, the results of hard (20-120 keV) X-ray observations of Cyg X-1 are reported. These data were obtained during the 'high' intensity state by balloon-borne mercuric iodide detectors, and are compared with data obtained at similar energies approximately 1 month earlier (A. Sheepmaker et al., in preparation) during the 'low' intensity state.

  15. H-alpha Tracking in the Clusters NGC 659, NGC 663, and Cygnus OB-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Using the 1.2-m telescope of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory we developed a calibrated H-alpha index for monitoring both absorption and emission features. Photometric data was then obtained using the BYU West Mountain Observatory 0.9-m telescope and a specially designed set of filters to match the spectrophotometric system. This data covered from July 2013 to October 2014 on three star clusters; NGC 659, NGC 663, and Cygnus OB-2. In total there are over 40 nights of data. We will present our preliminary results from this data set.

  16. SWAN-Fly : A flexible cloud-enabled framework for context-aware applications in smartphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharath Das, R.; van Halteren, A.T.; Bal, H.E.

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are equipped with various hardware sensors to enrich the user experience. SWAN is a middleware framework that supports easy collection and processing of sensor data. However, the limited resources of the smartphones prevent the apps from supporting big data applications that need to

  17. Water‐Data Report 393556093132501 ELK CREEK NR SUMNER MO, DS ON SWAN LAKE REFUGE-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 390 35’ 56.0” N, long. 930 13’ 25” W, at Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillecothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is located near abandoned...

  18. Black swan risk management : The moderation effect of risk mitigation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q; Krikke, H.R.; Caniels, M.C.J.; Giannakis, M.; Johnsen, T.; Miemczyk, J.; Kamann, D.-J.; Bernardin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many scholars have discussed supply chain risk mitigation on operational risks, but less on rare, highly influential, and retrospective predictable risks, such as natural disasters, epidemics, and socio-political crises. They are Black Swan risks (Taleb, 2007). More than disrupting supply chains,

  19. SWAN-mud: engineering model for mud-induced wave damping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Wouter; Winterwerp, J.C.; de Boer, G.J.; Cornelisse, JM.; Zijlema, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a new dispersion relation and energy-dissipation equation obtained from a viscous two-layer model schematization in the state-of-the-art wave forecasting model SWAN to simulate wave damping in coastal areas by fluid mud deposits. This new dispersion

  20. The C3 Framework: One Year Later - an Interview with Kathy Swan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    On September 17, 2013 (Constitution Day), the C3 Framework was released under the title "The College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History." The C3 Project Director and lead writer was NCSS member Kathy Swan, who is…

  1. On the Development of an Operational SWAN Model for the Black Sea (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpinar, A.; Van Vledder, G.P.

    2013-01-01

    This poster describes the results of some studies performed on the development of an efficient and operational SWAN model for the Black Sea. This model will be used to study the wind-wave climate and wave energy potential in the region and will provide boundary conditions for coastal engineering and

  2. SWAN: NGC 253’s Nucleated Star Bursting Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Mark; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David; Momjian, Emmanuel; Walter, Fabian; Rand, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We present the first results from SWAN: Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby galaxies. Nearby galaxies are conveniently located to probe molecular gas properties on scales of 10 to 200 pc, which are appropriate for Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). The resolution of the VLA in D and C configurations maps to a few 10’s of parsecs in these galaxies. To advance studies of galaxy evolution it is paramount to understand how processes in the molecular ISM and star formation are linked on these scales. We have observed the metastable transitions of ammonia and the 22GHz water maser line in four nearby galaxies: NGC 253, IC 342, NGC 2146, and NGC 6946. These galaxies were chosen to span an order of magnitude in star formation rate, and a range of galactic ecosystems. We use the ammonia transitions to derive kinetic temperatures, which exposes the heating and cooling balance of the ISM. We then aim to relate these conditions to energetic feedback from star formation indicated by water masers. Currently our analysis is focused on NGC 253. NGC 253 is a barred spiral galaxy with a nucleated starburst of ≈3M⊙ per year. We have observed ammonia transitions (1,1) to (5,5) and the 22GHz water maser line with a resolution of ≈63pc. We have identified nine regions across the nucleated starburst for study. The ammonia (3,3) line appears to be masing in the centermost 200pc. In combination with Large Velocity Gradient models (LVG) we find that the properties of the molecular gas is warm, ranging from 100K to 160K, with molecular hydrogen densities from 2.2e3 cm-3 to 4.8e3 cm-3. We have identified two regions of water maser emission. The first region is a north south extension, about the center of the galaxy, with a major axis of ≈7”(150pc) and a minor axis of ≈3”(90pc), and the second is a nearby region ≈6”(100pc) to the southeast of the galaxy center. By means of these measurements, we gain an understanding of the molecular ISM associated with the nucleated

  3. Swan foraging shapes spatial distribution of two submerged plants, favouring the preferred prey species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsten, Håkan; Klaassen, Marcel

    2008-06-01

    Compared to terrestrial environments, grazing intensity on belowground plant parts may be particularly strong in aquatic environments, which may have great effects on plant-community structure. We observed that the submerged macrophyte, Potamogeton pectinatus, which mainly reproduces with tubers, often grows at intermediate water depth and that P. perfoliatus, which mainly reproduces with rhizomes and turions, grows in either shallow or deep water. One mechanism behind this distributional pattern may be that swans prefer to feed on P. pectinatus tubers at intermediate water depths. We hypothesised that when swans feed on tubers in the sediment, P. perfoliatus rhizomes and turions may be damaged by the uprooting, whereas the small round tubers of P. pectinatus that escaped herbivory may be more tolerant to this bioturbation. In spring 2000, we transplanted P. perfoliatus rhizomes into a P. pectinatus stand and followed growth in plots protected and unprotected, respectively, from bird foraging. Although swan foraging reduced tuber biomass in unprotected plots, leading to lower P. pectinatus density in spring 2001, this species grew well both in protected and unprotected plots later that summer. In contrast, swan grazing had a dramatic negative effect on P. perfoliatus that persisted throughout the summer of 2001, with close to no plants in the unprotected plots and high densities in the protected plots. Our results demonstrate that herbivorous waterbirds may play a crucial role in the distribution and prevalence of specific plant species. Furthermore, since their grazing benefitted their preferred food source, the interaction between swans and P. pectinatus may be classified as ecologically mutualistic.

  4. The isolation and characterization of a novel telomerase immortalized first trimester trophoblast cell line, Swan 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straszewski-Chavez, S L; Abrahams, V M; Alvero, A B; Aldo, P B; Ma, Y; Guller, S; Romero, R; Mor, G

    2009-11-01

    Studies using first trimester trophoblast cells may be limited by the inability to obtain patient samples and/or adequate cell numbers. First trimester trophoblast cell lines have been generated by SV40 transformation or similar methods, however, this approach is known to induce phenotypic and karyotypic abnormalities. The introduction of telomerase has been proposed to be a viable alternative for the immortalization of primary human cells. To investigate whether telomerase-induced immortalization might be a more feasible approach for the generation of first trimester trophoblast cell lines, we isolated primary trophoblast cells from a 7-week normal placenta and infected the cells with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Although this hTERT-infected first trimester trophoblast cell line, which we have named Swan 71, has been propagated for more than 100 passages, it still has attributes that are characteristic of primary first trimester trophoblast cells. The Swan 71 cells are positive for the expression of cytokeratin 7, vimentin and HLA-G, but do not express CD45, CD68 or the Fibroblast Specific Antigen (FSA), CD90/Thy-1. In addition, we also demonstrated that the Swan 71 cells secrete fetal fibronectin (FFN) as well as low levels of human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (hCG). Moreover, the Swan 71 cells exhibit a cytokine and growth factor profile that is similar to primary trophoblast cells and are resistant to Fas, but not TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. This suggests that the Swan 71 cells may represent a valuable model for future in vitro trophoblast studies.

  5. NuSTAR Observations of the Powerful Radio-Galaxy Cygnus A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Ogle, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A,focusing on the central absorbed active galactic nucleus (AGN). Cygnus A is embedded in a cool-core galaxy cluster, and hence we also examine archival XMM-Newton data to facilitate the decomposition of the spectrum into the AGN...... and intracluster medium (ICM) components. NuSTAR gives a source-dominated spectrum of the AGN out to >70keV. In gross terms, the NuSTAR spectrum of the AGN has the form of a power law (Γ~1.6-1.7) absorbed by a neutral column density of NH~1.6x1023 cm-2. However, we also detect curvature in the hard (>10ke......V (90% confidence). Interestingly, the absorbed power-law plus reflection modelleaves residuals suggesting the absorption/emission from a fast(15,000-26,000km/s), high column-density (NW>3x1023 cm-2), highly ionized (ξ~2,500 erg cm/s-1) wind. A second, even faster ionized wind component is also...

  6. Polarized mid-infrared synchrotron emission in the core of Cygnus A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Tadhunter, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Mason, R. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Perlman, E. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, E-39005 Cantabria (Spain); Ramos Almeida, C.; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Calle Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 Tenerife (Spain); Ichikawa, K. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Levenson, N. A. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Álvarez, C. A. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ramírez, E. A. [Universidade de São Paulo, IAG, Rua do Matão 1226, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Telesco, C. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 11205, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We present high-angular (∼0.''4) resolution mid-infrared (MIR) polarimetric observations in the 8.7 μm and 11.6 μm filters of Cygnus A using CanariCam on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. A highly polarized nucleus is observed with a degree of polarization of 11% ± 3% and 12% ± 3% and a position angle of polarization of 27° ± 8° and 35° ± 8° in a 0.''38 (∼380 pc) aperture for each filter. The observed rising of the polarized flux density with increasing wavelength is consistent with synchrotron radiation from the parsec-scale jet close to the core of Cygnus A. Based on our polarization model, the synchrotron emission from the parsec-scale jet is estimated to be 14% and 17% of the total flux density in the 8.7 μm and 11.6 μm filters, respectively. A blackbody component with a characteristic temperature of 220 K accounts for >75% of the observed MIR total flux density. The blackbody emission arises from a combination of (1) dust emission in the torus; and (2) diffuse dust emission around the nuclear region, but the contributions of the two components cannot be well-constrained in these observations.

  7. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole in Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-01-01

    The compact primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 was the first black hole to be established via dynamical observations. We have recently determined accurate values for its mass and distance, and for the orbital inclination angle of the binary. Building on these results, which are based on our favored (asynchronous) dynamical model, we have measured the radius of the inner edge of the black hole s accretion disk by fitting its thermal continuum spectrum to a fully relativistic model of a thin accretion disk. Assuming that the spin axis of the black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum vector, we have determined that Cygnus X-1 contains a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a* > 0.95 (3(sigma)). For a less probable (synchronous) dynamical model, we find a. > 0.92 (3 ). In our analysis, we include the uncertainties in black hole mass, orbital inclination angle, and distance, and we also include the uncertainty in the calibration of the absolute flux via the Crab. These four sources of uncertainty totally dominate the error budget. The uncertainties introduced by the thin-disk model we employ are particularly small in this case given the extreme spin of the black hole and the disk s low luminosity.

  8. Evidence of high-frequency/small-scale turbulence in the Cygnus region and anomalous Faraday rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2017-01-01

    Faraday effect - a common and useful probe of cosmic magnetic fields - is the result of magnetically-induced birefringence in plasmas causing rotation of the polarization plane of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave. Classically, the rotation angle scales with the wavelength as Δϕ =RMλ2 , where RM is the rotation measure. Although a typical RM in the Milky Way is of the order of a few hundred to a few thousand, a famous Cygnus region shows anomalously small, even negative rotation measures. Moreover, Faraday rotation measurements seem to be inconsistent with the standard λ2-law. We argue that fast micro-turbulence can cause this anomaly. We demonstrate that electromagnetic high-frequency and/or small-scale fluctuations can lead to effective plasma collisionality by scattering electrons over pitch-angle. We show that such quasi-collisionality radically alters Faraday rotation and other radiative transport properties, e.g., absorption, transmission and reflection. Thus, we explain the Cygnus puzzle by anomalous Faraday rotation in a thin ``blanket'' of highly turbulent plasma at the front of an interstellar bubble/shock. Supported by DOE grant DE-SC0016368.

  9. Visual Observation and Measurements of 33 so far Unconfirmed Tycho Double Stars in Cygnus with 2 Arcseconds Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Wilfried

    2017-04-01

    As already reported (Knapp and Gould 2016), most Tycho Double Star objects in the WDS catalog are unconfirmed. From the huge number of in total nearly 1000 TDS/TDT objects in the Cygnus constellation, all unconfirmed pairs (per beginning of 2016) listed with 2" separation were visually observed and measured based on CCD images.

  10. The Reflection Component from Cygnus X-1 in the Soft State Measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Nowak, Michael A.; Parker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late-2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ~1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power-law, and reflection components along...

  11. The Soft State of Cygnus X-1 Observed With NuSTAR: A Variable Corona and a Stable Inner Disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Madsen, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    , we construct a model incorporating both the standard disk-corona continuum and relativistic reflection from the accretion disk, based on prior work on Cygnus X-1, and apply this model to each epoch independently. We find excellent consistency for the black hole spin and the iron abundance...

  12. Status report of the 1989 Survey of Hunter Activity and Harvest on the Swan Lake Public Hunting Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A half-day hunting restriction for the Swan Lake Public Hunting Area (SLPHA) has been recommended to- improve goose use of food resources within hunting zones. The...

  13. Water Data Analysis 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTSMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2013-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — WATER MONITORING STATION ANALYSIS – CALENDAR YEAR 2013 TO 2016 SITE NUMBER: 394031093062801 SITE NAME: Elk Creek nr Rothville MO, Stutman Rd US of Swan Lake NWR...

  14. Water Data Analysis 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2013-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — WATER MONITORING STATION ANALYSIS – CALENDAR YEAR 2013 to 2016 SITE NUMBER: 393937093090901 SITE NAME: Turkey Creek nr Sumner MO, Fulbright Rd COOPERATION: Swan Lake...

  15. Water Data Analysis 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2013-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — WATER MONITORING STATION ANALYSIS – CALENDAR YEAR 2013 to 2016 SITE NUMBER: 393937093090901 SITE NAME: Turkey Creek nr Sumner MO, Fulbright Rd COOPERATION: Swan Lake...

  16. The Trumpeter, Company 424 Civilian Conservation Corps Camp Redington in Swan Quarter, North Carolina; October Issue, Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a historic monthly report of Camp Redington Civilian Conservation Corps located in Swan Quarter, North Carolina. It describes the progress and...

  17. Chewing Lice of Swan Geese (Anser cygnoides): New Host-Parasite Associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.

    2016-01-01

    Chewing lice (Phthiraptera) that parasitize the globally threatened swan goose Anser cygnoides have been long recognized since the early 19th century, but those records were probably biased towards sampling of captive or domestic geese due to the small population size and limited distribution of ...... domestic or captive animals may provide biased information on the occurrence, prevalence, host selection, and host-ectoparasite interactions from those on wild hosts.......Chewing lice (Phthiraptera) that parasitize the globally threatened swan goose Anser cygnoides have been long recognized since the early 19th century, but those records were probably biased towards sampling of captive or domestic geese due to the small population size and limited distribution...

  18. Gender equity programmes in academic medicine: a realist evaluation approach to Athena SWAN processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Louise; Wyatt, David; Fudge, Nina; Mattingley, Helena; Williamson, Catherine; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-09-08

    Gender inequity has persisted in academic medicine. Yet equity is vital for countries to achieve their full potential in terms of translational research and patient benefit. This study sought to understand how the gender equity programme, Athena SWAN, can be enabled and constrained by interactions between the programme and the context it is implemented into, and whether these interactions might produce unintended consequences. Multimethod qualitative case studies using a realist evaluation approach. 5 departments from a university medical school hosting a Translational Research Organisation. 25 hours of observations of gender equality committee meetings, 16 in-depth interviews with Heads of Departments, Committee Leads and key personnel involved in the initiative. 4 focus groups with 15 postdoctoral researchers, lecturers and senior lecturers. The implementation of Athena SWAN principles was reported to have created social space to address gender inequity and to have highlighted problematic practices to staff. However, a number of factors reduced the programme's potential to impact gender inequity. Gender inequity was reproduced in the programme's enactment as female staff was undertaking a disproportionate amount of Athena SWAN work, with potential negative impacts on individual women's career progression. Early career researchers experienced problems accessing Athena SWAN initiatives. Furthermore, the impact of the programme was perceived to be undermined by wider institutional practices, national policies and societal norms, which are beyond the programme's remit. Gender equity programmes have the potential to address inequity. However, paradoxically, they can also unintentionally reproduce and reinforce gender inequity through their enactment. Potential programme impacts may be undermined by barriers to staff availing of career development and training initiatives, and by wider institutional practices, national policies and societal norms. Published by the

  19. Lessons in Adaptability and Preparing for Black Swan Risks from the Military and Hedge Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    U.S. forces.50 Getting bureaucracy to loosen up to enable adaptability is difficult, especially with the federal government’s regulatory labyrinth ...this at a time when both men were in essential jobs, one running the entire war and the other operating from the shadows to defeat the most...for Black Swan Risks from the Military and Hedge Funds William R. Burns, Jr. Drew Miller Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  20. The influence of drought-induced acidification on the biotic recovery of Swan Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnott, S.E. [York Univ., Dorset, ON (Canada) Dept. of Biology; Yan, N.; Nicholls, K. [Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Dorset, ON (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide emissions from Sudbury smelters have been reduced from greater than 2.2 million t/year in the 1960s, to less than 0.3 million t/year since1994, as a result of changes in industrial practices that were developed in accordance with government emission control regulations. In response, sulfate concentrations have decreased in hundreds of Sudbury area lakes and both alkalinity and pH values have risen. In some cases the pH changes were enough to begin to restore damaged biotic assemblages. There is no current understanding of how short term, drought- induced acidification effects affect the recovery of biota from historical acidification. A study was undertaken to determine if the biota of Swan Lake were recovering as water quality improved during the early to mid-1980s and to determine if the drought-driven acidification event influenced this recovery. As well, investigators wanted to determine if changes in the recovery patterns of planktonic algae, rotifers, and Crustacea in Swan Lake coincided with the 1988 re-acidification event. The plankton of Swan Lake began to recover from acid stress during the early 1980s as did the rotifer community, but, in contrast to the algae and rotifers, the crustacean zooplankton was both slow to recover and incomplete in the early 1980s. The slow pace of recovery in Swan Lake was probably not attributable to an absence of potential colonists. The drought-induced re-acidification of the lake had a dramatic effect in biological recovery through a multitude of factors. Reasons for expected plankton communities decline and unexpected Crustacean communities increases are speculated about. 52 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Polarized Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, P.; Rodriquez, J.; Wilms, J.; Bel, M. Cadolle; Pottschmidt, K.; Grinberg, V.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their inherently high flux allowing the detection of clear signals, black hole X-ray binaries are interesting candidates for polarization studies, even if no polarization signals have been observed from them before. Such measurements would provide further detailed insight into these sources' emission mechanisms. We measured the polarization of the gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-I with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope. Spectral modeling ofthe data reveals two emission mechanisms: The 250-400 keY data are consistent with emission dominated by Compton scattering on thermal electrons and are weakly polarized. The second spectral component seen in the 400keV-2MeV band is by contrast strongly polarized, revealing that the MeV emission is probably related to the jet first detected in the radio band.

  2. Anatomy of a cosmic-ray neutrino source and the Cygnus X-3 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Harding, A. K.; Barnard, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of an intense beam of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from a compact object in the Cygnus X-3 binary system hitting the companion star, and of the subsequent production of secondary neutrinos, are examined. A maximum allowable beam luminosity of about 10 to the 42nd erg/s is found for a system containing a 1-10 solar mass main sequence target star. The proton beam must heat a relatively small area of the target star to satisfy observational constraints on the resulting stellar wind. With such a model, the neutrino to gamma-ray flux ratio of about 1000 can result from a combination of gamma-ray absorption and a large neutrino to gamma-ray duty cycle ratio. It is found that the high density of the atmosphere resulting from compression by the beam leads to pion cascading and a neutrino spectrum peaking at 1-10 GeV energies.

  3. Faraday rotation measure variations in the Cygnus region and the spectrum of interstellar plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, T. Joseph; Spangler, Steven R.; Cordes, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear polarization observations were made of eight double-lobed radio galaxies viewed through the galactic plane in the Cygnus region. These observations have been used to determine intra- and intersource rotation measure differences; in some cases, unambiguous rotation measures have been extracted. The rotation measures are dominated by foreground magnetoionic material. The differences in rotation measure between pairs of sources correlate with angular separation for separations from 10 arcsec to 1.5 deg. These rotation measure fluctuations are consistent with a model in which the electron density varies on roughly 0.1-200 pc scales. The amplitudes of these variations are, in turn, consistent with those electron density variations that cause diffractive interstellar scattering on scales less than 10 to the 11th cm.

  4. Black Swans and Many Worlds: Contemporary models in music, the arts and ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Black Swans and Many Worlds are new models to help explain musical structures, and by extension, events in the social environment and in internal human experience. Many Worlds takes its departure point from quantum physics, and especially the work of Hugh Everett III, who used the defining point of a measurement in the sub-atomic world as initiating alternative courses of action. Everett extrapolated this idea to the macro-world: a defining point may initiate multiple outcomes, each with its own character and events, as parallel worlds. One application of this model is to consider musical works within a genre as Many Worlds. Black Swans derive from Nassim Taleb, who proposes that social, political, and in fact all aspects of today’s world are not understandable by logical processes or incremental change but are often rocked by extreme, unpredictable shocks. If Many Worlds provide new ways of thinking about potentiality, probability and innovation, Black Swans arrest us in our tracks by eruptions that threaten to derail contemporary life, and with it, music, the arts and ideas.

  5. Implementing Lumberjacks and Black Swans Into Model-Based Tools to Support Human-Automation Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Angelia; Wickens, Christopher D

    2017-03-01

    The objectives were to (a) implement theoretical perspectives regarding human-automation interaction (HAI) into model-based tools to assist designers in developing systems that support effective performance and (b) conduct validations to assess the ability of the models to predict operator performance. Two key concepts in HAI, the lumberjack analogy and black swan events, have been studied extensively. The lumberjack analogy describes the effects of imperfect automation on operator performance. In routine operations, an increased degree of automation supports performance, but in failure conditions, increased automation results in more significantly impaired performance. Black swans are the rare and unexpected failures of imperfect automation. The lumberjack analogy and black swan concepts have been implemented into three model-based tools that predict operator performance in different systems. These tools include a flight management system, a remotely controlled robotic arm, and an environmental process control system. Each modeling effort included a corresponding validation. In one validation, the software tool was used to compare three flight management system designs, which were ranked in the same order as predicted by subject matter experts. The second validation compared model-predicted operator complacency with empirical performance in the same conditions. The third validation compared model-predicted and empirically determined time to detect and repair faults in four automation conditions. The three model-based tools offer useful ways to predict operator performance in complex systems. The three tools offer ways to predict the effects of different automation designs on operator performance.

  6. Optical and X-Ray Observations of the Western Edge of the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, N. A.; Graham, J. R.; Hester, J. J.; Petre, R.; Raymond, J. C.

    1994-12-01

    The western edge of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant provides an important opportunity to study blast wave--interstellar cloud interactions. On the western edge of the Loop is an extensive coherent network of bright optical filaments from fast radiative shocks. This region is unique within the Cygnus Loop, because the remnant appears to be running into a large molecular cloud in this direction. To study this interaction we have obtained deep wide-field optical line images and X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager. The optical data show a variety of shocks, including non-radiative Balmer-line filaments, incomplete shocks, and shocks with complete cooling and recombination zones. The ROSAT-HRI data show bright, sharply limb-brightened X-rays confined behind the edge of the shock front delineated by the optical filaments. The Einstein-IPC data at this location has been interpreted as an enhancement due to thermal evaporation (Charles et al. 1985). Comparison of the optical and X-ray data sugests that the western limb geometry is simple. If there is evaporation, it must occur across a surface defined by a radiative shock, which contains very strong, highly ordered magnetic fields aligned in the plane of the shock. An alternative explanation for the coincidence of the bright X-rays and the radiative filaments is that compression of the post-blast wave gas by a reverse shock results in increased brightness. In either case, because of the simple geometry in this region, the X-ray emission behind the blast wave offers perhaps the clearest evidence of the structure of the post-blast wave medium in any middle-aged remnant. Charles, P. A., Kahn, S. M., and McKee, C. F. 1985 ApJ 295 456

  7. Shocked and Scorched: Free-Floating Evaporating Gas Globules and Star Formation in Cygnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, M. J.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-05-01

    We report molecular line observations of a new class of Free-floating Evaporating Gas Globules with tadpole shapes (i.e., FrEGGs), recently discovered in the Cygnus star-forming region. We serendipitously found two of these in an HST imaging survey, including one of the most prominent members of this class (IRAS20324+4057: the Tadpole). Our molecular-line observations, carried out with the Arizona Radio Observatory's mm-wave telescopes, include on-the-fly maps in the CO and 13CO J=2-1 lines as well as pointed observations in the J=3-2 line of the high-density tracers HCO+ and N2H+. These data show the presence of dense molecular cores with total masses of cold molecular gas exceeding one to a few Msun in almost all FrEGGs. Our radio continuum imaging of 3 FrEGGs, as well as Halpha images from the IPHAS survey reveal bright photo-ionized peripheries around these objects. We infer that FrEGGs are dense, star-forming molecular cores that originated in the Cygnus cloud and are now being photoevaporated by the ultraviolet radiation field of the Cyg OB2 cluster, and shaped by the ram pressure of strong wind sources. The extended tails in some of the largest objects show wiggles likely resulting from Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities. We find evidence for non-thermal radio emission in the Tadpole, with the radio emission peaking strongly along the shock/ionization front at its head, possibly as a result of a compressed magnetic layer in this front that is interacting with cosmic rays associated with the Cyg OB2 association.

  8. Search for very high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-1 with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Bhattacharyya, W.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Ishio, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Kuveždić, D.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Maggio, C.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Minev, M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moreno, V.; Moretti, E.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Ninci, D.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Righi, C.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Sitarek, J.; Šnidarić, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres-Albà, N.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Zarić, D.; MAGIC Collaboration; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Pooley, G. G.; Trushkin, S. A.; Zanin, R.

    2017-12-01

    The microquasar Cygnus X-1 displays the two typical soft and hard X-ray states of a black hole transient. During the latter, Cygnus X-1 shows a one-sided relativistic radio-jet. Recent detection of the system in the high energy (HE; E ≳ 60 MeV) gamma-ray range with Fermi-LAT associates this emission with the outflow. Former MAGIC observations revealed a hint of flaring activity in the very high-energy (VHE; E ≳ 100 GeV) regime during this X-ray state. We analyse ∼97 h of Cygnus X-1 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes between July 2007 and October 2014. To shed light on the correlation between hard X-ray and VHE gamma rays as previously suggested, we study each main X-ray state separately. We perform an orbital phase-folded analysis to look for variability in the VHE band. Additionally, to place this variability behaviour in a multiwavelength context, we compare our results with Fermi-LAT, AGILE, Swift-BAT, MAXI, RXTE-ASM, AMI and RATAN-600 data. We do not detect Cygnus X-1 in the VHE regime. We establish upper limits for each X-ray state, assuming a power-law distribution with photon index Γ = 3.2. For steady emission in the hard and soft X-ray states, we set integral upper limits at 95 per cent confidence level for energies above 200 GeV at 2.6 × 10-12 photons cm-2 s-1 and 1.0 × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1, respectively. We rule out steady VHE gamma-ray emission above this energy range, at the level of the MAGIC sensitivity, originating in the interaction between the relativistic jet and the surrounding medium, while the emission above this flux level produced inside the binary still remains a valid possibility.

  9. A New Polarimetric Study of Cygnus A Using JVLA from 2-18GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerato Sebokolodi, Makhuduga; Perley, Rick; Carilli, Chris; Smirnov, Oleg M.; Makhathini, Sphesihle

    2018-01-01

    Polarimetric studies of Cygnus A [5, 1, 2, 3] have shown that this radio galaxy has unusually large rotation measures ranging from -4000 to +3000 rad m -2 for the eastern lobe (E-lobe) and -2000 to +1300 rad m -2 for western lobe(W-lobe). A challenge since then has been to identify the medium(s) responsible for these high Faraday rotations (FR). Although a majority of the FR must arise from the surrounding cluster gas, an unknown portion may arise either in the sheath or within the lobes. In these cases, some depolarization must result, along with a non λ 2 rotation of the plane of polarization. Detecting such a depolarization will enable an estimate of the internal (and/or sheath) thermal gas density. [1] found significant depolarization associated with the inner regions of the E-lobe and no depolarization associated with the W-lobe. This depolarization could be either internal to the source (Faraday depolarization) or due to unresolved small-scale fluctuations in the foreground screen (beam depolarization) [1]. The former is expected to impose significant deviations in the λ2 -law, none of which have been found to date, nor could have been found due to the limited number of frequencies employed in these studies.Since 2015, new JVLA polarimetric observations of Cygnus A have been taken, in all four configurations, covering the frequency range from 2 to 18GHz. These new data provide thousands of frequency channels at high resolution and sensitivity – opening a new opportunity to study in great detail the physics of the jets, lobes and the magnetic field of the X-ray cluster medium and lobes. Our objective is to analyze these new polarimetric data with the expectation of extending the previous work and more importantly, to investigate the possibility of any significantdeviations from the λ2-law. Initial analysis shows significant deviations from λ2 -law associated with the W-lobe. We will present these results in detail, and also the results from RM

  10. SWAN: An expert system with natural language interface for tactical air capability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    SWAN is an expert system and natural language interface for assessing the war fighting capability of Air Force units in Europe. The expert system is an object oriented knowledge based simulation with an alternate worlds facility for performing what-if excursions. Responses from the system take the form of generated text, tables, or graphs. The natural language interface is an expert system in its own right, with a knowledge base and rules which understand how to access external databases, models, or expert systems. The distinguishing feature of the Air Force expert system is its use of meta-knowledge to generate explanations in the frame and procedure based environment.

  11. The queering of Swan Lake: a new male gaze for the performance of sexual desire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Kent G

    2003-01-01

    This essay argues that, by re-gendering the ballet classic Swan Lake, choreographer Matthew Bourne has also queered it. He thrusts center stage an unstable relationship between two male characters, and in so doing, de-centers the conventionally fixed categories of sex, gender and sexual desire. He also forces a long-simmering relationship between homosexuality and dance out of the closet and into mainstream popular culture. Applying Mulvey's theory of spectatorship and Butler's theory of gendered performance, the essay describes how viewers may be intrigued, rather than repulsed, by the ambiguities surrounding Bourne's portrayal of sexual identity.

  12. Sea level variability influencing coastal flooding in the Swan River region, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliot, Matt

    2012-02-01

    Coastal flooding refers to the incidence of high water levels produced by water level fluctuations of marine origin, rather than riverine floods. An understanding of the amplitude and frequency of high water level events is essential to foreshore management and the design of many coastal and estuarine facilities. Coastal flooding events generally determine public perception of sea level phenomena, as they are commonly associated with erosion events. This investigation has explored the nature of coastal flooding events affecting the Swan River Region, Western Australia, considering water level records at four sites in the estuary and lower river, extending from the mouth of the Swan River to 40 km upstream. The analysis examined the significance of tides, storms and mean sea level fluctuations over both seasonal and inter-annual time scales. The relative timing of these processes is significant for the enhanced or reduced frequency of coastal flooding. These variations overlie net sea level rise previously reported from the coastal Fremantle record, which is further supported by changes to the distribution of high water level events at an estuarine tidal station. Seasonally, coastal flooding events observed in the Swan River region are largely restricted to the period from May to July due to the relative phases of the annual mean sea fluctuation and biannual tidal cycle. Although significant storm surge events occur outside this period, their impact is normally reduced, as they are superimposed on lower tidal and mean sea level conditions. Over inter-annual time scales tide, storminess and mean sea level produce cycles of enhanced and depressed frequency of coastal flooding. For the Swan River region, the inter-annual tidal variation is regular, dominated by the 18.6 year lunar nodal cycle. Storminess and mean sea level variations are independent and irregular, with cycles from 3 to 10 year duration. Since 1960, these fluctuations have not occurred in phase

  13. Dust Destruction in a Non-radiative Shock in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 μm and 70 μm images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 μm to the 24 μm flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0farcm1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0farcm75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n H~ 2.0 cm-3, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  14. Numerically modelling the Cygnus Loop as a remnant evolved in an anisotropic cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Yu, Huan; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of the middle-aged supernova remnant, Cygnus Loop, seen in X-rays, is peculiar, with a blowout in the south region and other irregular features, such as a bump in the west, a limb with a planar morphology in the east and asymmetry between the east and the west shock profiles of the blowout. The detailed process of the formation of the peculiar profile of the shock is still unclear. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations for the remnant to revisit its evolution. In the simulations, the progenitor ejects an anisotropic, latitude-dependent wind, and travels in a direction that is not aligned with the symmetry axis of the wind. As a result, a cavity with a fringed structure is produced. The remnant has evolved in the cavity for about 104 yr. In the north-east, the shock has first encountered the bow shock, and this part corresponds to the bright north-eastern region. The south blowout is formed due to the shock travelling into the undisturbed wind, and the interaction of the shock with the cavity leads to the other peculiar features of the shock structure. The resulting profile of the remnant is consistent with that indicated in X-rays. It can be concluded that the supernova explosion occurred in the cavity produced by an anisotropic stellar wind experiencing two main phases with different wind velocities.

  15. Gemini/GNIRS infrared spectroscopy of the Wolf-Rayet stellar wind in Cygnus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljonen, K. I. I.; Maccarone, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    The microquasar Cygnus X-3 was observed several times with the Gemini North Infrared Spectrograph while the source was in the hard X-ray state. We describe the observed 1.0-2.4 μm spectra as arising from the stellar wind of the companion star and suggest its classification as a WN 4-6 Wolf-Rayet star. We attribute the orbital variations of the emission line profiles to the variations in the ionization structure of the stellar wind caused by the intense X-ray emission from the compact object. The strong variability observed in the line profiles will affect the mass function determination. We are unable to reproduce earlier results, from which the mass function for the Wolf-Rayet star was derived. Instead, we suggest that the system parameters are difficult to obtain from the infrared spectra. We find that the near-infrared continuum and the line spectra can be represented with non-LTE Wolf-Rayet atmosphere models if taking into account the effects arising from the peculiar ionization structure of the stellar wind in an approximative manner. From the representative models we infer the properties of the Wolf-Rayet star and discuss possible mass ranges for the binary components.

  16. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, H.; /Ibaraki U., Mito; Tibaldo, L.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII; Ballet, J.; /Paris U., VI-VII; Giordano, F.; /Bari U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Grenier, I.A.; /Paris U., VI-VII; Porter, T.A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Roth, M.; /Washington U., Seattle; Tibolla, O.; /Wurzburg U.; Uchiyama, Y.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Yamazaki, R.; /Sagamihara, Aoyama Gakuin U.

    2011-11-08

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) Cygnus Loop (G74.0-8.5). We detect significant gamma-ray emission associated with the SNR in the energy band 0.2-100 GeV. The gamma-ray spectrum shows a break in the range 2-3 GeV. The gamma-ray luminosity is {approx} 1 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} between 1-100 GeV, much lower than those of other GeV-emitting SNRs. The morphology is best represented by a ring shape, with inner/outer radii 0{sup o}.7 {+-} 0{sup o}.1 and 1{sup o}.6 {+-} 0{sup o}.1. Given the association among X-ray rims, H{alpha} filaments and gamma-ray emission, we argue that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields adjacent to the shock regions. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray spectrum.

  17. Electron Energy Distributions at Relativistic Shock Sites: Observational Constraints from the Cygnus A Hotspots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-10-15

    We report new detections of the hotspots in Cygnus A at 4.5 and 8.0 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Together with detailed published radio observations and synchrotron self-Compton modeling of previous X-ray detections, we reconstruct the underlying electron energy spectra of the two brightest hotspots (A and D). The low-energy portion of the electron distributions have flat power-law slopes (s {approx} 1.5) up to the break energy which corresponds almost exactly to the mass ratio between protons and electrons; we argue that these features are most likely intrinsic rather than due to absorption effects. Beyond the break, the electron spectra continue to higher energies with very steep slopes s>3. Thus, there is no evidence for the 'canonical' s=2 slope expected in 1st order Fermi-type shocks within the whole observable electron energy range. We discuss the significance of these observations and the insight offered into high-energy particle acceleration processes in mildly relativistic shocks.

  18. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange in the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  19. Aerogel Cherenkov detector for characterizing the intense flash x-ray source, Cygnus, spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y., E-mail: yhkim@lanl.gov; Herrmann, H. W.; McEvoy, A. M.; Young, C. S.; Hamilton, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Schwellenbach, D. D.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Smith, A. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An aerogel Cherenkov detector is proposed to measure the X-ray energy spectrum from the Cygnus—intense flash X-ray source operated at the Nevada National Security Site. An array of aerogels set at a variety of thresholds between 1 and 3 MeV will be adequate to map out the bremsstrahlung X-ray production of the Cygnus, where the maximum energy of the spectrum is normally around 2.5 MeV. In addition to the Cherenkov radiation from aerogels, one possible competing light-production mechanism is optical transition radiation (OTR), which may be significant in aerogels due to the large number of transitions from SiO{sub 2} clusters to vacuum voids. To examine whether OTR is a problem, four aerogel samples were tested using a mono-energetic electron beam (varied in the range of 1–3 MeV) at NSTec Los Alamos Operations. It was demonstrated that aerogels can be used as a Cherenkov medium, where the rate of the light production is about two orders magnitude higher when the electron beam energy is above threshold.

  20. Accretion and outflow in the proplyd-like objects near Cygnus OB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarcello, M. G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Drake, J. J.; Wright, N. J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS-67, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); García-Alvarez, D. [Dpto. de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 E-La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Kraemer, K. E. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Kenny Cottle L106B, Newton, MA 02459-1161 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    Cygnus OB2 is the most massive association within 2 kpc from the Sun, hosting hundreds of massive stars, thousands of young low mass members, and some sights of active star formation in the surrounding cloud. Recently, 10 photoevaporating proplyd-like objects with tadpole-shaped morphology were discovered in the outskirts of the OB association, approximately 6-14 pc away from its center. The classification of these objects is ambiguous, being either evaporating residuals of the parental cloud that are hosting a protostar inside or disk-bearing stars with an evaporating disk, such as the evaporating proplyds observed in the Trapezium Cluster in Orion. In this paper, we present a study based on low-resolution optical spectroscopic observations made with the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy, mounted on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, of two of these protostars. The spectrum of one of the objects shows evidence of accretion but not of outflows. In the latter object, the spectra show several emission lines indicating the presence of an actively accreting disk with outflow. We present estimates of the mass loss rate and the accretion rate from the disk, showing that the former exceeds the latter as observed in other known objects with evaporating disks. We also show evidence of a strong variability in the integrated flux observed in these objects as well as in the accretion and outflow diagnostics.

  1. Modelling hard and soft states of Cygnus X-1 with propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, S.; Ingram, A.; van der Klis, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a timing analysis of three Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 with the propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model PROPFLUC. The model simultaneously predicts power spectra, time lags and coherence of the variability as a function of energy. The observations cover the soft and hard states of the source, and the transition between the two. We find good agreement between model predictions and data in the hard and soft states. Our analysis suggests that in the soft state the fluctuations propagate in an optically thin hot flow extending up to large radii above and below a stable optically thick disc. In the hard state, our results are consistent with a truncated disc geometry, where the hot flow extends radially inside the inner radius of the disc. In the transition from soft to hard state, the characteristics of the rapid variability are too complex to be successfully described with PROPFLUC. The surface density profile of the hot flow predicted by our model and the lack of quasi-periodic oscillations in the soft and hard states suggest that the spin of the black hole is aligned with the inner accretion disc and therefore probably with the rotational axis of the binary system.

  2. Spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated filament in the Cygnus Loop with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Vancura, Olaf; Bowers, Charles W.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Raymond, John C.

    1992-01-01

    A fair UV spectrum of a nonradiative filament in the Cygnus Loop covering the wavelength range 830-1860 A at 3.5-A resolution was obtained using the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the Astro-1 space shuttle mission. Nonradiative shock models which include a more sophisticated treatment of Lyman line transfer are calculated. It is found that the HUT spectrum can be explained in terms of a shock with velocity 175-185 km/s propagating into a low-density medium. This shock velocity can be reconciled with the 135-km/s width of the broad component of H-alpha in this filament if equilibration of the postshock electron and ion temperatures proceeds much more rapidly than Coulomb equilibration time scales. The time required for a 180-km/s shock to develop a partial recombination zone is short, about 200 yr if n is approximately equal to 2/cu cm. This suggests that the shock is decelerating as it encounters denser material. The current analysis patently favors rapid equilibration of electrons and ions behind the shock.

  3. H-alpha Monitoring of the Star Field around Cygnus OB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Seth; Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Cygnus OB2 is a young stellar association located at RA: 20:33:12 and Dec: +41:19. Given the significant number of O and B stars, with the potential to be emission line objects, this is an ideal field to test the monitoring capabilities of the H-Alpha filters discussed by Joner & Hintz (2015). From August 2013 to July 2016 we collected 50 nights of data through narrow and wide H-alpha filters using the BYU West Mountain Observatory 0.9-m telescope with a Finger Lakes PL3041 CCD. This provided 0.62 arcsec/pixel with a field of view of 21’ on a side. Photometry was obtained from these frames using DAOPhot in order to minimize contamination from nearby stars. The index was then created by subtracting the magnitude in the wide filter from that in the narrow filter. Each night was then carefully zeropointed to allow for examination of long term variation. In total we examined 580 stars to check for variability in the H-alpha emission line. We will present our preliminary results for variations seen in a number of individual stars.

  4. News and Views: Herschel reveals a new swan in Cygnus-X; Two models of Type 1a supernovae are both right; Milky Way companions throw doubt on dark matter; Lightning can map volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    It appears that both models for the formation of Type 1a supernovae are correct, in different cases. The significance of these supernovae in measurements of cosmic distances and the acceleration of the expansion of the universe mean that the distinction is significant. Careful mapping of the arrangement of galaxies around the Milky Way has revealed that they lie in a plane at right angles to the galactic disc. The results pose a challenge to models of dark matter distribution and galactic structure. An electromagnetic resonance established by lightning could be used to map volatile molecules on other planets, thanks to their effects on the electrical conductivity of planetary atmospheres.

  5. Mass production of `Swan`s Golden`, Cupressus sempervirens by tissue culture and its radiation breeding. 2. Study on growth regulating substance to stimulate the elongation of shoot apex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Hirokatsu [Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Some species of `Swan`s Golden` have been propagated by means of grafting because propagation by cutting is difficult. However, not a few species of the plant are easily lodged, resulting that spreading of `Swan`s Golden` is difficult. Here, an investigation was made on growth regulating substances added into the basal medium in respects of their kinds and concentrations and also the kind of medium for successive culture. As the basal medium, SH medium supplemented with 4 g/l of gel-light and 3 g/l of carbon-powder was used. The optimum medium for the initiation of culture was the basal medium added with zeatin (Ze) and gibberellin (GA) and it was also suitable for successive culture after the 14 day. The medium added with Ze and benzyladenine (BA) or Ze alone was found to be most suitable for the culture after the 28 day. The concentration was optimum at 1 - 2.5 mg/l for either of these growth regulating substances. (M.N.)

  6. A STRUGGLE FOR LOVE OF BELLA SWAN REFLECTED IN NEW MOON MOVIE: AN INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Riska Lestari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper described the struggle for love of Bella Swan reflected in New Moon movie by using Alfred Adler’s individual psychology and analyzed the plot of the movie. It used qualitative research method and the object of this study was a major character named Bella Swan. Primary data sources were the New Moon movie directed by Christopher Weitz and the script of the movie, while secondary data sources were collected from many sources such as dictionary, articles from internet, and books related to this study. Methods of data collecting were observation and library research. The method of data analysis was descriptive analysis. Based on the analysis, It reflected the condition of a person who had a goal and struggle to get it. It concluded that Bella had high struggles to reach her goals. The plot of New Moon movie is complicated and stimulating, therefore it made the story was not flat and boring. By analyzing the plot, the viewers could easily understand the story and the message of the movie and catch up the moral lesson of it.

  7. Treatment of giant pulmonary interstitial emphysema by ipsilateral bronchial occlusion with a Swan-Ganz catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Shantanu [College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, The Children' s Hospital of New York, New York, NY (United States); Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Gupta, Archana; Wung, Jen-Tien [College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, The Children' s Hospital of New York, New York, NY (United States); Berdon, Walter E. [College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, Pediatric Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Unilateral giant pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE) can be seen as a complication of chronic ventilation in extremely low-birth-weight babies. Many can be managed by conventional pulmonary care which includes positioning, suctioning, chest physiotherapy, gentle conventional ventilation and high-frequency ventilation. Some may need invasive procedures such as lung puncture, pleurotomies and excisional surgery. This is the group in which single-lung ventilation may be beneficial and circumvent the need for an invasive procedure. We describe the technique of single-lung ventilation using a Swan-Ganz catheter to block the main stem bronchus on the diseased side in air-leak syndromes. A retrospective chart review was done on 17 newborns undergoing single-lung ventilation using this technique at the Children's Hospital of New York, Columbia University, from 1986 to 2000. The technique was successful in the management of severe, neonatal unilateral lung disease not responsive to conventional modes of therapy in all but two neonates as seen by a significant improvement in pH and a decrease in PaCO{sub 2} levels. In one neonate malpositioning of the Swan-Ganz catheter balloon could have contributed to the development of pneumothorax. The described technique of single-lung ventilation provides a safe, minimally invasive and economically feasible method of management of unilateral giant PIE in newborns not responsive to conventional modes of therapy with minimal complications. (orig.)

  8. Tourism today: Between the black swan and the reality of the fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Inés Sánchez Arciniegas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present essay begins by adapting the metaphor of Nassim Taleb, The Black Swan to the phenomenon of tourism in order to inquire the effects that terrorism acts have on the world´s tourist behaviour. This article was finished on June 2016 and is consistent with the unpredictability of subsequent events. You won’t find an analysis of statistics based on tourism models or analysis methods; nonetheless it presents a deductive approximation based on news reviews and social network publications that circulate about tourism. On the one hand, the news related to the impacts of terrorist attacks disturb the world at global scale making an impact on tourism destinations and on the other hand, there are cities with a parallel reality, one that shows an idyllic world, with positive and encouraging statistics of tourist visitors, travel promotion and circulation of travel experiences in social networks. Resembling the novel, the fiction of real characters. The sources triangulation, is not conclusive but indicative about the vast information that exists, the elaborated circulation of images and the broad literature of tourism; (some of them showing an interdisciplinary relation between terrorism and tourism however, some of it lacks research and do not contribute to the knowledge of this phenomenon in social and economic aspects, beyond the marketing, a thematic highly privilege by the production of texts. The current swan disturbs, but the reaction of the travel industry is to settle.

  9. Clinical utility of the Chinese Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal-Behaviors questionnaire (SWAN) when compared with DISC-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Grace Fong-Chun; Lai, Kelly Yee-Ching; Luk, Ernest Siu-Luen; Hung, Se-Fong; Leung, Patrick Wing-Leung

    2014-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and impairing child and adolescent psychiatric disorder. Early identification and prompt treatment are essential. Rating scales are commonly used by clinicians and researchers to assess ADHD children. In the current study, we aimed to examine the clinical utility of the Chinese version of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviors (SWAN) questionnaire. We validated its subscale scores against the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (DISC-IV) and looked into its ability to identify ADHD in a psychiatric clinic setting. We also tested age and gender effects on SWAN scores. Specific subscale cutoff scores of SWAN were subsequently determined. A total of 290 children aged 6-12 years old studying in local mainstream primary schools were recruited from a clinic setting and interviewed with the parent version of DISC-IV. Their parents and teachers completed the corresponding version of SWAN. Both parent and teacher versions of SWAN were found to have good concurrent validity with DISC-IV. It could identify ADHD well in a clinic sample. Gender-specific cutoff scores were determined. Sensitivities and specificities were found to be satisfactory. SWAN was also found to perform equally well in identifying ADHD in those with and without comorbid Autistic Spectrum Disorder. SWAN was proven to be a useful tool to aid the assessment of ADHD in a clinic sample.

  10. A High Angular Resolution Survey of Massive Stars in Cygnus OB2: Results from the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Printed in the U.S.A. A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF MASSIVE STARS IN CYGNUS OB2: RESULTS FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FINE GUIDANCE SENSORS...angular resolution survey of massive OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association that we conducted with the fine guidance sensor 1R (FGS1r) on the Hubble Space...al. 2009) and imaging observations (Maı́z Apellániz 2010). The fine guidance sensors (FGSs) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provide us with

  11. Potential disease transmission from wild geese and swans to livestock, poultry and humans: a review of the scientific literature from a One Health perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmberg, Johan; Berg, Charlotte; Lerner, Henrik; Waldenström, Jonas; Hessel, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are more herbivorous waterfowl (swans and geese) close to humans, livestock and poultry than ever before. This creates widespread conflict with agriculture and other human interests, but also debate about the role of swans and geese as potential vectors of disease of relevance for human and animal health. Using a One Health perspective, we provide the first comprehensive review of the scientific literature about the most relevant viral, bacterial, and unicellular pathogens occurring in wild geese and swans. Research thus far suggests that these birds may play a role in transmission of avian influenza virus, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and antibiotic resistance. On the other hand, at present there is no evidence that geese and swans play a role in transmission of Newcastle disease, duck plague, West Nile virus, Vibrio, Yersinia, Clostridium, Chlamydophila, and Borrelia. Finally, based on present knowledge it is not possible to say if geese and swans play a role in transmission of Escherichia coli, Pasteurella, Helicobacter, Brachyspira, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Microsporidia. This is largely due to changes in classification and taxonomy, rapid development of identification methods and lack of knowledge about host specificity. Previous research tends to overrate the role of geese and swans as disease vectors; we do not find any evidence that they are significant transmitters to humans or livestock of any of the pathogens considered in this review. Nevertheless, it is wise to keep poultry and livestock separated from small volume waters used by many wild waterfowl, but there is no need to discourage livestock grazing in nature reserves or pastures where geese and swans are present. Under some circumstances it is warranted to discourage swans and geese from using wastewater ponds, drinking water reservoirs, and public beaches. Intensified screening of swans and geese for AIV, West Nile virus and anatid herpesvirus is warranted. PMID:28567210

  12. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  13. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  14. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  15. Gulf of Mexico hurricane wave simulations using SWAN : Bulk formula-based drag coefficient sensitivity for Hurricane Ike

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Weisberg, R.H.; Zheng, L.; Zijlema, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of wind input parameterizations on wave estimations under hurricane conditions are examined using the unstructured grid, third-generation wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Experiments using Hurricane Ike wind forcing, which impacted the Gulf of Mexico in 2008, illustrate

  16. Bagging grey swans : A supply network approach to identifying and managing low-probability high-impact supply chain events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossetti, Christian; Akkermans, Henk; Bhakoo, Vikram; Carnovale, Steven

    Over the past decade practitioners and researchers have become increasingly focused on managing risks in extended supply chains. Whether these risks involve supply disruptions, financial liabilities for a supplier’s actions, or large market shifts; Grey Swan events, defined as unforeseen

  17. G141.2+5.0, A NEW PULSAR WIND NEBULA DISCOVERED IN THE CYGNUS ARM OF THE MILKY WAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothes, R.; Foster, T. J. [National Research Council Herzberg, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia, V2A 6J9 (Canada); Sun, X. H. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Reich, W., E-mail: roland.kothes@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    We report the discovery of the new pulsar wind nebula (PWN) G141.2+5.0 in data observed with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory's Synthesis Telescope at 1420 MHz. The new PWN has a diameter of about 3.'5, which translates to a spatial extent of about 4 pc at a distance of 4.0 kpc. It displays a radio spectral index of α ≈ –0.7, similar to the PWN G76.9+1.1. G141.2+5.0 is highly polarized up to 40% with an average of 15% in the 1420 MHz data. It is located in the center of a small spherical H I bubble, which is expanding at a velocity of 6 km s{sup –1} at a systemic velocity of v {sub LSR} = –53 km s{sup –1}. The bubble could be the result of the progenitor star's mass loss or the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) created by the same supernova explosion in a highly advanced stage. The systemic LSR velocity of the bubble shares the velocity of H I associated with the Cygnus spiral arm, which is seen across the second and third quadrants and an active star-forming arm immediately beyond the Perseus arm. A kinematical distance of 4 ± 0.5 kpc is found for G141.2+5.0, similar to the optical distance of the Cygnus arm (3.8 ± 1.1 kpc). G141.2+5.0 represents the first radio PWN discovered in 17 years and the first SNR discovered in the Cygnus spiral arm, which is in stark contrast with the Perseus arm's overwhelming population of shell-type remnants.

  18. The Soft State of Cygnus X-1 Observed with NuSTAR: A Variable Corona and a Stable Inner Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Madsen, K. K.; Grinberg, V.; Barret, D.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Clavel, M.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-epoch hard X-ray analysis of Cygnus X-1 in its soft state based on four observations with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Despite the basic similarity of the observed spectra, there is clear spectral variability between epochs. To investigate this variability, we construct a model incorporating both the standard disk-corona continuum and relativistic reflection from the accretion disk, based on prior work on Cygnus X-1, and apply this model to each epoch independently. We find excellent consistency for the black hole spin and the iron abundance of the accretion disk, which are expected to remain constant on observational timescales. In particular, we confirm that Cygnus X-1 hosts a rapidly rotating black hole, 0.93 < approx. a* < approx. 0.96, in broad agreement with the majority of prior studies of the relativistic disk reflection and constraints on the spin obtained through studies of the thermal accretion disk continuum. Our work also confirms the apparent misalignment between the inner disk and the orbital plane of the binary system reported previously, finding the magnitude of this warp to be approx.10deg-15deg. This level of misalignment does not significantly change (and may even improve) the agreement between our reflection results and the thermal continuum results regarding the black hole spin. The spectral variability observed by NuSTAR is dominated by the primary continuum, implying variability in the temperature of the scattering electron plasma. Finally, we consistently observe absorption from ionized iron at approx. 6.7 keV, which varies in strength as a function of orbital phase in a manner consistent with the absorbing material being an ionized phase of the focused stellar wind from the supergiant companion star.

  19. Deep radio images of the HEGRA and Whipple TeV sources in the Cygnus OB2 region.

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Ribas, Josep; Paredes i Poy, Josep Maria; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Bosch i Ramon, Valentí

    2007-01-01

    The modern generation of Cherenkov telescopes has revealed a new population of gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy. Some of them have been identified with previously known X-ray binary systems while other remain without clear counterparts a lower energies. Our initial goal here was reporting on extensive radio observations of the first extended and yet unidentified source, namely TeV J2032+4130. This object was originally detected by the HEGRA telescope in the direction of the Cygnus OB2 region a...

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cygnus-X CO and SiO outflows datacubes (Duarte-Cabral+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Cabral, A.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Hennemann, M.; Schneider, N.; Andre, P.; Gusdorf, A.; Csengeri, T.; Louvet, F.

    2014-07-01

    Fits files of the CO and SiO datacubes, both clean (i.e. not corrected for primary beam) and sky (i.e. primary beam corrected), for the six massive dense cores of Cygnus-X that we study in these two articles (2013A&A...558A.125D and 2014A&A...570A...1D). The CO emission has been combined with IRAM 30m data for short-spacings. The SiO data has not been short-spaced. (2 data files).

  1. Power spectra of ionospheric scintillations obtained from observations of Cygnus A on the radio telescope URAN-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panishko, S. K.; Litvinenko, O. A.; Kravetz, R. O.

    2006-10-01

    There are many records of Cygnus A passages through the direction pattern obtained on the radio telescope URAN-4 during 1998-2004. Most of these show fluctuations in the flux density caused by ionospheric scintillations. The power spectrum is an important characteristic of the stochastic process and such processes are the main reason for the nature of scintillations. In this paper, estimations of the power spectra of ionospheric scintillations are made from the observations of Cyg A on the radio telescope URAN-4. Examples of the spectra are presented for observations under different circumstances and for several scintillation activity levels.

  2. Single-dish and VLBI observations of Cygnus X-3 during the 2016 giant flare episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Giroletti, M.; Righini, S.; Stagni, M.; Orlati, A.; Migoni, C.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Barbas, L.; Buttaccio, S.; Cassaro, P.; De Vicente, P.; Gawroński, M. P.; Lindqvist, M.; Maccaferri, G.; Stanghellini, C.; Wolak, P.; Yang, J.; Navarrini, A.; Loru, S.; Pilia, M.; Bachetti, M.; Iacolina, M. N.; Buttu, M.; Corbel, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Markoff, S.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Kalemci, E.; Belloni, T.; Grinberg, V.; Marongiu, M.; Vargiu, G. P.; Trois, A.

    2017-11-01

    In 2016 September, the microquasar Cygnus X-3 underwent a giant radio flare, which was monitored for 6 d with the Medicina Radio Astronomical Station and the Sardinia Radio Telescope. Long observations were performed in order to follow the evolution of the flare on an hourly scale, covering six frequency ranges from 1.5 to 25.6 GHz. The radio emission reached a maximum of 13.2 ± 0.7 Jy at 7.2 GHz and 10 ± 1 Jy at 18.6 GHz. Rapid flux variations were observed at high radio frequencies at the peak of the flare, together with rapid evolution of the spectral index: α steepened from 0.3 to 0.6 (with Sν ∝ ν-α) within 5 h. This is the first time that such fast variations are observed, giving support to the evolution from optically thick to optically thin plasmons in expansion moving outward from the core. Based on the Italian network (Noto, Medicina and SRT) and extended to the European antennas (Torun, Yebes, Onsala), very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations were triggered at 22 GHz on five different occasions, four times prior to the giant flare, and once during its decay phase. Flux variations of 2 h duration were recorded during the first session. They correspond to a mini-flare that occurred close to the core 10 d before the onset of the giant flare. From the latest VLBI observation we infer that 4 d after the flare peak the jet emission was extended over 30 mas.

  3. NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS TOWARD THE CYGNUS OB2 ASSOCIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kondo, Sohei; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kawakita, Hideyo [Laboratory of Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy, Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Naoto [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ikeda, Yuji [Photocoding, 460-102 Iwakura-Nakamachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-0025 (Japan); Yasui, Chikako; Mizumoto, Misaki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Fukue, Kei; Yamamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Natsuko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mito, Hiroyuki [Kiso Observatory, Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 10762-30 Mitake, Kiso-machi, Kiso-gun, Nagano, 397-0101 (Japan); Nakaoka, Tetsuya; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Kitano, Ayaka; Otsubo, Shogo [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Kinoshita, Masaomi, E-mail: hamano@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-04-10

    We obtained the near-infrared (NIR) high-resolution (R ≡ λ/Δλ ∼ 20,000) spectra of the seven brightest early-type stars in the Cygnus OB2 association for investigating the environmental dependence of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The WINERED spectrograph mounted on the Araki 1.3 m telescope in Japan was used to collect data. All 20 of the known DIBs within the wavelength coverage of WINERED (0.91 < λ < 1.36 μm) were clearly detected along all lines of sight because of their high flux density in the NIR wavelength range and the large extinction. The equivalent widths (EWs) of DIBs were not correlated with the column densities of C{sub 2} molecules, which trace the patchy dense component, suggesting that the NIR DIB carriers are distributed mainly in the diffuse component. On the basis of the correlations among the NIR DIBs both for stars in Cyg OB2 and stars observed previously, λλ10780, 10792, 11797, 12623, and 13175 are found to constitute a “family,” in which the DIBs are correlated well over the wide EW range. In contrast, the EW of λ10504 is found to remain almost constant over the stars in Cyg OB2. The extinction estimated from the average EW of λ10504 (A{sub V} ∼ 3.6 mag) roughly corresponds to the lower limit of the extinction distribution of OB stars in Cyg OB2. This suggests that λ10504 is absorbed only by the foreground clouds, implying that the carrier of λ10504 is completely destroyed in Cyg OB2, probably by the strong UV radiation field. The different behaviors of the DIBs may be caused by different properties of the DIB carriers.

  4. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus Surveillance for Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: Raw data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Example of raw data submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center of test results from oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected on Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks...

  5. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus Surveillance for Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: Batch 324NC Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Batch summaries from the National Wildlife Health Center of test results from oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected on Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks on Pocosin...

  6. Report to the Pacific Flyway Committee on 1985-2004 Coastal Zone Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Goose Survey of geese, swans and sandhill cranes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of geese, tundra swans and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) for the 20th consecutive year. The...

  7. Report to the Pacific Flyway Committee on 1985-2002 Coastal Zone Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Goose Survey of geese, swans and sandhill cranes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of geese, tundra swans and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) for the 18th consecutive year. The...

  8. Temperature data from buoy casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from 01 August 1928 to 04 September 1932 (NODC Accession 0000242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using buoy casts from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from August 1, 1928 to September 4, 1932 in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were...

  9. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus Surveillance for Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: Raw data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Example of raw data submitted from the National Wildlife Health Center of test results from oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected on Tundra Swans and Wood...

  10. Testing The ‘Black Swan Effect’ on Croatian Stock Market Between 2000 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Radman Peša

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We tested the economic activity and stock exchange of Croatia as a new country of EU in order to investigate the ‘Black Swan effect’ from 2000 to 2013. The empirical findings obtained in application of OLS methodology and Chow breaking point test provide evidence and show that resignation of the Croatian ex Prime Minister lead country successfully to EU, but were also ‘The Black Swan’ event, being unpredictable and having huge impact on political and economic environment in Croatia obtained through CROBEX, Croatian stock exchange indices. Authors conclude that the resignation was connected to one of the first significant cases of corruption in Croatia which has got the negative impact on the economic development of the country in general, dealing at the same time with global recession.

  11. The Swiss Black Swan Bad Scenario: Is Switzerland Another Casualty of the Eurozone Crisis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Lleo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Financial disasters to hedge funds, bank trading departments and individual speculative traders and investors seem to always occur because of non-diversification in all possible scenarios, being overbet and being hit by a bad scenario. Black swans are the worst type of bad scenario: unexpected and extreme. The Swiss National Bank decision on 15 January 2015 to abandon the 1.20 peg against the Euro was a tremendous blow for many Swiss exporters, but also Swiss and international investors, hedge funds, global macro funds, banks, as well as the Swiss central bank. In this paper, we discuss the causes for this action, the money losers and the few winners, what it means for Switzerland, Europe and the rest of the world, what kinds of trades were lost and how they have been prevented.

  12. Ballet in the Dark: A Critical Review of Black Swan by Darren Aronofsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Angela Corpus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Choreographing the life of a ballerina in an ominous psychological thriller is a highly gendered project that takes us to well-established suspects in the patriarchal schema of the ballet world. Black Swan’s filmmakers created a narrative out of a performance of the classic ballet Swan Lake, making it a mimicry of the life of the tragic heroine Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman. The symptomatic pathology of perfectionism haunts the lead character, revealing her manifest hubris while unmasking the systemic social conditioning of women in the ballet system. These women are driven to become tenacious competitors, pleasant and willing objects of a gaze and patronage that are traditionally male-defined and controlled.

  13. Sleep duration and weight change in midlife women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, Bradley M.; Janssen, Imke; Cursio, John F.; Matthews, Karen A.; Hall, Martica; Gold, Ellen B.; Burns, John W.; Kravitz, Howard M.

    2012-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been associated with higher current body mass index (BMI) and subsequent weight gain. However, most prior longitudinal studies are limited by reliance on self-reported sleep duration, and none accounted for the potential confounding effect of sleep-disordered breathing. The associations of sleep duration with current BMI and BMI change were examined among 310 midlife women in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study (2003–2005). Sleep duration was assessed for approximately one month with concurrent wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing was quantified using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) based on in-home polysomnography. BMI was assessed annually through core SWAN visit 10 (2006 and 2008). Mean BMI increased from 29.6 (SD=7.8) kg/m2 to 30.0 (SD=8.0) kg/m2 over an average of 4.6 years (SD=1.0) of follow up. In cross-sectional analyses controlling for AHI, demographic variables, and several potential confounding variables, actigraphy (estimate=−1.22, 95%C.I.: −2.03, −.42) and diary (estimate=−.86, 95%C.I. −1.62, −.09) measures of sleep duration were inversely associated with BMI. Each hour of less sleep was associated with 1.22 kg/m2 greater BMI for actigraphy sleep duration, and a 0.86 kg/m2 greater BMI for diary sleep duration. Longitudinal associations between sleep duration and annual BMI change were non-significant in unadjusted and fully-adjusted models. In this cohort of midlife women, cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and current BMI were independent of sleep-disordered breathing, but sleep duration was not prospectively associated with weight change. PMID:23505171

  14. Clonal diversity and structure within a population of the pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus foraged by Bewick's swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangelbroek, H H; Ouborg, N J; Santamaría, L; Schwenk, K

    2002-10-01

    Clonal diversity within plant populations is affected by factors that influence genet (clone) survival and seed recruitment, such as resource availability, disturbance, seed dispersal mechanism, propagule predation and the age of the population. Here we studied a population of Potamogeton pectinatus, a pseudo-annual aquatic macrophyte. Within populations reproduction appears to be mainly asexually through subterranean propagules (tubers), while recruitment via seeds is believed to be relatively unimportant. RAPD markers were used to analyse clonal diversity and genetic variation within the population. Ninety-seven genets were identified among 128 samples taken from eight plots. The proportion of distinguishable genets (0.76) and Simpson's diversity index (0.99) exhibited high levels of clonal diversity compared to other clonal plants. According to an analysis of molecular variance (amova) most genetic variation occurred between individuals within plots (93-97%) rather than between plots (8-3%). These results imply that sexual reproduction plays an unexpectedly important role within the population. Nevertheless, autocorrelation statistics revealed a spatial genetic structure resulting from clonal growth. In contrast to genetic variation, clonal diversity was affected by several ecological factors. Water depth and silt content had direct negative effects on clonal diversity. Tuber predation by Bewick's swans had an unexpected indirect negative effect on clonal diversity through reducing the tuber-bank biomass in spring, which on its turn was positively correlated to clonal diversity. The disturbance by swans, therefore, did not enhance seed recruitment and thus clonal diversity; on the contrary, heavily foraged areas are probably more prone to stochastic loss of genets leading to reduced clonal diversity.

  15. Sleep duration and weight change in midlife women: the SWAN sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, Bradley M; Janssen, Imke; Cursio, John F; Matthews, Karen A; Hall, Martica; Gold, Ellen B; Burns, John W; Kravitz, Howard M

    2013-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been associated with higher current BMI and subsequent weight gain. However, most prior longitudinal studies are limited by reliance on self-reported sleep duration, and none accounted for the potential confounding effect of sleep-disordered breathing. The associations of sleep duration with current BMI and BMI change were examined among 310 midlife women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study (2003-2005). Sleep duration was assessed for approximately one month with concurrent wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The presence and severity of sleep-disordered breathing was quantified using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) based on in-home polysomnography. BMI was assessed annually through core SWAN visit 10 (2006 and 2008). Mean BMI increased from 29.6 (SD = 7.8) kg/m(2) to 30.0 (SD = 8.0) kg/m(2) over an average of 4.6 years (SD = 1.0) of follow-up. In cross-sectional analyses controlling for AHI, demographic variables, and several potential confounding variables, actigraphy (estimate = -1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.03, -0.42) and diary (estimate = -0.86, 95% CI -1.62, -0.09) measures of sleep duration were inversely associated with BMI. Each hour of less sleep was associated with 1.22 kg/m(2) greater BMI for actigraphy sleep duration, and a 0.86 kg/m(2) greater BMI for diary sleep duration. Longitudinal associations between sleep duration and annual BMI change were nonsignificant in unadjusted and fully adjusted models. In this cohort of midlife women, cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and current BMI were independent of sleep-disordered breathing, but sleep duration was not prospectively associated with weight change. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  16. Clinical utility of the Chinese Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-Symptoms and Normal-behaviors questionnaire (SWAN when compared with DISC-IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan GFC

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Grace Fong-Chun Chan,1 Kelly Yee-Ching Lai,2 Ernest Siu-Luen Luk,3 Se-Fong Hung,2 Patrick Wing-Leung Leung4 1Department of Psychiatry, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, 2Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Private practice, 4Clinical and Health Psychology Centre, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common and impairing child and adolescent psychiatric disorder. Early identification and prompt treatment are essential. Rating scales are commonly used by clinicians and researchers to assess ADHD children. Objective: In the current study, we aimed to examine the clinical utility of the Chinese version of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behaviors (SWAN questionnaire. We validated its subscale scores against the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (DISC-IV and looked into its ability to identify ADHD in a psychiatric clinic setting. We also tested age and gender effects on SWAN scores. Specific subscale cutoff scores of SWAN were subsequently determined.Method: A total of 290 children aged 6–12 years old studying in local mainstream primary schools were recruited from a clinic setting and interviewed with the parent version of DISC-IV. Their parents and teachers completed the corresponding version of SWAN.Results: Both parent and teacher versions of SWAN were found to have good concurrent validity with DISC-IV. It could identify ADHD well in a clinic sample. Gender-specific cutoff scores were determined. Sensitivities and specificities were found to be satisfactory. SWAN was also found to perform equally well in identifying ADHD in those with and without comorbid Autistic Spectrum Disorder.Conclusion: SWAN was proven to be a useful tool to aid the assessment of ADHD in a clinic sample. Keywords: ADHD, SWAN, DISC-IV, validity

  17. Advancing gender equality through the Athena SWAN Charter for Women in Science: an exploratory study of women's and men's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Chapple, Alison; Edmunds, Laurel D; Ziebland, Sue

    2017-02-21

    While in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia, higher education and research institutions are widely engaged with the Athena SWAN Charter for Women in Science to advance gender equality, empirical research on this process and its impact is rare. This study combined two data sets (free- text comments from a survey and qualitative interviews) to explore the range of experiences and perceptions of participation in Athena SWAN in medical science departments of a research-intensive university in Oxford, United Kingdom. The study is based on the secondary analysis of data from two projects: 59 respondents to an anonymous online survey (42 women, 17 men) provided relevant free-text comments and, separately, 37 women participated in face-to-face narrative interviews. Free-text survey comments and narrative interviews were analysed thematically using constant comparison. Both women and men said that participation in Athena SWAN had brought about important structural and cultural changes, including increased support for women's careers, greater appreciation of caring responsibilities, and efforts to challenge discrimination and bias. Many said that these positive changes would not have happened without linkage of Athena SWAN to government research funding, while others thought there were unintended consequences. Concerns about the programme design and implementation included a perception that Athena SWAN has limited ability to address longstanding and entrenched power and pay imbalances, persisting lack of work-life balance in academic medicine, questions about the sustainability of positive changes, belief that achieving the award could become an end in itself, resentment about perceived positive discrimination, and perceptions that further structural and cultural changes were needed in the university and wider society. The findings from this study suggest that Athena SWAN has a positive impact in advancing gender equality, but there may be limits to how much it can

  18. Ground-water quality in the western Snake River basin, Swan Falls to Glenns Ferry, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Water-quality data were collected from 92 wells in the western Snake River basin, Swan Falls to Glenns Ferry, Idaho. Current data were compiled with pre-1980 data from 116 wells to define water-quality conditions in major aquifers. Factors affecting water quality are composition of aquifer materials, water temperature, and source of recharge. Mixing of water by interaquifer flow, from confined, hot water aquifers (40 degrees Celsius or greater) with water from cold water aquifers (less than 20 degrees Celsius) occurs along regional complex fault systems, and through partially cased boreholes. Cold water generally contains calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate plus carbonate ions; hot water generally contains sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate plus carbonate ions. Warm water (between 20 degrees and 40 degrees Celsius) has an intermediate chemical composition resulting from mixing. Ground-water quality is acceptable for most uses, although it locally contains chemical constituents or physical properties that may restrict its use. Effects of thermal water used for irrigation on quality of shallow ground water are inconclusive. Long-term increase in concentrations of several constituents in parts of the study area may be due to effects of land- and water-use activities, such as infiltration of septic-tank effluent. (USGS)

  19. Expression of TGF-β in Fractures Fixed by Nitinol Swan-like Memory Compressive Connectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Xu, S. G.; Fu, Q. G.

    2011-07-01

    In this article, the effect of internal fixation of a Nitinol swan-like memory compressive connector (SMC) on the temporal expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) at fracture sites is evaluated. Specimens were collected from 35 New Zealand rabbits modeled for bilateral humeral fracture fixed with either SMC or stainless dynamic compression plate (DCP). Five rabbits each were killed at day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56. The local positive staining potency, positive area ratio, and positive index of TGF-β were measured using an immunohistochemistry approach (EnVision) in combination with a computerized image analysis system. TGF-β staining was seen in mesenchymal cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and in the extracellular matrix of fractures fixed in both the SMC and the DCP samples without a significant difference in staining at both the early stages (days 1 and 3) and day 56. A higher TGF-β content was observed in the fractures fixed with SMC when compared to that of DCP from day 7 to 28. As a conclusion, TGF-β is highly expressed in fractures fixed with SMC during chondrogenesis stage and entochondrostosis stage. Finally, the mechanism of how SMC promoting synthesis and secretion of TGF-β in the process of fracture healing has been discussed.

  20. Cardiovascular Fat, Menopause, and Sex Hormones in Women: The SWAN Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoudary, Samar R; Shields, Kelly J; Janssen, Imke; Hanley, Carrie; Budoff, Matthew J; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Powell, Lynda H; Matthews, Karen A

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular risk increases in women after menopause. Mounting evidence demonstrates a role of cardiovascular fat (CF) in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease, but no research has examined CF in relation to sex hormones or menopausal status in women. The objective was to determine the relationship between CF depots, menopausal status, and endogenous sex hormones. Cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs were used. The setting included the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart and Cardiovascular Fat Ancillary Study. A total of 456 women (mean age, 50.75 y); 62% premenopausal/early perimenopausal, and 38% late peri-/postmenopausal. Menopausal status, endogenous sex hormones measured simultaneously with CF volumes, and circulating estradiol available 4.80 years (median) before CF measures. Volumes of CF (epicardial adipose tissue [EAT], paracardial adipose tissue [PAT], total heart adipose tissue [TAT = EAT + PAT], and aortic perivascular adipose tissue [PVAT]). In final models, late peri-/postmenopausal women had 9.88% more EAT, 20.72% more PAT, and 11.69% more TAT volumes than pre-/early perimenopausal women (P menopausal status. In final models, lower estradiol concentrations were associated with greater volumes of PAT and TAT (P obesity, and other covariates. Endogenous sex hormones are associated with CF. Perhaps CF plays a role in the higher risk of coronary heart disease reported in women after menopause.

  1. Detailed review and analysis of complex radiotherapy clinical trial planning data: evaluation and initial experience with the SWAN software system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Martin A; Haworth, Annette; Kearvell, Rachel; Hooton, Ben; Coleman, Rhonda; Spry, Nigel; Bydder, Sean; Joseph, David

    2008-02-01

    Contemporary radiotherapy clinical trials typically require complex three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. This produces large amounts of data relating technique and dose delivery for correlation with patient outcomes. Assessment of the quality of this information is required to ensure protocol compliance, to quantify the variation in treatments given to patients and to enhance the power of studies to determine correlates of patient outcomes. A software system ('SWAN') was developed to facilitate the objective analysis, quality-assurance and review of digital treatment planning data from multi-centre radiotherapy trials. The utility of this system was assessed on the basis of its functionality and our experience of its use in the context of multi-centre clinical trials and trials-support activities. The SWAN system has been shown to have the functionality required for use in several multi-centre trials, including automated review and archive processes. Approximately 800 treatment plans from over 30 participating institutions have so far been assessed with the system for several treatment planning scenarios. To illustrate this we include a description of the use of the system for a large-recruitment prostate radiotherapy trial being undertaken in Australasia, including examples of how the review process has changed clinical practice. The successful implementation of SWAN has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. The software provides an opportunity for comprehensive review of treatment parameters that could impact on clinical outcomes and trial results. Such quality-assurance (QA) has previously been difficult or impossible to achieve, particularly for a clinical trial involving large numbers of patients. Such reviews have highlighted inconsistencies in clinical practice that have since been addressed through feedback from the review process. The process of data collection and review should be undertaken by dedicated, experienced and skilled staff in

  2. The Cosmic-Ray and Gas Content of the Cygnus Region as Measured in Gamma Rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cygnus region hosts a giant molecular-cloud complex which actively forms massive stars. Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and radiation fields make it shine at y-ray energies. Several gamma-ray pulsars and other energetic sources are seen in this direction. Aims. In this paper we analyse the gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the energy range from 100 Me V to 100 Ge V in order to probe the gas and cosmic-ray content over the scale of the whole Cygnus complex. The gamma-ray emission on the scale of the central massive stellar clusters and from individual sources is addressed elsewhere. Methods. The signal from bright pulsars is largely reduced by selecting photons in their off-pulse phase intervals. We compare the diffuse gamma-ray emission with interstellar gas maps derived from radio/mm-wave lines and visual extinction data. and a global model of the region, including other pulsars and gamma-ray sources, is sought. Results. The integral H I emissivity above 100 MeV averaged over the whole Cygnus complex amounts to 12.06 +/- 0.11 (stat.) (+0.15 -0.84) (syst.J] x 10(exp -26) photons /s / sr / H-atom, where the systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the H I opacity to calculate its column densities. The integral emissivity and its spectral energy distribution are both consistent within the systematics with LAT measurements in the interstellar space near the solar system. The average X(sub co) N(H2)/W(sub co) ratio is found to be [1.68 +/- 0.05 (stat.) (H I opacity)] x 1020 molecules cm-2 (K km/s /r, consistent with other LAT measurements in the Local Arm. We detect significant gamma-ray emission from dark neutral gas for a mass corresponding to approx 40% of that traced by CO. The total interstellar mass in the Cygnus complex inferred from its gamma-ray emission amounts to 8(+5 -1) x 10(exp 6) Solar M at a distance of 1.4 kpc. Conclusions. Despite the conspicuous star formation activity and large

  3. Implementation of viscoelastic mud-induced energy attenuation in the third-generation wave model, SWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyramzade, Mostafa; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of waves with fluid mud can dissipate the wave energy significantly over few wavelengths. In this study, the third-generation wave model, SWAN, was advanced to include attenuation of wave energy due to interaction with a viscoelastic fluid mud layer. The performances of implemented viscoelastic models were verified against an analytical solution and viscous formulations for simple one-dimensional propagation cases. Stationary and non-stationary test cases in the Surinam coast and the Atchafalaya Shelf showed that the inclusion of the mud-wave interaction term in the third-generation wave model enhances the model performance in real applications. A high value of mud viscosity (of the order of 0.1 m2/s) was required in both field cases to remedy model overestimation at high frequency ranges of the wave spectrum. The use of frequency-dependent mud viscosity value improved the performance of model, especially in the frequency range of 0.2-0.35 Hz in the wave spectrum. In addition, the mud-wave interaction might affect the high frequency part of the spectrum, and this part of the wave spectrum is also affected by energy transfer from wind to waves, even for the fetch lengths of the order of 10 km. It is shown that exclusion of the wind input term in such cases might result in different values for parameters of mud layer when inverse modeling procedure was employed. Unlike viscous models for wave-mud interaction, the inverse modeling results to a set of mud parameters with the same performance when the viscoelastic model is used. It provides an opportunity to select realistic mud parameters which are in more agreement with in situ measurements.

  4. Chronic Stress is Prospectively Associated with Sleep in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Martica H; Casement, Melynda D; Troxel, Wendy M; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T; Kravitz, Howard M; Krafty, Robert T; Buysse, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate whether levels of upsetting life events measured over a 9-y period prospectively predict subjective and objective sleep outcomes in midlife women. Prospective cohort study. Four sites across the United States. 330 women (46-57 y of age) enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study. N/A. Upsetting life events were assessed annually for up to 9 y. Trajectory analysis applied to life events data quantitatively identified three distinct chronic stress groups: low stress, moderate stress, and high stress. Sleep was assessed by self-report and in-home polysomnography (PSG) during the ninth year of the study. Multivariate analyses tested the prospective association between chronic stress group and sleep, adjusting for race, baseline sleep complaints, marital status, body mass index, symptoms of depression, and acute life events at the time of the Sleep Study. Women characterized by high chronic stress had lower subjective sleep quality, were more likely to report insomnia, and exhibited increased PSG-assessed wake after sleep onset (WASO) relative to women with low to moderate chronic stress profiles. The effect of chronic stress group on WASO persisted in the subsample of participants without baseline sleep complaints. Chronic stress is prospectively associated with sleep disturbance in midlife women, even after adjusting for acute stressors at the time of the sleep study and other factors known to disrupt sleep. These results are consistent with current models of stress that emphasize the cumulative effect of stressors on health over time. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. Bedtime Variability and Metabolic Health in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Briana J; Matthews, Karen A; Hasler, Brant P; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Kline, Christopher E; Buysse, Daniel J; Kravitz, Howard M; Tiani, Alaina G; Harlow, Sioban D; Hall, Martica H

    2016-02-01

    Circadian misalignment, as seen in shift workers, can disrupt metabolic processes. Associations between sleep timing in nonshift workers and metabolic health are unknown. We examined sleep timing and indices of metabolic health in a community sample of midlife women. Caucasian (n = 161), African American (n = 121) and Chinese (n = 56) non-shift-working women aged 48-58 y who were not taking insulin-related medications, participated in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study and were subsequently examined approximately 5.39 (standard deviation = 0.71) y later. Daily diary-reported bedtimes were used to calculate four measures of sleep timing: mean bedtime, bedtime variability, bedtime delay and bedtime advance. Body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, HOMA-IR) were measured at two time points. Linear regressions evaluated whether sleep timing was associated with BMI and HOMA-IR cross-sectionally and prospectively. In cross-sectional models, greater variability in bedtime and greater bedtime delay were associated with higher HOMA-IR (β = 0.128; P = 0.007, and β = 0.110; P = 0.013, respectively) and greater bedtime advance was associated with higher BMI (β = 0.095; P = 0.047). Prospectively, greater bedtime delay predicted increased HOMA-IR at Time 2 (β = 0.152; P = 0.003). Results were partially explained by shifted sleep timing on weekends. Frequent shifts in sleep timing may be related to metabolic health among non-shift working midlife women. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 269. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  6. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange: Applications in the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate high-energy astrophysical environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities. Collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 are considered. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31

  7. Changing distribution and abundance of Swan Goose Anser cygnoides in the Yangtze River floodplain: the likely loss of a very important wintering site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Cao, L.; Barter, M.; Fox, A.D.; Zhao, M.; Meng, F.; Shi, H.; Jiang, Y.; Zhu, W.

    2011-01-01

    Virtually the entire population of the globally ‘Vulnerable’ Swan Goose Anser cygnoides winters in the Yangtze floodplain. Historically, the species was widely distributed throughout the floodplain but now approximately 95% of the population is confined to three closely-situated wetlands in Anhui

  8. Catéter de Swan Ganz: Opinión de expertos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Cohen Arazi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente existen dudas sobre la seguridad del uso del catéter de Swan Ganz (CSG. Para definir la opinión de los cardiólogos de nuestro país, el Consejo de Emergencias Cardiovasculares de la Sociedad Argentina de Cardiología (SAC realizó una reunión para evaluar la opinión de expertos en diferentes escenarios (cirugía no cardíaca, cardíaca, síndromes coronarios e insuficiencia cardíaca, usando el método RAND-UCLA appropiateness. Se envió la evidencia bibliográfica previa a la reunión en la SAC y en la misma los panelistas seleccionaron las variables para conformar las situaciones clínicas que luego fueron enviadas para que individualmente, en una segunda etapa, determinaran si consideraban beneficioso o perjudicial la utilización del catéter con una escala de 1 a 9 (1 significaba que los potenciales perjuicios superaban a los beneficios, 9 que los beneficios eran mayores y 5 que podía considerarse indistintamente beneficioso o perjudicial. Dos expertos analizaron los resultados, describiendo la tasa de acuerdo/desacuerdo. Finalmente, cada indicación se clasificó como “apropiada”, “dudosa” o inapropiada de acuerdo a la mediana definida por los panelistas: 1-3 se clasificó como inapropiado, 4-6 dudoso y 7-9 como indicación apropiada. Observamos gran discrepancia en la opinión sobre la indicación de CSG entre los expertos. Sin embargo, los panelistas estuvieron a favor de su utilización en situaciones que incluían shock y disfunción miocárdica, especialmente cuando se asoció disfunción orgánica. Hubo situaciones en las que los panelistas consideraron inapropiada la indicación del CSG, en pacientes sin disfunción orgánica.

  9. Evaluating the suitability of the SWAN/COSMO-2 model system to simulate short-crested surface waves for a narrow lake with complex bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Graf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectral wave model SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore was applied to Lake Zurich, a narrow pre-Alpine lake in Switzerland. The aim of the study is to investigate whether the model system consisting of SWAN and the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-2 is a suitable tool for wave forecasts for the pre-Alpine Lake Zurich. SWAN is able to simulate short-crested wind-generated surface waves. The model was forced with a time varying wind field taken from COSMO-2 with hourly outputs. Model simulations were compared with measured wave data at one near-shore site during a frontal passage associated with strong on-shore winds. The overall course of the measured wave height is well captured in the SWAN simulation: the wave amplitude significantly increases during the frontal passage followed by a transient drop in amplitude. The wave pattern on Lake Zurich is quite complex. It strongly depends on the inherent variability of the wind field and on the external forcing due to the surrounding complex topography. The influence of the temporal wind resolution is further studied with two sensitivity experiments. The first one considers a low-pass filtered wind field, based on a 2-h running mean of COSMO-2 output, and the second experiment uses simple synthetic gusts, which are implemented into the SWAN model and take into account short-term fluctuations of wind speed at 1-sec resolution. The wave field significantly differs for the 1-h and 2-h simulations, but is only negligibly affected by the gusts.

  10. YSO Jets in the Galactic Plane from UWISH2. IV. Jets and Outflows in Cygnus-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, S. V.; Froebrich, D.

    2018-01-01

    We have performed an unbiased search for outflows from young stars in Cygnus-X using 42 deg2 of data from the UKIRT Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2 Survey), to identify shock-excited near-IR H2 emission in the 1–0 S(1) 2.122 μm line. We uncovered 572 outflows, of which 465 are new discoveries, increasing the number of known objects by more than 430%. This large and unbiased sample allows us to statistically determine the typical properties of outflows from young stars. We found 261 bipolar outflows, and 16% of these are parsec scale. The typical bipolar outflow is 0.45 pc in length and has gaps of 0.025–0.1 pc between large knots. The median luminosity in the 1–0 S(1) line is 10‑3 {L}ȯ . The bipolar flows are typically asymmetrical, with the two lobes misaligned by 5°, one lobe 30% shorter than the other, and one lobe twice as bright as the other. Of the remaining outflows, 152 are single-sided and 159 are groups of extended, shock-excited H2 emission without identifiable driving sources. Half of all driving sources have sufficient WISE data to determine their evolutionary status as either protostars (80%) or classical T Tauri stars (20%). One-fifth of the driving sources are variable by more than 0.5 mag in the K-band continuum over several years. Several of the newly identified outflows provide excellent targets for follow-up studies. We particularly encourage the study of the outflows and young stars identified in a bright-rimmed cloud near IRAS 20294+4255, which seems to represent a textbook example of triggered star formation.

  11. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus Surveillance for Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks on Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: Batches 651NC and 670NC Summaries.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Batch summaries from the National Wildlife Health Center of test results from oral-pharyngeal and cloacal swabs collected on Tundra Swans and Wood Ducks on Pocosin...

  12. Report to the Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-1999 breeding ground survyes of geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of nesting geese, tundra swans, and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for the 15th consecutive year. The...

  13. Report to the Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-2000 breeding ground survyes of geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of geese, tundra swans, and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for the 16th consecutive year. The survey...

  14. Report to Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-1996 breeding ground surveys of geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone, Yukon-Kuskokwim delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of nesting geese, swans and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for the 12th consecutive year. The survey...

  15. Report to Pacific Flyway Study Committee and Waterfowl Conservation Committee on the 1985-1995 breeding ground surveys of geese and swans in the coastal zone, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of nesting geese, swans and sandhill cranes in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta were conducted for the eleventh consecutive year. The...

  16. Theoretical electronic transition moments for the Ballik-Ramsay, Fox-Herzberg, and Swan systems of C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electronic transition moments and their variation with internuclear separation are calculated for the Ballik-Ramsay (b 3 Sigma g - a 3 Pi u), Fox-Herzberg (e 3 Pi g-a 3 Pi u) and Swan (d 3 Pi g-a 3 Pi u) band systems of C2, which appear in a variety of terrestrial and astrophysical sources. Electronic wave functions of the a 3 Pi u, b 2 Sigma g -, d 3 Pi g and e 3 Pi g states of C2 are obtained by means of a self-consistent field plus configuration interaction calculation using an atomic basis of 46 Slater-type orbitals, and theoretical potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants for the four electronic states were computed. The results obtained for both the potential energy curves and electronic transition moments are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Are predictions of cancer response to targeted drugs, based on effects in unrelated tissues, the 'Black Swan' events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Beatrica; Golem, Ante Zvonimir; Kurbel, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Adverse effects of targeted drugs on normal tissues can predict the cancer response. Rash correlates with efficacy of erlotinib, cetuximab and gefitinib and onset of arterial hypertension with response to bevacizumab, sunitinib, axitinib and sorafenib, possible examples of 'Black Swan' events, unexpected scientific observations, as described by Karl Popper in 1935. The proposition is that our patients have individual intrinsic variants of cell growth control, important for tumor response and adverse effects on tumor-unrelated tissue. This means that the lack of predictive side effects in healthy tissue is linked with poor results of tumor therapy when tumor resistance is caused by mechanisms that protect all cells of that patient from the targeted drug effects.

  18. Long term variability of Cygnus X-1. VI. Energy-resolved X-ray variability 1999-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, V.; Pottschmidt, K.; Böck, M.; Schmid, C.; Nowak, M. A.; Uttley, P.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rodriguez, J.; Hell, N.; Markowitz, A.; Bodaghee, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Rothschild, R. E.; Wilms, J.

    2014-05-01

    We present the most extensive analysis of Fourier-based X-ray timing properties of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 to date, based on 12 years of bi-weekly monitoring with RXTE from 1999 to 2011. Our aim is a comprehensive study of timing behavior across all spectral states, including the elusive transitions and extreme hard and soft states. We discuss the dependence of the timing properties on spectral shape and photon energy, and study correlations between Fourier-frequency dependent coherence and time lags with features in the power spectra. Our main results follow. (a) The fractional rms in the 0.125-256 Hz range in different spectral states shows complex behavior that depends on the energy range considered. It reaches its maximum not in the hard state, but in the soft state in the Comptonized tail above 10 keV. (b) The shape of power spectra in hard and intermediate states and the normalization in the soft state are strongly energy-dependent in the 2.1-15 keV range. This emphasizes the need for an energy-dependent treatment of power spectra and a careful consideration of energy- and mass-scaling when comparing the variability of different source types, e.g., black hole binaries and AGN. PSDs during extremely hard and extremely soft states can be easily confused for energies above ~5 keV in the 0.125-256 Hz range. (c) The coherence between energy bands drops during transitions from the intermediate into the soft state but recovers in the soft state. (d) The time lag spectra in soft and intermediate states show distinct features at frequencies related to the frequencies of the main variability components seen in the power spectra and show the same shift to higher frequencies as the source softens. Our results constitute a template for other sources and for physical models for the origin of the X-ray variability. In particular, we discuss how the timing properties of Cyg X-1 can be used to assess the evolution of variability with spectral shape in other black

  19. SALINITY, HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE, TEMPERATURE, SIGMA-THETA and POTENTIAL TEMPERATURE profile data collected in the North Atlantic Ocean on the CYGNUS, HUDSON and PARIZEAU cruises CY98-079, HUD9877 and others as part of the GB project from 1993-10-12 to 1999-09-29 (NODC Accession 0104393)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0104393 includes profile and physical data collected aboard the CYGNUS, HUDSON and PARIZEAU during cruises CY98-079, HUD9877, PAR93-032, PAR94-018,...

  20. T2 Star-weighted Angiography (SWAN) Allows to Concomitantly Assess the Prostate Contour While Detecting Fiducials Before MR-based Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirajlal, Pierre-Antoine; Jambon, Eva; Albat-Esquirou, Agnes; Galmiche, Chloe; Bernhard, Jean-Christophe; Grenier, Nicolas; Haaser, Thibaud; Cornelis, François H

    2017-08-22

    To evaluate the performance of T2 star-weighted angiography (SWAN) to concomitantly assess the prostate contour while detecting fiducials before magnetic resonance (MR)-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in prostate carcinoma. Forty patients (mean age: 73.1 ± 7.5 years; average Gleason score: 7 ± 1; average prostate-specific antigen: 14.7 ± 11.6 ng/mL) underwent MR and computed tomography imaging before fiducial-based IMRT. MR protocol included SWAN, T2-weighted (T2w) and diffusion-weighted imaging in a first group (n = 20) and SWAN, T2w and T2-star weighted imaging in a second group (n = 20). In group 1, the depiction of fiducials, image sharpness and visibility of prostate boundaries were independently evaluated by 2 readers on SWAN, T2w or diffusion-weighted images. In group 2, a similar evaluation was performed by 2 other readers on SWAN and T2-star images only. Depiction of fiducials was compared to computed tomography findings. The median scores of visibility of prostate boundaries, image sharpness and depiction of fiducials by SWAN were above average to excellent for all readers. In group 1, readers correctly located 56 of 57 (98.2%) and 47 of 57 (82.5%) fiducials, respectively; and 50 of 51 (98%), and 48 of 51 (88.2%) fiducials in group 2, respectively. By allowing adequate visualization of the prostate boundaries and high depiction of fiducial markers concomitantly, SWAN might be used for treatment planning of IMRT. The use of this sequence might simplify the registration process and limit any errors associated with image fusion. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    Coastal development in Black Sea has increased in recent years. Therefore, careful monitoring of the storms and verification of numerical tools with reliable data has become important. Previous studies by Kirezci and Ozyurt (2015) investigated extreme events in Black Sea using different wind datasets (NCEP's CFSR and ECMWF's operational datasets) and different numerical tools (SWAN and Wavewatch III). These studies showed that significant effect to results is caused by the deep water source-sink terms (wave growth by wind, deep water dissipation of wave energy (whitecapping) and deep water non-linear wave-wave interactions). According to Timmermans(2015), uncertainty about wind forcing and the process of nonlinear wave-wave interactions are found to be dominant in numerical wave modelling. Therefore, in this study deep water source and sink term solution approaches of 3rd generation numerical tool (SWAN model) are tested, validated and compared using the selected extreme storms in Black Sea. 45 different storms and storm like events observed in Black Sea between years 1994-1999 are selected to use in the models. The storm selection depends on the instrumental wave data (significant wave heights, mean wave period and mean wave direction) obtained in NATO-TU Waves project by the deep water buoy measurements at Hopa, Sinop, Gelendzhik, and wind data (mean and peak wind speeds, storm durations) of the regarding events. 2 different wave growth by wind with the corresponding deep water dissipation terms and 3 different wave -wave interaction terms of SWAN model are used in this study. Wave growth by wind consist of two parts, linear growth which is explained by Cavaleri and Malanotte-Rizzoli(1981),and dominant exponential growth. There are two methods in SWAN model for exponential growth of wave, first one by Snyder et al. (1981), rescaled in terms of friction velocity by Komen et. al (1984) which is derived using driving wind speed at 10m elevation with related drag

  2. Body image satisfaction and depression in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathryn L; Janssen, Imke; Appelhans, Bradley M; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Karavolos, Kelly; Dugan, Sheila A; Avery, Elizabeth A; Shipp-Johnson, Karla J; Powell, Lynda H; Kravitz, Howard M

    2014-06-01

    With aging, women's bodies undergo changes that can affect body image perception, yet little is known about body image in midlife. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between body image and depressive symptoms in Caucasian and African-American midlife women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Chicago site. Body image was measured using the Stunkard Adult Female Figure Rating Scale, and a clinically significant level of depressive symptoms was defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ≥16 (N=405; N=63 (15.6%) with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms). Differences between perceived actual, perceived ideal, and actual body size and responses to questions concerning weight satisfaction and attractiveness were examined using logistic regression for associations with a CES-D score of ≥16. Women with body image dissatisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; p=0.04) or who perceived themselves as "unattractive" (OR=7.74; pbody image may be more likely to have clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this association.

  3. Swan-shaped bone fixation device made of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy for treating humeral fracture in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qing-lin; Zhang, Chun-cai; Gao, Tang-cheng; Xu, Shuo-gui; Ren, Ke

    2003-07-01

    To establish the animal model for treating humeral fracture with swan-shaped bone fixation device made of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy. Models of humeral fractures was established in 30 rabbits and on one side the fracture was fixed with the Ni-Ti shape memory alloy device (SMC side) and on the other with 4-hole dynamic compression plate (DCP side). Anteroposterior radiograph of both humeri were taken at the time points of 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks respectively after operation. All the rabbits survived the experiment and their forelimbs bore obviously less weight than hindlimb. In SMC side, the humeral fracture healed without either osteoporosis or external callus. The fracture healing in DCP side gave rise to obvious external callus formation, and the healing process took significantly longer time than in SMC group. The humerus of rabbit is similar to human humerus in view of their anatomic morphology and biomechanical properties, therefore rabbit humeral fracture models can be ideal for exploring the mechanism of fracture healing induced by the alloy device.

  4. An ugly duckling becomes a swan {hor_ellipsis}: How an organization becomes customer focused through listening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asercion, R.E.; Myer, V.J. [Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The story we`re about to tell is true and the names have not been changed to protect the innocent because BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR), a subsidiary of the Boeing Company, is proud of its metamorphosis from the ugly duckling of computer support to the shining swan-like star of the Help Desk industry. The transformation occurred in the midst of an all but antiquated computer technology environment, rapid technology changes, low employee morale, and high amount of customer frustration. BCSR, located at the Hanford site in the southeastern corner of Washington State, provides information resource management and computer support to the Department of Energy (DOE) complex located at the site. The primary mission of DOE is environmental restoration and waste clean-up. End User Support (EUS), an organization within BCSR, is tasked with all aspects of microcomputer support, both hardware and software. EUS efficiently and effectively supports approximately 12,000 computer users across the entire 560 square mile site. With a small staff of 50 consultants and technicians, EUS provides support to a diverse customer base that includes engineers and scientists, as well as financial personnel, managers, and clerical support. But it wasn`t always this way. BCSR management recognized it and empowered the EUS staff to make the necessary changes. Here`s how they did it.

  5. Wave energy balance in wave models (SWAN) for semi-enclosed domains-Application to the Catalan coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Elena; Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Espino, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This study has been motivated by the limited accuracy of wave models under short-duration, fetch-limited conditions. This applies particularly to the wave period, in semi-enclosed domains with highly variable wind patterns as along the Catalan coast. The wave model SWAN version 40.91A is used here in three nested grids covering all the North-western Mediterranean Sea with a grid resolution from 9 to 1 km, forced with high resolution wind patterns from BSC (Barcelona Supercomputing Center) for two study periods, the winter 2010 and the spring 2011. The results are validated in eight locations with different types of instrumentations. In order to improve the results, a modification of the whitecapping term parameters is performed. Also the appropriate frequency integral range used to calculate the integral wave parameters is tested to be sure to compare the simulation results and the measurements for the same frequency interval. The results obtained show a clear improvement of the mean wave period and the peak period for the study area, decreasing considerably the negative bias observed previously, while almost no change is observed in wave height due to the proposed modifications. These results can be generalized to the Spanish Mediterranean coast and may be applicable to study areas with similar characteristics as the ones presented here: semi-enclosed domains with fetch-limited conditions and young sea waves.

  6. Wetland State-and-Transition Model Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) provides important habitat for many species of waterfowl, including trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator), a species of greatest...

  7. Does Risk for Anxiety Increase During the Menopausal Transition? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, Joyce T.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Chang, Yuefang; Randolph, John F.; Avis, Nancy E.; Gold, Ellen B.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the risk of anxiety in women during midlife and the menopausal transition. We examined anxiety as a cluster of 4 symptoms and determined the association between menopausal stage and high anxiety during ten years of follow-up of 2,956 women of multiple race/ethnicities. Methods This study was a longitudinal analysis of data from the multi-site Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a study of menopause and aging. Women were 42-52 at study entry. The outcome was high anxiety, a score of 4 or greater on the sum of four anxiety symptoms rated according to frequency in the previous 2 weeks from 0 (none) to 4 (daily) (upper 20%). Covariates included sociodemographics, health factors, stressors, and vasomotor symptoms (VMS). Results Women with low anxiety at baseline were more likely to report high anxiety symptoms when early or late perimenopausal or postmenopausal compared to when they were premenopausal (odds ratios ranged from 1.56 to 1.61), independent of multiple risk factors, including upsetting life events, financial strain, fair/poor perceived health, and VMS. Women with high anxiety at baseline continued to have high rates of high anxiety throughout the follow-up but odds ratios did not differ by menopausal stage. Conclusion Women with high anxiety premenopausally may be chronically anxious and not at increased risk of high anxiety at specific stages of the menopausal transition. In contrast, women with low anxiety premenopausally may be more susceptible to high anxiety during and after the menopausal transition than before. PMID:23615639

  8. Application of SWAN+ADCIRC to tide-surge and wave simulation in Gulf of Maine during Patriot's Day storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-mei Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The southern coast of the Gulf of Maine in the United States is prone to flooding caused by nor'easters. A state-of-the-art fully-coupled model, the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN model with unstructured grids and the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC model, was used to study the hydrodynamic response in the Gulf of Maine during the Patriot's Day storm of 2007, a notable example of nor'easters in this area. The model predictions agree well with the observed tide-surges and waves during this storm event. Waves and circulation in the Gulf of Maine were analyzed. The Georges Bank plays an important role in dissipating wave energy through the bottom friction when waves propagate over the bank from offshore to the inner gulf due to its shallow bathymetry. Wave energy dissipation results in decreasing significant wave height (SWH in the cross-bank direction and wave radiation stress gradient, which in turn induces changes in currents. While the tidal currents are dominant over the Georges Bank and in the Bay of Fundy, the residual currents generated by the meteorological forcing and waves are significant over the Georges Bank and in the coastal area and can reach 0.3 m/s and 0.2 m/s, respectively. In the vicinity of the coast, the longshore current generated by the surface wind stress and wave radiation stress acting parallel to the coastline is inversely proportional to the water depth and will eventually be limited by the bottom friction. The storm surge level reaches 0.8 m along the western periphery of the Gulf of Maine while the wave set-up due to radiation stress variation reaches 0.2 m. Therefore, it is significant to coastal flooding.

  9. Divine Love: The Reception of Leda and the Swan Myth in Works by Jewish and Arab Israeli Artists - Contexts and Meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Sevilla Sadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The motif of the abduction of a woman is one of the most frequent in Ancient Greek and Roman art. Abductions in mythology are generally portrayed as carried out by a god disguised as a human or an animal, such as Zeus who, in the form of a bull, golden rain or a swan, seduces a beautiful young maiden. These myths have been interpreted from different viewpoints, such as gender, social, political and philosophical. One of the most frequent myths of abduction is that of Leda and the Swan, which appears in both Greek and Roman painting and sculpture. This theme has found many echoes in contemporary Israeli art, and constitutes the case study for this discussion, which belongs to the field of Classical Reception studies. The interpretations of this myth are diverse, ranging from a socio-gender context, to post-colonialism and its relevance to the local situation; to subversives, concerning tradition versus contemporary culture; to emotionality and romantic suffering; and to love as phantasmagoria. These varied interpretations will be examined in the following analysis in light of both ancient concepts and contemporary outlooks, based on literary and philosophical sources.

  10. Population estimates and geographical distributions of swans and geese in East Asia based on counts during the non-breeding season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jia, Qiang; Koyama, Kazuo; Choi, Chang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we estimated the population sizes of two swan species and four goose species from observations during the non-breeding period in East Asia. Based on combined counts from South Korea, Japan and China, we estimated the total abundance of these species as follows: 42,000–47,000 W......For the first time, we estimated the population sizes of two swan species and four goose species from observations during the non-breeding period in East Asia. Based on combined counts from South Korea, Japan and China, we estimated the total abundance of these species as follows: 42...... recently also limits our ability to determine the true status of A. f. middendorffii there, but all indications suggest this population numbers around 18,000 individuals and is in need of urgent attention. The small, highly concentrated and declining numbers of Lesser White-fronted Geese give concern...... demographic and tracking studies are required to provide the necessary information to retain populations in favourable conservation status....

  11. The Broad Iron K-alpha line of Cygnus X-1 as Seen by XMM-Newton in the EPIC-pn Modified Timing Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Refiz; Dauser, Thomas; Wilms, Jorn; Pottschmidt, Katja; Nowak, Michael A.; Fritz, Sonja; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kirsch, Marcus G. F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Staubert, Rudiger

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of the broadened, flourescent iron K(alpha) line in simultaneous XMM-Newton and RXTE data from the black hole Cygnus X-I. The XMM-Newton data were taken in a modified version of the Timing Mode of the EPIC-pn camera. In this mode the lower energy threshold of the instrument is increased to 2.8 keV to avoid telemetry drop outs due to the brightness of the source, while at the same time preserving the signal to noise ratio in the Fe K(alpha) band. We find that the best-fit spectrum consists of the sum of an exponentially cut-off power-law and relativistically smeared, ionized reflection. The shape of the broadened Fe K(alpha) feature is due to strong Compton broadening combined with relativistic broadening. Assuming a standard, thin accretion disk, the black hole is close to maximally rotating. Key words. X-rays: binaries - black hole physics - gravitation

  12. Acculturation and sleep among a multiethnic sample of women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lauren; Troxel, Wendy M; Kravitz, Howard M; Hall, Martica H; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-02-01

    Mexican immigrants to the United States report longer sleep duration and fewer sleep complaints than their US-born counterparts. To investigate whether this effect extends to other immigrant groups, we examined whether the prevalence of self-reported sleep complaints is higher among US-born Hispanic/Latina, Chinese, and Japanese immigrant women compared to their first-generation immigrant ethnic counterparts as well as to US-born whites. We examined whether these associations persisted after adjusting for sociodemographic and health characteristics and whether acculturation mediated the effects. Cross-sectional observational study. Multisite study in Oakland, CA; Los Angeles, CA; and Newark, NJ. Hispanic/Latina (n = 196), Chinese (n = 228), Japanese (n = 271) and non-Hispanic white (n = 485) women (mean age = 46 y, range 42-52 y) participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN); 410 or 59.0% of the nonwhites were first-generation immigrants. None. Questionnaires were used to assess sleep complaints, race/ethnicity, immigrant status, language acculturation (use of English language), and sociodemographic and health variables. Approximately 25% of first-generation immigrant women reported sleep complaints compared to 37% of those who were US-born nonwhites and 42% of US-born whites. Multivariable adjusted logistic regression analyses showed that US-born nonwhites had higher odds of reporting any sleep complaints (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-3.0), compared to first-generation immigrants. Women with higher levels of language acculturation had greater odds of reporting any sleep complaint compared to those with less language acculturation. Adjustment for language acculturation mediated 40.4% (95% CI 28.5-69.8) of the association between immigrant status and any sleep complaint. When results were stratified by race/ethnicity, significant mediation effects of acculturation were only found for Hispanic/Latina and Japanese women

  13. Perceived discrimination is associated with reduced breast and cervical cancer screening: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Rathouz, Paul J; Karavolos, Kelly; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Janssen, Imke; Kravitz, Howard M; Lewis, Tené T; Powell, Lynda H

    2014-02-01

    Racial disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening have been documented in African American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. Perceived discrimination may contribute to this disparity. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between perceived everyday racial/ethnic and other discrimination and receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a multiethnic population of women. We analyzed data from 3,258 women participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multiethnic/racial, longitudinal cohort study of the natural history of the menopausal transition conducted at seven U.S. sites. Participants completed a validated measure of perceived discrimination and reasons for believing that they were treated differently, along with Pap smears, clinical breast exams (CBE), and mammography at each follow-up period. We used multiple logistic regression for the binary outcomes of having a Pap smear, CBE, or mammogram in each of the two follow-up years, using self-reported "race discrimination" and "other discrimination" at baseline as the main predictors. African American women reported the highest percentage of racial discrimination (35%), followed by Chinese (20%), Hispanic (12%), Japanese (11%), and non-Hispanic white women (3%). Non-Hispanic white women reported the highest percentage of "other" discrimination (40%), followed by Chinese (33%), African American (24%), Japanese (23%), and Hispanic women (16%). Perceived racial discrimination was not associated with reduced receipt of preventive screening, except in one fully adjusted model. Reported discrimination owing to "other" reasons, such as age or gender, was associated with reduced receipt of Pap smear (odds ratio [OR] 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-0.99), CBE (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.67-0.91), and mammography (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.69-0.92) regardless of patient race. Perceived discrimination is an important issue across racial/ethnic groups and is negatively

  14. Natural radionuclides tracing in marine surface waters along the northern coast of Oman Sea by combining the radioactivity analysis, oceanic currents and the SWAN model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Mostajaboddavati, Mojtaba; Kamali, Mahdi; Tari, Marziyeh; Mosayebi, Sanaz; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh

    2015-03-15

    This study aims to establish a managed sampling plan for rapid estimate of natural radio-nuclides diffusion in the northern coast of the Oman Sea. First, the natural radioactivity analysis in 36 high volume surface water samples was carried out using a portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Second, the oceanic currents in the northern coast were investigated. Then, the third generation spectral SWAN model was utilized to simulate wave parameters. Direction of natural radioactivity propagation was coupled with the preferable wave vectors and oceanic currents direction that face to any marine pollution, these last two factors will contribute to increase or decrease of pollution in each grid. The results were indicated that the natural radioactivity concentration between the grids 8600 and 8604 is gathered in the grid 8600 and between the grids 8605 and 8608 is propagated toward middle part of Oman Sea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Near-infrared time-series photometry in the field of Cygnus OB2 association. I. Rotational scenario for candidate members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquette, J.; Bouvier, J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Vaz, L. P. R.; Guarcello, M. G.

    2017-07-01

    Context. In recent decades, the picture of early pre-main sequence stellar rotational evolution has been constrained by studies targeting different regions at a variety of ages with respect to young star formation. Observational studies suggest a dependence of rotation with mass, and for some mass ranges a connection between rotation and the presence of a circumstellar disk. The role of environmental conditions on the rotational regulation, however, has still not been fully explored. Aims: We investigate the rotational properties of candidate members of the young massive association Cygnus OB2. By evaluating their rotational properties, we address questions regarding the effect of environment properties on PMS rotational evolution. Methods: We studied JHK-band variability in 5083 candidate members (24% of them are disk-bearing stars). We selected variable stars with the Stetson variability index and performed the period search with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram for periods between 0.83-45 days. Period detections were verified using false alarm probability levels, Saunders statistics, the string and rope length method, and visual verification of folded light curves. Results: We identified 1224 periodic variable stars (24% of the candidate member sample, 8% of the disk-bearing sample, and 28% of the non-disk-bearing sample). Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to evaluate completeness and contamination of the periodic sample, out of which 894 measured periods were considered reliable. Our study was considered reasonably complete for periods between 2 and 30 days. Conclusions: The general scenario for the rotational evolution of young stars seen in other regions is confirmed by Cygnus OB2 period distributions with disc-bearing stars rotating on average more slowly than non-disk-bearing stars. A mass-rotation dependence was also verified, but as in NGC 6530, very low mass stars (M ≤ 0.4 M⊙) are rotating on average slower than higher mass stars (0.4M

  16. Raising a beautiful swan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-01-01

    and included a total of 15 interdisciplinary staff members. After transcribing the interviews, the text material was analysed and interpreted in a three-methodological-step process inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. In the analysis and interpretation three themes was identified. The themes were......: (1) a chance towards a new and better scene; (2) a step towards a more neurologically friendly environment; and (3) a renewed view of the neurological patients. This study concludes that to the health professionals, the intervention was meaningful in several ways because it created structure during...... mealtimes and emphasized the importance of creating a calm environment for both patients and health professionals. The intervention was described as an eye-opening and well-regarded event in the field of neurological care that facilitated community, and reflections on nursing care and professional identity...

  17. Raising a beautiful swan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-01-01

    The British concept named Protected Mealtimes is known for stopping all non-acute activities and giving health professionals an opportunity to focus on providing patients their meals without being interrupted or disturbed. PM involves a cultural and behavioural change in the clinical setting, since...... mealtimes and emphasized the importance of creating a calm environment for both patients and health professionals. The intervention was described as an eye-opening and well-regarded event in the field of neurological care that facilitated community, and reflections on nursing care and professional identity...

  18. Swan Lake NWR ROCSTAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Resources of Concern Selection Tool for Americas Refuges (ROCSTAR) was developed to assist national wildlife refuges, waterfowl production areas, wetland...

  19. Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby Galaxies (SWAN): Resolved Ammonia Thermometry, and Water and Methanol Masers in the Nuclear Starburst of NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Mark; Ott, Jürgen; Rand, Richard; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Schinnerer, Eva

    2017-06-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array molecular line observations of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253, from SWAN, the Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby galaxies. SWAN is a molecular line survey at centimeter wavelengths designed to reveal the physical conditions of star-forming gas over a range of star-forming galaxies. NGC 253 has been observed in four 1 GHz bands from 21 to 36 GHz at 6″ ˜ 100 pc) spatial and 3.5 km s-1 spectral resolution. In total we detect 19 transitions from 7 molecular and atomic species. We have targeted the metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (NH3) from (1, 1) to (5, 5) and the (9, 9) line, the 22.2 GHz water (H2O) ({6}16{--}{5}23) maser, and the 36.1 GHz methanol (CH3OH) ({4}-1{--}{3}0) maser. Using NH3 as a thermometer, we present evidence for uniform heating over the central kpc of NGC 253. The molecular gas is best described by a two kinetic temperature model with a warm 130 K and a cooler 57 K component. A comparison of these observations with previous ALMA results suggests that the molecular gas is not heated in photon-dominated regions or shocks. It is possible that the gas is heated by turbulence or cosmic rays. In the galaxy center we find evidence for NH3(3, 3) masers. Furthermore, we present velocities and luminosities of three water maser features related to the nuclear starburst. We partially resolve CH3OH masers seen at the edges of the bright molecular emission, which coincides with expanding molecular superbubbles. This suggests that the masers are pumped by weak shocks in the bubble surfaces.

  20. Macrodinâmicas de crescimento em uma economia Solow-Swan com migração: uma abordagem de jogos evolucionários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaylson Jair da Silveira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduz-se no modelo Solow-Swan a migração como uma dinâmica satisficing. A conclusão geral está de acordo com a abordagem tradicional: as características da economia doméstica no estado estacionário dependem do saldo migratório líquido. Entretanto, novos resultados são obtidos. Em primeiro lugar, a economia doméstica não pode trilhar sua trajetória de crescimento equilibrado como uma perpétua receptora/fornecedora líquida de mão-de-obra. Em segundo lugar, caso ela apresente em seu estado estacionário um saldo migratório líquido nulo, o tamanho de sua população depende das condições iniciais (path dependence. Finalmente, demonstra-se que a introdução de um "efeito congestionamento" da imigração líquida abre a possibilidade de existência simultânea da economia doméstica e do resto do mundo.Migration as a satisficing dynamics is introduced into the Solow-Swan model. The general conclusion is in agreement with that of the traditional approach: the steady-state features of domestic economy depends on the net migration rate. However, there are new outcomes. The domestic economy cannot be a perpetual host/supplier of migrants in its balanced growth path. If the domestic economy shows a zero-net migration rate in the steady state, then the population level will depend on the initial conditions (path dependence. A "congestion effect" resulting from net migration opens the possibility of simultaneous existence of the domestic economy and the rest of the world.

  1. USE OF FOCUS GROUPS IN MULTI-SITE, MULTI-ETHNIC RESEARCH PROJECTS FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH: A STUDY OF WOMEN ACROSS THE NATION (SWAN) EXAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Adler, Shelley R.; Mouton, Charles P.; Ory, Marcia; Underwood, Lynne G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To outline the lessons learned about the use of focus groups for the multi-site, multi-ethnic longitudinal Study of Women Across the Nation (SWAN). Focus groups were designed to identify potential cultural differences in the incidence of symptoms and the meaning of transmenopause among women of diverse cultures, and to identify effective recruitment and retention strategies. Design Inductive and deductive focus groups for a multi-ethnic study. Setting Seven community research sites across the United States conducted focus groups with six ethnic populations: African American, Chinese American, Japanese American, Mexican American, non-Hispanic white, and Puerto Rican. Patients or Participants Community women from each ethnic group of color. Interventions A set of four/five focus groups in each ethnic group as the formative stage of the deductive, quantitative SWAN survey. Main Outcome Measures Identification of methodological advantages and challenges to the successful implementation of formative focus groups in a multi-ethnic, multi-site population-based epidemiologic study. Results We provide recommendations from our lessons learned to improve the use of focus groups in future studies with multi-ethnic populations. Conclusions Mixed methods using inductive and deductive approaches require the scientific integrity of both research paradigms. Adequate resources and time must be budgeted as essential parts of the overall strategy from the outset of study. Inductive cross-cultural researchers should be key team members, beginning with inception through each subsequent design phase to increase the scientific validity, generalizability, and comparability of the results across diverse ethnic groups, to assure the relevance, validity and applicability of the findings to the multicultural population of focus. PMID:19769020

  2. Use of focus groups in multi-site, multi-ethnic research projects for women's health: a Study of Women Across the Nation (swan) example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Adler, Shelley R; Mouton, Charles E; Ory, Marcia; Underwood, Lynne G

    2009-01-01

    To outline the lessons learned about the use of focus groups for the multisite, multi-ethnic longitudinal Study of Women Across the Nation (SWAN). Focus groups were designed to identify potential cultural differences in the incidence of symptoms and the meaning of transmenopause among women of diverse cultures, and to identify effective recruitment and retention strategies. Inductive and deductive focus groups for a multi-ethnic study. Seven community research sites across the United States conducted focus groups with six ethnic populations: African American, Chinese American, Japanese American, Mexican American, non-Hispanic white, and Puerto Rican. Community women from each ethnic group of color. A set of four/five focus groups in each ethnic group as the formative stage of the deductive, quantitative SWAN survey. Identification of methodological advantages and challenges to the successful implementation of formative focus groups in a multi-ethnic, multi-site population-based epidemiologic study. We provide recommendations from our lessons learned to improve the use of focus groups in future studies with multi-ethnic populations. Mixed methods using inductive and deductive approaches require the scientific integrity of both research paradigms. Adequate resources and time must be budgeted as essential parts of the overall strategy from the outset of study. Inductive cross-cultural researchers should be key team members, beginning with inception through each subsequent design phase to increase the scientific validity, generalizability, and comparability of the results across diverse ethnic groups, to assure the relevance, validity and applicability of the findings to the multicultural population of focus.

  3. Parity, lactation, bone strength, and 16-year fracture risk in adult women: findings from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takahiro; Ishii, Shinya; Greendale, Gail A; Cauley, Jane A; Ruppert, Kristine; Crandall, Carolyn J; Karlamangla, Arun S

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to examine the associations of lifetime parity and accumulated length of lactation with bone strength in women prior to the menopause transition and fracture risk during and after the transition. Participants were 2239 pre- or early peri-menopausal women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), ages 42-53 years at baseline, who had no childbirths after age 42. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in the femoral neck and the lumbar spine at the baseline SWAN visit using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and the composite indices of femoral neck strength relative to load (in three failure modes: compression, bending, and impact) were calculated from femoral neck BMD, femoral neck size, and body size. Data on fractures after age 42 were collected for a median follow-up of 15.7 years (interquartile range, 11.4-18.5 years). In multiple linear regressions adjusted for covariates, lifetime parity was associated positively with femoral neck strength relative to load (0.024 standard deviation (SD) increment in impact strength index per childbirth, p=0.049), but accumulated length of lactation was associated negatively with lumbar spine BMD (0.018 SD decrement per every additional 6 months of lactation, p=0.040). In Cox proportional hazards regressions adjusted for covariates, neither parity nor lactation was associated with fracture hazard after age 42. In conclusion, parity and lactation have little impact on peak bone strength prior to menopause, and do not affect fracture risk after age 42 over 16-year follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationships between Menopausal and Mood Symptoms and EEG Sleep Measures in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Middle-Aged Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Howard M.; Avery, Elizabeth; Sowers, MaryFran; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Owens, Jane F.; Matthews, Karen A.; Hall, Martica; Zheng, Huiyong; Gold, Ellen B.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine associations of vasomotor and mood symptoms with visually scored and computer-generated measures of EEG sleep. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Setting: Community-based in-home polysomnography (PSG). Participants: 343 African American, Caucasian, and Chinese women; ages 48–58 years; pre-, peri- or post-menopausal; participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (SWAN Sleep Study). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Measures included PSG-assessed sleep duration, continuity, and architecture, delta sleep ratio (DSR) computed from automated counts of delta wave activity, daily diary-assessed vasomotor symptoms (VMS), questionnaires to collect mood (depression, anxiety) symptoms, medication, and lifestyle information, and menopausal status using bleeding criteria. Sleep outcomes were modeled using linear regression. Nocturnal VMS were associated with longer sleep time. Higher anxiety symptom scores were associated with longer sleep latency and lower sleep efficiency, but only in women reporting nocturnal VMS. Contrary to expectations, VMS and mood symptoms were unrelated to either DSR or REM latency. Conclusions: Vasomotor symptoms moderated associations of anxiety with EEG sleep measures of sleep latency and sleep efficiency and was associated with longer sleep duration in this multi-ethnic sample of midlife women. Citation: Kravitz HM; Avery E; Sowers MF; Bromberger JT; Owens JF; Matthews KA; Hall M; Zheng H; Gold EB; Buysse DJ. Relationships between menopausal and mood symptoms and Eeg sleep measures in a multi-ethnic sample of middle-aged women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1221-1232. PMID:21886360

  5. Catchment export of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus across an agro-urban land use gradient, Swan-Canning River system, southwestern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Kevin C.

    2010-03-01

    Coastal regions in many regions of the world are under increasing pressure from the expansion of agriculture and urbanization associated with elevated N and P loading and eutrophication of coastal estuaries. I compared how mixed land use catchments deliver dissolved and particulate forms of C, N, and P in streamflow to the Swan-Canning estuary that bisects Perth, Western Australia. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) composed the majority of the total C and N load, particulate C and N fluxes were minor, and P fluxes were evenly split between soluble reactive phosphorus and particulate/organic P. In contrast to current biogeochemical theory, DON export was dominant in urban and agricultural catchments in the low-gradient environment of the Swan Coastal Plain, whereas NO3 export was a greater factor in higher-gradient, forested catchments on the urban fringe. This trend suggests that hydrologic conditions that supported coastal wetlands prior to human development may still promote DON mobilization as well as dissolved inorganic nitrogen loss along hydrologic flow paths. Substantial variability in export of C, N, and P across catchments highlights the unique hydrologic properties of Australian catchments. Areal C, N, and P export was significantly related to catchment runoff which was lowest in a catchment with inland drainage, but greatest in urban catchments with impervious surfaces and shallow groundwater. The effective delivery of DOC and DON to aquatic ecosystems in urbanizing coastal catchments underscores the importance of restoration efforts that address hydrologic retention as well as the source and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter.

  6. Monitoring the 2010-2015 Hard X-ray/Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Activity of Cygnus X-1 with GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Gary L.; Jenke, Peter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2017-08-01

    Cygnus X-1 is a high-mass X-ray binary with a black hole companion that typically resides in a hard spectral state, where it is extremely bright in hard X-rays and low energy gamma rays and much fainter in the soft X-rays. Since 2008 August, we have used the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi to monitor Cyg X-1 in the 10-1000 keV energy range using the Earth occultation technique. Starting in the middle of 2010, Cyg X-1 was observed by GBM to enter a period of increased activity, making several transitions to the soft state, characterized by the typical rise in the soft X-ray flux and decrease in the hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray flux. From the soft state, Cyg X-1 made several transitions to intermediate states as well as several short transitions back to the hard state. At the end of 2015, Cyg X-1 transitioned back to the canonical hard state, where it has remained ever since. We have generated long-term, broad-band light curves based on daily monitoring of Cyg X-1 over a 9 year period showing the hard-to-soft state transitions, the intermediate states, and the soft-to-hard and failed soft-to-hard state transitions. Spectra are presented of Cyg X-1 in the various states and comparisons made between spectra in the same state. The time evolution of the x-ray hardness ratios is also presented.

  7. Modelling deep water habitats to develop a spatially explicit, fine scale understanding of the distribution of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renae K Hovey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus, is endemic to Western Australia and supports substantial commercial and recreational fisheries. Due to and its wide distribution and the commercial and recreational importance of the species a key component of managing western rock lobster is understanding the ecological processes and interactions that may influence lobster abundance and distribution. Using terrain analyses and distribution models of substrate and benthic biota, we assess the physical drivers that influence the distribution of lobsters at a key fishery site. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using data collected from hydroacoustic and towed video surveys, 20 variables (including geophysical, substrate and biota variables were developed to predict the distributions of substrate type (three classes of reef, rhodoliths and sand and dominant biota (kelp, sessile invertebrates and macroalgae within a 40 km(2 area about 30 km off the west Australian coast. Lobster presence/absence data were collected within this area using georeferenced pots. These datasets were used to develop a classification tree model for predicting the distribution of the western rock lobster. Interestingly, kelp and reef were not selected as predictors. Instead, the model selected geophysical and geomorphic scalar variables, which emphasise a mix of terrain within limited distances. The model of lobster presence had an adjusted D(2 of 64 and an 80% correct classification. CONCLUSIONS: Species distribution models indicate that juxtaposition in fine scale terrain is most important to the western rock lobster. While key features like kelp and reef may be important to lobster distribution at a broad scale, it is the fine scale features in terrain that are likely to define its ecological niche. Determining the most appropriate landscape configuration and scale will be essential to refining niche habitats and will aid in selecting appropriate sites for protecting critical

  8. NuSTAR view of the Z-type neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Aditya S.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pahari, M.; Raychaudhuri, B.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the NuSTAR observation of the Z-type neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 performed on 2015 January 7. During this observation, the source exhibited a sudden decrease in count rate (dips) and stronger variability in 3-79 keV X-ray light curve. The hardness-intensity diagram shows that the source remained in the so-called normal branch of the Z-track, although an extended `flaring branch' is observed during the dips. The source was in a soft spectral state with the 3-45 keV luminosity of L ≃ (0.5-1.1) × 1038 erg s-1, assuming a distance of 8 kpc. Both the non-dip and dip X-ray spectra are well represented by models in which the soft band is dominated by the emission from the disc, while the hard X-ray band is dominated by the Comptonized emission from the boundary layer/corona and its reflected emission from the disc. The X-ray spectrum also revealed a broad Fe K α emission line which is nearly symmetric at the higher flux and asymmetric when the flux is reduced by a factor of ˜2. The relativistic reflection model predicts the inner radius of the accretion disc as Rin ≃ 2.5-6.0 RISCO (≃30-73 km) for the non-dip state and Rin ≃ 2.0-2.6 RISCO (≃24-32 km) for the dip state. If the inner disc is truncated due to the pressure arising from a magnetic field, this implies an upper limit of the magnetic field strength of ≤7.6 × 109 G at the magnetic poles which is consistent with other estimates.

  9. Modelling deep water habitats to develop a spatially explicit, fine scale understanding of the distribution of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Renae K; Van Niel, Kimberly P; Bellchambers, Lynda M; Pember, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    The western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus, is endemic to Western Australia and supports substantial commercial and recreational fisheries. Due to and its wide distribution and the commercial and recreational importance of the species a key component of managing western rock lobster is understanding the ecological processes and interactions that may influence lobster abundance and distribution. Using terrain analyses and distribution models of substrate and benthic biota, we assess the physical drivers that influence the distribution of lobsters at a key fishery site. Using data collected from hydroacoustic and towed video surveys, 20 variables (including geophysical, substrate and biota variables) were developed to predict the distributions of substrate type (three classes of reef, rhodoliths and sand) and dominant biota (kelp, sessile invertebrates and macroalgae) within a 40 km(2) area about 30 km off the west Australian coast. Lobster presence/absence data were collected within this area using georeferenced pots. These datasets were used to develop a classification tree model for predicting the distribution of the western rock lobster. Interestingly, kelp and reef were not selected as predictors. Instead, the model selected geophysical and geomorphic scalar variables, which emphasise a mix of terrain within limited distances. The model of lobster presence had an adjusted D(2) of 64 and an 80% correct classification. Species distribution models indicate that juxtaposition in fine scale terrain is most important to the western rock lobster. While key features like kelp and reef may be important to lobster distribution at a broad scale, it is the fine scale features in terrain that are likely to define its ecological niche. Determining the most appropriate landscape configuration and scale will be essential to refining niche habitats and will aid in selecting appropriate sites for protecting critical lobster habitats.

  10. Spectrum and Morphology of the Two Brightest Milagro Sources in the Cygnus Region: MGRO J2019+37 and MGRO J2031+41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, U.; Allen, B, T.; Aune, T.; Berley, D.; Bonamente, E.; Christopher, G. E.; DeYoung, T.; Dingus, B. L.; Ellsworth, R. W.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Cygnus region is a very bright and complex portion of the TeV sky, host to unidentified sources and a diffuse excess with respect to conventional cosmic-ray propagation models. Two of the brightest TeV sources, MGRO J2019+37 and MGRO J2031+41, are analyzed using Milagro data with a new technique, and their emission is tested under two different spectral assumptions: a power law and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The new analysis technique is based on an energy estimator that uses the fraction of photomultiplier tubes in the observatory that detect the extensive air shower. The photon spectrum is measured in the range 1-100 TeV using the last three years of Milagro data (2005-2008), with the detector in its final configuration. An F-test indicates that MGRO J2019+37 is better fit by a power law with an exponential cutoff than by a simple power law. The best-fitting parameters for the power law with exponential cutoff model are a normalization at 10 TeV of 7(sup +5 sub -2) × 10(exp -10)/ s /sq m/ TeV, a spectral index of 2.0(sup +0.5 sub -10), and a cutoff energy of 29(sup +50 sub -16) TeV. MGRO J2031+41 shows no evidence of a cutoff. The best-fitting parameters for a power law are a normalization of 2.1(sup +0.6 sub -0.6) × 10(exp -10)/ s/sq m/ TeV and a spectral index of 3.22(sup +0.23 sub -0.18. The overall flux is subject to a approx.. 30% systematic uncertainty. The systematic uncertainty on the power-law indices is approx. 0.1. Both uncertainties have been verified with cosmic-ray data. A comparison with previous results from TeV J2032+4130, MGRO J2031+41, and MGRO J2019+37 is also presented.

  11. El doble y el espejo en Cisne negro (Darren Aronofsky, 2010. The double and the mirror in Black Swan (Darren Aronofsky, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana España

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Con su último largometraje, Cisne negro (2010, Darren Aronofsky propone una nueva visión de su cine de la obsesión, a través del proceso de autodestrucción de una bailarina, sumergida en su afán por encarnar el papel principal en una obra de ballet.El presente artículo trata de abordar el tratamiento que el director realiza del fenómeno del doble, como vehículo sobre el que se sustenta la crisis obsesiva de la protagonista, atendiendo a sus diversas representaciones y objetivos en la configuración final del texto. With his latest film, Black Swan (2010, Darren Aronofsky offers a new vision of his obsession cinema, through the process of self-destruction of a dancer, immersed in her effort to embody the lead role in a ballet performance. This current article aim to attend the director treatment of the double phenomenon as a vehicle on which rests the obsessive crisis of the protagonist, according to their several representations and objectives in the final configuration of the text.

  12. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

  13. O modelo de Solow-Swan na linguagem de dinâmica de sistemas: uma aplicação para o Brasil

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    Newton Paulo Bueno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste texto é contribuir para a discussão sobre o crescimento econômico brasileiro utilizando uma abordagem inédita: a dinâmica de sistemas. Especificamente, pretende-se desenvolver uma versão sistêmica do modelo de Solow-Swan que permita explorar novos ângulos de insights de trabalhos que têm empregado o modelo para o Brasil e avaliar as possibilidades de crescimento da economia brasileira no futuro próximo. A motivação para abordar o tema com essa metodologia é que ela permite modelar o crescimento econômicocomo um processo dinamicamente complexo. Mostrar-se-á que abordar o tema dessa perspectiva abre uma gama de novas possibilidades no que diz respeito à experimentaçãocom modelos teóricos, tais como proceder a análises mais acuradas de sensibilidadede soluções e obter estimativas para parâmetros não observáveis, por meio do procedimento de calibragem.

  14. Von Krahli Teatri „Luikede järv“ kui mälumasin: esteetiline absoluut ja sotsiaalne kontekst / Von Krahl Theatre’s “Swan Lake” as a Memory Machine: Aesthetic Absolute and Social Context

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    Riina Oruaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the interrelation between video projections and stage action and the meanings created via these relations in Von Krahl Theatre’s production of „Swan Lake“ (2003, directors Peeter Jalakas and Alexander Pepelyayev. „Swan Lake“ at Von Krahl Theatre was a post-modern interpretation of Tchaikovsky’s ballet that deconstructed myths of Soviet society. In the conceptual introduction to the performance, the directors dedicated the production to the theme of absolute beauty and aesthetic ideal, and claimed the synthesis of aesthetic and social contexts to be of utmost importance. The performance analysis in this article reveals the ambivalence of the aesthetic absolute and position of the ballet „Swan Lake“ as an icon. The context of this production was layered through the social and political, as well as artistic processes that influenced the reception of the performance. The social and aesthetic context is analysed based on Mieke Bal’s concept of framing, which is more dynamic and open than understanding context as something fixed. The analysis of screens and the stage action is based on the theoretical models of intermediality in performing arts.  The central section of this paper is focused on analysing the stage action and the relationship between the stage action and video projections as techniques of dissonance. This work by Jalakas and Pepelyaev was a multimedia dance performance where video clips of the ballets „Swan Lake“ and „The Dying Swan“ alternated with footages of Soviet heavy industry, war apparatus, athletes, etc. The various oppositions and parallels between the stage action and screen footage made the political meaning of the performance visible. The paper also analyses the narrative structure, the cast of characters and scenography. There was a certain hierarchy in the cast (actors versus dancers and character structure (politicians, Black and White Swan, and the corps de ballet which was

  15. Longitudinal Changes in Sexual Functioning as Women Transition Through Menopause: Results from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Nancy E.; Brockwell, Sarah; Randolph, John F.; Shen, Shunhua; Cain, Virginia S.; Ory, Marcia; Greendale, Gail A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Sexual functioning is an important component of women’s lives. The extent to which the menopause transition is associated with decreased sexual functioning remains inconclusive. This study seeks to determine if advancing through the menopause transition is associated with changes in sexual functioning. Design A prospective, longitudinal cohort study of women aged 42–52 at baseline recruited at 7 US sites (N=3302) in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Cohort eligible women had an intact uterus, at least one ovary, were not currently using exogenous hormones, were either pre- or early perimenopausal, and self-identified as one of the study’s designated racial/ethnic groups. Data from the baseline interview and six annual follow-up visits are reported. Outcomes are self-reported ratings of importance of sex; frequency of sexual desire, arousal, masturbation, sexual intercourse, and pain during intercourse; degree of emotional satisfaction and physical pleasure. Results Adjusting for baseline age, chronological aging, and relevant social, health, and psychological parameters, the odds of reporting vaginal or pelvic pain increased and desire decreased by late perimenopause. Masturbation increased at early perimenopause, but declined during postmenopause. Menopausal transition was unrelated to other outcomes. Health, psychological functioning, and importance of sex were related to all sexual function outcomes. Age, race/ethnicity, marital status, change in relationship, and vaginal dryness were also associated with sexual functioning. Conclusions Pain during sexual intercourse increases and sexual desire decreases over the menopausal transition. Masturbation increases during the early transition, but then declines in postmenopause. Adjusting for other factors, the menopausal transition was not independently associated with reports of the importance of sex, sexual arousal, frequency of sexual intercourse, emotional satisfaction with

  16. Role stress, role reward, and mental health in a multiethnic sample of midlife women: results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza di Scalea, Teresa; Matthews, Karen A; Avis, Nancy E; Thurston, Rebecca C; Brown, Charlotte; Harlow, Sioban; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about the independent associations of reward and stress within specific roles with multiple measures of mental health in an ethnically diverse community sample of midlife women. The objective of this study is to examine if (1) role reward (within each role and across roles) contributes directly to mental health and buffers the negative impact of role stress and (2) associations among role occupancy, role stress, and role reward and mental health vary by race/ethnicity. With separate logistic regression analysis, we investigated cross-sectional relationships between role stress and role reward with presence/absence of high depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D≥16]), anxiety symptoms (feeling tense or nervous, irritable or grouchy, fearful for no reason, and heart pounding or racing total score≥4), or low social functioning (bottom 25th percentile of the Short-Form-36 [SF-36] social functioning subscale) in 2549 women participating in the third visit of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a longitudinal population-based study of menopause. High reward across roles attenuated the negative impact of role stress on social functioning but not on anxiety or depression. High reward marriage buffered the impact of marital stress on depression, and high reward mothering buffered the effect of maternal stress on depression and social functioning. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics and Chinese with high stress across roles had better social functioning, and African American mothers had lower odds of high depressive symptoms. Role reward buffers the negative impact of stress on social functioning and depression, but not on anxiety. Minorities may respond to role stress by seeking social support.

  17. Consistently High Sports/Exercise Activity Is Associated with Better Sleep Quality, Continuity and Depth in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E.; Irish, Leah A.; Krafty, Robert T.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Dugan, Sheila A.; Hall, Martica H.

    2013-01-01

    sleep quality, continuity and depth in midlife women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1279-1288. PMID:23997360

  18. Environmental tobacco smoke and risk of late-diagnosis incident fibroids in the Study of Women's Health across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason Y Y; Chang, Po-Yin; Gold, Ellen B; Johnson, Wesley O; Lee, Jennifer S

    2016-10-01

    To assess the longitudinal relationship of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure during midlife, and its interaction with active smoking, with the risk of late-diagnosis incident uterine fibroids during the menopausal transition. Thirteen-year prospective cohort study. Not applicable. Community-based, multiracial/ethnic cohort of 2,575 women aged 42 to 52 years at baseline, undergoing the menopausal transition. Questionnaire and blood draws. Discrete-time proportional odds models were used to estimate the conditional odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident fibroids, adjusted for menopausal status, race/ethnicity, study site, age, education, estradiol levels, sex hormone use, body mass index, timing of blood draw, age at menarche, alcohol use, and smoking status and pack-years. As part of SWAN, at each near-annual study visit, ETS exposure, smoking, and fibroid occurrence were self-reported via questionnaire, and blood draws were collected. Women who were exposed to ETS (≥1 person-hour/week) had 1.28 (95% CI, 1.03, 1.60) times the adjusted odds of incident fibroids in the ensuing year compared the unexposed. The odds were elevated in never smokers (adjusted OR 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06, 1.70) and former smokers (adjusted OR 2.57; 95% CI, 1.05, 7.23). In midlife, ETS exposure was associated with an increased risk of late-diagnosis incident fibroids in women undergoing the menopausal transition. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of SWAN+ADCIRC to tide-surge and wave simulation in Gulf of Maine during Patriot’s Day storm

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    Dong-mei Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The southern coast of the Gulf of Maine in the United States is prone to flooding caused by nor’easters. A state-of-the-art fully-coupled model, the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN model with unstructured grids and the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC model, was used to study the hydrodynamic response in the Gulf of Maine during the Patriot’s Day storm of 2007, a notable example of nor’easters in this area. The model predictions agree well with the observed tide-surges and waves during this storm event. Waves and circulation in the Gulf of Maine were analyzed. The Georges Bank plays an important role in dissipating wave energy through the bottom friction when waves propagate over the bank from offshore to the inner gulf due to its shallow bathymetry. Wave energy dissipation results in decreasing significant wave height (SWH in the cross-bank direction and wave radiation stress gradient, which in turn induces changes in currents. While the tidal currents are dominant over the Georges Bank and in the Bay of Fundy, the residual currents generated by the meteorological forcing and waves are significant over the Georges Bank and in the coastal area and can reach 0.3 m/s and 0.2 m/s, respectively. In the vicinity of the coast, the longshore current generated by the surface wind stress and wave radiation stress acting parallel to the coastline is inversely proportional to the water depth and will eventually be limited by the bottom friction. The storm surge level reaches 0.8 m along the western periphery of the Gulf of Maine while the wave set-up due to radiation stress variation reaches 0.2 m. Therefore, it is significant to coastal flooding.

  20. Psychosocial features associated with lifetime comorbidity of major depression and anxiety disorders among a community sample of mid-life women: the SWAN mental health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyranowski, Jill M; Schott, Laura L; Kravitz, Howard M; Brown, Charlotte; Thurston, Rebecca C; Joffe, Hadine; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2012-12-01

    In clinical samples, comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders is associated with greater symptom severity and elevated suicide risk. Less is known, however, regarding the long-term psychosocial impact that a lifetime history of both major depressive disorder (MDD) and one or more anxiety disorders has in community samples. This report evaluates clinical, psychological, social, and stress-related characteristics associated with a lifetime history of MDD and anxiety. Data from 915 women aged 42-52 who were recruited as part of the the Study of Women's Health across the Nation (SWAN) Mental Health Study were used to examine clinical and psychosocial features across groups of women with a lifetime history of MDD alone, anxiety alone, both MDD and anxiety, or neither MDD nor anxiety. As compared with women with a history of either MDD or anxiety alone, women with a comorbid history were more likely to report recurrent MDD, multiple and more severe lifetime anxiety disorders, greater depressive and anxiety symptoms, diminished social support, and more past-year distressing life events. Exploratory analyses indicated that women with a comorbid history also report more childhood abuse/neglect and diminished self-esteem, as compared with women with a history of either disorder alone. Midlife women with a comorbid history that includes both MDD and anxiety disorders report diminished social support, more symptomatic distress, and a more severe and recurrent psychiatric history. Future research is needed to clarify the biological and psychosocial risk factors associated with this comorobid profile, and to develop targeted interventions for this at-risk group. Depression and Anxiety 00:1-8, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Methods to determine pumped irrigation-water withdrawals from the Snake River between Upper Salmon Falls and Swan Falls Dams, Idaho, using electrical power data, 1990-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Molly A.

    1999-01-01

    Pumped withdrawals compose most of the irrigation-water diversions from the Snake River between Upper Salmon Falls and Swan Falls Dams in southwestern Idaho. Pumps at 32 sites along the reach lift water as high as 745 feet to irrigate croplands on plateaus north and south of the river. The number of pump sites at which withdrawals are being continuously measured has been steadily decreasing, from 32 in 1990 to 7 in 1998. A cost-effective and accurate means of estimating annual irrigation-water withdrawals at pump sites that are no longer continuously measured was needed. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1998, as part of its Water-Use Program, to determine power-consumption coeffi- cients (PCCs) for each pump site so that withdrawals could be estimated by using electrical powerconsumption and total head data. PCC values for each pump site were determined by using withdrawal data that were measured by the U.S. Geological Survey during 1990–92 and 1994–95, energy data reported by Idaho Power Company during the same period, and total head data collected at each site during a field inventory in 1998. Individual average annual withdrawals for the 32 pump sites ranged from 1,120 to 44,480 acre-feet; average PCC values ranged from 103 to 1,248 kilowatthours per acre-foot. During the 1998 field season, power demand, total head, and withdrawal at 18 sites were measured to determine 1998 PCC values. Most of the 1998 PCC values were within 10 percent of the 5-year average, which demonstrates that withdrawals for a site that is no longer continuously measured can be calculated with reasonable accuracy by using the PCC value determined from this study and annual power-consumption data. K-factors, coefficients that describe the amount of energy necessary to lift water, were determined for each pump site by using values of PCC and total head and ranged from 1.11 to 1.89 kilowatthours per acre-foot per foot. Statistical methods were used to define the

  2. Effects of multiple disturbances in seagrass meadows : shading decreases resilience to grazing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eklof, Johan S.; McMahon, Kathryn; Lavery, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystem shifts are often associated with multiple disturbances, but limited knowledge on the mechanisms involved hampers management. This study investigated how short-term shading affected the resilience of the seagrass Halophila ovalis to grazing by black swans (Cygnus atratus) - a historically

  3. INTEGRAÇÃO DE MODELAGEM NUMÉRICA (SWAN E DADOS DE CAMPO NA DETERMINAÇÃO DO CLIMA DE ONDAS NO LITORAL SETENTRIONAL DO RIO GRANDE DO NORTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Alves de Matos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta os resultados da aplicação do modelo numérico Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN com análises comparativas das medidas obtidas a partir dos resultados de modelagem e de medições durante as campanhas de campo em 2010 e 2012 no Litoral Setentrional do Rio Grande do Norte (NE do Brasil. O objetivo principal do presente estudo foi aplicar e validar o modelo numérico SWAN na determinação do clima de ondas, avaliar seus pontos fortes e limitações para a região de interesse. Os dados de campo realizados em dois pontos próximo da costa em profundidades de 3 m (PT_1 e 6 m (PT_2 por meio do uso de dois adcp: AWAC e AQUADOPP. Os dados adquiridos com estes equipamentos foram processados e permitiram a realização de análises espectrais de altura significativa, HS (m, período médio, Tmed (s, e direção média, DIR (º. Para a implementação do modelo SWAN foram empregados para as condições de contorno os dados de agitação a partir do modelo de 3ª geração de escala oceânica Wavewatch III. Para o refinamento e aplicabilidade do modelo, foram introduzidos dados de ventos e maré locais, corrigidos com base no Manual de Engenharia Costeira (CEM, permitindo assim, melhor ajuste dos resultados da modelagem. O domínio de cálculo foi referenciado para as dimensões da carta náutica 720, com três malhas regulares de diferentes dimensões e resolução: externa, intermediária e interna, sendo esta última, utilizada para fornecer os parâmetros de propagação da onda ao longo da costa. As configurações usadas para o SWAN foram as padrões em modo estacionário, com as formulações KOMEN, a dissipação devido à rebentação induzida pelo fundo com atrito de fundo usando a formulação JONSWAP com coeficiente de atrito С = 0.015m2s-3 em condições wind sea, e a formulação whitecapping ou excesso de declividade, as interações entre tríades de ondas e interações onda-onda quádrupla. As estat

  4. Reparação de múltiplas fístulas broncopleurais periféricas por oclusão brônquica selectiva com catéter de Swan-Ganz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Glória

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: As fístulas broncopleurais (FBP constituem um problema clínico frequente mas de resolução complicada, sobretudo em doentes sob ventilação mecânica. O manejo destas situações envolve um controlo adequado.dos sistemas de drenagem torácica e do suporte ventilatório. A terapêutica cirúrgica é habitualmente reservada para as situações em que as medidas médicas falham, mas muitos doentes internados em UCI são péssimos candidatos a uma cirurgia torácica major. Nos últimos anos têm sido descritas várias técnicas para reparação endobrônquica de FBP envolvendo o uso de materiais selantes, tais como derivados do cianoacrilato ou fibrina. Descrevemos uma nova técnica de reparação de FBPs por oclusão brônquica selectiva com catéter de Swan-Ganz. Esta técnica foi aplicada com sucesso num doente ventilado, com internamento prolongado em UCI (mais de 3 meses por múltiplas fistulas distais de alto débito que condicionavam insuficiência respiratória grave e impossibilidade de desmame do ventilador. SUMMARY: The medical therapy of bronchopleural fistulas (BPF in the mechanically ventilated patient continue to present a formidable challenge. Management includes adequate control of chest tubes, drainage systems and ventilator support. Most patients in ICU are poor surgical candidates so nonoperative therapy was develloped.in last years. These modalities include endobronchial occlusion with cyanoacrylatebased agents and fibrin agents. We present a new technique by selective bronchial occlusion with a Swan-Ganz catheter. This technique was successfully applied in a ventilated patient with long-standing permanence in ICU by multiple peripheral high-flow BPF and serious respiratory failure with ventilator dependence. Palavras-chave: Broncofibroscopia, fistula broncopleural, oclusão brônquica, Key-Words: fiberoptic bronchoscopy, bronchopleural fistula, bronchial occlusion

  5. Percutaneous retrieval of centrally embolized fragments of central venous access devices or knotted Swan-Ganz catheters. Clinical report of 14 retrievals with detailed angiographic analysis and review of procedural aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Kalińczuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Totally implantable venous access systems (TIVAS, Swan-Ganz (SG and central venous catheters (CVC allow easy and repetitive entry to the central cardiovascular system. Fragments of them may be released inadvertently into the cardiovascular system during their insertion or as a result of mechanical complications encountered during long-term utilization. Aim : To present results of percutaneous retrieval of embolized fragments of central venous devices or knotted SG and review the procedural aspects with a series of detailed angiographies. Material and methods : Between January 2003 and December 2012 there were 14 (~0.025% successful retrievals in 13 patients (44 ±16 years, 15% females of embolized fragments of TIVAS (n = 10 or CVC (n = 1 or of dislodged guide-wires (n = 2 or knotted SG (n = 1. Results : Foreign bodies with the forward end located in the right ventricle (RV, as well as those found in the pulmonary artery (PA, often required repositioning with a pigtail catheter as compared to those catheter fragments which were located in the right atrium (RA and/or great vein and possessed an accessible free end allowing their direct ensnarement with the loop snare (57.0% (4/7 vs. 66.7% (2/3 vs. 0.0% (0/3; p = 0.074 respectively. Procedure duration was 2–3 times longer among catheters retrieved from the PA than among those with the forward edge located in the RV or RA (30 (18–68 vs. 13.5 (11–37 vs. 8 min (8–13; p = 0.054 respectively. The SG catheter knotted in the vena cava superior (VCS was encircled with the loop snare introduced transfemorally, subsequently cut at its skin entrance and then pulled down inside the 14 Fr vascular sheath. Conclusions : By using the pigtail catheter and the loop snare, it is feasible to retrieve centrally embolized fragments or knotted central venous access devices.

  6. THE BLACK SWAN OF THE ROMANIAN TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela-Liliana CIOBAN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The imposing and magnificent natural Romanian sight forces me to ask myself the question: "What is the problem of Romanian tourism?", question which has as support the contribution of tourism services to GDP, the share of people employed in tourism, the number of enterprises/businesses in tourism, mobile/property capital owned by the tourist sector, etc. The analysis of these indicators highlight the contribution of tourism services in Romania's economic and social growth. The two obvious aspects of tourism have a strong impact on people, communities and the environment. Impact on a region can be social, political, economic and cultural. The social impact of tourism refers to the direct effects on tourists and people/communities in destination areas, and the impact on the level of education, culture and civilization, on the use of leisure time, the links between communities/nations, and cultural heritage in tourist areas. Effects identified may impact both positively and negatively in the regions analyzed. The positive social impact in the communities relate to the creation of jobs (the new employment opportunities and professionalization of local labor, especially for disadvantaged groups, such as youth or women, infrastructure development, increasing local budget revenue, diversification of forms of crafts and facilitating social integration through intercultural exchanges between tourists and the host population. Regarding the negative social impact, this refers to the gradual destruction of traditional livelihoods, disrupting the local structures of power and the adoption of harmful behaviors (especially among children and young people. It results that tourism development leads to improved quality of life when there are taken into account the specific conditions and it is carried out in a sustainable manner.

  7. Focus on Balance, Not Black Swans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rodnie; Peterson, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The speed and access of information today has increased the scrutiny level facing risk managers in higher education. It is true that a more complex, more connected world has created new risks and new issues for university leadership. However, a lot of the same issues have remained constant for campuses: (1) emergency management; (2) campus safety;…

  8. Free Will, Black Swans and Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Ted; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2016-01-01

    The current dominant perspective on addiction as a brain disease has been challenged recently by Marc Lewis, who argued that the brain-changes related to addiction are similar to everyday changes of the brain. From this alternative perspective, addictions are bad habits that can be broken, provided that people are motivated to change. In that case, autonomous choice or ?free will? can overcome bad influences from genes and or environments and brain-changes related to addiction. Even though we...

  9. RGS Spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop XA Knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Gaetz, Terrance J.

    2004-01-01

    The observations were performed at the end of April 2002, and the data were received in July 2002. Unfortunately, the observations were badly compromised by high levels of background radiation; one of the three observations was lost entirely. Two replacement observations were scheduled for November 2002, and were only made available in January of 2003. A preliminary analysis of the RGS data has been performed. Analysis of these data is complicated by the extended nature of the source, and the limited statistics. Nevertheless, examination of the 'm lambda' vs. 'xdsp-corr' data shows that the bright knot is visible in C VI Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, the O VII triplet and He-beta, and O VIII Ly-alpha. The dispersed C VI Ly-alpha image is the first image of the remnant at that energy. The F, I, R components of the O VII triplet can be seen, and the 0 VII He-beta is distinct from the O VIII Ly-alpha (although the dispersed diffuse emission provides a pseudo-continuum). Trial-and-error adjustment of the rgsproc parameters allowed the extraction of a narrow (approx. 1 arcmin wide) region centered on the knot; corresponding background spectra were extracted from the sky background data sets. The xspec rgsxsrc model was used to convolve the response with a Chandra spatial image. Because the spatial distribution of the emission is energy-dependent, the use of a single convolution kernel is only approximate.

  10. Giant Radio Flare of Cygnus X-3 in September 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkin, S. A.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Zhekanis, G. V.

    2017-06-01

    In the long-term multi-frequency monitoring program of the microquasars with RATAN-600 we discovered the giant flare from X-ray binary Cyg X-3 on 13 September 2016. It happened after 2000 days of the 'quiescent state' of the source passed after the former giant flare (˜18 Jy) in March 2011. We have found that during this quiet period the hard X-ray flux (Swift/BAT, 15-50 keV) and radio flux (RATAN-600, 11 GHz) have been strongly anti-correlated. Both radio flares occurred after transitions of the microquasar to a 'hypersoft' X-ray state that occurred in February 2011 and in the end of August 2016. The giant flare was predicted by us in the first ATel (Trushkin et al. (2016)). Indeed after dramatic decrease of the hard X-ray Swift 15-50 keV flux and RATAN 4- 11 GHz fluxes (a 'quenched state') a small flare (0.7 Jy at 4-11 GHz) developed on MJD 57632 and then on MJD 57644.5 almost simultaneously with X-rays radio flux rose from 0.01 to 15 Jy at 4.6 GHz during few days. The rise of the flaring flux is well fitted by a exponential law that could be a initial phase of the relativistic electrons generation by internal shock waves in the jets. Initially spectra were optically thick at frequencies lower 2 GHz and optically thin at frequencies higher 8 GHz with typical spectral index about -0.5. After maximum of the flare radio fluxes at all frequencies faded out with exponential law.

  11. Black swans, cognition and the power of learning from failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Allison S; Redford, Kent; Margoluis, Richard; Knight, Andrew T

    2017-11-01

    Failure carries undeniable stigma and is difficult to confront for individuals, teams, and organizations. Disciplines such as commercial and military aviation, medicine, and business have long histories of grappling with it, beginning with the recognition that failure is inevitable in every human endeavor. While conservation may arguably be more complex, conservation professionals can draw upon the research and experience of these other disciplines to institutionalize activities and attitudes that foster learning from failures, whether they are minor setbacks or major disasters. Understanding the role of individual cognitive biases, team psychological safety, and organizational willingness to support critical self-examination all contribute to creating a cultural shift in conservation to one that is open to the learning opportunity that failure provides. This new approach to managing failure is a necessary next step in the evolution of conservation effectiveness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Black Swan Event Assessment for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Materials Application Blanket: batts and rolls Fiberglass, mineral wool, plastic fibers, natural fibers. Floors, ceilings, unfinished walls...and blown-in Cellulose, fiberglass, mineral wool. Existing walls, attic floors. Reflective system Cardboard, plastic film Unfinished floors...attic floors Structural isolated panels Foam board, liquid foam insulation core, straw core insulation New constructions There is another way of

  13. Symbols of the Soviet empire : dying swan / Maria Goltsmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goltsmann, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Vene balletist, selle kuulsusest ja sobivusest ka nõukogude süsteemi - nii sõjaväe paraadid kui ka balletietendused olid nagu Nõukogude Liidu fassaad, nõudes erakordset distsipliini, mis oli oluline nii monarhiale kui ka kommunistlikule diktaatuurile, seda hinnati kõrgelt, kuid alati ei järgitud. Ka "Luikede järvest" ja selle etendamisest

  14. Emerging risks: The wave of black swan events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rising trend of new business opportunities, triggered by the emerging technologies, has substantially contributed to the recovery of the global economy in recent years. The global growth supported by modern technology, however, has also generated a new wave of complex, mutually intertwined and rather changeable risks, which are unambiguously warning against the uncertainties arising in the economic environment. A thorough and continuous monitoring of these risks has become an imperative for business entities in the function of protecting the operations of enterprises and banks.

  15. Public Hunting and Fishing Plan Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting and fishing activities and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and...

  16. Black swans, wicked problems, and science during crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machlis, G.E.; McNutt, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic resources face challenges that are significant and widespread, including (but not limited to) overharvesting, climate change, selected stock collapse, coral reef decline, species extinction, pollution, and more. These challenges are the focus of much ocean science, which is helping to inform policy and guide management actions. The steady growth of research results and the emergence of new research needs have been systematically reviewed through periodic assessments, such as those of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (Valdés et al., 2010).

  17. Alaska productivity surveys of geese, swans, and brant

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Productivity surveys were conducted by several agencies and individuals during late summer, fall, and/or winter of 2009 and early 2010 to estimate juvenile-to-adult...

  18. July 2013 pulmonary case of the month: swan song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesselius LJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after the first 150 words. History of Present Illness A 53 year old man presented to the emergency department with a 2 week history of progressive dyspnea. He thought it was anxiety due to quitting drinking just before the onset of his symptoms. He also had fatigue and malaise. PMH, SH, FH He had no significant past medical history or family history. He did not smoke but drank 2-6 beers/day until 2 weeks prior to presentation. Physical Examination BP 110/60 mm Hg, P 110 beats/min, R 32 breaths/min, T 37.6° C, SpO2 81% He is pale and appears mildly dyspneic otherwise his physical exam is unremarkable. Chest Radiography His chest x-ray is shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Initial PA (Panel A and lateral (Panel B chest x-ray. Which of the following laboratory tests is/are not indicated? 1. Arterial blood gases; 2. Complete blood count; 3. Spiral thoracic CT scan; 4. Urinanalysis; 5. All of …

  19. Heat pumps in Denmark - From ugly duckling to white swan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Sophie; Røpke, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, the smart grid and heat pumps have increasingly gained attention in Denmark as an integral part of the low carbon transition of the energy system. The main reason being that the smart grid enables the integration of large amounts of intermittent wind energy into the electr......Over the last 10 years, the smart grid and heat pumps have increasingly gained attention in Denmark as an integral part of the low carbon transition of the energy system. The main reason being that the smart grid enables the integration of large amounts of intermittent wind energy...

  20. Public Use Reports from 1989 at Swan Lake NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Public use reports detailing the number of visitors to the refuge in 1989. The recorded information details the type of visitor traffic (foot, car, etc.) that...

  1. Public Use Reports From 1990 at Swan Lake NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Public use reports detailing the number of visitors to the refuge in 1990. The recorded information details the type of visitor traffic (foot, car, etc.) that...

  2. Black Swan Sticking out in Turkish Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan GOCEN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores different aspects of an extraordinary event in Turkish banking sector: politically motivated seizure of Bank Asya by the state. We present how political motives play a key role in such an exceptional expropriation ignoring pillars of economic freedom. The attitude of the governing Justice and Development Party (AKP on democratization path of Turkey is presented for further elaboration to bring revealing insight. Financial statement of Asia Participation Bank Inc. (Bank Asya is detailed to indicate absence of economic ground for seizure. Our analysis on Bank Asya along with references to similar events and their repercussions point out possible severe legal enforcements against government authorities with political more than justice concerns and prejudgment.

  3. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge contaminants survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bullheads (Ictalurus sp.), carp (Cyprinus carpio), a quillback (Carpiodes cyprinus), a bigmouth buffalo (Ictiobus cyprinellus), and a turtle were collected from Elk,...

  4. Carrying capacity of a heterogeneous lake for migrating swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyimesi, A.

    2010-01-01

    One way to express the value of a natural habitat is its capacity to harbour a particular target species. In the case of migratory birds, the cumulative number of birds that can be accommodated at a site for a given period of time (‘bird-days’) became an accepted currency for this carrying capacity.

  5. Relation of waterfowl poisoning to sediment lead concentrations in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Audet, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Day, D.

    2000-01-01

    For many years, waterfowl have been poisoned by lead after ingesting contaminated sediment in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, in Idaho. Results of studies on waterfowl experimentally fed this sediment were combined with results from field studies conducted in the Basin to relate sediment lead concentration to injury to waterfowl. The first step in the model estimated exposure as the relation of sediment lead concentration to blood lead concentration in mute swans (Cygnus olor), ingesting 22% sediment in a rice diet. That rate corresponded to the 90th percentile of sediment ingestion estimated from analyses of feces of tundra swans (Olor columbianus) in the Basin. Then, with additional laboratory studies on Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) fed the sediment, we developed the general relation of blood lead to injury in waterfowl. Injury was quantified by blood lead concentrations, ALAD (-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase) activity, protoporphyrin concentrations, hemoglobin concentrations, hepatic lead concentrations, and the prevalence of renal nuclear inclusion bodies. Putting the exposure and injury relations together provided a powerful tool for assessing hazards to wildlife in the Basin. The no effect concentration of sediment lead was estimated as 24 mg/kg and the lowest effect level as 530 mg/kg. By combining our exposure equation with data on blood lead concentrations measured in moribund tundra swans in the Basin, we estimated that some mortality would occur at a sediment lead concentration as low as 1800 mg/kg.

  6. Effects of trail width on the densities of four species of breeding birds in chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron L. Holmes; Geoffrey R. Geupel

    2005-01-01

    We investigated densities of four common species, Wrentit (Chamaea fasciata), Spotted Towhee (Piplio erythrophthalmus), Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii), and Orange-crowned Warbler (Vermivora celata) in relation to trail width in chaparral habitats of Mt. Tamalpais, Marin...

  7. Can sacrificial feeding areas protect aquatic plants from herbivore grazing? Using behavioural ecology to inform wildlife management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin A; Stillman, Richard A; Daunt, Francis; O'Hare, Matthew T

    2014-01-01

    Effective wildlife management is needed for conservation, economic and human well-being objectives. However, traditional population control methods are frequently ineffective, unpopular with stakeholders, may affect non-target species, and can be both expensive and impractical to implement. New methods which address these issues and offer effective wildlife management are required. We used an individual-based model to predict the efficacy of a sacrificial feeding area in preventing grazing damage by mute swans (Cygnus olor) to adjacent river vegetation of high conservation and economic value. The accuracy of model predictions was assessed by a comparison with observed field data, whilst prediction robustness was evaluated using a sensitivity analysis. We used repeated simulations to evaluate how the efficacy of the sacrificial feeding area was regulated by (i) food quantity, (ii) food quality, and (iii) the functional response of the forager. Our model gave accurate predictions of aquatic plant biomass, carrying capacity, swan mortality, swan foraging effort, and river use. Our model predicted that increased sacrificial feeding area food quantity and quality would prevent the depletion of aquatic plant biomass by swans. When the functional response for vegetation in the sacrificial feeding area was increased, the food quantity and quality in the sacrificial feeding area required to protect adjacent aquatic plants were reduced. Our study demonstrates how the insights of behavioural ecology can be used to inform wildlife management. The principles that underpin our model predictions are likely to be valid across a range of different resource-consumer interactions, emphasising the generality of our approach to the evaluation of strategies for resolving wildlife management problems.

  8. Non-adaptive territory selection by a bird with exceptionally long parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Radosław; Minias, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    High-quality territories are expected to provide greater fitness return for breeding individuals and, thus, are likely to have higher long-term occupation rate in comparison to low-quality territories. However, if environmental and ecological cues used for territory selection cannot reliably predict true territory quality, a mismatch between preferences and fitness may occur. We suggest that this kind of non-adaptive territory selection is more likely in species with long reproductive cycles, as a long time interval between territory establishment and young fledgling should reduce predictability of conditions during the critical stages of brood care. In this study, we investigated adaptiveness of territory selection in a migratory bird with exceptionally long parental care, the mute swan Cygnus olor, which requires over four months to complete the entire reproductive cycle from egg laying to young fledging. For this purpose, we collected information on the long-term (10-19 years) occupancy of 222 swan breeding territories and correlated it with reproductive performance (n = 1,345 breeding attempts) and body condition of breeding adults. We found that long-term occupancy positively correlated with the timing of breeding, suggesting that individuals settled earlier in the attractive, frequently occupied territories. By contrast, we found no relationship between territory occupancy and reproductive output (hatching and fledging success) or adult body condition. The results indicate that at the time of territory selection swans might not be able to reliably assess territory quality, likely due to: (1) exceptionally long period of parental care, which reduces temporal correlation between the conditions at the time of territory selection and conditions during chick rearing; and (2) unpredictability of human-related activities that had a major impact on reproductive output of swan pairs in our population.

  9. Can sacrificial feeding areas protect aquatic plants from herbivore grazing? Using behavioural ecology to inform wildlife management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Wood

    Full Text Available Effective wildlife management is needed for conservation, economic and human well-being objectives. However, traditional population control methods are frequently ineffective, unpopular with stakeholders, may affect non-target species, and can be both expensive and impractical to implement. New methods which address these issues and offer effective wildlife management are required. We used an individual-based model to predict the efficacy of a sacrificial feeding area in preventing grazing damage by mute swans (Cygnus olor to adjacent river vegetation of high conservation and economic value. The accuracy of model predictions was assessed by a comparison with observed field data, whilst prediction robustness was evaluated using a sensitivity analysis. We used repeated simulations to evaluate how the efficacy of the sacrificial feeding area was regulated by (i food quantity, (ii food quality, and (iii the functional response of the forager. Our model gave accurate predictions of aquatic plant biomass, carrying capacity, swan mortality, swan foraging effort, and river use. Our model predicted that increased sacrificial feeding area food quantity and quality would prevent the depletion of aquatic plant biomass by swans. When the functional response for vegetation in the sacrificial feeding area was increased, the food quantity and quality in the sacrificial feeding area required to protect adjacent aquatic plants were reduced. Our study demonstrates how the insights of behavioural ecology can be used to inform wildlife management. The principles that underpin our model predictions are likely to be valid across a range of different resource-consumer interactions, emphasising the generality of our approach to the evaluation of strategies for resolving wildlife management problems.

  10. Non-adaptive territory selection by a bird with exceptionally long parental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Włodarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-quality territories are expected to provide greater fitness return for breeding individuals and, thus, are likely to have higher long-term occupation rate in comparison to low-quality territories. However, if environmental and ecological cues used for territory selection cannot reliably predict true territory quality, a mismatch between preferences and fitness may occur. We suggest that this kind of non-adaptive territory selection is more likely in species with long reproductive cycles, as a long time interval between territory establishment and young fledgling should reduce predictability of conditions during the critical stages of brood care. In this study, we investigated adaptiveness of territory selection in a migratory bird with exceptionally long parental care, the mute swan Cygnus olor, which requires over four months to complete the entire reproductive cycle from egg laying to young fledging. For this purpose, we collected information on the long-term (10–19 years occupancy of 222 swan breeding territories and correlated it with reproductive performance (n = 1,345 breeding attempts and body condition of breeding adults. We found that long-term occupancy positively correlated with the timing of breeding, suggesting that individuals settled earlier in the attractive, frequently occupied territories. By contrast, we found no relationship between territory occupancy and reproductive output (hatching and fledging success or adult body condition. The results indicate that at the time of territory selection swans might not be able to reliably assess territory quality, likely due to: (1 exceptionally long period of parental care, which reduces temporal correlation between the conditions at the time of territory selection and conditions during chick rearing; and (2 unpredictability of human-related activities that had a major impact on reproductive output of swan pairs in our population.

  11. Self-sustained strong mass transfer without Roche lobe overflow - Cygnus X-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Ruderman, Malvin; Shaham, Jacob

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed that the binary evolution of Cyg X-3 is driven by a self-excited wind from a solar composition companion star sustained by radiation from a neutron star primary. Observations would then imply that the companion is a white dwarf underfilling its Roche lobe, with mass between 0.01 and 0.03 solar masses. Cyg X-3 could then be in the late stage of very low mass X-ray binary evolution expected to result in a millisecond pulsar binary similar to the eclipsing system PSR 1957 + 20.

  12. Telecentric Zoom Lens Designed for the Cygnus X-Ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    high-energy radiographic x-ray source. Three large zoom lenses have been assembled to collect images from large scintillators. A large elliptical...produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests that are performed at the NNSS. Subcritical tests are single- shot, high-value events. The test...source. Three large zoom lenses have been assembled to collect images from large scintillators. A large elliptical pellicle (394 × 280 mm) deflects the

  13. Variable millimetre radiation from the colliding-wind binary Cygnus OB2 #8A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, R.; Fenech, D. M.; Prinja, R. K.; Pittard, J. M.; Morford, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Massive binaries have stellar winds that collide. In the colliding-wind region, various physically interesting processes occur, leading to enhanced X-ray emission, non-thermal radio emission, as well as non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays. Non-thermal radio emission (due to synchrotron radiation) has so far been observed at centimetre wavelengths. At millimetre wavelengths, the stellar winds and the colliding-wind region emit more thermal free-free radiation, and it is expected that any non-thermal contribution will be difficult or impossible to detect. Aims: We aim to determine if the material in the colliding-wind region contributes substantially to the observed millimetre fluxes of a colliding-wind binary. We also try to distinguish the synchrotron emission from the free-free emission. Methods: We monitored the massive binary Cyg OB2 #8A at 3 mm with the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) interferometer of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM). The data were collected in 14 separate observing runs (in 2014 and 2016), and provide good coverage of the orbital period. Results: The observed millimetre fluxes range between 1.1 and 2.3 mJy, and show phase-locked variability, clearly indicating that a large part of the emission is due to the colliding-wind region. A simple synchrotron model gives fluxes with the correct order of magnitude, but with a maximum that is phase-shifted with respect to the observations. Qualitatively this phase shift can be explained by our neglect of orbital motion on the shape of the colliding-wind region. A model using only free-free emission results in only a slightly worse explanation of the observations. Additionally, on the map of our observations we also detect the O6.5 III star Cyg OB2 #8B, for which we determine a 3 mm flux of 0.21 ± 0.033 mJy. Conclusions: The question of whether synchrotron radiation or free-free emission dominates the millimetre fluxes of Cyg OB2 #8A remains open. More detailed modelling of this system, based on solving the hydrodynamical equations, is required to give a definite answer. This work is based on observations carried out under project numbers S14AW and S16AU with the IRAM NOEMA Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  14. XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Radio Observations of CYGNUS X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    XMM-Newton observations of this target were not made successfully until October 2004, due to problems of high background and instrumental flaring in the prior observability windows. Processed data for analysis was delivered a few months after the observations. Thus, work on these observations is beginning now, in the spring of 2005. A preliminary analysis of these observations reveals a complex spectrum, with relativistic emission line features. Detailed modeling and interpretation of this data will be completed over several months.

  15. LOFAR imaging of Cygnus A - direct detection of a turnover in the hotspot radio spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKean, J.P.; Godfrey, L.E.H.; Vegetti, S.; Wise, M.W.; Morganti, R.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Hardcastle, M.J.; Rafferty, D.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I.M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bernardi, G.

    2016-01-01

    The low-frequency radio spectra of the hotspots within powerful radio galaxies can provide valuable information about the physical processes operating at the site of the jet termination. These processes are responsible for the dissipation of jet kinetic energy, particle acceleration, and

  16. The effect of climate change on the western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus) fishery of Western Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caputi, Nick; de Lestang, Simon; Pearce, Alan; Feng, Ming; Melville-Smith, Roy

    2010-01-01

    .... Rising water temperatures over 35 years may have resulted in a decrease in size at maturity and size of migrating lobsters from shallow to deep water, increases in abundance of undersized and legal...

  17. Self-sustained strong mass transfer without Roche lobe overflow - Cygnus X-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, M.; Ruderman, M.; Shaham, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA))

    1989-07-01

    It is proposed that the binary evolution of Cyg X-3 is driven by a self-excited wind from a solar composition companion star sustained by radiation from a neutron star primary. Observations would then imply that the companion is a white dwarf underfilling its Roche lobe, with mass between 0.01 and 0.03 solar masses. Cyg X-3 could then be in the late stage of very low mass X-ray binary evolution expected to result in a millisecond pulsar binary similar to the eclipsing system PSR 1957 + 20. 27 refs.

  18. Cygnus X-3 and other ultra-high-energy gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, several binary X-ray sources have been found to be sources of ultrahigh-energy gamma emission. Air-shower observations indicate photon energies above about 1 PeV. Observations from Cyg X-3 are reviewed and compared with data on the sources Her X-1, Vel X-1, and LMC X-4. Current theoretical models for the production of gamma rays and the acceleration of high-energy particles are discussed, and the consequences for the evolution of such systems are examined.

  19. STT Doubles with Large DM - Part V: Aquila, Delphinus, Cygnus, Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Nanson, John

    2016-07-01

    The results of visual double star observing sessions suggested a pattern for STT doubles with large DM of being harder to resolve than would be expected based on the WDS catalog data. It was felt this might be a problem with expectations on one hand, and on the other might be an indication of a need for new precise measurements, so we decided to take a closer look at a selected sample of STT doubles and do some research. We found that, as in the other constellations covered so far (Gem, Leo, UMa etc.), at least several of the selected objects in Aql, Del, Cyg and Aqr show parameters quite different from the current WDS data

  20. Circumstellar Structure Around Evolved Stars in the Cygnus-X Star Formation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    of evolved objects in the survey region, from Miras and Cepheids to Wolf-Rayet (WR) and carbon stars to planetary nebulae (PNe) and supernova ...systematic search for additional circumstellar nebulae was made. SIMBAD was used to compile positional lists of evolved objects that lie within the...emission. The emission around two of these stars, which are listed in Table 2, was first reported by Kraemer et al. (2009). Here, we discuss the

  1. Outbreak of type C botulism in captive wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo, Djeison L; Von Hohendorf, Raquel; Boabaid, Fabiana M; Both, Maria C; Sonne, Luciana; Assis, Ronnie A; Caldas, Rogerio P; Driemeier, David

    2012-06-01

    In late summer 2010, an outbreak of type C botulism affected the birds kept in a dam at a southern Brazilian zoo. A total of 14(10 black-necked swans, Cygnus melancoryphus; 3 Muscovy ducks, Cairina moschata; and 1 fulvous whistling-duck, Dendrocygna bicolor) out of 100 birds died after showing flaccid paralysis of the skeletal muscles characterized by general locomotion deficit, flight and swimming disorders, dropped neck, and severe dyspnea. Carcasses of dead birds (some infested by larvae of sarcophagus fly) scattered in the bird enclosure, and oxygen-free, organically rich mud and/or shallow standing waters present at the edges of the weir were identified as possible toxin sources. Postmortem examinations revealed no significant pathological changes. Epidemiologic and clinical findings indicated the diagnosis of type C botulism toxin, which was confirmed by mouse bioassay and seroneutralization.

  2. Avian bornavirus in free-ranging waterfowl in North America and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Jesper; Thomsen, Anders F.; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    canadensis) and trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator) in Ontario, Canada 1. Since then this genotype, now identified as ABBV-1, has been identified from a variety of wild avian species 5, predominantly waterfowl, in North America at prevalences ranging from 10 to 50%, and in 2014 an additional genotype...... was identified in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) 2. In order to determine whether avian bornavirus was present in European waterfowl, the brains of 333 hunter killed geese in Denmark were examined by real time RT-PCR for the presence of avian bornavirus; seven birds (2.1%) were positive. Sequences were 98.......18-99.83 % identical to each other, and 97.38-98.06 % identical to a reference sequence of ABBV-1 from North America. This is the first finding of ABV in wild waterfowl in Europe, and extends the range of waterfowl species in which the virus has been identified to include the pink-footed goose (Anser brachyrhynchus...

  3. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in zoo and domestic animals in Jiangxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Houqiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic protozoan parasite that infects a wide range of warm-blooded animals throughout the world. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii were determined using a commercial indirect hemagglutination (IHA test in wild animals in a zoo. Three of 11 giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis (27%, 1 of 5 wolves (Canis lupus laniger (20%, 1 of 6 hippopotamuses (Hippopotamus amphibious (17%, and 2 of 9 tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus (22% were found to be positive. No antibodies were detected in leopards (Panthera pardus, wild geese (Anser cygnoides, and Eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus. Domestic species from 13 counties of Jiangxi Province, China were also investigated by an indirect hemagglutination (IHA test. Thirty-five of 340 goats (10%, 94 of 560 water buffaloes (17%, and 4 of 35 cattle (11% were found to be seropositive. This is the first report of T. gondii infection in animals kept in zoos and domestic animals in this province.

  4. [Are nasal Trichobilharzia cercariae potential threath to human health?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skírnisson, Karl; Kolarova, Libusa

    2002-10-01

    During late summer in 1995 to 1997, repeated outbreaks of maculopapular skin eruptions were observed on legs of children after wading in the pond of the Family Park in Reykjavík, Iceland. Investigation, starting in autumn 1997, revealed that the causative agent was a previously undescribed schistosome cercaria of the genus Trichobilharzia, shed by Radix peregra, the only snail occurring in the pond. This was the first report of swimmer's itch in Iceland. Infection experiments with cercariae from the pond have revealed adult worms and eggs of a Trichobilharzia in the nasal area of ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos f.dom.) 18-23 days p.i., and schistosomula in the spinal cord of BALB/c mice 3, 6 and 10 days p.i. Moreover, a mouse killed 3 days p.i. also had schistosomula in the lungs. During the prepatent period the infected ducklings had neuromotoric symptoms and gross pathology revealed petechiae in the nasal cavity. The results indicate that the cercaria responsible for swimmer's itch in Iceland is a nasal schistosome. Furthermore, adults of two visceral Trichobilharzia species have been found in Icelandic whooper swans Cygnus cygnus. As schistosomula of both nasal and visceral Trichobilharzia species are able to develop and migrate for several days in a non-specific mammalian host, humans are warned to expose themselves to Trichobilharzia cercariae in Iceland.

  5. Obročkovalna Dejavnost in Pregled Najdb Obročkanih Ptic V Sloveniji V Letu 2013 / An overview of bird ringing in Slovenia in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrezec Al

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, 73,529 birds of 161 species were ringed in Slovenia, with 114 finds from abroad, 73 finds of foreign-ringed birds and 1580 local finds. The most numerous ringed species were Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla and Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica, while among ringed nestlings Great Tits Parus major and Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus prevailed. The most numerous species among recoveries was the Mute Swan Cygnus olor with probably the oldest swan recorded in Slovenia so far, a 25-year-old female. The longest distance recovery concerned a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus from Norway (2,801 km. Of interest among local finds is the longest recovery distance (122 km recorded for Ural Owl Strix uralensis in Slovenia so far. In 2013, two rare species for Slovenia were ringed, Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus (2 individuals and Siberian Rubythroat Calliope calliope, which was the first record for Slovenia. The first analysis of ringing sites in Slovenia is given as a baseline for establishing a network of Constant Effort Sites

  6. A bumblefoot outbreak and fatal septicemia in captive aquatic birds in Brazil Surto de esparavão e septicemia fatal em aves aquáticas cativas no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinícius Romero Marques

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A bumblefoot outbreak with different prognosis according to host species was studied in captive aquatic avian species. Six wood ducks (Aix sponsa, three scarlet-ibis (Eudocimus ruber, two black-swans (Cygnus atratus, five white-faced ducks (Dendrocygna viduata and two roseate spoonbills (Platalea ajaja were kept in a common pen with abrasive pavement pond margin, predisposing to podal skin wear. Incoordination and mortality occurred in the two roseate spoonbils and one black swan. Coagulase-positive penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the synovial fluid and from the liver. All birds sharing the pen presented active or cicatricial foot lesions, indicating a possible challenge to the environmental Staphylococci. However, except for the roseate spoonbill and the black swan, which had fatal disease, for all other species the case did not evolve to a clinically debilitating or fatal disease. The different susceptibility to a fatal Staphylococcus aureus coagulase positive infection is discussed.Este trabalho relata um surto de esparavão em aves aquáticas cativas com prognóstico variado conforme a espécie de ave. Foram examinados um marreco carolina (Aix sponsa, três guarás (íbis vermelha (Eudocimus ruber, dois cisnes negros (Cygnus atratus, cinco marrecas piadeiras (Dendrocygna viduata e dois colhereiros (Platalea ajaja mantidos em recinto comunitário, em cativeiro e em criatório. No recinto, a piscina é margeada por borda de cimento abrasivo que possibilita a abrasão da pele podal. Todas as aves apresentaram erosões da pele na face de apoio dos pés, indicando fator predisponente (erosão similar e possível semelhante desafio infeccioso. Entretanto, incoordenação e mortalidade ocorreram em colhereiros e no cisne negro, mas não nas outras espécies. Staphylococcus aureus coagulase positivo e resistente à penicilina foi isolado do líquido sinovial e do fígado das aves recém-mortas e conservadas em geladeira

  7. Flash crashes, bursts, and black swans: parallels between financial markets and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bruce J; Clancy, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    As systems evolve over time, their natural tendency is to become increasingly more complex. Studies in the field of complex systems have generated new perspectives on management in social organizations such as hospitals. Much of this research appears as a natural extension of the cross-disciplinary field of systems theory. This is the 16th in a series of articles applying complex systems science to the traditional management concepts of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling. In this article, Dr Clancy, the editor of this column, and co-author, Dr West, discuss how the collapse of global financial markets in 2008 may provide valuable insight into mechanisms of complex system behavior in healthcare. Dr West, a physicist and expert in the field of complex systems and network science, is author of a chapter in the book, On the Edge: Nursing in the Age of Complexity (Lindberg C, Nash S, Linberg C. Bordertown, NJ: Plexus Press; 2008) and his most recent book, Disrupted Networks: From Physics to Climate Change (West BJ, Scafetta N. Singapore: Disrupted Networks, World Scientific Publishing; 2010).

  8. Of Tilting Earths, Ruler Swans, and Fighting Mosquitoes: First Graders Writing Nonfiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melissa I.

    2012-01-01

    Using discourse analysis methodology, this dissertation describes the literacy practices of first grade students as they engaged in researching, writing and illustrating nonfiction. The research focused on two instructional units on writing nonfiction that included a poster unit and a research report unit. The data consisted of 27 days of video…

  9. Host behaviour and physiology underpin individual variation in avian influenza virus infection in migratory Bewick's swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoye, B.J.; Fouchier, R.A.M; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Individual variation in infection modulates both the dynamics of pathogens and their impact on host populations. It is therefore crucial to identify differential patterns of infection and understand the mechanisms responsible. Yet our understanding of infection heterogeneity in wildlife is limited,

  10. H08515C: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Swan Islands, Honduras, 1960-03-19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. Panic, slash, or crash-Do black swans flap in stock markets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dar-Hsin; Huang, Han-Lin

    2018-02-01

    Stock transaction data typically present a time series that exhibits a somewhat confusing trend, making it difficult to issue any form of crisis warning. This study employs Fourier spectrum analysis to clearly show manic and irrational investors chasing prices. When clustering generates an enormous amount of unstable power, the result is a stock market collapsing into a danger area that can be taken as a warning signal. We thus take the Dow Jones Index as a typical stock market and employ daily data from 1994-2015. This study finds the investors' purchasing power through certain thresholds, analyses the performance characteristics of the spectrum, and denotes when a stock market is in a most serious crisis stage and in a second most serious correction stage. The result of our study indicates that the warning signal accurately measures a stock market crash that can be applicable to the Dow Jones Index, Nasdaq Index, and Germany ADX Index and to the emerging markets of Bovespa Index (Brazil) and Shanghai Index (China). Furthermore, this study provides a quantitative reference concerning the depth of market crashes.

  12. Forecasting and Hindcasting Waves With the SWAN Model in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    propagating past the islands). The with a very large time interval between computations (24 h ability of MLM to correctly reproduce multiple swells...on slowly In terms of agreement with observations, there is little or no varying, unsteady and inhomogeneous depths and currents. J. Phys

  13. 2016 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  14. 2014 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  15. 2015 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  16. Column-store support for RDF data management: not all swans are white

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidirourgos, L.; Goncalves, R.; Kersten, M.; Nes, N.; Manegold, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an independent evaluation of the techniques presented in the VLDB 2007 paper "Scalable Semantic Web Data Management Using Vertical Partitioning", authored by D. Abadi, A. Marcus, S. R. Madden, and K. Hollenbach [1]. We revisit the proposed benchmark and examine

  17. Column-store support for RDF data management: not all swans are white

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Sidirourgos (Eleftherios); R.A. Goncalves (Romulo); M.L. Kersten (Martin); N.J. Nes (Niels); S. Manegold (Stefan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis paper reports on the results of an independent evaluation of the techniques presented in the VLDB 2007 paper "Scalable Semantic Web Data Management Using Vertical Partitioning", authored by D. Abadi, A. Marcus, S. R. Madden, and K. Hollenbach. We revisit the proposed benchmark

  18. 2013 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  19. 2010 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  20. 2012 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  1. 2008 Deer Spotlight Survey Report For Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) numbers have increased greatly throughout Missouri over the past century due to the abundant habitat and conservation...

  2. Swan foraging shapes spatial distribution of two submerged plants, favouring the preferred prey species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandsten, H.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to terrestrial environments, grazing intensity on belowground plant parts may be particularly strong in aquatic environments, which may have great effects on plant-community structure. We observed that the submerged macrophyte, Potamogeton pectinatus, which mainly reproduces with tubers,

  3. The U.S. Response to NEOS: Avoiding a Black Swan Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Exposition , 2, http://dx.doi.org.libproxy.nps.edu/10.2514/6.1996-4382. 70 Ibid. 71 Lindley Johnson, “NEO Program 2015 for SBAG #12,” Near-Earth...status updates. AlertSF, a text -based notification system for San Franciscans, also sends emergency alerts to area residents on events ranging from...way to do this would be to use Google Analytics , which analyzes website traffic, locations, and queries.294 The location information could be

  4. Clonal diversity and structure within a population of the pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus foraged by Bewick's swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangelbroek, H.H.; Ouborg, N.J.; Santamaría, L.; Schwenk, K.

    2002-01-01

    Clonal diversity within plant populations is affected by factors that influence genet (clone) survival and seed recruitment, such as resource availability, disturbance, seed dispersal mechanism, propagule predation and the age of the population. Here we studied a population of Potamogeton

  5. From Swan to Ugly Duckling? Mentoring Dynamics and Preservice Teachers' Readiness to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadinia, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on two preservice teachers who experienced significantly different mentoring relationships in their two placements during a one-year teaching degree in a university in Western Australia. Data were collected through three rounds of semi-structured interviews, reflective journals and classroom observations. The findings indicated…

  6. 76 FR 29259 - Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Chariton County, MO; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... would be additional study on methods for increasing the amount of native foods for waterfowl within a 2... Conservation Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact for Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce the availability of the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and Finding of No...

  7. The "flying swan" technique: a novel method for anterior labral repair using a tensioned suture bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Susan; Wallace, Andrew L

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair is an effective technique for most cases of traumatic shoulder instability. However, patients with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesions frequently have multiple episodes of subluxation or dislocation and a high recurrence rate after surgery, even with modern methods of labral repair. One reason may be failure of biological healing of the labrum due to an inadequate "footprint" of contact between the capsulolabral tissue and the glenoid bone. We have developed a technique that facilitates a tensioned suture bridge between suture anchors that may improve the results of labral repair in patients with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesions.

  8. Habitat quality estimated from head-dipping time in trampling swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, B.A.; De Boer, T.; De Vries, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    It would be valuable to be able to infer the habitat quality of underwater-feeding birds and mammals from their diving or head-dipping behavior, especially when underwater sampling is difficult. In air-breathing animals that obtain their food by diving from the water surface to the bottom (or any

  9. Recent Updates to SWANFAR (registered trademark), a 5DVAR Data Assimilation System for SWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-10

    Facility’s 26 m Datawell Waverider buoy. Post-assimilation corrected re- sults were compared with spectra from the 17 m Waverider buoy, the 11 m Acoustic ...USER MODIFICATIONS # ################################################################################# # # tiling (NB: SWANFAR...will only use ipr*jpr for 1D tiling ): export ipr=4 export jpr=2 # # cycle parameters export ITERMAX=5 ## maximum number of CG

  10. H08515B: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Swan Islands, Honduras, 1960-03-19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. Circulating Sex Hormones and Risk of Uterine Fibroids: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason Y Y; Gold, Ellen B; Johnson, Wesley O; Lee, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen has been implicated in the development of uterine fibroids. However, the contribution of androgen in women is unknown. Our objective was to assess the longitudinal relations of circulating androgens and estradiol (E2) and their joint effects to the risk of developing fibroids. This is a 13-year longitudinal study in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. This study was conducted in seven sites across the United States (1997-2013). At baseline, 3240 pre- or early peri-menopausal women with an intact uterus, ages 45-52 years were included; 43.6% completed the follow-up. There were 512 incident and 478 recurrent fibroid cases. We measured near-annual time-varying serum levels of bioavailable E2 and bioavailable T, dichotomized at the median (high vs low). We estimated the conditional odds ratio (OR) of fibroids in the ensuing year using discrete-time proportional odds models adjusted for race/ethnicity/site, age, body mass index, menopausal stage, reproductive factors, smoking, timing of blood draw, and FSH. Women with high T had a statistically significant increased risk of incident fibroids (OR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.76; P = .04), but not recurrent fibroids. This risk was further elevated in those with high T and E2 (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.07-2.17; P = .02). High E2 and T was associated with lower risk of recurrent fibroids (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.26-0.96; P = .04). High T with high E2 was associated with an elevated risk of incident fibroids in midlife women who never reported fibroids before baseline. Conversely, the risk of recurrent fibroids was mitigated in women with high E2 and high T.

  12. Hunting Solomonoff's Swans: Exploring the Boundary Between Physics and Statistics in Hydrological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Statistical models consistently out-perform conceptual models in the short term, however to account for a nonstationary future (or an unobserved past) scientists prefer to base predictions on unchanging and commutable properties of the universe - i.e., physics. The problem with physically-based hydrology models is, of course, that they aren't really based on physics - they are based on statistical approximations of physical interactions, and we almost uniformly lack an understanding of the entropy associated with these approximations. Thermodynamics is successful precisely because entropy statistics are computable for homogeneous (well-mixed) systems, and ergodic arguments explain the success of Newton's laws to describe systems that are fundamentally quantum in nature. Unfortunately, similar arguments do not hold for systems like watersheds that are heterogeneous at a wide range of scales. Ray Solomonoff formalized the situation in 1968 by showing that given infinite evidence, simultaneously minimizing model complexity and entropy in predictions always leads to the best possible model. The open question in hydrology is about what happens when we don't have infinite evidence - for example, when the future will not look like the past, or when one watershed does not behave like another. How do we isolate stationary and commutable components of watershed behavior? I propose that one possible answer to this dilemma lies in a formal combination of physics and statistics. In this talk I outline my recent analogue (Solomonoff's theorem was digital) of Solomonoff's idea that allows us to quantify the complexity/entropy tradeoff in a way that is intuitive to physical scientists. I show how to formally combine "physical" and statistical methods for model development in a way that allows us to derive the theoretically best possible model given any given physics approximation(s) and available observations. Finally, I apply an analogue of Solomonoff's theorem to evaluate the tradeoff between model complexity and prediction power.

  13. Transfusion associated complications in cardiac surgery : the swan song of the allogeneic leukocytes ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilgin, Memiş Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands 1 of 1.000 inhibitants undergo cardiac surgery annually. To compensate blood loss these patients receive often blood transfusions, which can cause unexpected adverse reactions. Allogeneic leukocytes may play a prominent role in the development of these adverse reactions. We found

  14. Corona, Jet, and Relativistic Line Models for Suzaku/RXTE/Chandra-HETG Observations of the Cygnus X-1 Hard State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Hanke, Manfred; Trowbridge, Sarah N.; Markoff, Sera B.; Wilms, Joern; Pottschmidt, Katja; Coppi, Paolo; Maitra, Dipankar; Davis, Jhn E.; Tramper, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Using Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have conducted a series of four simultaneous observations of the galactic black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in what were historically faint and spectrally hard "low states". Additionally, all of these observations occurred near superior conjunction with our line of sight to the X-ray source passing through the dense phases of the "focused wind" from the mass donating secondary. One of our observations was also simultaneous with observations by the Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). These latter spectra are crucial for revealing the ionized absorption due to the secondary s focused wind. Such absorption is present and must be accounted for in all four spectra. These simultaneous data give an unprecedented view of the 0.8-300 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1, and hence bear upon both corona and X-ray emitting jet models of black hole hard states. Three models fit the spectra well: coronae with thermal or mixed thermal/non-thermal electron populations, and jets. All three models require a soft component that we fit with a low temperature disk spectrum with an inner radius of only a few tens of GM/c2. All three models also agree that the known spectral break at 10 keV is not solely due to the presence of reflection, but each gives a different underlying explanation for the augmentation of this break. Thus whereas all three models require that there is a relativistically broadened Fe line, the strength and inner radius of such a line is dependent upon the specific model, thus making premature line-based estimates of the black hole spin in the Cyg X-1 system. We look at the relativistic line in detail, accounting for the narrow Fe emission and ionized absorption detected by HETG. Although the specific relativistic parameters of the line are continuum-dependent, none of the broad line fits allow for an inner disk radius that is > 40 GM/c(sup 2).

  15. Determining the diet of larvae of western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus using high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard O'Rorke

    Full Text Available The Western Australian rock lobster fishery has been both a highly productive and sustainable fishery. However, a recent dramatic and unexplained decline in post-larval recruitment threatens this sustainability. Our lack of knowledge of key processes in lobster larval ecology, such as their position in the food web, limits our ability to determine what underpins this decline. The present study uses a high-throughput amplicon sequencing approach on DNA obtained from the hepatopancreas of larvae to discover significant prey items. Two short regions of the 18S rRNA gene were amplified under the presence of lobster specific PNA to prevent lobster amplification and to improve prey amplification. In the resulting sequences either little prey was recovered, indicating that the larval gut was empty, or there was a high number of reads originating from multiple zooplankton taxa. The most abundant reads included colonial Radiolaria, Thaliacea, Actinopterygii, Hydrozoa and Sagittoidea, which supports the hypothesis that the larvae feed on multiple groups of mostly transparent gelatinous zooplankton. This hypothesis has prevailed as it has been tentatively inferred from the physiology of larvae, captive feeding trials and co-occurrence in situ. However, these prey have not been observed in the larval gut as traditional microscopic techniques cannot discern between transparent and gelatinous prey items in the gut. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of gut DNA has enabled us to classify these otherwise undetectable prey. The dominance of the colonial radiolarians among the gut contents is intriguing in that this group has been historically difficult to quantify in the water column, which may explain why they have not been connected to larval diet previously. Our results indicate that a PCR based technique is a very successful approach to identify the most abundant taxa in the natural diet of lobster larvae.

  16. Determining the diet of larvae of western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus) using high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rorke, Richard; Lavery, Shane; Chow, Seinen; Takeyama, Haruko; Tsai, Peter; Beckley, Lynnath E; Thompson, Peter A; Waite, Anya M; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    The Western Australian rock lobster fishery has been both a highly productive and sustainable fishery. However, a recent dramatic and unexplained decline in post-larval recruitment threatens this sustainability. Our lack of knowledge of key processes in lobster larval ecology, such as their position in the food web, limits our ability to determine what underpins this decline. The present study uses a high-throughput amplicon sequencing approach on DNA obtained from the hepatopancreas of larvae to discover significant prey items. Two short regions of the 18S rRNA gene were amplified under the presence of lobster specific PNA to prevent lobster amplification and to improve prey amplification. In the resulting sequences either little prey was recovered, indicating that the larval gut was empty, or there was a high number of reads originating from multiple zooplankton taxa. The most abundant reads included colonial Radiolaria, Thaliacea, Actinopterygii, Hydrozoa and Sagittoidea, which supports the hypothesis that the larvae feed on multiple groups of mostly transparent gelatinous zooplankton. This hypothesis has prevailed as it has been tentatively inferred from the physiology of larvae, captive feeding trials and co-occurrence in situ. However, these prey have not been observed in the larval gut as traditional microscopic techniques cannot discern between transparent and gelatinous prey items in the gut. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of gut DNA has enabled us to classify these otherwise undetectable prey. The dominance of the colonial radiolarians among the gut contents is intriguing in that this group has been historically difficult to quantify in the water column, which may explain why they have not been connected to larval diet previously. Our results indicate that a PCR based technique is a very successful approach to identify the most abundant taxa in the natural diet of lobster larvae.

  17. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  18. Time-varying correlations between delta EEG power and heart rate variability in midlife women: the SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Scott D; Krafty, Robert T; Taylor, Briana J; Cribbet, Matthew R; Thayer, Julian F; Buysse, Daniel J; Kravitz, Howard M; Buysse, Evan D; Hall, Martica H

    2015-04-01

    No studies have evaluated the dynamic, time-varying relationship between delta electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep and high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) in women. Delta EEG and HF-HRV were measured during sleep in 197 midlife women (M(age)  = 52.1, SD = 2.2). Delta EEG-HF-HRV correlations in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep were modeled as whole-night averages and as continuous functions of time. The whole-night delta EEG-HF-HRV correlation was positive. The strongest correlations were observed during the first NREM sleep period preceding and following peak delta power. Time-varying correlations between delta EEG-HF-HRV were stronger in participants with sleep-disordered breathing and self-reported insomnia compared to healthy controls. The dynamic interplay between sleep and autonomic activity can be modeled across the night to examine within- and between-participant differences including individuals with and without sleep disorders. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Swan River National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  20. Population analysis and habitat selection of the whistling swan in the northern slope and Kotzebue areas, Alaska, summer 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Collaboration with the Tundra Biome Program (International Biological Program and National Science Foundation); U.S. Fish Atlantic Richfield Co.

  1. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  2. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  3. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  4. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  5. Hunting a Black Swan: Policy Options for America’s Police in Preventing Radiological/Nuclear Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    to teenager . I could not have done any of this without the three of them. xi TABLE OF CONTENTS I. HUNTING A...panic, as well as significant financial consequences.2 The above scenario is fictional but will serve as an introduction to the discussion of what...nuclear or radiological attack. In his book , 27 Will Terrorists Go Nuclear?, RAND’s Brian Jenkins extensively analyzes this topic and refutes

  6. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  7. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  8. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  9. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  10. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  11. Animal-plant-microbe: Direct and indirect effects of Swan foraging behavior modulate methane cycling in temperate shallow wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Stomp, M.; Santamaria, L.; Klaassen, M.R.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100593127; Laanbroek, H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070378282

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands are among the most important ecosystems on Earth both in terms of productivity and biodiversity, but also as a source of the greenhouse gas CH4. Microbial processes catalyzing nutrient recycling and CH4 production are controlled by sediment physico-chemistry, which is in turn affected by

  12. Animal-plant-microbe interactions: direct and indirect effects of swan foraging behavior modulate methane cycling in temperate shallow wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Stomp, M.; Santamaria, L.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands are among the most important ecosystems on Earth both in terms of productivity and biodiversity, but also as a source of the greenhouse gas CH4. Microbial processes catalyzing nutrient recycling and CH4 production are controlled by sediment physico-chemistry, which is in turn affected by

  13. Animal-plant-microbe interactions: direct and indirect effects of swan foraging behaviour modulate methane cycling in temperate shallow wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Stomp, M.; Santamaria, L.; Klaassen, M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands are among the most important ecosystems on Earth both in terms of productivity and biodiversity, but also as a source of the greenhouse gas CH4. Microbial processes catalyzing nutrient recycling and CH4 production are controlled by sediment physico-chemistry, which is in turn affected by

  14. Wave hindcast studies using SWAN nested in WAVEWATCH III - comparison with measured nearshore buoy data off Karwar, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Sandhya, K.G.; Nair, T.M.B.; Rathod, J.L.

    for the tropical Indian Ocean are 0.8 m/s, 0.57, 2.6 m/s and 52.5, respectively (Harikumar et al., 2013). The earlier studies have shown that bathymetry is also an important factor (Chawla, 2007; Brown and Wolf, 2009). Hence, both bathymetry and wind field.... J. Geophysical Res. 104 (4), 7649- 7666. Brown, Jennifer M., and Judith Wolf., 2009. Coupled wave and surge modellingfor the easern Irish sea and implications for model wind-stress. Continental shelf Res. 29(10), 1329-1342. Cavaleri, L., 1994...

  15. 77 FR 31843 - Swan Lake North Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted For Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... vertical shaft; (7) a 30-foot-diameter, 1,000-foot-long high pressure steel-lined penstock branching into... application, can be viewed or printed on the ``eLibrary'' link of Commission's Web site at http://www.ferc.gov...

  16. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Swan River National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  17. Keynote Address: In Today's E-information Marketplace: AM I a Swan or Ungainly Duckling? (Greeting Change Gracefully)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okerson, Ann

    The various electronic media transform the way in which authors create their works and readers read and use them in their study, research and publication. Those profound changes are mirrored by immense changes in the back rooms of librarians and information specialists who now deal with a radically different environment for decision-making and access choices. This opening talk will review characteristics of the ``new'' marketplace, including: * The immense growth of electronic resources of all sorts * The shift from national copyright law to individually negotiated institutional license as the regime that governs use of electronic resources * The move of publishers to sell information in ``aggregated'' bundles, even though customers may not ask for this * The development of aggressive groups of libraries buying together as consortia and changing the marketplace Most of the talk will be given to reviewing and expanding on the above points. Floating gracefully requires being well informed, developing new skills as collaborators and negotiators, and maintaining an open, flexible approach to the way in which library work is managed.

  18. Sleep Hygiene Behaviors Among Midlife Women with Insomnia or Sleep-Disordered Breathing: The SWAN Sleep Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kline, Christopher E.; Irish, Leah A.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Okun, Michele L.; Owens, Jane F.; Hall, Martica H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are the most common sleep disorders among midlife women. Although promoting sleep hygiene behaviors may be a useful behavioral approach for the management of insomnia or SDB, the frequency with which women engage in these behaviors is unclear.

  19. H10518: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Swan Creek and Rock Hall Harbor, Chespeake Bay, Maryland, 1993-12-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. The swan mussel (Anodonta cygnea) in Anzali wetland of Iran, a potential biomonitor for Cd and Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjali, Saeed; Mortazavi, Samar

    2014-08-01

    Protecting wetlands from environmental pollution has been of significant importance, as they are the vital habitats for various kinds of birds and animals. This study has aimed to monitor the contamination of Cd and Pb in Anzali wetland, located in the north of Iran using a mussel biomonitor. The contents of Cd and Pb were measured in the surface sediment, the soft tissue, and the shell of A. cygnea. The samples were collected from four sites in the region. The results demonstrated that the shell of A. cygnea can be employed as a precise case for biomonitoring of Cd and Pb, due to the higher biota-sediment accumulation factor and the lower coefficient of variation values found in the shell compared with the soft tissue, and also according to the positive correlation between Cd and Pb levels in the shell of A. cygnea and the sediment.

  1. Trace elements in bivalves from the Rio Cruces, Chile, trace watershed evolution after a major earthquake and challenge a postulated chemical spill from a pulp plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk, M.; Burchell, M.; Nairn, R.; Tubrett, M.; Forsterra, G.

    2009-05-01

    In May, 1960, the largest recorded earthquake in the history of the planet hit southern Chile, dropping part of the course of the Rio Cruces by 2m and creating an extensive wetland. The Brazilian Waterweed Egeria densa colonised the area, and became a primary food source for large populations of the Black-necked Swan, Cygnus melancoryphus. In 2004, a large pulp mill commenced operations upstream on the river. According to local reports, immediately after the opening of the plant, the weed died and the swans left. There was public outcry, and a search for a cause or a culprit. It was postulated that some sort of chemical spill from the plant caused the weed to die, resulting in departure of the swans. In 2008, we collected specimens of the bivalve Diplodon chilensis from several locations downstream from the Plant and towards the wetland to see if there was evidence of a chemical spill recorded in the shells. We prepared thin-sections of the shells to observe growth line development and patterns. Additionally, shell samples were analysed for stable oxygen isotopes and trace elements, using LA-ICP/MS. Based on annual growth lines, some of the bivalves were long-lived, with an age of more than 50 years. These individuals settled in the river shortly after the earthquake, and have lived there continuously ever since. Annual and sub-annual banding was clear, and the annual cyclicity of the major bands was verified with oxygen isotope analysis. There are no changes in growth corresponding to 2004. Trace element scans provided a wealth of information on the evolution of this earthquake-impacted wetland. Barium, Strontium and Manganese all showed strong annual cyclicity. From the analysis of older specimens, we interpret the high peaks of the Ba signal as reflecting soil erosion-Ba peaks are large immediately after the earthquake, then they diminish through time. Sr is likely a temperature signal, and Mn reflects runoff. Minor peaks in Cu, As and Pb probably reflect

  2. Aerobic cloacal and pharyngeal bacterial flora in six species of free-living birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkat, J; Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E; Schmitz Ornés, A; Eilers, A; Schmidt, V

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the culturable aerobic pharyngeal and cloacal bacterial flora of free-living birds, to determine the physiological bacterial microbiota, to identify possible interactions between feeding behaviour and the composition of the pharyngeal and cloacal microflora and to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs of 167 free-living birds, including water rails (Rallus aquaticus), spotted crakes (Porzana porzana), mute swans (Cygnus olor), barn swallows (Hirundo rustica), reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) and black cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) from Germany, were cultured to determine the prevalence of aerobic bacteria. Statistical analysis of bacterial findings and feeding behaviour was performed. A widespread soil and water bacteria were isolated, which are expected to be present in the habitat and food. However, some potentially avian- and human-pathogenic bacteria, such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, were also recovered. Free-living birds of the examined species harbour several environmental bacteria, which could be facultative pathogenic. Prevalence of bacteria in healthy free-living birds of the species included in this survey is influenced by environmental and alimentary factors. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. High seroprevalence of antibodies to avian influenza viruses among wild waterfowl in Alaska: implications for surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather M.; Hall, Jeffery S.; Flint, Paul L.; Franson, J. Christian; Ely, Craig R.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    We examined seroprevalence (presence of detectable antibodies in serum) for avian influenza viruses (AIV) among 4,485 birds, from 11 species of wild waterfowl in Alaska (1998–2010), sampled during breeding/molting periods. Seroprevalence varied among species (highest in eiders (Somateria and Polysticta species), and emperor geese (Chen canagica)), ages (adults higher than juveniles), across geographic locations (highest in the Arctic and Alaska Peninsula) and among years in tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus). All seroprevalence rates in excess of 60% were found in marine-dependent species. Seroprevalence was much higher than AIV infection based on rRT-PCR or virus isolation alone. Because pre-existing AIV antibodies can infer some protection against highly pathogenic AIV (HPAI H5N1), our results imply that some wild waterfowl in Alaska could be protected from lethal HPAIV infections. Seroprevalence should be considered in deciphering patterns of exposure, differential infection, and rates of AIV transmission. Our results suggest surveillance programs include species and populations with high AIV seroprevalences, in addition to those with high infection rates. Serologic testing, including examination of serotype-specific antibodies throughout the annual cycle, would help to better assess spatial and temporal patterns of AIV transmission and overall disease dynamics.

  4. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in zoo and domestic animals in Jiangxi Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Houqiang; Li, Kun; Zhang, Hui; Gan, Ping; Shahzad, Muhammad; Wu, Xiaoxing; Lan, Yanfang; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic protozoan parasite that infects a wide range of warm-blooded animals throughout the world. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii were determined using a commercial indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test in wild animals in a zoo. Three of 11 giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) (27%), 1 of 5 wolves (Canis lupus laniger) (20%), 1 of 6 hippopotamuses (Hippopotamus amphibious) (17%), and 2 of 9 tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus) (22%) were found to be positive. No antibodies were detected in leopards (Panthera pardus), wild geese (Anser cygnoides), and Eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). Domestic species from 13 counties of Jiangxi Province, China were also investigated by an indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test. Thirty-five of 340 goats (10%), 94 of 560 water buffaloes (17%), and 4 of 35 cattle (11%) were found to be seropositive. This is the first report of T. gondii infection in animals kept in zoos and domestic animals in this province. © H. Luo et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  5. Lead poisoning of waterfowl by contaminated sediment in the Coeur D'Alene River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, L.; Creekmore, L.H.; Audet, D.J.; Snyder, M.R.; Meteyer, C.U.; Franson, J. Christian; Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Finley, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho has been contaminated by mine tailings that have impaired the health of wildlife since the early 1900s. In other parts of the world, virtually all lead poisoning of waterfowl is caused by the ingestion of manmade lead artifacts, primarily spent lead shotshell pellets or, occasionally, fishing sinkers. However, in the Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho, nonartifactual lead poisoning was the ultimate cause of death of most of 219 (77%) of 285 waterfowl carcasses that had been found sick or dead from 1992 through 1997. The majority of these 219 waterfowl (172 tundra swans [Cygnus columbianus], 33 Canada geese [Branta canadensis], and 14 other species) were poisoned by ingesting river sediment that was contaminated with lead. The next most common cause of death (20 instances, 7%) was lead poisoning accompanied by ingested shotshell pellets. The remaining 46 waterfowl succumbed to trauma, infectious diseases (aspergillosis, avian cholera, tuberculosis), or miscellaneous problems, or the cause of death was not determined.

  6. Redke vrste ptic v sloveniji v letu 2013 – Poročilo Nacionalne komisije za redkosti / Rare birds in Slovenia in 2013 – Slovenian Rarities Committee's Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanžel Jurij

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This report by the Slovenian Rarities Committee presents records of rare bird species in Slovenia in 2013, with some addenda for previous years. The numbers in brackets refer to the number of records (first number and individuals (second number, recorded between 1 Jan 1950 and 31 Dec 2012. Since 1 Jan 2013, submission to the Committee is required for 37 additional species, 17 of which are regional rarities. Records of these species are not numbered, since records from previous years were not collected by the Committee. Four new species were recorded in category A: White-headed Duck Oxyura leucocephala, Baillon’s Crake Porzana pusilla, Audouin’s Gull Larus audouinii and Siberian Rubythroat Calliope calliope. Three species, Helmeted Guineafowl Numida meleagris, Chukar Alectoris chukar and Common Bulbul Pycnonotus barbatus, were added to category E. Other notable observations were the second and third records of Bewick’s Swan Cygnus columbianus and fourth record of Dalmatian Pelican Pelecanus crispus. The list of birds recorded in Slovenia (as of 31 Dec 2013 contains 384 species (369 in category A, 7 in category B, 8 exclusively in category C; 4 species are both in categories A and C. Category D contains 6 species, while category E contains 33. These two categories are not part of the list

  7. Bird ringing in Slovenia in 2014 and results of the first telemetry study of an African migrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrezec Al

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, 162 bird species were recorded during the bird ringing activities in Slovenia. Of 155 species, 62,275 birds were ringed, and 107 recoveries of birds ringed in Slovenia and found abroad, 148 foreign recoveries in Slovenia and 1395 local recoveries were recorded. The most frequently ringed species were Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla and Great Tit Parus major. As far as ringed nestlings are concerned, Great Tits and Barn Swalllows Hirundo rustica predominated. Considering the recoveries ringed of found birds abroad, the commonest were Black-headed Gulls Chroicocephalus ridibundus and Mute Swans Cygnus olor. The farthest recovery was a Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica found in the Democratic Republic of Congo (5171 km away. Among the more interesting finds was also the so far southernmost recovery of a Sand Martin Riparia riparia found in Israel. Let us also mention the first recovery of a Corncrake Crex crex, which bred and was ringed in 2013 at Planinsko polje (central Slovenia and was found in the 2014 breeding season in the Czech Republic. Among rare species, two Little Buntings Emberiza pusilla were caught and ringed. After nine years, the Roller Coracias garrulus bred again in Slovenia in 2014 and its nestlings were ringed. The paper also brings the description of the migration route of the first African migrant, the Black Stork Ciconia nigra, marked with a GPS/GSM telemetric device, which migrated across the Adriatic Sea, Sicily and Sahara to Nigeria.

  8. Integral's first look at the gamma-ray Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    about 0.1 seconds and have to be filtered out with software,” says Pietro Ubertini, IBIS Principal Investigator. JEM-X proved to be particularly susceptible to space weather and scientists had to ‘re-tune’ it. * * * Cygnus X-1 is one of the brightest high-energy emitters in the sky. Relative to its parent constellation, Cygnus - the Swan, Cygnus X-1 it is located about halfway along the row of stars that mark the Swan’s neck, at about 10 000 light years from Earth. Cygnus X-1 was discovered in the 1960s and is thought to be a black hole, ripping its companion star to pieces. The companion star, HDE 226868, is a blue supergiant with a surface temperature of around 31 000K. It orbits the black hole once every 5.6 days.

  9. Building a framework for transportation resiliency and evaluating the resiliency benefits of light rail transit in Denver, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    You might spend nearly your whole life coming across only white swans. Yet, all it takes is a single black : swan to prove that not all swans are white. Economist and noted author Nassim Taleb introduced this idea : of a black swan theory as a ...

  10. A Black Swan in a Sea of White Noise: Using Technology-Enhanced Learning to Afford Educational Inclusivity for Learners with Asperger’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James McDowell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Against a backdrop of increasingly vocation-focussed course provision within higher education, of widening participation initiatives intended to promote greater inclusion for learners affected by learning difficulties, and of moves towards greater use of social and collaborative forms of learning, this paper discusses the case of an undergraduate Computing student affected by Asperger’s Syndrome (AS.While there is recognition in the literature of problems associated with face-to-face dialogue for persons affected by AS, there is a paucity of research both into the experience of students in higher education, and around the issue of participation in group-work activities increasingly found in creative aspects of computing. This paper highlights a tension between moves towards collaborative learning and UK disabilities legislation in relation to learners with AS. Employing a qualitative case-study methodology, the investigation revealed how a technology-enhanced learning intervention afforded an AS-diagnosed learner greater opportunities to participate in group-work in a higher education context. The findings suggest that not only can computer-mediated communications afford AS-diagnosed learners opportunities to participate meaningfully in group-work, but also that the learner demonstrated higher levels of collective-inclusive versus individual-exclusive phraseology than neurotypical peers, thereby challenging assumptions around participation in collaborative learning activities and assimilation of peer-feedback.

  11. Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms Among Middle-Aged Women: The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, Joyce T.; Harlow, Sioban; Avis, Nancy; Kravitz, Howard M.; Cordal, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We examined racial/ethnic differences in significant depressive symptoms among middle-aged women before and after adjustment for socioeconomic, health-related, and psychosocial characteristics. Methods. Racial/ethnic differences in unadjusted and adjusted prevalence of significant depressive symptoms (score ≥ 16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression [CES-D] Scale) were assessed with univariate and multiple logistic regressions. Results. Twenty-four percent of the sample had a CES-D score of 16 or higher. Unadjusted prevalence varied by race/ethnicity (P women had the highest odds, and Chinese and Japanese women had the lowest odds, for a CES-D score of 16 or higher. This variation is in part because of health-related and psychosocial factors that are linked to socioeconomic status. PMID:15284047

  12. Signo, cisne, sereia: notas sobre o (desencontro em Mallarmé e Blanchot = Sign, Swan, Mermaid: notes about the (disencounter in Mallarmé and Blanchot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittencourt, Rita Lenira de Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available De algum modo, as exigências formais de Stéphane Mallarmé(1842-1898 encontram eco nas teorizações igualmente arriscadas de Maurice Blanchot(1907-2003, em torno da literatura como lugar do sentido, do segredo e do mistério sem mistérios do mundo e da arte. Separados temporalmente, o segundo sondou a poética do primeiro como um discreto e elegante sintoma de um dizer que joga o trabalho da palavra ao plano atemporal da poesia do futuro. Estas notas partem das reflexões blanchotianas que abrem O livro por vir (2005, a respeito de um (desencontro mítico entre a personagem Ulisses e o canto das Sereias, que seria o paradigma da literatura, e também de alguns artigos, desse e de outros livros, em torno da obra do poeta francês, em direção ao que elaboro como outro (desencontro, entre Cisne e Signo, proposto em um soneto mallarmeano que também anuncia o que vem: as críticas, os livros (o Livro, poemas e teorias sobre a literatura e a arte modernas

  13. Raising a beautiful swan: a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation of health professionals' experiences of participating in a mealtime intervention inspired by Protected Mealtimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Birkelund, Regner; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2017-12-01

    The British concept named Protected Mealtimes is known for stopping all non-acute activities and giving health professionals an opportunity to focus on providing patients their meals without being interrupted or disturbed. PM involves a cultural and behavioural change in the clinical setting, since health professionals are asked to adjust their daily routines. This study investigate how health professionals experience participating in a mealtime intervention inspired by the concept of Protected Mealtimes and intend to change mealtime practices. Three focus group interviews was conducted and included a total of 15 interdisciplinary staff members. After transcribing the interviews, the text material was analysed and interpreted in a three-methodological-step process inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. In the analysis and interpretation three themes was identified. The themes were: (1) a chance towards a new and better scene; (2) a step towards a more neurologically friendly environment; and (3) a renewed view of the neurological patients. This study concludes that to the health professionals, the intervention was meaningful in several ways because it created structure during mealtimes and emphasized the importance of creating a calm environment for both patients and health professionals. The intervention was described as an eye-opening and well-regarded event in the field of neurological care that facilitated community, and reflections on nursing care and professional identity were expressed.

  14. Raising a beautiful swan: a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation of health professionals’ experiences of participating in a mealtime intervention inspired by Protected Mealtimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Birkelund, Regner; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The British concept named Protected Mealtimes is known for stopping all non-acute activities and giving health professionals an opportunity to focus on providing patients their meals without being interrupted or disturbed. PM involves a cultural and behavioural change in the clinical setting, since health professionals are asked to adjust their daily routines. This study investigate how health professionals experience participating in a mealtime intervention inspired by the concept of Protected Mealtimes and intend to change mealtime practices. Three focus group interviews was conducted and included a total of 15 interdisciplinary staff members. After transcribing the interviews, the text material was analysed and interpreted in a three-methodological-step process inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. In the analysis and interpretation three themes was identified. The themes were: (1) a chance towards a new and better scene; (2) a step towards a more neurologically friendly environment; and (3) a renewed view of the neurological patients. This study concludes that to the health professionals, the intervention was meaningful in several ways because it created structure during mealtimes and emphasized the importance of creating a calm environment for both patients and health professionals. The intervention was described as an eye-opening and well-regarded event in the field of neurological care that facilitated community, and reflections on nursing care and professional identity were expressed. PMID:28835178

  15. Coupling alongshore variations in wave energy to beach morphologic change using the SWAN wave model at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Jodi L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    Coastal managers have faced increasing pressure to manage their resources wisely over the last century as a result of heightened development and changing environmental forcing. It is crucial to understand seasonal changes in beach volume and shape in order to identify areas vulnerable to accelerated erosion. Shepard (1950) was among the first to quantify seasonal beach cycles. Sonu and Van Beek (1971) and Wright et al. (1985) described commonly occurring beach states. Most studies utilize widest spaced 2-D cross shore profiles or shorelines extracted from aerial photographs (e.g. Winant et al. 1975; Aubrey, 1979, Aubrey and Ross, 1985; Larson and Kraus, 1994; Jimenez et al., 1977; Lacey and Peck, 1998; Guillen et al., 1999; Norcorss et al., 2002) to analyzed systematic changes in beach evolution. But with the exception of established field stations, such as Duck, NC (Birkemeier and Mason, 1984), ans Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS) in Japan (Katoh, 1997), there are very few beach change data sets with high temporal and spatial resolutions (e.g. Dail et al., 2000; Ruggiero et al., 2005; Yates et al., in press). Comprehensive sets of nearshore morphological data and local in situ measurements outside of these field stations are very rare and virtually non-existent high-energy coasts. Studied that have attempted to relate wave statistics to beach morphology change require some knowledge of the nearshore wave climate, and have had limited success using offshore measurement (Sonu and Van Beek, 1971; Dail et al., 2000). The primary objective of this study is to qualitatively compare spatially variable nearshore wave predictions to beach change measurements in order to understand the processes responsible for a persistent erosion 'hotspot' at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA. Local wave measurements are used to calibrate and validate a wave model that provides nearshore wave prediction along the beach. The model is run for thousands of binned offshore wave conditions to help isolate the effects of offshore wave direction and period on nearshore wave predictions. Alongshore varying average beach change statistics are computed at specific profile locations from topographic beach surveys and lidar data. The study area is located in the San Francisco Bight in central California. Ocean Beach is a seven kilometer long north-south trending sandy coastline located just south of the entrance to the San Francisco Bay Estuary (Figure 1). It contains an erosion hotspot in the southern part of the beach which has resulted in damage to local infrastructure and is the cause of continued concern. A wide range of field data collection and numerical modeling efforts have been focused here as part of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) San Francisco Bight Coastal Processes Study, which began in October 2003 and represents the first comprehensive study of coastal processes at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. Ocean Beach is exposed to very strong tidal flows, with measured currents often in excess of 1 m/s at the north end of the beach. Current profiler measurements indicate that current magnitudes are greater in the northern portion of the beach, while wave energy is greater in the southern portion where erosion problems are greatest (Barnard et al., 2007). The sub-aerial beach volume fluctuates seasonally over a maximum envelope of 400,000 m3 for the seven kilometer stretch (Barnard et al, 2007). The wave climate in the region is dominated by an abundance of low frequency energy (greater than 20 s period) and prevailing northwest incident wave angles. The application of a wave model to the region is further complicated by the presence of the Farallon Islands 40 kilometers west, and a massive ebb tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay (~150 km2), which creates complicated refraction patterns as wave energy moves from offshore Ocean Beach; however the cost and threat of the energetic nearshore environment have limited the temporal and spatial resolution of these measurements. Applying numerical models to predict wave and current patterns along the beach can help supplement the filed data that exists and provide opportunities to make prediction about the impacts of changing environmental forcing.

  16. Resolved Ammonia Thermometry, Water and Methanol Masers from the “Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby Galaxies (SWAN)”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Mark; Ott, Juergen; Rand, Richard J.; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Walter, Fabian; Schinnerer, Eva

    2017-01-01

    We present Karl G Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) molecular line observations of the nearby star forming galaxies NGC 253 and IC 342. These galaxies are close enough to be resolved with a few tens of pc resolution with the VLA. At this resolution we are well matched to the physical scales of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) and therefore sensitive to the dominant processes therein. We have selected metastable inversion transitions of NH3 from (1,1) to (5,5) and the (9,9), the 22.2 GHz H2O (616-523) maser, and the 36.1 GHz CH3OH (414-303) maser. We use the metastable NH3 transitions to calculate rotation temperatures of the gas, and apply LVG models to estimate kinetic temperatures. Our selected masers are collisionally pumped and reveal the locations of shocked material. We find that the molecular gas is well described by cool 57K and warm 130K components, and there is no significant temperature variation over the central kpc. The result suggests that neither PDRs nor superbubbles significantly heat the molecular gas, but superbubbles likely increase the bulk motion of GMCs. We also report the discovery of H2O masers associated with the large-scale biconical outflow for the first time, indicating the presence of shocked dense gas. Finally, we find CH3OH masers, indicative of weak shocks, coincident with superbubble walls.

  17. The role of herbivorous water birds in aquatic systems through interactions with aquatic macrophytes, with special reference to the Bewick's Swan - Fennel Pondweed system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.R.J.; Nolet, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    The role of aquatic macrophytes in stimulating biodiversity and maintaining clear waters is currently undisputed. The management of (eutrophic) shallow waters is therefore often directed at (re-)establishing macrophyte domination. In contrast, the role of water birds has long been considered of

  18. Consistently high sports/exercise activity is associated with better sleep quality, continuity and depth in midlife women: the SWAN sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Irish, Leah A; Krafty, Robert T; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M; Buysse, Daniel J; Bromberger, Joyce T; Dugan, Sheila A; Hall, Martica H

    2013-09-01

    To examine relationships between different physical activity (PA) domains and sleep, and the influence of consistent PA on sleep, in midlife women. Cross-sectional. Community-based. 339 women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (52.1 ± 2.1 y). None. Sleep was examined using questionnaires, diaries and in-home polysomnography (PSG). PA was assessed in three domains (Active Living, Household/Caregiving, Sports/Exercise) using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) up to 4 times over 6 years preceding the sleep assessments. The association between recent PA and sleep was evaluated using KPAS scores immediately preceding the sleep assessments. The association between the historical PA pattern and sleep was examined by categorizing PA in each KPAS domain according to its pattern over the 6 years preceding sleep assessments (consistently low, inconsistent/consistently moderate, or consistently high). Greater recent Sports/Exercise activity was associated with better sleep quality (diary "restedness" [P sleep continuity (diary sleep efficiency [SE; P = 0.02]) and depth (higher NREM delta electroencephalographic [EEG] power [P = 0.04], lower NREM beta EEG power [P Exercise activity was also associated with better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores (P = 0.02) and higher PSG-assessed SE (P sleep and Active Living or Household/Caregiving activity (either recent or historical pattern) were noted. Consistently high levels of recreational physical activity, but not lifestyle- or household-related activity, are associated with better sleep in midlife women. Increasing recreational physical activity early in midlife may protect against sleep disturbance in this population.

  19. Temperature, salinity and other parameters from bottle casts in the northeast Pacific Ocean from SWAN from 1965-10-30 to 1966-09-18 (NODC Accession 7000633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data, barometric pressure, air temperature and surface winds measurements were collected during nine bottle cast at six stations in...

  20. Association of Ethnicity with Involuntary Childlessness and Perceived Reasons for Infertility: Baseline Data from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmon, Anatte; Hailpern, Susan M.; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Green, Robin R.; Santoro, Nanette; Polotsky, Alex J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether ethnicity is associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived reasons for difficulties in becoming pregnant . Design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal cohort Setting Multiethnic, community-based observational study of US women Patient(s) 3149 midlife women, aged 42-52 Main Outcome Measure(s) Involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility Result(s) One hundred and thirty-three subjects (4.2%) were involuntarily childless, defined by a reported history of infertility and nulliparity. Ethnicity was significantly associated with self-reported involuntary childlessness. After controlling for economic and other risk factors, African-American (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.15 – 0.59) and Chinese women (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.14 – 0.90) were less likely to suffer from involuntary childlessness as compared to non-Hispanic Caucasian women. Additionally, 302 subjects reported a perceived etiology of infertility. An unexpectedly large proportion of these women (24.5%, 74 out of 302) reported etiologies not known to cause infertility (i.e. tipped uterus, ligaments for tubes were stretched), with African-American women having been most likely to report these etiologies (OR 2.81; 95% CI 1.26 – 6.28) as the reason for not becoming pregnant. Conclusion(s) Ethnicity is significantly associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility. Misattribution of causes of infertility is common and merits further consideration with respect to language or cultural barriers as well as possible physician misattribution. PMID:21958690

  1. Childhood socioeconomic circumstances and depressive symptom burden across 15 years of follow-up during midlife: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, Joyce T; Schott, Laura L; Matthews, Karen A; Kravitz, Howard M; Harlow, Siobán D; Montez, Jennifer Karas

    2017-08-01

    Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage may contribute to adult depression. Understanding pathways by which early socioeconomic adversity may shape adult depression is important for identifying areas for intervention. Studies to date have focused on one potential pathway, adult socioeconomic status (SES), and assessed depression at only one or a few time points. Our aims were to examine (a) the association between childhood SES (low vs. high) and depressive symptom burden in midlife and (b) whether adult socioeconomic, psychosocial, and physical health characteristics are important pathways. Using annual data from a cohort of 1109 black and white US women recruited in 1996-1997, we evaluated the association between childhood SES and depressive symptom burden across 15 years in midlife and whether adult characteristics-financial difficulty, lower education, stressful events, low social support, low role functioning, medical conditions, and bodily pain-mediated the association. Depressive symptom burden was estimated by calculating area under the curve of annual scores across 15 years of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D). In unadjusted models, low childhood SES was associated with greater depressive burden (P = 0.0002). Each hypothesized mediator, individually, did not reduce the association. However, when five of the hypothesized mediators were included together in the same analysis, they explained more than two thirds of the association between childhood SES and depressive symptom burden reducing the P value for childhood SES to non-significance (P = 0.20). These results suggest that childhood SES influences midlife depressive symptom burden through a cluster of economic stress, limited social resources, and physical symptoms in adulthood.

  2. Invasive potential of a South-American fish species, Geophagus brasiliensis, in the Swan River, Western Australia: based tolerance to instantaneous and gradual changes in salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de M.; Coutts, T.

    2010-01-01

    The south-west of Western Australia is a biodiversity hotspot and has a high proportion of endemic freshwater fishes. None of the native fish species are primary piscivores and with the exception of the freshwater cobbler (Tandanus bostocki) all species are small (

  3. A white elephant is not a black swan: Why you can do more about it project risk than you think (a reply to flyvberg and budzier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zafft

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Failed IT projects destroy value on a massive scale. Failure occurs because traditional efforts to improve IT performance treat project delivery as an operational endeavor driven by technologists. Progress, these technologists say, lies in ever more complex implementation methodologies. In reality, an IT project is a business endeavor which must be evaluated in financial terms, both as a standalone effort and in relation to other efforts competing for resources. Moreover, a client or vendor’s projects represent a rolling collection of endeavors. They are best analyzed and managed as a portfolio. Proof of success will not only come through better project delivery and business ROI but the ability to insure IT projects for timeliness, adherence to budget, and full functionality

  4. Association of ethnicity with involuntary childlessness and perceived reasons for infertility: baseline data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmon, Anatte; Hailpern, Susan M; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Green, Robin R; Santoro, Nanette; Polotsky, Alex J

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate whether ethnicity is associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived reasons for difficulties in becoming pregnant. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal cohort. Multiethnic, community-based observational study of US women. Women in midlife (3,149), aged 42-52 years. None. Involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility. One hundred thirty-three subjects (4.2%) were involuntarily childless, defined by a reported history of infertility and nulliparity. Ethnicity was significantly associated with self-reported involuntary childlessness. After controlling for economic and other risk factors, African American (odds ratio [OR] 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.59) and Chinese women (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.14-0.90) were less likely to suffer from involuntary childlessness compared with non-Hispanic white women. In addition, 302 subjects reported a perceived etiology of infertility. An unexpectedly large proportion of these women (24.5%, 74 of 302) reported etiologies not known to cause infertility (i.e., tipped uterus, ligaments for tubes were stretched), with African American women having been most likely to report these etiologies (OR 2.81; 95% CI 1.26-6.28) as the reason for not becoming pregnant. Ethnicity is significantly associated with involuntary childlessness and perceived etiology of infertility. Misattribution of causes of infertility is common and merits further consideration with respect to language or cultural barriers, as well as possible physician misattribution. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring West Nile virus (WNV) infection in wild birds in Serbia during 2012: first isolation and characterisation of WNV strains from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, T; Blazquez, A B; Lupulović, D; Lazić, G; Escribano-Romero, E; Fabijan, D; Kapetanov, M; Lazić, S; Saiz, Jc

    2013-10-31

    West Nile virus (WNV), a neurovirulent mosquito-transmissible zoonotic virus, has caused recent outbreaks in Europe, including Serbia from August until October 2012. Although humans can be infected, birds are the main natural WNV reservoir. To assess WNV circulation in northern Serbia, 133 wild birds were investigated. These comprised resident and migratory birds, collected between January and September 2012 in the Vojvodina province. The birds belonged to 45 species within 27 families. Blood sera (n=92) and pooled tissues from respective birds (n=81) were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT) and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). WNV antibodies were detected in seven (8%) sera: four from Mute Swans (Cygnus olor), two from White-tailed Eagles (Haliaeetus albicillas), and one from a Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus). Five sera neutralised WNV but not Usutu virus. For the first time in Serbia, WNV RNA was detected by RT-qPCR in pooled tissue samples of eight respective birds. WNV RNA was also derived from an additional bird, after a serum sample resulted infective in cell culture. The total nine WNV RNA positive birds included three Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis), two White-tailed Eagles, one Legged Gull (Larus michahelis), one Hooded Crow (Corvus cornix), one Bearded Parrot-bill (Panarus biramicus), and one Common Pheasant. Phylogenetic analysis of partial E region sequences showed the presence of, at least, two lineage 2 Serbian clusters closely related to those responsible for recent human and animal outbreaks in Greece, Hungary and Italy. Full genomic sequence from a goshawk isolate corroborated this data. These results confirm WNV circulation in Serbia and highlight the risk of infection for humans and horses, pointing to the need for implementing WNV surveillance programmes.

  6. New and noteworthy waterfowl records at artificial wetlands from Baja California Sur, Mexico Registros nuevos y sobresalientes de anátidos en humedales artificiales de Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carmona

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present 9 recent records of rare waterfowls in Baja California Sur, all of them in artificial wetlands: 3 freshwater sites and 1 concentration area for a saltworks. We present the first records of the Ross's Goose in the state. The remaining 8 species are: Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (breeding, Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Greater White-fronted Goose, Snow Goose, Cackling Goose, Tundra Swan, Mallard and Hooded Merganser. To this list we added an historical compilation of the records of these species in artificial sites of the state. The artificial wetlands are no replacement for their natural counterparts, they are nevertheless an important part of the region's landscape mosaic. As the records of the present work exemplify, this man-made habitat increases the regional species richness, and should be considered as important areas that need to be protected.Presentamos registros recientes de 9 especies de anátidos raros en Baja California Sur, todos ellos realizados en humedales creados por el hombre: 3 sitios dulceacuícolas y 1 área de concentración para la producción de sal. Se incluyen los primeros registros del ganso de Ross (Chen rossii para el estado. Las 8 especies restantes son: Dendrocygna autumnalis (anidación, D. bicolor, Anser albifrons, Chen caerulesens, Branta hutchinsii, Cygnus columbianus, Anas platyrhynchos y Lophodytes cucullatus. A la lista, agregamos una recopilación histórica de los registros de estas especies en humedales artificiales del estado. Aunque estos sitios no deben sustituir a sus contrapartes naturales, actualmente forman parte del mosaico paisajístico que ofrece la región; adicionalmente, incrementan la riqueza de especies de la región, por lo que es necesario brindarles protección.

  7. Cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio sem o emprego de soluções cardioplégicas, balão intra-aórtico, ou cateter de Swan-Ganz Myocardial revascularization without cardioplegia, intra-aortic baloon or Swan-Ganz catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Régis Jucá

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available No período de 1974 a 1987, 620 pacientes foram submetidos a cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio, na Casa de Saúde Sáo Raimundo, com 28 óbitos, 4,5% de mortalidade. Dezenove pacientes foram submetidos a procedimentos associados: prótese aórtica, mitral, ou ressecçáo de aneurisma ventricular. Os pacientes com idade acima de 70 anos e os submetidos a reoperaçáo estão incluídos. Não houve seleção dos casos. O método de proteção miocárdica foi o do pinçamento intermitente da aorta, hipotermia corporal de 30ºC e hipotermia tópica com solução salina gelada. A síndrome de baixo débito, a mediastinite em paciente diabético, anemia pré-operatória em paciente com angina instável acima de 70 anos de idade, tamponamento cardíaco tardio, endarterectomia não satisfatória, desatenção no uso de nipride no pós-operatório, choque após a protamina, sangramento, acidente vascular cerebral, coma hiperosmolar foram, entre outras, as causas de óbito. Da presente experiência, concluímos que o pinçamento intermitente da aorta, associado à hipotermia, é um aceitável método de preservação do miocárdio.From 1974 to December 1987, 620 patients were submitted to myocardial revascularization, with 28 deaths, 4.5% mortality. Nineteen patients received associated procedures: 14 ventricular aneurysmectomy and 5 valvular prosthesis. The method of myocardial protection was intermitent clamping of the aorta, topical and body hypothermia of 30ºC. From this experience we conclude that this method offers a satisfactory myocardial preservation.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis Supports Horizontal Transmission as a Driving Force of the Spread of Avian Bornaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Rubbenstroth

    Full Text Available Avian bornaviruses are a genetically diverse group of viruses initially discovered in 2008. They are known to infect several avian orders. Bornaviruses of parrots and related species (Psittaciformes are causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease, a chronic and often fatal neurologic disease widely distributed in captive psittacine populations. Although knowledge has considerably increased in the past years, many aspects of the biology of avian bornaviruses are still undiscovered. In particular, the precise way of transmission remains unknown.In order to collect further information on the epidemiology of bornavirus infections in birds we collected samples from captive and free-ranging aquatic birds (n = 738 and Passeriformes (n = 145 in Germany and tested them for the presence of bornaviruses by PCR assays covering a broad range of known bornaviruses. We detected aquatic bird bornavirus 1 (ABBV-1 in three out of 73 sampled free-ranging mute swans (Cygnus olor and one out of 282 free-ranging Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus. Canary bornavirus 1 (CnBV-1, CnBV-2 and CnBV-3 were detected in four, six and one out of 48 captive common canaries (Serinus canaria forma domestica, respectively. In addition, samples originating from 49 bornavirus-positive captive Psittaciformes were used for determination of parrot bornavirus 2 (PaBV-2 and PaBV-4 sequences. Bornavirus sequences compiled during this study were used for phylogenetic analysis together with all related sequences available in GenBank.Within ABBV-1, PaBV-2 and PaBV-4, identical or genetically closely related bornavirus sequences were found in parallel in various different avian species, suggesting that inter-species transmission is frequent relative to the overall transmission of these viruses. Our results argue for an important role of horizontal transmission, but do not exclude the additional possibility of vertical transmission. Furthermore we defined clearly separated

  9. Rezultati januarskega štetja vodnih ptic leta 2014 v Sloveniji / Results of the January 2014 waterbird census in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božič Luka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the International Waterbird Census (IWC was carried out in Slovenia on 18 and 19 Jan. Waterbirds were counted on all larger rivers, along the entire Slovenian Coastland and on most of the major standing waters in the country. During the census, in which 268 observers took part, 413 sections of the rivers and coastal sea with a total length of 1395.1 km and 226 other localities (178 standing waters and 48 streams were surveyed. Altogether, 45,346 waterbirds of 62 species were counted. This is the lowest number of waterbirds recorded after the 1997 and 1998 censuses. The greatest numbers of waterbirds were counted in the Drava count area, i.e. 20,217 individuals (44.6% of all waterbirds in Slovenia. By far the most numerous species was Mallard Anas platyrhynchos (43.0% of all waterbirds, followed by Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus (10.1% of all waterbirds, Coot Fulica atra (7.9% of all waterbirds, Yellow-legged Gull Larus michahellis (6.0% of all waterbirds and Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (4.6% of all waterbirds. The number of 1,000 counted individuals was also surpassed by Mute Swan Cygnus olor, Pochard Aythya ferina, Tufted Duck Ay. fuligula and Teal An. crecca. Among the rarer recorded species, the Black Stork Ciconia nigra (registered for the first time during the January Waterbird Censuses; only the second winter record in Slovenia, Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis and Flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus (both registered only for the second time during the IWC should be given a special mention. Numbers of the following species were the highest so far recorded during the IWC: Shelduck Tadorna tadorna, Muscovy Duck Cairina moschata, Shoveler An. clypeata, Redthroated Loon Gavia stellata and Pygmy Cormorant Phalacrocorax pygmeus. Also, the total number of C and E category species/taxa was the highest to date, although still quite low with 70 individuals. Numbers of the following species were the lowest so far recorded during the IWC

  10. Avian mortalities due to transmission line collisions: a review of current estimates and field methods with an emphasis on applications to the Canadian electric network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Rioux

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Birds are vulnerable to collisions with human-made fixed structures. Despite ongoing development and increases in infrastructure, we have few estimates of the magnitude of collision mortality. We reviewed the existing literature on avian mortality associated with transmission lines and derived an initial estimate for Canada. Estimating mortality from collisions with power lines is challenging due to the lack of studies, especially from sites within Canada, and due to uncertainty about the magnitude of detection biases. Detection of bird collisions with transmission lines varies due to habitat type, species size, and scavenging rates. In addition, birds can be crippled by the impact and subsequently die, although crippling rates are poorly known and rarely incorporated into estimates. We used existing data to derive a range of estimates of avian mortality associated with collisions with transmission lines in Canada by incorporating detection, scavenging, and crippling biases. There are 231,966 km of transmission lines across Canada, mostly in the boreal forest. Mortality estimates ranged from 1 million to 229.5 million birds per year, depending on the bias corrections applied. We consider our most realistic estimate, taking into account variation in risk across Canada, to range from 2.5 million to 25.6 million birds killed per year. Data from multiple studies across Canada and the northern U.S. indicate that the most vulnerable bird groups are (1 waterfowl, (2 grebes, (3 shorebirds, and (4 cranes, which is consistent with other studies. Populations of several groups that are vulnerable to collisions are increasing across Canada (e.g., waterfowl, raptors, which suggests that collision mortality, at current levels, is not limiting population growth. However, there may be impacts on other declining species, such as shorebirds and some species at risk, including Alberta's Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator and western Canada's endangered Whooping

  11. Rezultati januarskega štetja vodnih ptic leta 2015 v Sloveniji/ Results of the January 2015 waterbird census in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božič Luka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2015, the International Waterbird Census (IWC was carried out in Slovenia on 17 and 18 Jan. Waterbirds were counted on all larger rivers, along the entire Slovenian Coastland and on most of the major standing waters in the country. During the census, in which 276 observers took part, 409 sections of the rivers and coastal sea with a total length of 1385.8 km and 224 other localities (172 standing waters and 52 streams were surveyed. Altogether, 46,425 waterbirds of 57 species were counted. This is one of the lowest numbers of waterbirds recorded during the 19 years of IWC in Slovenia. The highest numbers of waterbirds were counted in the Drava count area, i.e. 17,014 individuals (36.7% of all waterbirds in Slovenia. By far the most numerous species was Mallard Anas platyrhynchos (45.9% of all waterbirds, followed by Coot Fulica atra (8.4% of all waterbirds, Blackheaded Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus (7.5% of all waterbirds, Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (5.7% of all waterbirds and Mute Swan Cygnus olor (4.6% of all waterbirds. The number of 1000 counted individuals was also surpassed by Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula, Yellow-legged Gull Larus michahellis and Teal An. crecca. Among the rarer recorded species, the Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis (registered only for the third time during the IWC and Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus (registered only for the fourth time during the IWC deserve special mention. Also, Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea was recorded for the fourth time during the IWC, but the individual observed was classified to category E (introduced species without self-sustaining populations, escapees from captivity. Numbers of the following species were the highest so far recorded during the IWC: Greylag Goose Anser anser, Muscovy Duck Cairina moschata, Shoveler An. clypeata, Goosander Mergus merganser and Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos. The number of Redbreasted Mergansers M. serrator was the lowest so far recorded during the

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis Supports Horizontal Transmission as a Driving Force of the Spread of Avian Bornaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Schmidt, Volker; Rinder, Monika; Legler, Marko; Twietmeyer, Sönke; Schwemmer, Phillip; Corman, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Avian bornaviruses are a genetically diverse group of viruses initially discovered in 2008. They are known to infect several avian orders. Bornaviruses of parrots and related species (Psittaciformes) are causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease, a chronic and often fatal neurologic disease widely distributed in captive psittacine populations. Although knowledge has considerably increased in the past years, many aspects of the biology of avian bornaviruses are still undiscovered. In particular, the precise way of transmission remains unknown. Aims and Methods In order to collect further information on the epidemiology of bornavirus infections in birds we collected samples from captive and free-ranging aquatic birds (n = 738) and Passeriformes (n = 145) in Germany and tested them for the presence of bornaviruses by PCR assays covering a broad range of known bornaviruses. We detected aquatic bird bornavirus 1 (ABBV-1) in three out of 73 sampled free-ranging mute swans (Cygnus olor) and one out of 282 free-ranging Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus). Canary bornavirus 1 (CnBV-1), CnBV-2 and CnBV-3 were detected in four, six and one out of 48 captive common canaries (Serinus canaria forma domestica), respectively. In addition, samples originating from 49 bornavirus-positive captive Psittaciformes were used for determination of parrot bornavirus 2 (PaBV-2) and PaBV-4 sequences. Bornavirus sequences compiled during this study were used for phylogenetic analysis together with all related sequences available in GenBank. Results of the Study Within ABBV-1, PaBV-2 and PaBV-4, identical or genetically closely related bornavirus sequences were found in parallel in various different avian species, suggesting that inter-species transmission is frequent relative to the overall transmission of these viruses. Our results argue for an important role of horizontal transmission, but do not exclude the additional possibility of vertical transmission

  13. Eu não quero ser a mulher saliente! Eu prefiro ser a Isabella Swan! Apropriações das identidades femininas por crianças na recepção midiática

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Marta Maria Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar as apropriações das identidades femininas por crianças no âmbito da recepção midiática. Participaram da investigação dezessete crianças, entre nove a treze anos de idade. Na investigação, foram utilizadas as seguintes técnicas/instrumentos de produção de dados da investigação: elaboração de desenhos, produção escrita, diário de campo, questionário, seleção de imagens na internet e rodas de conversa. A abordagem qualitativa, de inspiraçã...

  14. Terrorism/Criminalogy/Sociology via Magnetism-Hamiltonian ``Models''?!: Black Swans; What Secrets Lie Buried in Magnetism?; ``Magnetism Will Conquer the Universe?''(Charles Middleton, aka ``His Imperial Majesty The Emperior Ming `The Merciless!!!''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrott, Anthony; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; Hoover, John-Edgar; Ness, Elliott

    2013-03-01

    Terrorism/Criminalogy//Sociology : non-Linear applied-mathematician (``nose-to-the grindstone / ``gearheadism'') ''modelers'': Worden,, Short, ...criminologists/counter-terrorists/sociologists confront [SIAM Conf. on Nonlinearity, Seattle(12); Canadian Sociology Conf,. Burnaby(12)]. ``The `Sins' of the Fathers Visited Upon the Sons'': Zeno vs Ising vs Heisenberg vs Stoner vs Hubbard vs Siegel ''SODHM''(But NO Y!!!) vs ...??? Magntism and it turn are themselves confronted BY MAGNETISM,via relatively magnetism/metal-insulator conductivity / percolation-phase-transitions critical-phenomena -illiterate non-linear applied-mathematician (nose-to-the-grindstone/ ``gearheadism'')''modelers''. What Secrets Lie Buried in Magnetism?; ``Magnetism Will Conquer the Universe!!!''[Charles Middleton, aka ``His Imperial Majesty The Emperior Ming `The Merciless!!!']'' magnetism-Hamiltonian phase-transitions percolation-``models''!: Zeno(~2350 BCE) to Peter the Pilgrim(1150) to Gilbert(1600) to Faraday(1815-1820) to Tate (1870-1880) to Ewing(1882) hysteresis to Barkhausen(1885) to Curie(1895)-Weiss(1895) to Ising-Lenz(r-space/Localized-Scalar/ Discrete/1911) to Heisenberg(r-space/localized-vector/discrete/1927) to Priesich(1935) to Stoner (electron/k-space/ itinerant-vector/discrete/39) to Stoner-Wohlfarth (technical-magnetism hysteresis /r-space/ itinerant-vector/ discrete/48) to Hubbard-Longuet-Higgins (k-space versus r-space/

  15. Cosmic X-ray Sources, Galactic and Extragalactic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram, E T; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1966-04-01

    Instruments carried aboard an Aerobee rocket in April 1965 provided evidence for x-ray emission from the directions of the radio galaxies Cygnus A and M-87 and from the galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. A survey of the Cygnus region revealed a marked decrease in the flux of x-rays from Cygnus XR-1, which was identified in June 1964 as the second brightest object in the first Naval Research Laboratory list of x-ray sources. The detection sensitivity was improved over previous surveys and several new sources were detected at lower flux levels.

  16. Implications of Privatizing U.S Marine Deployed Tactical Telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Scope: To provide the first of two knowledge and skill areas required to effectively deploy the SWAN-D VSAT terminal. The first half o this 10...will be able to configure the networking equipment within a SWAN-D VSAT terminal to pass NIPR/SIPR data, voice and video traffic to distant end

  17. Non-accelerator experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  18. Search for gamma-ray events in the BATSE data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Walter

    1994-01-01

    We find large location errors and error radii in the locations of channel 1 Cygnus X-1 events. These errors and their associated uncertainties are a result of low signal-to-noise ratios (a few sigma) in the two brightest detectors for each event. The untriggered events suffer from similarly low signal-to-noise ratios, and their location errors are expected to be at least as large as those found for Cygnus X-1 with a given signal-to-noise ratio. The statistical error radii are consistent with those found for Cygnus X-1 and with the published estimates. We therefore expect approximately 20 - 30 deg location errors for the untriggered events. Hence, many of the untriggered events occurring within a few months of the triggered activity from SGR 1900 plus 14 are indeed consistent with the SGR source location, although Cygnus X-1 is also a good candidate.

  19. Invasive Species Undeterred by Increasing Urbanization and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Conway, T. M.; Fortin, M.

    2011-12-01

    The future of many species appears bleak with the realization that continued urbanization and climate change will have significant effects on the earth's ecosystems by changing water cycles, habitat availability and inter-species dynamics, among other effects. Invasive species are likely to thrive in these changing disturbed ecosystems due to their ability to capitalize on marginal habitats, and therefore pose a severe threat. Our study utilizes the invasive mute swan as a model species to examine invasive species' relationship with urban landcover and predict how its distribution will change with increasing urbanization and climate change in its non-native range. We first use generalized linear models and classification trees to determine current landscape correlates of mute swans in Ontario, Canada. We determine that, after percentage water cover, the presence of urban areas is the second most important factor in determining the presence of mute swans. This is especially significant considering that mute swans are an aquatic species utilizing the limited wetlands and waterbodies found in urban areas. We then use the machine learning tool MaxEnt to model mute swan distribution in the future by taking into account different scenarios of urbanization and climate change. As the percentage of land cover occupied by urban areas increases, the probability of mute swan occupancy of these areas also increases. The effects of climate change are varying. Climate change will increase temperatures in Ontario, thereby increasing the possible locations for establishment by the mute swan, but it will also result in lower lake levels, which will somewhat reduce the percentage water cover. However, due to the large amount of shoreline available for mute swan establishment, especially on the Great Lakes, these effects on waterbodies will likely not inhibit mute swan establishment and range expansion in the next century. While climate change is important, it is not the only

  20. The US Navy Coupled Ocean-Wave Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    wave model to the ocean model (i.e., SWAN to NCOM) includes the Stokes drift current ( SDC ) from the waves due to the wave motion, the wave radiation...wave-radiation stress gradients from SWAN are applied in NCOM as a surface stress. The SDC from SWAN is included within the Coriolis term in...continuity equation (these SDC terms are imple- mented as in Bennis et al., 2011). The SDC is also used in the param- eterization of the enhancement of

  1. Folk, akustiline selline, on hambus Tristan Priimäel / Tristan Priimägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Priimägi, Tristan, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Iron & Wine "Our Endless Numbered Days", Sufjan Stevens "Seven Swans", Joanna Newsom "The Milk-Eyed Mender", Nick Drake "Made to Love Magic", Kings Of Convenience "Riot On an Empty Street", White Magic "Through the Sun Door"

  2. Plaadid / Immo Mihkelson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mihkelson, Immo, 1959-

    2004-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest Ragatmika "Katkiminekud", "Killing Joke", The Streets "A Grand Don't Come For Free", Jamie Cullum "Twentysomething", Armand Van Helden "New York: A Mix Odyssey", Awan Lee "Swan Lee 2nd album"

  3. Goose Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting geese and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Swan...

  4. Sperm Counts Continue to Decline in Western Nations: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the July 25 issue of the journal Human Reproduction Update . SOURCES: Shanna Swan, Ph.D., professor, environmental ... Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York City; Human Reproduction Update , July 25, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2017 ...

  5. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NEAR MENDON, MO, 2013-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — WATER MONITORING STATION ANALYSIS – CALENDAR YEAR 2013 to 2014 SITE NUMBER: 393619093074801 SITE NAME: Yellow Creek nr Mendon, MO, County Road CC COOPERATION: Swan...

  6. Land use plan with emphasis on management of Eastern Prairie population of Canada Geese

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge was established to provide nesting, resting and feeding area for waterfowl. The Refuge management priority goals include;...

  7. Evaluation of the source and extent of lead poisoning at Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge, Bennett County, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The presence of lead shot at levels which would warrant remediation were not identified on any of the study plots. However, trumpeter swans and at least in prior...

  8. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water. Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services.In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  9. Wave Scenario Grid with Proposed Sediment Borrow Pit 3 of Breton Island, Louisiana: Model Input Grid 4 with Pit 3 Configuration

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model input grid 4 bathymetry with pit 3 configuration (G4_P3_grid.shp) and output of significant wave height, dominant...

  10. Safety Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge Safety Plan discusses policies for the safety of the station employees, volunteers, and public. This plan seeks to identify...

  11. Avian Influenza in Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... terns and shorebirds or waterfowl such as ducks, geese and swans. These wild birds are often viewed ... human health. FAO and OIE are concerned with issues affecting animals, food and agriculture. Top of Page ...

  12. Biographies | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Amalie Emmy Noether · Beatrice Tinsley · Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin · Florence Jessie MacWilliams · Henrietta Swan Leavitt · Marie Skoldowska Curie · Rosalind Franklin · Maria Goeppert Mayer · Edavaleth Kakkat Janaki Ammal; Grace ...

  13. Ocean-Wave Coupled Modeling in COAMPS-TC: A Study of Hurricane Ivan (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    input of the Stokes Drift Current ( SDC ) calculated from the SWAN wave spectra to NCOM, is examined. The models indicate that the SDC was on the order...of 10 -25% of the near-surface Eulerian current during Ivan. Recent studies of the importance of the SDC and the resulting Langmuir turbulence on...model coupling, which included the input of the Stokes Drift Current ( SDC ) calculated from the SWAN wave spectra to NCOM, is examined. The models indi

  14. Latin America Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-08

    Seen as Possibility (Daniel Prieto Vial; TECNOLOGIA MILITARY, Apr 85) 1 Mexico Expresses Interest in Closer Ties With Caricom (BARBADOS ADVOCATE, 17...Drive Against Status Grants 56 Criticism of Attorney General’s Status ^ Swan on Status Issue 5g Tourism Chief’s Departure 5g Close House Vote for...UBP 5g Criticism of Swan Address Union Organ Offers Proposals for ’Better Bermuda’ (Editorial; THE WORKERS VOICE, 19 Apr 85) PLP Dissidents

  15. Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) Version 5.0, Rev. 2.0 (User’s Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    command vi can be used to open the script: vi setup_nrlssc 2. Set the wall time, which is the actual time taken by a computer to complete a run...SWAN grid setup. SWAN actually uses the NCOM setup for part of its grid setup. • lwav- The number of vertical depths for wave forcing input...fort.35), 5) Listing of MVOI observations (fort.36), 6) Synthetics (direct and MODAS ) for MODAS , including rejections and editing results (fort

  16. Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS), Version 5.0, Revision 2.0 (User’s Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    command vi can be used to open the script: vi setup_nrlssc 2. Set the wall time, which is the actual time taken by a computer to complete a run...SWAN grid setup. SWAN actually uses the NCOM setup for part of its grid setup. • lwav- The number of vertical depths for wave forcing input...fort.35), 5) Listing of MVOI observations (fort.36), 6) Synthetics (direct and MODAS ) for MODAS , including rejections and editing results (fort

  17. The Reliability and Validity of the English and Spanish Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD and Normal Behavior Rating Scales in a Preschool Sample: Continuum Measures of Hyperactivity and Inattention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D.; Swanson, James M.; Riggs, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the English and Spanish versions of the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD-symptom and Normal-behavior (SWAN) rating scale. Method Parents of preschoolers completed both a SWAN and the well-established Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) on two separate occasions over a span of 3 months; instruments were in the primary language of the family (English or Spanish). Results Psychometric properties for the English and Spanish versions of the SWAN were adequate, with high internal consistency and moderate test–retest reliability. Skewness and kurtosis statistics for the SWAN were within the range expected for a normally distributed population. The SWAN also demonstrated adequate convergent and discriminant validity in correlations with the various subscales of the SDQ. Conclusion Psychometric properties of both the English and Spanish versions of the SWAN indicate that it is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring child attention and hyperactivity. The stability of ratings over time in this preschool sample was moderate, which may reflect the relative instability of these characteristics in preschool children. PMID:21807955

  18. An assessment of the wind re-analyses in the modelling of an extreme sea state in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Adem; Ponce de León, S.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims at an assessment of wind re-analyses for modelling storms in the Black Sea. A wind-wave modelling system (Simulating WAve Nearshore, SWAN) is applied to the Black Sea basin and calibrated with buoy data for three recent re-analysis wind sources, namely the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reanalysis-Interim (ERA-Interim), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), and Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) during an extreme wave condition that occurred in the north eastern part of the Black Sea. The SWAN model simulations are carried out for default and tuning settings for deep water source terms, especially whitecapping. Performances of the best model configurations based on calibration with buoy data are discussed using data from the JASON2, TOPEX-Poseidon, ENVISAT and GFO satellites. The SWAN model calibration shows that the best configuration is obtained with Janssen and Komen formulations with whitecapping coefficient (Cds) equal to 1.8e-5 for wave generation by wind and whitecapping dissipation using ERA-Interim. In addition, from the collocated SWAN results against the satellite records, the best configuration is determined to be the SWAN using the CFSR winds. Numerical results, thus show that the accuracy of a wave forecast will depend on the quality of the wind field and the ability of the SWAN model to simulate the waves under extreme wind conditions in fetch limited wave conditions.

  19. SAX J2103.5+4545 in outburst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, R.; Beckmann, V.; Bianchin, V.

    2008-01-01

    We report an intense hard X-ray outburst detected from the Be/ neutron star HMXB SAX J2103.5+4545 (Blay et al. 2004, A&A, 427, 293), which is known to be a pulsar. The source was detected during INTEGRAL observations of the Galactic Plane in the Cygnus region, starting at 2007-04-25T09:14 (UTC). ...

  20. Circumstellar carbonaceous material associated with late-type dusty WC Wolf-Rayet stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiar, JE; Tielens, AGGM

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the 5-8.5 mum infrared spectra of the late-type Wolf-Rayet stars WR 118, WR 112, and WR 104, the WN star WR 147, the B5 hypergiant Cygnus OB2 No. 12, and the Galactic center luminous blue variable Pistol Star using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory.

  1. The microquasar Cyg X-1: a short review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowak, M.A.; Wilms, J.; Hanke, M.; Pottschmidt, K.; Markoff, S.

    2012-01-01

    We review the spectral properties of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. Specifically, we discuss two recent sets of multi-satellite observations. One comprises a 0.5-500 keV spectrum, obtained with every flying X-ray satellite at that time, that is among the hardest Cyg X-1 spectra observed to

  2. Habitat surrounding patch reefs influences the diet and nutrition of the western rock lobster

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study the influence of habitat on the diet and nutrition of a common reef-associated generalist consumer, the western rock lobster Panulirus cygnus, was tested. Stable isotopes (13C/12C and 15N/14N) and gut contents were used to assess the diet of lobsters collected from ...

  3. 78 FR 57215 - Waiver of Requirement To Enter Into a Reciprocal Waiver of Claims Agreement With All Customers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... file with author) (referring to Antares launch of the Cygnus payload as ORB-D1 Mission). NanoRacks and... definitions. Section 440.3 defines a customer, in relevant part, as any person with rights in the payload or.... Accordingly, because NanoRacks and the students are persons who have rights in their respective payloads, the...

  4. Content analysis of comments posted on Australian online news sites reporting a celebrity admitting smoking while pregnant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Beverley; Freeman, Becky

    2016-12-14

    More than 12% of Australian women who gave birth in 2012 reported smoking during pregnancy. Smoking during pregnancy may be under-reported as a result of negative societal attitudes towards pregnant women who smoke. This study sought to identify the extent and nature of online news readers' reactions to online news stories reporting Australian celebrity Chrissie Swan's admission of smoking while pregnant, and whether any smoking and pregnancy health information was included. Quantitative media content analysis. Readers' comments posted online in response to Australian online news stories and blogs reporting that Chrissie Swan had admitted smoking while pregnant were coded for inclusion in one of two categories: (1) opposing the judgement of Swan or (2) supporting the judgement of Swan. These comments were then grouped into seven frames. Comments that reflected the readers' own experiences of smoking during pregnancy and the inclusion of any helpful health information were also assessed. Comments that were critical of the judgement of Swan were most frequently found. Specific health facts and quit smoking advice rarely featured. Common frames were 'against making moral judgement' and 'smoking in pregnancy is wrong or harmful'. The lack of comments addressing the misinformation about smoking and quitting during pregnancy suggests a potential role for public health practitioners in future smoking and pregnancy communication programs. The increase in the number of Australians participating in online communities and blogs provides the opportunity for capacity building and resources to enable a proactive and rapid public health response to media opportunities.

  5. National Guard and Reserve Equipment Report for Fiscal Year 2013 (NGRER FY 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Z00057 1 1 1 1 23 Interface Unit Comm Equip: OL-713(V)1/TYQ CSS VSAT Z00560 0 1 1 1 0 Processor Group Signal Data: OL-701/TYQ Z53098 12 12 12 12 248...Cargo, 3/4-ton, M101 W95537 +4 0 Interface Unit Comm Equip: OL- 713(V)1/TYQ CSS VSAT Z00560 +2 0 FY 2009 P-1R Equipment Aircraft Joint Cargo Aircraft...Proj/HW Refurbishment 4,700,000 VSAT / VSAT Network Packages SWAN D 2,199,991 VSAT / VSAT Small SWAN D (V) 1 1,600,000 VSAT / VSAT Medium SWAN D (V) 2 39,474

  6. Experimental verification of the linear and non-linear versions of a panel code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoropoulos, G. J.; Katsikis, C.; Chalkias, D. S.

    2011-03-01

    In the proposed paper numerical calculations are carried out using two versions of a three-dimensional, timedomain panel method developed by the group of Prof. P. Sclavounos at MIT, i.e. the linear code SWAN2, enabling optionally the use of the instantaneous non-linear Froude-Krylov and hydrostatic forces and the fully non-linear SWAN4. The analytical results are compared with experimental results for three hull forms with increasing geometrical complexity, the Series 60, a reefer vessel with stern bulb and a modern fast ROPAX hull form with hollow bottom in the stern region. The details of the geometrical modeling of the hull forms are discussed. In addition, since SWAN4 does not support transom sterns, only the two versions of SWAN2 were evaluated over experimental results for the parent hull form of the NTUA double-chine, wide-transom, high-speed monohull series. The effect of speed on the numerical predictions was investigated. It is concluded that both versions of SWAN2 the linear and the one with the non-linear Froude-Krylov and hydrostatic forces provide a more robust tool for prediction of the dynamic response of the vessels than the non-linear SWAN4 code. In general, their results are close to what was expected on the basis of experience. Furthermore, the use of the option of non-linear Froude-Krylov and hydrostatic forces is beneficial for the accuracy of the predictions. The content of the paper is based on the Diploma thesis of the second author, supervised by the first one and further refined by the third one.

  7. Experimental verification of the linear and non-linear versions of a panel code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J. Grigoropoulos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the proposed paper numerical calculations are carried out using two versions of a three-dimensional, time-domain panel method developed by the group of Prof. P. Sclavounos at MIT, i.e. the linear code SWAN2, enabling optionally the use of the instantaneous non-linear Froude-Krylov and hydrostatic forces and the fully non-linear SWAN4. The analytical results are compared with experimental results for three hull forms with increasing geometrical complexity, the Series 60, a reefer vessel with stern bulb and a modern fast ROPAX hull form with hollow bottom in the stern region. The details of the geometrical modeling of the hull forms are discussed. In addition, since SWAN4 does not support transom sterns, only the two versions of SWAN2 were evaluated over experimental results for the parent hull form of the NTUA double-chine, wide-transom, high-speed monohull series. The effect of speed on the numerical predictions was investigated. It is concluded that both versions of SWAN2 the linear and the one with the non-linear Froude-Krylov and hydrostatic forces provide a more robust tool for prediction of the dynamic response of the vessels than the non-linear SWAN4 code. In general, their results are close to what was expected on the basis of experience. Furthermore, the use of the option of non-linear Froude-Krylov and hydrostatic forces is beneficial for the accuracy of the predictions. The content of the paper is based on the Diploma thesis of the second author, supervised by the first one and further refined by the third one.

  8. The theory of Suslin matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi A. Rao

    Swan-Towber realized in 1974 that the unimodular “square” rows. (a2,b,c) can always be completed to an invertible matrix. We write two completions below. aa + bb + cc = 1.. a2 b c b + ac. −c 2 + ba c. −a + b c − c bb c − ab a + b c + a cc. −b 2 − a b c... Swan-Towber. We will denote this matrix by ST2((a,b,c),(a ,b ,c )) ...

  9. Codeswitching and Generative Grammar: A Critique of the MLF Model and Some Remarks on "Modified Minimalism"

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacSwan, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an empirical and theoretical critique of the Matrix Language Frame (MLF) model (Myers-Scotton, 1993; Myers-Scotton and Jake, 2001), and includes a response to Jake, Myers-Scotton and Gross's (2002) (JMSG) critique of MacSwan (1999, 2000) and reactions to their revision of the MLF model as a "modified minimalist approach." The…

  10. Strategies for Successful Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Mary Beth; Palenque, Stephanie Maher

    2017-01-01

    The thought of group work, or CLC Groups often strikes fear and loathing in the hearts and minds of both students and instructors. According to Swan, Shen, and Hiltz (2006) collaborative work presents the possibilities of many difficulties including a largely unequal contribution of group participants, an inability of the students to manage the…

  11. Modelling the effects of climate and land cover change on groundwater recharge in south-west Western Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawes, W; Ali, R; Varma, S; Emelyanova, I; Hodgson, G; McFarlane, D

    2012-01-01

    .... There is expected to be a reduction of diffuse recharge across the Swan Coastal Plain. This study aims to quantify the change in groundwater recharge in response to a range of future climate and land cover patterns across south-west Western Australia...

  12. 78 FR 37243 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Public Libraries Survey, FY 2014-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... financial resources) is minimized, collection instruments are clearly understood, and the impact of... the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have.... Swan, Senior Statistician, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Institute of Museum and...

  13. 78 FR 64025 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Public Libraries Survey, 2014-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, collection instruments are... information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the...: Deanne W. Swan, Senior Statistician, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Institute of Museum...

  14. Estimation of Wave Conditions Along a New Breakwater for the Hanstholm Harbour, Using the Numerical Model MILDwave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratigaki, Vasiliki; Troch, Peter; Margheritini, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Extension of the Hanstholm harbour (Denmark) is being planned, including the construction of a new breakwater. Within the general frame of the development plan of the harbour, numerical modelling has been carried out using the ild-slope model MILDwave developed at Ghent University, for estimating...... with analytical (Goda’ method) and numerical results (SWAN-1D)....

  15. Does a child's language ability affect the correspondence between parent and teacher ratings of ADHD symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Debbie; Maydew, Harriet; Sears, Claire; Norbury, Courtenay Frazier

    2017-04-05

    Rating scales are often used to identify children with potential Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), yet there are frequently discrepancies between informants which may be moderated by child characteristics. The current study asked whether correspondence between parent and teacher ratings on the Strengths and Weakness of ADHD symptoms and Normal behaviour scale (SWAN) varied systematically with child language ability. Parent and teacher SWAN questionnaires were returned for 200 children (aged 61-81 months); 106 had low language ability (LL) and 94 had typically developing language (TL). After exploring informant correspondence (using Pearson correlation) and the discrepancy between raters, we report inter-class correlation coefficients, to assess inter-rater reliability, and Cohen's kappa, to assess agreement regarding possible ADHD caseness. Correlations between informant ratings on the SWAN were moderate. Children with LL were rated as having increased inattention and hyperactivity relative to children with TL; teachers, however, rated children with LL as having more inattention than parents. Inter-rater reliability of the SWAN was good and there were no systematic differences between the LL and TL groups. Case agreement between parent and teachers was fair; this varied by language group with poorer case agreement for children with LL. Children's language abilities affect the discrepancy between informant ratings of ADHD symptomatology and the agreement between parents and teachers regarding potential ADHD caseness. The assessment of children's core language ability would be a beneficial addition to the ADHD diagnostic process.

  16. 78 FR 58340 - Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, WY; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... nesting habitat for at least 32 water bird species; if developed, these habitats could provide suitable nesting habitat for more migratory bird species, including the trumpeter swan, a species of management concern. Refuge habitats also provide important habitat for resident species. Greater sage grouse use...

  17. Long-distance endozoochorous dispersal of submerged macrophyte seeds by migratory waterbirds in Northern Europe - a critical review of possibilities and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausen, P.; Nolet, B.A.; Fox, A.D.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    We review whether migratory Anatidae, i.e., swans, geese and ducks, could be acting as vectors for dispersal of Zostera, Ruppia and Potamogeton propagules by endozoochory (carrying seeds in their guts). We list six prerequisites that must all be fulfilled, if successful dispersal should occur.

  18. Connecting seas : western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use and climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eerden, MR; Drent, RH; Stahl, J; Bakker, JP

    The western Palaearctic continental flyway that connects the tundra and taiga belts of Russia with north-west Europe is the major migratory avenue for an estimated 9.3 million herbivorous water birds ( swans, geese and ducks). Agricultural practices together with protection measures subsidize the

  19. Rochester Castle MMORPG: Instructional Gaming and Collaborative Learning at a Western Australian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark J. W.; Eustace, Ken; Fellows, Geoff; Bytheway, Allan; Irving, Leah

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the first stage of a project to develop and test the use of massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) for promoting computer supported collaborative learning through instructional gaming in the high school classroom. Teachers and students of English and Science at Swan View Senior High School, Western…

  20. i „ , n Alternative Medicines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    POTENTIAL OF NEUROPROTECTIVE ANTIOXIDANT-BASED THERAPEUTICS FROM. PELTOPHORÍM AFRICANUMSOND.{¥ ABACEAE). E. S. Bfaimenyera*8*, M. A. Aderogba \\ J. N. Etoff8, and G. E. Swan" a Programme for Phytomedicine, Department of Paraclinical Sciences, University of Pretoria, Private. Bag X04 ...