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Sample records for swallowtail papilio dardanus

  1. Independent evolution of sexual dimorphism and female-limited mimicry in swallowtail butterflies (Papilio dardanus and Papilio phorcas).

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    Timmermans, M J T N; Thompson, M J; Collins, S; Vogler, A P

    2017-03-01

    Several species of swallowtail butterflies (genus Papilio) are Batesian mimics that express multiple mimetic female forms, while the males are monomorphic and nonmimetic. The evolution of such sex-limited mimicry may involve sexual dimorphism arising first and mimicry subsequently. Such a stepwise scenario through a nonmimetic, sexually dimorphic stage has been proposed for two closely related sexually dimorphic species: Papilio phorcas, a nonmimetic species with two female forms, and Papilio dardanus, a female-limited polymorphic mimetic species. Their close relationship indicates that female-limited polymorphism could be a shared derived character of the two species. Here, we present a phylogenomic analysis of the dardanus group using 3964 nuclear loci and whole mitochondrial genomes, showing that they are not sister species and thus that the sexually dimorphic state has arisen independently in the two species. Nonhomology of the female polymorphism in both species is supported by population genetic analysis of engrailed, the presumed mimicry switch locus in P. dardanus. McDonald-Kreitman tests performed on SNPs in engrailed showed the signature of balancing selection in a polymorphic population of P. dardanus, but not in monomorphic populations, nor in the nonmimetic P. phorcas. Hence, the wing polymorphism does not balance polymorphisms in engrailed in P. phorcas. Equally, unlike in P. dardanus, none of the SNPs in P. phorcas engrailed were associated with either female morph. We conclude that sexual dimorphism due to female polymorphism evolved independently in both species from monomorphic, nonmimetic states. While sexual selection may drive male-female dimorphism in nonmimetic species, in mimetic Papilios, natural selection for protection from predators in females is an alternative route to sexual dimorphism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Colour constancy in the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus.

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    Kinoshita, M; Arikawa, K

    2000-12-01

    We have recently shown that the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus uses colour vision when searching for food. In the field, these butterflies feed on nectar provided by flowers of various colours not only in direct sunlight but also in shaded places and on cloudy days, suggesting that they have colour constancy. Here, we tested this hypothesis. We trained newly emerged Papilio xuthus to feed on sucrose solution on a paper patch of a certain colour under white illumination. The butterflies were then tested under both white and coloured illumination. Under white illumination, yellow- and red-trained butterflies selected the correctly coloured patch from a four-colour pattern and from a colour Mondrian collage. Under four different colours of illumination, we obtained results that were fundamentally similar to those under white illumination. Moreover, we performed critical tests using sets of two similar colours, which were also correctly discriminated by trained butterflies under coloured illumination. Taken together, we conclude that the butterfly Papilio xuthus exhibits some degree of colour constancy when searching for food.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Alpine black swallowtail, Papilio Maackii (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Li-Xin; Wu, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2013-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio maackii has been completed. It is 15,357 bp in length, and contains the typical complement of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA), and 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Two A + T-rich regions are included in this mitogenome. Gene order in P. maackii mitogenome is basically identical to that of the inferred ancestral insect genome, with the exception of translocations of trnM, which is shared by some Papilios.

  4. Molecular phylogeny, historical biogeography, and divergence time estimates for swallowtail butterflies of the genus Papilio (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Zakharov, Evgueni V; Caterino, Michael S; Sperling, Felix A H

    2004-04-01

    Swallowtail butterflies are recognized as model organisms in ecology, evolutionary biology, genetics, and conservation biology but present numerous unresolved phylogenetic problems. We inferred phylogenetic relationships for 51 of about 205 species of the genus Papilio (sensu lato) from 3.3-Kilobase (kb) sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (2.3 kb of cytochrome oxidases I and II and 1.0 kb of elongation factor 1 alpha). Congruent phylogenetic trees were recovered within Papilio from analyses of combined data using maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis, and maximum parsimony bootstrap consensus. Several disagreements with the traditional classification of Papilio were found. Five major previously hypothesized subdivisions within Papilio were well supported: Heraclides, Pterourus, Chilasa, Papilio (sensu stricto), and Eleppone. Further studies are required to clarify relationships within traditional "Princeps," which was paraphyletic. Several biologically interesting characteristics of Papilio appear to have polyphyletic origins, including mimetic adults, larval host associations, and larval morphology. Early diversification within Papilio is estimated at 55-65 million years ago based on a combination of biogeographic time constraints rather than fossils. This divergence time suggests that Papilio has slower apparent substitution rates than do Drosophila and fig-pollinating wasps and/or divergences corrected using best-fit substitution models are still being consistently underestimated. The amount of sequence divergence between Papilio subdivisions is equivalent to divergences between genera in other tribes of the Papilionidae, and between genera of moths of the noctuid subfamily Heliothinae.

  5. GENETICS OF MIMICRY IN THE TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLIES, PAPILIO GLAUCUS AND P. CANADENSIS (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONIDAE).

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    Scriber, J Mark; Hagen, Robert H; Lederhouse, Robert C

    1996-02-01

    The tiger swallowtail butterfly, Papilio glaucus, exhibits a female-limited polymorphism for Batesian mimicry; the Canadian tiger swallowtail, Papilio canadensis, lacks the mimetic (dark) form entirely. The species hybridize to a limited extent where their ranges overlap. Field collections and censuses indicate that mimetic females occur throughout the range of P. glaucus but at lowest frequencies in populations at the latitudinal edges of its geographic range such as the southernmost part of Florida and along the entire northern edge of its distribution from Massachusetts to Minnesota. Frequencies of mimetic females have remained relatively stable over time. Inheritance of the mimetic form is controlled primarily by two interacting sex-linked loci. The typical matrilineal pattern of inheritance in P. glaucus can be explained by polymorphism at a Y-linked locus, b. Analysis of P. glaucus × P. canadensis crosses has also revealed an X-linked locus, s, which controls the expression of the mimetic phenotype. The P. canadensis allele, s can , suppresses the mimetic phenotype in hybrid and backcross females. Results from more than 12 yr of rearing tiger swallowtails, including interspecies hybrids, indicate that the absence of mimetic P. canadensis females is due to both a high frequency of the "suppressing" allele s can and low frequency of the black-pigment-determining b + allele. The frequency of s can (or other suppressing alleles of s) in P. glaucus populations outside the hybrid zone is low. Some males heterozygous at the s locus and some suppressed mimetic females occur within the hybrid zone. A simple genetic model predicts the frequency of daughters that differ in phenotype from their mothers. © 1996 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

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    SUWARNO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno (2010 Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 11: 19-23. The population dynamic of Papilio polytes L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the citrus orchard in Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Population of immature stages of P. polytes was observed alternate day from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, from April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and from October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. The population dynamics of the immature stages of P. polytes varied between seasons. The immature stages of P. polytes are more abundance and significantly different in the PWS than those of the DS and the SWS. The larval densities in all seasons decreased with progressive development of the instar stages. Predators and parasitoids are the main factor in regulating the population abundance of immature stages of P. polytes. There were positive correlations between the abundance of immature stages of P. polytes and their natural enemies abundance in each season. Ooencyrtus papilioni Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae is the most egg parasitoid. Oxyopes quadrifasciatus L. Koch. and O. elegans L. Koch. (Araneae: Oxyopidae are the main predators in the young larvae, meanwhile Sycanus dichotomus Stal. (Heteroptera: Reduviidae, Calotes versicolor Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae, birds and praying mantis attacked the older larvae.

  7. Combined pigmentary and structural effects tune wing scale coloration to color vision in the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus

    OpenAIRE

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Matsushita, Atsuko; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Butterflies have well-developed color vision, presumably optimally tuned to the detection of conspecifics by their wing coloration. Here we investigated the pigmentary and structural basis of the wing colors in the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, applying spectrophotometry, scatterometry, light and electron microscopy, and optical modeling. The about flat lower lamina of the wing scales plays a crucial role in wing coloration. In the cream, orange and black scales, the ...

  8. Procurement of exogenous ammonia by the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes, for protein biosynthesis and sperm production

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    Honda, Keiichi; Takase, Hiroyuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    How to acquire sufficient quantity of nitrogen is a pivotal issue for herbivores, particularly for lepidopterans (butterflies and moths) of which diet quality greatly differs among their life stages. Male Lepidoptera often feed from mud puddles, dung, and carrion, a behavior known as puddling, which is thought to be supplementary feeding targeted chiefly at sodium. During copulation, males transfer a spermatophore to females that contains, besides sperm, nutrients (nuptial gifts) rich in sodium, proteins, and amino acids. However, it is still poorly understood how adults, mostly nectarivores, extract nitrogen from the environment. We examined the availability of two ubiquitous inorganic nitrogenous ions in nature, viz. ammonium (or ammonia) and nitrate ions, as nutrients in a butterfly, and show that exogenous ammonia ingested by adult males of the swallowtail, Papilio polytes, can serve as a resource for protein biosynthesis. Feeding experiments with 15N-labeled ammonium chloride revealed that nitrogen was incorporated into eupyrene spermatozoa, seminal protein, and thoracic muscle. Ammonia uptake by males significantly increased the number of eupyrene sperms in the reproductive tract tissues. The females also had the capacity to assimilate ammonia into egg protein. Consequently, it is evident that acquired ammonia is utilized for the replenishment of proteins allocable for reproduction and somatic maintenance. The active exploitation of exogenous ammonia as a nutrient by a butterfly would foster better understanding of the foraging and reproductive strategies in insects.

  9. Repeated Reticulate Evolution in North American Papilio machaon Group Swallowtail Butterflies.

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    Julian R Dupuis

    Full Text Available Hybridization between distinct populations or species is increasingly recognized as an important process for generating biodiversity. However, the interaction between hybridization and speciation is complex, and the diverse evolutionary outcomes of hybridization are difficult to differentiate. Here we characterize potential hybridization in a species group of swallowtail butterflies using microsatellites, DNA sequences, and morphology, and assess whether adaptive introgression or homoploid hybrid speciation was the primary process leading to each putative hybrid lineage. Four geographically separated hybrid populations were identified in the Papilio machaon species group. One distinct mitochondrial DNA clade from P. machaon was fixed in three hybrid taxa (P. brevicauda, P. joanae, and P. m. kahli, while one hybrid swarm (P. zelicaon x machaon exhibited this hybrid mtDNA clade as well as widespread parental mtDNA haplotypes from both parental species. Microsatellite markers and morphology showed variable admixture and intermediacy, ranging from signatures of prolonged differential introgression from the paternal species (P. polyxenes/P. zelicaon to current gene flow with both parental species. Divergences of the hybrid lineages dated to early- to mid-Pleistocene, suggesting that repeated glaciations and subsequent range shifts of parental species, particularly P. machaon hudsonianus, facilitated initial hybridization. Although each lineage is distinct, P. joanae is the only taxon with sufficient evidence (ecological separation from parental species to define it as a homoploid hybrid species. The repetition of hybridization in this group provides a valuable foundation for future research on hybridization, and these results emphasize the potential for hybridization to drive speciation in diverse ways.

  10. Jamaica's Critically Endangered Butterfly: A Review of the Biology and Conservation Status of the Homerus Swallowtail (Papilio (Pterourus) homerus Fabricius).

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    Lehnert, Matthew S; Kramer, Valerie R; Rawlins, John E; Verdecia, Vanessa; Daniels, Jaret C

    2017-07-10

    The Homerus swallowtail, Papilio (Pterourus) homerus Fabricius, is listed as an endangered species and is endemic to the Caribbean island of Jamaica. The largest butterfly in the Western Hemisphere, P. homerus once inhabited seven of Jamaica's 14 parishes and consisted of at least three populations; however, now only two stronghold populations remain, a western population in the rugged Cockpit Country and an eastern population in the Blue and John Crow Mountains. Despite numerous studies of its life history, much about the population biology, including estimates of total numbers of individuals in each population, remains unknown. In addition, a breeding program is needed to establish an experimental population, which could be used to augment wild populations and ensure the continued survival of the species. Here, we present a review of the biology of P. homerus and recommendations for a conservation plan.

  11. Constituents of osmeterial secretion of pre-final instar larvae of citrus swallowtail,Papilio demodocus (Esper) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Burger, B V; Munro, Z; Röth, M; Spies, H S; Truter, V; Geertsema, H; Habich, A

    1985-08-01

    The defensive osmeterial secretion of pre-final instar larvae of the citrus swallowtail,Papilio demodocus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) was found to contain methyl 3-hydroxybutanoate, 3-hydroxybutanoic acid, α-pinene, myrcene, limonene, β-phellandrene, (Z)-ocimene, (E)-ocimene, β-caryophyllene, (E)-β-farnesene, and germacrene-A, as well as a further number of unidentified sesquiterpenoid constituents. The presence of germacrene-A in the secretion was inferred from the formation of β-elemene under certain GC conditions. Larvae of the second, third, and fourth instars produce qualitatively similar secretions. Remarkable quantitative differences were found between the secretions of individual larvae. These variations could not be correlated with the diet on which the larvae were fed, their sex, instar, or color form. However, in a number of larvae the two prongs of the osmeterium were found to produce quantitatively different secretions.

  12. Combined pigmentary and structural effects tune wing scale coloration to color vision in the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus.

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    Stavenga, Doekele G; Matsushita, Atsuko; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Butterflies have well-developed color vision, presumably optimally tuned to the detection of conspecifics by their wing coloration. Here we investigated the pigmentary and structural basis of the wing colors in the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, applying spectrophotometry, scatterometry, light and electron microscopy, and optical modeling. The about flat lower lamina of the wing scales plays a crucial role in wing coloration. In the cream, orange and black scales, the lower lamina is a thin film with thickness characteristically depending on the scale type. The thin film acts as an interference reflector, causing a structural color that is spectrally filtered by the scale's pigment. In the cream and orange scales, papiliochrome pigment is concentrated in the ridges and crossribs of the elaborate upper lamina. In the black scales the upper lamina contains melanin. The blue scales are unpigmented and their structure differs strongly from those of the pigmented scales. The distinct blue color is created by the combination of an optical multilayer in the lower lamina and a fine-structured upper lamina. The structural and pigmentary scale properties are spectrally closely related, suggesting that they are under genetic control of the same key enzymes. The wing reflectance spectra resulting from the tapestry of scales are well discriminable by the Papilio color vision system.

  13. Age-specific life table of swallowtail butterfly Papilio demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

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    SUWARNO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno. 2012. Age-specific life table of swallowtail butterfly Papilio demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 13: 28-33. Age-specific life table of Papilio demoleus L. in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Development of P. demoleus was observed from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. Survivorship of P. demoleus in the DS was lower than in the SWS and in the PWS. The mortality (qx of the fifth instar larvae P. demoleus in all seasons was higher than in other stages. Predators, parasitoids, and rainfall were the most important factors of mortality in immature stages of P. demoleus. Predators caused the highest mortality in all stages of P. demoleus, except the pupal stage. Predation in the DS (94.39% was higher than in the SWS (90.88% and PWS (84.04% but no significantly different among the seasons. Meanwhile there was significantly different of mortality caused by parasitoids and the rain among the seasons. Spiders were the important mortality agent in the eggs and young larvae, meanwhile in the older larvae were S. dichotomus and Podisus sp. Ooencyrtus papilioni and Pteromalus puparum were the important parasitoids for the eggs and pupae of P. demoleus, respectively. In summary, the season influenced the survivorship of P. demoleus in citrus plantation. P. demoleus had the highest survival in the wet primary season (PWS, while the lowest survival was observed in the dry season (DS.

  14. Sugar receptor response of the food-canal taste sensilla in a nectar-feeding swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

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    Inoue, Takashi A.; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Seta, Kazuaki; Imaeda, Daisuke; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2009-03-01

    The feeding behavior in nectar-feeding insects is triggered by a sugar-receptor response in contact chemosensilla. The contact chemosensilla are distributed not only on tarsi and the outside of the proboscis but also on the inside of the food canal in Lepidoptera. Although the chemosensilla inside the food canal are assumed to detect sweet taste during the passage of nectar through the food canal, their electrophysiological function has received little attention. In the nectar-feeding Asian swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), we found 15- to 30-μm-long sensilla neatly lined up along the inside galea wall, which forms the food canal in the proboscis. The receptor neurons of these sensilla responded to sucrose. We hypothesized that starch and sucrose compete with each other for a taste receptor site on the sensilla. When we added starch and sucrose to the food-canal sensilla, the electrophysiological responses of food-canal sensilla were inhibited in parallel with the food-sucking behavior of the butterflies. These results suggest that the food-canal sensilla are involved in the behavioral control of nectar-sucking in this butterfly species.

  15. Identification of odoriferous compounds from adults of a swallowtail butterfly, Papilio machaon (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Omura, H; Honda, K; Hayashi, N

    2001-01-01

    Adults, particularly males, of a papilionid butterfly, Papilio machaon hippocrates, emit a fairly strong scent perceivable by humans. We have identified a variety of volatile compounds (hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and so on) from the wings and bodies of both sexes of the butterfly. Male wings secreted n-dodecane, linalool and geranylacetone as major components together with small amounts of camphene, limonene, p-cymene, 2-phenylethanol, n-hexanal, n-decanal, isoamyl acetate, p-allylanisole, 2-pyrrolidone and other characteristic volatiles. The overall profile of volatile compounds detected from male body was quite different from that of the wings. Male body was devoid of camphene, 2-phenylethanol, n-hexanal but instead contained limonene, acetoin, a sesquiterpene hydrocarbon (C15H24, methyl n-octanoate, (E,E)-hepta-2,4-dienal, and another isomer of heptadienal as principal components, of which the last four compounds were specific to the body. All these substances seem to concurrently characterize the male odor. The chemical patterns of compounds found from female wings and body were essentially the same in quality as those of male wings and body, respectively, although their quantities in females were generally smaller than in males. Females, however, had a larger amount of acetamide than males. The chemical compositions of volatiles from the fore and hind wings of males were not greatly different from each other, and every component was considered to be present on all parts of the wings. This suggests that the scent-producing organs or scent-emitting pores are widely distributed on the whole wings. EAG responses of both sexes to 12 selected compounds identified from the butterfly were not strong at a dose of 1 microg, while both sexes showed relatively stronger responses to n-nonanal, methyl n-octanoate, D-limonene and linalool at a higher dose (10 microg). Although sexual difference in EAG response was not prominent, females appeared a

  16. Differential patterns of hybridization and introgression between the swallowtails Papilio machaon and P. hospiton from Sardinia and Corsica islands (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae).

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    Cianchi, R; Ungaro, A; Marini, M; Bullini, L

    2003-06-01

    Proportions of hybridization and introgression between the swallowtails Papilio hospiton, endemic to Sardinia and Corsica, and the holarctic Papilio machaon, were characterized using nine fully diagnostic and two differentiated allozyme loci and a mitochondrial DNA marker. Very low frequencies of F1 hybrids were detected in both Sardinia (0-4%, average 1.4%) and Corsica (0-3%, average 0.5%), as well as of first generation backcrosses (B1). No F2 were observed, in agreement with the hybrid breakdown detected in laboratory crosses. In spite of this minimal current gene exchange, specimens carrying introgressed alleles were found in high proportions in P. machaon but in lower proportions in P. hospiton. Introgression apparently occurred through past hybridization and repeated backcrossing, as evidenced by hybrid index scores and Bayesian assignment tests. Levels of introgression were low (0-1%) at two sex-linked loci and mitochondrial DNA, limited (0.4-2%) at three autosomal loci coding for dimeric enzymes, and high (up to 43%) at four autosomal loci coding for monomeric enzymes. Accordingly, selective filters are acting against foreign alleles, with differential effectiveness depending on the loci involved. The low levels of introgression at sex-linked loci and mitochondrial DNA are in agreement with Haldane's rule and suggest that introgression in P. machaon proceeds mainly through males, owing to a lower fitness of hybrid females. Papilio machaon populations showed higher levels of introgression in Sardinia than in Corsica. The role of reinforcement in the present reproductive isolation between P. machaon and P. hospiton is examined, as well as the evolutionary effects of introgressive hybridization between the two species.

  17. Comprehensive microarray-based analysis for stage-specific larval camouflage pattern-associated genes in the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

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    Futahashi Ryo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body coloration is an ecologically important trait that is often involved in prey-predator interactions through mimicry and crypsis. Although this subject has attracted the interest of biologists and the general public, our scientific knowledge on the subject remains fragmentary. In the caterpillar of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus, spectacular changes in the color pattern are observed; the insect mimics bird droppings (mimetic pattern as a young larva, and switches to a green camouflage coloration (cryptic pattern in the final instar. Despite the wide variety and significance of larval color patterns, few studies have been conducted at a molecular level compared with the number of studies on adult butterfly wing patterns. Results To obtain a catalog of genes involved in larval mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, we constructed expressed sequence tag (EST libraries of larval epidermis for P. xuthus, and P. polytes that contained 20,736 and 5,376 clones, respectively, representing one of the largest collections available in butterflies. A comparison with silkworm epidermal EST information revealed the high expression of putative blue and yellow pigment-binding proteins in Papilio species. We also designed a microarray from the EST dataset information, analyzed more than five stages each for six markings, and confirmed spatial expression patterns by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Hence, we succeeded in elucidating many novel marking-specific genes for mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, including pigment-binding protein genes, the melanin-associated gene yellow-h3, the ecdysteroid synthesis enzyme gene 3-dehydroecdysone 3b-reductase, and Papilio-specific genes. We also found many cuticular protein genes with marking specificity that may be associated with the unique surface nanostructure of the markings. Furthermore, we identified two transcription factors, spalt and ecdysteroid signal-related E75, as genes

  18. Hormonal control of the orange coloration of diapause pupae in the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Yamanaka, Akira; Imai, Hiroshi; Adachi, Miwa; Komatsu, Mitsunobu; Islam, A T M Fayezul; Kodama, Ichiro; Kitazawa, Chisato; Endo, Katsuhiko

    2004-10-01

    Diapause pupae of Papilio xuthus show color polymorphism, represented by diapause-green, orange, and brownish-orange types that are each associated with specific pupation sites. We investigated the role of the site of pupation on the induction of the development of orange types (or brownish-orange types), and the endocrine mechanism underlying the control of color polymorphism in short-day pupae. All short-day larvae of the wandering stage developed into orange or brownish-orange type pupae when they were placed in rough-surfaced containers after gut-purge. Utilizing a pharate pupal ligation between the thorax and abdomen, the endocrine mechanism underlying the control of color polymorphism was shown to involve a head-thorax factor (Orange-Pupa-Inducing Factor: OPIF) that induced orange types in short-day pupae. OPIF was bioassayed using the ligated abdomens of short-day pharate pupae. OPIF was extractable with 2% NaCl solution from 5th-instar larval ganglia complexes following the mesothoracic complex (TG(2,3)-AG(1-7)), but it could not be extracted with either acetone or 80% ethanol solution. OPIF may not exist in the brains of day-0 pupae or in brain-subesophageal ganglion and prothoracic ganglion complexes of 5th-instar larvae. The short-day pharate pupae responded to OPIF in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of Papilio syfanius (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Li-Xin; Ding, Meng-Juan; Wang, Jia-Jia; Luo, Lai-Gao; Liu, Yang; Ou, Yong-Yue

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio syfanius has been completed. It is 15,359 bp, and contains the typical complement of 13 protein-coding (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) and 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Two A + T-rich regions are included in this mitogenome. The nucleotide composition is very similar to other insects, showing a high bias towards A + T, especially the control region (92.8%). Gene order in P. syfanius mitogenome is basically identical to that of the inferred ancestral insect genome, with the exception of translocations of trnM, which is common in genus Papilio.

  20. Tuning of photoreceptor spectral sensitivities by red and yellow pigments in the butterfly Papilio xuthus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arikawa, K; Scholten, DGW; Kinoshita, M; Stavenga, DG; Scholten, Dick G.W.

    The compound eye of the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, consists of different types of ommatidia characterized by the pigmentation around the rhabdom. About 75% of the ommatidia harbor red pigment, whereas the other 25% contain yellow pigment. We find that the pigments

  1. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies

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    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented on the same intensity grey background and (ii) two orange discs of the same intensity separately presented on a grey background that was either higher or lower in intensity than the training background. The butterflies trained to high intensity red selected the orange disc of high intensity in protocol 1, and the disc on the background of low intensity grey in protocol 2. We obtained similar results in another set of experiments with purple discs instead of orange discs. The choices of the butterflies trained to low intensity red were opposite to those just described. Taken together, we conclude that Papilio has the ability to learn brightness and darkness of targets independent of colour, and that they have the so-called simultaneous brightness contrast. PMID:22179808

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asian Swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Papilio_xuthus_S.png Papilio_xuthus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuth...us&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=123 ...

  3. Molecular phylogeny of swallowtail butterflies of the tribe Papilionini (Papilionidae, Lepidoptera).

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    Aubert, J; Legal, L; Descimon, H; Michel, F

    1999-07-01

    Swallowtail butterflies of the tribe Papilionini number about 225 species and are currently used as model organisms in several research areas, including genetics, chemical ecology and phylogenetics of host plant utilization and mimicry, mechanisms of speciation, and conservation. We have inferred phylogenetic relationships for a sample of 18 species of the genus Papilio (sensu lato) and five outgroup taxa by sequencing two stretches of mitochondrial DNA that correspond to segments 12886-13370 and 12083-12545 of Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial DNA and consist of sections of the genes for the large ribosomal RNA and subunit 1 of NADH-dehydrogenase. Our data support the monophyly of Papilio and, within it, of several traditionally recognized subgroups. Species belonging to groups that utilize primarily Rutaceae as larval foodplants form two clusters, corresponding to Old World and American taxa, respectively, while two previously recognized clades-of American and South Asian-Austronesian origin-whose members were known to feed mostly on Lauraceae and Magnoliaceae, are observed to form a clade. The sister group of Papilio is found to be the South Asian genus Meandrusa, which also happens to feed on Lauraceae. The latter plant family is therefore the probable larval host of the ancestor Papilio and the shift to Rutaceae (which four-fifths of extant Papilio species use as foodplants) is more likely to have occurred only after the initial diversification of the genus. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Integrable Hamiltonian systems with swallowtails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K.; Sugny, D.

    2010-01-01

    We consider two-degree-of-freedom integrable Hamiltonian systems with bifurcation diagrams containing swallowtail structures. The global properties of the action coordinates in such systems together with the parallel transport of the period lattice and corresponding quantum cells in the joint

  5. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum papilio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Bastida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Galanthamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor marketed as a hydrobromide salt (Razadyne®, Reminyl® for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, is obtained from Amaryllidaceae plants, especially those belonging to the genera Leucojum, Narcissus, Lycoris and Ungernia. The growing demand for galanthamine has prompted searches for new sources of this compound, as well as other bioactive alkaloids for the treatment of AD. In this paper we report the isolation of the new alkaloid 11β-hydroxygalanthamine, an epimer of the previously isolated alkaloid habranthine, which was identified using NMR techniques. It has been shown that 11β-hydroxygalanthamine has an important in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Additionally, Hippeastrum papilio yielded substantial quantities of galanthamine.

  6. Cold hardiness and deacclimation of overwintering Papilio zelicaon pupae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caroline M; Nicolai, Annegret; Ferguson, Laura V; Bernards, Mark A; Hellmann, Jessica J; Sinclair, Brent J

    2014-12-01

    Seasonally-acquired cold tolerance can be reversed at warm temperatures, leaving temperate ectotherms vulnerable to cold snaps. However, deacclimation, and its underlying mechanisms, has not been well-explored in insects. Swallowtail butterflies are widely distributed but in some cases their range is limited by low temperature and their cold tolerance is seasonally acquired, implying that they experience mortality resulting from deacclimation. We investigated cold tolerance and hemolymph composition of Anise swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) pupae during overwintering in the laboratory, and after four days exposure to warm temperatures in spring. Overwintering pupae had supercooling points around -20.5°C and survived brief exposures to -30°C, suggesting partial freeze tolerance. Overwintering pupae had hemolymph osmolality of approximately 920 mOsm, imparted by high concentrations of glycerol, K⁺ and Na⁺. After exposure to spring warming, supercooling points increased to approximately -17°C, and survival of a 1h exposure to -20°C decreased from 100% to 0%. This deacclimation was associated with decreased hemolymph osmolality and reduced glycerol, trehalose, Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ concentrations. We compared cold tolerance of pupae to weather conditions at and beyond the species' northern range boundary. Minimum temperatures at the range boundary approached the lower lethal temperature of pupae, and were colder north of the range, suggesting that cold hardiness may set northern range limits. Minimum temperatures following warm snaps were likely to cause mortality in at least one of the past three years. Cold snaps in the spring are increasing in frequency as a result of global climate change, so are likely to be a significant source of mortality for this species, and other temperate ectotherms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The proximate control of pupal color in swallowtail butterflies: implications for the evolution of environmentally cued pupal color in butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matt; Rakes, Lauren; Yochum, Marisa; Dunn, Gabe; Wurster, Stacey; Kinney, Kevin; Hazel, Wade

    2007-01-01

    The environmentally cued production of cryptic green/yellow or brown/melanized pupae is widespread in butterflies, occurring in the Nymphalidae, Pieridae, and the Papilionidae subfamily Papilioninae. The dimorphism is controlled by the hormone pupal melanization reducing factor (PMRF). In the nymphalid Inachis io dibutryl cAMP mimics PMRF, and inhibits pupal melanization. However, in the papilionid Papilio polyxenes PMRF stimulates browning, suggesting that the control of pupal color by PMRF has evolved independently in the swallowtail and nymphalid-pierid lineages. We examined this hypothesis by using ligatures to prevent hormone release in five species representing three Papilioninae tribes. One species, Papilio glaucus, produces only brown pupae. Ligatures resulted in green cuticle posterior to the ligature in all five swallowtail species, including P. glaucus, suggesting that the mode of action of PMRF is the same in the three tribes. We also found that in P. polyxenes injections of dibutryl cAMP into prepupal larvae mimic the effect of PMRF, by causing dose-dependent pupal browning. Our results support the hypothesis that the control of pupal color by PMRF has evolved independently in the two lineages. The observation that green pupal color can be induced in P. glaucus by ligature indicates that environmentally cued pupal color could evolve by facultative inhibition of PMRF release.

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Old world swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aon_NL.png Papilio_machaon_S.png Papilio_machaon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pap...ilio+machaon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=47 ...

  9. POPULATION STRUCTURE AND HOST USE IN HYBRIDIZING SUBSPECIES OF PAPILIO GLAUCUS (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Robert H

    1990-12-01

    Two parapatric subspecies of the eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly, Papilio glaucus glaucus and P. g. canadensis, differ greatly in larval survival and growth on host plants in the Magnoliaceae, Salicaceae, and Betulaceae. In the first part of this study, butterflies were collected from 17 sites along a transect from Georgia to Quebec and used for allozyme electrophoresis. Two X- (or Z-)linked enzyme loci (Ldh and Pgd) showed allele frequency differences that delineated a hybrid zone between the subspecies in northern Pennsylvania and south-central New York. No significant linkage disequilibrium could be detected among allozyme loci within the hybrid zone samples. Genetic differentiation at Ldh and Pgd coincides with subspecies differences in diapause control and female mimicry, which are also sex-linked. Larval offspring of butterflies from 13 of the sites were then tested in the laboratory for survival and growth on Liriodendron tulipifera (Magnoliaceae), Populus deltoïdes (Salicaceae) and Betula lutea (Betulaceae). Steep clines in survival rates matched the position of the hybrid zone. Hybrid zone larvae showed intermediate survival rates and significant heterogeneity among families on all three plants, indicating presence of substantial genetic variation. The results suggest that differential host use by P. g. glaucus and P. g. canadensis is maintained primarily by independent clines in selection intensity for ability to use allopatric sets of host plants, coupled with restricted gene flow across the hybrid zone. © 1990 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Biomimicry of optical microstructures of Papilio palinurus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crne, Matija; Sharma, Vivek; Blair, John; Park, Jung Ok; Summers, Christopher J.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    The brilliant coloration of animals in nature is sometimes based on their structure rather than on pigments. The green colour on the wings of a butterfly Papilio palinurus originates from the hierarchical microstructure of individual wing scales that are tiled on the wing. The hierarchical structure gives rise to two coloured reflections of visible light, blue and yellow which when additively mixed, produce the perception of green colour on the wing scales. We used breath figure templated assembly as the starting point for the structure and, combining it with atomic layer deposition for the multilayers necessary for the production of interference colors, we have faithfully mimicked the structure and the optical effects found on the wing scale of the butterfly Papilio palinurus.

  11. New aspects on the symbiotic relationships between Dardanus fucosus (Crustacea: Paguridae), Calliactis tricolor (Cnidaria: Hormatiidae) and Porcellana sayana (Crustacea: Porcellanidae)

    OpenAIRE

    López-Victoria, M.; Barrios, L.M.; Kraus, H; Osorio, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The observations were made in captivity of the interactions between hermit crabs (Dardanus fucosus), anemones (Calliactis tricolor) and porcelain crabs (Porcellana sayan) all live together in two shells of gastropods collected in the region of Santa Marta. During 36 days were sporadic entries of the behavior of organisms, as well as video clips and photographs. We found new evidence in favor of relations of mutual and commensal type involving the three species, supported by the active transfe...

  12. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN THE HERMIT CRAB DARDANUS PEDUNCULATUS AND ITS COMMENSAL SEA ANEMONE CALLIACTIS TRICOLOR ON MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Lesje

    2012-01-01

    Crabs of the species Dardanus pedunculatus form a symbiotic relationship with Calliactis tricolor anemones on Moorea, French Polynesia. Crabs actively collect anemones for protection against octopus predation, while simultaneously giving the anemones a better habitat, defense against predators, and food as a result of the crab’s messy eating. In a laboratory setting, crabs will compete for anemones with larger crabs winning competitions. This paper examined crabs’ field collection patterns, a...

  13. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiroto [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shimoyama, Isao, E-mail: isao@i.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Mechano-Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  14. A model for population dynamics of the mimetic butterfly Papilio polytes in the Sakishima Islands, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimura, Toshio; Fujihashi, Yuta; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-21

    We present a mathematical model for population dynamics of the mimetic swallowtail butterfly Papilio polytes in the Sakishima Islands, Japan. The model includes four major variables, that is, population densities of three kinds of butterflies (two female forms f. cyrus, f. polytes and the unpalatable butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae) and their predator. It is well-known that the non-mimic f. cyrus resembles and attracts the male most, and the mimic f. polytes mimics the model butterfly P. aristolochiae. Based on experimental evidence, we assume that two forms f. cyrus and f. polytes interact under intraspecific competition for resources including the male, and the growth rate of f. cyrus is higher than that of f. polytes. We further assume that both the benefit of mimicry for the mimic f. polytes and the cost for the model are dependent on their relative frequencies, i.e. the motality of the mimic by predation decreases with increase in frequency of the model, while the motality of the model increases as the frequency of the mimic increases. Taking the density-dependent effect through carrying capacity into account, we set up a model system consisting of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs), analyze it mathematically and provide computer simulations that confirm the analytical results. Our results reproduce field records on population dynamics of P. polytes in the Miyako-jima Island. They also explain the positive dependence of the relative abundance (RA) of the mimic on the advantage index (AI) of the mimicry in the Sakishima Islands defined in Section 2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sex chromosome mosaicism and hybrid speciation among tiger swallowtail butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krushnamegh Kunte

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid speciation, or the formation of a daughter species due to interbreeding between two parental species, is a potentially important means of diversification, because it generates new forms from existing variation. However, factors responsible for the origin and maintenance of hybrid species are largely unknown. Here we show that the North American butterfly Papilio appalachiensis is a hybrid species, with genomic admixture from Papilio glaucus and Papilio canadensis. Papilio appalachiensis has a mosaic phenotype, which is hypothesized to be the result of combining sex-linked traits from P. glaucus and P. canadensis. We show that P. appalachiensis' Z-linked genes associated with a cooler thermal habitat were inherited from P. canadensis, whereas its W-linked mimicry and mitochondrial DNA were inherited from P. glaucus. Furthermore, genome-wide AFLP markers showed nearly equal contributions from each parental species in the origin of P. appalachiensis, indicating that it formed from a burst of hybridization between the parental species, with little subsequent backcrossing. However, analyses of genetic differentiation, clustering, and polymorphism based on molecular data also showed that P. appalachiensis is genetically distinct from both parental species. Population genetic simulations revealed P. appalachiensis to be much younger than the parental species, with unidirectional gene flow from P. glaucus and P. canadensis into P. appalachiensis. Finally, phylogenetic analyses, combined with ancestral state reconstruction, showed that the two traits that define P. appalachiensis' mosaic phenotype, obligatory pupal diapause and mimicry, evolved uniquely in P. canadensis and P. glaucus, respectively, and were then recombined through hybridization to form P. appalachiensis. These results suggest that natural selection and sex-linked traits may have played an important role in the origin and maintenance of P. appalachiensis as a hybrid species. In

  16. Population-level transcriptome sequencing of nonmodel organisms Erynnis propertius and Papilio zelicaon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrich Scott J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have demonstrated the use of Roche 454 sequencing technology for de novo transcriptome analysis. Low error rates and high coverage also allow for effective SNP discovery and genetic diversity estimates. However, genetically diverse datasets, such as those sourced from natural populations, pose challenges for assembly programs and subsequent analysis. Further, estimating the effectiveness of transcript discovery using Roche 454 transcriptome data is still a difficult task. Results Using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform, we sequenced and assembled larval transcriptomes for two butterfly species: the Propertius duskywing, Erynnis propertius (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae and the Anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae. The Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs generated represent a diverse sample drawn from multiple populations, developmental stages, and stress treatments. Despite this diversity, > 95% of the ESTs assembled into long (> 714 bp on average and highly covered (> 9.6× on average contigs. To estimate the effectiveness of transcript discovery, we compared the number of bases in the hit region of unigenes (contigs and singletons to the length of the best match silkworm (Bombyx mori protein--this "ortholog hit ratio" gives a close estimate on the amount of the transcript discovered relative to a model lepidopteran genome. For each species, we tested two assembly programs and two parameter sets; although CAP3 is commonly used for such data, the assemblies produced by Celera Assembler with modified parameters were chosen over those produced by CAP3 based on contig and singleton counts as well as ortholog hit ratio analysis. In the final assemblies, 1,413 E. propertius and 1,940 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.8; 2,866 E. propertius and 4,015 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.5. Conclusions Ultimately, these assemblies and SNP data will be used to generate microarrays for

  17. Population-level transcriptome sequencing of nonmodel organisms Erynnis propertius and Papilio zelicaon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Several recent studies have demonstrated the use of Roche 454 sequencing technology for de novo transcriptome analysis. Low error rates and high coverage also allow for effective SNP discovery and genetic diversity estimates. However, genetically diverse datasets, such as those sourced from natural populations, pose challenges for assembly programs and subsequent analysis. Further, estimating the effectiveness of transcript discovery using Roche 454 transcriptome data is still a difficult task. Results Using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform, we sequenced and assembled larval transcriptomes for two butterfly species: the Propertius duskywing, Erynnis propertius (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) and the Anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae). The Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) generated represent a diverse sample drawn from multiple populations, developmental stages, and stress treatments. Despite this diversity, > 95% of the ESTs assembled into long (> 714 bp on average) and highly covered (> 9.6× on average) contigs. To estimate the effectiveness of transcript discovery, we compared the number of bases in the hit region of unigenes (contigs and singletons) to the length of the best match silkworm (Bombyx mori) protein--this "ortholog hit ratio" gives a close estimate on the amount of the transcript discovered relative to a model lepidopteran genome. For each species, we tested two assembly programs and two parameter sets; although CAP3 is commonly used for such data, the assemblies produced by Celera Assembler with modified parameters were chosen over those produced by CAP3 based on contig and singleton counts as well as ortholog hit ratio analysis. In the final assemblies, 1,413 E. propertius and 1,940 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.8; 2,866 E. propertius and 4,015 P. zelicaon unigenes had a ratio > 0.5. Conclusions Ultimately, these assemblies and SNP data will be used to generate microarrays for ecoinformatics examining

  18. The role of latitudinal, genetic and temperature variation in the induction of diapause of Papilio glaucus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sean F; Valella, Patti; Thivierge, Gabrielle; Aardema, Matthew L; Scriber, J Mark

    2016-11-29

    A key adaptation in insects for dealing with variable environmental conditions is the ability to diapause. The tiger swallowtail butterflies, Papilio glaucus and P. canadensis are ideal species to explore the genetic causes and population genetic consequences of diapause because divergence in this trait is believed to be a salient factor in maintaining a hybrid zone between these species. Yet little is known about the factors that influence diapause induction in this system. Here we explored how spatial (latitudinal), environmental (temperature) and genetic (hybridization) factors affect diapause induction in this system. Specifically, a series of growth chamber experiments using wild caught individuals from across the eastern United States were performed to: (1) evaluate how critical photoperiod varies with latitude, (2) isolate the stage in which induction occurs, (3) test whether changes in temperature affected rates of diapause induction, and (4) explore how the incidence of diapause is affected in hybrid offspring. We find that induction occurs in the larval stage, is not sensitive to a relatively broad range of temperatures, appears to have a complex genetic basis (i.e., is not simply a dominant trait following a Mendelian inheritance pattern) and that the critical photoperiod increases by 0.4 h with each increasing degree in latitude. This work deepens our understanding of how spatial, environmental and genetic variation influences a key seasonal adaptation (diapause induction) in a well-developed ecological model system and will make possible future studies that explore how climatic variation affects the population dynamics and genetics of this system. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Replication of Optical Microstructures of Papilio palinurus through Biomimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasarao, Mohan; Crne, Matija; Sharma, Vivek; Blair, John; Park, Jung Ok; Summers, Christopher J.

    2009-03-01

    The coloration of animals in nature is sometimes based on their structure rather than pigments. Structural coloration based on diffraction, multilayer reflection, cholesteric analogues or photonic crystal-like structures is pervasive especially in the world of insects. The color of Papilio palinurus results from microbowl lined with a multilayer of air and chitin. The green color is the result of color mixing of the yellow light reflecting from the bottom of the bowl and the blue light reflecting from the sides of the bowl. We have used breath figure templated assembly as the starting point to mimic the structure of Papilio palinurus. We were able to produce microbowls which were then coated with a multilayer of alternating titanium oxide and aluminum oxide. The resulting structure exhibits the same color mixing as the original butterfly structure does.

  20. Plant scents modify innate colour preference in foraging swallowtail butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mina; Itoh, Yuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Michiyo

    2015-07-01

    Flower-visiting insects exhibit innate preferences for particular colours. A previous study demonstrated that naive Papilio xuthus females prefer yellow and red, whereas males are more attracted to blue. Here, we demonstrate that the innate colour preference can be modified by olfactory stimuli in a sexually dimorphic manner. Naive P. xuthus were presented with four coloured discs: blue, green, yellow and red. The innate colour preference (i.e. the colour first landed on) of the majority of individuals was blue. When scent from essential oils of either orange flower or lily was introduced to the room, females' tendency to select the red disc increased. Scents of lavender and flowering potted Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, however, were less effective. Interestingly, the odour of the non-flowering larval host plant, Citrus unshiu, shifted the preference to green in females. In males, however, all plant scents were less effective than in females, such that blue was always the most favoured colour. These observations indicate that interactions between visual and olfactory cues play a more prominent role in females. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01680-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4. 68 2e-11 2 ( CV175313 ) PAPILIOdpolyt_B02_1_014 Papilio dardanus cDNA Pap... 50 0.18 1 ( CV175230 ) PAPIL...IObpolyt_H06_1_057 Papilio dardanus cDNA Pap... 50 0.18 1 ( AC222524 ) Macaca mulatta clone CH250-49B4, WORK

  2. A swallowtail catastrophe model for the emergence of leadership in coordination-intensive groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Bond, Robert W

    2007-04-01

    This research extended the previous studies concerning the swallowtail catastrophe model for leadership emergence to coordination-intensive groups. Thirteen 4-person groups composed of undergraduates played in Intersection coordination (card game) task and were allowed to talk while performing it; 13 other groups worked nonverbally. A questionnaire measured leadership emergence at the end of the game along with other social contributions to the groups' efforts. The swallowtail catastrophe model that was evident in previous leadership emergence phenomena in creative problem solving and production groups was found here also. All three control parameters were identified: a general participation variable that was akin to K in the rugged landscape model of self-organization, task control, and whether the groups worked verbally or nonverbally. Several new avenues for future research were delineated.

  3. Warning Color Changes in Response to Food Deprivation in the Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor

    OpenAIRE

    Pegram, Kimberly V.; Nahm, Alexandra C.; Ronald L. Rutowski

    2013-01-01

    Predation on distasteful animals should favor warning coloration that is relatively conspicuous and phenotypically invariable. However, even among similarly colored individuals there can be variation in their warning signals. In butterflies, individual differences in larval feeding history could cause this variation. The warning signal of the pipevine swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) consists of both a blue iridescent patch and pigmentbased orange spots on...

  4. The mitochondrial genome of Papilio demoleus Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianrong; Yao, Chengyi; Li, Lei; Wang, Yayu; Zou, Zhiwen; Wang, Jing; Xia, Bin

    2016-07-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Papilio demoleus (GenBank accession number KR024009) by long PCR and primer walking methods. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 15,249 bp containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a control region. The overall base composition of the genome is A (39.31%), T (41.57%), C (11.33%) and G (7.78%) with an A + T-rich region, similar to other invertebrate mitochondrial genomes. The start codon was mainly ATG in most of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes such as COII, ATP6, COIII, ND4, ND4L, Cob and ND1, while ATA for ND2, COI, ATP8, ND3, ND5 and ND6 genes. The stop codon was mainly TAA in most of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes, whereas TAG was found in ND1 gene only. The A + T region is located between 12S rRNA and tRNA(M)(et) with a length of 403 bp.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Wen; Hou, Li-Xia; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yu-Jie; Qin, Xin-Min

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence mitochondrial genome of Papilio polytes was determined using long PCR and conserved primers walking approaches. The genome was 15,260 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region (CR). The gene composition and order of P. polytes were similar to other lepidopteran species. All protein-coding genes begin with ATG and ATT as initiation codon except COI using CGA. 8 genes (ATP8, ATP6, ND3, ND5, ND4L, ND6, Cytb and ND1) ended with TAA and TAG stop codon, the remaining five genes had incomplete stop codon T. The overall base composition of the genome in descending order was 39.51% A, 11.86% C, 40.75% T and 7.88% G, with a A + T bias of 80.26%. CR is located between the 12S rRNA and tRNA-Met genes and is 439 bp in length, with an AT content of 83.37%.

  6. Tiger Swallowtail Genome Reveals Mechanisms for Speciation and Caterpillar Chemical Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Cong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Predicting phenotype from genotype represents the epitome of biological questions. Comparative genomics of appropriate model organisms holds the promise of making it possible. However, the high heterozygosity of many Eukaryotes currently prohibits assembling their genomes. Here, we report the 376 Mb genome sequence of Papilio glaucus (Pgl, the first sequenced genome from the Papilionidae family. We obtained the genome from a wild-caught specimen using a cost-effective strategy that overcomes the high (2% heterozygosity problem. Comparative analyses suggest the molecular bases of various phenotypic traits, including terpene production in the Papilionidae-specific organ, osmeterium. Comparison of Pgl and Papilio canadensis transcriptomes reveals mutation hotspots (4% genes associated with their divergence: four key circadian clock proteins are enriched in inter-species mutations and likely responsible for the difference in pupal diapause. Finally, the Pgl genome confirms Papilio appalachiensis as a hybrid of Pgl and Pca, but suggests it inherited 3/4 of its genes from Pca.

  7. Tiger Swallowtail Genome Reveals Mechanisms for Speciation and Caterpillar Chemical Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qian; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-02-12

    Predicting phenotype from genotype represents the epitome of biological questions. Comparative genomics of appropriate model organisms holds the promise of making it possible. However, the high heterozygosity of many Eukaryotes currently prohibits assembling their genomes. Here, we report the 376 Mb genome sequence of Papilio glaucus (Pgl), the first sequenced genome from the Papilionidae family. We obtained the genome from a wild-caught specimen using a cost-effective strategy that overcomes the high (2%) heterozygosity problem. Comparative analyses suggest the molecular bases of various phenotypic traits, including terpene production in the Papilionidae-specific organ, osmeterium. Comparison of Pgl and Papilio canadensis transcriptomes reveals mutation hotspots (4% genes) associated with their divergence: four key circadian clock proteins are enriched in inter-species mutations and likely responsible for the difference in pupal diapause. Finally, the Pgl genome confirms Papilio appalachiensis as a hybrid of Pgl and Pca, but suggests it inherited 3/4 of its genes from Pca. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adaptations to “Thermal Time” Constraints in Papilio: Latitudinal and Local Size Clines Differ in Response to Regional Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mark Scriber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptations to “thermal time” (=Degree-day constraints on developmental rates and voltinism for North American tiger swallowtail butterflies involve most life stages, and at higher latitudes include: smaller pupae/adults; larger eggs; oviposition on most nutritious larval host plants; earlier spring adult emergences; faster larval growth and shorter molting durations at lower temperatures. Here we report on forewing sizes through 30 years for both the northern univoltine P. canadensis (with obligate diapause from the Great Lakes historical hybrid zone northward to central Alaska (65° N latitude, and the multivoltine, P. glaucus from this hybrid zone southward to central Florida (27° N latitude. Despite recent climate warming, no increases in mean forewing lengths of P. glaucus were observed at any major collection location (FL to MI from the 1980s to 2013 across this long latitudinal transect (which reflects the “converse of Bergmann’s size Rule”, with smaller females at higher latitudes. Unlike lower latitudes, the Alaska, Ontonogon, and Chippewa/Mackinac locations (for P. canadensis showed no significant increases in D-day accumulations, which could explain lack of size change in these northernmost locations. As a result of 3–4 decades of empirical data from major collection sites across these latitudinal clines of North America, a general “voltinism/size/D-day” model is presented, which more closely predicts female size based on D-day accumulations, than does latitude. However, local “climatic cold pockets” in northern Michigan and Wisconsin historically appeared to exert especially strong size constraints on female forewing lengths, but forewing lengths quickly increased with local summer warming during the recent decade, especially near the warming edges of the cold pockets. Results of fine-scale analyses of these “cold pockets” are in contrast to non-significant changes for other Papilio populations seen across

  9. Aristolochic acids fromThottea spp. (Aristolochiaceae) and the osmeterial secretions of Thottea-feeding troidine swallowtail larvae (Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, R; Weintraub, J D; Feeny, P; Fukami, H

    1993-07-01

    Two aristolochiaceous plants in the genusThottea were shown to contain aristolochic acids. Larvae of two Malaysian troidine swallowtail butterflies,Troides (Troides) amphrysus andPachliopta (Losaria) neptunus, that fed onThottea leaves were found to sequester corresponding aristolochic acid analogs in the osmeterial glands.

  10. Shell occupation by the hermit crab Dardanus insignis (Decapoda, Diogenidae from the north Coast of São Paulo state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. F. Frameschi

    Full Text Available Abstract The pattern of shell occupation by the hermit crab Dardanus insignis (Saussure, 1858 from the subtropical region of southeastern coast of Brazil was investigated in the present study. The percentage of shell types that were occupied and the morphometric relationships between hermit crabs and occupied shells were analyzed from monthly collections conducted during two years (from January 1998 to December 1999. Individuals were categorized according to sex and gonadal maturation, weighed and measured with respect to their cephalothoracic shield length (CSL and wet weight (CWW. Shells were measured regarding their aperture width (SAW, dry weight (SDW and internal volume (SIV. A total of 1086 hermit crabs was collected, occupying shells of 11 gastropod species. Olivancillaria urceus (Roding, 1798 was most commonly used by the hermit crab D. insignis, followed by Buccinanops cochlidium (Dillwyn, 1817, and Stramonita haemastoma (Linnaeus, 1767. The highest determination coefficients (r2 > 0.50, p < 0.01 were recorded particularly in the morphometric relationships between CSL vs. CWW and SAW vs. SIV, which are important indication that in this D. insignis population the great majority the animals occupied adequate shells during the two years analysed. The high number of used shell species and relative plasticity in pattern of shell utilization by smaller individuals of D. insignis indicated that occupation is influenced by the shell availability, while larger individuals demonstrated more specialized occupation in Tonna galea (Linnaeus, 1758 shell.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Papilio bianor (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), and its phylogenetic position within Papilionidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Xia; Ying, She; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Yu, Zhang; Li, Hui-Min; Qin, Xin-Min

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Papilio bianor was determined in the present paper. The complete mtDNA from P. bianor was 15,358 base pairs in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The P. bianor genes were in the same order and orientation as the completely sequenced mitogenomes of other lepidopteran species. To determine the phylogentic position of P. bianor with related species within Papilionidae, the Bayesian phylogenetic tree was reconstructed with the concatenated nucleotide dataset of the 13 protein-coding genes. The phylogenetic trees confirmed that P. bianor and four species of Papilionidae clustered into a clade, and shared a close relationship with Papilio maraho. Meanwhile, the molecular phylogenetic trees also confirmed that Papilionidae is a monophyletic group, and Pieridae is closely related with Lycaenidae and Nymphalidae.

  12. K+ excretion: the other purpose for puddling behavior in Japanese Papilio butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi A; Ito, Tetsuo; Hagiya, Hiroshi; Hata, Tamako; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Yokohari, Fumio; Niihara, Kinuko

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 μg and 4.15 μg, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+.

  13. Japanese Papilio butterflies puddle using Na+ detected by contact chemosensilla in the proboscis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi A; Hata, Tamako; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Tetsuo; Niihara, Kinuko; Hagiya, Hiroshi; Yokohari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    Many butterflies acquire nutrients from non-nectar sources such as puddles. To better understand how male Papilio butterflies identify suitable sites for puddling, we used behavioral and electrophysiological methods to examine the responses of Japanese Papilio butterflies to Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+). Based on behavioral analyses, these butterflies preferred a 10-mM Na(+) solution to K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) solutions of the same concentration and among a tested range of 1 mM to 1 M NaCl. We also measured the ion concentrations of solutions sampled from puddling sites in the field. Na(+) concentrations of the samples were up to 6 mM, slightly lower than that preferred by butterflies in the behavioral experiments. Butterflies that sipped the 10 mM Na(+) solution from the experimental trays did not continue to puddle on the ground. Additionally, butterflies puddled at sites where the concentrations of K(+), Ca(2+), and/or Mg(2+) were higher than that of Na(+). This suggests that K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) do not interfere with the detection of Na(+) by the Papilio butterfly. Using an electrophysiological method, tip recordings, receptor neurons in contact chemosensilla inside the proboscis evoked regularly firing impulses to 1, 10, and 100 mM NaCl solutions but not to CaCl(2) or MgCl(2). The dose-response patterns to the NaCl solutions were different among the neurons, which were classified into three types. These results showed that Japanese Papilio butterflies puddle using Na(+) detected by the contact chemosensilla in the proboscis, which measure its concentration.

  14. A novel biorational pesticide: efficacy of methionine against Heraclides (Papilio) cresphontes, a surrogate of the invasive Princeps (Papilio) demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Delano S; Cuda, James P; Stevens, Bruce R

    2011-12-01

    ABSTRACT The Southeast Asian citrus-feeding butterfly Princeps (Papilio) demoleus (L.) was recently introduced into the Americas, causing an imminent threat to citrus production and ornamental flora. The human nutrient amino acid methionine has been shown by us to disrupt aminoacid-modulated ion transport systems in caterpillars and other insect larvae that possess an alkaline midgut. Heraclides (Papilio) cresphontes was bioassayed as a United States Department of Agriculture permitted surrogate of the Florida quarantined P. demoleus to test the potential efficacy of methionine. Larvae were allowed to feed ad libitum on wild lime plants with leaves treated with methionine or proline. Methionine caused 100% mortality in first through fourth instars in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as determined by probit analysis whereas proline was not toxic. Wild lime host plants did not exhibit phytotoxicity with methionine treatments during a 14 d test period. It is concluded that methionine is an effective larvicide against H. cresphontes, and therefore may be a candidate environmentally safe biorational pesticide for use against invasive P. demoleus in the Americas.

  15. Cytochrome P450s in Papilio multicaudatus and the transition from oligophagy to polyphagy in the Papilionidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, W; Schuler, M A; Berenbaum, M R

    2007-08-01

    Although substrate-specific CYP6B1 and CYP6B3 enzymes in Papilio polyxenes contribute to specialization on furanocoumarin-containing host plants, CYP6B4 and CYP6B17 enzymes in the polyphagous Papilio glaucus and Papilio canadensis have a broader range of substrates. Papilio multicaudatus, an oligophage with one furanocoumarin-containing host, is putatively ancestral to polyphagous Papilio species. Furanocoumarin-inducible CYP6B33-CYP6B37 and CYP6AB6 were characterized from this species. Heterologous expression of CYP6B33 revealed furanocoumarin metabolism resembling that of CYP6B4-CYP6B17 enzymes from P. glaucus and P. canadensis. Molecular models of CYP6B33 and CYP6B4 indicate that seven conserved aromatic side chains stabilize their hydrophobic catalytic sites and that a Lys484-Ser484 substitution enlarges the CYP6B4 active site pocket to increase the predicted distance between the substrate and reactive oxygen relative to CYP6B1. Loss of specialization in this lineage may have resulted from relatively few mutational changes, allowing acquisition of broader catalytic activities without loss of ancestral furanocoumarin-metabolizing activities.

  16. A partitioned likelihood analysis of swallowtail butterfly phylogeny (Lepidoptera:Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, M S; Reed, R D; Kuo, M M; Sperling, F A

    2001-02-01

    Although it is widely agreed that data from multiple sources are necessary to confidently resolve phylogenetic relationships, procedures for accommodating and incorporating heterogeneity in such data remain underdeveloped. We explored the use of partitioned, model-based analyses of heterogeneous molecular data in the context of a phylogenetic study of swallowtail butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae). Despite substantial basic and applied study, phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages of this prominent group remain contentious. We sequenced 3.3 kb of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (2.3 kb of cytochrome oxidase I and II and 1.0 kb of elongation factor-1 alpha, respectively) from 22 swallowtails, including representatives of Baroniinae, Parnassiinae, and Papilioninae, and from several moth and butterfly outgroups. Using parsimony, we encountered considerable difficulty in resolving the deepest splits among these taxa. We therefore chose two outgroups with undisputed relationships to each other and to Papilionidae and undertook detailed likelihood analyses of alternative topologies. Following from previous studies that have demonstrated substantial heterogeneity in the evolutionary dynamics among process partitions of these genes, we estimated evolutionary parameters separately for gene-based and codon-based partitions. These values were then used as the basis for examining the likelihoods of possible resolutions and rootings under several partitioned and unpartitioned likelihood models. Partitioned models gave markedly better fits to the data than did unpartitioned models and supported different topologies. However, the most likely topology varied from model to model. The most likely ingroup topology under the best-fitting, six-partition GTR + gamma model favors a paraphyletic Parnassiinae. However, when examining the likelihoods of alternative rootings of this tree relative to rootings of the classical hypothesis, two rootings of the latter emerge as

  17. Numerical Study on the Heat Release Distributions of a Supersonic Combustor with Three-Dimensional "Swallowtail" Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaofeng; Yao, Xuanyu; Jiang, Zonglin

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion has been a focus technology in hypersonic aviation in the past decades [1]. Three-dimensional cavity may act as the flame holder of a Scramjet engine in air-breathing hypersonic propulsion. An interesting three-dimensional cavity is "swallowtail" cavity which has a special inner shape like a swallowtail. With three-dimensional cavity in supersonic chamber, threedimensional vortexes may be organized optimally, and the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between cavity flow and supersonic flow may be enhanced to provide better performance of mixing and combustion[2]. Also, three-dimensional cavity may avoid the sharp heat release in local region of chamber and suppress the subsonic combustion oscillation induced by the cavity in a supersonic combustor. It is necessary to study the heat release distribution of a supersonic combustor with three-dimensional cavity.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese peacock, Papilio bianor (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Li-Xin; Wu, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2013-12-01

    The sequence of the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the Chinese peacock Papilio bianor has been completed. It is 15,332 bp with an A + T content of 80.6% and contains the typical complement of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA), and 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Comparison of this sequence with the sequences of the other completely sequenced insect mitogenomes showed that the gene order and orientation are basically identical to that of Drosophila yakuba with the exception of the rearrangement of one tRNA gene. Nucleotide composition is very similar with other insects, showing a high bias toward A + T.

  19. The role of latitudinal, genetic and temperature variation in the induction of diapause of Papilio glaucus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key adaptation in insects to deal with variable environmental (i.e., climatic) conditions is the ability to diapause. Papilio glaucus and P. canadensis are ideal species to explore the genetic causes and population genetic consequences of diapause because divergence in this trait is believed to be...

  20. New subspecies of Papilio and Graphium from the Solomon Islands, with Observations on Graphium Codrus (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racheli, T.

    1979-01-01

    During inspection of the Papilionid butterflies of the Nieuwenhuis collection in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie, Leiden, I found some new forms which are described below. Papilio toboroi straatmani ssp. nov. (pl. 1 figs. 1-2) Diagnosis. — Characterized by the large discal band on fore and

  1. Behavioural mimicry in flight path of Batesian intraspecific polymorphic butterfly Papilio polytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tasuku; Imafuku, Michio

    2015-06-22

    Batesian mimics that show similar coloration to unpalatable models gain a fitness advantage of reduced predation. Beyond physical similarity, mimics often exhibit behaviour similar to their models, further enhancing their protection against predation by mimicking not only the model's physical appearance but also activity. In butterflies, there is a strong correlation between palatability and flight velocity, but there is only weak correlation between palatability and flight path. Little is known about how Batesian mimics fly. Here, we explored the flight behaviour of four butterfly species/morphs: unpalatable model Pachliopta aristolochiae, mimetic and non-mimetic females of female-limited mimic Papilio polytes, and palatable control Papilio xuthus. We demonstrated that the directional change (DC) generated by wingbeats and the standard deviation of directional change (SDDC) of mimetic females and their models were smaller than those of non-mimetic females and palatable controls. Furthermore, we found no significant difference in flight velocity among all species/morphs. By showing that DC and SDDC of mimetic females resemble those of models, we provide the first evidence for the existence of behavioural mimicry in flight path by a Batesian mimic butterfly. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Rediscovery of two rare butterflies Papilio elephenor Doubleday, 1845 and Shijimia moorei Leech, 1889 from proposed Ripu-Chirang Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Choudhury

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two rare butterflies Papilio elephenor Doubleday, 1886 and Moore’s Cupid Shijimia moorei Leech, 1889 were rediscovered from the proposed Ripu-Chirang Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India.

  3. Contemporary patterns in a historical context: phylogeographic history of the pipevine swallowtail, Battus philenor (Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, James A; Nice, Chris C

    2003-05-01

    We examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in pipevine swallowtail butterflies (Battus philenor) from throughout its extant range to provide a historical, phylogeographical context for ecological studies of the disjunct population in California. We evaluate current hypotheses regarding host plant use, behavior, and mimetic relationships of B. philenor populations and generate alternative hypotheses. Compared to populations throughout the rest of the species' range, California populations are ecologically distinct in that they lack mimics, lay significantly larger clutches of eggs, and exclusively use a unique, endemic larval host plant. Analysis of molecular variance, tests of population differentiation, and nested clade analysis of mtDNA variation indicate that, despite low levels of population genetic structure across the species' range, there is evidence of recent range expansion from presumed Pleistocene refuge(s) in southeastern North America. Colonization of California appears to have been a recent event. This phylogeographic investigation also suggests that the evolution of life-history adaptations to a novel larval host has occurred rapidly in California and the lack of mimics in California may be attributable to the recency of colonization.

  4. Warning Color Changes in Response to Food Deprivation in the Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Kimberly V.; Nahm, Alexandra C.; Rutowski, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Predation on distasteful animals should favor warning coloration that is relatively conspicuous and phenotypically invariable. However, even among similarly colored individuals there can be variation in their warning signals. In butterflies, individual differences in larval feeding history could cause this variation. The warning signal of the pipevine swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) consists of both a blue iridescent patch and pigmentbased orange spots on the ventral hindwing. B. philenor males also display a dorsal surface iridescent patch that functions as a sexual indicator signal. A previous study of iridescence in B. philenor found that the iridescent blue on both the dorsal and ventral hind wings is variable and significantly different between lab-reared and field-caught individuals. These differences could be the result of larval food deprivation in the field. Through experimental manipulation of larval diet, larval food deprivation was evaluated as a potential cause of the differences observed between lab and field individuals, and if food deprivation is a source of inter-individual variation in warning signals. B. philenor larvae were food restricted starting at two points in the last larval instar, and one group was fed through pupation. Adult coloration was then compared. Food deprivation led to poorer adult condition, as indicated by lower adult body mass, forewing length, and fat content of stressed individuals. As the level of food deprivation increased, the hue of the iridescent patches on both the dorsal and ventral hind wing shifted to shorter wavelengths, and the chroma of the orange spots decreased. The shifts in iridescent color did not match the differences previously found between lab and field individuals. However, the treatment differences indicate that food deprivation may be a significant source of warning color variation. The differences between the treatment groups are likely detectable by predators

  5. Autecology of the common mormon butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera : Rhopalocera : Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, J B; Ramana, S P Venkata; Reddi, C Subba

    2002-04-01

    The adults of the common mormon butterfly Papilio polytes Linn. feed on a variety of floral species. The larval food plants in the study area included Citrus limon and Murraya koenigii both of the family Rutaceae. The eggs are laid singly, and the hatching time is three days. The larvae pass through five instars. The larval growth is directly correlated with the quantity of food consumed. The AD (approximate digestibility) values decreased from first instar to the last, whereas the ECD (efficiency of conversion of digested food) and ECI (efficiency of conversion of ingested food) values increased, thus bearing an inverse relationship with AD. The development time from egg to adult is 28-30, giving 11-12 generations in a year, but with better breeding during August-February. Thus P. polytes is multivoltine.

  6. Phylogenetic evaluation of the taxonomic status of Papilio maackii and P. syfanius (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Xin; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2011-06-01

    The taxonomic status of Papilio maackii and P. syfanius has long been disputed. We conducted a molecular phylogenetic study to evaluate the taxonomic status of P. maackii and P. syfanius. A total of twenty-four P. maackii individuals from six localities and sixteen P. syfanius individuals from two localities were analyzed. We sequenced the partial region of the CO-I gene (about 579 bp) and partial CO-II gene sequence (about 655bp) of the two species. The Kimura-2-Parameter distances among P. maackii and P. syfanius ranged from 0 to 0.6%. Fifteen haplotypes were obtained based on the combined data set. The results strongly supported that all P. maackii individuals and all P. syfanius individuals formed a large clade, and could not be divided into separated clades. This research indicated that the two species have only very recently undergone speciation.

  7. AcEST: DK954176 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RS23_SPOFR 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 232 1e-60 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan...6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1

  8. AcEST: DK955595 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ibosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 232 1e-60 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S ribo... KVVKVANVSLLALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE

  9. AcEST: BP911513 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ribosomal protein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 194 2e-49 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan...23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length

  10. AcEST: DK954344 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available somal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 232 1e-60 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Drosophil...sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2

  11. AcEST: DK947306 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1e-59 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 228 1e...EKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length =

  12. AcEST: DK958664 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osomal protein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 232 9e-61 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan...somal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 143 Score = 232

  13. AcEST: DK946056 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available R 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 226 8e-59 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan...>sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2

  14. A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojiro Shiraiwa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, sp. n. is described from southwestern United States, Mexico, and Central America (type locality: USA, Texas, Duval County. It is closely allied to H. cresphontes (Cramer, 1777 and the two species are sympatric in central Texas. The new species is diagnosed by male genitalia and exhibits a nearly 3% difference from H. cresphontes in the COI DNA barcode sequence of mitochondrial DNA. The two Heraclides species can usually be told apart by the shape and size of yellow spots on the neck, by the wing shape, and the details of wing patterns. “Western Giant Swallowtail” is proposed as the English name for H. rumiko. To stabilize nomenclature, neotype for Papilio cresphontes Cramer, 1777, an eastern United States species, is designated from Brooklyn, New York, USA; and lectotype for Papilio thoas Linnaeus, 1771 is designated from Suriname. We sequenced DNA barcodes and ID tags of nearly 400 Papilionini specimens completing coverage of all Heraclides species. Comparative analyses of DNA barcodes, genitalia, and facies suggest that Heraclides oviedo (Gundlach, 1866, reinstated status, is a species-level taxon rather than a subspecies of H. thoas (Linnaeus, 1771; and H. pallas (G. Gray, [1853], reinstated status, with its subspecies H. P. bajaensis (J. Brown & Faulkner, 1992, comb. n., and Heraclides anchicayaensis Constantino, Le Crom & Salazar, 2002, stat. n., are not conspecific with H. astyalus (Godart, 1819.

  15. Successful Community-Based Conservation: The Story of Millbank and Pterourus (Papilio) homerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Eric; Parnell, John; Lewis, Delano S

    2017-07-14

    The literature on community-based environmental management is very extensive and the discussion of the pros and cons is continuing. Presented here is an example of a successful interaction between university-based entomologists and a local rural community, detailing the change in the attitude of the town of Millbank, Jamaica, from a Giant Swallowtail Butterfly collecting site to a model for community protection of a species and its environment. A review of some of the research work on community-based conservation efforts is included. These linkages take a considerable time to establish and the efforts spent by scientific personnel, governmental representatives and eco-tourists are itemized to emphasize how specific conservation activities have inspired confidence in the local community, thus engendering trust and mutual respect between the two groups. Reviews of the developed legislative support from both international and state entities also must be in place, and these are included in chronological detail as much as possible. Finally, a review of the long-term funding of educational and other local programs providing a level of stability to the conservation effort, until the local community can take over the protection of the species and/or habitat, is provided. Of utmost importance is a comprehensive educational campaign to not only sensitize the community, but the larger society, so that there can be buy-in from all stakeholders.

  16. Chemosensory basis of larval performance of Papilio hospiton on different host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollai, Giorgia; Biolchini, Maurizio; Solari, Paolo; Crnjar, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Papilio hospiton Géné is an oligophagous species, endemic of the islands of Corsica and Sardinia, using various Apiaceae and Rutaceae as host plants, such as Ferula communis, Ferula arrigonii, Peucedanum paniculatum, Ruta lamarmorae and Pastinaca latifolia. We previously found that the lateral maxillary styloconic sensillum in the larva has two deterrent neurons, one phagostimulant and one salt specific, while the medial sensillum has two phagostimulant neurons, one deterrent and one salt specific. In this work we studied the sensitivity of gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) to saps of F. communis, F. arrigonii, P. paniculatum, P. latifolia and R. lamarmorae and evaluated the relationship between taste sensitivity to different host-plants and larval growth rate on each of them. The spike activity was recorded from medial and lateral taste sensilla stimulated with plant saps, and GRN response patterns were cross compared in the light of a different feeding acceptance. The phagodeterrent GRNs show a higher activity in response to F. arrigonii and R. lamarmorae than to F. communis, P. paniculatum and P. latifolia. Behavioral trials showed that the time to pupation is significantly longer when larvae are reared on F. arrigonii and R. lamarmorae than on the other host-plants. These results suggest that the different activity of the phagodeterrent GRNs may inhibit food acceptance and extend the duration of the larval stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The mitochondrial genome of the butterfly Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and related phylogenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia; Liu, Dian-Feng; Wang, Nai-Xin; Zhu, Chao-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Fang

    2010-12-01

    The nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the butterfly Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) was sequenced for its nucleotide sequence of 13,964 bp. The genome has a typical gene order identical to other lepidopteran species. All tRNAs showed same stable canonical clover-leaf structure as those of other insects, except for tRNA(Ser) (AGN), in which the dihydrouracil arm (DHU arm) could not form stable stem-loop structure. Anomalous initiation codons have been observed for the cox1 gene, where the ATTACG hexa-nucleotide was believed to be involved in the initiation signaling. Twelve mitochondrial protein-coding gene sequence data were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the insect orders. Even though the number of insect orders represented by complete mitochondrial genomes is still limited, several well-established relationships are evident in the phylogenetic analysis of the complete sequences. Monophyly of the Homometabola was not supported in this paper. Phylogenetic analyses of the available species of Bombycoidea, Pyraloidea, Papilionoidea and Tortricidea bolstered the current morphology-based hypothesis that Bombycoidea, Pyraloidea and Papilionoidea are monophyletic (Obtectomera). Bombycoidea (Bombyx mandarina and Antheraea pernyi) and Papilionoidea (P. xuthus and Coreana raphaelis) formed a sister group.

  18. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wang [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China); Zhang Di [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn; Fan Tongxiang; Ding Jian; Gu Jiajun [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China); Guo Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas.

  19. An ultraviolet absorbing pigment causes a narrow-band violet receptor and a single-peaked green receptor in the eye of the butterfly Papilio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arikawa, K; Mizuno, S; Scholten, DGW; Kinoshita, M; Seki, T; Kitamoto, J; Stavenga, DG

    The distal photoreceptors in the tiered retina of Papilio exhibit different spectral sensitivities. There are at least two types of short-wavelength sensitive receptors: an ultraviolet receptor with a normal spectral shape and a violet receptor with a very narrow spectral bandwidth. Furthermore, a

  20. Coexpression of two visual pigments in a photoreceptor causes an abnormally broad spectral sensitivity in the eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arikawa, K; Mizuno, S; Kinoshita, M; Stavenga, DG

    2003-01-01

    The compound eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus consists of three different types of ommatidia, each containing nine photoreceptor cells (R1 - R9). We have found previously that the R5 - R8 photoreceptors of type II ommatidia coexpress two different mRNAs, encoding opsins of green- and

  1. Structure and metamorphic changes in the brain of the lemon butterfly Papilio demoleus L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Y N; Maurya, G C

    1977-01-01

    The morphology of the larval and adult brain of Papilio demoleus, and changes in the cell population and neuropile morphology during the pupal period have been described. The larval brain has more simple fibre areas than that of the adult. Dividing neuroblasts have been found which form the adult neurones. The larval brain contains the three neuromeres (proto-, deuto-, and tritocerebrum). The protocerebrum has well developed corpora pedunculata, a central body, a pons cerebralis and developing optic centres. The corpora ventralia are joined with each other by paired ventral commissures (single in adult). The deutocerebrum is simple and small, the antennal centres are small and simple (ef. adult). The glomerular tritocerebrum is posteroventral to the deutocerebrum, and fibres from the former travel to the crura cerebri. The cortex of the brain consists of four types of glial cells and of association cells, and large and medium sized motor neurones. The number of mitoses is greatest in the larval and prepupal stages; in the pupa it decreases gradually and in late stages it does not occur. Histolysis and pyknosis begin in the prepupa and decrease considerably in the late pupa. The entire neural lamella is broken down in the early pupa. Numerous haemocytes penetrate the laminae of the neural lambella and envelop the entire brain. In the adult, behind the well-developed central body is an ellipsoid body. The medulla interna is divided into two smaller lobes and the deutocerebral lobes are differentiated into cortical and medullary zones. Chiasmata between optic centres are also formed during the pupal period.

  2. Expression of three reporter genes in four cell lines developed from Papilio demoleus Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Xin; Li, Xian; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Xie, Shi-Cong; Feng, Ying

    2018-03-01

    This paper used recombinant baculoviruses that carried three reporter genes, green fluorescent protein (GFP), β-galactosidase, and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), to infect four new cell lines from Papilio demoleus Linnaeus larvae (named RIRI-PaDe-1, RIRI-PaDe-2, RIRI-PaDe-3, and RIRI-PaDe-4). The expression levels of the three recombinant proteins were detected at 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h after infection and compared with Sf9 and High Five cells to evaluate the characteristics of these four cell lines as host cells. The inoculation densities of the tested cell lines were 2 × 10 4 cells/well (96-well plate) and 1 × 10 5 cells/well (24-well plate), and adding a volume of virus stock resulted in an MOI of 5.0. The results showed that the four cell lines could be infected by recombinant baculovirus and that cell lysis occurred 96 h after infection. In the four tested cell lines, only a small number of RIRI-PaDe-1 and RIRI-PaDe-3 cells expressed recombinant GFP and showed green fluorescence. The expression was much lower than that of Sf9 and High Five. Comparing the intracellular and extracellular activity of β-galactosidase indicated that the P. demoleus cell system was more suitable for the expression of secreted proteins, and its extracellular β-galactosidase level was close to that of Sf9, but the expression level of SEAP was far lower than those of Sf9 and High Five.

  3. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Papilio protenor (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) and Implications for Papilionidae Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Yi; Wu, Yun-He; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Jing; Zheng, Si-Zhu; Wang, Shu-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Papilio protenor (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) was sequenced and annotated in this study. The mitogenome comprised a typical circular, double-stranded DNA molecule of 15,268 bp in length including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and an A+T-rich region. The gene order and mitogenome orientation were similar to those of all known Papilionidae species. The nucleotide composition of the P. protenor mitogenome exhibits considerable A+T bias (80.5%) and the AT (−0.019) and GC (−0.231) skewness is slightly negative. All of the PCGs except for cytochrome c oxidase (COI) start with a canonical ATN start codon, whereas the COI gene is tentatively designated by the CGA codon. Of the 13 PCGs, 11 contain the complete stop codon TAA or TAG, whereas COI and COII were terminated with a single T nucleotide. All tRNAs exhibit the typical cloverleaf structure, except for tRNASer(AGN), which does not contain the dihydrouridine arm. The 458 bp A+T-rich region is comprised of nonrepetitive sequences including the motif ATAGA followed by a poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (AT)6 element preceded by the ATTTA motif. Phylogenetic analysis of the 13 PCGs data using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood methods, and maximum parsimony support the view that the subfamily Parnassiinae is regarded as an independent subfamily within Papilionidae and that Zerynthiini should be treated as one of the two clades of the subfamily Parnassiinae along with Parnasiini. In addition, the analysis strongly supports the monophyly of the subfamily Parnassiinae.

  4. Taste sensitivity and divergence in host plant acceptance between adult females and larvae of Papilio hospiton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollai, Giorgia; Biolchini, Maurizio; Crnjar, Roberto

    2018-02-27

    On the island of Sardinia the lepidopteran Papilio hospiton uses Ferula communis as exclusive host-plant. However, on the small island of Tavolara, adult females lay eggs on Seseli tortuosum, a plant confined to the island. When raised in captivity on Seseli only few larvae grew beyond the first-second instar. Host specificity of lepidopterans is determined by female oviposition preferences, but also by larval food acceptance, and adult and larval taste sensitivity may be related to host selection in both cases. Aim of this work was: (i) to study the taste sensitivity of larvae and ovipositing females to saps of Ferula and Seseli; (ii) to cross-compare the spike activity of gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) to both taste stimuli; (iii) to evaluate the discriminating capability between the two saps and determine which neural code/s is/are used. The results show that: (i) the spike responses of the tarsal GRNs of adult females to both plant saps are not different and therefore they cannot discriminate the two plants; (ii) larval L-lat GRN shows a higher activity in response to Seseli than Ferula, while the opposite occurs for the phagostimulant neurons, and larvae may discriminate between the two saps by means of multiple neural codes; (iii) the number of eggs laid on the two plants is the same, but the larval growth performance is better on Ferula than Seseli. Taste sensitivity differences may explain the absence of a positive relationship between oviposition preferences by adult females and plant acceptance and growth performance by larvae. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Deterrent effect evaluation of vegetal extracts on Papilio thoas brasiliensis (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae Rothschild & Jordan, 1906

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cupertino de Souza Débora María

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A crescente preocupação mundial tem motivado pesquisadores a buscarem alternativas consideradas saudáveis e que controlem insetos-praga e doenças. Dentre estas alternativas, destaca-se a utilização de aleloquímicos extraídos de plantas (Jacobson 1989, pois são produtos naturais que reduzem os efeitos negativos ocasionados pela aplicação descontrolada de inseticidas organossintéticos (Medeiros et al 2005, reduzindo o desenvolvimento de populações resistentes do inseto, e o aparecimento de novas pragas ou a ressurgência de outras (Souza 2004. O uso de extratos de plantas medicinais faz com que determinados componentes ativos presentes nos vegetais, quando utilizados de forma concentrada, atuem no controle de insetos, inibindo sua alimentação ou prejudicando-os após a ingestão (Costa et al 2004. Muitas apresentam sobre os insetos efeito tóxico, inibição de crescimento, redução de fecundidade, fertilidade e repelência dado os compostos metabólicos secundários que apresentam como alcalóides, terpenos, flavonóides e esteróides com propriedades medicinais comprovadas (Di Stasi 1996, se justificado, portanto, o uso delas no controle de pragas. Assim, a presente pesquisa teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito deterrente de extratos de espécies medicinais de Atropa belladonna L. (belladona; Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (nim; Mikania glomerata Spreng. (guaco; Symphytum officinale L. (confrei; Ruta graveolens L. (arruda; sobre Papilio thoas brasiliensis (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae. Na presente pesquisa o destaque deve ser dado ao confrei e nim pelo efeito deterrente apresentado. No presente estudo foi possível determinar que houve deterrência, mas não há como informar se outros efeitos ocorreram somados a esse.

  6. The performance studies on swallow-tailed naphthalene diimide derivatives in solution processed inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Gulsah; Sarica, Hizir; Erten-Ela, Sule

    2014-10-01

    Two different soluble swallow-tailed naphthalene diimide derivatives were synthesized, 1,4:5,8-naphthalene diimides (NDIs), N,N‧-bis-(1-butylpentyl)-naphthalenetetracarboxylic-1,4:5,8-biscarboximide (NDI-1) and N,N‧-bis-(1-pentylhexyl)-naphthalenetetracarboxylic-1,4:5,8-biscarboximide (NDI-2). Thermal stabilities were also measured with thermal gravimetry analyser (TGA). Naphthalene diimides showed high thermal stability. NDI derivatives exhibited good thermal stabilities that thermal decomposition peak appeared at 438 °C and 421 °C, respectively for NDI-1 and NDI-2. Highly soluble naphthalene diimide derivatives were used in inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells. Two different ZnO cathode layers were used to fabricate bulk heterojunction solar cells. One of them was single layer consists of dense ZnO layer and the other was double layer comprising porous ZnO layer onto dense ZnO layer. Inverted bulk heterojunction devices were designed in a FTO/ ZnO (single or double layer)/P3HT:C60:NDI device geometry. Best efficiency was obtained for FTO/ZnO (single or double layer)/P3HT:C60:NDI-2 device as 8.78 mA/cm2 of short circuit photocurrent density, 300 mV of open circuit voltage, 0.28 of filling factor, 0.74 of overall conversion efficiency.

  7. A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Kojiro; Cong, Qian; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    Heraclidesrumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, sp. n. is described from southwestern United States, Mexico, and Central America (type locality: USA, Texas, Duval County). It is closely allied to Heraclidescresphontes (Cramer, 1777) and the two species are sympatric in central Texas. The new species is diagnosed by male genitalia and exhibits a nearly 3% difference from Heraclidescresphontes in the COI DNA barcode sequence of mitochondrial DNA. The two Heraclides species can usually be told apart by the shape and size of yellow spots on the neck, by the wing shape, and the details of wing patterns. "Western Giant Swallowtail" is proposed as the English name for Heraclidesrumiko. To stabilize nomenclature, neotype for Papiliocresphontes Cramer, 1777, an eastern United States species, is designated from Brooklyn, New York, USA; and lectotype for Papiliothoas Linnaeus, 1771 is designated from Suriname. We sequenced DNA barcodes and ID tags of nearly 400 Papilionini specimens completing coverage of all Heraclides species. Comparative analyses of DNA barcodes, genitalia, and facies suggest that Heraclidesoviedo (Gundlach, 1866), reinstated status, is a species-level taxon rather than a subspecies of Heraclidesthoas (Linnaeus, 1771); and Heraclidespallas (G. Gray, [1853]), reinstated status, with its subspecies HeraclidesPapiliobajaensis (J. Brown & Faulkner, 1992), comb. n., and Heraclidesanchicayaensis Constantino, Le Crom & Salazar, 2002, stat. n., are not conspecific with Heraclidesastyalus (Godart, 1819).

  8. Start-up Characteristics of Swallow-tailed Axial-grooved Heat Pipe under the conditions of Multiple Heat Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renping

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical model was developed for predicting start-up characteristics of Swallow-tailed Axial-grooved Heat Pipe under the conditions of Multiple Heat Sources. The effects of heat capacitance of heat source, liquid-vapour interfacial evaporation-condensation heat transfer, shear stress at the interface was considered in current model. The interfacial evaporating mass flow rate is based on the kinetic analysis. Time variations of evaporating mass rate, wall temperature and liquid velocity are studied from the start-up to steady state. The calculated results show that wall temperature demonstrates step transition at the junction between the heat source and non-existent heat source on the evaporator. The liquid velocity changes drastically at the evaporator section, however, it has slight variation at the evaporator section without heat source. When the effect of heat source is ignored, the numerical temperature demonstrates a quicker response. With the consideration of capacitance of the heat source, the data obtained from the proposed model agree well with the experimental results.

  9. Ultra high-field SWI of the substantia nigra at 7T: reliability and consistency of the swallow-tail sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Manuel A; Engelhorn, Tobias; Marxreiter, Franz; Winkler, Juergen; Lang, Stefan; Kloska, Stephan; Goelitz, Philipp; Doerfler, Arnd

    2017-10-26

    The loss of the swallow-tail sign of the substantia nigra has been proposed for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Aim was to evaluate, if the sign occurs consistently in healthy subjects and if it can be reliably detected with high-resolution 7T susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). Thirteen healthy adults received SWI at 7T. 3 neuroradiologists, who were blinded to patients' diagnosis, independently classified subjects regarding the swallow-tail sign to be present or absent. Accuracy, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) as well as inter- and intra-rater reliability and internal consistency were analyzed. The sign could be detected in 81% of the cases in consensus reading. Accuracy to detect the sign compared to the consensus was 100, 77 and 96% for the three readers with PPV reader 1/2/3 = 1/0.45/0.83 and NPV = 1/1/1. Inter-rater reliability was excellent (inter-class correlation coefficient = 0.844, alpha = 0.871). Intra-rater reliability was good to excellent (reader 1 R/L = 0.625/0.786; reader 2 = 0.7/0.64; reader 3 = 0.9/1). The swallow-tail sign can be reliably detected. However, our data suggest its occurrence is not consistent in healthy subjects. It may be possible that one reason is an individually variable molecular organization of nigrosome 1 so that it does not return a uniform signal in SWI.

  10. Analysis of the feeding habits of the swallow-tailed hummingbird, Eupetomena macroura (Gmelin, 1788), in an urban park in southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Toledo,MCB; Moreira, DM

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to observe and describe the feeding habits and available food resources of the swallow-tailed hummingbird, Eupetomena macroura. The study was carried out in a municipal park located in the city of Taubaté, in the state of São Paulo. The observations took place between December 2003 and October 2004, recording the following variables: 1) the plant species visited for feeding and territorial defense; 2) the kinds of food resources; and 3) the kinds of flight to procure ...

  11. [The demonstration of natural hybridization between two swallowtail species Parnassius nomion and Parnassius bremeri (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) using RAPD-PCR technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, E V

    2001-04-01

    Genetic evidence for interspecific hybridization between Parnassius nomion and Parnassius bremeri in nature is presented. To demonstrate hybridization between these species, RAPD analysis was used. By testing 25 decamer primers, three and two diagnostic markers were revealed for P. nomion and P. bremeri, respectively. Out of 28 animals examined, 4 were shown to be interspecific hybrids. According to the distribution of diagnostic markers, the interspecific hybrids were intermediate with regard to the parental species. Ecological and biological characteristics of two swallowtail species that promote their hybridization in nature are discussed.

  12. Establishment and characterization of a cell line developed from the neonate larvae of Papilio demoleus Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei-Feng; Feng, Ying; Zhang, Xin; Li, Xian; Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2013-02-01

    A new cell line named RIRI-PaDe, developed from the neonate larvae of Papilio demoleus Linnaeus, was established in modified Grace's medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum. The cell line was incubated at 28°C and consisted of attached round and short spindle-like cells. The population doubling time was 55 h. The chromosome numbers varied widely from 24 to 136 with a mode of 59 at the 71st passage. Comparison of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene of the cell line and neonate larvae confirmed that the cell line was of P. demoleus origin. This cell line was susceptible to the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus and Apocheima cinerarius nucleopolyhedrovirus.

  13. Environmental factors affecting black/white coloration of the silken girdle in the swallowtail butterfly, Atrophaneura alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masami; Yamanaka, Akira; Masaki, Hisashi; Nishijima, Ayako; Harada, Yumiko; Kitazawa, Chisato; Abe, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Masao; Endo, Katsuhiko

    2005-11-01

    The silken girdles of pupae of the swallowtail butterfly Atrophaneura alcinous show black and white color diphenism. Field observations revealed that all pupae observed on non-food plants and the leaves and stems of the larval food plant Aristolochia debilis were classified as a silken girdle of a black type, while a large portion of pupae pupating on the twigs and trunks of cherry trees in close proximity to A. debilis were classified as a silken girdle of a black type. Additionally, all pupae observed on the surfaces of artificial objects in areas where there are no surrounding plants or trees were classified as a silken girdle of a white type. We demonstrated the effect of day length and the texture, light, plant odor and humidity of pupation sites on the coloration of the silken girdle in A. alcinous. Regardless of long-day or short-day day length conditions, light conditions of constant light or dark, or the presence of a plant odor of A. debilis as environmental cues, all larvae placed at over 80% relative humidity (R.H.) developed into pupae with a silken girdle of a black type. However, all larvae developed into pupae with a silken girdle of a white type when R.H. was below 75%. Furthermore, when pupae with a silken girdle of a white type were transferred to conditions of 90% R.H. within 24 hr of pupation, the white color of the silken girdle changed into a black type within 24 hr of the transfer. The present data suggest that the induction of a black coloration of the silken girdle in A. alcinous requires a R.H. of approximately 80% or more as an environmental factor.

  14. Comment: 188 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Old world swallowtail Papilio machaon Papilio_machaon_L.png 188.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Lif...to: Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science) bando 2010/01/12 14:04:30 2010/01/14 19:57:15 ...

  15. AcEST: DK952240 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 205 1e-52 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S ribosomal pro...ALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Leng

  16. AcEST: DK955152 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available APDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 232 8e-61 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S ribosomal protein S23...KKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length =

  17. AcEST: DK946237 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 199 1e-50 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=...KVANVSLLALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 S

  18. AcEST: BP911630 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available optera fru... 165 1e-40 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 165 1e-40 sp|Q8T...6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 143 Score = 165 b

  19. AcEST: DK958663 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 226 6e-59 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan...|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 143 Score = 226

  20. AcEST: DK952837 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ibosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 232 8e-61 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Drosop...3 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 143 Score

  1. AcEST: DK946898 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3_SPOFR 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 213 4e-55 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan...RS 376 KE+PRS Sbjct: 138 KERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=R

  2. AcEST: DK958111 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 232 9e-61 sp|Q8T3U2|RS23_DROME 40S rib...1 KVVKVANVSLLALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardanus GN=RpS23 P

  3. Diet composition of nestlings and adults of the threatened Bolivian Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris boliviana (Aves: Passeriformes: Cotingidae in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica del Rosario Avalos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The qualitative and quantitative composition of the nestling and adult diet of the threatened Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris boliviana was studied through the analysis of fecal samples.  Nestling diet consisted of 62% fruit and 38% insects but varied according to the nestling age. The diet of adults was made up of 89% fruit and 11% insects.  The fruit eaten came primarily from the trees Schefflera morototoni, Hyeronima moritziana and Ocotea cuprea.  Most insects in the fecal samples were winged-species of the orders Hymenoptera and Coleoptera.  This species relied mostly on fruiting trees from semi-humid forest fragments and isolated trees on mountain savannas.  Thus, management plans for this bird should consider the conservation of these habitats. 

  4. EST Table: CK513241 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK513241 rswdd0_011349.y1 10/09/29 71 %/148 aa emb|CAW30924.1| putative aldo-ketose reductase 1 [Papilio dar...danus] 10/08/31 36 %/137 aa FBpp0241767|DwilGK12624-PA 10/08/28 39 %/110 aa Y39G8B.

  5. EST Table: CK513889 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK513889 rswdd0_012665.y1 10/09/29 70 %/136 aa emb|CAW30924.1| putative aldo-ketose reductase 1 [Papilio dar...danus] 10/08/31 36 %/109 aa FBpp0234599|DvirGJ20182-PA 10/08/28 low homology 10/09/

  6. Of Swallowtails and Swallows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Education consultant Samantha Bennett describes an inquiry unit in which 2nd graders practice the habits of lepidopterists to learn about butterflies and to create a literary nonfiction story that incorporated their butterfly research. She takes the reader through the teacher's process of planning this unit, including choosing the "4…

  7. Time-scale dependency of host plant biomass- and trait-mediated indirect effects of deer herbivory on a swallowtail butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shun; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    Despite recent attempts to quantify the relative strength of density- and trait-mediated indirect effects, rarely has the issue been properly addressed at the population level. Most research is based on short-term small-scale experiments in which behavioural and/or physiological responses prevail. Here, we estimated the time-scales during which density- and trait-mediated effects manifest, as well as the strength of these effects, using an interaction chain with three organisms (deer-plant-butterfly). A hierarchical Bayesian model was performed by using a long-term data set of deer density in the Boso Peninsula, central Japan (where local densities differ spatially and temporally) as well as densities of the swallowtail butterfly Byasa alcinous and its host plant Aristolochia kaempferi. The time-scale effect of deer on plant quantity and quality was estimated according to the degree of carry-over effects. The negative influence on leaf density showed a temporal saturation pattern over the long term, while the positive influence on leaf quality due to resprouting of leaves after deer browsing showed no clear temporal trend. The net indirect effect changed from positive to negative with time, with the negative density-mediated effect becoming prominent in the long term. Our novel approach is widely applicable in assessing the dynamic impacts of wildlife if the spatio-temporal variability of expansion and/or invasion history is known. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  8. Analysis of the feeding habits of the swallow-tailed hummingbird, Eupetomena macroura (Gmelin, 1788, in an urban park in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MCB. Toledo

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to observe and describe the feeding habits and available food resources of the swallow-tailed hummingbird, Eupetomena macroura. The study was carried out in a municipal park located in the city of Taubaté, in the state of São Paulo. The observations took place between December 2003 and October 2004, recording the following variables: 1 the plant species visited for feeding and territorial defense; 2 the kinds of food resources; and 3 the kinds of flight to procure and obtain food. E. macroura visited 12 plant species. For territorial defense, Mangifera indica was the most visited, whereas Malvaviscus arboreus was most visited for feeding. The foliage was the plant part that received the most frequent visits. In order to obtain nectar, the only species visited was M. arboreus; to obtain arthropods, the species most visited were Mangifera indica and Hymenaea stilbocarpa. In the dry season, the hummingbirds visited flowers, whereas in the rainy season they visited leaves to acquire food. The arthropod groups most frequently found on leafy branches were Homoptera and Psocoptera. Finally, the results of the type of flight analysis showed that flight used to capture food was more often observed than were flights to search for food. In conclusion, these observations suggest that E. macroura shows plasticity in feeding behavior, which can help it to persist in urban areas.

  9. Proteome changes in the plasma of Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae): effect of parasitization by the endoparasitic wasp Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-ying; Ye, Gong-yin; Fang, Qi; Hu, Cui

    2009-06-01

    Although the biochemical dissection of parasitoid-host interactions is becoming well characterized, the molecular knowledge concerning them is minimal. In order to understand the molecular bases of the host immune response to parasitoid attack, we explored the response of Papilio xuthus parasitized by the endoparasitic wasp Pteromalus puparum using proteomic approach. By examining the differential expression of plasma proteins in the parasitized and unparasitized host pupae by two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, 16 proteins were found to vary in relation to parasitization compared with unparasitized control samples. All of them were submitted to identification by mass spectrometry coupled with a database search. The modulated proteins were found to fall into the following functional groups: humoral or cellular immunity, detoxification, energy metabolism, and others. This study contributes insights into the molecular mechanism of the relationships between parasitoids and their host insects.

  10. Expression of CYP6B1 and CYP6B3 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and furanocoumarin metabolism in different tissues of Papilio polyxenes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R A; Zangerl, A R; Berenbaum, M R; Schuler, M A

    2001-04-27

    The CYP6B1 and CYP6B3 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in the midgut of the black swallowtail participate in the metabolism of toxic furanocoumarins present in its host plants. In this study, biochemical analyses indicate that the fat body metabolizes significant amounts of the linear furanocoumarins bergapten and xanthotoxin after larvae feed on xanthotoxin. Northern analyses of the combined CYP6B1/3 transcript expression patterns indicate that transcripts in this P450 subfamily are induced in the midgut and fat body by xanthotoxin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses of individual CYP6B1/CYP6B3 mRNAs indicate that CYP6B1 transcripts are induced by xanthotoxin in all tissues examined and that CYP6B3 transcripts are induced in the fat body only. These results indicate that the fat body participates in the P450-mediated metabolism of excess furanocoumarins unmetabolized by the midgut. Although transcripts of both genes were detected and CYP6B1 transcripts were induced by xanthotoxin in the integument, furanocoumarin metabolism was not detected. Comparison of these P450 promoters with the promoters of alcohol dehydrogenase genes expressed in the fat bodies of several Drosophila species suggest that the xanthotoxin inducibilities of these P450 genes in fat bodies are regulated by elements other than those modulating expression of Adh genes.

  11. Comment: 184 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Asian Swallowtail Papilio xuthus Papilio_xuthus_L.png 184.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life...keru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science) アゲハ 標本版(夏型) かなりボロっちいですが、参考のために。。。 nakazato 2009/06/16 18:52:42 2010/01/14 19:53:50 ...

  12. Characterization of a new insect cell line that is derived from the neonate larvae of Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and its susceptibility to AcNPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Feng, Ying; Ding, Wei-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Ye; Ma, Tao

    2012-06-01

    The cell line RIRI-PX1 was established from neonate larval tissues of Papilio xuthus by performing primary cultures in the modified Grace medium that was supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). The cell line primarily consisted of spindle-shaped and spherical cells which attached themselves to the flask. The population-doubling times (PDTs) at the 50th and 60th passage were 42.5 h and 42.1 h respectively. The average chromosome numbers of RIRI-PX1 cell line from passage 5 to passage 50 ranged from 103 to 199. It was confirmed that RIRI-PX1 cell line was derived from P. xuthus by comparing the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) of RIRI-PX1 cells and P. xuthus eggs. This cell line was susceptible to the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) and produced high yield of polyhedral occlusion bodies (43.9OBs/cell) after 10 days of infection by AcNPV. The virus titer of AcNPV infected RIRI-PX1 cells was 3.25×10⁷ TCID₅₀/ml. We concluded that the RIRI-PX1 cell line is established from the neonate larvae tissues successfully and the cells of the cell line are sensitive to AcNPV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comment: 186 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Asian Swallowtail Papilio xuthus Papilio_xuthus_L.png 186.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life...keru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science) アゲハチョウ(ナミアゲハ) Papilio xuthus 標本風の写真もあるかと思うので探してみます。 (もしくは撮り直す) nakazato 2008/12/22 09:47:51 2010/01/14 19:54:38 ...

  14. Plant guide: Barestem biscuitroot: Lomatium nudicaule (Pursh) J.M. Coult. and Rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek Tilley; Loren St. John

    2012-01-01

    Barestem biscuitroot is palatable primarily to sheep but grows in such limited quantities that it is hardly an important forage species (Hermann 1966). It serves as a host plant for the larvae of anise swallowtail butterfly (Papilio zelicaon) (Pelini et al 2009).

  15. Papilio (Ornithoptera) Ritsemae, n. sp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, P.C.T.

    1889-01-01

    La découverte de cette nouvelle espèce fut faite à l’occasion d’une révision des Ornithoptera à ailes supérieures noirâtres et à ailes inférieures jaunes, se trouvant dans la collection du Musée d’Histoire Naturelle de Leyde, dans celle de la Société Natura Artis Magistra à Amsterdam et dans les

  16. Comment: 185 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Asian Swallowtail Papilio xuthus Papilio_xuthus_L.png 185.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life...keru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science) アゲハ 標本版です。(春型) 春型/夏型だの、オス/メスでかなり姿が違うものとかあったりしますが、 どうしましょうね。

  17. A host-inducible cytochrome P-450 from a host-specific caterpillar: molecular cloning and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M B; Schuler, M A; Berenbaum, M R

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases (P-450s) play a critical role in the detoxification of natural and synthetic toxins in a wide range of organisms. We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding a P-450, CYP6B1, from larvae of Papilio polyxenes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), the black swallowtail butterfly. This P-450, cloned from a herbivorous insect, is highly inducible by xanthotoxin, a secondary metabolite abundant in the host plants of this specialized herbivore. On Northern blots, mRNAs crossreactive with CYP6B1 were detected in three Papilio species that, like the black swallowtail, have high levels of xanthotoxin-metabolic P-450 activity and encounter xanthotoxin or related compounds in their host plants; in contrast, no crossreactive mRNAs were detectable in three papilinid species that never encounter xanthotoxin in their host plants and lack detectable xanthotoxin-metabolic activity. These results provide evidence that new P-450s can arise as herbivores colonize different host plants and support the hypothesis that interactions between herbivores and their toxin-producing host plants have contributed to the diversification of the P-450 superfamily. Images PMID:1279697

  18. Coincidental intraguild predation by caterpillars on spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirotsuka, Kanako; Yano, Shuichi

    2012-01-29

    Intraguild predation (IGP) is defined as the killing and eating of prey species by a predator that also can utilize the resources of the prey. It is mainly reported among carnivores that share common herbivorous prey. However, a large chewing herbivore could prey upon sedentary and/or micro herbivores in addition to utilizing a host plant. To investigate such coincidental IGP, we observed the behavioral responses of the polyphagous mite Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae) when its host plant Cayratia japonica (Thunb.) Gagnep. (Vitaceae) was attacked by hornworms, Theretra japonica Boisduval (Sphingidae) and T. oldenlandiae Fabricius (Sphingidae). We also examined an interaction between the oligophagous mite Panonychus citri McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae) and caterpillars of the swallowtail Papilio xuthus L. (Papilionidae) that share citrus plants as their main food source. Although all T. kanzawai and some active stage P. citri tried to escape from the coincidental IGP, some were consumed together with eggs, quiescent mites, and host plant leaves, suggesting that coincidental IGP occurs on spider mites in the wild. Moreover, neither hornworms nor swallowtail caterpillars distinguished between spider mite-infested and uninfested leaves, suggesting that the mite-infested leaves do not discourage caterpillar feeding. The reasons that the mites have no effective defense against coincidental IGP other than escaping are discussed.

  19. Seasonal change in pupation behaviour and pupal mortality in a swallowtail butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanescu, C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity in pupal colour has evolved to render cryptic pupae. Apart from characteristics of the pupation site, the photoperiod experienced by larvae is important in determining pupal colour, long and short photophases eliciting the formation of green and brown pupae, respectively. This seasonal polyphenismis often correlated with developmental pathway, green pupae developing directly and brown pupae entering into diapause. From 1996 to 2000, immature stages of Iphiclides podalirius were monitored on natural hostplants in NE Spain. Larvae were followed to the pupation site and pupal colour, characteristics of the pupation site and the fate of pupae were recorded. Before August, pupae were non-diapausing green while in early August they were dimorphic, after which, they were brown and overwintered. As theory predicts, differences in pupation sites in successive generations were found in relation to pupal colour. Green pupae occurred on the hostplants and brown pupae were found among the leaf litter. Mortality ranged from 14.3 to 100%. Bird predation was the major mortality factor for green pupae and was also important for brown pupae. Results suggest that preference for pupation sites in the litter in diapausing broods evolved to avoid strong bird predation on the hostplants. Preference for sites above ground level in summer generations may have evolved in response to both non-visual (small mammals and visual (avian predators.

  20. Swallow-tailed Bee-eater Merops hirundineus : first record for Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 32 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Deterrent effect evaluation of vegetal extracts on Papilio thoas brasiliensis (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) Rothschild & Jordan, 1906

    OpenAIRE

    Cupertino de Souza Débora María; Mara-Mussury Rosilda

    2010-01-01

    A crescente preocupação mundial tem motivado pesquisadores a buscarem alternativas consideradas saudáveis e que controlem insetos-praga e doenças. Dentre estas alternativas, destaca-se a utilização de aleloquímicos extraídos de plantas (Jacobson 1989), pois são produtos naturais que reduzem os efeitos negativos ocasionados pela aplicação descontrolada de inseticidas organossintéticos (Medeiros et al 2005), reduzindo o desenvolvimento de populações resistentes do inseto, e o aparecimento de no...

  2. Isolation and characterization of CYP6B4, a furanocoumarin-inducible cytochrome P450 from a polyphagous caterpillar (Lepidoptera:papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C F; Berenbaum, M R; Schuler, M A

    1997-05-01

    Papilio glaucus (tiger swallowtail) is a generalist that rarely encounters plants containing furanocoumarins yet is constitutively capable of metabolizing low levels of these highly toxic allelochemicals. In larvae of this species, metabolism of linear (xanthotoxin, bergapten), and angular (angelicin, sphondin), furanocoumarins can be induced up to 30-fold by the presence of xanthotoxin in their diet. Degenerate primers corresponding to conserved amino acid sequences in three insect P450s, Musca domestica (CYP6A1), Drosophila melanogaster (CYP6A2) and Papilio polyxenes (CYP6B1), were used to clone xanthotoxin-induced P450 transcripts from P. glaucus larvae by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) strategy. Positive clones encoding the highly conserved F--G-R-C-G P450 signature motif were used to isolate a full-length CYP6B4v1 cDNA from a P. glaucus xanthotoxin-induced cDNA library. Sequence comparisons indicate the P. glaucus CYP6B4v1 protein sequence is 63% and 61% identical, respectively, to the P. polyxenes furanocoumarin-inducible CYP6B1v1 and CYP6B3v1 proteins. Northern analysis indicates that CYP6B4 and related transcripts are highly induced in response to xanthotoxin. Baculovirus-mediated expression of the CYP6B4v1 protein in lepidopteran cell lines demonstrates that this P450 isozyme metabolizes isopimpinellin, imperatorin, and bergapten at high rates, xanthotoxin and psoralen at intermediate rates and angelicin, sphondin, and trioxsalen only at very low rates.

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Common mormon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Papilio_polytes_S.png Papilio_polytes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+pol...ytes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=80 ...

  4. Die Anomuren des Roten Meeres (Crustacea Decapoda: Paguridea, Galatheidea, Hippidea) 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewinsohn, Ch.

    1969-01-01

    INHALT Einführung................... 4 Technische Bemerkungen................ 9 Systematischer Teil................. 12 Paguridea................... 12 Diogenidae.................. 12 Paguristes.................. 12 Clibanarius.................. 18 Dardanus.................. 26

  5. Singularities, swallowtails and Dirac points. An analysis for families of Hamiltonians and applications to wire networks, especially the Gyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Ralph M.; Khlebnikov, Sergei; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit

    2012-08-15

    Motivated by the Double Gyroid nanowire network we develop methods to detect Dirac points and classify level crossings, aka. singularities in the spectrum of a family of Hamiltonians. The approach we use is singularity theory. Using this language, we obtain a characterization of Dirac points and also show that the branching behavior of the level crossings is given by an unfolding of A{sub n} type singularities. Which type of singularity occurs can be read off a characteristic region inside the miniversal unfolding of an A{sub k} singularity. We then apply these methods in the setting of families of graph Hamiltonians, such as those for wire networks. In the particular case of the Double Gyroid we analytically classify its singularities and show that it has Dirac points. This indicates that nanowire systems of this type should have very special physical properties.

  6. Population Dynamics of the Swallowtail Butterfly Battus polystictus polystictus (Butler) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) with Notes on Its Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, V W; de Morais, A B B; Romanowski, H P; Mega, N O

    2016-02-01

    Battus polystictus (Butler) is a butterfly from the Neotropical region, occurring in the Atlantic Forest and Pampa biomes. It is commonly found in forest fragments surrounded by meadow formations, subjected to marked seasonal changes. Here, we report the population dynamics of B. polystictus at a high latitude environment and provide notes on its natural history. Population parameters were estimated on a 12-month mark-recapture program and the seasonality of resources investigated by exhaustive mapping of host-plants and flowers. The number of butterflies per day was not stable during the year, ranging from zero (winter) to 22 (summer); the sex ratio was always male biased (3M:1F). The age structure was not constant, with an increase of older individuals toward summer. The population density was positively correlated with temperature, relative humidity, and day length. The residence time was lower for males, while the vagility was lower for females; the increment of resources at forest edges seems to increase the likelihood of occurrence of both sexes. The results shown here suggest that South Brazilian populations of B. polystictus have high ecological demands for spring and summer conditions, avoiding winter in diapause.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of the New World Troidini swallowtails (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) based on COI, COII, and EF-1alpha genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Brandão, Karina Lucas; Lucci Freitas, André Victor; Brower, Andrew V Z; Solferini, Vera Nisaka

    2005-09-01

    A phylogeny of the Neotropical members of the Tribe Troidini (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) was obtained with sequences of three protein-coding genes: two mitochondrial (COI and COII), and one nuclear (EF-1alpha). Parsimony and Bayesian analyses of 33 taxa resulted in very similar trees regardless of method used with the 27 troidines always forming a monophyletic clade. Within Troidini, the genus Battus is sister group to the remaining troidines, followed by a clade formed by the Paleotropical taxa (here represented by three exemplars). The genus Euryades is the next branch, and sister group of Parides. The genus Parides is monophyletic, and is divided into four main groups by Maximum Parsimony analysis, with the most basal group composed of tailed species restricted to SE Brazil. Character optimization of ecological and morphological traits over the phylogeny proposed for troidines indicated that the use of several species of Aristolochia is ancestral over the use of few or a single host-plant. For the other three characters, the ancestral states were the absence of long tails, forest as the primary habitat and oviposition solitary or in loose group of several eggs.

  8. Electroporation-mediated somatic transgenesis for rapid functional analysis in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Toshiya; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2013-01-15

    Transgenesis is a powerful technique for determining gene function; however, it is time-consuming. It is virtually impossible to carry out in non-model insects in which egg manipulation and screening are difficult. We have established a rapid genetic functional analysis system for non-model insects using a low-cost electroporator (costing under US$200) designed for somatic transformation with the piggyBac transposon. Using this system, we successfully generated somatic transgenic cell clones in various target tissues (e.g. olfactory neurons, wing epidermis, larval epidermis, muscle, fat body and trachea) of the silkworm Bombyx mori during development. We also induced stable and transient RNA interference (RNAi) using short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediating DNA vectors and direct transfer of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), respectively. We found that these electroporation-mediated approaches could also be applied to the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus and the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Thus, this method could be a powerful genetic tool for elucidating various developmental phenomena in non-model insects.

  9. Convergent evolution of neuroendocrine control of phenotypic plasticity in pupal colour in butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnecker, G.; Hazel, W.

    1999-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity in pupal colour occurs in three families of butterflies (the Nymphalidae, Papilionidae and Pieridae), typically in species whose pupation sites vary unpredictably in colour. In all species studied to date, larvae ready for pupation respond to environmental cues associated with the colour of their pupation sites and moult into cryptic light (yellow–green) or dark (brown–black) pupae. In nymphalids and pierids, pupal colour is controlled by a neuroendocrine factor, pupal melanization-reducing factor (PMRF), the release of which inhibits the melanization of the pupal cuticle resulting in light pupae. In contrast, the neuroendocrine factor controlling pupal colour in papilionid butterflies results in the production of brown pupae. PMRF was extracted from the ventral nerve chains of the peacock butterfly Inachis io (Nymphalidae) and black swallowtail butterfly Papilio polyxenes (Papilionidae). When injected into pre-pupae, the extracts resulted in yellow pupae in I. io but brown pupae in P. polyxenes. These results suggest that the same neuroendocrine factor controls the plasticity in pupal colour, but that plasticity in pupal colour in these species has evolved independently (convergently).

  10. Caterpillar color patterns are determined by a two-phase melanin gene prepatterning process: new evidence from tan and laccase2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo; Banno, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2010-01-01

    The larval color patterns in Lepidoptera exhibit splendid diversity, and identifying the genes responsible for pigment distribution is essential to understanding color-pattern evolution. The swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, is a good candidate for analyzing marking-associated genes because its body markings change dramatically at the final molt. Moreover, the silkworm Bombyx mori is most suitable for identification of lab-generated color mutants because genome information and many color mutants are available. Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of 10 melanin-related genes in P. xuthus, and analyzed whether these genes were responsible for Bombyx larval color mutants. We found that seven genes correlated strongly with the stage-specific larval cuticular markings of P. xuthus, suggesting that, compared with Drosophila, more genes showed marking specificity in lepidopteran larvae. We newly found that the expression of both tan and laccase2 is strongly correlated with the larval black markings in both P. xuthus and B. mori. The results of F2 linkage analysis and mutant analysis strongly suggest that tan is the responsible gene for Bombyx larval color mutant rouge, and that tan is important in emphasizing black markings of lepidopteran larvae. Detailed comparison of temporal and spatial expression patterns showed that larval cuticular markings were regulated at two different phases. Marking-specific expression of oxidizing enzymes preceded the marking-specific expression of melanin synthesis enzymes at mRNA level, which is the reverse of the melanin synthesis step.

  11. A highly sensitive room temperature H2S gas sensor based on SnO2 multi-tube arrays bio-templated from insect bristles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junlong; Pan, Feng; Xue, Ruiyang; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-05-07

    A tin oxide multi-tube array (SMTA) with a parallel effect was fabricated through a simple and promising method combining chemosynthesis and biomimetic techniques; a biomimetic template was derived from the bristles on the wings of the Alpine Black Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio maackii). SnO2 tubes are hollow and porous structures with micro-pores regularly distributed on the wall. The morphology, the delicate microstructure and the crystal structure of this SMTA were characterized by super resolution digital microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The SMTA exhibits a high sensitivity to H2S gas at room temperature. It also exhibits a short response/recovery time, with an average value of 14/30 s at 5 ppm. In particular, heating is not required for the SMTA in the gas sensitivity measurement process. On the basis of these results, SMTA is proposed as a suitable new material for the design and fabrication of room-temperature H2S gas sensors.

  12. Using electroretinograms and multi-model inference to identify spectral classes of photoreceptors and relative opsin expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessios, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how individual photoreceptor cells factor in the spectral sensitivity of a visual system is essential to explain how they contribute to the visual ecology of the animal in question. Existing methods that model the absorption of visual pigments use templates which correspond closely to data from thin cross-sections of photoreceptor cells. However, few modeling approaches use a single framework to incorporate physical parameters of real photoreceptors, which can be fused, and can form vertical tiers. Akaike's information criterion (AICc) was used here to select absorptance models of multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that maximize information, given visual system spectral sensitivity data obtained using extracellular electroretinograms and structural parameters obtained by histological methods. This framework was first used to select among alternative hypotheses of photoreceptor number. It identified spectral classes from a range of dark-adapted visual systems which have between one and four spectral photoreceptor classes. These were the velvet worm, Principapillatus hitoyensis, the branchiopod water flea, Daphnia magna, normal humans, and humans with enhanced S-cone syndrome, a condition in which S-cone frequency is increased due to mutations in a transcription factor that controls photoreceptor expression. Data from the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus, which has at least five main spectral photoreceptor classes in its compound eyes, were included to illustrate potential effects of model over-simplification on multi-model inference. The multi-model framework was then used with parameters of spectral photoreceptor classes and the structural photoreceptor array kept constant. The goal was to map relative opsin expression to visual pigment concentration. It identified relative opsin expression differences for two populations of the bluefin killifish, Lucania goodei. The modeling approach presented here will be useful in selecting the most likely

  13. Climate-Driven Reshuffling of Species and Genes: Potential Conservation Roles for Species Translocations and Recombinant Hybrid Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Mark Scriber

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Comprising 50%–75% of the world’s fauna, insects are a prominent part of biodiversity in communities and ecosystems globally. Biodiversity across all levels of biological classifications is fundamentally based on genetic diversity. However, the integration of genomics and phylogenetics into conservation management may not be as rapid as climate change. The genetics of hybrid introgression as a source of novel variation for ecological divergence and evolutionary speciation (and resilience may generate adaptive potential and diversity fast enough to respond to locally-altered environmental conditions. Major plant and herbivore hybrid zones with associated communities deserve conservation consideration. This review addresses functional genetics across multi-trophic-level interactions including “invasive species” in various ecosystems as they may become disrupted in different ways by rapid climate change. “Invasive genes” (into new species and populations need to be recognized for their positive creative potential and addressed in conservation programs. “Genetic rescue” via hybrid translocations may provide needed adaptive flexibility for rapid adaptation to environmental change. While concerns persist for some conservationists, this review emphasizes the positive aspects of hybrids and hybridization. Specific implications of natural genetic introgression are addressed with a few examples from butterflies, including transgressive phenotypes and climate-driven homoploid recombinant hybrid speciation. Some specific examples illustrate these points using the swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae with their long-term historical data base (phylogeographical diversity changes and recent (3-decade climate-driven temporal and genetic divergence in recombinant homoploid hybrids and relatively recent hybrid speciation of Papilio appalachiensis in North America. Climate-induced “reshuffling” (recombinations of species composition, genotypes

  14. Molecular logic behind the three-way stochastic choices that expand butterfly colour vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Michael; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Saldi, Giuseppe; Huo, Lucy; Arikawa, Kentaro; Desplan, Claude

    2016-07-14

    Butterflies rely extensively on colour vision to adapt to the natural world. Most species express a broad range of colour-sensitive Rhodopsin proteins in three types of ommatidia (unit eyes), which are distributed stochastically across the retina. The retinas of Drosophila melanogaster use just two main types, in which fate is controlled by the binary stochastic decision to express the transcription factor Spineless in R7 photoreceptors. We investigated how butterflies instead generate three stochastically distributed ommatidial types, resulting in a more diverse retinal mosaic that provides the basis for additional colour comparisons and an expanded range of colour vision. We show that the Japanese yellow swallowtail (Papilio xuthus, Papilionidae) and the painted lady (Vanessa cardui, Nymphalidae) butterflies have a second R7-like photoreceptor in each ommatidium. Independent stochastic expression of Spineless in each R7-like cell results in expression of a blue-sensitive (Spineless(ON)) or an ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive (Spineless(OFF)) Rhodopsin. In P. xuthus these choices of blue/blue, blue/UV or UV/UV sensitivity in the two R7 cells are coordinated with expression of additional Rhodopsin proteins in the remaining photoreceptors, and together define the three types of ommatidia. Knocking out spineless using CRISPR/Cas9 (refs 5, 6) leads to the loss of the blue-sensitive fate in R7-like cells and transforms retinas into homogeneous fields of UV/UV-type ommatidia, with corresponding changes in other coordinated features of ommatidial type. Hence, the three possible outcomes of Spineless expression define the three ommatidial types in butterflies. This developmental strategy allowed the deployment of an additional red-sensitive Rhodopsin in P. xuthus, allowing for the evolution of expanded colour vision with a greater variety of receptors. This surprisingly simple mechanism that makes use of two binary stochastic decisions coupled with local coordination may prove

  15. Winter is coming: Diapause in the subtropical swallowtail butterfly Euryades corethrus (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) is triggered by the shortening of day length and reinforced by low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporale, Andressa; Romanowski, Helena Piccoli; Mega, Nicolás Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Diapause is modulated by genetic responses to some environmental cues. The most common stimulus to trigger diapause is photoperiod, but temperature and humidity can also be important. Subtropical grasslands insects are overexposed to seasonality and can use diapause as strategy to overcome harsh conditions, avoiding freezing winter temperatures and drought summer conditions. Here, we investigate if photoperiod, temperature, and humidity can induce and terminate dormancy using the model Euryades corethrus, a butterfly from Pampa that diapause as pupae. We hypothesize that photoperiod, temperature, and humidity can induce dormancy; to test the hypothesis, individuals from a stock population were subjected to experiments controlling these three factors. Photoperiod and temperature interactions were also tested. To evaluate if the removal of the harsh factor that induced diapause trigger diapause termination, 50% of dormant pupae in each experiment were exposed to amenable conditions. The results indicated that diapause is mainly induced by short photophases, while temperature and humidity separately do not increase dormancy frequency. Short photoperiods and low temperatures interact with each other, increasing dormancy in experimental populations. The evidences suggest that diapause is trigger by short-day lengths and boosted by low temperatures as winter approaches. The incidence of obligatory summer diapause was not supported, but the occurrence of dormant pupae in high-temperature treatments suggests that high temperatures produce facultative diapause. Regarding diapause termination, the softening of harsh conditions that induced diapause was not sufficient to reverse the dormancy state, suggesting that diapause termination is more complex than previously thought, probably involving internal clocks. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 78 FR 9067 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... authorization to take (capture, hold, propagate in captivity and release) St. Francis Satyr butterflies for the..., temporarily house, propagate in captivity, and release) Schaus Swallowtail butterflies (Heraclides aristodemus...

  17. AcEST: DK950093 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ein S23 OS=Spodoptera fru... 224 2e-58 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 2...EKPRS 411 + VSLLAL+KEKKE+PRS Sbjct: 126 ANVSLLALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan

  18. AcEST: BP912060 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 232 8e-61 sp|Q8T...AL+KEKKE+PRS Sbjct: 121 KVVKVANVSLLALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan

  19. Comment: 187 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Common mormon Papilio polytes Papilio_polytes_L.png 187.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life...ru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science) bando 2010/01/12 14:04:54 2010/01/14 19:55:05 ...

  20. A PRELIMINARY ANNOTATED CHECKLIST OF THE PAPILIONIDAE OF LAOS WITH NOTES ON TAXONOMY, PHENOLOGY, DISTRIBUTION AND VARIATION (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Cotton

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available 63 Papilionid taxa of Laos are reported representing 60 biological species. Of these, the occurrence of Papilio elephenor is unproven, and that of Papilio krishna is refuted, leaving 58 species confirmed for Laos. Notes on their taxonomy, distribution, phenology and variation are given. The following synonymies or changes of status are herewith listed:Graphium antiphates itamputi is regarded as a separate subspecies from pompilius stat. rev.Papilio tamerlanus timur Ney, 1911 is a synonym of Papilio alebion mullah Alphéraky, 1897, syn. nov. The following combinations are therefore proposed for the collective species: Graphium mullah mullah (Alphéraky, 1897 comb. nov. applies to the Sichuan population; Graphium mullah chungianus (Murayama, 1961 comb. nov., for the Taiwanese subspecies; and Graphium mullah kooichii (Morita, 1996 comb. nov. for the Lao subspecies.The true type of Papilio arycles sphinx Fruhstorfer, 1899 is identified, and arycleoides Fruhstorfer, 1902 placed in synonymy, syn. nov.Teinopalpus imperialis bhumipoli Nakano & Sukkit, 1985, T. i. gerritesi Nakano, 1995, T. i. gillesi Turlin, 1991, and T. i. hakkaorum Schäffler 2004 are shown to be synonyms of Teinopalpus imperialis imperatrix de Nicéville, 1899, syn. nov.Atrophaneura varuna liziensis Zhao, 1997 is synonymized with A. varuna astorion (Westwood, 1842 syn. nov.The names elegans Chou et al., 2000, pulcher Chou et al., 2000 and longimacula Wang & Niu, 2002 are sunk as synonyms of Papilio bianor bianor syn. nov.Papilio bianor significans Fruhstorfer, 1902 is regarded as a valid subspecies (stat. rev. and the ranges of Papilio bianor gladiator Fruhstorfer, [1902] and ganesa Doubleday, 1842 are clarified.Papilio noblei de Nicéville, [1889] is shown to be monotypic, and haynei Tytler, 1926 is sunk as a synonym syn. nov.Papilio hipponous siamensis Godfrey, 1916 is synonymized with pitmani Elwes & de Nicéville, [1887] syn. nov.The taxon imitata Monastyrskii & Devyatkin, 2003

  1. AcEST: DK947189 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ra fru... 226 6e-59 sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio dardan... 226 6e-59 sp|Q8T3U2|...KEKKEKPRS 484 V+ VSLLAL+KEKKE+PRS Sbjct: 125 VANVSLLALYKEKKERPRS 143 >sp|Q6EV23|RS23_PAPDA 40S ribosomal protein S23 OS=Papilio darda

  2. First Report of Two Diogenid Species of Hermit Crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung, Jibom

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two diogenid hermit crab species, Dardanus lagopodes and Diogenes deflectomanus, are newly reported from Korea. Dardanus lagopodes is distinguished from the other species of genus Dardanus in Korea by having setae with cream-colored tips on the cephalothorax and the following characteristics: ocular peduncles somewhat longer than antennular peduncles, and the pereopod without a longitudinal sulcus and scute-like projections. Diogenes deflectomanus is similar to D. nitidimanus but can be distinguished by having the fixed finger of the left cheliped bent slightly downwardly and the following characteristics: slightly shorter ocular peduncle, elongated left cheliped with small granules on the surface, right cheliped without calcareous teeth on the cutting edge of the dactylus, and the minute spine of post-median margin of the telson is not well developed. The geographical distributions of these two species are extended by the present study. In particular, D. deflectomanus in the current study is the first report outside Chinese waters. Now, 20 species of the family Diogenidae are known in Korean waters.

  3. Page 1 r Stability of multiple access communication networks 379 de ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mosely J. Humblet P A 1985 A class of efficient contention resolution algorithms for multiple access. IEEE Trans. Connur. COM-33: 45-5. Nelson R 1984 The stochastic cusp, swallowtail and hyperbolic umbilic catastrophes as manifest in a simple communications model. Performance'84 (Amsterdam: Elsevier Science ...

  4. Species of the Mississippi River Headwaters Reservoirs Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    S CRICKET GULL, FRANKLIN S GREBE, WESTERN HAWK, COOPER’S HAWK, MARSH HAWK, RED SHOULDERED HERON, GREAT BLUE KITE, SWALLOW-TAILED LAMPREY ...BELTED KINGLET, GOLDEN CROWNED KINGLET, RUBY-CROWNED LAMPREY , AMERICAN BROOK LAMPREY , CHESTNUT LAMPREY , SILVER LARK, HORNED LEMMING...REDSTART, AMERICAN ROBIN, AMERICAN SALAMANDER, BLUE SPOTTED SALAMANDER, JEFFERSON SALAMANDER, TIGER SALMON, CHINOOK (KING, PACIFIC ) SALMON

  5. Raising Butterflies from Your Own Garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley-Pfeifer, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Describes how raising monarch, black swallowtail, and mourning cloak butterflies in a kindergarten class garden can provide opportunities for observation experiences. Includes detailed steps for instruction and describes stages of growth. Excerpts children's journal dictations to illustrate ways to support the discovery process. Describes related…

  6. Nigrosome-1 on Susceptibility Weighted Imaging to Differentiate Parkinson's Disease From Atypical Parkinsonism: An In Vivo and Ex Vivo Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Steens, S.C.A.; Rumund, A. van; Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van; Kusters, B.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Verbeek, M.M.; Bloem, B.R.; Góraj, B.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous case-control studies have suggested that the absence of a swallow-tail appearance in the substantia nigra on high-resolution SWI, representing nigrosome-1, has high accuracy to identify Parkinson's disease (PD). The first goal of our study was to evaluate nigrosome-1 ex vivo

  7. Ocupação de conchas de gastrópodes por ermitões (Decapoda, Anomura no litoral de Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Occupation of gastropod shells by hermit crabs (Decapoda, Anomura in the littoral of Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Ayres-Peres

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar a ocupação de conchas por ermitões no litoral da cidade de Rio Grande, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os animais foram amostrados em 14 radiais em Rio Grande, entre 12 e 50 metros de profundidade. Cada ermitão e sua respectiva concha foram identificados, pesados e medidos. Um total de 408 animais foi capturado, pertencentes às famílias Diogenidae e Paguridae; as duas espécies mais abundantes foram Dardanus insignis (de Saussure, 1858 e Loxopagurus loxochelis (Moreira, 1901. Os ermitões ocuparam conchas de 13 espécies de gastrópodes, principalmente de Buccinanops lamarckii (Kiener, 1834 e B. gradatum (Deshayes, 1844. Dardanus insignis utilizou 12 das 13 espécies de moluscos registradas; Loxopagurus loxochelis utilizou nove. De um modo geral, o padrão de ocupação de conchas apresenta uma correlação entre o tamanho do ermitão e o tamanho da concha; no caso das duas espécies de ermitões mais abundantes, a maior correlação foi entre peso/tamanho do animal e o tamanho da abertura da concha, evidenciando, que a ocupação de conchas se dá não apenas pela disponibilidade local das mesmas, mas também pelas relações entre as variáveis dos ermitões e das conchas de gastrópodes.The present study aimed to characterize the shell occupation by hermit crabs at the Rio Grande city, state of Rio Grande do Sul. Animals were sampled at 14 radials in Rio Grande, between 12 and 50 meters depth. Each hermit crab and its respective shell were identified, weighted and measured. A total of 408 animals were captured, of families Paguridae and Diogenidae; the most abundant species were Dardanus insignis (de Saussure, 1858 and Loxopagurus loxochelis (Moreira, 1901. The animals occupied shells from 13 gastropod species, mainly of Buccinanops lamarckii (Kiener, 1834 and B. gradatum (Deshayes, 1844. Dardanus insignis utilized shells from 12 of the 13 mollusks species registered; L. loxochelis from

  8. Cutting the Nomenclatural Gordian Knot around Pyrgus Carthami (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de R.

    1987-01-01

    The name Papilio fritillarius Poda, 1761, is shown to be a nomen dubium. It has caused much confusion and has been applied to five or six different species since the first publication and to three different species in the last 40 years. To put an end to the confusion a neotype is designated. For the

  9. Characterization and monitoring of selected rhizobial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... sulfated methyl fucose (Ferro et al., 2000). Nearly full- length 16S rRNA sequences and partial 23S rRNA sequences confirmed that two isolates from D. retusa were highly similar or identical to Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from the legumes Erythrina and Clitoria (Papilio- noideae tribe Phaseoleae) in ...

  10. Wolbachia endosymbiont infection in two Indian butterflies and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The presence of the Wolbachia super group 'B' in the butterflies Red Pierrot, Talicada nyseus (Guerin) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) and Blue Mormon, Papilio polymnestor Cramer (Papilionidae), is documented for the first time in India. The study also gives an account on the lifetime fecundity and female-biased sex ratio in T.

  11. Phylogeny and Historical Biogeography of Asian Pterourus Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae): A Case of Intercontinental Dispersal from North America to East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Wei; Yen, Shen-Horn; Lees, David C; Lu, Chih-Chien; Yang, Ping-Shih; Hsu, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic status of the well-known Asian butterflies often known as Agehana (a species group, often treated as a genus or a subgenus, within Papilio sensu lato) has long remained unresolved. Only two species are included, and one of them especially, Papilio maraho, is not only rare but near-threatened, being monophagous on its vulnerable hostplant, Sassafras randaiense (Lauraceae). Although the natural history and population conservation of "Agehana" has received much attention, the biogeographic origin of this group still remains enigmatic. To clarify these two questions, a total of 86 species representatives within Papilionidae were sampled, and four genes (concatenated length 3842 bp) were used to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and historical scenarios. Surprisingly, "Agehana" fell within the American Papilio subgenus Pterourus and not as previously suggested, phylogenetically close to the Asian Papilio subgenus Chilasa. We therefore formally synonymize Agehana with Pterourus. Dating and biogeographic analysis allow us to infer an intercontinental dispersal of an American ancestor of Asian Pterourus in the early Miocene, which was coincident with historical paleo-land bridge connections, resulting in the present "East Asia-America" disjunction distribution. We emphasize that species exchange between East Asia and America seems to be a quite frequent occurrence in butterflies during the Oligocene to Miocene climatic optima.

  12. Phylogeny and Historical Biogeography of Asian Pterourus Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: A Case of Intercontinental Dispersal from North America to East Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wei Wu

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic status of the well-known Asian butterflies often known as Agehana (a species group, often treated as a genus or a subgenus, within Papilio sensu lato has long remained unresolved. Only two species are included, and one of them especially, Papilio maraho, is not only rare but near-threatened, being monophagous on its vulnerable hostplant, Sassafras randaiense (Lauraceae. Although the natural history and population conservation of "Agehana" has received much attention, the biogeographic origin of this group still remains enigmatic. To clarify these two questions, a total of 86 species representatives within Papilionidae were sampled, and four genes (concatenated length 3842 bp were used to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and historical scenarios. Surprisingly, "Agehana" fell within the American Papilio subgenus Pterourus and not as previously suggested, phylogenetically close to the Asian Papilio subgenus Chilasa. We therefore formally synonymize Agehana with Pterourus. Dating and biogeographic analysis allow us to infer an intercontinental dispersal of an American ancestor of Asian Pterourus in the early Miocene, which was coincident with historical paleo-land bridge connections, resulting in the present "East Asia-America" disjunction distribution. We emphasize that species exchange between East Asia and America seems to be a quite frequent occurrence in butterflies during the Oligocene to Miocene climatic optima.

  13. Papiliochrome II pigment reduces the angle dependency of structural wing colouration in nireus group papilionids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Vukusic, Peter; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    The wings of four papilionid butterfly species of the nireus group, Papilio bromius, P. epiphorbas, P. nireus and P. oribazus, are marked by blue-green coloured bands surrounded by black margins. The cover scales in the coloured bands contain a violet-absorbing, blue-fluorescing pigment. The

  14. Pathogenicity and proteome production of Isaria fumosorosea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. With this information it was suggested that, partial characterization of catalytic domain was predicted in the fungal isolates Ifr. Keywords: Entomopathogenic fungi, Isaria fumosorosea, Papilio demoleus, biological control. African Journal of Biotechnology, Vol 13(43) 4176-4182 ...

  15. Strike-Slip Faulting Processes on Ganymede: Global Morphological Mapping and Structural Interpretation of Grooved and Transitional Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, L. M.; Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many large-scale, morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface and in the transition from dark to light (grooved) materials. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies (i.e., en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters) from Galileo and Voyager images. We focus on complex structures associated with grooved terrain (e.g. Nun Sulcus, Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Arbela Sulcus) and terrains transitional from dark to light terrain (e.g. the boundary between Nippur Sulcus and Marius Regio, including Byblus Sulcus and Philus Sulcus). Detailed structural interpretations suggest strong evidence of strike-slip faulting in some regions (i.e., Nun and Dardanus Sulcus); however, further investigation of additional strike-slip structures is required of less convincing regions (i.e., Byblus Sulcus). Where applicable, these results are synthesized into a global database representing an inferred sense of shear for many of Ganymede's fractures. Moreover, when combined with existing observations of extensional features, these results help to narrow down the range of possible principal stress directions that could have acted at the regional or global scale to produce grooved terrain on Ganymede.

  16. A checklist of butterflies of Dakshina Kannada District, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Naik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In a preliminary study on the butterflies of Dakshina Kannada District, located in the southwestern part of the Karnataka along the Western Ghats in Karnataka State in India, a total of 172 species of butterflies belonging to 117 genera, from six families was prepared by visiting various landscapes during the period September 2012 to December 2015.  Of the various species recorded, Papilio clytia (Linnaeus, Papilio lio medon (Moore, Pachlio ptahector (Linnaeus, Castalius rosimon (Fabricius, Acytolepis puspa (Horsefield, Lethe europa (Fabricius, Neptis jumbah (Moore, Dophlae velina (Stoll, Hypolimnas misippus (Linnaeus and Doleschallia bisaltide (Cramer comes under the Schedule I of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act 1972.  The present study provides the baseline data of butterfly species of Dakshina Kannada. 

  17. Genetic drift. Descent, lineage, and pedigree of the Trojans in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, Euterpe

    2007-12-15

    Homer's Iliad, is an epic poem that describes the last 70 days of the Trojan War, which was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans. Here, the descent, lineage, and the pedigree of the Trojans are presented. In the Illiad, they are said to have originated from Zeus. Beginning with him, the Trojan pedigree comprised 17 men in 8 generations with Dardanus, founder of Dardania in the second generation; Tros, King of the Trojans in the fourth generation; and the two heroes Hector and Aeneas in the eighth generation. In the seventh generation, Priam, as King of the Trojans, had a huge family, including 50 sons: 19 children with his wife Hecabe, other sons with many different wives, and some daughters as well. Hector, the first born, became leader of the Trojans. Hector's brother, Paris, in abducting Helen of Sparta, the wife of King Menelaus, caused the Trojan War to break out. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Symbiosis of sea anemones and hermit crabs: different resource utilization patterns in the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Chintiroglou, Chariton

    2012-09-01

    The small-scale distribution and resource utilization patterns of hermit crabs living in symbiosis with sea anemones were investigated in the Aegean Sea. Four hermit crab species, occupying shells of nine gastropod species, were found in symbiosis with the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica. Shell resource utilization patterns varied among hermit crabs, with Dardanus species utilizing a wide variety of shells. The size structure of hermit crab populations also affected shell resource utilization, with small-sized individuals inhabiting a larger variety of shells. Sea anemone utilization patterns varied both among hermit crab species and among residence shells, with larger crabs and shells hosting an increased abundance and biomass of C. parasitica. The examined biometric relationships suggested that small-sized crabs carry, proportionally to their weight, heavier shells and increased anemone biomass than larger ones. Exceptions to the above patterns are related either to local resource availability or to other environmental factors.

  19. A Case Study on Uruk Sulcus, Ganymede: How Variations in Fault Strike and Stress Distribution can Affect Shear Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Burkhard, L. M.; Collins, G. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2016-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies from Galileo and Voyager imagery. We investigate the role of tidal stresses using the numerical code SatStress to calculate both diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) tidal stresses at Ganymede's surface. We then compute Coulomb failure conditions, which are a function of fault strike and regional stress magnitudes, for the mapped regions. Previous work at Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Uruk Sulcus, regions with an inferred right-lateral sense of slip, suggests that global tidal stress models of both diurnal and NSR stress contributions readily generate shear and normal stress magnitudes ( 1.1 MPa) that could give rise to shear failure at depth ( 2 km). While models for both Dardanus and Tiamat Sulcus accurately predict right-lateral motion, stresses at Uruk Sulcus suggest a left-lateral sense of slip for the current fault strike orientation. This presents an opportunity to examine the role of temporal fault strike variations, as well as changes in the distribution of stresses, on shear failure and sense of slip. We find that models with a 10 - 40° clockwise rotation of Uruk's fault strike predict the expected right-lateral slip. Strain ellipses derived from morphological mapping efforts suggest as much as 50° of rotation may have occurred here. Such a rotation may be plausible if the feature formed in a different orientation than it presently possesses due to migration of the ice shell. Further investigation of changes in distribution of stress, perhaps due to a NSR bulge shift or true polar wander, help provide insight into how features on Ganymede may have evolved through time.

  20. Genetic Determinism vs. Phenotypic Plasticity in Protist Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulot, Matthieu; Marcisz, Katarzyna; Grandgirard, Lara; Lara, Enrique; Kosakyan, Anush; Robroek, Bjorn J M; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Payne, Richard J; Mitchell, Edward A D

    2017-02-23

    Untangling the relationships between morphology and phylogeny is key to building a reliable taxonomy, but is especially challenging for protists, where the existence of cryptic or pseudocryptic species makes finding relevant discriminant traits difficult. Here we use Hyalosphenia papilio (a testate amoeba) as a model species to investigate the contribution of phylogeny and phenotypic plasticity in its morphology. We study the response of H. papilio morphology (shape and pores number) to environmental variables in (i) a manipulative experiment with controlled conditions (water level), (ii) an observational study of a within-site natural ecological gradient (water level), and (iii) an observational study across 37 European peatlands (climate). We showed that H. papilio morphology is correlated to environmental conditions (climate and water depth) as well as geography, while no relationship between morphology and phylogeny was brought to light. The relative contribution of genetic inheritance and phenotypic plasticity in shaping morphology varies depending on the taxonomic group and the trait under consideration. Thus, our data call for a reassessment of taxonomy based on morphology alone. This clearly calls for a substantial increase in taxonomic research on these globally still under-studied organisms leading to a reassessment of estimates of global microbial eukaryotic diversity. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2017 International Society of Protistologists.

  1. Eyes with basic dorsal and specific ventral regions in the glacial Apollo, Parnassius glacialis (Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Hiroko; Matsushita, Atsuko; Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies on butterflies have indicated that their colour vision system is almost species specific. To address the question of how this remarkable diversity evolved, we investigated the eyes of the glacial Apollo, Parnassius glacialis, a living fossil species belonging to the family Papilionidae. We identified four opsins in the Parnassius eyes--an ultraviolet- (PgUV), a blue- (PgB), and two long wavelength (PgL2, PgL3)-absorbing types--and localized their mRNAs within the retina. We thus found ommatidial heterogeneity and a clear dorso-ventral regionalization of the eye. The dorsal region consists of three basic types of ommatidia that are similar to those found in other insects, indicating that this dorsal region retains the ancestral state. In the ventral region, we identified two novel phenomena: co-expression of the opsins of the UV- and B-absorbing type in a subset of photoreceptors, and subfunctionalization of long-wavelength receptors in the distal tier as a result of differential expression of the PgL2 and PgL3 mRNAs. Interestingly, butterflies from the closely related genus Papilio (Papilionidae) have at least three long-wavelength opsins, L1-L3. The present study indicates that the duplication of L2 and L3 occurred before the Papilio lineage diverged from the rest, whereas L1 was produced from L3 in the Papilio lineage.

  2. Old lineages in a new ecosystem: diversification of arcellinid amoebae (Amoebozoa and peatland mosses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Fiz-Palacios

    Full Text Available Arcellinid testate amoebae (Amoebozoa form a group of free-living microbial eukaryotes with one of the oldest fossil records known, yet several aspects of their evolutionary history remain poorly understood. Arcellinids occur in a range of terrestrial, freshwater and even brackish habitats; however, many arcellinid morphospecies such as Hyalosphenia papilio are particularly abundant in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, a relatively new ecosystem that appeared during the diversification of Sphagnum species in the Miocene (5-20 Myr ago. Here, we reconstruct divergence times in arcellinid testate amoebae after selecting several fossils for clock calibrations and then infer whether or not arcellinids followed a pattern of diversification that parallels the pattern described for Sphagnum. We found that the diversification of core arcellinids occurred during the Phanerozoic, which is congruent with most arcellinid fossils but not with the oldest known amoebozoan fossil (i.e. at ca. 662 or ca. 750 Myr. Overall, Sphagnum and the Hyalospheniidae exhibit different patterns of diversification. However, an extensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of distinct clades within H. papilio species complex demonstrated a correlation between the recent diversification of H. papilio, the recent diversification of Sphagnum mosses, and the establishment of peatlands.

  3. Feeding stimulants for larvae of Graphium sarpedon nipponum (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) from Cinnamomum camphora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhan, Zhi-Hui; Tebayashi, Shin-Ichi; Kim, Chul-Sa; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The feeding response of larvae of the swallowtail butterfly, Graphium sarpedon nipponum (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), is elicited by a methanolic extract from camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) leaves. Based on bioassay-guided fractionation, three compounds, isolated from the methanolic extract of fresh leaves of the camphor tree, were revealed to be involved in a multi-component system of feeding stimulants. Structures of these feeding stimulants were identified as sucrose, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and quercetin 3-O-β-glucopyranoside by NMR and LC-MS.

  4. Whole-mount in situ hybridization of sectioned tissues of species hybrids to detect cis-regulatory changes in gene expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    To distinguish whether differences in gene expression between species or between individuals of the same species are caused by cis-regulatory changes or by distribution differences in trans-regulatory proteins, comparison of species-specific mRNA expression in an F1 hybrid by whole-mount in situ hybridization is a rarely used yet very powerful tool. If asymmetric expression pattern is observed for the two alleles, this implies a cis-regulatory divergence of this gene. Alternatively, if symmetric expression pattern is observed for both alleles, the change in expression of this gene is probably caused by changes in the distribution of trans-regulatory proteins. In this chapter, I describe how to prepare RNA probes, tissue samples and how to detect mRNA expression pattern using in situ hybridization. Although I choose to present here the detection of yellow-related gene (YRG) expression pattern in the larval epidermis of swallowtail butterflies, this protocol can be adapted to other species and tissues. YRG mRNA expression is correlated with interspecific differences of yellow and green larval color pattern such as V-shaped markings in swallowtail butterflies. F1 hybrids show an intermediate color pattern between parental species. In this case, both species-specific YRG mRNA showed a similar expression pattern in F1 hybrids, suggesting that the change in expression of YRG is mainly caused by changes in the distribution of trans-regulatory proteins.

  5. MULTIPOLE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AND HIGH-ORDER PERTURBATIONS ON THE QUADRUPOLE LENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Z.; Lin, W. P. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, G. L. [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Kang, X., E-mail: chuzhe@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn [Partner Group of MPI for Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-03-10

    An arbitrary surface mass density of the gravitational lens can be decomposed into multipole components. We simulate the ray tracing for the multipolar mass distribution of the generalized Singular Isothermal Sphere model based on deflection angles, which are analytically calculated. The magnification patterns in the source plane are then derived from an inverse shooting technique. As has been found, the caustics of odd mode lenses are composed of two overlapping layers for some lens models. When a point source traverses this kind of overlapping caustics, the image numbers change by {+-}4, rather than {+-}2. There are two kinds of caustic images. One is the critical curve and the other is the transition locus. It is found that the image number of the fold is exactly the average value of image numbers on two sides of the fold, while the image number of the cusp is equal to the smaller one. We also focus on the magnification patterns of the quadrupole (m = 2) lenses under the perturbations of m = 3, 4, and 5 mode components and found that one, two, and three butterfly or swallowtail singularities can be produced, respectively. With the increasing intensity of the high-order perturbations, the singularities grow up to bring sixfold image regions. If these perturbations are large enough to let two or three of the butterflies or swallowtails make contact, then eightfold or tenfold image regions can be produced as well. The possible astronomical applications are discussed.

  6. AcEST: DK961348 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L tr_hit_id A9VLA0 Definition tr|A9VLA0|A9VLA0_BACWK VrrB protein OS=Bacillus weihenstephanensis (strain KBA...nces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value tr|A9VLA0|A9VLA0_BACWK VrrB protein OS=Bacillus weihenstephan...rotein L23A OS=Papilio xuthus ... 31 9.6 >tr|A9VLA0|A9VLA0_BACWK VrrB protein OS=Bacillus weihenstephanensis

  7. Sobre os tipos de lepidoptera depositados em museus brasileiros: XXIII. Papilionidae, Pieridae e Nymphalidae (Morphinae, Nymphalinae descritos por J.F. Zikán (suplemento e apatelodidae descritos por M. Draudt About the types of Lepidoptera depositated in Brazilian museums: XXIII. Papilionidae, Pieridae and Nympiialidae (Morphinae, Nymphalinae described by J.F. Zikán (supplement and apatelodidae described by M. Draud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf H.H. Mielke

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A supplementary list of lhe Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalinae (Morphinae, Nymphalinae dcscribed by J.F. Zikán, with the repositories of their types, and informes about the Apatelodidae described by M. Draudt, from the Zikán collection, are presented. Lectotypes are designated for Papilio agalhosilaus Zikán, 1938; Phoebis trile race chryseida Zikán, 1940; Phoebis trile race chyseida form ismene Zikán, 1940; and Morpho hércules form irideus Zikán, 1935.

  8. Structural colour: Colour mixing in wing scales of a butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukusic, P.; Sambles, J. R.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2000-03-01

    Green coloration in the animal kingdom, as seen in birds' feathers and reptile integument, is often an additive mixture of structurally effected blue and pigmentary yellow. Here we investigate the origin of the bright green coloration of the wing scales of the Indonesian male Papilio palinurus butterfly, the microstructure of which generates an extraordinary combination of both yellow and blue iridescence. The dual colour arises from a modulation imposed on the multilayer, producing the blue component as a result of a previously undiscovered retro-reflection process.

  9. To what extent do food preferences explain the trophic position of heterotrophic and mixotrophic microbial consumers in a Sphagnum peatland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassey, Vincent E J; Meyer, Caroline; Dupuy, Christine; Bernard, Nadine; Mitchell, Edward A D; Toussaint, Marie-Laure; Metian, Marc; Chatelain, Auriel P; Gilbert, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Although microorganisms are the primary drivers of biogeochemical cycles, the structure and functioning of microbial food webs are poorly studied. This is the case in Sphagnum peatlands, where microbial communities play a key role in the global carbon cycle. Here, we explored the structure of the microbial food web from a Sphagnum peatland by analyzing (1) the density and biomass of different microbial functional groups, (2) the natural stable isotope (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) signatures of key microbial consumers (testate amoebae), and (3) the digestive vacuole contents of Hyalosphenia papilio, the dominant testate amoeba species in our system. Our results showed that the feeding type of testate amoeba species (bacterivory, algivory, or both) translates into their trophic position as assessed by isotopic signatures. Our study further demonstrates, for H. papilio, the energetic benefits of mixotrophy when the density of its preferential prey is low. Overall, our results show that testate amoebae occupy different trophic levels within the microbial food web, depending on their feeding behavior, the density of their food resources, and their metabolism (i.e., mixotrophy vs. heterotrophy). Combined analyses of predation, community structure, and stable isotopes now allow the structure of microbial food webs to be more completely described, which should lead to improved models of microbial community function.

  10. Checklist of butterfly (Insecta: Lepidoptera fauna of Tehsil Tangi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

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    Farzana Khan Perveen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies (Insecta: Lepidopteraare well known insects, play an important role in the ecosystem as bioindicators and pollinators. They have bright colours, remarkable shapes and supple flight. The present study was conducted to prepare the checklist of butterfly fauna of Tehsil Tangi during August, 2014 to May, 2015. A total of 506 specimens were collected belong to 3 families with 18 genera and 23 species. The collected species are the common or lemon emigrant, Catopsila ponoma Fabricius; mottled emigrant, Catopsilia pyranthe Linnaeus; clouded yellow, Colias fieldii Fabricius; common grass yellow, Eurema hecabe Linnaeus; eastern pale clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate Esper; Indian cabbage white, Pieris canidia Sparrman; Indian little orange tip, Colotis etrida Boisduval; pioneer white or African caper white, Belonias aurota Fabricius; plain tiger, Danaua chrysippus Linnaeus; blue tiger, Tirumala liminniace Cramer; peacock pansy, Junonia almanac Linnaeus; Indian fritillary, Argyreus hyperbius Linnaeus; Indian red admiral, Venesa indica Herbst; yellow pansy, Junonia hierta Fabricius; blue pansy, Junonia orytha Linnaeus; white edged rock brown, Hipparchia parisatis Kollar; banded tree brwon, Lethe confuse Aurivillius; common castor, Ariadne merione Cramer; painted lady, Caynthia cardui Linnaeus; Himalayan sailer, Neptis mahendra Moore; common boran, Euthalia garuda Hewitson; lime butterfly, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus and great black mormon butterfly, Papilio polytes Linnaeus. It was concluded that the family Nymphalidae has the highest numbers of individuals in the present checklist. It is recommended that butterfly fauna of the study area should be conserved and their habitat should be protected.

  11. Outbred genome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyan; Fan, Dingding; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guichun; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Li; Fang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lei; Dong, Yang; Chen, Yuan; Ding, Yun; Zhao, Ruoping; Feng, Mingji; Zhu, Yabing; Feng, Yue; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhu, Deying; Xiang, Hui; Feng, Xikan; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Guojie; Kronforst, Marcus R; Wang, Wen

    2015-09-10

    Butterflies are exceptionally diverse but their potential as an experimental system has been limited by the difficulty of deciphering heterozygous genomes and a lack of genetic manipulation technology. Here we use a hybrid assembly approach to construct high-quality reference genomes for Papilio xuthus (contig and scaffold N50: 492 kb, 3.4 Mb) and Papilio machaon (contig and scaffold N50: 81 kb, 1.15 Mb), highly heterozygous species that differ in host plant affiliations, and adult and larval colour patterns. Integrating comparative genomics and analyses of gene expression yields multiple insights into butterfly evolution, including potential roles of specific genes in recent diversification. To functionally test gene function, we develop an efficient (up to 92.5%) CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method that yields obvious phenotypes with three genes, Abdominal-B, ebony and frizzled. Our results provide valuable genomic and technological resources for butterflies and unlock their potential as a genetic model system.

  12. Diversity and distribution of butterflies (Insecta: Lepidoptera of district Dir lower, Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Inayatullah Khan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies are the fine-looking creatures and act as ecological indicators and pollinators. The present study is the first record of Butterfly fauna of Dir lower. Collection was carried out during March - August 2013. The specimens were collected and identified with the help of taxonomic keys and preserved specimens in National Insect Museum Islamabad. The collection of 375 specimens were preserved. Identification revealed 24 species belonging to 20 genera and 7 families. The species are Papilio polyctor Boisduval, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus, Junonia almanac Linnaeus, Pararge schakra Kollar, Junonia hierta Fabricius, Junonia orythea Linnaeus, Argyrius hyperbius Linnaeus, Hypolimnus bolina Linnaeus, Vanessa cashmiriensis Kollar, Phalantha phalantha Drury, Melitea didyma Esper, Lycaena phalaeas Linnaeus, Lybithea lipita Moore, Danius chrysippus Linnaeus, Hipparchia parasitas Kollar, Lethe rohria Fabricius, Maniola davendra Moore, Pontia daplidice Linnaeus, Belenois aurota Fabricius, Pieris brassicae Linnaeus, Colias erate Esper, Eurema hecabe Linnaeus, Colias fieldi Linnaeus and Cynthia cardui Linnaeus. The highest population was shown by Pieris brassicae followed by Danius chrysippus and Cynthia cardui. Twelve species belong to family Nymphalidae (50%, which shows the highest abundance rate. Butterfly density was the highest at Timergara. Butterfly fauna was the highest in May followed by August and lowest in March. It is concluded that pollution free environment of Dir Lower is more suitable for the survival of butterfly fauna. Large scale study is required to fully explore the butterfly fauna of the area.

  13. Outbred genome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyan; Fan, Dingding; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guichun; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Li; Fang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lei; Dong, Yang; Chen, Yuan; Ding, Yun; Zhao, Ruoping; Feng, Mingji; Zhu, Yabing; Feng, Yue; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhu, Deying; Xiang, Hui; Feng, Xikan; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Guojie; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Wang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Butterflies are exceptionally diverse but their potential as an experimental system has been limited by the difficulty of deciphering heterozygous genomes and a lack of genetic manipulation technology. Here we use a hybrid assembly approach to construct high-quality reference genomes for Papilio xuthus (contig and scaffold N50: 492 kb, 3.4 Mb) and Papilio machaon (contig and scaffold N50: 81 kb, 1.15 Mb), highly heterozygous species that differ in host plant affiliations, and adult and larval colour patterns. Integrating comparative genomics and analyses of gene expression yields multiple insights into butterfly evolution, including potential roles of specific genes in recent diversification. To functionally test gene function, we develop an efficient (up to 92.5%) CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method that yields obvious phenotypes with three genes, Abdominal-B, ebony and frizzled. Our results provide valuable genomic and technological resources for butterflies and unlock their potential as a genetic model system. PMID:26354079

  14. Investigations and Mimicry of the Optical Properties of Butterfly Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Christopher J.; Gaillot, Davy P.; Crne, Matija; Blair, John; Park, Jung O.; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Deparis, Olivier; Welch, Victoria; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    Structural color in Nature has been observed in plants, insects and birds, and has led to a strong interest in these phenomena and a desire to understand the mechanisms responsible. Of particular interest are the optical properties of butterflies. In this paper, we review three investigations inspired by the unique optical properties exhibited in a variety of butterfly wings. In the first investigation, conformal atomic layer depositions (ALDs) were used to exploit biologically defined 2D photonic crystal (PC) templates of Papilio blumei with the purpose of increasing the understanding of the optical effects of naturally formed dielectric architectures, and of exploring any novel optical effects. In the second study, it was demonstrated that faithful mimicry of Papilio palinurus can be achieved by physical fabrication methods through using breath figures to provide templates and ALD routines to enable optical properties. Finally, knowledge of the optical structure properties of the Princeps nireus butterfly has resulted in bioinspired designs to enhanced scintillator designs for radiation detection.

  15. Habitat heterogeneity in the assemblages and shell use by the most abundant hermit crabs (Anomura: Diogenidae and Paguridae: does the occupied shell species differ according to gender and species?

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    Gilson Stanski

    Full Text Available Abstract The goal of this study was to identify patterns of shell occupation by different species of hermit crabs from the southern Brazilian coast. In total, 644 individuals were collected, represented by six hermit species. Isocheles sawayai Forest & Saint Laurent, 1968 showed the highest abundance, with 575 individuals, followed by Loxopagurus loxochelis (Moreira, 1901 (n = 56. The other species were Petrochirus diogenes (Linnaeus, 1758, Dardanus insignis (Saussure, 1858, Pagurus exilis (Benedict, 1892 and Pagurus leptonyx Forest & Saint Laurent, 1968. Loxopagurus loxochelis was found associated with shells of 12 gastropod species, with 75% of males occupying shells of Olivancilaria urceus (Roding, 1798 and 78% of females inhabiting shells of Semicassis granulata (Born, 1778. Shells of Semicassis granulata were the lightest of all gastropod shells, demonstrating differential resource utilization. Additionally, I. sawayai occupied shells of 10 species, highlighting Stramonita haemastoma (Linnaeus, 1767 with the highest occupation percentage in all demographic classes, confirming a pattern of occupation with a strong relationship to the availability of the resource. The comparison of our results with those of other studies corroborated the influence of region and gastropod diversity on gastropod shell occupation.

  16. Real and Complex Turbulence for the Stochastic Burgers Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Neate, A

    2004-01-01

    The inviscid limit of Burgers equation, with body forces white noise in time, is discussed in terms of the level surfaces of the minimising Hamilton-Jacobi function and the classical mechanical caustic. Presurfaces and precaustics are introduced by using the classical mechanical flow map. When the prelevel surface touches the precaustic, the geometry (number of cusps) on the level surface changes infinitely rapidly causing `real turbulence' (Davies, Truman and Zhao). Using an idea of Felix Klein, it is shown that the geometry (number of swallowtails) on the caustic also changes infinitely rapidly when the real part of the precaustic touches its complex counterpart, which we call `complex turbulence'. These two new kinds of turbulence are both inherently stochastic in nature. A complete analysis of this problem is given in terms of a reduced (one dimensional) action function. This characterises which parts of the original caustic are singular - an old problem in applied mathematics relevant for our `elementary...

  17. Dynamical Analysis and Big Bang Bifurcations of 1D and 2D Gompertz's Growth Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, J. Leonel; Taha, Abdel-Kaddous; Fournier-Prunaret, D.

    In this paper, we study the dynamics and bifurcation properties of a three-parameter family of 1D Gompertz's growth functions, which are defined by the population size functions of the Gompertz logistic growth equation. The dynamical behavior is complex leading to a diversified bifurcation structure, leading to the big bang bifurcations of the so-called “box-within-a-box” fractal type. We provide and discuss sufficient conditions for the existence of these bifurcation cascades for 1D Gompertz's growth functions. Moreover, this work concerns the description of some bifurcation properties of a Hénon's map type embedding: a “continuous” embedding of 1D Gompertz's growth functions into a 2D diffeomorphism. More particularly, properties that characterize the big bang bifurcations are considered in relation with this coupling of two population size functions, varying the embedding parameter. The existence of communication areas of crossroad area type or swallowtails are identified for this 2D diffeomorphism.

  18. Biogeographic and diversification patterns of Neotropical Troidini butterflies (Papilionidae support a museum model of diversity dynamics for Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condamine Fabien L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal and geographical diversification of Neotropical insects remains poorly understood because of the complex changes in geological and climatic conditions that occurred during the Cenozoic. To better understand extant patterns in Neotropical biodiversity, we investigated the evolutionary history of three Neotropical swallowtail Troidini genera (Papilionidae. First, DNA-based species delimitation analyses were conducted to assess species boundaries within Neotropical Troidini using an enlarged fragment of the standard barcode gene. Molecularly delineated species were then used to infer a time-calibrated species-level phylogeny based on a three-gene dataset and Bayesian dating analyses. The corresponding chronogram was used to explore their temporal and geographical diversification through distinct likelihood-based methods. Results The phylogeny for Neotropical Troidini was well resolved and strongly supported. Molecular dating and biogeographic analyses indicate that the extant lineages of Neotropical Troidini have a late Eocene (33–42 Ma origin in North America. Two independent lineages (Battus and Euryades + Parides reached South America via the GAARlandia temporary connection, and later became extinct in North America. They only began substantive diversification during the early Miocene in Amazonia. Macroevolutionary analysis supports the “museum model” of diversification, rather than Pleistocene refugia, as the best explanation for the diversification of these lineages. Conclusions This study demonstrates that: (i current Neotropical biodiversity may have originated ex situ; (ii the GAARlandia bridge was important in facilitating invasions of South America; (iii colonization of Amazonia initiated the crown diversification of these swallowtails; and (iv Amazonia is not only a species-rich region but also acted as a sanctuary for the dynamics of this diversity. In particular, Amazonia probably allowed

  19. Biogeographic and diversification patterns of Neotropical Troidini butterflies (Papilionidae) support a museum model of diversity dynamics for Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, Fabien L; Silva-Brandão, Karina L; Kergoat, Gael J; Sperling, Felix A H

    2012-06-12

    The temporal and geographical diversification of Neotropical insects remains poorly understood because of the complex changes in geological and climatic conditions that occurred during the Cenozoic. To better understand extant patterns in Neotropical biodiversity, we investigated the evolutionary history of three Neotropical swallowtail Troidini genera (Papilionidae). First, DNA-based species delimitation analyses were conducted to assess species boundaries within Neotropical Troidini using an enlarged fragment of the standard barcode gene. Molecularly delineated species were then used to infer a time-calibrated species-level phylogeny based on a three-gene dataset and Bayesian dating analyses. The corresponding chronogram was used to explore their temporal and geographical diversification through distinct likelihood-based methods. The phylogeny for Neotropical Troidini was well resolved and strongly supported. Molecular dating and biogeographic analyses indicate that the extant lineages of Neotropical Troidini have a late Eocene (33-42 Ma) origin in North America. Two independent lineages (Battus and Euryades+Parides) reached South America via the GAARlandia temporary connection, and later became extinct in North America. They only began substantive diversification during the early Miocene in Amazonia. Macroevolutionary analysis supports the "museum model" of diversification, rather than Pleistocene refugia, as the best explanation for the diversification of these lineages. This study demonstrates that: (i) current Neotropical biodiversity may have originated ex situ; (ii) the GAARlandia bridge was important in facilitating invasions of South America; (iii) colonization of Amazonia initiated the crown diversification of these swallowtails; and (iv) Amazonia is not only a species-rich region but also acted as a sanctuary for the dynamics of this diversity. In particular, Amazonia probably allowed the persistence of old lineages and contributed to the steady

  20. Case study of building of conservation coalitions to conserve ecological interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gao; Luo, Shihong; Mei, Nianshu; Shen, Dingfang; Sun, Weibang

    2015-12-01

    We engaged experts in various fields of study (pollination ecology, chemical ecology, and ethnobotany), invited community participation, and provided environmental education in an effort to conserve an endangered birthwort (Aristolochia delavayi) and a vulnerable pipevine swallowtail (Byasa daemonius). Scientists studied the uptake and sequestration of the secondary metabolites aristolochic acids from A. delavayi leaves by different stages of pipevine swallowtail as a defense mechanism; low fruit set of the myophilous A. delavayi due to pollinator limitation; and the emission of chemical signals that attract parasitic wasps by the prepupae of B. daemonius. The results of these studies were part of an education program delivered by personnel of non-governmental organizations. The program was devised to deliver information to the public about the health risks of consuming A. delavayi individuals (aristolochic-acid-associated cancers) and to establish a bridge between the public and scientific research. Following delivery of the program, the behavior of residents changed considerably. Community residents were involved in management activities, including participation in a program to promote understanding of ecological interactions between A. delavayi and B. daemonius; designing an in situ conservation site; monitoring A. delavayi and B. daemonius individuals; and promoting the natural fruit set of A. delavayi by scattering animal excrement to attract fly pollinators. The integration of scientific information and community participation appears to have resulted in an increase in abundance of threatened A. delavayi and B. daemonius populations. We believe the involvement of local people in conservation is necessary for successful species conservation. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Late Holocene palaeohydrological changes in a Sphagnum peat bog from NW Romania based on testate amoebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei-Cosmin Diaconu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the possibility of reconstructing the palaeohydrological changes in an active Sphagnum peat bog from north-western Romania using testate amoebae fauna and organic matter content determined by loss on ignition (LOI. In total 28 taxa of testate amoebae were identified of which 11 were frequent enough to present a remarkable ecological significance. Based on the relative abundance of these taxa nine zones were identified, crossing from very wet to dry climate conditions. The wet periods identified are characterized by taxa like Centropyxis cassis, Amphitrema flavum and Hyalosphenia papilio, while in the dry periods Difflugia pulex and Nebela militaris thrive. We showed that combining qualitative information regarding hydrological preferences with the quantitative percentage data from the fossil record it is possible to obtain information regarding major surface moisture changes from the peat bog surface. Furthermore we identified a link between distribution of testate amoebae assemblages, organic matter variation and minerogenic material.

  2. Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukusic Pete

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

  3. Study of the surface structure of butterfly wings using the scanning electron microscopic moiré method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Satoshi; Wang, Qinghua; Xie, Huimin; Zhao, Yapu

    2007-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) moiré method was used to study the surface structure of three kinds of butterfly wings: Papilio maackii Menetries, Euploea midamus (Linnaeus), and Stichophthalma howqua (Westwood). Gratings composed of curves with different orientations were found on scales. The planar characteristics of gratings and some other planar features of the surface structure of these wings were revealed, respectively, in terms of virtual strain. Experimental results demonstrate that SEM moiré method is a simple, nonlocal, economical, effective technique for determining which grating exists on one whole scale, measuring the dimension and the whole planar structural character of the grating on each scale, as well as characterizing the relationship between gratings on different scales of each butterfly wing. Thus, the SEM moiré method is a useful tool to assist with characterizing the structure of butterfly wings and explaining their excellent properties.

  4. Taste receptor plasticity in relation to feeding history in two congeneric species of Papilionidae (Lepidoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollai, Giorgia; Biolchini, Maurizio; Crnjar, Roberto

    2018-02-15

    In the peripheral taste system of insects, the responsiveness of gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) depends on several factors, such as larval instar, feeding history, physiological state and time of day. To study the role of the feeding history, the spike activity of the maxillary taste chemosensilla in the larvae of two related species of Lepidoptera (Papilio machaon L. and Papilio hospiton Géné) raised on different host plants, was recorded with electrophysiological techniques after stimulation with simple stimuli (sugars, bitters and inorganic salt) and host plant saps, with the aim of cross-comparing their response patterns and evaluating any effects of different feeding histories. For this purpose the larvae were raised each on their preferential host plant and, in addition, P. machaon larvae was also raised on Ferula communis, the host plant preferred by P. hospiton. The GRN spike activity of the lateral and medial sensilla of each test group was measured in response to simple and complex stimuli. The taste discrimination capabilities and modalities of the two species were measured and cross-compared with the aim of studying convergence and/or divergence linked to the insect feeding history. The results show that: a) the GRN responsiveness of both sensilla in P. machaon raised on Fe. communis differs significantly from that of P. machaon on Foeniculum vulgare, but is not different from P. hospiton on Fe. communis; b) P. machaon larvae raised on Fe. communis exhibit response spectra somewhat intermediate between those of P. machaon on fennel and of P. hospiton on Fe. communis, the latter two exhibiting a wider difference from each other; c) the pattern of GRNs activity generated by each plant sap in both sensilla of P. machaon raised on Fe. communis is different from that generated when raised on Fo. vulgare, while no difference is observed with P. hospiton. The data support the hypothesis that diet-related factors may influence peripheral chemosensitivity

  5. Patterns of divergence across the geographic and genomic landscape of a butterfly hybrid zone associated with a climatic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sean F; Fontaine, Michael C; Scriber, J Mark; Pfrender, Michael E; O'Neil, Shawn T; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid zones are a valuable tool for studying the process of speciation and for identifying the genomic regions undergoing divergence and the ecological (extrinsic) and nonecological (intrinsic) factors involved. Here, we explored the genomic and geographic landscape of divergence in a hybrid zone between Papilio glaucus and Papilio canadensis. Using a genome scan of 28,417 ddRAD SNPs, we identified genomic regions under possible selection and examined their distribution in the context of previously identified candidate genes for ecological adaptations. We showed that differentiation was genomewide, including multiple candidate genes for ecological adaptations, particularly those involved in seasonal adaptation and host plant detoxification. The Z chromosome and four autosomes showed a disproportionate amount of differentiation, suggesting genes on these chromosomes play a potential role in reproductive isolation. Cline analyses of significantly differentiated genomic SNPs, and of species-diagnostic genetic markers, showed a high degree of geographic coincidence (81%) and concordance (80%) and were associated with the geographic distribution of a climate-mediated developmental threshold (length of the growing season). A relatively large proportion (1.3%) of the outliers for divergent selection were not associated with candidate genes for ecological adaptations and may reflect the presence of previously unrecognized intrinsic barriers between these species. These results suggest that exogenous (climate-mediated) and endogenous (unknown) clines may have become coupled and act together to reinforce reproductive isolation. This approach of assessing divergence across both the genomic and geographic landscape can provide insight about the interplay between the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation and endogenous and exogenous selection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Global Dosage Compensation Is Ubiquitous in Lepidoptera, but Counteracted by the Masculinization of the Z Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huylmans, Ann Kathrin; Macon, Ariana; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2017-10-01

    While chromosome-wide dosage compensation of the X chromosome has been found in many species, studies in ZW clades have indicated that compensation of the Z is more localized and/or incomplete. In the ZW Lepidoptera, some species show complete compensation of the Z chromosome, while others lack full equalization, but what drives these inconsistencies is unclear. Here, we compare patterns of male and female gene expression on the Z chromosome of two closely related butterfly species, Papilio xuthus and Papilio machaon, and in multiple tissues of two moths species, Plodia interpunctella and Bombyx mori, which were previously found to differ in the extent to which they equalize Z-linked gene expression between the sexes. We find that, while some species and tissues seem to have incomplete dosage compensation, this is in fact due to the accumulation of male-biased genes and the depletion of female-biased genes on the Z chromosome. Once this is accounted for, the Z chromosome is fully compensated in all four species, through the up-regulation of Z expression in females and in some cases additional down-regulation in males. We further find that both sex-biased genes and Z-linked genes have increased rates of expression divergence in this clade, and that this can lead to fast shifts in patterns of gene expression even between closely related species. Taken together, these results show that the uneven distribution of sex-biased genes on sex chromosomes can confound conclusions about dosage compensation and that Z chromosome-wide dosage compensation is not only possible but ubiquitous among Lepidoptera. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Invertebrate predation on egg masses of the European cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Catarina P. P.; Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Á.; Villanueva, Roger

    2018-01-01

    The eggs of the European cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, develop attached to the seafloor in shallow water habitats and possess a relatively thick black capsule that protects them from the surrounding environment. Since embryological development may take several months, eggs are vulnerable to a variety of threats present in shallow waters, including predation. This study investigates predation of S. officinalis eggs by benthic invertebrates. Twenty-eight invertebrate species from 6 different phyla and with diverse feeding habits were tested as potential predators under laboratory conditions. We also investigated how the feeding traits of these species are related to the mechanical ability to break the egg capsule and prey upon cuttlefish embryos. Species that fed on cuttlefish eggs were the sea snail Bolinus brandaris, the crab Cancer pagurus, the hermit crab Dardanus arrosor, the lobster Homarus gammarus, the invasive blue crab Callinectes sapidus, the shrimp Squilla mantis, the sea urchins Echinus melo, Cidaris sp. and Paracentrotus lividus and the starfish Astropecten aranciacus. It is of note that C. sapidus is a potential predatory crab, which raises the concern that this invasive species may constitute a novel threat for cuttlefish eggs as more populations become established in NE Atlantic waters. Of the biological traits examined, prey capture tools in the tested species best explained the experimental feeding results, suggesting that predation of S. officinalis eggs was determined generally by a mechanical factor and highlighting the importance of the protective egg capsule against predators. However, chemosensory factors are likely to be implicated as well. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding of the ecology of early life stages of cuttlefish and the factors that can affect offspring survival and subsequently impact the recruitment of this species.

  8. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  9. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  10. Inferring the effects of compositional boundary layers on crystal nucleation, growth textures, and mineral chemistry in natural volcanic tephras through submicron-resolution imaging

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    Georg F. Zellmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystal nucleation and growth are first order processes captured in volcanic rocks and record important information about the rates of magmatic processes and chemical evolution of magmas during their ascent and eruption. We have studied glass-rich andesitic tephras from the Central Plateau of the Southern Taupo Volcanic Zone by electron- and ion-microbeam imaging techniques to investigate down to sub-micrometre scale the potential effects of compositional boundary layers (CBLs of melt around crystals on the nucleation and growth of mineral phases and the chemistry of crystal growth zones. We find that CBLs may influence the types of mineral phases nucleating and growing, and growth textures such as the development of swallowtails. The chemistry of the CBLs also has the capacity to trigger intermittent overgrowths of nanometre-scale bands of different phases in rapidly growing crystals, resulting in what we refer to as cryptic phase zoning. The existence of cryptic phase zoning has implications for the interpretation of microprobe compositional data, and the resulting inferences made on the conditions of magmatic evolution. Identification of cryptic phase zoning may in future lead to more accurate thermobarometric estimates and thus geospeedometric constraints. In future, a more quantitative characterization of CBL formation and its effects on crystal nucleation and growth may contribute to a better understanding of melt rheology and magma ascent processes at the onset of explosive volcanic eruptions, and will likely be of benefit to hazard mitigation efforts.

  11. Nonrandom Composition of Flower Colors in a Plant Community: Mutually Different Co-Flowering Natives and Disturbance by Aliens.

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    Takashi T Makino

    Full Text Available When pollinators use flower color to locate food sources, a distinct color can serve as a reproductive barrier against co-flowering species. This anti-interference function of flower color may result in a community assembly of plant species displaying mutually different flower colors. However, such color dispersion is not ubiquitous, suggesting a variable selection across communities and existence of some opposing factors. We conducted a 30-week study in a plant community and measured the floral reflectances of 244 species. The reflectances were evaluated in insect color spaces (bees, swallowtails, and flies, and the dispersion was compared with random expectations. We found that co-existing colors were overdispersed for each analyzed pollinator type, and this overdispersion was statistically significant for bees. Furthermore, we showed that exclusion of 32 aliens from the analysis significantly increased the color dispersion of native flowers in every color space. This result indicated that aliens disturbed a native plant-pollinator network via similarly colored flowers. Our results demonstrate the masking effects of aliens in the detection of color dispersion of native flowers and that variations in pollinator vision yield different outcomes. Our results also support the hypothesis that co-flowering species are one of the drivers of color diversification and affect the community assembly.

  12. Phylogeny, historical biogeography, and taxonomic ranking of Parnassiinae (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) based on morphology and seven genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Vazrick; Zakharov, Evgueni V; Sperling, Felix A H

    2007-01-01

    We tested the taxonomic utility of morphology and seven mitochondrial or nuclear genes in a phylogenetic reconstruction of swallowtail butterflies in the subfamily Parnassiinae. Our data included 236 morphological characters and DNA sequences for seven genes that are commonly used to infer lepidopteran relationships (COI+COII, ND5, ND1, 16S, EF-1alpha, and wg; total 5775 bp). Nuclear genes performed best for inferring phylogenies, particularly at higher taxonomic levels, while there was substantial variation in performance among mitochondrial genes. Multiple analyses of molecular data (MP, ML and Bayesian) consistently produced a tree topology different from that obtained by morphology alone. Based on molecular evidence, sister-group relationships were confirmed between the genera Hypermnestra and Parnassius, as well as between Archon and Luehdorfia, while the monophyly of the subfamily was weakly supported. We recognize three tribes within Parnassiinae, with Archon and Luehdorfia forming the tribe Luehdorfiini Tutt, 1896 [stat. rev.]. Three fossil taxa were incorporated into a molecular clock analysis with biogeographic time constraints. Based on dispersal-vicariance (DIVA) analysis, the most recent common ancestor of Parnassiinae occurred in the Iranian Plateau and Central Asia to China. Early diversification of Parnassiinae took place at the same time that India collided into Eurasia, 65-42 million years ago.

  13. Speciation in Cloudless Sulphurs Gleaned from Complete Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qian; Shen, Jinhui; Warren, Andrew D.; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    For 200 years, zoologists have relied on phenotypes to learn about the evolution of animals. A glance at the genotype, even through several gene markers, revolutionized our understanding of animal phylogeny. Recent advances in sequencing techniques allow researchers to study speciation mechanisms and the link between genotype and phenotype using complete genomes. We sequenced and assembled a complete genome of the Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae) from a single wild-caught specimen. This genome was used as reference to compare genomes of six specimens, three from the eastern populations (Oklahoma and north Texas), referred to as a subspecies Phoebis sennae eubule, and three from the southwestern populations (south Texas) known as a subspecies Phoebis sennae marcellina. While the two subspecies differ only subtly in phenotype and mitochondrial DNA, comparison of their complete genomes revealed consistent and significant differences, which are more prominent than those between tiger swallowtails Pterourus canadensis and Pterourus glaucus. The two sulphur taxa differed in histone methylation regulators, chromatin-associated proteins, circadian clock, and early development proteins. Despite being well separated on the whole-genome level, the two taxa show introgression, with gene flow mainly from P. s. marcellina to P. s. eubule. Functional analysis of introgressed genes reveals enrichment in transmembrane transporters. Many transporters are responsible for nutrient uptake, and their introgression may be of selective advantage for caterpillars to feed on more diverse food resources. Phylogenetically, complete genomes place family Pieridae away from Papilionidae, which is consistent with previous analyses based on several gene markers. PMID:26951782

  14. Analysis of the Multiple-Solution Response of a Flexible Rotor Supported on Non-Linear Squeeze Film Dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHU, C. S.; ROBB, D. A.; EWINS, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    The multiple-solution response of rotors supported on squeeze film dampers is a typical non-linear phenomenon. The behaviour of the multiple-solution response in a flexible rotor supported on two identical squeeze film dampers with centralizing springs is studied by three methods: synchronous circular centred-orbit motion solution, numerical integration method and slow acceleration method using the assumption of a short bearing and cavitated oil film; the differences of computational results obtained by the three different methods are compared in this paper. It is shown that there are three basic forms for the multiple-solution response in the flexible rotor system supported on the squeeze film dampers, which are the resonant, isolated bifurcation and swallowtail bifurcation multiple solutions. In the multiple-solution speed regions, the rotor motion may be subsynchronous, super-subsynchronous, almost-periodic and even chaotic, besides synchronous circular centred, even if the gravity effect is not considered. The assumption of synchronous circular centred-orbit motion for the journal and rotor around the static deflection line can be used only in some special cases; the steady state numerical integration method is very useful, but time consuming. Using the slow acceleration method, not only can the multiple-solution speed regions be detected, but also the non-synchronous response regions.

  15. Butterfly wings shaped by a molecular cookie cutter: evolutionary radiation of lepidopteran wing shapes associated with a derived Cut/wingless wing margin boundary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Warren P; Martin, Arnaud; Reed, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Butterflies and moths show a remarkable diversity of specialized wing shapes, yet little is known about the molecular basis of wing shape determination. To learn more about this process we examined the expression of dorsoventral (DV) boundary candidate genes in developing wings of several species of Lepidoptera. We found that the transcription factor Cut and mRNA for the signaling molecule wingless (wg) are strongly co-expressed in a discrete zone around the larval wing disc margin. Surprisingly, the expression boundary of Cut and wg clearly presages complex future adult wing shapes, including the hindwing tails of swallowtail butterflies, very early in final-instar wing disc development. During pupal wing development the cells in this zone undergo apoptosis, thereby defining the actual margin of the adult wing. Comparison with gene expression in beetle and fly wings suggests that this delineation of a topologically independent boundary running parallel to the DV boundary is a derived feature of Lepidoptera. We propose that the developmental decoupling of wing margin determination and DV boundary formation was a major developmental innovation that facilitated the radiation of specialized wing shapes in moths and butterflies.

  16. Reversible thermochromic response based on photonic crystal structure in butterfly wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanlin; Wang, Guo Ping; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2018-01-01

    Subtle responsive properties can be achieved by the photonic crystal (PC) nanostructures of butterfly based on thermal expansion effect. The studies focused on making the sample visually distinct. However, the response is restricted by limited thermal expansion coefficients. We herein report a new class of reversible thermochromic response achieved by controlling the ambient refractive index in butterfly PC structure. The photonic ethanol-filled nanoarchitecture sample is simply assembled by sealing liquid ethanol filling Papilio ulysses butterfly wing. Volatile ethanol is used to modulate the ambient refractive index. The sample is sealed with glasses to ensure reversibility. Liquid ethanol filling butterfly wing demonstrated significant allochroic response to ambient refractive index, which can be controlled by the liquefaction and vaporization of ethanol. This design is capable of converting thermal energy into visual color signals. The mechanism of this distinct response is simulated and proven by band theory. The response properties are performed with different filled chemicals and different structure parameters. Thus, the reversible thermochromic response design might have potential use in the fields such as detection, photonic switch, displays, and so forth.

  17. Reversible thermochromic response based on photonic crystal structure in butterfly wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wanlin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtle responsive properties can be achieved by the photonic crystal (PC nanostructures of butterfly based on thermal expansion effect. The studies focused on making the sample visually distinct. However, the response is restricted by limited thermal expansion coefficients. We herein report a new class of reversible thermochromic response achieved by controlling the ambient refractive index in butterfly PC structure. The photonic ethanol-filled nanoarchitecture sample is simply assembled by sealing liquid ethanol filling Papilio ulysses butterfly wing. Volatile ethanol is used to modulate the ambient refractive index. The sample is sealed with glasses to ensure reversibility. Liquid ethanol filling butterfly wing demonstrated significant allochroic response to ambient refractive index, which can be controlled by the liquefaction and vaporization of ethanol. This design is capable of converting thermal energy into visual color signals. The mechanism of this distinct response is simulated and proven by band theory. The response properties are performed with different filled chemicals and different structure parameters. Thus, the reversible thermochromic response design might have potential use in the fields such as detection, photonic switch, displays, and so forth.

  18. Molecular systematics and evolution of the recently discovered "Parnassian" butterfly (Parnassius davydovi Churkin, 2006) and its allied species (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Keiichi; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Shinkawa, Tsutomu

    2009-07-15

    The nucleotide sequence of 807 bp of the mtDNA-ND5 locus of Parnassius davydovi (Churkin, S. 2006. A new species of Parnassius Latreille, 1804, from Kyrgyzstan (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae). Helios (Moskow) 7,142-158), was determined. This butterfly was unexpectedly discovered recently in Kyrgyzstan, and we wished to shed light on its molecular phylogenetic relationship to other Parnassian butterflies, as well as to the related taxa in the subfamily Parnassiinae of the family Papilionidae. Using the ML method with the GTR+I+Gamma model, we inferred the phylogenetic tree for 60 Parnassius individuals together with materials of the related genera in the subfamily Parnassiinae (Hypermnestra, Archon, Luehdorfia, Bhutanitis, Allancastria, Zerynthia and Sericinus) with Papilio machaon as an out-group. It was found that P. davydovi is a distinct species most closely related to P. loxias in clade VI among the eight clades, or species groups of Parnassius. The morphological diversity in the form of sphragis, the attachment to the female abdomen formed by the male during copulation, is characteristic to this clade, and we inferred the order of emergence of the different sphragis forms during evolution. Attempts to estimate the divergence times between related taxa were also made. It was inferred that the relatively rapid radiation of Parnassian butterflies started at about 24 MYA BP, while P. davydovi diverged from P. loxias at about 10 MYA BP.

  19. Study of nano-architecture of the wings of Paris Peacock butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Ekata; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Kulkarni, G. R.

    Butterflies are one of the most colorful creatures in animal Kingdom. Wings of the male butterfly are brilliantly colored to attract females. Color of the wings plays an important role in camouflage. Study of structural colors in case of insects and butterflies are important for their biomimic and biophotonic applications. Structural color is the color which is produced by physical structures and their interaction with light. Paris Peacock or Papilio paris butterfly belongs to the family Papilionidae. The basis of structural color of this butterfly is investigated in the present study. The upper surface of the wings in this butterfly is covered with blue, green and brown colored scales. Nano-architecture of these scales was investigated with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). Photomicrographs were analyzed using image analysis software. Goniometric color or iridescence in blue and green colored scales of this butterfly was observed and studied with the help of gonio spectrophotometer in the visible range. No iridescence was observed in brown colored scales of the butterfly. Hues of the blue and green color were measured with spectrophotometer and were correlated with nano-architecture of the wing. Results of electron microscopy and reflection spectroscopy are used to explain the iridescent nature of blue and green scales. Sinusoidal grating like structures of these scales were prominently seen in the blue scales. It is possible that the structure of these wings can act as a template for the fabrication of sinusoidal gratings using nano-imprint technology.

  20. A contribution key for identification of butterflies (Lepidoptera of Tehsil Tangi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

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    Farzana Khan Perveen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies are the useful bio-indicators of an ecosystem, sensitive to any change in environment, such as temperature, microclimate and solar radiation etc, however, they utilize host plants for their oviposition and larval development. Therefore, the present study was conducted to prepare the contribution key for identification of butterflies of Tehsil Tangi during August, 2014-May, 2015. The specimens (ni = 506 were collected belong to 3 families with 18 genera and 23 species. However, the collected butterflies were comprised of families Nymphalidae 50%> Pieridae 43%> Papilionidae 7%. The family Nymphalidae were primarily, blue, pale brown or orange and antennae-tips with large conspicuous knobs, while, family Pieridae were mostly creamy, white, yellow or light orange, although, the family Papilionidae were multi-colours, i.e., yellow, blackish-brown, white or orange and antennae-tips with or without knobs. The largest butterfly was great black mormon, Papilio polytes Linnaeus (Family: Papilionidae with body length 26.0±0.0 (nP. polytes = 1; M±SD mm, while the smallest butterflies Indian little orange tip, Colotis etrida Boisduval (Family: Pieridae with body length 11.5±0.6 (nC. etrida = 4; M±SD mm. The key of butterflies (Lepidoptera of Tehsil Tangi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan has been established in this paper. It is recommended to evaluate the butterfly fauna of District Charsadda to educate and create awareness in the local community for conservation and protestation of their habitats.

  1. The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India

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    Arun P. Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study spanning 3.7 years on the butterflies of Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary GWS (21km2, a semi-evergreen forest, in Jorhat District of Assam, northeastern India revealed 211 species of butterflies belonging to 115 genera including 19 papilionids and seven ‘rare’ and ‘very rare’ species as per Evans list of the Indian sub-continent (Great Blue Mime Papilio paradoxa telearchus; Brown Forest BobScobura woolletti; Snowy Angle Darpa pteria dealbatahas; Constable Dichorragia nesimachus; Grey Baron Euthalia anosia anosia; Sylhet Oakblue Arhopala silhetensis; Branded Yamfly Yasoda tripunctata. The butterflies showed a strong seasonality pattern in this forest with only one significant peak during the post monsoon (September-October when 118 species were in flight inside the forest which slowly declined to 92 species in November-December. Another peak (102 species was visible after winter from March to April. Species composition showed least similarity between pre-monsoon (March-May and post-monsoon (October-November seasons. The number of papilionid species were greater from July to December as compared from January to June. The findings of this study suggest that the pattern of seasonality in a semi-evergreen forest in northeastern India is distinct from that of the sub-tropical lowland forest in the Himalaya. Favourable logistics and rich diversity in GWS points to its rich potential in promoting ‘butterfly inclusive ecotourism’ in this remnant forest.

  2. Wavelength discrimination in the hummingbird hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Francismeire J; Kelber, Almut; Rodríguez-Gironés, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Despite the strong relationship between insect vision and the spectral properties of flowers, the visual system has been studied in detail in only a few insect pollinator species. For instance, wavelength discrimination thresholds have been determined in two species only: the honeybee (Apis mellifera) and the butterfly Papilio xuthus. Here, we present the wavelength discrimination thresholds (Δλ) for the hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum. We compared the data with those found for the honeybee, the butterfly P. xuthus and the predictions of a colour discrimination model. After training moths to feed from a rewarded disc illuminated with a monochromatic light, we tested them in a dual-choice situation, in which they had to choose between light of the training wavelength and a novel unrewarded wavelength. To characterise the Δλ function, we decreased the difference between wavelengths in subsequent tests. We also varied the light intensity to test its effect on the discrimination capacity. In agreement with the predictions of the model, we found two expected minima of discrimination where photoreceptor sensitivities overlap, as well as a third, minor, unpredicted minimum around the peak of the blue photoreceptor. Macroglossum stellatarum is capable of discriminating between lights with a wavelength difference of 1-2 nm. These discrimination minima are similar to those found for the tetrachromatic P. xuthus, and are better than those of the honeybee. The moth is also capable of using achromatic information to discriminate between lights of long wavelengths. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Anatomically diverse butterfly scales all produce structural colours by coherent scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Quinn, Tim; Torres, Rodolfo H

    2006-02-01

    The structural colours of butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) have been attributed to a diversity of physical mechanisms, including multilayer interference, diffraction, Bragg scattering, Tyndall scattering and Rayleigh scattering. We used fibre optic spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 2D Fourier analysis to investigate the physical mechanisms of structural colour production in twelve lepidopteran species from four families, representing all of the previously proposed anatomical and optical classes of butterfly nanostructure. The 2D Fourier analyses of TEMs of colour producing butterfly scales document that all species are appropriately nanostructured to produce visible colours by coherent scattering, i.e. differential interference and reinforcement of scattered, visible wavelengths. Previously hypothesized to produce a blue colour by incoherent, Tyndall scattering, the scales of Papilio zalmoxis are not appropriately nanostructured for incoherent scattering. Rather, available data indicate that the blue of P. zalmoxis is a fluorescent pigmentary colour. Despite their nanoscale anatomical diversity, all structurally coloured butterfly scales share a single fundamental physical color production mechanism - coherent scattering. Recognition of this commonality provides a new perspective on how the nanostructure and optical properties of structurally coloured butterfly scales evolved and diversified among and within lepidopteran clades.

  4. Expression and Enzyme Activity of Catalase in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Is Responsive to Environmental Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanhui; Bai, Qi; Zheng, Xusong; Lu, Zhongxian

    2017-08-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme that protects organisms against oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we cloned and characterized a full-length cDNA of CAT from Chilo suppressalis (CsCAT) and examined the influence of environmental stresses on CsCAT expression and enzyme activity. The cDNA contains a 1659-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 553 amino acids most closely related (90.14%) to Papilio polytes catalases. The CsCAT was expressed in all developmental stages with the highest expression in the fat body, and the CsCAT enzyme activity closely mirrored its observed mRNA expression patterns. The CsCAT mRNA was up-regulated when the larvae were exposed to high temperature (≥30 °C), insecticides (abamectin and chlorantraniliprole), chemicals (H2O2, CHP, CdCl2, and CuSO4), and a dead-end trap plant (vetiver grass), and the CsCAT enzyme activity again mirrored the observed CsCAT expression patterns. These results suggest that up-regulation of CsCAT may enhance the defense response of C. suppressalis by weakening the effects of environmental stresses, and provide insight into the role of CsCAT during development of C. suppressalis. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Butterfly diversity as a data base for the development plan of Butterfly Garden at Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, West Java

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    TATI SURYATI SYAMSUDIN SUBAHAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subahar TSS, Yuliana A (2010 Butterfly diversity as a data base for the development plan of Butterfly Garden at Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, West Java. Biodiversitas 11: 24-28. Change of land use and the increasing number of visitors to Bosscha area was one factor for the development plan of butterfly garden in the area. The objectives of this research were to examine butterfly diversity and its potential for development plan of butterfly garden. Butterfly diversity and its richness conducted by standard walk methods. Host plant and larval food plant was recorded during butterfly survey. Public perception on the development plan of butterfly garden was examined by questionnaire. The results showed that 26 species of butterfly was found in Bosscha area and Delias belisama belisama was the most dominant species. Public perceptions consider that the development plan of butterfly garden will give benefit to the community; not only providing new insight (40.41%, additional tourism object (23.97% and will gave aesthetical value (17.12%. Twelve local species should be considered for development plan of butterfly garden: Papilio agamemnon, P. demoleus, P. memnon, P. sarpedon, Delias belisama, Eurema hecabe, Danaus chrysippus, Argynis hiperbius, Cethosia penthesilea, Hypolimnas missipus, Melanitis phedima and Euthalia Adonijah. Host plant: Bougainvillea spectabilis, Citrus aurantium, Lantana camara, Macaranga tanarius and food plants: Citrus aurantium, Cosmos caudatus, Eupatorium inulifolium, Gomphrena globosa, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Lantana camara, and Tithonia diversifolia.

  6. Mimicry and masquerade from the avian visual perspective

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    Mary Caswell STODDARD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Several of the most celebrated examples of visual mimicry, like mimetic eggs laid by avian brood parasites and pala­table insects mimicking distasteful ones, involve signals directed at the eyes of birds. Despite this, studies of mimicry from the avian visual perspective have been rare, particularly with regard to defensive mimicry and masquerade. Defensive visual mimicry, which includes Batesian and Müllerian mimicry, occurs when organisms share a visual signal that functions to deter predators. Masquerade occurs when an organism mimics an inedible or uninteresting object, such as a leaf, stick, or pebble. In this paper, I present five case studies covering diverse examples of defensive mimicry and masquerade as seen by birds. The best-known cases of defensive visual mimicry typically come from insect prey, but birds themselves can exhibit defensive visual mimicry in an attempt to escape mobbing or dissuade avian predators. Using examples of defensive visual mimicry by both insects and birds, I show how quantitative models of avian color, luminance, and pattern vision can be used to enhance our understanding of mimicry in many systems and produce new hypotheses about the evolution and diversity of signals. Overall, I investigate examples of Batesian mimicry (1 and 2, Müllerian mimicry (3 and 4, and masquerade (5 as follows: 1 Polymorphic mimicry in African mocker swallowtail butterflies; 2 Cuckoos mimicking sparrowhawks; 3 Mimicry rings in Neotropical butterflies; 4 Plumage mimicry in toxic pitohuis; and 5 Dead leaf-mimicking butterflies and mantids [Current Zoology 58 (4: 630–648, 2012].

  7. New evidence on the systematic and phylogenetic position of Parides burchellanus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Silva-Brandão, K L; Azeredo-Espin, A M L; Freitas, A V L

    2008-05-01

    Parides burchellanus is considered a rare and threatened swallowtail species restricted to central Brazil. It shows considerable morphological similarity to Parides panthonus jaguarae, with which it shares both geographical range and larval host plant. At present, P. burchellanus and P. panthonus are believed to be distinct species, based on minor differences in male genitalia. In this study, the phylogenetic and systematic position of P. burchellanus in relation to three subspecies of P. panthonus (P. p. jaguarae, P. p. lysimachus and P. p. aglaope) was evaluated using molecular evidence: the complete sequence of the mtDNA genes COI and COII and of the nuclear gene EF-1α (c. 3300 bp). In addition, the informativeness of the 'barcode' region next to the 5' end of COI (c. 650 bp) was evaluated for delimiting these taxa. Individual analysis by neighbour-joining, using Kimura 2-parameter distance model, and by maximum parsimony showed that P. p. jaguarae + P. p. lysimachus + P. p. aglaope + P. burchellanus form a strongly supported monophyletic clade, and all molecular regions consistently recovered P. p. jaguarae and P. burchellanus as sister species. The genetic divergence among the subspecies of P. panthonus and P. burchellanus is equivalent to the divergence among conspecifics of other species of Parides, and smaller than the interspecific divergence among different sister species of this genus. The results support the proposal that P. p. jaguarae and P. burchellanus are likely to be synonymous, and suggest that P. burchellanus can be considered conspecific with P. panthonus. The taxonomic classification of P. burchellanus should be revised on the basis of the molecular data. © 2007 The Authors.

  8. Long Frontal Projections Help Battus philenor (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) Larvae Find Host Plants.

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    Kandori, Ikuo; Tsuchihara, Kazuko; Suzuki, Taichi A; Yokoi, Tomoyuki; Papaj, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Animals sometimes develop conspicuous projections on or near their heads as, e.g., weaponry, burrowing or digging tools, and probes to search for resources. The frontal projections that insects generally use to locate and assess resources are segmented appendages, including antennae, maxillary palps, and labial palps. There is no evidence to date that arthropods, including insects, use projections other than true segmental appendages to locate food. In this regard, it is noteworthy that some butterfly larvae possess a pair of long antenna-like projections on or near their heads. To date, the function of these projections has not been established. Larvae of pipevine swallowtail butterflies Battus philenor (Papilionidae) have a pair of long frontal fleshy projections that, like insect antennae generally, can be actively moved. In this study, we evaluated the possible function of this pair of long moveable frontal projections. In laboratory assays, both frontal projections and lateral ocelli were shown to increase the frequency with which search larvae found plants. The frontal projections increased finding of host and non-host plants equally, suggesting that frontal projections do not detect host-specific chemical cues. Detailed SEM study showed that putative mechanosensillae are distributed all around the frontal as well as other projections. Taken together, our findings suggest that the frontal projections and associated mechanosensillae act as vertical object detectors to obtain tactile information that, together with visual information from lateral ocelli and presumably chemical information from antennae and mouthparts, help larvae to find host plants. Field observations indicate that host plants are small and scattered in southern Arizona locations. Larvae must therefore find multiple host plants to complete development and face significant challenges in doing so. The frontal projections may thus be an adaptation for finding a scarce resource before starving to

  9. Long Frontal Projections Help Battus philenor (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae Larvae Find Host Plants.

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    Ikuo Kandori

    Full Text Available Animals sometimes develop conspicuous projections on or near their heads as, e.g., weaponry, burrowing or digging tools, and probes to search for resources. The frontal projections that insects generally use to locate and assess resources are segmented appendages, including antennae, maxillary palps, and labial palps. There is no evidence to date that arthropods, including insects, use projections other than true segmental appendages to locate food. In this regard, it is noteworthy that some butterfly larvae possess a pair of long antenna-like projections on or near their heads. To date, the function of these projections has not been established. Larvae of pipevine swallowtail butterflies Battus philenor (Papilionidae have a pair of long frontal fleshy projections that, like insect antennae generally, can be actively moved. In this study, we evaluated the possible function of this pair of long moveable frontal projections. In laboratory assays, both frontal projections and lateral ocelli were shown to increase the frequency with which search larvae found plants. The frontal projections increased finding of host and non-host plants equally, suggesting that frontal projections do not detect host-specific chemical cues. Detailed SEM study showed that putative mechanosensillae are distributed all around the frontal as well as other projections. Taken together, our findings suggest that the frontal projections and associated mechanosensillae act as vertical object detectors to obtain tactile information that, together with visual information from lateral ocelli and presumably chemical information from antennae and mouthparts, help larvae to find host plants. Field observations indicate that host plants are small and scattered in southern Arizona locations. Larvae must therefore find multiple host plants to complete development and face significant challenges in doing so. The frontal projections may thus be an adaptation for finding a scarce resource

  10. Universal dynamical properties preclude standard clustering in a large class of biochemical data.

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    Gomez, Florian; Stoop, Ralph L; Stoop, Ruedi

    2014-09-01

    Clustering of chemical and biochemical data based on observed features is a central cognitive step in the analysis of chemical substances, in particular in combinatorial chemistry, or of complex biochemical reaction networks. Often, for reasons unknown to the researcher, this step produces disappointing results. Once the sources of the problem are known, improved clustering methods might revitalize the statistical approach of compound and reaction search and analysis. Here, we present a generic mechanism that may be at the origin of many clustering difficulties. The variety of dynamical behaviors that can be exhibited by complex biochemical reactions on variation of the system parameters are fundamental system fingerprints. In parameter space, shrimp-like or swallow-tail structures separate parameter sets that lead to stable periodic dynamical behavior from those leading to irregular behavior. We work out the genericity of this phenomenon and demonstrate novel examples for their occurrence in realistic models of biophysics. Although we elucidate the phenomenon by considering the emergence of periodicity in dependence on system parameters in a low-dimensional parameter space, the conclusions from our simple setting are shown to continue to be valid for features in a higher-dimensional feature space, as long as the feature-generating mechanism is not too extreme and the dimension of this space is not too high compared with the amount of available data. For online versions of super-paramagnetic clustering see http://stoop.ini.uzh.ch/research/clustering. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Nomenclature, variation, and the biological species concept in Lamasina (Lycaenidae: Theclinae: Eumaeini Nomenclatura, variação e o conceito biológico de espécie em Lamasina (Lycaenidae: Theclinae: Eumaeini

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    Robert K. Robbins

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The correct generic name for the species that belong to Eucharia Boisduval, 1870, a homonym, is either Annamaria D'Abrera & Bálint, 2001, which has been considered to be unavailable, or Lamasina Robbins, 2002, a replacement name for Eucharia. A recent re-interpretation of the original description of Annamaria was incorrect, and Annamaria is confirmed as being unavailable under Article 13.1 of the Code. A proposed neotype for Papilio ganimedes Cramer, 1775 is invalidated, and a possible syntype is illustrated. Results of an analysis of variation in the Lamasina ganimedes complex are distinctly different from those previously published and provide insufficient evidence to support the hypothesis that L. lathyi (Bálint, 2005 is distinct under a biological species concept. Lamasina lathyi is a synonym of L. ganimedes syn. nov. Statistical evidence overwhelmingly falsifies the published hypothesis that the L. rhaptissima (Johnson, 1991 (14 males and L. columbia (Bálint, 2005 (8 females species complexes are distinct rather than males and females of the same complex. Lamasina columbia is endemic to western Colombia. The hypothesis that L. rhapsodia (Bálint, 2005 from Bolivia is a distinct species is not better supported than the hypotheses that the one known specimen of L. rhapsodia is a geographical variant or an aberrant specimen. Lamasina rhapsodia is a synonym of L. rhaptissima syn. nov. Superficial similarity in ventral wing patterns in genera Paiwarria Kaye, 1904 and Lamasina is noted. A nomenclatural checklist for Lamasina is presented.O nome genérico correto para as espécies de Eucharia Boisduval, 1870, um homônimo, é Annamaria D'Abrera & Bálint, 2001, que tem sido considerado não válido, ou Lamasina Robbins, 2002, um nome substituto para Eucharia. Uma reinterpretação recente da descrição original de Annamaria é considerada incorreta, confirmando a não disponibilidade do nome com base no Artigo 13.1 do Código. O neótipo de

  12. Response of microbial communities to experimental warming and precipitation decrease in Rzecin peatland (Poland)

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    Basińska, Anna M.; Gąbka, Maciej; Reczuga, Monika; Łuców, Dominika; Stróżecki, Marcin; Samson, Mateusz; Józefczyk, Damian; Chojnicki, Bogdan; Urbaniak, Marek; Leśny, Jacek; Olejnik, Janusz; Gilbert, Daniel; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Juszczak, Radosław; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    community was characterised by higher abundance of mixotrophic species (Hyalosphenia papilio, Archerella flavum, Heleopera sphagni) in all plots, after half year of warming and decreased precipitation we found significant decrease of mixotrophic species biomass. Redundancy analysis showed that TA species distribution (in first year of manipulation) was significantly affected by the treatment type and upper and lower Sphagnum segment. The combination of warming and decreased precipitation led to significant testate amoeba biomass decrease (especially of mixotrophic dominant Hyalosphenia papilio). For less abundant species like Nebela tincta we found an increase of biomass in all treatments, compared to control plots. Changes in microbial communities structure, caused by the combination of drought and warming can influence peatland functioning. For instance, reduction of microbial primary production and intensified consumption may modify physicochemical water parameters as well as carbon dynamics. Project financed by the Polish-Norwegian Research Programme operated by the National Centre for Research and Development under the Norwegian Financial Mechanism (No. Pol-Nor/203258/31/2013, WETMAN). Anna M. Basinska acknowledges support from Franche-Comté regional council and Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté.

  13. Checklist of butterfly fauna of Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

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    Farzana Perveen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies play dual role, firstly as the pollinator, carries pollen from one flower to another and secondly their larvae act as the pest, injurious to various crops. Their 21 species were identified belonging to 3 different families from Kohat, Pakistan during September-December 2008. The reported families Namphalidae covered 33%, Papilionidae 10%, and Pieridae 57% biodiversity of butterflies of Kohat. In Namphalidae included: species belonging to subfamily Nymphalinae, Indian fritillary, Argynnis hyperbius Linnaeus; common castor, Ariadne merione (Cramer; painted lady, Cynthia cardui (Linnaeus; peacock pansy, Junonia almanac Linnaeus; blue pansy, J. orithya Linnaeus; common leopard, Phalantha phalantha (Drury; species belonging to subfamily Satyrinae, white edged rock brown, Hipparchia parisatis (Kollar. In Papilionidae included: subfamily Papilioninae, lime butterfly, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus and common mormon, Pa. polytes Linnaeus. In Pieridae included: subfamily Coliaclinae, dark clouded yellow, Colias croceus (Geoffroy; subfamily Coliadinae, lemon emigrant, Catopsilia pomona Fabricius; little orange tip, C. etrida Boisduval; blue spot arab,Colotis protractus Butler; common grass yellow, Eumera hecab (Linnaeus; common brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni (Linnaeus; yellow orange tip, Ixias pyrene Linnaeus; subfamily Pierinae, pioneer white butterfly, Belenoi aurota Bingham; Murree green-veined white, Pieris ajaka Moore; large cabbage white, P. brassicae Linnaeus; green-veined white, P. napi (Linnaeus; small cabbage white, P. rapae Linnaeus. The wingspan of collected butterflies, minimum was 25 mm of C. etrida which was the smallest butterfly, however, maximum was 100 mm of P. demoleus and P. polytes which were the largest butterflies. A detail study is required for further exploration of butterflies' fauna of Kohat.

  14. Insect Diversity of the Muni-Pomadze Ramsar Site: An Important Site for Biodiversity Conservation in Ghana

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    Rosina Kyerematen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An inventory of species diversity of insects of the Muni-Pomadze Ramsar site, with special reference to species of conservation concern, was carried out as part of an evaluation of changes in the ecological character of the site, twenty years after designation. Samples were taken from two protected areas within the Ramsar site, in the wet (July, dry (January, and intermediate (June seasons. Community diversity was characterized in terms of number of species accumulated, species richness, Shannon-Weiner indices of diversity, Pielou’s evenness, and Bray-Curtis similarity. A total of 134 families from 19 insect orders were recorded during the entire study period. Yenku Block A recorded the highest species richness (98 and the highest diversity index (14.97, corroborated by the highest Margalef index of 3.82 with a relatively even distribution of species (0.834 during the intermediate season, and recorded the lowest diversity (6.957 and species richness (41 during the dry season. On the whole, the Muni-Pomadzi Ramsar site showed a high diversity of insect species. The presence of species such as Junonia oenone and Papilio demodocus which are specialized in degraded habitats at Yenku Block A in large numbers is a clear indication of degradation of the forest, but the presence of forest species such as Salamis anacardii and Euphaedra crokeri is an indication that some parts of this reserve are still in good shape. A comparison of the butterfly species recorded with findings in a 1997 survey showed a marked increase in numbers from 75 to 130; this may be attributed to the habitat changes that have taken place at the site offering more diverse habitat types.

  15. Characterization of a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae

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    Arash eZibaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM and anterior midgut (AM. A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35 ºC. Also, the enzyme had Vmax values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and Km values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether N, N, N′, N′-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones.

  16. Diapause pupal color diphenism induced by temperature and humidity conditions in Byasa alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

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    Yamamoto, Kazuaki; Tsujimura, Yuki; Kometani, Miwako; Kitazawa, Chisato; Islam, Abu Taher Md Fayezul; Yamanaka, Akira

    2011-07-01

    We investigated whether diapause pupae of Byasa alcinous exhibit pupal color diphenism (or polyphenism) similar to the diapause pupal color polyphenism shown by Papilio xuthus. All diapause pupae of B. alcinous observed in the field during winter showed pupal coloration of a dark-brown type. When larvae were reared and allowed to reach pupation under short-day conditions at 18°C under a 60±5% relative humidity, diapause pupae exhibited pupal color types of brown (33%), light-brown (25%), yellowish-brown (21%), diapause light-yellow (14%) and diapause yellow (7%). When mature larvae reared at 18°C were transferred and allowed to reach pupation at 10°C and 25°C under a 60±5% relative humidity after a gut purge, the developmental ratio of brown and light-brown, yellowish-brown, and diapause light-yellow and diapause yellow types was 91.2, 8.8 and 0.0% at 10°C, and 12.2, 48.8 and 39.0% at 25°C, respectively. On the other hand, when mature larvae reared at 18°C were transferred and allowed to reach pupation at 10°C, 18°C and 25°C under an over 90% relative humidity after a gut purge, the developmental ratio of brown and light-brown, yellowish-brown, and diapause light-yellow and diapause yellow types was 79.8, 16.9 and 3.3% at 10°C, 14.5, 26.9 and 58.6% at 18°C, and 8.3, 21.2 and 70.5% at 25°C, respectively. These results indicate that diapause pupae of brown types are induced by lower temperature and humidity conditions, whereas yellow types are induced by higher temperature and humidity conditions. The findings of this study show that diapause pupae of B. alcinous exhibit pupal color diphenism comprising brown and diapause yellow types, and suggest that temperature and humidity experienced after a gut purge are the main factors that affect the diapause pupal coloration of B. alcinous as environmental cues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visitantes florais de plantas invasoras de áreas com fruteiras irrigadas Floral visitors of weed plants of irrigated orchard areas

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    Lúcia Helena Piedade Kiill

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available As plantas invasoras afetam a produtividade das fruteiras irrigadas, sendo necessários estudos sobre sua ecologia, principalmente formas de reprodução e associação com insetos. O presente trabalho foi desenvolvido em Petrolina-PE, objetivando classificar os visitantes florais de plantas invasoras em polinizadores e pilhadores, de acordo com o comportamento apresentado. As observações foram feitas de maio a outubro de 1998, em 26 dias não consecutivos, no intervalo das 7h00 às 16h00. As invasoras foram classificadas em nectaríferas e poliníferas, quando visitadas para retirada exclusiva de néctar ou de pólen; e em mistas, quando visitadas para retirada dos dois recursos. Para a análise de freqüência foi adotado um sistema de notas: a- número de visitas >30, b- entre 10 e 30 e c- Weeds can impair yield of irrigated fruit crops, studies about their ecology being needed, especially ways of reproduction and association with insects. This work was carried out in Petrolina, PE, Brazil with the objective of identifying the floral visitors of weeds, and classifying them as pollinators and pollen and/or nectar thieves, according to their behavior. The observations were made between May and October of 1998, in 26 not consecutive days, between 7:00 am and 4:00 pm. The weeds were classified in nectariferous and polliniferous when these were visited exclusively for collection of nectar or pollen, and mixed when these were visited to collect both. A grade system was adopted for the frequency evaluation: a- number of visits >30, b - between 10 to 30, c - <10. Among the 24 weeds observed, 14 were classified as nectariferous, six as polliniferous and four were considered mixed. Among the floral visitors, the following bees were registered (Xylocopa grisescens, X. frontalis, Centris aff. perforator, Ptilotrix aff. plumata, Diadasina riparia, Apis mellifera, Trigona spinipes, Eulaema nigrita, butterflies (Ascia monuste, Papilio thoas brasiliensis

  18. Crioconservação de espécies de Amaryllidaceae

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    ANTONIO FERNANDO CAETANO TOMBOLATO

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O Jardim Botânico do IAC tem como objetivo conservar as espécies nativas do Estado de São Paulo, oferecendo áreas para a preservação in situ, ex situ e in vitro, além de câmaras com baixa temperatura, já que a crioconservação se transformou também em alternativa interessante para a conservação de recursos genéticos. Realizaram-se testes de crioconservação em sementes recalcitrantes de três espécies de Amaryllidaceae: Hippeastrum papilio (HP, Hippeastrum glaucescens (HG e Zephyranthes robusta (ZR. No delineamento experimental, foram estabelecidas quatro repetições de 25 sementes cada, em 4 tratamentos: T1: -196ºC sem protetor; T2: -196ºC com o protetor PVS2; T3: -196ºC com o agente protetor de alginato de sódio; T4: semeadura direta sem nenhum tratamento a frio (testemunha. As porcentagens de germinação obtidas foram: T1: 98%, 70% e 80%, respectivamente para ZR, HP e HG. T2: - 93%, 68% e 21%, respectivamente. T3: - 1%, 0% e 8% respectivamente; T4: 99%, 72% e 88%, respectivamente. A partir dos resultados, pode-se observar que os agentes protetores não foram necessários para a conservação das sementes nas condições do ensaio, uma vez que as taxas de germinação foram melhores sem PVS2 ou alginato de sódio. Observou-se também que a crioconservação sem agentes protetores, propiciou a germinação mais rápida do que a por testemunha para as três espécies testadas. Verificou-se uma provável quebra de dormência da semente de ZR, pois, houve uma aceleração no processo de germinação de cerca de dois dias. Esta observação merece maior aprofundamento.

  19. Morfometria de Papilioninae (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae ocorrentes em quatro localidades do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. I. Comparações com a massa corporal Morphometrics of Papilioninae (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae occurring in four localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. I. Comparisons with body mass

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    Rocco Alfredo Di Mare

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A análise da relação entre a asa e partes do corpo em Lepidoptera podem revelar uma conexão entre a estrutura e a função. Este estudo investigou relações entre o tamanho do corpo de papilionídeos e suas partes, importantes para entender como a forma e o tamanho são determinados, e como eles estão adaptados aos ambientes bióticos e abióticos. Fêmeas são mais pesadas que machos (acima de 1,75 g. Em habitat diferentes, o tórax e o abdômen das fêmeas é maior em 100% das 11 espécies analisadas, a massa total 92%, e a massa de asas 75%. Espécies cujas fêmeas tiveram a maior massa também mostraram maior deslocamento e dispersão nas suas áreas de vida. Em habitats mais perturbados pelo homem ou com menor cobertura vegetal, o aumento no tamanho do tórax é significativamente maior que o das asas, tanto para os machos como para as fêmeas. Nos machos, o aumento de abdômen não é significativamente maior que o das asas, em todos os locais investigados. Porém, nas fêmeas o aumento do abdômen é significativo em todas os locais. A análise de agrupamento mostra dois grandes grupos caracterizados por espécies com tamanhos e proporções semelhantes. Um grupo com espécies que ocupam ambientes com umidade alta, e outro (mais heterogêneo que ocupa habitats alterados pela ação do homem. O primeiro mostra duas subdivisões distinguidas pelo tipo de exibição que machos apresentam às fêmeas.Relationship analysis among wing and body parts in Lepidoptera may reveal a connection between structure and function. This study investigates relationships between swallowtail body size and its parts to understand how shape and size are determined, and how they are related to adaptation to biotic and abiotic environments. Females are heavier than males (up to 1,75g. In different habitats, thorax and abdomen in females are larger in 100% of the 11 analyzed species, total mass 92%, and wings mass 75%. Species whose females had greater mass

  20. Melt inclusions are not reliable proxies for magmatic liquid composition: evidence from crystal-poor andesites and dacites in the Tequila volcanic field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    A compositional study of >200 melt inclusions in plagioclase and orthopyroxene phenocrysts from six crystal-poor (2-5 vol%) andesite and dacite lavas (60-68 wt% SiO2) from the Tequila volcanic field in the Mexico arc is used to evaluate whether melt inclusions in phenocrysts accurately record magmatic liquid compositions. The crystal-poor andesites and dacites were erupted contemporaneously with crystal-poor rhyolites, and there is a continuum in the SiO2 concentration of the erupted magmas. The liquid line of descent defined by the whole-rock compositions ranges from andesite to rhyolite (60-77 wt% SiO2), as illustrated on Harker diagrams. The crystal-poor andesites and dacites are multiply saturated with five to seven mineral phases (plagioclase + orthopyroxene + titanomagnetite + ilmenite + apatite ± augite ± hornblende), most of which crystallized via degassing during magma ascent (Frey and Lange, 2009). By comparison with phase equilibrium experiments from the literature, it is shown that the vast majority of crystals are phenocrysts and not xenocrysts. Textural evidence of rapid crystal growth includes skeletal, hopper, and swallow-tail morphologies and abundant melt inclusions. The inclusions range in size from a few microns to > 50 μm and occur as isolated pockets and extensive channels that mimic the crystal morphology. Inclusions are typically brown glass, with occasional microphenocrysts of titanomagnetite and/or apatite within or adjacent to the melt inclusions. The compositions of the melt inclusions in the plagioclase and orthopyroxene phenocrysts, when plotted on Harker diagrams, vary systematically from one another and from the liquid line of descent defined by the whole rock compositions of erupted magmas. For example, melt inclusions in plagioclase are systematically depleted in Al2O3 relative to the whole rock samples, whereas those in coexisting orthopyroxenes are systematically enriched in Al2O3. The opposite trend is found for FeO, where it

  1. Efficiency of playback for assessing the occurrence of five bird species in Brazilian Atlantic Forest fragments

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    Danilo Boscolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Playback of bird songs is a useful technique for species detection; however, this method is usually not standardized. We tested playback efficiency for five Atlantic Forest birds (White-browed Warbler Basileuterus leucoblepharus, Giant Antshrike Batara cinerea, Swallow-tailed Manakin Chiroxiphia caudata, Whiteshouldered Fire-eye Pyriglena leucoptera and Surucua Trogon Trogon surrucura for different time of the day, season of the year and species abundance at the Morro Grande Forest Reserve (South-eastern Brazil and at thirteen forest fragments in a nearby landscape. Vocalizations were broadcasted monthly at sunrise, noon and sunset, during one year. For B. leucoblepharus, C. caudata and T. surrucura, sunrise and noon were more efficient than sunset. Batara cinerea presented higher efficiency from July to October. Playback expanded the favourable period for avifaunal surveys in tropical forest, usually restricted to early morning in the breeding season. The playback was efficient in detecting the presence of all species when the abundance was not too low. But only B. leucoblepharus and T. surrucura showed abundance values significantly related to this efficiency. The present study provided a precise indication of the best daily and seasonal periods and a confidence interval to maximize the efficiency of playback to detect the occurrence of these forest species.A técnica de play-back é muito útil para a detecção de aves, mas este método geralmente não é padronizado. Sua eficiência em atestar a ocorrência de cinco espécies de aves da Mata Atlântica (Pula-pula-assobiador Basileuterus leucoblepharus, Batará Batara cinerea, Tangará Chiroxiphia caudata, Olho-de-fogo Pyriglena leucoptera e Surucuá-de-barriga-vermelha Trogon surrucura foi analisada de acordo com o horário do dia, estação do ano e abundância das espécies na Reserva Florestal do Morro Grande (São Paulo, Brasil e em treze fragmentos florestais de uma paisagem adjacente

  2. Pyrrhopyginae: gêneros novos e revalidados (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae Pyrrhopyginae: new and revalidated genera (Lepidoptera, Hespe-riidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf H.H. Mielke

    2002-03-01

    zereda rufinucha (Godman & Salvin, 1879, Chalypyge zereda rufipectus (Godman & Salvin, 1879, Chalypyge zereda zepha (Evans, 1951, Ochropyge ruficauda (Hayward, 1932, Melanopyge cossea (H. Druce, 1875, Melanopyge erythrosticta (Godman & Salvin, 1879, Melanopyge hoffmannl (Freeman, 1977, Melanopyge maculosa (Hewitson, 1866, Melanopyge mulleri (Bell, 1934, Jonaspyge Jonas (C. Felder & R. Felder, 1859, Jonaspyge aesculapus (Staudinger, 1876, Jonaspyge tzotzlll (Freemann, 1969, Creonpyge creon creon (H. Druce, 1874, Creonpyge creon lillana (Nicolay & Small, 1969, Creonpyge creon laylori (Nicolay & Small, 1981, Cyanopyge sangaris (Skinner, 1921, Mysarbia sejanus sejanus (Hoppfer, 1874, Mysarbia sejanus erythrostigma (Ršber, 1925, Arnysoria galgala (Hewitson, 1866, Mimardaris aetata (Godman & Salvin, 1879, Mimardaris Umax (Evans, 1951, Mimardaris mlnthe (Godman & Salvin, 1879, Mimardaris montra (Evans, 1951, Mimardaris pityusa (Hewitson, 1875, Mimardaris porus poms (Evans, 1951, Mimardaris porus mortis (Evans, 1951, Mimardaris sela sela (Hewitson, 1866, Mimardaris sela aequatorea (Róber, 1925, Mimardaris sela chanchamayonis (Draudt, 1924, Mimardaris sela periphema (Hewitson, [1875], and Mimardaris sela peruviana (Draudt, 1921. The following is a new synonym: Tamyris hygieia C. Felder & R. Felder, 1867 of Pyrrhopyga [sic] zereda Hewitson, 1866. Mysarbia sejanus stolli Mielke, ssp. n. is a replacement name for Papilio thasus Stoll, 1781, preoccupied by Stoll, 1780.

  3. A systematic catalogue of butterflies of the former Soviet Union (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lituania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan) with special account to their type specimens (Lepidoptera: Hesperioidea, Papilionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Stanislav K; Bolshakov, Lavr V

    2016-09-01

    A catalogue of butterflies of Russia and adjacent countries is given, with special account to the name-bearing types depository. This catalogue contains data about 86 species (3 of them are questionable) of Hesperiidae (22 genera); 47 species of Papilionidae (14 genera); 89 species of Pieridae (5 of them are questionable)  (15 genera); 1 species (1 genus) of Libytheinae(dae); 2 species of Danainae(dae) (2 genera); 160 species of Nymphalinae(dae) (1 of them is questionable) (23 genera); 259 species of Satyrinae(dae) (14 of them are questionable, mainly from genera Oeneis and Pseudochazara) (34 genera); 3 species of Riodinidae (2 genera); 318 species of Lycaenidae (11 of them are questionable, mainly from genera Neolycaena and Plebeius) (57 genera). In total: 965 species of butterflies, 174 genera, by countries: Armenia-244, Azerbaijan-225, Belarus-107, Estonia-113, Georgia-211, Kyrgyzstan-316, Kazakhstan-344, Latvia-115, Lituania-126, Moldova-87, Russia-522, Tajikistan-295, Turkmenistan-159, Ukraine-192, Uzbekistan-241. Detailed distribution and subspecific structure (if present) for every species is provided. Lectotypes of the following species-group taxa are designated: Hesperia poggei Lederer, 1858, Parnassius felderi Bremer, 1861, P. eversmanni Eversmann, 1851, P. boedromius Püngeler, 1901, Limenitis moltrechti Kardakov, 1928, L. sydyi Kindermann, 1853, L. amphyssa Ménétriès, 1859, L. doerriesi Staudinger, 1892, L. helmanni duplicata Staudinger, 1892, L. homeyeri Tancré, 1881, Argynnis penelope Staudinger, 1891, A. thore borealis Staudinger, 1861, Vanessa io geisha Stichel, [1908], Melitaea maturna staudingeri Wnukowsky, 1929 (=uralensis Staudinger, 1871), M. didymina Staudinger, 1895, Papilio fascelis Esper, 1783, Thecla quercivora Staudinger, 1887, Lycaena orion var. ornata Staudinger, 1892. The following nomenclatural acts are established: Neolycaena submontana baitenovi (Zhdanko, 2011), comb. et stat.n. The following new synonymy is provided: Hesperia